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Sample records for ii-iii oxidation potential

  1. Benzylic oxidation catalyzed by dirhodium(II,III) caprolactamate.

    PubMed

    Catino, Arthur J; Nichols, Jason M; Choi, Hojae; Gottipamula, Sidhartha; Doyle, Michael P

    2005-11-10

    [reaction: see text] Dirhodium caprolactamate [Rh2(cap)4] is an effective catalyst for benzylic oxidation with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) under mild conditions. Sodium bicarbonate is the optimal base additive for substrate conversion. Benzylic carbonyl compounds are readily obtained, and a formal synthesis of palmarumycin CP2 using this methodology is described.

  2. Abiotic selenium redox transformations in the presence of Fe(II,III) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, S.C.B.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1997-11-07

    Many suboxic sediments and soils contain an Fe(II,III) oxide called green rust. Spectroscopic evidence showed that selenium reduces from an oxidation state of +VI to 0 in the presence of green rust at rates comparable with those found in sediments. Selenium speciation was different in solid and aqueous phases. These redox reactions represent an abiotic pathway for selenium cycling in natural environments, which has previously been considered to be mediated principally by microorganisms. Similar green rust-mediated abiotic redox reactions are likely to be involved in the mobility of several other trace elements and contaminants in the environment. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE SORPTION AND ARSENITE OXIDATION BY IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron (II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron that is being used in permeable reactive barriers to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. To optimize the design of iron barriers, it is important to evaluate the influence of geoch...

  4. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of cobalt (II, III) oxide, iron (III) oxide, silicon dioxide, and aluminum oxide nanoparticles on human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajiv, S; Jerobin, J; Saranya, V; Nainawat, M; Sharma, A; Makwana, P; Gayathri, C; Bharath, L; Singh, M; Kumar, M; Mukherjee, A; Chandrasekaran, N

    2016-02-01

    Despite the extensive use of nanoparticles (NPs) in various fields, adequate knowledge of human health risk and potential toxicity is still lacking. The human lymphocytes play a major role in the immune system, and it can alter the antioxidant level when exposed to NPs. Identification of the hazardous NPs was done using in vitro toxicity tests and this study mainly focuses on the comparative in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of four different NPs including cobalt (II, III) oxide (Co3O4), iron (III) oxide (Fe2O3), silicon dioxide (SiO2), and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) on human lymphocytes. The Co3O4 NPs showed decrease in cellular viability and increase in cell membrane damage followed by Fe2O3, SiO2, and Al2O3 NPs in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h of exposure to human lymphocytes. The oxidative stress was evidenced in human lymphocytes by the induction of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and depletion of catalase, reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase. The Al2O3 NPs showed the least DNA damage when compared with all the other NPs. Chromosomal aberration was observed at 100 µg/ml when exposed to Co3O4 NPs and Fe2O3 NPs. The alteration in the level of antioxidant caused DNA damage and chromosomal aberration in human lymphocytes.

  5. Assessment of potential wood supply for intermediate scale thermoconversion facilities, Tasks I, II, III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The Department of Energy's Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program has been concerned with the potential of wood biomass to contribute to the Nation's energy supply. One of the factors inhibiting the selection of wood biomass for energy by non-forest industries, especially by those requiring large quantities (500 to 2000 green tons per day), is concern with adequate fuel supply in terms of both a supply system and an adequate resource base. With respect to the latter, this report looks at the gross resource base as has been historically reported and also examines factors other than traditional product removals that could reduce to some degree the amount of resource that is available. The study also examined the conversion of a New England utility from coal to wood chips.

  6. Synthesis of iron(II,III) oxide/zinc oxide/copper(II) oxide (Fe3O4/ZnO/CuO) nanocomposites and their photosonocatalytic property for organic dye removal.

    PubMed

    Taufik, Ardiansyah; Saleh, Rosari

    2017-04-01

    A facile sol-gel method was adopted to synthesize iron(II,III) oxide/zinc oxide/copper(II) oxide (Fe3O4/ZnO/CuO) nanocomposites with various CuO loadings at a low temperature. The prepared nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyses. The photosonocatalytic properties of the nanocomposites were tested by methylene blue removal in aqueous solutions under the combination of UV or visible light and ultrasound. The catalyst with the lowest CuO loading exhibited the highest photosonocatalytic performance under UV light, while the fastest degradation under visible light was achieved at the highest CuO loading. Overall, the photosonocatalytic process with light and ultrasound irradiation led to more complete degradation compared to using light alone. According to the experiments performed with radical scavengers, the holes and OH radicals are the dominant oxidative species. The nanocomposites can be easily separated from the treated solution using an external magnetic field, and the samples remain very stable after 4 cycles. These results indicate that these materials have great potential for treating organic pollutants in wastewaters.

  7. Oxidation-Responsive, EuII/III-Based, Multimodal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance and Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report, for the first time, a multimodal, oxidation-responsive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging that uses the differences in the properties between Eu in the +2 and +3 oxidation states. The enhancement of contrast in T1-weighted magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging was observed in the +2 but not in the +3 oxidation state, and the complex is a known chemical exchange saturation transfer agent for magnetic resonance imaging in the +3 oxidation state. PMID:28393130

  8. Mn(II,III) oxidation and MnO2 mineralization by an expressed bacterial multicopper oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, Cristina N.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Lee, Sung -Woo; Spiro, Thomas G.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-07-01

    Reactive Mn(IV) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and control the bioavailability and distribution of many toxic and essential elements and organic compounds. Their formation is thought to be dependent on microbial enzymes, because spontaneous Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxidation is slow. Several species of marine Bacillus spores oxidize Mn(II) on their exosporium, the outermost layer of the spore, encrusting them with Mn(IV) oxides. Molecular studies have identified the mnx (Mn oxidation) genes, including mnxG, encoding a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), as responsible for this two-electron oxidation, a surprising finding because MCOs only catalyze single-electron transfer reactions. Characterization of the enzymatic mechanism has been hindered by the lack of purified protein. By purifying active protein from the mnxDEFG expression construct, we found that the resulting enzyme is a blue (absorption maximum 590 nm) complex containing MnxE, MnxF, and MnxG proteins. Further, by analyzing the Mn(II)- and (III)-oxidizing activity in the presence of a Mn(III) chelator, pyrophosphate, we found that the complex facilitates both electron transfers from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV). X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the Mn mineral product confirmed its similarity to Mn(IV) oxides generated by whole spores. Our results demonstrate that Mn oxidation from soluble Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides is a two-step reaction catalyzed by an MCO-containing complex. Lastly, with the purification of active Mn oxidase, we will be able to uncover its mechanism, broadening our understanding of Mn mineral formation and the bioinorganic capabilities of MCOs.

  9. Mn(II,III) oxidation and MnO2 mineralization by an expressed bacterial multicopper oxidase

    DOE PAGES

    Butterfield, Cristina N.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Lee, Sung -Woo; ...

    2013-07-01

    Reactive Mn(IV) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and control the bioavailability and distribution of many toxic and essential elements and organic compounds. Their formation is thought to be dependent on microbial enzymes, because spontaneous Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxidation is slow. Several species of marine Bacillus spores oxidize Mn(II) on their exosporium, the outermost layer of the spore, encrusting them with Mn(IV) oxides. Molecular studies have identified the mnx (Mn oxidation) genes, including mnxG, encoding a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), as responsible for this two-electron oxidation, a surprising finding because MCOs only catalyze single-electron transfer reactions. Characterization of themore » enzymatic mechanism has been hindered by the lack of purified protein. By purifying active protein from the mnxDEFG expression construct, we found that the resulting enzyme is a blue (absorption maximum 590 nm) complex containing MnxE, MnxF, and MnxG proteins. Further, by analyzing the Mn(II)- and (III)-oxidizing activity in the presence of a Mn(III) chelator, pyrophosphate, we found that the complex facilitates both electron transfers from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV). X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the Mn mineral product confirmed its similarity to Mn(IV) oxides generated by whole spores. Our results demonstrate that Mn oxidation from soluble Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides is a two-step reaction catalyzed by an MCO-containing complex. Lastly, with the purification of active Mn oxidase, we will be able to uncover its mechanism, broadening our understanding of Mn mineral formation and the bioinorganic capabilities of MCOs.« less

  10. Mn(II,III) oxidation and MnO2 mineralization by an expressed bacterial multicopper oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, Cristina N.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Spiro, Thomas G.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-07-01

    Reactive Mn(IV) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and control the bioavailability and distribution of many toxic and essential elements and organic compounds. Their formation is thought to be dependent on microbial enzymes, because spontaneous Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxidation is slow. Several species of marine Bacillus spores oxidize Mn(II) on their exosporium, the outermost layer of the spore, encrusting them with Mn(IV) oxides. Molecular studies have identified the mnx (Mn oxidation) genes, including mnxG, encoding a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), as responsible for this two-electron oxidation, a surprising finding because MCOs only catalyze single-electron transfer reactions. Characterization of the enzymatic mechanism has been hindered by the lack of purified protein. By purifying active protein from the mnxDEFG expression construct, we found that the resulting enzyme is a blue (absorption maximum 590 nm) complex containing MnxE, MnxF, and MnxG proteins. Further, by analyzing the Mn(II)- and (III)-oxidizing activity in the presence of a Mn(III) chelator, pyrophosphate, we found that the complex facilitates both electron transfers from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV). X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the Mn mineral product confirmed its similarity to Mn(IV) oxides generated by whole spores. Our results demonstrate that Mn oxidation from soluble Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides is a two-step reaction catalyzed by an MCO-containing complex. With the purification of active Mn oxidase, we will be able to uncover its mechanism, broadening our understanding of Mn mineral formation and the bioinorganic capabilities of MCOs.

  11. Decoration of the layered manganese oxide birnessite with Mn(II/III) gives a new water oxidation catalyst with fifty-fold turnover number enhancement.

    PubMed

    McKendry, Ian G; Kondaveeti, Sandeep K; Shumlas, Samantha L; Strongin, Daniel R; Zdilla, Michael J

    2015-08-07

    The role of the manganese average oxidation state (AOS) in water oxidation catalysis by birnessite was investigated. Low AOS samples were most active, generating O2 immediately. Samples with a relatively high AOS showed an initial induction period and decreased turnover. Mn(ii- and iii)-enriched samples gave a 10-50 fold enhancement in turnover number.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and application of iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles in mimic of wound healing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyala, Divya

    The research study focused on synthesis, characterization and applications of Fe3O4 core-shelled magnetic nanomaterials. This Fe3O4 magnetic nanomaterials will be prepared by using cost effective and convenient wet-chemistry method and will encapsulated using aqueous extracts of medicinal natural products. Three natural products namely Symplocos racemosa, Picrorhiza kurroa and Butea monosperma used to encapsulate Fe3O 4 MNMs due to their scope to reduce the risk of cancer, improves health, increase energy and enhance the immunity. These three medicinal natural products are synthesize by using water as a solvents to derive its active constituents, which will further used to functionalize the magnetic nanomaterials. The magnetic nanoparticles characterization studies performed using X-ray powder diffraction, Scanning electron microscope, Transmission electron microscope, Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Magnetic property. Fe3O4 magnetic nanomaterials biological activity was tested on Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). The results pointed out that, due to the adequate coating of Fe 3O4 (Iron Oxide) core by the medicinal chemical constituents from the natural products, the absorption of Fe3O4 magnetic nanomaterials was not detected in the UV-VIS Spectroscopy. TEM images showed that Fe3O4 coated with natural product extract in core-shelled structure, and the size of the particle ranges from 6 nm to 10 nm. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was performed to determine the nature of chemicals present in natural extracts and functionalized Fe3O 4 magnetic nanomaterials. The model of wound healing mimic and antibacterial activity performed on gram-negative (Escherichia coli), indicating steady increasing cell growth after adding Fe3O4 MNMs. It was also found that MNMs synthesized at high temperatures shows less wound healing activity, when compared to MNMs prepared at room temperature due to formation

  13. A new direction in dye-sensitized solar cells redox mediator development: in situ fine-tuning of the cobalt(II)/(III) redox potential through Lewis base interactions.

    PubMed

    Kashif, Muhammad K; Axelson, Jordan C; Duffy, Noel W; Forsyth, Craig M; Chang, Christopher J; Long, Jeffrey R; Spiccia, Leone; Bach, Udo

    2012-10-10

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are an attractive renewable energy technology currently under intense investigation. In recent years, one area of major interest has been the exploration of alternatives to the classical iodide/triiodide redox shuttle, with particular attention focused on cobalt complexes with the general formula [Co(L)(n)](2+/3+). We introduce a new approach to designing redox mediators that involves the application of [Co(PY5Me(2))(MeCN)](2+/3+) complexes, where PY5Me(2) is the pentadentate ligand, 2,6-bis(1,1-bis(2-pyridyl)ethyl)pyridine. It is shown, by X-ray crystallography, that the axial acetonitrile (MeCN) ligand can be replaced by more strongly coordinating Lewis bases (B) to give complexes with the general formula [Co(PY5Me(2))(B)](2+/3+), where B = 4-tert-butylpyridine (tBP) or N-methylbenzimidazole (NMBI). These commonly applied DSC electrolyte components are used for the first time to fine-tune the potential of the redox couple to the requirements of the dye through coordinative interactions with the Co(II/III) centers. Application of electrolytes based on the [Co(PY5Me(2))(NMBI)](2+/3+) complex in combination with a commercially available organic sensitizer has enabled us to attain DSC efficiencies of 8.4% and 9.2% at a simulated light intensity of 100% sun (1000 W m(-2) AM1.5 G) and at 10% sun, respectively, higher than analogous devices applying the [Co(bpy)(3)](2+/3+) redox couple, and an open circuit voltage (V(oc)) of almost 1.0 V at 100% sun for devices constructed with the tBP complex.

  14. Recent Advances of Cobalt(II/III) Redox Couples for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Giribabu, Lingamallu; Bolligarla, Ramababu; Panigrahi, Mallika

    2015-08-01

    In recent years dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have emerged as one of the alternatives for the global energy crisis. DSSCs have achieved a certified efficiency of >11% by using the I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple. In order to commercialize the technology almost all components of the device have to be improved. Among the various components of DSSCs, the redox couple that regenerates the oxidized sensitizer plays a crucial role in achieving high efficiency and durability of the cell. However, the I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple has certain limitations such as the absorption of triiodide up to 430 nm and the volatile nature of iodine, which also corrodes the silver-based current collectors. These limitations are obstructing the commercialization of this technology. For this reason, one has to identify alternative redox couples. In this regard, the Co(II/III) redox couple is found to be the best alternative to the existing I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple. Recently, DSSC test cell efficiency has risen up to 13% by using the cobalt redox couple. This review emphasizes the recent development of Co(II/III) redox couples for DSSC applications.

  15. Cholinergic suppression of excitatory synaptic transmission in layers II/III of the parasubiculum.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, S D; Glovaci, I; Karpowicz, L S; Chapman, C A

    2012-01-10

    Layer II of the parasubiculum (PaS) receives excitatory synaptic input from the CA1 region of the hippocampus and sends a major output to layer II of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortex. The PaS also receives heavy cholinergic innervation from the medial septum, which contributes to the generation of theta-frequency (4-12 Hz) electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Cholinergic receptor activation exerts a wide range of effects in other areas of the hippocampal formation, including membrane depolarization, changes in neuronal excitability, and suppression of excitatory synaptic responses. The present study was aimed at determining how cholinergic receptor activation modulates excitatory synaptic input to the layer II/III neurons of the PaS in acute brain slices. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in layer II/III of the PaS were evoked by stimulation of either layer I afferents, or ascending inputs from layer V. Bath-application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (0.5-10 μM) suppressed the amplitude of fEPSPs evoked by both superficial- and deep layer stimulation, and also enhanced paired-pulse facilitation. Constant bath-application of the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline (10 μM) failed to eliminate the suppression, indicating that the cholinergic suppression of fEPSPs is not due to increased inhibitory tone. The muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (1 μM) blocked the suppression of fEPSPs, and the selective M(1)-preferring receptor antagonist pirenzepine (1 μM), but not the M(2)-preferring antagonist methoctramine (1-5 μM), also significantly attenuated the suppression. Therefore, cholinergic receptor activation suppresses excitatory synaptic input to layer II/III neurons of the PaS, and this suppression is mediated in part by M(1) receptor activation.

  16. Diruthenium(II,III) tetramidates as a new class of oxygenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Leslie; Cao, Zhi; Fanwick, Phillip E; Ren, Tong

    2012-01-14

    Two new diruthenium(II,III) tetramidate compounds, Ru(2)(NHOCC(CH(3))(2))(4)Cl (1) and Ru(2)(NHOCCH(2)CH(3))(4)Cl (2) have been prepared and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The activity of promoting sulfide oxygenation using simple oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was studied. A UV-kinetics study indicated that the initial rates of 1 and 2 are comparable to the previously studied diruthenium tetracarboxylates in promoting TBHP oxygenation of methyl phenyl sulfide (MPS). Using excess oxidant and CH(3)CN as the solvent, organic sulfides MPS and diphenyl sulfide (PPS) were oxidized using 1 mol% of the catalytic species. Compound 1 is more effective than 2 in converting sulfides to sulfoxide under the same conditions. Fast conversion was achieved when the reactions were carried out in the solvent-free conditions, and the major oxidation product was the sulfoxide. The electronic structure of the title compounds was studied with DFT calculations to gain an understanding of the activation of peroxy reagents.

  17. ARSENIC INTERACTION WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST: IMPLICATIONS FOR ARSENIC REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zerovalent iron is being used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under anaerobic conditions. The interaction between arsenic and this green...

  18. Motor Training Promotes Both Synaptic and Intrinsic Plasticity of Layer II/III Pyramidal Neurons in the Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Yasumasa; Ito, Nana; Yamamoto, Yui; Owada, Yuji; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Mitsushima, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Motor skill training induces structural plasticity at dendritic spines in the primary motor cortex (M1). To further analyze both synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in the layer II/III area of M1, we subjected rats to a rotor rod test and then prepared acute brain slices. Motor skill consistently improved within 2 days of training. Voltage clamp analysis showed significantly higher α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/N-methyl-d-aspartate (AMPA/NMDA) ratios and miniature EPSC amplitudes in 1-day trained rats compared with untrained rats, suggesting increased postsynaptic AMPA receptors in the early phase of motor learning. Compared with untrained controls, 2-days trained rats showed significantly higher miniature EPSC amplitude and frequency. Paired-pulse analysis further demonstrated lower rates in 2-days trained rats, suggesting increased presynaptic glutamate release during the late phase of learning. One-day trained rats showed decreased miniature IPSC frequency and increased paired-pulse analysis of evoked IPSC, suggesting a transient decrease in presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release. Moreover, current clamp analysis revealed lower resting membrane potential, higher spike threshold, and deeper afterhyperpolarization in 1-day trained rats—while 2-days trained rats showed higher membrane potential, suggesting dynamic changes in intrinsic properties. Our present results indicate dynamic changes in glutamatergic, GABAergic, and intrinsic plasticity in M1 layer II/III neurons after the motor training. PMID:27193420

  19. tert-Butyl hydroperoxide oxygenation of organic sulfides catalyzed by diruthenium(II,III) tetracarboxylates.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Leslie; Barker Paredes, Julia E; Cao, Zhi; Ren, Tong

    2013-11-04

    Diruthenium(II,III) carboxylates Ru2(esp)2Cl (1a), [Ru2(esp)2(H2O)2]BF4 (1b), and Ru2(OAc)4Cl (2) efficiently catalyze the oxygenation of organic sulfides. As noted in a previous work, 1a is active in oxygenation of organic sulfides with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) in CH3CN. Reported herein in detail is the oxygenation activity of 1a, 1b, and 2, with the latter being highly selective in oxo-transfer to organic sulfides using TBHP under ambient conditions. Solvent-free oxidation reactions were achieved through dissolving 1a or 1b directly into the substrate with 2 equiv of TBHP, yielding TOF up to 2056 h(-1) with 1b. Also examined are the rate dependence on both catalyst and oxidant concentration for reactions with catalysts 1a and 2. Ru2(OAc)4Cl may be kinetically saturated with TBHP; however, Ru2(esp)2Cl does not display saturation kinetics. By use of a series of para-substituted thioanisoles, linear free-energy relationships were established for both 1a and 2, where the reactivity constants (ρ) are negative and that of 1a is about half that of 2. Given these reactivity data, two plausible reaction pathways were suggested. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation for the model compound Ru2(OAc)4Cl·TBHP, with TBHP on the open axial site, revealed elongation of the O-O bond of TBHP upon coordination.

  20. Porphyrin-sensitized solar cells with cobalt (II/III)-based redox electrolyte exceed 12 percent efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yella, Aswani; Lee, Hsuan-Wei; Tsao, Hoi Nok; Yi, Chenyi; Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Nazeeruddin, Md Khaja; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2011-11-04

    The iodide/triiodide redox shuttle has limited the efficiencies accessible in dye-sensitized solar cells. Here, we report mesoscopic solar cells that incorporate a Co((II/III))tris(bipyridyl)-based redox electrolyte in conjunction with a custom synthesized donor-π-bridge-acceptor zinc porphyrin dye as sensitizer (designated YD2-o-C8). The specific molecular design of YD2-o-C8 greatly retards the rate of interfacial back electron transfer from the conduction band of the nanocrystalline titanium dioxide film to the oxidized cobalt mediator, which enables attainment of strikingly high photovoltages approaching 1 volt. Because the YD2-o-C8 porphyrin harvests sunlight across the visible spectrum, large photocurrents are generated. Cosensitization of YD2-o-C8 with another organic dye further enhances the performance of the device, leading to a measured power conversion efficiency of 12.3% under simulated air mass 1.5 global sunlight.

  1. Tetrahydrocannabinol induces brain mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction and increases oxidative stress: a potential mechanism involved in cannabis-related stroke.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities V max (complexes I, III, and IV activities), V succ (complexes II, III, and IV activities), V tmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (V max/V 0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased V max (-71%; P < 0.0001), V succ (-65%; P < 0.0001), and V tmpd (-3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (V max/V 0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke.

  2. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities), Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities), Vtmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P < 0.0001), Vsucc (−65%; P < 0.0001), and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke. PMID:25654095

  3. Potential markers of oxidative stress in stroke.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Antonio; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Polidori, M Cristina; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2005-10-01

    Free radical production is increased in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, leading to oxidative stress that contributes to brain damage. The measurement of oxidative stress in stroke would be extremely important for a better understanding of its pathophysiology and for identifying subgroups of patients that might receive targeted therapeutic intervention. Since direct measurement of free radicals and oxidized molecules in the brain is difficult in humans, several biological substances have been investigated as potential peripheral markers. Among lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde, despite its relevant methodological limitations, is correlated with the size of ischemic stroke and clinical outcome, while F2-isoprostanes appear to be promising, but they have not been adequately evaluated. 8-Hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine has been extensively investigated as markers of oxidative DNA damage but no study has been done in stroke patients. Also enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants have been proposed as indirect markers. Among them ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, uric acid, and superoxide dismutase are related to brain damage and clinical outcome. After a critical evaluation of the literature, we conclude that, while an ideal biomarker is not yet available, the balance between antioxidants and by-products of oxidative stress in the organism might be the best approach for the evaluation of oxidative stress in stroke patients.

  4. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II,III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  5. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  6. Genetic improvement of U.S. soybean in Maturity Groups II, III, and IV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] improvement via plant breeding has been critical for the success of the crop. The objective of this study was to quantify genetic change in yield and other traits that occurred over the past 80 years of North American soybean breeding in maturity groups (MGs) II, III...

  7. Play the winner for phase II/III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Yao, Q; Wei, L J

    In comparing two treatments under a typical sequential clinical trial setting, a 50-50 randomization design generates reliable data for making efficient inferences about the treatment difference for the benefit of patients in the general population. However, if the treatment difference is large and the endpoint of the study is potentially fatal, it does not seem appropriate to sacrifice a large number of study patients who are assigned to the inferior arm. An adaptive design is a data-dependent treatment allocation rule that sequentially uses accumulating information about the treatment difference during the trial to modify the allocation rule for new study patients. In this article, we utilize real trials from AIDS and cancer to illustrate the advantage of using adaptive designs. Specifically we show that, with adaptive designs, the loss of power for testing the equality of two treatments is negligible. Moreover, the study patients do not have to pay a handsome price for the benefit of future patients. We also propose multi-stage adaptive rules to relax the administrative burden of implementing the study and to handle continuous response variables, such as the failure time in survival analysis.

  8. Oxidation Potentials in Iron and Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, J. W.

    2013-11-01

    The state of oxidation of a pyrometallurgical process given by the partial pressure of oxygen and the temperature (the oxidation potential) is one of the important properties monitored and controlled in the smelting and refining of iron and the nonferrous metals. Solid electrolyte sensors based on ZrO2 and a reference electrode such as Cr/Cr2O3 to measure the oxygen pressure found early application in the steel industry, followed soon after in copper, nickel, lead, and zinc smelting. Similar devices are installed in automobile postcombustion/exhaust trains as part of emission control systems. The current discussion reviews this technology as applied in the primary steps of iron and steel making and refining.

  9. Potential role of bicarbonate during pyrite oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelou, V.P.; Holt, A.; Seta, A.K.

    1998-07-15

    The need to prevent the development of acid mine drainage (AMD) by oxidation of pyrite has triggered numerous investigations into the mechanisms of its oxidation. According to Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory, the surface-exposed sulfur atom of pyrite possesses an unshared electron pair which produces a slightly negatively charged pyrite surface that can attract cations such as Fe{sup 2+}. Because of surface electroneutrality and pH considerations, however, the pyrite surface Fe{sup 2+} coordinates OH. The authors proposed that this surface Fe{sup 2+} OH when in the presence of CO{sub 2} is converted to {minus}FeCO{sub 3} or {minus}FeHCO{sub 3}, depending on pH. In this study, using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) they demonstrated that such complexes form on the surface of pyrite and continue to persist even after a significant fraction of the surface Fe{sup 2+} was oxidized to Fe{sup 3+}. FT-IR spectra also showed the presence of two carbonyl absorption bands (1,682 and 1,653 cm{sup {minus}1}) on the surface of pyrite upon exposure to CO{sub 2} which suggested that pyrite surface carbon complexes existed in two different surface chemical environments, pointing out two potential mechanisms of pyrite surface-CO{sub 2} interactions. One potential mechanism involved formation of a pyrite surface-Fe(II)HCO{sub 3} complex, whereas a second potential mechanism involved formation of a pyrite surface-carboxylic acid group complex [{minus}Fe(II)SSCOOFe-(II)].

  10. Equatorially connected diruthenium(II,III) units toward paramagnetic supramolecular structures with singular magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Barral, M Carmen; Gallo, Teresa; Herrero, Santiago; Jiménez-Aparicio, Reyes; Torres, M Rosario; Urbanos, Francisco A

    2006-05-01

    The reaction of Ru2Cl(O2CMe)(DPhF)3 (DPhF = N,N'-diphenylformamidinate) with mono- and polycarboxylic acids gives a clean substitution of the acetate ligand, leading to the formation of complexes Ru2Cl(O2CC6H5)(DPhF)3 (1), Ru2Cl(O2CC6H4-p-CN)(DPhF)3 (2), [Ru2Cl(DPhF)3(H2O)]2(O2C)2 (3), [Ru2Cl(DPhF)3]2[C6H4-p-(CO2)2] (4), and [Ru2Cl(DPhF)3]3[C6H3-1,3,5-(CO2)3] (5). The preparation of [Ru2(NCS)(DPhF)3]3[C6H3-1,3,5-(CO2)3] (6) and {[Ru2(DPhF)3(H2O)]3[C6H3-1,3,5-(CO2)3]}(SO3CF3)3 (7) from 5 is also described. All complexes are characterized by elemental analysis, IR and electronic spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, cyclic voltammetry, and variable-temperature magnetic measurements. The crystal structure determinations of complexes 2.0.5THF and 3.THF.4H2O (THF = tetrahydrofuran) are reported. The reactions carried out demonstrate the high chemical stability of the fragment [Ru2(DPhF)3]2+, which is preserved in all tested experimental conditions. The stability of this fragment is also corroborated by the mass spectra. Electrochemical measurements reveal in all complexes one redox process due to the equilibrium Ru2(5+) <--> Ru2(6+). In the polynuclear complex 7, some additional oxidation processes are also observed that have been ascribed to the presence of two types of dimetallic units rather than two consecutive reversible oxidations. The magnetic behavior toward temperature for complexes 1-7 from 300 to 2 K is analyzed. Complexes 1-7 show low values of antiferromagnetic coupling in accordance with the molecular nature in 1 and 2 and the absence of important antiferromagnetic interaction through the carboxylate bridging ligands in 3-7, respectively. In addition, the magnetic properties of complex 7 do not correspond to any magnetic behavior described for diruthenium(II,III) complexes. The experimental data of compound 7 are simulated considering a physical mixture of S = 1/2 and 3/2 spin states. This magnetic study demonstrates the high sensitivity of the electronic

  11. Transparent Conducting Oxides as Potential Thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) in their less-doped semiconducting states have potential as thermoelectric oxides or TEOs. They are attractive as TEOs owing to: 1) their good thermochemical stability, 2) their n-type character (to complement existing p-type TEOs), and 3) their high electronic mobilities. The numerator of the TE figure of merit (Z), also known as the ``power factor'' (PF), is the product of the electronic conductivity and the square of the Seebeck coefficient. An experimental procedure named after its developer, ``Jonker'' analysis plots Seebeck coefficient vs. the natural logarithm of the electronic conductivity. Data for bulk ceramic specimens just prior to the onset of degeneracy tend to fall on a line of slope, k/e (k =Boltzmann constant, e =charge of the electron). From this line, the doping composition corresponding to the highest power factor can be determined and the PF optimized, based upon data from a few carefully chosen compositions. Subsequently, following a procedure originally derived by Ioffe, the zero-thermopower intercept of these Jonker lines can be directly related to the maximum achievable power factor for a given TEO. So-called ``Ioffe'' plots allow for meaningful comparisons between candidate TEO materials, and also indicate the minimum thermal conductivity required to achieve a target ZT value at the temperature of measurement. Results for TCO-based TEOs will be discussed for both simple and compound (including layered) materials. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as part of an Energy Frontier Research Center under grant no. DE-SC0001059.

  12. Novel graphite salts of high oxidizing potential

    SciTech Connect

    McCarron, E.M. III

    1980-08-01

    The intercalation of graphite by the third-transition-series metal hexafluorides has yielded the graphite salts, C/sub 8//sup +/OsF/sub 6//sup -/, C/sub 8//sup +/IrF/sub 6//sup -/ and C/sub 12//sup 2 +/PtF/sub 6//sup 2 -/. The fluoroplatinate salt represents the highest electron withdrawal from the graphite network yet achieved. Analogues to the Os and Ir salts have been obtained both by fluorination of Group V pentaflouride intercalates, C/sub 8/MF/sub 5/ (M = As, Sb), and by the interaction of the dioxygenyl salts with graphite (8C + O/sub 2/MF/sub 6/ ..-->.. C/sub 8/MF/sub 6/ + O/sub 2/+). Non-intercalating binary fluorides have been observed to intercalate in the presence of a fluorine-rich environment (e.g., 8C + PF/sub 5/ + 1/2 F/sub 2/ ..-->.. C/sub 8/PF/sub 6/). GeF/sub 4/, which also does not spontaneously intercalate graphite, has been observed to interact with graphite in the presence of 2 atmospheres of fluorine overpressure to give the fluoroplatinate salt analogue, C/sub 12//sup 2 +/GeF/sub 6//sup 2 -/. This material is in equilibrium with the pentafluorogermanate at ordinary pressures and temperatures. C/sub 12//sup 2 +/GeF/sub 6//sup 2 -/ ..-->.. C/sub 12//sup +/GeF/sub 5//sup -/ + 1/2 F/sub 2/. C/sub 12/GeF/sub 6/ must have an oxidizing potential close to that of fluorine itself. The graphite fluorometallate salts are both electronic and ionic (F/sup -/) conductors. For the C/sub 8//sup +/MF/sub 6//sup -/ salts, a maximum electronic conductivity an order of magnitude greater than the parent graphite has been observed for stage two. The high oxidizing potential, coupled with the fluoride ion transport capability of the graphite salts, has been exploited in the construction of solid-state galvanic cells. These cells use the graphite fluorometallate salts as electrode materials in combination with a superionic fluoride-ion-conducting solid electrolyte.

  13. Role of Natural Organic Matter in Regulating the Partitioning of Fe(II, III) in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Chen, M.; Roberts, K.; Santschi, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient and plays an important role in controlling ocean productivity and carbon cycling. Fe has been shown to be mostly complexed with dissolved organic matter in seawater. However, the interaction of Fe with natural organic matter and how the quality and quantity of organic matter affect the chemical speciation of Fe in seawater remain poorly understood. Controlled laboratory experiments have been conducted to examine the partitioning of Fe(II, III) between dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases using radiotracers, model organic compounds, and ultrafiltration. In natural seawater, Fe is mostly partitioned in the colloidal and particulate phases, resulting in a logKd value of 7.3 and a logKc of 6.1, respectively. On average, about 25% of dissolved Fe-55 was found in the <1 kDa fraction, 56% in the 1-10 kDa small colloidal fraction, 11% in the 10-100 kDa medium colloidal fraction, and 8% in the large colloidal fraction (100 kDa-0.4 μm). In experimental treatments with extracellular polysaccharides, the partitioning of Fe(II, III) changed from mostly in the colloidal fraction to mostly in the <1 kDa truly dissolved fraction, with on average 67% in the <1 kDa, 13% in the 1-10 kDa, 4% in the 10-100 kDa, and 6% in the 100 kDa-0.4 μm fraction. The increase in Fe(II, III) solubility in the presence of extracellular polysaccharides is hypothesized to be the result of Fe reduction from Fe(III), a more particle-reactive form, to Fe(II), a more soluble form, during its interactions with natural organic matter in seawater. This experimental result has important implications for the biogeochemical cycling of Fe(II, III) and other redox sensitive trace elements in the ocean. While the complexation of Fe with DOM could depress the bioavailability of Fe in seawater, the resultant Fe reduction may significantly enhance its solubility and bioavailability to marine organisms.

  14. Voluntary exercise partially reverses neonatal alcohol-induced deficits in mPFC layer II/III dendritic morphology of male adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, G F; Criss, K J; Klintsova, A Y

    2015-08-01

    Developmental alcohol exposure in humans can produce a wide range of deficits collectively referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASD-related impairments in executive functioning later in life suggest long-term damage to the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In rodent neonates, moderate to high levels of alcohol exposure decreased frontal lobe brain size and altered medial PFC pyramidal neuron dendritic morphology. Previous research in our lab demonstrated that neonatal alcohol exposure decreased basilar dendritic complexity but did not affect spine density in Layer II/III pyramidal neurons in 26- to 30-day-old rats. The current study adds to the literature by evaluating the effect of neonatal alcohol exposure on mPFC Layer II/III basilar dendritic morphology in adolescent male rats. Additionally, it examines the potential for voluntary exercise to mitigate alcohol-induced deficits on mPFC dendritic complexity. An animal model of binge drinking during the third trimester of pregnancy was used. Rats were intubated with alcohol (alcohol-exposed, AE; 5.25 g kg(-1) day(-1)) on postnatal days (PD) 4-9; two control groups were included (suckle control and sham-intubated). Rats were anesthetized and perfused with heparinized saline solution on PD 42, and brains were processed for Golgi-Cox staining. Developmental alcohol exposure decreased spine density and dendritic complexity of basilar dendrites of Layer II/III neurons in the medial PFC (mPFC) compared to dendrites of control animals. Voluntary exercise increased spine density and dendritic length in AE animals resulting in elimination of the differences between AE and SH rats. Thus, voluntary exercise during early adolescence selectively rescued alcohol-induced morphological deficits in the mPFC.

  15. Oxidation of Inconel alloy MA754 at low oxidation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Braski, D.N.; Goodell, P.D.; Cathcart, J.V.; Kane, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    It has been known for some time that the addition of small oxide particles to an 80 Ni-20 Cr alloy not only increases its elevated-temperature strength, but also markedly improves its resistance to oxidation. The mechanism by which the oxide dispersoid enhances the oxidation resistance was studied. Initial experiments were performed using inconel alloy MA754, which is nominally: 78 Ni, 20 Cr, 0.05 C, 0.3 Al, 0.5 Ti, 1.0 Fe, and 0.6 Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (wt %). Small disks (3 mm diam x 0.38 mm thick) were cut from MA754 plate stock and prepared with two different surface conditions. The first was prepared by mechanically polishing one side of a disk through 0.5 ..mu..m diamond on a syntron polisher while the second used an additional sulfuric acid-methanol electropolishing treatment to remove the cold-worked surface layer. Disks having both surface treatments were oxidized in a radiantly heated furnace for 30 s at 1000/sup 0/C. Three different environments were investigated: hydrogen with nominal dew points of 0/sup 0/C, -25/sup 0/C, and -55/sup 0/C. The oxide particles and films were examined in TEM by using extraction replicas (carbon) and by backpolishing to the oxide/metal interface. The particles were analyzed by EDS and SAD. Preliminary results are given.

  16. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Aluminium substitution in iron(II III)-layered double hydroxides: Formation and cationic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruby, Christian; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Aissa, Rabha; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Brunelli, Michela; François, Michel

    2008-09-01

    The formation and the modifications of the structural properties of an aluminium-substituted iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxide (LDH) of formula Fe4IIFe(2-6y)IIIAl6yIII (OH) 12 SO 4, 8H 2O are followed by pH titration curves, Mössbauer spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Rietveld refinements allow to build a structural model for hydroxysulphate green rust, GR(SO 42-), i.e. y=0, in which a bilayer of sulphate anions points to the Fe 3+ species. A cationic order is proposed to occur in both GR(SO 42-) and aluminium-substituted hydroxysulphate green rust when y<0.08. Variation of the cell parameters and a sharp decrease in average crystal size and anisotropy are detected for an aluminium content as low as y=0.01. The formation of Al-GR(SO 42-) is preceded by the successive precipitation of Fe III and Al III (oxy)hydroxides. Adsorption of more soluble Al III species onto the initially formed ferric oxyhydroxide may be responsible for this slowdown of crystal growth. Therefore, the insertion of low aluminium amount ( y˜0.01) could be an interesting way for increasing the surface reactivity of iron(II-III) LDH that maintains constant the quantity of the reactive Fe II species of the material.

  18. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  19. GLASSES CONTAINING IRON (II III) OXIDES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HEO J; XU K; CHOI JK; HRMA PR; UM W

    2011-11-07

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99) has posed serious environmental threats as US Department of Energy's high-level waste. This work reports the vitrification of Re, as surrogate for Tc-99, by iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses, respectively. Iron-phosphate glasses can dissolve Re as high as {approx} 1.2 wt. %, which can become candidate waste forms for Tc-99 disposal, while borosilicate glasses can retain less than 0.1 wt. % of Re due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Vitrification of Re as Tc-99's mimic was investigated using iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses. The retention of Re in borosilicate glasses was less than 0.1 wt. % and more than 99 wt. % of Re were volatilized due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Because the retention of Re in iron-phosphate glasses is as high as 1.2 wt. % and the volatilization is reduced down to {approx}50 wt. %, iron-phosphate glasses can be one of the glass waste form candidates for Tc (or Re) disposal. The investigations of chemical durability and leaching test of iron-phosphate glasses containing Re are now underway to test the performance of the waste form.

  20. OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL MEASUREMENTS OF IMPORTANT OXIDANTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions are important in drinking water treatment and distribution. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements of water reflect the tendency of major constituents in the water to accept or lose electrons. Although ORP measurements are valuable...

  1. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting.

  2. Carcinogenic Potential of Cholesterol Oxidation Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-15

    oxidation products of cholesterol. Subsequent pilot experiments revealed an increase in the incidence of liver tumors after brief inclusion in the diet of...similar properties. 3. To determine whether the nature of the total diet influences the liver tumor incidence in experimental mice on a regimen containing...females. We purchased the mice from the Charles River Laboratories, Inc., Wilmington, Mass. They were placed on the experimental diets shortly after

  3. Extraction radiopolarography for determining the oxidation potentials of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kosyakov, V.N.; Yakovlev, N.G.; Vlasov, M.M.

    1987-03-01

    A method is described for determining the oxidation potentials for valency transitions in transplutonium elements (TPE), which is usable when the element is present in trace amounts. This is based on electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the TPE in combination with a solvent-extraction method of determining the concentration ratio for the oxidized and reduced forms. The method is applicable to determining the potential of almost any reversible reaction if the solvent-extraction parameters for the oxidized and reduced forms differ substantially, while the potential (with allowance for the extraction system) lies in a region accessible to electrochemical oxidation or reduction. Two forms of use are considered: with liquid extraction and with extraction chromatography. The method is demonstrated on the Bk(IV)/Bk(III) transition with di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid as extraction agent.

  4. Sequential extraction method for determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/VI) in suspensions of iron-bearing phyllosilicates and uranium.

    PubMed

    Luan, Fubo; Burgos, William D

    2012-11-06

    Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of uranium because of their limited hydraulic conductivity, high specific surface area, and redox reactivity. Standard extraction procedures cannot be accurately applied for the determination of clay-Fe(II/III) and U(IV/VI) in clay mineral-U suspensions such that advanced spectroscopic techniques are required. Instead, we developed and validated a sequential extraction method for determination of clay-Fe(II/III) and U(IV/VI) in clay-U suspensions. In our so-called "H(3)PO(4)-HF-H(2)SO(4) sequential extraction" method, H(3)PO(4)-H(2)SO(4) is used first to solubilize and remove U, and the remaining clay pellet is subject to HF-H(2)SO(4) digestion. Physical separation of U and clay eliminates valence cycling between U(IV/VI) and clay-Fe(II/III) that otherwise occurred in the extraction solutions and caused analytical discrepancies. We further developed an "automated anoxic KPA" method to measure soluble U(VI) and total U (calculate U(IV) by difference) and modified the conventional HF-H(2)SO(4) digestion method to eliminate a series of time-consuming weighing steps. We measured the kinetics of uraninite oxidation by nontronite using this sequential extraction method and anoxic KPA method and measured a stoichiometric ratio of 2.19 ± 0.05 mol clay-Fe(II) produced per mol U(VI) produced (theoretical value of 2.0). We found that we were able to recover 98.0-98.5% of the clay Fe and 98.1-98.5% of the U through the sequential extractions. Compared to the theoretical stoichiometric ratio of 2.0, the parallel extractions of 0.5 M HCl for clay-Fe(II) and 1 M NaHCO(3) for U(VI) leached two-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). The parallel extractions of HF-H(2)SO(4) for clay Fe(II) and 1 M NaHCO(3) for U(VI) leached six-times more Fe(II) than U(VI).

  5. ROLE OF IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST IN ARSENIC REMEDIATION USING ZEROVALENT IRON IN COLUMN TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined corrosion products of zerovalent iron (Peerless iron) that was used in three column tests for removing arsenic under dynamic flow conditions with and without added phosphate and silicate. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate and magnetite were major iron corrosion products...

  6. Aluminium substitution in iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxides: Formation and cationic order

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, Christian Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Aissa, Rabha; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Brunelli, Michela; Francois, Michel

    2008-09-15

    The formation and the modifications of the structural properties of an aluminium-substituted iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxide (LDH) of formula Fe{sub 4}{sup II}Fe{sub (2-6y)}{sup III}Al{sub 6y}{sup III} (OH){sub 12} SO{sub 4}, 8H{sub 2}O are followed by pH titration curves, Moessbauer spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Rietveld refinements allow to build a structural model for hydroxysulphate green rust, GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), i.e. y=0, in which a bilayer of sulphate anions points to the Fe{sup 3+} species. A cationic order is proposed to occur in both GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and aluminium-substituted hydroxysulphate green rust when y<0.08. Variation of the cell parameters and a sharp decrease in average crystal size and anisotropy are detected for an aluminium content as low as y=0.01. The formation of Al-GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) is preceded by the successive precipitation of Fe{sup III} and Al{sup III} (oxy)hydroxides. Adsorption of more soluble Al{sup III} species onto the initially formed ferric oxyhydroxide may be responsible for this slowdown of crystal growth. Therefore, the insertion of low aluminium amount (y{approx}0.01) could be an interesting way for increasing the surface reactivity of iron(II-III) LDH that maintains constant the quantity of the reactive Fe{sup II} species of the material. - Graphical abstract: (a) Crystallographical structure of sulphated green rust: SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} point to the Fe{sup 3+} cations (red) that form an ordered array with the Fe{sup 2+} cations (green). (b) Width and asymmetry of the synchrotron XRD peaks increase rapidly when some Al{sup 3+} species substitute the Fe{sup 3+} cations; z is molar ratio Al{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 3+}.

  7. Assembly and properties of heterobimetallic Co(II/III)/Ca(II) complexes with aquo and hydroxo ligands.

    PubMed

    Lacy, David C; Park, Young Jun; Ziller, Joseph W; Yano, Junko; Borovik, A S

    2012-10-24

    The use of water as a reagent in redox-driven reactions is advantageous because it is abundant and environmentally compatible. The conversion of water to dioxygen in photosynthesis illustrates one example, in which a redox-inactive Ca(II) ion and four manganese ions are required for function. In this report we describe the stepwise formation of two new heterobimetallic complexes containing Co(II/III) and Ca(II) ions and either hydroxo or aquo ligands. The preparation of a four-coordinate Co(II) synthon was achieved with the tripodal ligand, N,N',N"-[2,2',2"-nitrilotris(ethane-2,1-diyl)]tris(2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonamido, [MST](3-). Water binds to [Co(II)MST](-) to form the five-coordinate [Co(II)MST(OH(2))](-) complex that was used to prepare the Co(II)/Ca(II) complex [Co(II)MST(μ-OH(2))Ca(II)⊂15-crown-5(OH(2))](+) ([Co(II)(μ-OH(2))Ca(II)OH(2)](+)). [Co(II)(μ-OH(2))CaOH(2)](+) contained two aquo ligands, one bonded to the Ca(II) ion and one bridging between the two metal ions, and thus represents an unusual example of a heterobimetallic complex containing two aquo ligands spanning different metal ions. Both aquo ligands formed intramolecular hydrogen bonds with the [MST](3-) ligand. [Co(II)MST(OH(2))](-) was oxidized to form [Co(III)MST(OH(2))] that was further converted to [Co(III)MST(μ-OH)Ca(II)⊂15-crown-5](+) ([Co(III)(μ-OH)Ca(II)](+)) in the presence of base and Ca(II)OTf(2)/15-crown-5. [Co(III)(μ-OH)Ca(II)](+) was also synthesized from the oxidation of [Co(II)MST](-) with iodosylbenzene (PhIO) in the presence of Ca(II)OTf(2)/15-crown-5. Allowing [Co(III)(μ-OH)Ca(II)](+) to react with diphenylhydrazine afforded [Co(II)(μ-OH(2))Ca(II)OH(2)](+) and azobenzene. Additionally, the characterization of [Co(III)(μ-OH)Ca(II)](+) provides another formulation for the previously reported Co(IV)-oxo complex, [(TMG(3)tren)Co(IV)(μ-O)Sc(III)(OTf)(3)](2+) to one that instead could contain a Co(III)-OH unit.

  8. ROTATION OF THE K3 II-III GIANT STAR {alpha} HYDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental spectroscopic determination of projected rotation rates of slowly rotating stars is challenging because the rotational broadening of the spectral lines is often comparable to, or smaller than, the broadening from other sources, most notably macroturbulence. Fourier techniques have the advantage over direct profile matching when the observed profiles are complete, but when the profiles are severely blended, the Fourier analysis is compromised. A process of modeling partial profiles for determining the rotation rate for stars having blended spectral lines is investigated and applied to the evolved star {alpha} Hya (K3 II-III). Projected rotation higher than 5 km s{sup -1} can be definitively ruled out for this star. Not all lines are equally good, depending on the amount of blending and also depending on the strength of the line, as the balance between the thermal and non-thermal components changes. A modest ambiguity arises between macroturbulence and rotational broadening, but a careful look at the differences between the observations and the models allows one to measure the rotation with acceptable precision. The result for {alpha} Hya is v sin i = 2.6 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1}.

  9. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  10. Selected methods for dissolved iron (II, III) and dissolved sulfide (-II) determinations in geothermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vivit, D.V.; Jenne, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Dissolved sulfide (-II) and dissolved iron (II, III) were determined in geothermal well water samples collected at Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Most samples consisted of liquid and gas (two phases) at the instant of collection; and a subset of samples, referred to as ' flashed ' samples, consisted of pressurized steam samples which were allowed to condense. Sulfide was determined by sulfide specific ion electrode; Fe(II) and Fe(III) plus Fe(II) were determined spectrophotometrically. The precision and accuracy of the methods were evaluated for these high-silica waters with replicate analyses, spike recoveries, and an alternate method. Direct current (d.c.) argon plasma emission spectrometry was the alternate method used for Fe(III)-plus-Fe(II) analyses. Mean dissolved iron concentrations ranged from 20.2 to 834 micrograms/L (ug/L) as Fe(II) and 26.8 to 904 ug/L as Fe(III) plus Fe(II). Mean sulfide concentrations ranged from about 0.01 to 5.3 mg/L (S-II) Generally, higher S(-II) values and larger Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios were found in the two-phase samples. These findings suggest that the ' flashed ' samples are at a less reduced state than the two-phase samples. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

  12. Significance of iron(II,III) hydroxycarbonate green rust in arsenic remediation using zerovalent iron in laboratory column tests.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Puls, Robert W

    2004-10-01

    We examined the corrosion products of zerovalent iron used in three column tests for removing arsenic from water under dynamic flow conditions. Each column test lasted 3-4 months using columns consisting of a 10.3-cm depth of 50:50 (w:w, Peerless iron:sand) in the middle and a 10.3cm depth of a sediment from Elizabeth City, NC, in both upper and lower portions of the 31-cm-long glass column (2.5 cm in diameter). The feeding solutions were 1 mg of As(V) L(-1) + 1 mg of As(III) L(-1) in 7 mM NaCl + 0.86 mM CaSO4 with or without added phosphate (0.5 or 1 mg of P L(-1)) and silicate (10 or 20 mg of Si L(-1)) at pH 6.5. Iron(II,III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (or simply, carbonate green rust) and magnetite were the major iron corrosion products identified with X-ray diffraction for the separated fractions (5 and 1 min sedimentation and residual). The presence of carbonate green rust was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (hexagonal morphology) and FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy (interlayer carbonate stretching mode at 1352-1365 cm(-1)). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation revealed the presence of predominantly As(V) at the surface of corroded iron particles despite the fact that the feeding solution in contact with Peerless iron contained more As(III) than As(V) as a result of a preferential uptake of As(V) over As(III) by the Elizabeth City sediment. Extraction of separated corrosion products with 1.0 M HCI showed that from 86 to 96% of the total extractable As (6.9-14.6 g kg(-1)) was in the form of As(V) in agreement with the XPS results. Combined microscopic and macroscopic wet chemistry results suggest that sorbed As(III) was partially oxidized by the carbonate green rust at the early stage of iron corrosion. The column experiments suggest that either carbonate green rust is kinetically favored or is thermodynamically more stable than sulfate green rust in the studied Peerless iron corrosion systems.

  13. Effects of the electrode oxidizing potential on underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Depth greatly affects the chemical composition and mechanical properties of underwater wet (UWW) welds. It is well documented in the literature that as depth increases, the amount of oxygen in the weld increases while the deoxidants decrease in concentration. To understand the influence of oxygen on the characteristics and properties of UWW welds, deposits of electrodes with different oxidizing potentials were studied. The oxidizing potentials of these electrodes were varied through additions of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to the covering of a ruffle electrode. No metallic deoxidants were used in the coverings, but MgO was added to one of the oxidizing electrodes as a possible way to control oxygen. The welds were made at 0.5 m of water depth. Chemical analysis showed that increasing oxidizing potential of the electrodes increased the weld metal oxygen content eventually reaching a plateau value of approximately 2,100 ppm. This concentration plateau is determined by the solubility limit of FeO in the liquid iron at the solidification temperature. The MgO addition was sufficient to reduce the oxygen level to 1,700 ppm. The results also showed that the effects of increasing oxidizing potential of the electrode covering on weld metal composition and microstructure are similar to those of increasing water depth. This finding is very significant since it allows for the simulation of deep water weld metal microstructures in shallow waters by controlling the oxidizing potential of the consumables used. Finally, studying the properties of oxidizing electrodes in shallow depths will also be useful in developing welding electrodes for deep waters.

  14. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL, OXIDANT, AND PH IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) reactions are very important in drinking water. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements reflect the redox state of water. Redox measurements are not widely made by drinking water utilities in part because they are not well understood. The ...

  15. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  16. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    PubMed

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  17. FKBP12 modulation of the binding of the skeletal ryanodine receptor onto the II-III loop of the dihydropyridine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Fiona M; Robert, Mylène; Jona, Istvan; Szegedi, Csaba; Albrieux, Mireille; Geib, Sandrine; De Waard, Michel; Villaz, Michel; Ronjat, Michel

    2002-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, excitation-contraction coupling involves a functional interaction between the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR). The domain corresponding to Thr(671)-Leu(690) of the II-III loop of the skeletal DHPR alpha(1)-subunit is able to regulate RyR properties and calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, whereas the domain corresponding to Glu(724)-Pro(760) antagonizes this effect. Two peptides, covering these sequences (peptide A(Sk) and C(Sk), respectively) were immobilized on polystyrene beads. We demonstrate that peptide A(Sk) binds to the skeletal isoform of RyR (RyR1) whereas peptide C(Sk) does not. Using surface plasmon resonance detection, we show that 1) domain Thr(671)-Leu(690) is the only sequence of the II-III loop binding with RyR1 and 2) the interaction of peptide A(Sk) with RyR1 is not modulated by Ca(2+) (pCa 9-2) nor by Mg(2+) (up to 10 mM). In contrast, this interaction is strongly potentiated by the immunophilin FKBP12 (EC(50) = 10 nM) and inhibited by both rapamycin (IC(50) = 5 nM) and FK506. Peptide A(Sk) induces a 300% increase of the opening probability of the RyR1 incorporated in lipid bilayer. Removal of FKBP12 from RyR1 completely abolishes this effect of domain A(Sk) on RyR1 channel behavior. These results demonstrate a direct interaction of the RyR1 with the discrete domain of skeletal DHPR alpha(1)-subunit corresponding to Thr(671)-Leu(690) and show that the association of FKBP12 with RyR1 specifically modulates this interaction. PMID:11751303

  18. In-situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) Investigation of a Bifunctional Manganese Oxide Catalyst with High Activity for Electrochemical Water Oxidation and Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Benck, Jesse D.; Gul, Sheraz; Webb, Samuel M.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    In-situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful technique that can be applied to electrochemical systems, with the ability to elucidate the chemical nature of electrocatalysts under reaction conditions. In this study, we perform in-situ XAS measurements on a bifunctional manganese oxide (MnOx) catalyst with high electrochemical activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), we find that exposure to an ORR-relevant potential of 0.7 V vs. RHE produces a disordered Mn3II,III,IIIO4 phase with negligible contributions from other phases. After the potential is increased to a highly anodic value of 1.8 V vs. RHE, relevant to the OER, we observe an oxidation of approximately 80% of the catalytic thin film to form a mixed MnIII,IV oxide, while the remaining 20% of the film consists of a less oxidized phase, likely corresponding to unchanged Mn3II,III,IIIO4. XAS and electrochemical characterization of two thin film catalysts with different MnOx thicknesses reveals no significant influence of thickness on the measured oxidation states, at either ORR or OER potentials, but demonstrates that the OER activity scales with film thickness. This result suggests that the films have porous structure, which does not restrict electrocatalysis to the top geometric layer of the film. As the portion of the catalyst film that is most likely to be oxidized at the high potentials necessary for the OER is that which is closest to the electrolyte interface, we hypothesize that the MnIII,IV oxide, rather than Mn3II,III,IIIO4, is the phase pertinent to the observed OER activity. PMID:23758050

  19. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical study of the structure of a new paramagnetic dimeric palladium(II,III) complex with creatine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitewa, Mariana; Enchev, Venelin; Bakalova, Tatyana

    2002-05-01

    The structure and coordination mode of the newly synthesized dimeric paramagnetic Pd(II,III) complex are studied using magneto-chemical, EPR and IR spectroscopic methods. In order to perform reliable assignment of the IR bands, the structure and IR spectrum of the free creatine were calculated using ab initio method. For calculation of the configuration of its deprotonated and doubly deprotonated forms the semiempirical AM1 method was used.

  20. Morphine as a Potential Oxidative Stress-Causing Agent.

    PubMed

    Skrabalova, Jitka; Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2013-11-01

    Morphine exhibits important pharmacological effects for which it has been used in medical practice for quite a long time. However, it has a high addictive potential and can be abused. Long-term use of this drug can be connected with some pathological consequences including neurotoxicity and neuronal dysfunction, hepatotoxicity, kidney dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, most studies examining the impact of morphine have been aimed at determining the effects induced by chronic morphine exposure in the brain, liver, cardiovascular system and macrophages. It appears that different tissues may respond to morphine diversely and are distinctly susceptible to oxidative stress and subsequent oxidative damage of biomolecules. Importantly, production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species induced by morphine, which have been observed under different experimental conditions, can contribute to some pathological processes, degenerative diseases and organ dysfunctions occurring in morphine abusers or morphine-treated patients. This review attempts to provide insights into the possible relationship between morphine actions and oxidative stress.

  1. Predictive tests to evaluate oxidative potential of engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiazza, Mara; Carella, Emanuele; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Corazzari, Ingrid; Viola, Franca; Fenoglio, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress constitutes one of the principal injury mechanisms through which particulate toxicants (asbestos, crystalline silica, hard metals) and engineered nanomaterials can induce adverse health effects. ROS may be generated indirectly by activated cells and/or directly at the surface of the material. The occurrence of these processes depends upon the type of material. Many authors have recently demonstrated that metal oxides and carbon-based nanoparticles may influence (increasing or decreasing) the generation of oxygen radicals in a cell environment. Metal oxide, such as iron oxides, crystalline silica, and titanium dioxide are able to generate free radicals via different mechanisms causing an imbalance within oxidant species. The increase of ROS species may lead to inflammatory responses and in some cases to the development of cancer. On the other hand carbon-based nanomaterials, such as fullerene, carbon nanotubes, carbon black as well as cerium dioxide are able to scavenge the free radicals generated acting as antioxidant. The high numbers of new-engineered nanomaterials, which are introduced in the market, are exponentially increasing. Therefore the definition of toxicological strategies is urgently needed. The development of acellular screening tests will make possible the reduction of the number of in vitro and in vivo tests to be performed. An integrated protocol that may be used to predict the oxidant/antioxidant potential of engineered nanoparticles will be here presented.

  2. Potential for microbial oxidation of ferrous iron in basaltic glass.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Mai Yia; Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Roden, Eric E

    2015-05-01

    Basaltic glass (BG) is an amorphous ferrous iron [Fe(II)]-containing material present in basaltic rocks, which are abundant on rocky planets such as Earth and Mars. Previous research has suggested that Fe(II) in BG can serve as an energy source for chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism, which has important ramifications for potential past and present microbial life on Mars. However, to date there has been no direct demonstration of microbially catalyzed oxidation of Fe(II) in BG. In this study, three different culture systems were used to investigate the potential for microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in BG, including (1) the chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing "Straub culture"; (2) the mixotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organism Desulfitobacterium frappieri strain G2; and (3) indigenous microorganisms from a streambed Fe seep in Wisconsin. The BG employed consisted of clay and silt-sized particles of freshly quenched lava from the TEB flow in Kilauea, Hawaii. Soluble Fe(II) or chemically reduced NAu-2 smectite (RS) were employed as positive controls to verify Fe(II) oxidation activity in the culture systems. All three systems demonstrated oxidation of soluble Fe(II) and/or structural Fe(II) in RS, whereas no oxidation of Fe(II) in BG material was observed. The inability of the Straub culture to oxidize Fe(II) in BG was particularly surprising, as this culture can oxidize other insoluble Fe(II)-bearing minerals such as biotite, magnetite, and siderite. Although the reason for the resistance of the BG toward enzymatic oxidation remains unknown, it seems possible that the absence of distinct crystal faces or edge sites in the amorphous glass renders the material resistant to such attack. These findings have implications with regard to the idea that Fe(II)-Si-rich phases in basalt rocks could provide a basis for chemolithotrophic microbial life on Mars, specifically in neutral-pH environments where acid-promoted mineral dissolution and

  3. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a novel biomarker of oxidative environmental stress.

    PubMed Central

    Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Kreps, Sarah E; Adrie, Christophe; Dall'Ava, Josette; Christiani, David; Polla, Barbara S

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiologic analyses, traditionally based on long-term cohort or case-control studies, provide retrospective causal associations between exposure to a particular environmental stressor and an exposure-related disease end point. Recent research initiatives have propelled a shift toward exploring molecular epidemiology and molecular biological markers (biomarkers) as a means of providing more immediate, quantitative risk assessment of potentially deleterious environmental exposures. We compared, in normal human monocytes isolated from the blood of healthy donors, variations in Hsp70 expression and mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) in response to exposure to either tobacco smoke or gamma-irradiation, two models for environmentally mediated oxidant exposure. On the basis of its mechanistic specificity for oxidants and little baseline variation in cells from distinct individuals, we propose that delta psi m represents a selective in vitro and in vivo biomarker for oxidant exposure. delta psi m may be used to gauge risks associated with oxidant-mediated air pollution and radiation. PMID:11882482

  4. Redox Potentials, Laccase Oxidation, and Antilarval Activities of Substituted Phenols

    PubMed Central

    Prasain, Keshar; Nguyen, Thi D. T.; Gorman, Maureen J.; Barrigan, Lydia M.; Peng, Zeyu; Kanost, Michael R.; Syed, Lateef U.; Li, Jun; Zhu, Kun Yan; Hua, Duy H.

    2012-01-01

    Laccases are copper-containing oxidases that are involved in sclerotization of the cuticle of mosquitoes and other insects. Oxidation of exogenous compounds by insect laccases may have the potential to produce reactive species toxic to insects. We investigated two classes of substituted phenolic compounds, halogenated di- and trihydroxybenzenes and substituted di-tert-butylphenols, on redox potential, oxidation by laccase and effects on mosquito larval growth. An inverse correlation between the oxidation potentials and laccase activity of halogenated hydroxybenzenes was found. Substituted di-tert-butylphenols however were found to impact mosquito larval growth and survival. In particular, 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)phenol (15) caused greater than 98% mortality of Anopheles gambiae larvae in a concentration of 180 nM, whereas 2-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-methylpropanal oxime (13) and 6,8-di-tert-butyl-2,2-dimethyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromene (33) caused 93% and 92% mortalities in concentrations of 3.4 and 3.7 μM, respectively. Larvae treated with di-tert-butylphenolic compounds died just before pupation. PMID:22300888

  5. Evidence of active tectonics on a Roman aqueduct system (II-III century A.D.) near Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Fabrizio; Montone, Paola; Pirro, Mario; Boschi, Enzo

    2004-04-01

    In this paper we describe evidence of strong tectonic deformation affecting two aqueducts of Roman age (II-III century A.D.). The channels are located approximately 20 km northeast of Rome along the ancient Via Tiburtina. Brittle and ductile deformation affects these two structures, including extensional joint systems, NE-oriented faults, and horizontal distortion. This deformation is consistent with right-lateral movement on major N-striking faults, and represents the first evidence that tectonic deformation took place in historical times in the vicinity of Rome, with local strike-slip movement superimposed on a regional extensional fault system.

  6. Oxidative potential of subway PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Teresa; Kelly, Frank J.; Dunster, Chrissi; Oliete, Ana; Martins, Vânia; Reche, Cristina; Minguillón, Maria Cruz; Amato, Fulvio; Capdevila, Marta; de Miguel, Eladio; Querol, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Air quality in subway systems is of interest not only because particulate matter (PM) concentrations can be high, but also because of the peculiarly metalliferous chemical character of the particles, most of which differ radically from those of outdoor ambient air. We report on the oxidative potential (OP) of PM2.5 samples collected in the Barcelona subway system in different types of stations. The PM chemical composition of these samples showed typically high concentrations of Fe, Total Carbon, Ba, Cu, Mn, Zn and Cr sourced from rail tracks, wheels, catenaries, brake pads and pantographs. Two toxicological indicators of oxidative activity, ascorbic acid (AA) oxidation (expressed as OPAA μg-1 or OPAA m-3) and glutathione (GSH) oxidation (expressed as OPGSH μg-1 or OPGSH m-3), showed low OP for all samples (compared with outdoor air) but considerable variation between stations (0.9-2.4 OPAA μg-1; 0.4-1.9 OPGSH μg-1). Results indicate that subway PM toxicity is not related to variations in PM2.5 concentrations produced by ventilation changes, tunnel works, or station design, but may be affected more by the presence of metallic trace elements such as Cu and Sb sourced from brakes and pantographs. The OP assays employed do not reveal toxic effects from the highly ferruginous component present in subway dust.

  7. Morphine as a Potential Oxidative Stress-Causing Agent

    PubMed Central

    Skrabalova, Jitka; Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Morphine exhibits important pharmacological effects for which it has been used in medical practice for quite a long time. However, it has a high addictive potential and can be abused. Long-term use of this drug can be connected with some pathological consequences including neurotoxicity and neuronal dysfunction, hepatotoxicity, kidney dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, most studies examining the impact of morphine have been aimed at determining the effects induced by chronic morphine exposure in the brain, liver, cardiovascular system and macrophages. It appears that different tissues may respond to morphine diversely and are distinctly susceptible to oxidative stress and subsequent oxidative damage of biomolecules. Importantly, production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species induced by morphine, which have been observed under different experimental conditions, can contribute to some pathological processes, degenerative diseases and organ dysfunctions occurring in morphine abusers or morphine-treated patients. This review attempts to provide insights into the possible relationship between morphine actions and oxidative stress. PMID:24376392

  8. Iron oxide reduction in deep Baltic Sea sediments: the potential role of anaerobic oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Matthias; Slomp, Caroline P.; Dijkstra, Nikki; Sapart, Célia J.; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kasten, Sabine; Riedinger, Natascha; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2015-04-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its emission from marine sediments to the atmosphere is largely controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Traditionally, sulfate is considered to be the most important electron acceptor for AOM in marine sediments. However, recent studies have shown that AOM may also be coupled to the reduction of iron (Fe) oxides (Beal et al., 2009; Riedinger et al., 2014; Egger et al., 2014). In the Baltic Sea, the transition from the Ancylus freshwater phase to the Littorina brackish/marine phase (A/L-transition) ca. 9-7 ka ago (Zillén et al., 2008) resulted in the accumulation of methanogenic brackish/marine sediments overlying Fe-oxide rich lacustrine deposits. The downward diffusion of methane from the brackish/marine sediments into the lake sediments leads to an ideal diagenetic system to study a potential coupling between Fe oxide reduction and methane oxidation. Here, we use porewater and sediment geochemical data obtained at sites M0063 and M0065 during the IODP Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment Expedition 347 in 2013 to identify the potential mechanisms responsible for the apparent Fe oxide reduction in the non-sulfidic limnic sediments below the A/L transition. In this presentation, we will review the various explanations for the elevated ferrous Fe in the porewater in the lake sediments and we will specifically address the potential role of the reaction of methane with Fe-oxides. References: Beal E. J., House C. H. and Orphan V. J. (2009) Manganese- and iron-dependent marine methane oxidation. Science 325, 184-187. Egger M., Rasigraf O., Sapart C. J., Jilbert T., Jetten M. S. M., Röckmann T., van der Veen C., Banda N., Kartal B., Ettwig K. F. and Slomp C. P. (2014) Iron-mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane in brackish coastal sediments. Environ. Sci. Technol. 49, 277-283. Riedinger N., Formolo M. J., Lyons T. W., Henkel S., Beck A. and Kasten S. (2014) An inorganic geochemical argument for coupled anaerobic oxidation of

  9. Intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of ethylene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp; Hellmann, Robert; Hassel, Egon; Bich, Eckard

    2014-10-01

    A six-dimensional potential energy hypersurface (PES) for two interacting rigid ethylene oxide (C2H4O) molecules was determined from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. The counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory was utilized to determine interaction energies for 10178 configurations of two molecules. An analytical site-site potential function with 19 sites per ethylene oxide molecule was fitted to the interaction energies and fine tuned to agree with data for the second acoustic virial coefficient from accurate speed of sound measurements. The PES was validated by computing the second virial coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data as they tend to fall within the uncertainty intervals and also obey the experimental temperature functions, except for viscosity, where experimental data are insufficient. Due to the lack of reliable data, especially for the transport properties, our calculated values are currently the most accurate estimates for these properties of ethylene oxide.

  10. Intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of ethylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp Hassel, Egon; Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard

    2014-10-28

    A six-dimensional potential energy hypersurface (PES) for two interacting rigid ethylene oxide (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O) molecules was determined from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. The counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory was utilized to determine interaction energies for 10178 configurations of two molecules. An analytical site-site potential function with 19 sites per ethylene oxide molecule was fitted to the interaction energies and fine tuned to agree with data for the second acoustic virial coefficient from accurate speed of sound measurements. The PES was validated by computing the second virial coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data as they tend to fall within the uncertainty intervals and also obey the experimental temperature functions, except for viscosity, where experimental data are insufficient. Due to the lack of reliable data, especially for the transport properties, our calculated values are currently the most accurate estimates for these properties of ethylene oxide.

  11. Chitosan-Functionalized Graphene Oxide as a Potential Immunoadjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ting; Zhang, Huijie; Huang, Dandi; Feng, Shini; Fujita, Morihisa; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2017-01-01

    The application of graphene oxide (GO) as a potential vaccine adjuvant has recently attracted considerable attention. However, appropriate surface functionalization of GO is crucial to improve its biocompatibility and enhance its adjuvant activity. In this study, we developed a simple method to prepare chitosan (CS)-functionalized GO (GO-CS) and further investigated its potential as a nanoadjuvant. Compared with GO, GO-CS possessed considerably smaller size, positive surface charge, and better thermal stability. The functionalization of GO with CS was effective in decreasing the non-specific protein adsorption and improving its biocompatibility. Furthermore, GO-CS significantly activated RAW264.7 cells and stimulated more cytokines for mediating cellular immune response, which was mainly due to the synergistic immunostimulatory effect of both GO and CS. GO-CS exhibits strong potential as a safe nanoadjuvant for vaccines and immunotherapy. PMID:28336893

  12. Chitosan-Functionalized Graphene Oxide as a Potential Immunoadjuvant.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ting; Zhang, Huijie; Huang, Dandi; Feng, Shini; Fujita, Morihisa; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2017-03-08

    The application of graphene oxide (GO) as a potential vaccine adjuvant has recently attracted considerable attention. However, appropriate surface functionalization of GO is crucial to improve its biocompatibility and enhance its adjuvant activity. In this study, we developed a simple method to prepare chitosan (CS)-functionalized GO (GO-CS) and further investigated its potential as a nanoadjuvant. Compared with GO, GO-CS possessed considerably smaller size, positive surface charge, and better thermal stability. The functionalization of GO with CS was effective in decreasing the non-specific protein adsorption and improving its biocompatibility. Furthermore, GO-CS significantly activated RAW264.7 cells and stimulated more cytokines for mediating cellular immune response, which was mainly due to the synergistic immunostimulatory effect of both GO and CS. GO-CS exhibits strong potential as a safe nanoadjuvant for vaccines and immunotherapy.

  13. [Characteristic of inflammatory infiltrate of gastric mucosa in patients with grade II-III gastric dysplasia and of stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Evtushenko, V A; Vusik, M V; Karakeshisheva, M B; Pleshko, R I; Ermolaeva, L A

    2008-01-01

    The study included 85 inpatients and outpatients in whom composition of inflammatory infiltrate from gastric mucosa (GM) was determined at the Oncological Research Institute, Tomsk Research Centre of the Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. The patients were allocated to 4 groups depending on nosological form of the disease. Group 1 comprised 21 patients with grade II-III GM epithelial dysplasia, group 2 - 24 patients having stomach cancer (histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma), group 3 - 19 patients with stage II-III mucinous gastric carcinoma, group 4 - 20 allegedly healthy subjects without signs of gastrointestinal pathology. It was shown that dysplastic processes in GM are associated with an increase of neutrophil, eosinophil, macrophage, and mast cell count along with a drop in the number of lymphocytes and plasmocytes. Stroma of invasive stomach cancer underwent intense inflammatory infiltration accompanied by a rise in the number of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, and neutrophils. Mucinous gastric carcinoma was characterized by an increase of the number of neutrophils and macrophages. Patients having adenocarcinoma of the stomach showed enhanced plasmocytic infiltration by plasmocytes with a low number of eosinophils and mast cells. It is concluded that characteristics of inflammatory GM infiltrate may be useful for the objective assessment of stomach cancer risk in patients with GM dysplasia, formation of a high oncological risk group, adequate dynamic monitoring and treatment of these patients.

  14. Prognostic value of tumor infiltrating NK cells and macrophages in stage II+III esophageal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao; Shi, Liangrong; Wu, Changping; Jiang, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the immunobiology of tumor microenvironment has recently translated into new therapeutic approach against human cancers. Besides the role of immune cells mediating adaptive immune responses, the tumor infiltrating components of the innate immune system including, neutrophils, mast cells, NK cells, and macrophages, also role importantly in anti-tumor immunity. In our present study, we retrospectively analyzed the prognostic value of the densities of tumor infiltrating NK cells and macrophages in esophageal cancer tissues derived from stage II+III patients. Our results showed that the density of the infiltrating NK cells in tumor stroma was significantly associated with nodal status. In addition, the densities of the infiltrating NK cells in tumor nest, and the infiltrating macrophages in tumor nest as well as in tumor stroma, were significantly associated with patients' postoperative prognoses. Furthermore, the combination of infiltrating NK cells in tumor nest and stroma, or the combination of infiltrating macrophages in tumor nest and stroma, could also be used as important prognostic tool in predicting the survival of the stage II+III esophageal cancer patients. PMID:27736796

  15. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  16. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius ST169 and novel ST354 SCCmec II-III isolates related to the worldwide ST71 clone.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Koizumi, A; Saito, M; Muramatsu, Y; Tamura, Y

    2016-01-01

    The recent appearance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) is a concern for both veterinary and human healthcare. MRSP clonal lineages with sequence type (ST) 71-spa t02-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) II-III and ST68-spa t06-SCCmec V have spread throughout Europe and North America, respectively. The current study compared the molecular characteristics of 43 MRSP isolates from dogs in Japan with those of MRSP from previous reports using multilocus sequence typing based on seven housekeeping genes, SCCmec typing, and detection of antimicrobial resistance genes. Three related clonal lineages, ST71, ST169, and the newly registered ST354, were observed in SCCmec II-III isolates from Japan, despite MRSP SCCmec II-III isolates being thought to belong to a single clonal lineage. The majority of SCCmec II-III isolates belonging to ST169 (9/11) and ST354 (3/3), but not ST71 (0/11), harboured tetM. Four STs were observed for the SCCmec V isolates; however, neither ST68 nor related STs were found in the Japanese MRSP isolates. In conclusion, MRSP SCCmec II-III isolates from Japan belonged to ST71 and related STs (ST169 and ST354). A variety of MRSP SCCmec V clones, including some novel clones, were identified.

  17. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Oh, Julia L. Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hahn, Karin; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.

  18. Valproic Acid, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Combination with Paclitaxel for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Phase II/III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Mariateresa; Gallo, Marco; Brignardello, Enrico; Milla, Paola; Orlandi, Fabio; Limone, Paolo Piero; Arvat, Emanuela; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe; Piovesan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) has a median survival less than 5 months and, to date, no effective therapy exists. Taxanes have recently been stated as the main drug treatment for ATC, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid efficiently potentiates the effects of paclitaxel in vitro. Based on these data, this trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the combination of paclitaxel and valproic acid for the treatment of ATC. This was a randomized, controlled phase II/III trial, performed on 25 ATC patients across 5 centers in northwest Italy. The experimental arm received the combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m2/weekly) and valproic acid (1,000 mg/day); the control arm received paclitaxel alone. Overall survival and disease progression, evaluated in terms of progression-free survival, were the primary outcomes. The secondary outcome was the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. The coadministration of valproic acid did not influence the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. Neither median survival nor median time to progression was statistically different in the two arms. Median survival of operated-on patients was significantly better than that of patients who were not operated on. The present trial demonstrates that the addition of valproic acid to paclitaxel has no effect on overall survival and disease progression of ATC patients. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2008-005221-11. PMID:27766105

  19. Global Change Simulations Affect Potential Methane Oxidation in Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankinship, J. C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4) are higher now than they have ever been during the past 420,000 years. However, concentrations have remained stable since 1999. Emissions associated with livestock husbandry are unlikely to have changed, so some combination of reduced production in wetlands, more efficient capture by landfills, or increased consumption by biological CH4 oxidation in upland soils may be responsible. Methane oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in upland soils and little is known about how these bacteria respond to anthropogenic global change, and how they will influence - or already are influencing - the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Might ongoing and future global changes increase biological CH4 oxidation? Soils were sampled from two field experiments to assess changes in rates of CH4 oxidation in response to global change simulations. Potential activities of CH4 oxidizing bacterial communities were measured through laboratory incubations under optimal temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric CH4 concentrations (~18 ppm, or 10x ambient). The ongoing 6-year multifactorial Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, elevated atmospheric CO2, elevated atmospheric N deposition, and increased wildfire frequency in an annual grassland in a Mediterranean-type climate in central California. The ongoing 1-year multifactorial Merriam Climate Change Experiment (MCCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, and reduced precipitation in four different types of ecosystems along an elevational gradient in a semi-arid climate in northern Arizona. The high desert grassland, pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine forest, and mixed conifer forest ecosystems range in annual precipitation from 100 to 1000 mm yr-1, and from productivity being strongly water limited to strongly temperature limited. Among JRGCE soils, elevated atmospheric CO2 increased potential CH4 oxidation rates (p=0.052) and wildfire

  20. Assessment of eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress using oxidation-reduction potential markers.

    PubMed

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Ntontou, Amalia-Maria; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Deli, Chariklia K; Poulios, Athanasios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Bar-Or, David; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP) and capacity ORP (cORP) oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress.

  1. Oxidative shift in tissue redox potential increases beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration.

    PubMed

    Kistamás, Kornél; Hegyi, Bence; Váczi, Krisztina; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Nánási, Péter P

    2015-07-01

    Profound changes in tissue redox potential occur in the heart under conditions of oxidative stress frequently associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Since beat-to-beat variability (short term variability, SV) of action potential duration (APD) is a good indicator of arrhythmia incidence, the aim of this work was to study the influence of redox changes on SV in isolated canine ventricular cardiomyocytes using a conventional microelectrode technique. The redox potential was shifted toward a reduced state using a reductive cocktail (containing dithiothreitol, glutathione, and ascorbic acid) while oxidative changes were initiated by superfusion with H2O2. Redox effects were evaluated as changes in "relative SV" determined by comparing SV changes with the concomitant APD changes. Exposure of myocytes to the reductive cocktail decreased SV significantly without any detectable effect on APD. Application of H2O2 increased both SV and APD, but the enhancement of SV was the greater, so relative SV increased. Longer exposure to H2O2 resulted in the development of early afterdepolarizations accompanied by tremendously increased SV. Pretreatment with the reductive cocktail prevented both elevation in relative SV and the development of afterdepolarizations. The results suggest that the increased beat-to-beat variability during an oxidative stress contributes to the generation of cardiac arrhythmias.

  2. Molecular basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, mucolipidosis II/III and Niemann-Pick C1 disease - Lysosomal storage disorders caused by defects of non-lysosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Schlotawa, Lars; Frese, Marc-André; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2009-04-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), mucolipidosis (ML) II/III and Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease are rare but fatal lysosomal storage disorders caused by the genetic defect of non-lysosomal proteins. The NPC1 protein mainly localizes to late endosomes and is essential for cholesterol redistribution from endocytosed LDL to cellular membranes. NPC1 deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of a broad range of lipids. The precise functional mechanism of this membrane protein, however, remains puzzling. ML II, also termed I cell disease, and the less severe ML III result from deficiencies of the Golgi enzyme N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphotransferase leading to a global defect of lysosome biogenesis. In patient cells, newly synthesized lysosomal proteins are not equipped with the critical lysosomal trafficking marker mannose 6-phosphate, thus escaping from lysosomal sorting at the trans Golgi network. MSD affects the entire sulfatase family, at least seven members of which are lysosomal enzymes that are specifically involved in the degradation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, sulfolipids or other sulfated molecules. The combined deficiencies of all sulfatases result from a defective post-translational modification by the ER-localized formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE), which oxidizes a specific cysteine residue to formylglycine, the catalytic residue enabling a unique mechanism of sulfate ester hydrolysis. This review gives an update on the molecular bases of these enigmatic diseases, which have been challenging researchers since many decades and so far led to a number of surprising findings that give deeper insight into both the cell biology and the pathobiochemistry underlying these complex disorders. In case of MSD, considerable progress has been made in recent years towards an understanding of disease-causing FGE mutations. First approaches to link molecular parameters with clinical manifestation have been described and even therapeutical options have been

  3. Oxidative Stress in COPD: Sources, Markers, and Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Adam John Anthony; Sapey, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Markers of oxidative stress are increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are able to alter biological molecules, signaling pathways and antioxidant molecule function, many of which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD. However, the involvement of ROS in the development and progression of COPD is not proven. Here, we discuss the sources of ROS, and the defences that have evolved to protect against their harmful effects. We address the role that ROS may have in the development and progression of COPD, as well as current therapeutic attempts at limiting the damage they cause. Evidence has indicated that the function of several key cells appears altered in COPD patients, and expression levels of important oxidant and antioxidant molecules may be abnormal. Therapeutic trials attempting to restore equilibrium to these molecules have not impacted upon all facets of disease and whilst the theory behind ROS influence in COPD appears sound, current models testing relevant pathways to tissue damage are limited. The heterogeneity seen in COPD patients presents a challenge to our understanding, and further research is essential to identify potential targets and stratified COPD patient populations where ROS therapies may be maximally efficacious. PMID:28212273

  4. Potential use and perspectives of nitric oxide donors in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Marvasi, Massimiliano

    2017-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged in the last 30 years as a key molecule involved in many physiological processes in plants, animals and bacteria. Current research has shown that NO can be delivered via donor molecules. In such cases, the NO release rate is dependent on the chemical structure of the donor itself and on the chemical environment. Despite NO's powerful signaling effect in plants and animals, the application of NO donors in agriculture is currently not implemented and research remains mainly at the experimental level. Technological development in the field of NO donors is rapidly expanding in scope to include controlling seed germination, plant development, ripening and increasing shelf-life of produce. Potential applications in animal production have also been identified. This concise review focuses on the use of donors that have shown potential biotechnological applications in agriculture. Insights are provided into (i) the role of donors in plant production, (ii) the potential use of donors in animal production and (iii) future approaches to explore the use and applications of donors for the benefit of agriculture. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. A comparative study of nitrite reduction by synthetic and biogenic Fe(II-III) hydroxysalts green rusts: Evidence for hydroxyl-nitrite green rust formation as an intermediate reaction product.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ona-Nguema, G.; Guerbois, D.; Morin, G.; Zhang, Y.; Noel, V.; Brest, J.

    2013-12-01

    The occurrence of high nitrite concentrations as a result of anthropogenic activities is an important water quality concern as it is highly toxic to human and fauna, and it is used as a nitrogen source for the assimilation process. The toxicity of nitrite is related to its transformation into carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds, which are suspected to be responsible for some gastric cancers, and to its ability to convert the hemoglobin to methaemoglobin what is then unable to fix oxygen and to transport it to the tissues, involving hypoxia and the blue-baby syndrome [1]. To reduce the adverse effect of nitrite on human health and on macroalgal blooms, any process enhancing the transformation of nitrite ions to nitrogen gas is of interest for the remediation of natural environments. To achieve this purpose the use of processes involving Fe(II)-containing minerals could be considered as one of the best options. Green-rusts are mixed Fe(II-III) layered double hydroxides commonly found in anoxic zones of natural environments such as sediments and hydromorphic soils. In such anoxic environments, green rust minerals play an important role in the biogeochemical redox cycling of iron and nitrogen, and can affect the speciation and mobility of many organic and inorganic contaminants. The present study investigates the reduction of nitrite by two synthetic and two biogenic green rusts. On the one hand, Fe(II-III) hydroxychloride and Fe(II-III) hydroxycarbonate green rusts were used as synthetic interlayer forms of GR, which are referred to as ';syn-GR(CO3)' and ';syn-GR(Cl)', respectively. On the other hand, the study was performed with biogenic Fe(II-III) hydroxycarbonate green rusts obtained from the bioreduction of two ferric precursors, either Fe(III)-oxyhydroxycarbonate or lepidocrocite; these biogenic green rusts are referred to as ';bio-GR(CO3)F' and ';bio-GR(CO3)L', respectively. For synthetic green rusts, results showed that the oxidation of both syn-GR(CO3) and syn

  6. Pro-oxidant and antioxidant potential of catecholestrogens against ferrylmyoglobin-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Rosa; Quintana, Kristina; Navarro, Rosaura; Martín, César; Hernández, M Luisa; Aurrekoetxea, Igor; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio; Lacort, Mercedes; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña

    2002-07-11

    Ferryl heme proteins may play a major role in vivo under certain pathological conditions. Catecholestrogens, the estradiol-derived metabolites, can act either as antioxidants or pro-oxidants in iron-dependent systems. The aim of the present work was (1) to determine the effects of ferrylmyoglobin on hepatocyte cytotoxicity, and (2) to assess the pro/antioxidant potential of a series of estrogens (phenolic, catecholic and stilbene-derived) against ferrylmyoglobin induced lipid peroxidation in rat hepatocytes. Cells were exposed to metmyoglobin plus hydrogen peroxide to form ferrylmyoglobin in the presence of the transition metal chelator diethylentriaminepentaacetic acid. Results showed that ferrylmyoglobin induced an initial oxidative stress, mainly reflected in an early lipid peroxidation and further decrease in GSH and ATP. However, cells gradually adapted to this situation, by recovering the endogenous ATP and GSH levels at longer incubation times. Phenolic and stilbene-derived estrogens inhibited ferrylmyoglobin-induced lipid peroxidation to different degrees: diethylstilbestrol>estradiol>resveratrol. Catecholestrogens at concentrations higher than 1 microM also inhibited lipid peroxidation with similar efficacy. The ability of estrogens to reduce ferrylmyoglobin to metmyoglobin may account for their antioxidant activity. In contrast, physiological concentrations (100 pM-100 nM) of the catecholestrogens exerted pro-oxidant activities, 4-hydroxyestradiol being more potent than 2-hydroxyestradiol. The implications of these interactions should be considered in situations where local myoglobin or hemoglobin microbleeding takes place.

  7. Composition and anion ordering in some Fe II-III hydroxysalt green rusts (carbonate, oxalate, methanoate): The fougerite mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génin, Jean-Marie R.; Ruby, Christian

    2008-03-01

    Main features of Fe II-III hydroxysalts (green rusts) are obtained from XRD. Moreover, Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that several Fe II sites exist. The structure is classified in green rusts one and two (GR1 and GR2) according to the stacking sequence of Fe(OH) 2 brucite-like layers depending on the shape and type of anions inserted within interlayers. Long range order as determined for hydroxysulphate GR2(SO 42-) is extended to distributions of cations and anions within GR1s even though these are not observed by XRD. Abundances of Fe II and Fe III environments within GR1s that intercalate carbonate, oxalate and methanoate (formate) are found for compositions [Fe 6IIFe 2III(OH) 16] 2+·[CO 32-·5H 2O] 2-, [Fe 4IIFe 2III(OH) 12] 2+·[CO 32-·3H 2O] 2-, [Fe 6IIFe 2III(OH) 16] 2+·[C 2O 42-·4H 2O] 2- and [Fe 5IIFe 2III(OH) 14] 2+·[2HCOO -·3H 2O] 2-, which correspond to orders α, β and γ where the cation distances are (2 × a0), (√3 × a0) or a mixture of both, with a ferric molar ratio x = {[Fe III]/[Fe total]} = 1/4, 1/3 and 2/7, respectively. Anion distributions within interlayers are devised and long range orders in other layered double hydroxides could questionably be extended from these models. The formula [Fe 6II(1- x) Fe 6 xIIIO 12H 2(7-3 x) ] 2+·[CO 32-·3H 2O] 2- for the fougerite mineral, which is the oxyhydroxycarbonate obtained by deprotonation of Fe II-III hydroxycarbonate [Fe 4IIFe 2III(OH) 12] 2+·[CO 32-·3H 2O] 2- where x ∈ [1/3,2/3] is confirmed.

  8. Systemic, postsymptomatic antisense oligonucleotide rescues motor unit maturation delay in a new mouse model for type II/III spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanik, Laurent P.; Osborne, Melissa A.; Davis, Crystal; Martin, Whitney P.; Austin, Andrew; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Lutz, Cathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical presentation of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) ranges from a neonatal-onset, very severe disease to an adult-onset, milder form. SMA is caused by the mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and prognosis inversely correlates with the number of copies of the SMN2 gene, a human-specific homolog of SMN1. Despite progress in identifying potential therapies for the treatment of SMA, many questions remain including how late after onset treatments can still be effective and what the target tissues should be. These questions can be addressed in part with preclinical animal models; however, modeling the array of SMA severities in the mouse, which lacks SMN2, has proven challenging. We created a new mouse model for the intermediate forms of SMA presenting with a delay in neuromuscular junction maturation and a decrease in the number of functional motor units, all relevant to the clinical presentation of the disease. Using this new model, in combination with clinical electrophysiology methods, we found that administering systemically SMN-restoring antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) at the age of onset can extend survival and rescue the neurological phenotypes. Furthermore, these effects were also achieved by administration of the ASOs late after onset, independent of the restoration of SMN in the spinal cord. Thus, by adding to the limited repertoire of existing mouse models for type II/III SMA, we demonstrate that ASO therapy can be effective even when administered after onset of the neurological symptoms, in young adult mice, and without being delivered into the central nervous system. PMID:26460027

  9. Potential Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Municipal Drinking Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. E.; Thienelt, T.; Tindall, J.; McMahon, P.

    2005-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, having a global warming potential 280 times larger than carbon dioxide. Although the bulk of N2O emissions appear to be related to agricultural activity, various industrial and transportation related emissions exist as well. This study reports the discovery of a new and significant source of potential N2O emissions related to its presence in purified municipal water supplies worldwide. Multiple drinking water samples were obtained from 86 cities in the United States (US) and 44 cities in 16 countries in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Samples ranged from 0.004 to 2μmol/L or the equivalent of 60% unsaturated to 200 times supersaturated with respect to ambient atmospheric concentration (320 ppb). Highest N2O contents were from southern US cities. Suspecting nitrification as the cause for the presence of N2O in drinking water, correlation statistics were calculated between N2O concentration and city size, geographical location, mean annual temperature, nitrate, and ammonia concentrations for the total population of samples as well as subsets based on country, water purification method, and raw water source (ground, surface, combination). The highest correlation (r=0.66, p<0.05, N=73) found was between latitude and N2O content for the subset group of large US cities using chloramines to purify water. Continuous year long sampling from a major US city indicated that variance in N2O content is remarkably low through the year within a water supply district. The annual US emission, based on this preliminary analysis, is 8x106 moles or 3.5X108 g N2O. Annual global emissions may be five times larger.

  10. A synthetic leaf: the biomimetic potential of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Marilla; Koch, George W.; Morgan, Eric R.; Shafer, Michael W.

    2015-03-01

    Emerging materials such as graphene oxide (GO) have micro and nano features that are functionally similar to those in plant cell walls involved in water transport. Therefore, it may now be possible to design and build biomimetic trees to lift water via mechanisms similar to those employed by trees, allowing for potential applications such as passive water pumping, filtering, and evaporative cooling. The tallest trees can raise large volumes of water to over 100 meters using only the vapor pressure gradient between their leaves and the atmosphere. This phenomenon occurs in all terrestrial plants when capillary forces generated in the microscopic pores in the cell walls of leaves are collectively applied to large diameter xylem conduits. The design of a synthetic tree that mimics these mechanisms will allow water to be moved to heights greater than is currently possible by any engineered system that does not require the use of a positive pressure pump. We are testing the suitability of membranous GO as the leaf of a synthetic tree and present an analysis in support of this design. In addition, we include results from a preliminary design using ceramics.

  11. Zeta potentials in the flotation of oxide and silicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Fuerstenau, D W; Pradip

    2005-06-30

    Adsorption of collectors and modifying reagents in the flotation of oxide and silicate minerals is controlled by the electrical double layer at the mineral-water interface. In systems where the collector is physically adsorbed, flotation with anionic or cationic collectors depends on the mineral surface being charged oppositely. Adjusting the pH of the system can enhance or prevent the flotation of a mineral. Thus, the point of zero charge (PZC) of the mineral is the most important property of a mineral in such systems. The length of the hydrocarbon chain of the collector is important because of chain-chain association enhances the adsorption once the surfactant ions aggregate to form hemimicelles at the surface. Strongly chemisorbing collectors are able to induce flotation even when collector and the mineral surface are charged similarly, but raising the pH sufficiently above the PZC can repel chemisorbing collectors from the mineral surface. Zeta potentials can be used to delineate interfacial phenomena in these various systems.

  12. An epidemiological study of workers potentially exposed to ethylene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wong, O; Trent, L S

    1993-04-01

    This epidemiological study was of 18,728 employees at 14 United States facilities producing sterilised medical supplies and spices, who were potentially exposed to ethylene oxide (EO) for at least 90 days. The mortality of the cohort was studied to the end of 1988. A total of 1353 deaths was identified. The cohort had a significantly lower mortality than the general population from all causes, all cancers, and non-malignant diseases. In the entire cohort, mortality was not significantly increased from any of the cancer sites examined. In particular, no significant increase in mortality was found in the cancer sites of interest based on previous studies--namely, stomach, leukaemia (including major specific cell types), pancreas, and brain. The lack of an increased mortality for these cancer sites was further strengthened by the lack of a dose-response relation with duration of employment and latency. Among the men, a statistically significant increase in mortality from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found. There was no indication for a dose-response relation for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and no specific job categories seemed to be responsible for the increase. Among the women, a deficit of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found, which was not consistent with the finding in the men. Therefore, the increase among the men did not seem to be related to exposure to EO.

  13. An epidemiological study of workers potentially exposed to ethylene oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, O; Trent, L S

    1993-01-01

    This epidemiological study was of 18,728 employees at 14 United States facilities producing sterilised medical supplies and spices, who were potentially exposed to ethylene oxide (EO) for at least 90 days. The mortality of the cohort was studied to the end of 1988. A total of 1353 deaths was identified. The cohort had a significantly lower mortality than the general population from all causes, all cancers, and non-malignant diseases. In the entire cohort, mortality was not significantly increased from any of the cancer sites examined. In particular, no significant increase in mortality was found in the cancer sites of interest based on previous studies--namely, stomach, leukaemia (including major specific cell types), pancreas, and brain. The lack of an increased mortality for these cancer sites was further strengthened by the lack of a dose-response relation with duration of employment and latency. Among the men, a statistically significant increase in mortality from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found. There was no indication for a dose-response relation for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and no specific job categories seemed to be responsible for the increase. Among the women, a deficit of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found, which was not consistent with the finding in the men. Therefore, the increase among the men did not seem to be related to exposure to EO. PMID:8494770

  14. Electrostatic potentials for metal-oxide surfaces and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streitz, F. H.; Mintmire, J. W.

    1994-10-01

    As most technologically important metals will form oxides readily, any complete study of adhesion at real metal surfaces must include the metal-oxide interface. The role of this ubiquitous oxide layer cannot be overlooked, as the adhesive properties of the oxide or oxide-metal system can be expected to differ profoundly from the adhesive properties of a bare metal surface. We report on the development of a computational method for molecular-dynamics simulations, which explicitly includes variable charge transfer between anions and cations. This method is found to be capable of describing the elastic properties, surface energies, and surface relaxation of crystalline metal oxides accurately. We discuss in detail results using this method for α-alumina and several of its low-index faces.

  15. Investigations of Transition Metal Oxide with the Perovskite Structure as Potential Multiferroics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Investigation of Transition Metal Oxides with the Perovskite Structure as Potential Multiferroics by Virginia Lea Miller and Steven C. Tidrow...Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-4621 October 2008 Investigation of Transition Metal Oxides with the Perovskite Structure as Potential...5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigation of Transition Metal Oxides with the Perovskite Structure as Potential Multiferroics 5c

  16. Oxidative stress in kidney transplantation: causes, consequences, and potential treatment.

    PubMed

    Nafar, Mohsen; Sahraei, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Samavat, Shiva; Vaziri, Nosartolah D

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative stress is a major mediator of adverse outcomes throughout the course of transplantation. Transplanted kidneys are prone to oxidative stress-mediated injury by pre-transplant and post-transplant conditions that cause reperfusion injury or imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants. Besides adversely affecting the allograft, oxidative stress and its constant companion, inflammation, cause cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and other disorders in transplant recipients. Presence and severity of oxidative stress can be assessed by various biomarkers produced from interaction of reactive oxygen species with lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, nitric oxide, glutathione, etc. In addition, expression and activities of redox-sensitive molecules such as antioxidant enzymes can serve as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Via activation of nuclear factor kappa B, oxidative stress promotes inflammation which, in turn, amplifies oxidative stress through reactive oxygen species generation by activated immune cells. Therefore, inflammation markers are indirect indicators of oxidative stress. Many treatment options have been evaluated in studies conducted at different stages of transplantation in humans and animals. These studies have provided useful strategies for use in donors or in organ preservation solutions. However, strategies tested for use in post-transplant phase have been largely inconclusive and controversial. A number of therapeutic options have been exclusively examined in animal models and only a few have been tested in humans. Most of the clinical investigations have been of short duration and have provided no insight into their impact on the long-term survival of transplant patients. Effective treatment of oxidative stress in transplant population remains elusive and awaits future explorations.

  17. Image analysis-derived metrics of histomorphological complexity predicts prognosis and treatment response in stage II-III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mezheyeuski, Artur; Hrynchyk, Ina; Karlberg, Mia; Portyanko, Anna; Egevad, Lars; Ragnhammar, Peter; Edler, David; Glimelius, Bengt; Östman, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of tumor histomorphology reflects underlying tumor biology impacting on natural course and response to treatment. This study presents a method of computer-aided analysis of tissue sections, relying on multifractal (MF) analyses, of cytokeratin-stained tumor sections which quantitatively evaluates of the morphological complexity of the tumor-stroma interface. This approach was applied to colon cancer collection, from an adjuvant treatment randomized study. Metrics obtained with the method acted as independent markers for natural course of the disease, and for benefit of adjuvant treatment. Comparative analyses demonstrated that MF metrics out-performed standard histomorphological features such as tumor grade, budding and configuration of invasive front. Notably, the MF analyses-derived “αmax” –metric constitutes the first response-predictive biomarker in stage II-III colon cancer showing significant interactions with treatment in analyses using a randomized trial-derived study population. Based on these results the method appears as an attractive and easy-to-implement tool for biomarker identification. PMID:27805003

  18. Equatorial π-stacking interactions in diruthenium (II,III) tetracarboxylate complexes containing extended π-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Natasha F.; Ronaldson, Michael; Stanley Cameron, T.; Wang, Ruiyao; Aquino, Manuel A. S.

    2013-11-01

    The synthesis of three new valent-averaged tetracarboxylatodiruthenium (II,III) complexes, [Ru2(1-naphthylacetate)4(H2O)2](PF6)ṡ4THF, 1ṡ4THF, [Ru2(2-naphthoate)4(THF)2](PF6)ṡ3THF, 2ṡ3THF, and [Ru2(coumarin-3-carboxylate)4(MeOH)2](PF6)ṡMeOHṡH2O, 3ṡMeOHṡH2O, was accomplished using a well documented carboxylate exchange reaction. All three complexes were thoroughly characterized using infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction. Due to the extended π-systems present, two of the complexes, 2ṡ3THF and 3ṡMeOHṡH2O, display extensive π-stacking in two dimensions, with similar interactions notably absent in 1ṡ4THF due to the perpendicular orientation of the naphthyl rings. Modest H-bonding is seen in complexes 1ṡ4THF and 3ṡMeOHṡH2O. As these types of complexes are noted secondary building units (SBU's) in the construction of metal-organic frameworks (MOF's), the significance of these interactions in stabilizing even larger, supramolecular structures, are noted.

  19. Cux1 Enables Interhemispheric Connections of Layer II/III Neurons by Regulating Kv1-Dependent Firing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tornos, Fernanda M; Briz, Carlos G; Weiss, Linnea A; Sebastián-Serrano, Alvaro; Ares, Saúl; Navarrete, Marta; Frangeul, Laura; Galazo, Maria; Jabaudon, Denis; Esteban, José A; Nieto, Marta

    2016-02-03

    Neuronal subtype-specific transcription factors (TFs) instruct key features of neuronal function and connectivity. Activity-dependent mechanisms also contribute to wiring and circuit assembly, but whether and how they relate to TF-directed neuronal differentiation is poorly investigated. Here we demonstrate that the TF Cux1 controls the formation of the layer II/III corpus callosum (CC) projections through the developmental transcriptional regulation of Kv1 voltage-dependent potassium channels and the resulting postnatal switch to a Kv1-dependent firing mode. Loss of Cux1 function led to a decrease in the expression of Kv1 transcripts, aberrant firing responses, and selective loss of CC contralateral innervation. Firing and innervation were rescued by re-expression of Kv1 or postnatal reactivation of Cux1. Knocking down Kv1 mimicked Cux1-mediated CC axonal loss. These findings reveal that activity-dependent processes are central bona fide components of neuronal TF-differentiation programs and establish the importance of intrinsic firing modes in circuit assembly within the neocortex.

  20. Accurate oxidation potentials of 40 benzene and biphenyl derivatives with heteroatom substituents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pu; Feinberg, Adam M; Guirado, Gonzalo; Farid, Samir; Dinnocenzo, Joseph P

    2014-10-03

    The redox equilibrium method was used to determine accurate oxidation potentials in acetonitrile for 40 heteroatom-substituted compounds. These include methoxy-substituted benzenes and biphenyls, aromatic amines, and substituted acetanilides. The redox equilibrium method allowed oxidation potentials to be determined with high precision (≤ ±6 mV). Whereas most of the relative oxidation potentials follow well-established chemical trends, interestingly, the oxidation potentials of substituted N-methylacetanilides were found to be higher than those of the corresponding acetanilides. Density functional theory calculations provided insight into the origin of these surprising results in terms of the preferred conformations of the amides versus their cation radicals.

  1. Natural Oxidant Demand Variability, Potential Controls, and Implications for in Situ, Oxidation-Based Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmer, A.; Cruz, S.; Dungan, B.; Holguin, F. O.; Ulery, A. L.; Hunter, B.; Carroll, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally occurring reduced species associated with subsurface materials can impose a significant natural oxidant demand (NOD), which is the bulk consumption of oxidants by soil water, minerals, and organic matter. Although injection of oxidants has been used for chemical transformation of organic contaminants, NOD represents a challenge for the in-situ delivery of oxidants as a remediation alternative. Co-injection of complexation agents with oxidants has been proposed to facilitate the delivery of oxidants for in situ chemical oxidation remediation of contaminated groundwater. This study investigates variability of NOD for different oxidants and sediments. The effect of the addition of various complexation agents, including EDTA, tween 80, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD), humic acid, and four generations of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, on the NOD was also examined. NOD was measured for a clay loam (collected from Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, AZ). Varying amounts of biosolids were mixed with subsamples of the clay loam to create three additional reference soils in order to study the effect of organic matter and other soil characteristics on the NOD. Bench-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the NOD for various oxidants, using the four soils, and replicated with and without various delivery agents. Measured NOD showed variability for each soil and oxidant composition. Additionally, significant differences were observed in NOD with the addition of delivery agents. The results support the elucidation of potential controls over NOD and have implications for in situ, oxidation-based remediation of contaminated groundwater.

  2. Reducing the Time From Diagnosis to Treatment of Patients With Stage II/III Rectal Cancer at a Large Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Lori A.; Jacobs, Ryan W.; Millas, Stefanos; Surabhi, Venkateswar; Mok, Henry; Jhaveri, Pavan; Kott, Marylee M.; Jackson, Lymesia; Rieber, Alyssa; Bhadkamkar, Nishin A.

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent therapy for stage II/III rectal cancer is necessarily complex. Current guidelines by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommend preoperative concurrent chemoradiation followed by resection and additional adjuvant chemotherapy. We used standard quality improvement methodology to implement a cost-effective intervention that reduced the time from diagnosis to treatment of patients with stage II/III rectal cancer by approximately 30% in a large public hospital in Houston, Texas. Implementation of the program resulted in a reduction in time from pathologic diagnosis to treatment of 29% overall, from 62 to 44 days. These gains were cost neutral and resulted from improvements in scheduling and coordination of care alone. Our results suggest that: (1) quality improvement methodology can be successfully applied to multidisciplinary cancer care, (2) effective interventions can be cost neutral, and (3) effective strategies can overcome complexities such as having multiple sites of care, high staff turnover, and resource limitations. PMID:26869658

  3. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival.

  4. Stage II/III rectal cancer with intermediate response to preoperative radiochemotherapy: Do we have indications for individual risk stratification?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is very heterogeneous. Pathologic complete response (pCR) is accompanied by a favorable outcome. However, most patients show incomplete response. The aim of this investigation was to find indications for risk stratification in the group of intermediate responders to RCT. Methods From a prospective database of 496 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, 107 patients with stage II/III cancers and intermediate response to preoperative 5-FU based RCT (ypT2/3 and TRG 2/3), treated within the German Rectal Cancer Trials were studied. Surgical treatment comprised curative (R0) total mesorectal excision (TME) in all cases. In 95 patients available for statistical analyses, residual transmural infiltration of the mesorectal compartment, nodal involvement and histolologic tumor grading were investigated for their prognostic impact on disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Residual tumor transgression into the mesorectal compartment (ypT3) did not influence DFS and OS rates (p = 0.619, p = 0.602, respectively). Nodal involvement after preoperative RCT (ypN1/2) turned out to be a valid prognostic factor with decreased DFS and OS (p = 0.0463, p = 0.0236, respectively). Persistent tumor infiltration of the mesorectum (ypT3) and histologic tumor grading of residual tumor cell clusters were strongly correlated with lymph node metastases after neoadjuvant treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions Advanced transmural tumor invasion after RCT does not affect prognosis when curative (R0) resection is achievable. Residual nodal status is the most important predictor of individual outcome in intermediate responders to preoperative RCT. Furthermore, ypT stage and tumor grading turn out to be additional auxiliary factors. Future clinical trials for risk-adapted adjuvant therapy should be based on a synopsis of clinicopathologic parameters. PMID:20388220

  5. Characterization of the thrombogenic potential of surface oxides on stainless steel for implant purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chun-Che; Shih, Chun-Ming; Su, Yea-Yang; Chang, Mau-Song; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2003-12-01

    Marketed stents are manufactured from various metals and passivated with different degrees of surface oxidation. The functional surface oxides on the degree of antithrombotic potential were explored through a canine femoral extracorporeal circuit model. Related properties of these oxide films were studied by open-circuit potential, current density detected at open-circuit potential, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Auger spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental evidences showed that blood clot weight after a 30-min follow-up was significantly lower for the stainless steel wire passivated with amorphous oxide (AO) compared to the wire passivated with polycrystalline oxide (PO) or commercial as-received wire coils (AS). Surface characterizations showed that a stable negative current density at open-circuit potential and a significant lower potential were found for the wire surface passivated with AO than for the surface passivated with PO. Time constant of AO is about 25 times larger than that of polycrystalline oxide. Significant difference in oxide grain sizes was found between PO and AO. Surface chemistries revealed by the AES and XPS spectra indicated the presence of a Cr- and oxygen-rich surface oxide for AO, and a Fe-rich and oxygen-lean surface oxide for PO. These remarkable characteristics of AO surface film might have a potential to provide for excellent antithrombotic characteristics for the 316L stainless steel stents.

  6. High expression of the stem cell marker nestin is an adverse prognostic factor in WHO grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Foong, Chan; Raisanen, Jack M.; Oliver, Dwight; Hiemenz, Matthew C.; Burns, Dennis K.; White, Charles L.; Whitworth, L. Anthony; Mickey, Bruce; Stegner, Martha; Habib, Amyn A.; Fink, Karen; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrating astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas of low to anaplastic grade (WHO grades II and III), in spite of being associated with a wide range of clinical outcomes, can be difficult to subclassify and grade by the current histopathologic criteria. Unlike oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas that can be identified by the 1p/19q codeletion and the more malignant glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas) that can be diagnosed solely based on objective features on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections, no such objective criteria exist for the subclassification of grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas (A+OA II-III). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of the stem cell marker nestin in adult A+OA II-III (n=50) using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted analysis on tissue microarrays. In addition, the correlation between nestin mRNA level and total survival was analyzed in the NCI Rembrandt database. The results showed that high nestin expression is a strong adverse prognostic factor for total survival (p=0.0004). The strength of the correlation was comparable to but independent of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH 1/2) mutation status. Histopathological grading and subclassification did not correlate significantly with outcome, although the interpretation of this finding is limited by the fact that grade III tumors were treated more aggressively than grade II tumors. These results suggest that nestin level and IDH 1/2 mutation status are strong prognostic features in A+OA II-III and possibly more helpful for treatment planning than routine histopathological variables such as oligodendroglial component (astrocytoma vs. oligoastrocytoma) and WHO grade (grade II vs. III). PMID:24519516

  7. High expression of the stem cell marker nestin is an adverse prognostic factor in WHO grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Hu, Tianshen; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Foong, Chan; Raisanen, Jack M; Oliver, Dwight; Hiemenz, Matthew C; Burns, Dennis K; White, Charles L; Whitworth, L Anthony; Mickey, Bruce; Stegner, Martha; Habib, Amyn A; Fink, Karen; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M

    2014-03-01

    Infiltrating astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas of low to anaplastic grade (WHO grades II and III), in spite of being associated with a wide range of clinical outcomes, can be difficult to subclassify and grade by the current histopathologic criteria. Unlike oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas that can be identified by the 1p/19q codeletion and the more malignant glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas) that can be diagnosed solely based on objective features on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections, no such objective criteria exist for the subclassification of grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas (A+OA II-III). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of the stem cell marker nestin in adult A+OA II-III (n = 50) using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted analysis on tissue microarrays. In addition, the correlation between nestin mRNA level and total survival was analyzed in the NCI Rembrandt database. The results showed that high nestin expression is a strong adverse prognostic factor for total survival (p = 0.0004). The strength of the correlation was comparable to but independent of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH 1/2) mutation status. Histopathological grading and subclassification did not correlate significantly with outcome, although the interpretation of this finding is limited by the fact that grade III tumors were treated more aggressively than grade II tumors. These results suggest that nestin level and IDH 1/2 mutation status are strong prognostic features in A+OA II-III and possibly more helpful for treatment planning than routine histopathological variables such as oligodendroglial component (astrocytoma vs. oligoastrocytoma) and WHO grade (grade II vs. III).

  8. Changes in the BDNF-immunopositive cell population of neocortical layers I and II/III after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongwon; Kang, Sung Goo; Kam, Kyung-Yoon

    2015-04-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family and is widely distributed in the central nervous system, including the cerebral cortex. BDNF plays an important role in normal neural development, survival of existing neurons, and activity-dependent neuroplasticity. BDNF can also be neuroprotective and evoke neurogenesis in certain pathological conditions, such as cerebral ischemia. Neocortical layer I is an important region that can integrate feedforward and feedback information from other cortical areas and subcortical regions. In addition, it has recently been proposed as a possible source of neuronal progenitor cells after ischemia. Therefore, we investigated changes in the BDNF-immunoreactive cell population of neocortical layers I and II/III after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced cerebral ischemia in rats. In unaffected condition, the number of BDNF(+) cells in layer I was significantly less than in layer II/III in the cingulate cortex and in the motor and sensory areas. The increase in the number of BDNF(+) cells in layer I 8 days after MCAO was more remarkable than layer II/III, in all regions except the area of cingulate cortex farthest from the infarct core. Only BDNF(+)-Ox-42(+) cells showed a tendency to increase consistently toward the infarct core in both layers I and II/III, implying a major source of BDNF for response to ischemic injury. The present study suggests that some beneficial effects during recovery from ischemic injury, such as increased supportive microglia/macrophages, occur owing to a sensitive response of BDNF in layer I.

  9. Monoterpenol Oxidative Metabolism: Role in Plant Adaptation and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ilc, Tina; Parage, Claire; Boachon, Benoît; Navrot, Nicolas; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Plants use monoterpenols as precursors for the production of functionally and structurally diverse molecules, which are key players in interactions with other organisms such as pollinators, flower visitors, herbivores, fungal, or microbial pathogens. For humans, many of these monoterpenol derivatives are economically important because of their pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, flavor, or fragrance applications. The biosynthesis of these derivatives is to a large extent catalyzed by enzymes from the cytochrome P450 superfamily. Here we review the knowledge on monoterpenol oxidative metabolism in plants with special focus on recent elucidations of oxidation steps leading to diverse linalool and geraniol derivatives. We evaluate the common features between oxidation pathways of these two monoterpenols, such as involvement of the CYP76 family, and highlight the differences. Finally, we discuss the missing steps and other open questions in the biosynthesis of oxygenated monoterpenol derivatives. PMID:27200002

  10. Clinical significance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene expression in stage II/III gastric cancer with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akio; Oshima, Takashi; Yoshihara, Kazue; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Aoyama, Toru; Suganuma, Nobuyasu; Yamamoto, Naoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Rino, Yasushi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Imada, Toshio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Overall survival remains unsatisfactory in stage II/III gastric cancer, even after curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) is associated with the proliferation of cancer cells. The present study therefore investigated the association of PDGFR-β gene expression with patient outcome in 134 stage II/III gastric cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. Relative PDGFR-β gene expression was measured in surgical cancer tissue and adjacent normal mucosa specimens by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The PDGFR-β gene expression levels were found to be significantly higher in the cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal mucosa. A high level of PDGFR-β gene expression was associated with a significantly poorer 5-year overall survival rate compared with a low level of PDGFR-β expression. Upon multivariate analysis, PDGFR-β gene expression was found to be an independent predictor of survival. Overall, the study indicates that PDGFR-β overexpression in gastric cancer tissues is a useful independent predictor of outcome in patients with stage II/III gastric cancer who receive adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

  11. Oxidative Stress Status in Childhood Obesity: A Potential Risk Predictor

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Elif; Özer, Ömer Faruk; Erek, Aybala Toprak; Erman, Hayriye; Torun, Emel; Ayhan, Sıddıka Kesgin; Caglar, Hifa Gülru; Selek, Sahbettin; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity characterized by excessive fat in the body is one of the most serious health problems worldwide due to the social, medical, and physiological complications. Obesity and associated diseases are triggering factors for oxidative stress and inflammation. The aim of this study was to explore the possible association between childhood obesity and inflammatory and oxidative status. Material/Methods Thirty-seven obese children and 37 healthy controls selected from among children admitted to BLIND University Paediatrics Department were included in the study. Anthropometric measurements were performed using standard methods. Glucose, lipid parameters, CRP, insulin, total oxidant status (TOS), total anti-oxidant status (TAS) levels, and total thiol levels (TTL) were measured in serum. HOMA index (HOMA-IR) were calculated. The differences between the groups were evaluated statistically using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results Body mass index was significantly higher in the obese group (median: 28.31(p<0.001). Glucose metabolism, insulin, and HOMA-IR levels were significantly higher in the obese group (both p<0.001). Total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in the obese group (p<0.001). TAS (med: 2.5 μmol Trolox eq/L (1.7–3.3)) and TOS (med: 49.1 μmol H2O2 eq/L (34.5–78.8)) levels and TTL (med: 0.22 mmol/L (0.16–0.26)) were significantly higher in the obese group (p=0.001). CRP levels showed positive correlation with TOS and negative correlation with TTL levels (p=0.005, r=0.473; p=0.01, r=−0.417; respectively). TTL levels exhibited negative correlation with TOS levels (p=0.03, r=−0.347). Conclusions In conclusion, obese children were exposed to more oxidative burden than children with normal weight. Increased systemic oxidative stress induced by childhood obesity can cause development of obesity-related complications and diseases. Widely focussed studies are required on the use

  12. Paclitaxel injection concentrate for nanodispersion versus nab-paclitaxel in women with metastatic breast cancer: a multicenter, randomized, comparative phase II/III study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Minish M; Gupte, Smita U; Patil, Shekhar G; Pathak, Anand B; Deshmukh, Chetan D; Bhatt, Niraj; Haritha, Chiramana; Govind Babu, K; Bondarde, Shailesh A; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Bajpai, Jyoti; Kumar, Ravi; Bakshi, Ashish V; Bhattacharya, Gouri Sankar; Patil, Poonam; Subramanian, Sundaram; Vaid, Ashok K; Desai, Chirag J; Khopade, Ajay; Chimote, Geetanjali; Bapsy, Poonamalle P; Bhowmik, Shravanti

    2016-02-01

    Paclitaxel is widely used in the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Formulations of paclitaxel contain surfactants and solvents or albumin derived from human blood. The use of co-solvents such as polyoxyethylated castor oil is thought to contribute to toxicity profile and hypersensitivity reactions as well as leaching of plasticizers from polyvinyl chloride bags and infusion sets. Currently, nab-paclitaxel, an albumin-bound paclitaxel in nanometer range continues to be the preferred taxane formulation used in clinic. This study (CTRI/2010/091/001116) investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a polyoxyethylated castor oil- and albumin-free formulation of paclitaxel [paclitaxel injection concentrate for nanodispersion (PICN)] compared with nab-paclitaxel in women with refractory MBC. The current study was a multicenter, open-label, parallel-group, randomized, comparative phase II/III trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of PICN (260 mg/m(2) [n = 64] and 295 mg/m(2) [n = 58] every 3 weeks) compared with nab-paclitaxel (260 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks [n = 58]) in women 18 and 70 years old with confirmed MBC. Overall response rate (ORR) was assessed with imaging every 2 cycles. An independent analysis of radiologic data was performed for evaluable patients. Progression-free survival (PFS) was a secondary efficacy measure. Independent radiologist-assessed ORRs in the evaluable population of women aged ≥70 years were 35, 49, and 43 % in the PICN 260 mg/m(2), PICN 295 mg/m(2), and nab-paclitaxel 260 mg/m(2) arms, respectively. Median PFS in the evaluable population was 23, 35, and 34 weeks in the PICN 260 mg/m(2), PICN 295 mg/m(2), and nab-paclitaxel 260 mg/m(2) arms, respectively. Adverse events occurred in similar proportions of patients across treatment arms. Hypersensitivity reactions were not frequently observed with the clinical use of PICN across the treatment cohorts. In women with metastatic breast cancer, PICN at 260 and 295 mg/m(2

  13. Cobalt(II/III) redox electrolyte in ZnO nanowire-based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiandong; Hao, Yan; Cabot, Andreu; Johansson, Erik M J; Boschloo, Gerrit; Hagfeldt, Anders

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we explore the use of cobalt complex redox shuttles in dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) based on ZnO nanowires (NWs). Arrays of vertically aligned ZnO NWs produced by a low-cost hydrothermal method are used to fabricate DSCs with [Co(bpy)3](2+/3+) as electrolyte. A direct comparison of the performance of [Co(bpy)3](2+/3+)-based ZnO DSC with I(-)/I3(-)-based ones demonstrates the higher suitability of the cobalt complex, both in terms of a larger open circuit voltage (VOC) and a higher photocurrent. The [Co(bpy)3](2+/3+) electrolyte results in VOC enhancements above 200 mV. This VOC increase is associated to the better match between the cobalt complex redox potential and the oxidation potential of the dye. The incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) enhancement is attributed to a less competitive visible light absorption of the cobalt redox couple. Thus the present study opens new opportunities to improve energy conversion efficiency in ZnO-based DSCs.

  14. Global perspective on the oxidative potential of airborne particulate matter: a synthesis of research findings.

    PubMed

    Saffari, Arian; Daher, Nancy; Shafer, Martin M; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-07-01

    An emerging hypothesis in the field of air pollution is that oxidative stress is one of the important pathways leading to adverse health effects of airborne particulate matter (PM). To advance our understanding of sources and chemical elements contributing to aerosol oxidative potential and provide global comparative data, we report here on the biological oxidative potential associated with size-segregated airborne PM in different urban areas of the world, measured by a biological (cell-based) reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay. Our synthesis indicates a generally greater intrinsic PM oxidative potential as well as higher levels of exposure to redox-active PM in developing areas of the world. Moreover, on the basis of our observations, smaller size fractions are generally associated with higher intrinsic ROS activity compared with larger PM size fractions. Another important outcome of our study is the identification of major species and sources that are associated with ROS activity. Water-soluble transition metals (e.g., Fe, Ni, Cu, Cr, Mn, Zn and V) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) showed consistent correlations with the oxidative potential of airborne PM across different urban areas and size ranges. The major PM sources associated with these chemical species include residual/fuel oil combustion, traffic emissions, and secondary organic aerosol formation, indicating that these sources are major drivers of PM-induced oxidative potential. Moreover, comparison of ROS activity levels across different seasons indicated that photochemical aging increases the intrinsic oxidative potential of airborne PM.

  15. Interatomic potentials for mixed oxide and advanced nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Walle, Axel van de; Jeon, Byoungseon; Groenbech-Jensen, Niels

    2011-03-01

    We extend our recently developed interatomic potentials for UO{sub 2} to the fuel system (U,Pu,Np)O{sub 2}. We do so by fitting against an extensive database of ab initio results as well as to experimental measurements. The applicability of these interactions to a variety of mixed environments beyond the fitting domain is also assessed. The employed formalism makes these potentials applicable across all interatomic distances without the need for any ambiguous splining to the well-established short-range Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark universal pair potential. We therefore expect these to be reliable potentials for carrying out damage simulations (and molecular dynamics simulations in general) in nuclear fuels of varying compositions for all relevant atomic collision energies.

  16. Oxidation-reduction potential of semen: what is its role in the treatment of male infertility?

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ashok; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Bjugstad, Kimberly B.; Cho, Chak-Lam

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of male infertility relies largely on conventional semen analysis, and its interpretation has a profound influence on subsequent management of patients. Despite poor correlation between conventional semen parameters and male fertility potential, inclusion of advanced semen quality tests to routine male infertility workup algorithms has not been widely accepted. Oxidative stress is one of the major mediators in various etiologies of male infertility; it has deleterious effects on spermatozoa, including DNA damage. Alleviation of oxidative stress constitutes a potential treatment strategy for male infertility. Measurement of seminal oxidative stress is of crucial role in the identification and monitoring of patients who may benefit from treatments. Various tests including reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) assay or malondialdehyde (MDA) assay used by different laboratories have their own drawbacks. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) is a measure of overall balance between oxidants and antioxidants, providing a comprehensive measure of oxidative stress. The MiOXSYS™ System is a novel technology based on a galvanostatic measure of electrons; it presents static ORP (sORP) measures with static referring to the passive or current state of activity between oxidants and antioxidants. Preliminary studies have correlated sORP to poor semen qualities. It is potentially useful in prognostication of assisted reproductive techniques outcomes, screening of antioxidants either in vivo or during IVF cycles, identification of infertile men who may benefit from treatment of oxidative stress, and monitoring of treatment success. The simplified laboratory test requiring a small amount of semen would facilitate clinical application and research in the field. In this paper, we discuss the measurement of ORP by the MiOXSYS System as a real-time assessment of seminal oxidative stress, and argue that it is a potential valuable clinical test

  17. Hydroxyethylated graphene oxide as potential carriers for methotrexate delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Libo; Suo, Siqingaowa; Luo, Dan; Jia, Hongying; Sha, Yinlin; Liu, Yang

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we presented a simple approach to prepare hydroxyethylated graphene oxide (HE-GO) with high water solubility and physiological stability. The successful synthesis of HE-GO was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The loading of anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) onto this nanocarrier (MTX/HE-GO) was investigated. The results of in vitro drug release experiment showed that the rate of MTX release from MTX/HE-GO was pH dependent. Moreover, cell viability assay demonstrated that HE-GO loaded with MTX exhibits higher anticancer activity against human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line than non-vehicle MTX.

  18. OXIDATIVE INACTIVATION OF THE PROTEASOME IN RPE: A POTENTIAL LINK BETWEEN OXIDATIVE STRESS AND UPREGULATION OF IL-8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are implicated in the pathogenesis of several age-related diseases. Stress-induced overproduction of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), is one of the early events of inflammation. The objective of this study was to determine potential links betwee...

  19. Oxidant production from source-oriented particulate matter - Part 1: Oxidative potential using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, J. G.; Richards-Henderson, N. K.; Bein, K. J.; McFall, A. S.; Wexler, A. S.; Anastasio, C.

    2014-09-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence supports the hypothesis that health effects from inhalation of ambient particulate matter (PM) are governed by more than just the mass of PM inhaled. Both specific chemical components and sources have been identified as important contributors to mortality and hospital admissions, even when these endpoints are unrelated to PM mass. Sources may cause adverse health effects via their ability to produce reactive oxygen species, possibly due to the transition metal content of the PM. Our goal is to quantify the oxidative potential of ambient particle sources collected during two seasons in Fresno, CA using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. We collected PM from different sources or source combinations into different ChemVol (CV) samplers in real time using a novel source-oriented sampling technique based on single particle mass spectrometry. We segregated the particles from each source-oriented mixture into two size fractions - ultrafine (Dp ≤ 0.17 μm) and submicron fine (0.17 μm ≤ Dp ≤ 1.0 μm) - and measured metals and the rate of DTT loss in each PM extract. We find that the mass-normalized oxidative potential of different sources varies by up to a actor of 8 and that submicron fine PM typically has a larger mass-normalized oxidative potential than ultrafine PM from the same source. Vehicular Emissions, Regional Source Mix, Commute Hours, Daytime Mixed Layer and Nighttime Inversion sources exhibit the highest mass-normalized oxidative potential. When we apportion the volume-normalized oxidative potential, which also accounts for the source's prevalence, cooking sources account for 18-29% of the total DTT loss while mobile (traffic) sources account for 16-28%. When we apportion DTT activity for total PM sampled to specific chemical compounds, soluble copper accounts for roughly 50% of total air-volume-normalized oxidative potential, soluble manganese accounts for 20%, and other unknown species, likely including quinones and other

  20. Structural, EPR, and Mössbauer characterization of (μ-alkoxo)(μ-carboxylato)diiron(II,III) model complexes for the active sites of mixed-valent diiron enzymes.

    PubMed

    Li, Feifei; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Dong, Yanhong; Kauffmann, Karl; Bominaar, Emile L; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2012-03-05

    To obtain structural and spectroscopic models for the diiron(II,III) centers in the active sites of diiron enzymes, the (μ-alkoxo)(μ-carboxylato)diiron(II,III) complexes [Fe(II)Fe(III)(N-Et-HPTB)(O(2)CPh)(NCCH(3))(2)](ClO(4))(3) (1) and [Fe(II)Fe(III)(N-Et-HPTB)(O(2)CPh)(Cl)(HOCH(3))](ClO(4))(2) (2) (N-Et-HPTB = N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-(1-ethyl-benzimidazolylmethyl))-2-hydroxy-1,3-diaminopropane) have been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV-visible absorption, EPR, and Mössbauer spectroscopies. Fe1-Fe2 separations are 3.60 and 3.63 Å, and Fe1-O1-Fe2 bond angles are 128.0° and 129.4° for 1 and 2, respectively. Mössbauer and EPR studies of 1 show that the Fe(III) (S(A) = 5/2) and Fe(II) (S(B) = 2) sites are antiferromagnetically coupled to yield a ground state with S = 1/2 (g= 1.75, 1.88, 1.96); Mössbauer analysis of solid 1 yields J = 22.5 ± 2 cm(-1) for the exchange coupling constant (H = JS(A)·S(B) convention). In addition to the S = 1/2 ground-state spectrum of 1, the EPR signal for the S = 3/2 excited state of the spin ladder can also be observed, the first time such a signal has been detected for an antiferromagnetically coupled diiron(II,III) complex. The anisotropy of the (57)Fe magnetic hyperfine interactions at the Fe(III) site is larger than normally observed in mononuclear complexes and arises from admixing S > 1/2 excited states into the S = 1/2 ground state by zero-field splittings at the two Fe sites. Analysis of the "D/J" mixing has allowed us to extract the zero-field splitting parameters, local g values, and magnetic hyperfine structural parameters for the individual Fe sites. The methodology developed and followed in this analysis is presented in detail. The spin Hamiltonian parameters of 1 are related to the molecular structure with the help of DFT calculations. Contrary to what was assumed in previous studies, our analysis demonstrates that the deviations of the g values from the free electron value (g = 2) for the

  1. Predicting Individualized Postoperative Survival for Stage II/III Colon Cancer Using a Mobile Application Derived from the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Emmanuel; Attwood, Kristopher; Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Al-Sukhni, Eisar; Boland, Patrick; Nurkin, Steven

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prediction calculators estimate postoperative survival and assist the decision-making process for adjuvant treatment. The objective of this study was to create a postoperative overall survival (OS) calculator for patients with stage II/III colon cancer. Factors that influence OS, including comorbidity and postoperative variables, were included. STUDY DESIGN The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with stage II/III colon cancer, diagnosed between 2004 and 2006, who had surgical resection. Patients were randomly divided to a testing (nt) cohort comprising 80% of the dataset and a validation (nv) cohort comprising 20%. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression of nt was performed to identify factors associated with 5-year OS. These were used to build a prediction model. The performance was assessed using the nv cohort and translated into mobile software. RESULTS A total of 129,040 patients had surgery. After exclusion of patients with carcinoma in situ, non-adenocarcinoma histology, more than 1 malignancy, stage I or IV disease, or missing data, 34,176 patients were used in the development of the calculator. Independent predictors of OS included patient-specific characteristics, pathologic factors, and treatment options, including type of surgery and adjuvant therapy. Length of postoperative stay and unplanned readmission rates were also incorporated as surrogates for postoperative complications (1-day increase in postoperative stay, hazard ratio [HR] 1.019, 95% CI 1.018 to 1.021, p < 0.001; unplanned readmission vs no readmission HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.45, p < 0.001). Predicted and actual 5-year OS rates were compared in the nv cohort with 5-year area under the curve of 0.77. CONCLUSIONS An individualized, postoperative OS calculator application was developed for patients with stage II/III colon cancer. This prediction model uses nationwide data, culminating in a highly comprehensive, clinically useful tool. PMID:26922599

  2. Near infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis for monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I + II + III supernatant in human albumin separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Can; Wang, Fei; Zang, Lixuan; Zang, Hengchang; Alcalà, Manel; Nie, Lei; Wang, Mingyu; Li, Lian

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, as a powerful process analytical tool, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely applied in process monitoring. In present work, NIRS combined with multivariate analysis was used to monitor the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I + II + III (FI + II + III) supernatant in human albumin (HA) separation to achieve qualitative and quantitative monitoring at the same time and assure the product's quality. First, a qualitative model was established by using principal component analysis (PCA) with 6 of 8 normal batches samples, and evaluated by the remaining 2 normal batches and 3 abnormal batches. The results showed that the first principal component (PC1) score chart could be successfully used for fault detection and diagnosis. Then, two quantitative models were built with 6 of 8 normal batches to determine the content of the total protein (TP) and HA separately by using partial least squares regression (PLS-R) strategy, and the models were validated by 2 remaining normal batches. The determination coefficient of validation (Rp2), root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance deviation (RPD) were 0.975, 0.501 g/L, 0.465 g/L and 5.57 for TP, and 0.969, 0.530 g/L, 0.341 g/L and 5.47 for HA, respectively. The results showed that the established models could give a rapid and accurate measurement of the content of TP and HA. The results of this study indicated that NIRS is an effective tool and could be successfully used for qualitative and quantitative monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of FI + II + III supernatant simultaneously. This research has significant reference value for assuring the quality and improving the recovery ratio of HA in industrialization scale by using NIRS.

  3. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Stage II-III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: JCOG Trial (JCOG 9906)

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Ken; Muro, Kei; Minashi, Keiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Boku, Narikazu; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Komatsu, Yoshito; Miyata, Yoshinori; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: In this Phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for Stage II-III esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Patients and Methods: Patients with clinical Stage II-III (T1N1M0 or T2-3N0-1M0) thoracic ESCC were enrolled between April 2000 and March 2002. Chemotherapy comprised two courses of protracted infusion of 5-FU (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and 8-12, and 2-h infusion of CDDP (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8; this regimen was repeated every 5 weeks. Concurrent radiotherapy involved 60-Gy irradiation (30 fractions) for 8 weeks with a 2-week break. Responders received two courses of 5-FU (800 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and CDDP (80 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1. Final analysis was conducted in March 2007. Survival and late toxicities were monitored for 5 years. Results: The characteristics of the 76 patients enrolled were as follows: median age, 61 years; male/female, 68/8; performance status 0/1, 59/17 patients; Stage IIA/IIB/III, 26/12/38 patients. Of the 74 eligible patients, 46 (62.2%) achieved complete response. Median survival time was 29 months, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 44.7% and 36.8%, respectively. Acute toxicities included Grade 3/4 esophagitis (17%), nausea (17%), hyponatremia (16%), and infection without neutropenia (12%). Late toxicities comprised Grade 3/4 esophagitis (13%), pericardial (16%) and pleural (9%) effusion, and radiation pneumonitis (4%), causing 4 deaths. Conclusions: CRT is effective for Stage II-III ESCC with manageable acute toxicities and can provide a nonsurgical treatment option. However, further improvement is required for reduction in late toxicity.

  4. Near infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis for monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I+II+III supernatant in human albumin separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Can; Wang, Fei; Zang, Lixuan; Zang, Hengchang; Alcalà, Manel; Nie, Lei; Wang, Mingyu; Li, Lian

    2017-03-15

    Nowadays, as a powerful process analytical tool, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely applied in process monitoring. In present work, NIRS combined with multivariate analysis was used to monitor the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I+II+III (FI+II+III) supernatant in human albumin (HA) separation to achieve qualitative and quantitative monitoring at the same time and assure the product's quality. First, a qualitative model was established by using principal component analysis (PCA) with 6 of 8 normal batches samples, and evaluated by the remaining 2 normal batches and 3 abnormal batches. The results showed that the first principal component (PC1) score chart could be successfully used for fault detection and diagnosis. Then, two quantitative models were built with 6 of 8 normal batches to determine the content of the total protein (TP) and HA separately by using partial least squares regression (PLS-R) strategy, and the models were validated by 2 remaining normal batches. The determination coefficient of validation (Rp(2)), root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance deviation (RPD) were 0.975, 0.501g/L, 0.465g/L and 5.57 for TP, and 0.969, 0.530g/L, 0.341g/L and 5.47 for HA, respectively. The results showed that the established models could give a rapid and accurate measurement of the content of TP and HA. The results of this study indicated that NIRS is an effective tool and could be successfully used for qualitative and quantitative monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of FI+II+III supernatant simultaneously. This research has significant reference value for assuring the quality and improving the recovery ratio of HA in industrialization scale by using NIRS.

  5. Identifying Criegee Intermediates As Potential Oxidants In The Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelli, A.; Hens, K.; Tatum Ernest, C.; Martinez, M.; Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Paasonen, P.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Elste, T.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Kubistin, D.; Phillips, G. J.; Williams, J.; Vereecken, L.; Lelieveld, J.; Harder, H.

    2015-12-01

    Criegee intermediates (CI) are formed during the ozonolysis of unsaturated compounds and have been intensively studied in the last few years due to their possible role as oxidants in the troposphere. Stabilised CI (SCI) are now known to react very rapidly, k(298 K) = 10-12 to 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, with a large number of trace gases (SO2, NO2, organic acids, water dimers). An assessment of their effective oxidative capacity remain challenging as, CI chemistry is complex, it spans a large range of rate coefficients for different SCI conformers reacting with water dimers and trace gases, and in addition, no reliable measurement technique able to detect ambient SCI concentrations is currently available. In this study, we examine the extensive dataset from the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 and the HOPE 2012 field campaigns, aided by literature data, to estimate the abundance of SCI in the lower troposphere. The budget of SCI is analyzed using four different approaches: 1) based on an observed yet unexplained H2SO4 production; 2) from the measured concentrations of unsaturated volatile organic compounds (VOC); 3) from OH reactivity measurements; 4) from the unexplained production rate of OH. A SCI concentration range between 5 x 103 and 2 x 106 molecule cm-3 is calculated for the two environments. The weighted mean estimate of the SCI concentration over the boreal forest of ~ 5 x 104 molecules cm-3 implies a significant impact on the conversion of SO2 into H2SO4. In addition, we present measurements obtained using our inlet pre-injector laser-induced fluorescence assay by gas expansion technique (IPI-LIF-FAGE) for the above-mentioned campaigns. A recent laboratory study performed with the same instrumental setup showed that the IPI-LIF-FAGE system is sensitive to the detection of the OH formed from unimolecular decomposition of SCI. In order to investigate the applicability of the laboratory findings to the ambient data, measurement of the background OH (OHbg), the signal

  6. A decacobalt(ii) cluster with triple-sandwich structure obtained by partial reductive hydrolysis of a pentacobalt(ii/iii) Weakley-type polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yan; Clemente-Juan, Juan M; Fierro, José L G; Giménez-Saiz, Carlos; Coronado, Eugenio

    2016-11-03

    Partial reductive hydrolysis of a penta-Co(II/III) cluster [Co(H2O)2(Co(III)W9O34)(PW9O34)](12-) (1) leads to the formation of [Co2{Co3(H2O)(Co(OH)2W7O26)(PW9O34)}2](22-) (2). This polyoxometalate is made up of two capping [PW9O34](9-) units and two bridging [W7O26](10-) units that assemble to encapsulate a novel deca-Co(II) cluster core comprising octahedral and tetrahedral Co(II) ions.

  7. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  8. Potentially toxic element release by fenton oxidation of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J P; Asaadi, M; Clarke, B; Ouki, S

    2006-01-01

    The presence, in sewage sludge, of excess levels of the potentially toxic elements (PTE) copper, zinc, chromium, cadmium, nickel, lead and mercury, could impact on our ability to recycle these residues in the future. Far stricter limits on the levels of PTEs are likely in proposed legislation. A method involving the dosing of Fenton's reagent, a mixture of ferrous iron and hydrogen peroxide, under acidic conditions was evaluated for its potential to reduce metal levels. The [Fe]:[H2O2] (w/w) ratio was found to give a good indication of the percentage copper and zinc elution obtainable. Sites with no iron dosing as part of wastewater treatment required extra iron to be added in order to initiate the Fenton's reaction. A significant reduction, in excess of 70%, of the copper and zinc was eluted from both raw primary and activated sludge solid fractions. Cadmium and nickel could be reduced to below detection limits but elution of mercury, lead and chromium was less than 40%. The iron catalyst concentration was found to be a crucial parameter. This process has the potential to reduce the heavy metal content of the sludge and allow the recycling of sludge to continue in a sustainable manner.

  9. Thermodynamics of axial substitution and kinetics of reactions with amino acids for the paddlewheel complex tetrakis(acetato)chloridodiruthenium(II,III).

    PubMed

    Santos, Rodrigo L S R; van Eldik, Rudi; de Oliveira Silva, Denise

    2012-06-18

    The known paddlewheel, tetrakis(acetato)chloridodiruthenium(II,III), offers a versatile synthetic route to a novel class of antitumor diruthenium(II,III) metallo drugs, where the equatorial ligands are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory carboxylates. This complex was studied here as a soluble starting prototype model for antitumor analogues to elucidate the reactivity of the [Ru(2)(CH(3)COO)(4)](+) framework. Thermodynamic studies on equilibration reactions for axial substitution of water by chloride and kinetic studies on reactions of the diaqua complexes with the amino acids glycine, cysteine, histidine, and tryptophan were performed. The standard thermodynamic reaction parameters ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔV° were determined and showed that both of the sequential axial substitution reactions are enthalpy driven. Kinetic rate laws and rate constants were determined for the axial substitution reactions of coordinated water by the amino acids that gave the corresponding aqua(amino acid)-Ru(2) substituted species. The results revealed that the [Ru(2)(CH(3)COO)(4)](+) paddlewheel framework remained stable during the axial ligand substitution reactions and was also mostly preserved in the presence of the amino acids.

  10. Attenuation of Combined Nickel(II) Oxide and Manganese(II, III) Oxide Nanoparticles’ Adverse Effects with a Complex of Bioprotectors

    PubMed Central

    Minigalieva, Ilzira A.; Katsnelson, Boris A.; Privalova, Larisa I.; Sutunkova, Marina P.; Gurvich, Vladimir B.; Shur, Vladimir Y.; Shishkina, Ekaterina V.; Valamina, Irene E.; Makeyev, Oleg H.; Panov, Vladimir G.; Varaksin, Anatoly N.; Grigoryeva, Ekaterina V.; Meshtcheryakova, Ekaterina Y.

    2015-01-01

    Stable suspensions of NiO and Mn3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) with a mean (±s.d.) diameter of 16.7 ± 8.2 and 18.4 ± 5.4 nm, respectively, purposefully prepared by laser ablation of 99.99% pure nickel or manganese in de-ionized water, were repeatedly injected intraperitoneally (IP) to rats at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg 3 times a week up to 18 injections, either alone or in combination. A group of rats was injected with this combination with the background oral administration of a “bio-protective complex” (BPC) comprising pectin, vitamins A, C, E, glutamate, glycine, N-acetylcysteine, selenium, iodide and omega-3 PUFA, this composition having been chosen based on mechanistic considerations and previous experience. After the termination of injections, many functional and biochemical indices and histopathological features (with morphometric assessment) of the liver, spleen, kidneys and brain were evaluated for signs of toxicity. The Ni and Mn content of these organs was measured with the help of the atomic emission and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. We obtained blood leukocytes for performing the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) test. Although both metallic NPs proved adversely bio-active in many respects considered in this study, Mn3O4-NPs were somewhat more noxious than NiO-NPs as concerns most of the non-specific toxicity manifestations and they induced more marked damage to neurons in the striatum and the hippocampus, which may be considered an experimental correlate of the manganese-induced Parkinsonism. The comparative solubility of the Mn3O4-NPs and NiO-NPs in a biological medium is discussed as one of the factors underlying the difference in their toxicokinetics and toxicities. The BPC has attenuated both the organ-systemic toxicity and the genotoxicity of Mn3O4-NPs in combination with NiO-NPs. PMID:26393577

  11. Plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on γTiAl alloy for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lara Rodriguez, L; Sundaram, P A; Rosim-Fachini, E; Padovani, A M; Diffoot-Carlo, N

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to enhance the potential of gamma titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy as a biomaterial, its surface characteristics were successfully modified using a calcium and phosphorous rich electrolyte through the application of plasma electrolytic oxidation. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize the morphology and topographical features of the resulting coating while X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to determine the surface oxide composition. The mechanical properties of the surface coating were characterized by nanoindentation studies. The results observed show the formation of a submicron scale porous structure and a concomitant increase in the surface roughness. The surface oxide was composed of rutile and anatase phases. Composition gradients of Ca and P were also present which can possibly enhance the biomaterial application potential of this treated surface. Nanoindentation measurements indicate the formation of a fairly compact oxide during the process.

  12. Potential Impacts of two SO2 oxidation pathways on regional sulfate concentrations: acqueous-hase oxidation by NO2 and gas-phase oxidation by Stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examine the potential impacts of two additional sulfate production pathways using the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system. First we evaluate the impact of the aqueous-phase oxidation of S(IV) by nitrogen dioxide using two published rate constants, differing by 1-2...

  13. The effect of coal bed dewatering and partial oxidation on biogenic methane potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Harris, Steve H.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Orem, William H.; Clark, Arthur C.; Corum, Margo D.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Coal formation dewatering at a site in the Powder River Basin was associated with enhanced potential for secondary biogenic methane determined by using a bioassay. We hypothesized that dewatering can stimulate microbial activity and increase the bioavailability of coal. We analyzed one dewatered and two water-saturated coals to examine possible ways in which dewatering influences coal bed natural gas biogenesis by looking at differences with respect to the native coal microbial community, coal-methane organic intermediates, and residual coal oxidation potential. Microbial biomass did not increase in response to dewatering. Small Subunit rRNA sequences retrieved from all coals sampled represented members from genera known to be aerobic, anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic. A Bray Curtis similarity analysis indicated that the microbial communities in water-saturated coals were more similar to each other than to the dewatered coal, suggesting an effect of dewatering. There was a higher incidence of long chain and volatile fatty acid intermediates in incubations of the dewatered coal compared to the water-saturated coals, and this could either be due to differences in microbial enzymatic activities or to chemical oxidation of the coal associated with O2 exposure. Dilute H2O2 treatment of two fractions of structural coal (kerogen and bitumen + kerogen) was used as a proxy for chemical oxidation by O2. The dewatered coal had a low residual oxidation potential compared to the water-saturated coals. Oxidation with 5% H2O2 did increase the bioavailability of structural coal, and the increase in residual oxidation potential in the water saturated coals was approximately equivalent to the higher methanogenic potential measured in the dewatered coal. Evidence from this study supports the idea that coal bed dewatering could stimulate biogenic methanogenesis through partial oxidation of the structural organics in coal once anaerobic conditions are restored.

  14. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra”

    PubMed Central

    Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Gallois, Nicolas; Schouten, Stefan; Stein, Lisa Y.; Prosser, James I.; Nicol, Graeme W.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganisms in soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOB and dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation under acidic conditions has been a long-standing paradox. While high rates of ammonia oxidation are frequently measured in acid soils, cultivated ammonia oxidizers grew only at near-neutral pH when grown in standard laboratory culture. Although a number of mechanisms have been demonstrated to enable neutrophilic AOB growth at low pH in the laboratory, these have not been demonstrated in soil, and the recent cultivation of the obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra” provides a more parsimonious explanation for the observed high rates of activity. Analysis of the sequenced genome, transcriptional activity, and lipid content of “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” reveals that previously proposed mechanisms used by AOB for growth at low pH are not essential for archaeal ammonia oxidation in acidic environments. Instead, the genome indicates that “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” contains genes encoding both a predicted high-affinity substrate acquisition system and potential pH homeostasis mechanisms absent in neutrophilic AOA. Analysis of mRNA revealed that candidate genes encoding the proposed homeostasis mechanisms were all expressed during acidophilic growth, and lipid profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrated that the membrane lipids of “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” were not dominated by crenarchaeol, as found in neutrophilic AOA. This study for the first time describes a genome of an obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer and identifies potential mechanisms enabling this unique phenotype for future biochemical characterization. PMID:26896134

  15. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra".

    PubMed

    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Gallois, Nicolas; Schouten, Stefan; Stein, Lisa Y; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2016-05-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganisms in soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOB and dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation under acidic conditions has been a long-standing paradox. While high rates of ammonia oxidation are frequently measured in acid soils, cultivated ammonia oxidizers grew only at near-neutral pH when grown in standard laboratory culture. Although a number of mechanisms have been demonstrated to enable neutrophilic AOB growth at low pH in the laboratory, these have not been demonstrated in soil, and the recent cultivation of the obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra" provides a more parsimonious explanation for the observed high rates of activity. Analysis of the sequenced genome, transcriptional activity, and lipid content of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" reveals that previously proposed mechanisms used by AOB for growth at low pH are not essential for archaeal ammonia oxidation in acidic environments. Instead, the genome indicates that "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" contains genes encoding both a predicted high-affinity substrate acquisition system and potential pH homeostasis mechanisms absent in neutrophilic AOA. Analysis of mRNA revealed that candidate genes encoding the proposed homeostasis mechanisms were all expressed during acidophilic growth, and lipid profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrated that the membrane lipids of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" were not dominated by crenarchaeol, as found in neutrophilic AOA. This study for the first time describes a genome of an obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer and identifies potential mechanisms enabling this unique phenotype for future biochemical characterization.

  16. Direct Determination of Equilibrium Potentials for Hydrogen Oxidation/Production by Open Circuit Potential Measurements in Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, John A. S.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-04-01

    Open circuit potentials were measured for acetonitrile solutions of a variety of acids and their conjugate bases under 1 atm H2. Acids examined were triethylammonium, dimethylformamidium, 2,6-dichloroanilinium, 4-cyanoanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-anisidinium salts. These potentials, along with the pKa values of the acids, establish the value of the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in acetonitrile as -0.028(4) V vs the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple. Dimethylformamidium forms homoconjugates and other aggregates with dimethylformamide; open circuit potentials (OCPs) were used to quantify the extent of these reactions. Overpotentials for electrocatalytic hydrogen production and oxidation were determined from open circuit potentials and voltammograms of acidic or basic catalyst solutions under H2. For these solutions, agreement between OCP values and potentials calculated using the Nernst equation is within 12 mV. Finally, use of the measured equilibrium potential allows direct comparison of catalytic systems in different media; it requires neither pKa values, homoconjugation constants, nor the SHE potential.

  17. Direct determination of equilibrium potentials for hydrogen oxidation/production by open circuit potential measurements in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Roberts, John A S; Bullock, R Morris

    2013-04-01

    Open circuit potentials were measured for acetonitrile solutions of a variety of acids and their conjugate bases under 1 atm H2. Acids examined were triethylammonium, dimethylformamidium, 2,6-dichloroanilinium, 4-cyanoanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-anisidinium salts. These potentials, along with the pKa values of the acids, establish the value of the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in acetonitrile as -0.028(4) V vs the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple. Dimethylformamidium forms homoconjugates and other aggregates with dimethylformamide; open circuit potentials (OCPs) were used to quantify the extent of these reactions. Overpotentials for electrocatalytic hydrogen production and oxidation were determined from open circuit potentials and voltammograms of acidic or basic catalyst solutions under H2. For these solutions, agreement between OCP values and potentials calculated using the Nernst equation is within 12 mV. Use of the measured equilibrium potential allows direct comparison of catalytic systems in different media; it requires neither pKa values, homoconjugation constants, nor the SHE potential.

  18. Theoretical study of ionization and one-electron oxidation potentials of N-heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sviatenko, Liudmyla K; Gorb, Leonid; Hill, Frances C; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-05-15

    A number of density functionals was utilized to predict gas-phase adiabatic ionization potentials (IPs) for nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds. Various solvation models were applied to the calculation of difference in free energies of solvation of oxidized and reduced forms of heterocyclic compounds in acetonitrile (AN) for correct reproduction of their standard oxidation potentials. We developed generally applicable protocols that could successfully predict the gas-phase adiabatic ionization potentials of nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds and their standard oxidation potentials in AN. This approach is supported by a MPW1K/6-31+G(d) level of theory which uses SMD(UA0) approximation for estimation of solvation energy of neutral molecules and PCM(UA0) model for ionized ones. The mean absolute derivation (MAD) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the current theoretical models for IP are equal to 0.22 V and 0.26, respectively, and for oxidation potentials MAD = 0.13 V and RMSE = 0.17.

  19. IDH mutation status and role of WHO grade and mitotic index in overall survival in grade II-III diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Olar, Adriana; Wani, Khalida M; Alfaro-Munoz, Kristin D; Heathcock, Lindsey E; van Thuijl, Hinke F; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S; Sulman, Erik P; Cahill, Daniel P; Vera-Bolanos, Elizabeth; Yuan, Ying; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Ylstra, Bauke; Wesseling, Pieter; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2015-04-01

    Diffuse gliomas are up till now graded based upon morphology. Recent findings indicate that isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status defines biologically distinct groups of tumors. The role of tumor grade and mitotic index in patient outcome has not been evaluated following stratification by IDH mutation status. To address this, we interrogated 558 WHO grade II-III diffuse gliomas for IDH1/2 mutations and investigated the prognostic impact of WHO grade within IDH-mutant and IDH-wild type tumor subsets independently. The prognostic impact of grade was modest in IDH-mutant [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.21, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.91-1.61] compared to IDH-wild type tumors (HR = 1.74, 95 % CI = 0.95-3.16). Using a dichotomized mitotic index cut-off of 4/1000 tumor cells, we found that while mitotic index was significantly associated with outcome in IDH-wild type tumors (log-rank p < 0.0001, HR = 4.41, 95 % CI = 2.55-7.63), it was not associated with outcome in IDH-mutant tumors (log-rank p = 0.5157, HR = 1.10, 95 % CI = 0.80-1.51), and could demonstrate a statistical interaction (p < 0.0001) between IDH mutation and mitotic index (i.e., suggesting that the effect of mitotic index on patient outcome is dependent on IDH mutation status). Patient age, an established prognostic factor in diffuse glioma, was significantly associated with outcome only in the IDH-wild type subset, and consistent with prior data, 1p/19q co-deletion conferred improved outcome in the IDH-mutant cohort. These findings suggest that stratification of grade II-III gliomas into subsets defined by the presence or absence of IDH mutation leads to subgroups with distinct prognostic characteristics. Further evaluation of grading criteria and prognostic markers is warranted within IDH-mutant versus IDH-wild type diffuse grade II-III gliomas as independent entities.

  20. Accelerated aging in schizophrenia patients: the potential role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2014-08-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that schizophrenia, a severe mental illness characterized by delusions, hallucinations and thought disorder is associated with accelerated aging. The free radical (oxidative stress) theory of aging assumes that aging occurs as a result of damage to cell constituents and connective tissues by free radicals arising from oxygen-associated reactions. Schizophrenia has been associated with oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, both of which also appear to reciprocally induce each other in a positive feedback manner. The buildup of damaged macromolecules due to increased oxidative stress and failure of protein repair and maintenance systems is an indicator of aging both at the cellular and organismal level. When compared with age-matched healthy controls, schizophrenia patients have higher levels of markers of oxidative cellular damage such as protein carbonyls, products of lipid peroxidation and DNA hydroxylation. Potential confounders such as antipsychotic medication, smoking, socio-economic status and unhealthy lifestyle make it impossible to solely attribute the earlier onset of aging-related changes or oxidative stress to having a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Regardless of whether oxidative stress can be attributed solely to a diagnosis of schizophrenia or whether it is due to other factors associated with schizophrenia, the available evidence is in support of increased oxidative stress-induced cellular damage of macromolecules which may play a role in the phenomenon of accelerated aging presumed to be associated with schizophrenia.

  1. Accelerated Aging in Schizophrenia Patients: The Potential Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that schizophrenia, a severe mental illness characterized by delusions, hallucinations and thought disorder is associated with accelerated aging. The free radical (oxidative stress) theory of aging assumes that aging occurs as a result of damage to cell constituents and connective tissues by free radicals arising from oxygen-associated reactions. Schizophrenia has been associated with oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, both of which also appear to reciprocally induce each other in a positive feedback manner. The buildup of damaged macromolecules due to increased oxidative stress and failure of protein repair and maintenance systems is an indicator of aging both at the cellular and organismal level. When compared with age-matched healthy controls, schizophrenia patients have higher levels of markers of oxidative cellular damage such as protein carbonyls, products of lipid peroxidation and DNA hydroxylation. Potential confounders such as antipsychotic medication, smoking, socio-economic status and unhealthy lifestyle make it impossible to solely attribute the earlier onset of aging-related changes or oxidative stress to having a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Regardless of whether oxidative stress can be attributed solely to a diagnosis of schizophrenia or whether it is due to other factors associated with schizophrenia, the available evidence is in support of increased oxidative stress-induced cellular damage of macromolecules which may play a role in the phenomenon of accelerated aging presumed to be associated with schizophrenia. PMID:25110609

  2. Investigation into the oxidative potential generated by the formation of particulate matter from incense combustion.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; BéruBé, Kelly; Lung, Shih-Chun C; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Jones, Tim

    2013-01-15

    The formation of aerosols during combustion plays an important role in allowing released products to interreact, leading to an increase in particulate matter oxidative potential. This study investigated the physicochemistry of incense combustion-derived pollutants, which were emitted into the ambient air as solid and gas phases, followed by the determination of their oxidative potential. Upon combustion of a joss stick, approximately 60% of the mass of incense raw ingredients was released into the ambient air as combustion products including 349.51 mg/g PM(10), 145.48 mg/g CO and 0.16 mg/g NOx. Furthermore, incense combustion produced significant number of primary particles (<50 nm) at 0.99×10(5) 1/h. The NOx generated during incense combustion was able to react with CaCO(3) to produce the final product of Ca(NO(3))(2) in the ambient air. Moreover, coagulation could be a vital process for the growth of primary incense combustion particles through the intermixing with volatile organics. The incense particle's reactions with other combustion-derived products could be responsible for their significant oxidative capacity of 33.1-43.4% oxidative DNA damage. This study demonstrated that the oxidative potential of incense particles appeared to be related to the process of particle formation, and also provided novel data for the respiratory exposure assessment.

  3. Benthic ammonia oxidizers differ in community structure and biogeochemical potential across a riverine delta

    PubMed Central

    Damashek, Julian; Smith, Jason M.; Mosier, Annika C.; Francis, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution in coastal zones is a widespread issue, particularly in ecosystems with urban or agricultural watersheds. California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, at the landward reaches of San Francisco Bay, is highly impacted by both agricultural runoff and sewage effluent, leading to chronically high nutrient loadings. In particular, the extensive discharge of ammonium into the Sacramento River has altered this ecosystem by vastly increasing ammonium concentrations and thus changing the stoichiometry of inorganic nitrogen stocks, with potential effects throughout the food web. This debate surrounding ammonium inputs highlights the importance of understanding the rates of, and controls on, nitrogen (N) cycling processes across the delta. To date, however, there has been little research examining N biogeochemistry or N-cycling microbial communities in this system. We report the first data on benthic ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities and potential nitrification rates for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, focusing on the functional gene amoA (which codes for the α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase). There were stark regional differences in ammonia-oxidizing communities, with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) outnumbering ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) only in the ammonium-rich Sacramento River. High potential nitrification rates in the Sacramento River suggested these communities may be capable of oxidizing significant amounts of ammonium, compared to the San Joaquin River and the upper reaches of San Francisco Bay. Gene diversity also showed regional patterns, as well as phylogenetically unique ammonia oxidizers in the Sacramento River. The benthic ammonia oxidizers in this nutrient-rich aquatic ecosystem may be important players in its overall nutrient cycling, and their community structure and biogeochemical function appear related to nutrient loadings. Unraveling the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of N cycling pathways, including benthic

  4. A many-body potential approach to modelling the thermomechanical properties of actinide oxides.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M W D; Rushton, M J D; Grimes, R W

    2014-03-12

    A many-body potential model for the description of actinide oxide systems, which is robust at high temperatures, is reported for the first time. The embedded atom method is used to describe many-body interactions ensuring good reproduction of a range of thermophysical properties (lattice parameter, bulk modulus, enthalpy and specific heat) between 300 and 3000 K for AmO2, CeO2, CmO2, NpO2, ThO2, PuO2 and UO2. Additionally, the model predicts a melting point for UO2 between 3000 and 3100 K, in close agreement with experiment. Oxygen-oxygen interactions are fixed across the actinide oxide series because it facilitates the modelling of oxide solid solutions. The new potential is also used to predict the energies of Schottky and Frenkel pair disorder processes.

  5. The Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A gene product, Mfn2, up-regulates fuel oxidation through expression of OXPHOS system.

    PubMed

    Pich, Sara; Bach, Daniel; Briones, Paz; Liesa, Marc; Camps, Marta; Testar, Xavier; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2005-06-01

    Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) is a mitochondrial membrane protein that participates in mitochondrial fusion in mammalian cells and mutations in the Mfn2 gene cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2A. Here, we show that Mfn2 loss-of-function inhibits pyruvate, glucose and fatty acid oxidation and reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, whereas Mfn2 gain-of-function increases glucose oxidation and mitochondrial membrane potential. As to the mechanisms involved, we have found that Mfn2 loss-of-function represses nuclear-encoded subunits of OXPHOS complexes I, II, III and V, whereas Mfn2 overexpression induced the subunits of complexes I, IV and V. Obesity-induced Mfn2 deficiency in rat skeletal muscle was also associated with a decrease in the subunits of complexes I, II, III and V. In addition, the effect of Mfn2 overexpression on mitochondrial metabolism was mimicked by a truncated Mfn2 mutant that is inactive as a mitochondrial fusion protein. Our results indicate that Mfn2 triggers mitochondrial energization, at least in part, by regulating OXPHOS expression through signals that are independent of its role as a mitochondrial fusion protein.

  6. The azide-bridged mixed-valent cobalt(II,III) compound [(CH(3))(3)NH](2)[CoCo(2)(N(3))(10)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Ju; Li, Yu-Xian; Xu, Min; Wang, Xia

    2010-12-04

    The crystal structure of the title compound, poly[bis-(tri-methyl-ammonium) hexa-μ(1,1)-azido-tetra-azido-tricobalt-ate(II,III)], [(CH(3))(3)NH](2)[Co(II)Co(III) (2)(N(3))(10)], consists of anionic chains [Co(II)Co(III) (2)(N(3))(10)](2-) extending parallel to the c axis and [(CH(3))(3)NH](+) counter-cations situated between the chains. In the anionic chain, one tetra-hedrally coordinated Co(II) atom (site symmetry 2) and two octa-hedrally coordinated Co(III) atoms are arranged alternately and are linked by μ(1,1)-azide bridges. The anionic chains and cations are connected via N-H⋯N hydrogen bonding into a three-dimensional structure.

  7. Purification of polyclonal antibodies from Cohn fraction II + III, skim milk, and whey by affinity chromatography using a hexamer peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Menegatti, Stefano; Naik, Amith D; Gurgel, Patrick V; Carbonell, Ruben G

    2012-11-01

    HWRGWV, a peptide that binds specifically to the Fc fragment of human immunoglobulin G (IgG), was used for the purification of IgG from Cohn fraction II + III of human plasma and from bovine skim milk and whey. The concentration of sodium chloride and sodium caprylate in the binding buffer as well as the pH of the elution buffer were optimized to achieve high IgG yield and purity. Under optimized conditions, IgG was recovered from plasma fractions with yield and purity up to 84% and 95%, respectively. IgG was also purified from skim milk with 74% yield and 92% purity and from whey with 85% yield and 93% purity. Purification experiments were also performed with Protein A resin and the results were found to be similar to those obtained with the peptide adsorbent.

  8. Oxidized Volcanic Materials as a Potential Explanation for Gray Hematite Regions on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minitti, M. E.; Lane, M. D.; Bishop, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Martian-analogue basalts synthesized, then oxidized, in the laboratory exhibit gray hematite coatings on exposed glass surfaces. We explore potential connections between these hematite coatings and the coarse, gray hematite signatures seen on Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROCHEMISTRY: AQUEOUS ONE-ELECTRON OXIDATION POTENTIALS FOR SUBSTITUTED ANILINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semiempirical molecular orbital theory and density functional theory are used to compute one-electron oxidation potentials for aniline and a set of 21 mono- and di-substituted anilines in aqueous solution. Linear relationships between theoretical predictions and experiment are co...

  10. Influence of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOAs) on the oxidative potential of diesel and biodiesel particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, S; Miljevic, B; Surawski, N C; Fairfull-Smith, K E; Bottle, S E; Brown, R; Ristovski, Z D

    2013-07-16

    Generally, the magnitude of pollutant emissions from diesel engines running on biodiesel fuel is ultimately coupled to the structure of the fuel's constituent molecules. Previous studies demonstrated the relationship between the organic fraction of particulate matter (PM) and its oxidative potential. Herein, emissions from a diesel engine running on different biofuels were analyzed in more detail to explore the role that different organic fractions play in the measured oxidative potential. In this work, a more detailed chemical analysis of biofuel PM was undertaken using a compact time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (c-ToF AMS). This enabled a better identification of the different organic fractions that contribute to the overall measured oxidative potentials. The concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using a profluorescent nitroxide molecular probe 9-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl-5-ethynyl)-10-(phenylethynyl)anthracene (BPEAnit). Therefore, the oxidative potential of the PM, measured through the ROS content, although proportional to the total organic content in certain cases, shows a much higher correlation with the oxygenated organic fraction as measured by the c-ToF AMS. This highlights the importance of knowing the surface chemistry of particles for assessing their health impacts. It also sheds light onto new aspects of particulate emissions that should be taken into account when establishing relevant metrics for assessing health implications of replacing diesel with alternative fuels.

  11. ANAEROBIC DDT BIOTRANSFORMATION: ENHANCEMENT BY APPLICATION OF SURFACTANTS AND LOW OXIDATION REDUCTION POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enhancement of anaerobic DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane) biotransformation by mixed cultures was studied with application of surfactants and oxidation reduction potential reducing agents. Without amendments, DDT transformation resulted mainly in the pr...

  12. Thyroid Function in Women after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer Stage II/III: Comparison With Controls From a Population Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Reinertsen, Kristin Valborg; Cvancarova, Milada; Wist, Erik; Bjoro, Trine; Dahl, Alv A.; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: A possible association between thyroid diseases (TD) and breast cancer (BC) has been debated. We examined prevalence and development of TD in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC compared with women from a general population. Secondarily, we explored the impact of two different radiotherapy (RT) techniques (standardized field arrangements vs. computed tomography [CT]-based dose planning) on TD in BC patients examined 35-120 months after primary BC treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 403 BC patients completed a questionnaire about TD and had blood samples taken for analyses of thyroid function. All had undergone postoperative RT with or without (2%) adjuvant systemic treatment. The results in the BC patients were compared with a cancer-free, age-matched control group from a general population (CGr). Results: There was higher prevalence of self-reported hypothyroidism in the BC patients as compared with the CGr (18% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). The raised prevalence was predominantly due to a substantial increase in the development of hypothyroidism after BC diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of hypothyroidism before BC diagnosis was similar to that observed in the CGr. Patients treated with CT-based RT showed a trend for increased post-BC development of hypothyroidism as compared with those treated with standardized field arrangements (p = 0.08). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is significantly increased in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC. Radiation to the thyroid gland may be a contributing factor. BC patients should be routinely screened for hypothyroidism.

  13. Predictors of Long-Term Quality of Life for Survivors of Stage II/III Rectal Cancer in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Mary E.; Stitzenberg, Karyn B.; Lin, Chi; Schlichting, Jennifer A.; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Juarez, Grelda Yazmin; Pendergast, Jane F.; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A.; Wallace, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Many patients do not receive guideline-recommended neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for resectable rectal cancer. Little is known regarding long-term quality of life (QOL) associated with various treatment approaches. Our objective was to determine patient characteristics and subsequent QOL associated with treatment approach. Methods: Our study was a geographically diverse population- and health system–based cohort study that included adults age 21 years or older with newly diagnosed stage II/III rectal cancer who were recruited from 2003 to 2005. Eligible patients were contacted 1 to 4 months after diagnosis and asked to participate in a telephone survey and to consent to medical record review, with separate follow-up QOL surveys conducted 1 and 7 years after diagnosis. Results: Two hundred thirty-nine patients with stage II/III rectal cancer were included in this analysis. Younger age (< 65 v ≥ 65 years: odds ratio, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.65) was significantly associated with increased odds of receiving neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The adjuvant chemoradiotherapy group had significantly worse mean EuroQol-5D (range, 0 to 1) and Short Form-12 physical health component scores (standardized mean, 50) at 1-year follow-up than the neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy group (0.75 v 0.85; P = .002; 37.2 v 43.3; P = .01, respectively) and the group that received only one or neither form of treatment (0.75 v 0.85; P = .02; 37.2 v 45.1; P = .008, respectively). Conclusion: Neoadjuvant treatment may result in better QOL and functional status 1 year after diagnosis. Further evaluation of patient and provider reasons for not pursuing neoadjuvant therapy is necessary to determine how and where to target process improvement and/or education efforts to ensure that patients have access to recommended treatment options. PMID:26080831

  14. The random-coil 'C' fragment of the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop can activate or inhibit native skeletal ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Haarmann, Claudia S; Green, Daniel; Casarotto, Marco G; Laver, Derek R; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2003-01-01

    The actions of peptide C, corresponding to (724)Glu-Pro(760) of the II-III loop of the skeletal dihydropyridine receptor, on ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels incorporated into lipid bilayers with the native sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane show that the peptide is a high-affinity activator of native skeletal RyRs at cytoplasmic concentrations of 100 nM-10 microM. In addition, we found that peptide C inhibits RyRs in a voltage-independent manner when added for longer times or at higher concentrations (up to 150 microM). Peptide C had a random-coil structure indicating that it briefly assumes a variety of structures, some of which might activate and others which might inhibit RyRs. The results suggest that RyR activation and inhibition by peptide C arise from independent stochastic processes. A rate constant of 7.5 x 10(5) s(-1).M(-1) was obtained for activation and a lower estimate for the rate constant for inhibition of 5.9 x 10(3) s(-1).M(-1). The combined actions of peptide C and peptide A (II-III loop sequence (671)Thr-Leu(690)) showed that peptide C prevented activation but not blockage of RyRs by peptide A. We suggest that the effects of peptide C indicate functional interactions between a part of the dihydropyridine receptor and the RyR. These interactions could reflect either dynamic changes that occur during excitation-contraction coupling or interactions between the proteins at rest. PMID:12620094

  15. Oxidation Potentials of Functionalized Sulfone Solvents for High-Voltage Li-Ion Batteries: A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Nan; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, Deen

    2012-01-01

    New electrolytes with large electrochemical windows are needed to meet the challenge for high-voltage Li-ion batteries. Sulfone as an electrolyte solvent boasts of high oxidation potentials. Here we examine the effect of multiple functionalization on sulfone's oxidation potential. We compute oxidation potentials for a series of sulfone-based molecules functionalized with fluorine, cyano, ester, and carbonate groups by using a quantum chemistry method within a continuum solvation model. We find that multifunctionalization is a key to achieving high oxidation potentials. This can be realized through either a fluorether group on a sulfone molecule or sulfonyl fluoride with a cyano or ester group.

  16. Fluctuation Analysis of Redox Potential to Distinguish Microbial Fe(II) Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Enright, A M L; Ferris, F G

    2016-11-01

    We developed a novel method for distinguishing abiotic and biological iron oxidation in liquid media using oxidation-reduction (redox) potential time series data. The instrument and processing algorithm were tested by immersing the tip of a Pt electrode with an Ag-AgCl reference electrode into an active iron-oxidizing biofilm in a groundwater discharge zone, as well as in two abiotic systems: a killed sample and a chemical control from the same site. We used detrended fluctuation analysis to characterize average root mean square fluctuation behavior, which was distinct in the live system. The calculated α value scaling exponents determined by detrended fluctuation analysis were significantly different at p < 0.001. This indicates that time series of electrode response data may be used to distinguish live and abiotic chemical reaction pathways. Due to the simplicity, portability, and small size, it may be suitable for characterization of extraterrestrial environments where water has been observed, such as Mars and Europa. Key Words: Oxidation-reduction potential-Detrended fluctuation analysis-Iron-oxidizing bacteria. Astrobiology 16, 846-852.

  17. Plutonium Oxide Containment and the Potential for Water-Borne Transport as a Consequence of ARIES Oxide Processing Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, David Matthew; Rowland, Joel C.

    2015-02-01

    The question of oxide containment during processing and storage has become a primary concern when considering the continued operability of the Plutonium Facility (PF-4) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An Evaluation of the Safety of the Situation (ESS), “Potential for Criticality in a Glovebox Due to a Fire” (TA55-ESS-14-002-R2, since revised to R3) first issued in May, 2014 summarizes these concerns: “The safety issue of fire water potentially entering a glovebox is: the potential for the water to accumulate in the bottom of a glovebox and result in an inadvertent criticality due to the presence of fissionable materials in the glovebox locations and the increased reflection and moderation of neutrons from the fire water accumulation.” As a result, the existing documented safety analysis (DSA) was judged inadequate and, while it explicitly considered the potential for criticality resulting from water intrusion into gloveboxes, criticality safety evaluation documents (CSEDs) for the affected locations did not evaluate the potential for fire water intrusion into a glovebox.

  18. Effects of Aftermarket Control Technologies on Gas and Particle Phase Oxidative Potential from Diesel Engine Emissions.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Jelica; Holder, Amara L; Yelverton, Tiffany L B

    2015-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) originating from diesel combustion is a public health concern due to its association with adverse effects on respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and lung cancer. This study investigated emissions from three stationary diesel engines (gensets) and varying power output (230 kW, 400 kW, and 600 kW) at 50% and 90% load to determine concentrations of gaseous (GROS) and PM reactive oxygen species (PMROS). In addition, the influence of three modern emission control technologies on ROS emissions was evaluated: active and passive diesel particulate filters (A-DPF and P-DPF) and a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). PMROS made up 30-50% of the total ROS measured without aftermarket controls. All applied controls removed PMROS by more than 75% on average. However, the oxidative potential of PM downstream of these devices was not diminished at the same rate and particles surviving the A-PDF had an even higher oxidative potential on a per PM mass basis compared to the particles emitted by uncontrolled gensets. Further, the GROS as compared to PMROS emissions were not reduced with the same efficiency (<36%). GROS concentrations were highest with the DOC in use, indicating continued formation of GROS with this control. Correlation analyses showed that PMROS and to a lesser extent GROS have a good correlation with semivolatile organic carbon (OC1) subfraction. In addition, results suggest that chemical composition, rather than PM size, is responsible for differences in the PM oxidative potential.

  19. Exogenous amino acids suppress glucose oxidation and potentiate hepatic glucose production in late gestation fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura D; Kohn, Jaden R; Rozance, Paul J; Hay, William W; Wesolowski, Stephanie R

    2017-02-08

    Acute amino acid (AA) infusion increases AA oxidation rates in normal late gestation fetal sheep. Because fetal oxygen consumption rate does not change with increased AA oxidation, we hypothesized that AA infusion would suppress glucose oxidation pathways and that the additional carbon supply from AA would activate hepatic glucose production. To test this, late gestation fetal sheep were infused intravenously for 3h with saline or exogenous AA (AA). Glucose tracer metabolic studies were performed and skeletal muscle and liver tissues samples were collected. AA infusion increased fetal arterial plasma branched chain AA, cortisol, and glucagon concentrations. Fetal glucose utilization rates were similar between basal and AA periods, yet the fraction of glucose oxidized and glucose oxidation rate were decreased by 40% in the AA period. AA infusion increased expression of PDK4, an inhibitor of glucose oxidation, nearly 2-fold in muscle and liver. In liver, AA infusion tended to increase PCK1 gluconeogenic gene and PCK1 correlated with plasma cortisol concentrations. AA infusion also increased liver mRNA expression of lactate transporter gene (MCT1), protein expression of GLUT2 and LDHA, and phosphorylation of AMPK, 4EBP1, and S6 proteins. In isolated fetal hepatocytes, AA supplementation increased glucose production and PCK1, LDHA, and MCT1 gene expression. These results demonstrate that AA infusion into fetal sheep competitively suppresses glucose oxidation and potentiates hepatic glucose production. These metabolic patterns support flexibility in fetal metabolism in response to increased nutrient substrate supply while maintaining a relatively stable rate of oxidative metabolism.

  20. Brassinosteroid Ameliorates Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles-Induced Oxidative Stress by Improving Antioxidant Potential and Redox Homeostasis in Tomato Seedling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengqi; Ahammed, Golam J.; Li, Caixia; Bao, Xiao; Yu, Jingquan; Huang, Chunlei; Yin, Hanqin; Zhou, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades use of metal-based nanoparticles (MNPs) has been increased significantly that eventually contaminating agricultural land and limiting crop production worldwide. Moreover, contamination of food chain with MNPs has appeared as a matter of public concern due to risk of potential health hazard. Brassinosteroid has been shown to play a critical role in alleviating heavy metal stress; however, its function in relieving zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-induced phytotoxicity remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential role of 24-epibrassinolide (BR) in mitigating ZnO NPs-induced toxicity in tomato seedlings. Seedling growth, biomass production, and root activity gradually decreased, but Zn accumulation increased with increasing ZnO NPs concentration (10–100 mg/L) in growth media (½ MS). The augmentation of BR (5 nM) in media significantly ameliorated 50 mg/L ZnO NPs-induced growth inhibition. Visualization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and quantification of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in tomato roots confirmed that ZnO NPs induced an oxidative stress. However, combined treatment with BR and ZnO NPs remarkably reduced concentration of H2O2 and MDA as compared with ZnO NPs only treatment, indicating that BR supplementation substantially reduced oxidative stress. Furthermore, the activities of key antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase were increased by combined treatment of BR and ZnO NPs compared with ZnO NPs only treatment. BR also increased reduced glutathione (GSH), but decreased oxidized glutathione (GSSG)] and thus improved cellular redox homeostasis by increasing GSH:GSSG ratio. The changes in relative transcript abundance of corresponding antioxidant genes such as Cu/Zn SOD, CAT1, GSH1, and GR1 were in accordance with the changes in those antioxidants under different treatments. More importantly, combined application of BR and ZnO NPs

  1. Assessing the oxidative potential of isoprene-derived epoxides and secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Amanda J.; Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.; Lin, Ying-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is known to contribute to adverse health effects, such as asthma, cardiopulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a major component of PM2.5 and can be enhanced by atmospheric oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide. However, whether biogenic SOA contributes to adverse health effects remains unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of isoprene-derived epoxides and SOA for generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in light of the recent recognition that atmospheric oxidation of isoprene in the presence of acidic sulfate aerosol is a major contributor to the global SOA burden. The dithiothreitol (DTT) assay was used to characterize the ROS generation by the isoprene-derived epoxides, trans-β-isoprene epoxydiol (trans-β-IEPOX) and methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE), and their hydrolysis products, the 2-methyltetrol diastereomers (2-MT), 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG), their organosulfate derivatives, as well as an isoprene-derived hydroxyhydroperoxide (ISOPOOH). In addition, ROS generation potential was evaluated for total SOA produced from photooxidation of isoprene and methacrolein (MACR) as well as from the reactive uptake of trans-β-IEPOX and MAE onto acidified sulfate aerosol. The high-NOx regime, which yields 2-MG-, MAE- and MACR-derived SOA has a higher ROS generation potential than the low-NOx regime, which yields 2-MT, IEPOX- and isoprene-derived SOA. ISOPOOH has an ROS generation potential similar to 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ), suggesting a significant contribution of aerosol-phase organic peroxides to PM oxidative potential. MAE- and MACR-derived SOA show equal or greater ROS generation potential than reported in studies on diesel exhaust PM, highlighting the importance of a comprehensive investigation of the toxicity of isoprene-derived SOA.

  2. Temperature response of methane oxidation and production potentials in peatland ecosystems across Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, Nina; Korrensalo, Aino; Kerttula, Johanna; Maljanen, Marja; Uljas, Salli; Lohila, Annalea; Laine, Anna; Vesala, Timo; Elliott, David; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that the ecosystems located in the high latitudes are especially sensitive to warming. Therefore, we compared 14 peatland systems throughout Finland along a latitudinal gradient from 69°N to 61°N to examine the response of methane production and methane oxidation with warming climate. Peat samples were taken at the height of the growing season in 2015 from 0 - 10cm below the water table depth. The plant communities in sampling locations were described by estimating cover of each plant species and pH of water was measured. Upon return to the lab, we made two parallel treatments, under anoxic and oxic conditions in order to calculate the CH4 production and consumption potentials of the peat and used three temperatures, 4°C, 17.5°C, and 30°C to examine the temperature effect on the potentials. We hypothesized that there will be an observable response curve in CH4 production and oxidation relative to temperature with a greater response with increasing latitude. In general, increasing temperature increased the potential for CH4 production and oxidation, at some sites, the potential was highest at 17.5°C, indicating that there is an optimum temperature threshold for the in situ methane producing and oxidizing microbial communities. Above this threshold, the peat microbial communities are not able to cope with increasing temperature. This is especially noticeable for methane oxidation at sites above 62°N. As countries are being expected to adequately account for their greenhouse gas budgets with increasing temperature models, knowing where the temperature threshold exists is of critical importance.

  3. Preparation and characterization of an iron oxide-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for potential bone cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sneha, Murugesan; Sundaram, Nachiappan Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, multifunctional magnetic nanostructures have been found to have potential applications in biomedical and tissue engineering. Iron oxide nanoparticles are biocompatible and have distinctive magnetic properties that allow their use in vivo for drug delivery and hyperthermia, and as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Hydroxyapatite is used frequently due to its well-known biocompatibility, bioactivity, and lack of toxicity, so a combination of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite materials could be useful because hydroxyapatite has better bone-bonding ability. In this study, we prepared nanocomposites of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite and analyzed their physicochemical properties. The results suggest that these composites have superparamagnetic as well as biocompatible properties. This type of material architecture would be well suited for bone cancer therapy and other biomedical applications.

  4. Fluctuation Analysis of Redox Potential to Distinguish Microbial Fe(II) Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, A. M. L.; Ferris, F. G.

    2016-11-01

    We developed a novel method for distinguishing abiotic and biological iron oxidation in liquid media using oxidation-reduction (redox) potential time series data. The instrument and processing algorithm were tested by immersing the tip of a Pt electrode with an Ag-AgCl reference electrode into an active iron-oxidizing biofilm in a groundwater discharge zone, as well as in two abiotic systems: a killed sample and a chemical control from the same site. We used detrended fluctuation analysis to characterize average root mean square fluctuation behavior, which was distinct in the live system. The calculated α value scaling exponents determined by detrended fluctuation analysis were significantly different at p < 0.001. This indicates that time series of electrode response data may be used to distinguish live and abiotic chemical reaction pathways. Due to the simplicity, portability, and small size, it may be suitable for characterization of extraterrestrial environments where water has been observed, such as Mars and Europa.

  5. How surface potential determines the kinetics of the first hole transfer of photocatalytic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Waegele, Matthias M; Chen, Xihan; Herlihy, David M; Cuk, Tanja

    2014-07-30

    Interfacial hole transfer between n-SrTiO3 and OH(-) was investigated by surface sensitive transient optical spectroscopy of an in situ photoelectrochemical cell during water oxidation. The kinetics reveal a single rate constant with an exponential dependence on the surface hole potential, spanning time scales from 3 ns to 8 ps over a ≈1 V increase. A voltage- and laser illumination-induced process moves the valence band edge at the n-type semiconductor/water interface to continuously change the surface hole potential. This single step of the water oxidation reaction is assigned to the first hole transfer h(+) + OH(-) → OH(•). The kinetics quantify how much a change in the free energy difference driving this first hole transfer reduces the activation barrier. They are also used to extrapolate the kinetic rate due to the activation barrier when that free energy difference is zero, or the Nernstian potential. This is the first time transient spectroscopy has enabled the separation of the first hole transfer from the full four hole transfer cycle and a direct determination of these two quantities. The Nernstian potential for OH(-)/OH(•) is also suggested, in rough agreement with gas-phase studies. The observation of a distinct, much longer time scale upon picosecond hole transfer to OH(-) suggests that a dominant, more stable intermediate of the water oxidation reaction, possibly a surface bound oxo, may result.

  6. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction potential in Chocolate Pots hot spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Fortney, N W; He, S; Converse, B J; Beard, B L; Johnson, C M; Boyd, E S; Roden, E E

    2016-05-01

    Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) is a unique, circumneutral pH, iron-rich, geothermal feature in Yellowstone National Park. Prior research at CP has focused on photosynthetically driven Fe(II) oxidation as a model for mineralization of microbial mats and deposition of Archean banded iron formations. However, geochemical and stable Fe isotopic data have suggested that dissimilatory microbial iron reduction (DIR) may be active within CP deposits. In this study, the potential for microbial reduction of native CP Fe(III) oxides was investigated, using a combination of cultivation dependent and independent approaches, to assess the potential involvement of DIR in Fe redox cycling and associated stable Fe isotope fractionation in the CP hot springs. Endogenous microbial communities were able to reduce native CP Fe(III) oxides, as documented by most probable number enumerations and enrichment culture studies. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR driven by oxidation of acetate, lactate, and H2 . Inhibitor studies and molecular analyses indicate that sulfate reduction did not contribute to observed rates of DIR in the enrichment cultures through abiotic reaction pathways. Enrichment cultures produced isotopically light Fe(II) during DIR relative to the bulk solid-phase Fe(III) oxides. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from enrichment cultures showed dominant sequences closely affiliated with Geobacter metallireducens, a mesophilic Fe(III) oxide reducer. Shotgun metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures confirmed the presence of a dominant G. metallireducens-like population and other less dominant populations from the phylum Ignavibacteriae, which appear to be capable of DIR. Gene (protein) searches revealed the presence of heat-shock proteins that may be involved in increased thermotolerance in the organisms present in the enrichments as well as porin-cytochrome complexes previously shown to be involved in extracellular electron transport. This analysis offers

  7. Exercise and oxidative stress: potential effects of antioxidant dietary strategies in sports.

    PubMed

    Pingitore, Alessandro; Lima, Giuseppina Pace Pereira; Mastorci, Francesca; Quinones, Alfredo; Iervasi, Giorgio; Vassalle, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals are produced during aerobic cellular metabolism and have key roles as regulatory mediators in signaling processes. Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between production of reactive oxygen species and an adequate antioxidant defense. This adverse condition may lead to cellular and tissue damage of components, and is involved in different physiopathological states, including aging, exercise, inflammatory, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. In particular, the relationship between exercise and oxidative stress is extremely complex, depending on the mode, intensity, and duration of exercise. Regular moderate training appears beneficial for oxidative stress and health. Conversely, acute exercise leads to increased oxidative stress, although this same stimulus is necessary to allow an up-regulation in endogenous antioxidant defenses (hormesis). Supporting endogenous defenses with additional oral antioxidant supplementation may represent a suitable noninvasive tool for preventing or reducing oxidative stress during training. However, excess of exogenous antioxidants may have detrimental effects on health and performance. Whole foods, rather than capsules, contain antioxidants in natural ratios and proportions, which may act in synergy to optimize the antioxidant effect. Thus, an adequate intake of vitamins and minerals through a varied and balanced diet remains the best approach to maintain an optimal antioxidant status. Antioxidant supplementation may be warranted in particular conditions, when athletes are exposed to high oxidative stress or fail to meet dietary antioxidant requirements. Aim of this review is to discuss the evidence on the relationship between exercise and oxidative stress, and the potential effects of dietary strategies in athletes. The differences between diet and exogenous supplementation as well as available tools to estimate effectiveness of antioxidant intake are also reported. Finally, we advocate the need

  8. Potential methane production and methane oxidation rates in peatland ecosystems of the Appalachian Mountains, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Yavitt, J.B.; Lang, G.E.; Downey, D.M. )

    1988-09-01

    Potential rates of methane production and carbon dioxide production were measured on 11 dates in 1986 in peat from six plant communities typical of moss-dominated peatlands in the Appalachian Mountains. Annual methane production ranged from 2.7 to 17.5 mol/sq m, and annual carbon dioxide production ranged from 30.6 to 79.0 mol/sq m. The wide range in methane production values among the communities found within a single peatland indicates that obtaining one production value for a peatland may not be appropriate. Low temperature constrained the potential for methane production in winter, while the chemical quality of the peat substrate appears to control methane production in the summer. Methane oxidation was measured throughout the peat profile to a depth of 30 cm. Values for methane oxidation ranged from 0.08 to 18.7 microM/hr among the six plant communities. Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria probably mediated most of the activity. On a daily basis during the summer, between 11 and 100% of the methane produced is susceptible to oxidation within the peat column. Pools of dissolved methane and dissolved carbon dioxide in pore waters were less than 0.2 and less than 1.0 mol/sq m, respectively, indicating that methane does not accumulate in the pore waters. Peatlands have been considered as an important source of biologically produced methane. Despite the high rates of methane production, the high rates of methane oxidation dampen the potential emission of methane to the atmosphere. 41 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Potentials and challenges of integration for complex metal oxides in CMOS devices and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Pham, C.; Chang, J. P.

    2015-02-01

    This review focuses on recent accomplishments on complex metal oxide based multifunctional materials and the potential they hold in advancing integrated circuits. It begins with metal oxide based high-κ materials to highlight the success of their integration since 45 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. By simultaneously offering a higher dielectric constant for improved capacitance as well as providing a thicker physical layer to prevent the quantum mechanical tunnelling of electrons, high-κ materials have enabled the continued down-scaling of CMOS based devices. The most recent technology driver has been the demand to lower device power consumption, which requires the design and synthesis of novel materials, such as complex metal oxides that exhibit remarkable tunability in their ferromagnetic, ferroelectric and multiferroic properties. These properties make them suitable for a wide variety of applications such as magnetoelectric random access memory, radio frequency band pass filters, antennae and magnetic sensors. Single-phase multiferroics, while rare, offer unique functionalities which have motivated much scientific and technological research to ascertain the origins of their multiferroicity and their applicability to potential devices. However, due to the weak magnetoelectric coupling for single-phase multiferroics, engineered multiferroic composites based on magnetostrictive ferromagnets interfacing piezoelectrics or ferroelectrics have shown enhanced multiferroic behaviour from effective strain coupling at the interface. In addition, nanostructuring of the ferroic phases has demonstrated further improvement in the coupling effect. Therefore, single-phase and engineered composite multiferroics consisting of complex metal oxides are reviewed in terms of magnetoelectric coupling effects and voltage controlled ferromagnetic properties, followed by a review on the integration challenges that need to be overcome to realize the

  10. Ranolazine, a partial fatty acid oxidation inhibitor, its potential benefit in angina and other cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Bharti; Subramanian, L

    2007-01-01

    Chronic Angina resistant to medical treatment with hemodynamically acting agents is a major problem in clinical setup. For such patients, large number of clinical trials have documented the beneficial effect of Ranolazine. It acts as an anti-anginal agent that controls myocardial ischemia through intracellular metabolic changes. Ranolazine is a partial fatty acid oxidation inhibitor which shifts cardiac energy metabolism from fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation. Since the oxidation of glucose requires less oxygen than the oxidation of fatty acids, ranolazine can help maintain myocardial function in times of ischemia. In addition, ranolazine has minimal effect on blood pressure and heart rate. Ranolazine, by inhibiting cellular ionic channels, prolongs the corrected QT interval. However, ranolazine has not yet been associated with any incidences of ventricular arrhythmia. Other possible mechanism by which Ranolazine could act is by reducing the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and improves reperfusion mechanical function. Ranolazine has been approved by US FDA for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris in combination with amlodipine, beta-blockers or nitrates in patients who do not show adequate response to other anti-anginals. Ranolazine is a metabolic modulator that is being developed by CV Therapeutics (CVT), under license from Roche (formerly Syntex), as a potential treatment for angina. Ranolazine is available as brand name 'Ranexa' as extended release oral tablets. This review focuses on the clinical effects, the mechanism of actions, drug interactions and beneficial effects of Ranolazine in chronic angina and other cardiometabolic disorders.

  11. Chemical characteristics and oxidative potential of particulate matter emissions from gasoline, diesel, and biodiesel cars.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ka Lam; Polidori, Andrea; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Tzamkiozis, Theodoros; Samaras, Zissis; Cassee, Flemming R; Gerlofs, Miriam; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2009-08-15

    Three light-duty vehicles in five different configurations [a Honda Accord operating with diesel with a closed-coupled oxidation catalyst and an underfloor catalyst replaced in some tests with a diesel particle filter (DPF), a Toyota Corolla operating with gasoline, and a VW Golf alternatively operating with petrodiesel or biodiesel] were tested in a dynamometer facility to develop an improved understanding of the factors affecting the toxicity of particulate exhaust emissions. The vehicles were tested using a variety of real-world driving cycles, more than the certification test (New European Driving Cycle). Particle samples were collected and analyzed for elemental and organic carbon (EC and OC, respectively), water soluble and water insoluble organic carbon (WSOC and WISOC, respectively), and inorganic ions, and the emission rates (mg/km) for each vehicle/configuration were determined. A dithiothreitol (DTT) assay was used to assess the oxidative potential of the particulate matter (PM) samples. The DPF-equipped diesel and gasoline vehicles were characterized by the lowest overall PM mass emissions, while the diesel and biodiesel cars produced the most potent exhaust in terms of oxidative activity. When the DPF was fitted on the Honda Accord diesel vehicle, the mass emission rates and distance-based oxidative potential were both decreased by 98%, compared to the original configuration. Correlation analysis showed that the DTT consumption rate was highly associated with WSOC, WISOC, and OC (R = 0.98, 0.93, and 0.94, respectively), consistent with previous findings.

  12. Potential Therapeutic Role of L-Carnitine in Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress and Atrophy Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Montesano, Anna; Senesi, Pamela; Luzi, Livio; Benedini, Stefano; Terruzzi, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    The targeting of nutraceutical treatment to skeletal muscle damage is an emerging area of research, driven by the need for new therapies for a range of muscle-associated diseases. L-Carnitine (CARN) is an essential nutrient and plays a key role in mitochondrial β-oxidation and in the ubiquitin-proteasome system regulation. As a dietary supplement to improve athletic performance, CARN has been studied for its potential to enhance β-oxidation. However, CARN effects on myogenesis, mitochondrial activity, and hypertrophy process are not completely elucidated. This in vitro study aims to investigate CARN role on skeletal muscle remodeling, differentiation process, and myotubes formation. We analyzed muscle differentiation and morphological features in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to 5 mM CARN. Our results showed that CARN was able to accelerate C2C12 myotubes formation and induce morphological changes, characterizing the start of hypertrophy process. In addition, CARN improved AKT activation and downstream cellular signaling pathways involved in skeletal muscle atrophy process prevention. Also, CARN positively regulated the pathways involved in oxidative stress defense. In this work, we provide an interesting novel mechanism of the potential therapeutic use of CARN to treat pathological conditions characterized by skeletal muscle morphological and functional impairment, oxidative stress production, and atrophy process in aging. PMID:25838869

  13. Improving carbon dioxide yields and cell efficiencies for ethanol oxidation by potential scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2014-12-01

    An ethanol electrolysis cell with aqueous ethanol supplied to the anode and nitrogen at the cathode has been operated under potential cycling conditions in order to increase the yield of carbon dioxide and thereby increase cell efficiency relative to operation at a fixed potential. At ambient temperature, faradaic yields of CO2 as high as 26% have been achieved, while only transient CO2 production was observed at constant potential. Yields increased substantially at higher temperatures, with maximum values at Pt anodes reaching 45% at constant potential and 65% under potential cycling conditions. Use of a PtRu anode increased the cell efficiency by decreasing the anode potential, but this was offset by decreased CO2 yields. Nonetheless, cycling increased the efficiency relative to constant potential. The maximum yields at PtRu and 80 °C were 13% at constant potential and 32% under potential cycling. The increased yields under cycling conditions have been attributed to periodic oxidative stripping of adsorbed CO, which occurs at lower potentials on PtRu than on Pt. These results will be important in the optimization of operating conditions for direct ethanol fuel cells and for the electrolysis of ethanol to produce clean hydrogen.

  14. High rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in freshwater wetlands reduce potential atmospheric methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Segarra, K E A; Schubotz, F; Samarkin, V; Yoshinaga, M Y; Hinrichs, K-U; Joye, S B

    2015-06-30

    The role of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in wetlands, the largest natural source of atmospheric methane, is poorly constrained. Here we report rates of microbially mediated AOM (average rate=20 nmol cm(-3) per day) in three freshwater wetlands that span multiple biogeographical provinces. The observed AOM rates rival those in marine environments. Most AOM activity may have been coupled to sulphate reduction, but other electron acceptors remain feasible. Lipid biomarkers typically associated with anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea were more enriched in (13)C than those characteristic of marine systems, potentially due to distinct microbial metabolic pathways or dilution with heterotrophic isotope signals. On the basis of this extensive data set, AOM in freshwater wetlands may consume 200 Tg methane per year, reducing their potential methane emissions by over 50%. These findings challenge precepts surrounding wetland carbon cycling and demonstrate the environmental relevance of an anaerobic methane sink in ecosystems traditionally considered strong methane sources.

  15. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing-Hsien; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Wang, Chi-Ping; Lin, Hui-Hsuan

    2013-10-15

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression.

  16. In vitro anti-oxidant potential of new metabolites from Hypericum oblongifolium (Guttiferae).

    PubMed

    Raziq, Naila; Saeed, Muhammad; Ali, Muhammad Shaiq; Zafar, Salman; Ali, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical investigations on Hypericum oblongifolium led to the isolation of a flavone named folicitin (1) and a bicyclic conjugated lactone, folenolide (2) from the ethyl acetate fraction of methanolic extract. Both metabolites were characterised as new compounds based on detailed spectroscopic analyses. In vitro anti-oxidant potential of both the compounds was evaluated by the DPPH radical scavenging assay. Compound 1 exhibited significant antioxidant activity while compound 2 was found inactive.

  17. A molecular switch based on potential-induced changes of oxidation state.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fan; He, Jin; Nuckolls, Colin; Roberts, Tucker; Klare, Jennifer E; Lindsay, Stuart

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the conductance of a hepta-aniline oligomer attached to gold electrodes held under potential control in electrolyte. It increases fifteen-fold (to 5.3+/-0.4 nS) on oxidation from the leucoemeraldine form to the emeraldine salt. The single-molecule current-voltage characteristic, linear in toluene, displays negative differential resistance in an acidic electrolyte. The negative differential resistance is accounted for by modification of the local surface potential by the applied bias. These results connect electrochemical data directly to molecular electronic behavior in a two-terminal device.

  18. Charge-transfer interatomic potential for investigation of the thermal-oxidation growth process of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamoto, So; Kumagai, Tomohisa; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Ohno, Takahisa; Kaneta, Chioko; Hatano, Asuka; Izumi, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    A charge-transfer interatomic potential, based on the hybrid-Tersoff potential that incorporates a covalent-ionic mixed-bond nature, was developed to reproduce the growth process of the thermal oxidation of silicon. A fitting process was employed with various reference structures sampled by MD. Actively exploring and learning the wide-range of phase space enabled us to develop a robust interatomic potential. Our interatomic potential reproduced the bulk properties of Si and SiO2 polymorphs well, in addition to the radial distribution function and bond angle distribution of amorphous SiO2. The covalent-ionic mixed-bond nature of the interatomic potential well reproduced the dissociation process of an oxygen molecule on the Si/SiO2 interface. The initial oxidation simulation was performed on the silicon surface. We grew the amorphous SiO2 layer by incorporating the oxygen molecules into the silicon network at the interface. The density of the SiO2 layer and the charge distribution at the interface showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Safety of zoledronic acid and incidence of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) during adjuvant therapy in a randomised phase III trial (AZURE: BIG 01-04) for women with stage II/III breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Coleman, R; Woodward, E; Brown, J; Cameron, D; Bell, R; Dodwell, D; Keane, M; Gil, M; Davies, C; Burkinshaw, R; Houston, S J; Grieve, R J; Barrett-Lee, P J; Thorpe, H

    2011-06-01

    The AZURE trial is an ongoing phase III, academic, multi-centre, randomised trial designed to evaluate the role of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in the adjuvant therapy of women with stage II/III breast cancer. Here, we report the safety and tolerability profile of ZOL in this setting. Eligible patients received (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and/or endocrine therapy and were randomised to receive neither additional treatment nor intravenous ZOL 4 mg. ZOL was administered after each chemotherapy cycle to exploit potential sequence-dependent synergy. ZOL was continued for 60 months post-randomisation (six doses in the first 6 months, eight doses in the following 24 months and five doses in the final 30 months). Serious (SAE) and non-serious adverse event (AE) data generated during the first 36 months on study were analysed for the safety population. 3,360 patients were recruited to the AZURE trial. The safety population comprised 3,340 patients (ZOL 1,665; control 1,675). The addition of ZOL to standard treatment did not significantly impact on chemotherapy delivery. SAE were similar in both treatment arms. No significant safety differences were seen apart from the occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in the ZOL group (11 confirmed cases; 0.7%; 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.1%). ZOL in the adjuvant setting is well tolerated, and can be safely administered in addition to adjuvant therapy including chemotherapy. The adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of ZOL, with a low incidence of ONJ.

  20. Methylmercury Oxidative Degradation Potentials in Contaminated and Pristine Sediments of the Carson River, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Oremland, R. S.; Miller, L. G.; Dowdle, P.; Connell, T.; Barkay, T.

    1995-01-01

    Sediments from mercury-contaminated and uncontaminated reaches of the Carson River, Nevada, were assayed for sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, denitrification, and monomethylmercury (MeHg) degradation. Demethylation of [(sup14)C]MeHg was detected at all sites as indicated by the formation of (sup14)CO(inf2) and (sup14)CH(inf4). Oxidative demethylation was indicated by the formation of (sup14)CO(inf2) and was present at significant levels in all samples. Oxidized/reduced demethylation product ratios (i.e., (sup14)CO(inf2)/(sup14)CH(inf4) ratios) generally ranged from 4.0 in surface layers to as low as 0.5 at depth. Production of (sup14)CO(inf2) was most pronounced at sediment surfaces which were zones of active denitrification and sulfate reduction but was also significant within zones of methanogenesis. In a core taken from an uncontaminated site having a high proportion of oxidized, coarse-grain sediments, sulfate reduction and methanogenic activity levels were very low and (sup14)CO(inf2) accounted for 98% of the product formed from [(sup14)C]MeHg. There was no apparent relationship between the degree of mercury contamination of the sediments and the occurrence of oxidative demethylation. However, sediments from Fort Churchill, the most contaminated site, were most active in terms of demethylation potentials. Inhibition of sulfate reduction with molybdate resulted in significantly depressed oxidized/reduced demethylation product ratios, but overall demethylation rates of inhibited and uninhibited samples were comparable. Addition of sulfate to sediment slurries stimulated production of (sup14)CO(inf2) from [(sup14)C]MeHg, while 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid blocked production of (sup14)CH(inf4). These results reveal the importance of sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria in oxidative demethylation of MeHg in anoxic environments. PMID:16535081

  1. Methylmercury oxidative degradation potentials in contaminated and pristine sediments of the Carson River, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G.; Dowdle, P.; Connell, T.; Barkay, T.

    1995-01-01

    Sediments from mercury-contaminated and uncontaminated reaches of the Carson River, Nevada, were assayed for sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, denitrification, and monomethylmercury (MeHg) degradation. Demethylation of [14C]MeHg was detected at all sites as indicated by the formation of 14CO2 and 14CH4. Oxidative demethylation was indicated by the formation of 14CO2 and was present at significant levels in all samples. Oxidized/reduced demethylation product ratios (i.e., 14CO2/14CH4 ratios) generally ranged from 4.0 in surface layers to as low as 0.5 at depth. Production of 14CO2 was most pronounced at sediment surfaces which were zones of active denitrification and sulfate reduction but was also significant within zones of methanogenesis. In a core taken from an uncontaminated site having a high proportion of oxidized, coarse-grain sediments, sulfate reduction and methanogenic activity levels were very low and 14CO2 accounted for 98% of the product formed from [14C]MeHg. There was no apparent relationship between the degree of mercury contamination of the sediments and the occurrence of oxidative demethylation. However, sediments from Fort Churchill, the most contaminated site, were most active in terms of demethylation potentials. Inhibition of sulfate reduction with molybdate resulted in significantly depressed oxidized/reduced demethylation product ratios, but overall demethylation rates of inhibited and uninhibited samples were comparable. Addition of sulfate to sediment slurries stimulated production of 14CO2 from [14C]MeHg, while 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid blocked production of 14CH4. These results reveal the importance of sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria in oxidative demethylation of MeHg in anoxic environments.

  2. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  3. Physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula (Salter-Harris Type I, II, III, and IV fractures).

    PubMed

    Podeszwa, David A; Mubarak, Scott J

    2012-06-01

    Physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula are common and can be seen at any age, although most are seen in the adolescent. An understanding of the unique anatomy of the skeletally immature ankle in relation to the mechanism of injury will help one understand the injury patterns seen in this population. A thorough clinical exam is critical to the diagnosis and treatment of these injuries and the avoidance of potentially catastrophic complications. Nondisplaced physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula can be safely treated nonoperatively. Displaced fractures should undergo a gentle reduction with appropriate anesthesia while multiple reduction attempts should be avoided. Gapping of the physis >3 mm after reduction should raise the suspicion of entrapped periosteum that will increase the risk of premature physeal closure. Open reduction of displaced Salter-Harris type III and IV fractures is critical to maintain joint congruity and minimize the risk of physeal arrest.

  4. Potential role of oxidative protein modification in energy metabolism in exercise.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Wataru; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Exercise leads to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via several sources in the skeletal muscle. In particular, the mitochondrial electron transport chain in the muscle cells produces ROS along with an elevation in the oxygen consumption during exercise. Such ROS generated during exercise can cause oxidative modification of proteins and affect their functionality. Many evidences have been suggested that some muscle proteins, i.e., myofiber proteins, metabolic signaling proteins, and sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins can be a targets modified by ROS generated due to exercise. We detected the modification of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) by Nε-(hexanoyl)lysine (HEL), one of the lipid peroxides, in exercised muscles, while the antioxidant astaxanthin reduced this oxidative stress-induced modification. Exercise-induced ROS may diminish CPT I activity caused by HEL modification, leading to a partly limited lipid utilization in the mitochondria. This oxidative protein modification may be useful as a potential biomarker to examine the oxidative stress levels, antioxidant compounds, and their possible benefits in exercise.

  5. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  6. Oxidative stress as a potential causal factor for autoimmune hemolytic anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Junichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Konno, Tasuku; Homma, Takujiro; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2015-01-01

    The kidneys and the blood system mutually exert influence in maintaining homeostasis in the body. Because the kidneys control erythropoiesis by producing erythropoietin and by supporting hematopoiesis, anemia is associated with kidney diseases. Anemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder, and it is caused by a deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), for which sulfhydryl oxidation due to an insufficient supply of NADPH is a likely direct cause. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) result in the sulfhydryl oxidation and hence are another potential cause for anemia. ROS are elevated in red blood cells (RBCs) under superoxide dismutase (SOD1) deficiency in C57BL/6 mice. SOD1 deficient mice exhibit characteristics similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the gerontic stage. An examination of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, which have normal SOD1 and G6PD genes, indicated that ROS levels in RBCs are originally high and further elevated during aging. Transgenic overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells effectively suppresses ROS elevation and ameliorates AIHA symptoms such as elevated anti-RBC antibodies and premature death in NZB mice. These results support the hypothesis that names oxidative stress as a risk factor for AIHA and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. Herein we discuss the association between oxidative stress and SLE pathogenesis based mainly on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of NZB and New Zealand white mice and provide insight into the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25949934

  7. Nicotine alkaloids as antioxidant and potential protective agents against in vitro oxidative haemolysis.

    PubMed

    Malczewska-Jaskóła, Karolina; Jasiewicz, Beata; Mrówczyńska, Lucyna

    2016-01-05

    The capacity of eleven nicotine alkaloids to reduce oxidative stress was investigated. In order to provide a structure-activity relationships analysis, new nicotine derivatives with a substituent introduced into the pyrrolidine ring were synthesized and investigated together with nicotine and its known analogs. All newly synthesized compounds were characterized by (1)H, (13)C NMR and EI-MS technique. The antioxidant properties of nicotine, its known analogs and newly produced derivatives, were evaluated by various antioxidant assays such 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH(•)) scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activity and total reducing ability determination by Fe(3+) → Fe(2+) transformation assay. The protective effects of all compounds tested against 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH)-induced oxidative haemolysis and morphological injury of human erythrocytes, were estimated in vitro. The results showed that nicotine alkaloids exhibited various antiradical efficacy and antioxidant activity in a structure- and a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the capacity of nicotine alkaloids to protect erythrocytes from AAPH- and t-BuOOH-induced oxidative haemolysis, was dependent on its incubation time with cells. Our findings showed that chemical and biological investigations conducted simultaneously can provide comprehensive knowledge concerning the antioxidant potential of nicotine alkaloids. This knowledge can be helpful in better understanding the properties of nicotine alkaloids under oxidative stress conditions.

  8. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to nitrite reduction can be a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Bao-Lan; Liu, Shuai; Chai, Xiao-Ping; He, Zhan-Fei; Ren, Hong-Xing; Liu, Yan; Geng, Sha; Wang, Wei; Tang, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yi-Ming; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) as a potential methane sink in the Hangzhou Bay and the adjacent Zhoushan sea area. The potential activity of the N-DAMO process was primarily observed in Hangzhou Bay by means of (13)C-labeling experiments, whereas very low or no potential N-DAMO activity could be detected in the Zhoushan sea area. The measured potential N-DAMO rates ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 nmol (13)CO2 g(-1) (dry sediment) day(-1), and the N-DAMO potentially contributed 2.0-9.4 % to the total microbial methane oxidation in the examined sediments. This indicated that the N-DAMO process may be an alternative pathway in the coastal methane cycle. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like bacteria in all the examined sediments, while the group A members (the dominant bacteria responsible for N-DAMO) were found mainly in Hangzhou Bay. Quantitative PCR showed that the 16S rRNA gene abundance of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria varied from 5.4 × 10(6) to 5.0 × 10(7) copies g(-1) (dry sediment), with a higher abundance observed in Hangzhou Bay. In addition, the overlying water NO3 (-) concentration and salinity were identified as the most important factors influencing the abundance and potential activity of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria in the examined sediments. This study showed the evidence of N-DAMO in coastal environments and indicated the importance of N-DAMO as a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

  9. Multiparametric MRI-based differentiation of WHO grade II/III glioma and WHO grade IV glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wiestler, Benedikt; Kluge, Anne; Lukas, Mathias; Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Schlegel, Jürgen; Meyer, Bernhard; Zimmer, Claus; Förster, Stefan; Pyka, Thomas; Preibisch, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive, imaging-based examination of glioma biology has received increasing attention in the past couple of years. To this end, the development and refinement of novel MRI techniques, reflecting underlying oncogenic processes such as hypoxia or angiogenesis, has greatly benefitted this research area. We have recently established a novel BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent) based MRI method for the measurement of relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) in glioma patients. In a set of 37 patients with newly diagnosed glioma, we assessed the performance of a machine learning model based on multiple MRI modalities including rOEF and perfusion imaging to predict WHO grade. An oblique random forest machine learning classifier using the entire feature vector as input yielded a five-fold cross-validated area under the curve of 0.944, with 34/37 patients correctly classified (accuracy 91.8%). The most important features in this classifier as per bootstrapped feature importance scores consisted of standard deviation of T1-weighted contrast enhanced signal, maximum rOEF value and cerebral blood volume (CBV) standard deviation. This study suggests that multimodal MRI information reflects underlying tumor biology, which is non-invasively detectable through integrative data analysis, and thus highlights the potential of such integrative approaches in the field of radiogenomics. PMID:27739434

  10. Chondroitin sulfate-capped super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential carriers of doxorubicin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Neha; Anwar, Mohammed; Asfer, Mohammed; Mehdi, Syed Hassan; Rizvi, Mohammed Moshahid Alam; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2016-10-20

    Chondroitin-4-sulfate (CS), a glycosaminoglycan, was used to prepare CS-capped super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which were further employed for loading a water-soluble chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin hydrochloride, DOX). CS-capped SPIONs have potential biomedical application in cancer targeting. The optimized formulation had a hydrodynamic size of 91.2±0.8nm (PDI; 0.228±0.004) and zeta potential of -49.1±1.66mV. DOX was loaded onto the formulation up to 2% (w/w) by physical interaction with CS. TEM showed nano-sized particles having a core-shell structure. XRD confirmed crystal phase of iron oxide. FT-IR conceived the interaction of iron oxide with CS as bidentate chelation and also confirmed DOX loading. Vibration sample magnetometry confirmed super-paramagnetic nature of nanoparticles, with saturation magnetization of 0.238emug(-1). In vitro release profile at pH 7.4 showed that 96.67% of DOX was released within 24h (first order kinetics). MTT assay in MCF7 cells showed significantly higher (p<0.0001) cytotoxicity for DOX in SPIONs than DOX solution (IC50 values 6.294±0.4169 and 11.316±0.1102μgmL(-1), respectively).

  11. Arginine-Based Inhibitors of Nitric Oxide Synthase: Therapeutic Potential and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Víteček, Jan; Lojek, Antonín; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Kubala, Lukáš

    2012-01-01

    In the past three decades, nitric oxide has been well established as an important bioactive molecule implicated in regulation of cardiovascular, nervous, and immune systems. Therefore, it is not surprising that much effort has been made to find specific inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases (NOS), the enzymes responsible for production of nitric oxide. Among the many NOS inhibitors developed to date, inhibitors based on derivatives and analogues of arginine are of special interest, as this category includes a relatively high number of compounds with good potential for experimental as well as clinical application. Though this group of inhibitors covers early nonspecific compounds, modern drug design strategies such as biochemical screening and computer-aided drug design have provided NOS-isoform-specific inhibitors. With an emphasis on major advances in this field, a comprehensive list of inhibitors based on their structural characteristics is discussed in this paper. We provide a summary of their biochemical properties as well as their observed effects both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we focus in particular on their pharmacology and use in recent clinical studies. The potential of newly designed specific NOS inhibitors developed by means of modern drug development strategies is highlighted. PMID:22988346

  12. Influence of chloride in mortar made of Portland cement types II, III, and V on the near-field microwave reflection properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cairong; Benally, Aaron D.; Case, Tobias; Zoughi, Reza; Kurtis, Kimberly

    2000-07-01

    Corrosion of steel rebar in reinforced concrete structures, can be induced by the presence of chloride in the structure. Corrosion of steel rebar is a problematic issue in the construction industry as it compromises the strength and integrity of the structure. Although techniques exist for chloride detection and its migration into a structure, they are destructive, time consuming and cannot be used for the interrogation of large surfaces. In this investigation three different portland cement types; namely, ASTM types II, III and V were used, and six cubic (8' X 8' X 8') mortar specimens were produced all with water-to-cement (w/c) ratio of 0.6 and sand-to-cement (s/c) ratio of 1.5. Tap water was used when producing three of these specimens (one of each cement type). For the other three specimens calcium chloride was added to the mixing tap water resulting in a salinity of 2.5%. These specimens were placed in a hydration room for one day and thereafter left it the room temperature with low humidity. The reflection properties of these specimens, using an open-ended rectangular waveguide probe, were monitored daily at 3 GHz (S-band) and 10 GHz (X-band). The results show the influence of cement type on the reflection coefficient as well as the influence of chloride on the curing process and setting time.

  13. Beating the Odds: Successful Establishment of a Phase II/III Clinical Research Trial in Resource-Poor Liberia during the Largest-Ever Ebola Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Doe-Anderson, J; Baseler, B; Driscoll, P; Johnson, M; Lysander, J; McNay, L; Njoh, WS; Smolskis, M; Wehrlen, L; Zuckerman, J

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that a country such as Liberia, not fully recovered from the devastation of decades of civil unrest, lacked the appropriate ethical and regulatory framework, basic human and health care services, and infrastructure to carry out clinical trials according to international standards of quality during a public health emergency. However, as Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea were being ravaged by the largest and most devastating Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak ever recorded, the topic of conducting clinical trials of experimental vaccine and treatment candidates in these resource-poor countries generated the keen interest and concern of scientists, researchers, physicians, bioethicists, philanthropists, and even politicians. Decisive action on behalf of the Liberian government, and a timely positive and supportive response from the United States (U.S.) government, led to the formation of PREVAIL (Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia) – a clinical research partnership between the two governments. Within a span of 12 weeks, this partnership accomplished the unimaginable: the successful initiation of a Phase II/III vaccine clinical trial for EVD in Liberia. This paper will discuss the dynamics of the research collaboration, barriers encountered, breakthroughs realized, key elements of success, and lessons learned in the process. PMID:28042619

  14. Ion paired chromatography of iron (II,III), nickel (II) and copper (II) as their 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline chelates.

    PubMed

    Mudasir; Yoshioka, N; Inoue, H

    1997-07-01

    A reversed phase ion-paired chromatographic method that can be used to determine trace amounts of iron (II,III), nickel (II) and copper (II) was developed and applied to the determination of iron (II) and iron (III) levels in natural water. The separation of these metal ions as their 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthroline) chelates on an Inertsil ODS column was investigated by using acetonitrile-water (80/20, v/v) containing 0.06 M perchloric acid as mobile phase and diode array spectrophotometric detection at 250-650 nm. Chromatographic parameters such as composition of mobile phase and concentration of perchloric acid in mobile phase were optimized. The calibration graphs of iron (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) ions were linear (r > 0.991) in the concentration range 0-0.5, 0-2.0 and 0-4.0 mug ml(-1), respectively. The detection limit of iron (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) were 2.67, 5.42 and 18.2 ng ml(-1) with relative standard deviation (n = 5) of 3.11, 5.81 and 7.16% at a concentration level of 10 ng ml(-1) for iron (II) and nickel (II) and 25 ng ml(-1) for copper (II), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of iron(II) and iron(III) in tap water and sea water samples without any interference from other common metal ions.

  15. Ionization potentials of transparent conductive indium tin oxide films covered with a single layer of fluorine-doped tin oxide nanoparticles grown by spray pyrolysis deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fukano, Tatsuo; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Ida, Takashi; Hashizume, Hiroo

    2005-04-15

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films deposited with single layers of monodispersive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) nanoparticles of several nanometers in size were grown on glass substrates by intermittent spray pyrolysis deposition using conventional atomizers. These films have significantly higher ionization potentials than the bare ITO and FTO films grown using the same technique. The ITO films covered with FTO particles of 7 nm in average size show an ionization potential of 5.01 eV, as compared with {approx}4.76 and {approx}4.64 eV in ITO and FTO films, respectively, which decreases as the FTO particle size increases. The ionization potentials are practically invariant against oxidation and reduction treatments, promising a wide application of the films to transparent conducting oxide electrodes in organic electroluminescent devices and light-emitting devices of high efficiencies.

  16. Reduced Graphene Oxide Anodes for Potential Application in Algae Biophotovoltaic Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Fong-Lee; Jaafar, Muhammad Musoddiq; Phang, Siew-Moi; Chan, Zhijian; Salleh, Nurul Anati; Azmi, Siti Zulfikriyah; Yunus, Kamran; Fisher, Adrian C.; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2014-12-01

    The search for renewable energy sources has become challenging in the current era, as conventional fuel sources are of finite origins. Recent research interest has focused on various biophotovoltaic (BPV) platforms utilizing algae, which are then used to harvest solar energy and generate electrical power. The majority of BPV platforms incorporate indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes for the purpose of charge transfer due to its inherent optical and electrical properties. However, other materials such as reduced graphene oxide (RGO) could provide higher efficiency due to their intrinsic electrical properties and biological compatibility. In this work, the performance of algae biofilms grown on RGO and ITO anodes were measured and discussed. Results indicate improved peak power of 0.1481 mWm-2 using the RGO electrode and an increase in efficiency of 119%, illustrating the potential of RGO as an anode material for applications in biofilm derived devices and systems.

  17. Effect of Solanum surattense seed on the oxidative potential of cauda epididymal spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, T; David, E; Viviyan, Therasa S; Elumalai, EK

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of aqueous seed extract of Solanum surattense (S. surattense) on the oxidative potential of cauda epididymal spermatozoa. Methods S. surattense seed extract was orally administered at the dosage of 10 mg/kg b.w. for 15 days, after which aspartate transferase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), citric acid and iso-citrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) were assayed. Results The activity levels of the enzymes AST and ALT, which are considered to be the androgenicity in the sperm suspension, were depleted in the extract fed rats. The activity level of the enzyme ICDH, was reduced significantly in the treated group (P<0.001). Conclusions It can be concluded that the oral administration of the aqueous seed extract of S. surattense can deplete the oxidative stress of cauda epididymal spermatozoa in albino rats. PMID:23569828

  18. Clinical potential of nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activators.

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila A

    2005-09-01

    A major problem with using nitrates in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is that tolerance develops to their vasodilatory actions. YC-1 was used as the lead compound to synthesize further nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activators, including BAY-41-2272 and BAY-41-8543. A nitric oxide and heme-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY-58-2667, was subsequently discovered by high-throughput screening. Tolerance to the vasodilatory actions of BAY-41-8543 and BAY-58-2667 does not develop. Results from animal studies have suggested that these compounds may have potential in the treatment of ischemic heart disease, essential and pulmonary hypertension, congestive heart failure, glomerulonephritis and erectile dysfunction.

  19. Oxidative stress and Alzheimer's disease: dietary polyphenols as potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Darvesh, Altaf S; Carroll, Richard T; Bishayee, Anupam; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J

    2010-05-01

    Oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In recent years, antioxidants - especially those of dietary origin - have been suggested as possible agents useful for the prevention and treatment of AD. This article reviews the role of oxidative stress and the contribution of free radicals in the development of AD, and also discusses the use of antioxidants as a therapeutic strategy in the amelioration of this illness. The antioxidant potential of polyphenolic compounds obtained from dietary sources, such as anthocyanins from berries, catechins and theaflavins from tea, curcumin from turmeric, resveratrol from grapes and peanuts, the dihydrochalcones aspalathin and nothofagin from rooibos and the xanthone mangiferin from honeybush, are discussed in this review. The neuroprotective effects of these phytochemicals in preclinical models of AD are highlighted. Finally, innovative concepts, novel hypotheses, current challenges and future directions in the use of dietary polyphenols for the treatment of AD are discussed.

  20. Reduced graphene oxide anodes for potential application in algae biophotovoltaic platforms.

    PubMed

    Ng, Fong-Lee; Jaafar, Muhammad Musoddiq; Phang, Siew-Moi; Chan, Zhijian; Salleh, Nurul Anati; Azmi, Siti Zulfikriyah; Yunus, Kamran; Fisher, Adrian C; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2014-12-22

    The search for renewable energy sources has become challenging in the current era, as conventional fuel sources are of finite origins. Recent research interest has focused on various biophotovoltaic (BPV) platforms utilizing algae, which are then used to harvest solar energy and generate electrical power. The majority of BPV platforms incorporate indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes for the purpose of charge transfer due to its inherent optical and electrical properties. However, other materials such as reduced graphene oxide (RGO) could provide higher efficiency due to their intrinsic electrical properties and biological compatibility. In this work, the performance of algae biofilms grown on RGO and ITO anodes were measured and discussed. Results indicate improved peak power of 0.1481 mWm(-2) using the RGO electrode and an increase in efficiency of 119%, illustrating the potential of RGO as an anode material for applications in biofilm derived devices and systems.

  1. Oxidative Stress and Carcinogenesis: Potential of Phytochemicals in Breast Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Forcados, Gilead Ebiegberi; James, Dorcas Bolanle; Sallau, Abdullahi Balarabe; Muhammad, Aliyu; Mabeta, Peace

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer remains a burden in both developed and developing countries, with higher mortality in developing countries. Attempts to eradicate cancer have not been successful despite the progress made in the development of more novel chemotherapeutic drugs. Reactive-oxygen-species-mediated oxidative stress is known to play a role in breast cancer pathogenesis via genetic and epigenetic modifications, resulting in uncontrolled cell proliferation. Phytochemicals could provide leads for the development of alternative therapeutic agents due to their antioxidant activity, as well as their ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, most of the studies carried out using in vitro models do not continue with further studies in estrogen-receptor-positive in vivo breast cancer models, or fail to examine the possible biochemical mechanisms of phytochemical-based amelioration. This review examines oxidative-stress-mediated carcinogenesis and the potential of phytochemicals as anticancer agents.

  2. Cumene hydroperoxide induced changes in oxidation-reduction potential in fresh and frozen seminal ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Sharma, R; Henkel, R; Roychoudhury, S; Sikka, S C; du Plessis, S; Sarda, Y B; Speyer, C; Nouh, M; Douglas, C; Kayali, Z; Ahmed, E S; Sabanegh, E

    2017-03-15

    Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) is a newer integrated measure of the balance between total oxidants (reactive oxygen species-ROS) and reductants (antioxidants) that reflects oxidative stress in a biological system. This study measures ORP and evaluates the effect of exogenous induction of oxidative stress by cumene hydroperoxide (CH) on ORP in fresh and frozen semen using the MiOXSYS Analyzer. Semen samples from healthy donors (n = 20) were collected and evaluated for sperm parameters. All samples were then flash-frozen at -80°C. Oxidative stress was induced by CH (5 and 50 μmoles/ml). Static ORP (sORP-(mV/10(6) sperm/ml) and capacity ORP (cORP-μC/10(6) sperm/ml) were measured in all samples before and after freezing. All values are reported as mean ± SEM. Both 5 and 50 μmoles/ml of CH resulted in a significant decline in per cent motility compared to control in pre-freeze semen samples. The increase in both pre-freeze and post-thaw semen samples for sORP was higher in the controls than with 50 μmoles/ml of CH. The change from pre-freeze to post-thaw cORP was comparable. The system is a simple, sensitive and portable tool to measure the seminal ORP and its dynamic impact on sperm parameters in both fresh and frozen semen specimens.

  3. Oxidative dissolution potential of biogenic and abiogenic TcO 2 in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

    2009-04-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Tc is highly mobile in its most oxidized state [Tc(VII)O4-] and less mobile in the reduced form [Tc(IV)O 2· nH 2O]. Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state; unconsolidated Pliocene-age fluvial sediment from the upper Ringold (RG) Formation at the Hanford Site and a clay-rich saprolite from the Field Research Center (FRC) background site on the Oak Ridge Site. Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 reduced Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. After bioreduction and heat-killing, biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO 2-like phase in both sediments. The biogenic redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular scale speciation of Tc compared to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-containing particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 μm-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were attributed to mass

  4. Theoretical Determination of One-Electron Oxidation Potentials for Nucleic Acid Bases.

    PubMed

    Psciuk, Brian T; Lord, Richard L; Munk, Barbara H; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2012-12-11

    The oxidation potentials for N-methyl substituted nucleic acid bases guanine, adenine, cytosine, thymine, uracil, xanthine, and 8-oxoguanine were computed using B3LYP and CBS-QB3 with the SMD solvation model. Acid-base and tautomeric equilibria present in aqueous solution were accounted for by combining standard redox potentials with calculated pKa and tautomerization energies to produce an ensemble averaged pH dependent potential. Gas phase free energies were computed using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) and CBS-QB3. Solvation free energies were computed at the SMD/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Compared to experimental results, calculations with the CBS-QB3 level of theory have a mean absolute error (MAE) of ca. 1 kcal/mol for the gas phase proton affinity/gas phase basicity and an MAE of ca. 0.04 eV for the adiabatic/vertical ionization potentials. The B3LYP calculations have a MAE of ∼2 kcal/mol for the proton affinity/gas phase basicity data but systematically underestimated ionization potentials by 0.14-0.21 eV. Solvent cavities for charged solute species were rescaled uniformly by fitting computed pKa data to experimentally measured pKa values. After solvent cavity scaling, the MAEs for computed pKa's compared to experimental results are 0.7 for B3LYP and 0.9 for CBS-QB3. In acetonitrile, the computed E°(XH(+•)/XH) redox potentials are systematically lower than experimentally measured potentials by 0.21 V for CBS-QB3 and 0.33 V for B3LYP. However, the redox potentials relative to adenine are in very good agreement with experimental results, with MAEs of 0.10 V for CBS-QB3 and 0.07 V for B3LYP. In aqueous solution, B3LYP and CBS-QB3 have MAEs of 0.21 and 0.19 V for E7(X(•),H(+)/XH). Replacing the methyl substituent with ribose changes the calculated E7 potentials by 0.1-0.2 V. The calculated difference between the guanine and adenine oxidation potentials is too large compared to experimental results, but the calculated difference between

  5. Assessment of oxidative stress and chromosomal aberration inducing potential of three medical grade silicone polymer materials.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmi, P; Geetha, C S; Mohanan, P V

    2013-02-01

    Medical expenditures for devices are increasing along with the ageing of human population and the synthesis of materials such as silicone polymers is on upsurge for manufacturing these devices. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) emphasizes a battery of tests for preclinical assessment of biocompatibility of medical devices. Genotoxicity assays have become an integral component of these test procedures and it employs a set of in vitro and in vivo experiments to detect mutagens. Hence, this study was performed with an intention to investigate the genotoxic potential of the physiological saline extracts of three medical grade silicone polymer materials by the in vitro chromosomal aberration assay using human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Further, the oxidative stress inducing potential of the material extracts was investigated in vivo in mice liver homogenates using cyclophosphamide as positive control. The investigation revealed that none of the three materials were able to produce marked human lymphocyte chromosomal aberration, suggesting the absence of mutagens. The materials also showed negative results in their oxidative stress inducing potential, which was revealed by the normal levels of lipid peroxidation and unaltered levels of glutathione and its metabolizing enzymes in the mice liver tissue homogenates. It was interesting to observe a significant correlation between the genotoxic and antioxidant parameters investigated. Hence, it is suggested that the estimation of antioxidant status would serve as a better preliminary testing procedure prior to evaluating the genetic and molecular toxicity mechanisms of medical devices and/or materials intended for manufacture of such devices.

  6. Stationary market applications potential of solid oxide and solid polymer fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.N.; Fletcher, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    The UK DTI`s Advanced Fuel Cells Programme currently focuses on two main fuel cell technologies, namely the solid oxide and solid polymer systems (SOFC and SPFC), respectively. The provision of accurate and timely market data is regarded as an important part of the overall programme objectives, such as to assist both Government and industry in their appraisals of the technologies. The present study was therefore commissioned against this background, with a complementary study addressing transportation and mobile applications. The results reported herein relate to the stationary market applications potential of both SOFC and SPFC systems.

  7. Determination of the oxidation potentials of organic benzene derivatives: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Kyu; Jung, Jaehoon; Cho, Jeong-Ju; Kim, Hyeong-Jin

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the IP, Δ Ge, and Eox values for 10 mono-substituted benzene molecules and compared them with experimental values obtained by linear sweep voltammetry. The Eox values were evaluated using the density functional method and thermodynamic cycles. The relative oxidation potentials are in close agreement with experimental values, while the UB3LYP/6-31+G(d) approach shows the absolute Eox values to be lower by about 0.9 V. Consideration of bulk solvent effects is important to fully describe the experimental variation in Eox. The HOMO, NBO, and Wiberg bond index were analyzed to investigate the changes when moving from neutral to cationic molecules.

  8. Development of Novel Magnetic Metal Oxide Thin Films and Carbon Nanotube Materials for Potential Device Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-09

    spin spring materials .”To study this possibility, we extended our investigation to the synthesis of CoFe2O4/CoFe2/CoFe2O4 trilayers under different...09-05-2016 18-May-2011 17-May-2014 Final Report: Development of Novel Magnetic Metal Oxide Thin Films and Carbon Nanotube Materials for Potential...U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Nanomagnetics, carbon nanotubes, multilayer materials , spin

  9. Metal Oxide Nanomaterials in Nanomedicine: Applications in Photodynamic Therapy and Potential Toxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaojia; Aker, Winfred G; Huang, Ming-Ju; Watts, John D; Hwang, Huey-Min

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide nanomaterials have exhibited excellent performance as nanomedicines in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer and infection treatment. Their unique and tunable physicochemical properties advance them as promising alternatives in drug delivery, early diagnosis, imaging, and treatment against various tumors and infectious diseases. Moreover, the implementation of nanophototherapy in deep tissue sites is enhanced by advancements in photosensitization technology. Notwithstanding the progress made in emerging metal oxide nanomaterials-derived PDT, the potential toxicity towards adjunct tissues associated with this approach remains challenging. Regulation and legislation have also been recommended and subsequently enacted in response to public concerns related to large-scale production, transportation, use, and disposal of those nanomaterials. Consequently, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) paradigm has been adopted and is widely used in evaluating and predicting the side effects of nanomedicines, thus influencing their design and fabrication. This article briefly reviews the application of metal oxide nanomaterials in PDT and their associated adverse impacts as reported in recent publications. The future trends and implications of this platform in nanomedicine are also highlighted. However, more studies and efforts have to be carried out for developing novel nano-therapeutics with high selectivity, sensitivity, biocompatibility, and minimal side effects in PDT.

  10. Antioxidant potential of tea reduces arsenite induced oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, D; Roy, S; Roy, M

    2010-04-01

    Environmental arsenic (As) is a potent human carcinogen and groundwater As contamination is a major health concern in West Bengal, India. Oxidative stress has been one of the prime factors in As-induced carcinogenicity. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), beyond the body's endogenous antioxidant balance cause a severe imbalance of the cellular antioxidant defence mechanism. Tea, a popular beverage has excellent chemopreventive and antioxidant properties. In this study it was investigated whether these flavonoids could ameliorate the arsenite (As III) induced oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice. Bio-monitoring with comet assay elicited that the increase in genotoxicity caused by As III was counteracted by both black tea and green tea. Elevated levels of lipid peroxides and protein carbonyl by As III were effectively reduced with green as well as black tea. They also exhibited protective action against the As III induced depletion of antioxidants like catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione (GSH) in mice liver tissue. Thus the tea polyphenols by virtue of their antioxidant potential may be used as an effective agent to reduce the As III induced oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice.

  11. Cerium oxide nanoparticles prevent apoptosis in primary cortical culture by stabilizing mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Arya, A; Sethy, N K; Das, M; Singh, S K; Das, A; Ujjain, S K; Sharma, R K; Sharma, M; Bhargava, K

    2014-07-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) of spherical shape have unique antioxidant capacity primarily due to alternating + 3 and + 4 oxidation states and crystal defects. Several studies revealed the protective efficacies of CNPs in cells and tissues against the oxidative damage. However, its effect on mitochondrial functioning, downstream effectors of radical burst and apoptosis remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether CNPs treatment could protect the primary cortical cells from loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and Δψm-dependent cell death. CNPs with spherical morphology and size range 7-10 nm were synthesized and utilized at a concentration of 25 nM on primary neuronal culture challenged with 50 μM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We showed that optimal dose of CNPs minimized ROS content of the cells and also curbed related surge in cellular calcium flux. Importantly, CNPs treatment prevented apoptotic loss of cell viability. Reduction in the apoptosis could be successfully attributed to the maintenance of Δψm and restoration of major redox equivalents NADH/NAD(+) ratio and cellular ATP. These findings, therefore, suggest possible route of CNPs protective efficacies in primary cortical culture.

  12. Role of oxidative stress & transient receptor potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Protiti; Bathri, Rashmi; Kumar, Lalit; Vijayan, V.K.; Maudar, K.K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect millions of people worldwide and is known to be one of the leading causes of death. The highly sensitive airways protect themselves from irritants by cough and sneeze which propel endogenous and exogenous substances to minimize airway noxious effects. One noxious effect of these substances is activation of peripheral sensory nerve endings of nociceptor neurons innervating these airways lining thus transmitting dangerous signals from the environment to the central nervous system (CNS). Nociceptor neurons include transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, especially the vanilloid and ankyrin subfamilies, TRPV1/A1 which can be activated by noxious chemical challenges in models of airways disease. As oxidative stress may activate airways sensory neurons and contribute to COPD exacerbations we sought to review the role that TRP channel activation by oxidative signals may have on airway responses. It would be prudent to target the TRP channels with antagonists and lower systemic oxidative stress with agents that can modulate TRP expression and boost the endogenous levels of antioxidants for treatment and management of COPD. PMID:26458340

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Environments and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesle, M.; Beam, J.; Jay, Z.; Bodle, B.; Bogenschutz, E.; Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be produced in natural waters via photochemical reactions between dissolved oxygen, organic carbon and light. Other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are potentially formed in environments with high concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe(II), ~10-100 μM) by reaction between H2O2 and Fe(II) (i.e., Fenton chemistry). Thermophilic archaea and bacteria inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats have defense mechanisms against both extracellular and intracellular peroxide, such as peroxiredoxins (which can degrade H2O2) and against other ROS, such as superoxide dismutases. Biological cycling of H2O2 is not well understood in geothermal ecosystems, and geochemical measurements combined with molecular investigations will contribute to our understanding of microbial response to oxidative stress. We measured H2O2 and other dissolved compounds (Fe(II), Fe(III), H2S, O2), as well as photon flux, pH and temperature, over time in surface geothermal waters of several acidic springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY (Beowulf Spring and One Hundred Spring Plain). Iron-oxide mats were sampled in Beowulf Spring for on-going analysis of metatranscriptomes and RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response gene transcription (e.g., superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and peroxidases). In situ analyses show that H2O2 concentrations are lowest in the source waters of sulfidic systems (ca. 1 μM), and increase by two-fold in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III)-oxide mat formation (ca. 2 - 3 μM). Channel transects confirm increases in H2O2 as a function of oxygenation (distance). The temporal dynamics of H2O2, O2, Fe(II), and H2S in Beowulf geothermal waters were also measured during a diel cycle, and increases in H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux. These results suggest that photochemical reactions may contribute to changes in H2O2. We hypothesize that increases in H2O2 and O2

  14. Long interspersed nuclear element-1 hypomethylation and oxidative stress: correlation and bladder cancer diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Patchsung, Maturada; Boonla, Chanchai; Amnattrakul, Passakorn; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana

    2012-01-01

    Although, increased oxidative stress and hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) associate with bladder cancer (BCa) development, the relationship between these alterations is unknown. We evaluated the oxidative stress and hypomethylation of the LINE-1 in 61 BCa patients and 45 normal individuals. To measure the methylation levels and to differentiate the LINE-1 loci into hypermethylated, partially methylated and hypomethylated, peripheral blood cells, urinary exfoliated cells and cancerous tissues were evaluated by combined bisulfite restriction analysis PCR. The urinary total antioxidant status (TAS) and plasma protein carbonyl content were determined. The LINE-1 methylation levels and patterns, especially hypomethylated loci, in the blood and urine cells of the BCa patients were different from the levels and patterns in the healthy controls. The urinary TAS was decreased, whereas the plasma protein carbonyl content was increased in the BCa patients relative to the controls. A positive correlation between the methylation of LINE-1 in the blood-derived DNA and urinary TAS was found in both the BCa and control groups. The urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content provided the best diagnostic potential for BCa prediction. Based on post-diagnostic samples, the combination test improved the diagnostic power to a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 96%. In conclusion, decreased LINE-1 methylation is associated with increased oxidative stress both in healthy and BCa subjects across the various tissue types, implying a dose-response association. Increases in the LINE-1 hypomethylation levels and the number of hypomethylated loci in both the blood- and urine-derived cells and increase in the oxidative stress were found in the BCa patients. The combination test of the urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content may be useful for BCa screening and monitoring of treatment.

  15. Metal oxide-based nanoparticles: revealing their potential to enhance oil recovery in different wettability systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendraningrat, Luky; Torsæter, Ole

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents systematic studies of hydrophilic metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed in brine intended to reveal their potential to enhance oil recovery (EOR) in various rock wettability systems. The stability in suspension (nanofluid) of the NPs has been identified as a key factor related to their use as an EOR agent. Experimental techniques have been developed for nanofluid stability using three coupled methods: direct visual observation, surface conductivity and particle size measurements. The use of a dispersant has been investigated and has been shown to successfully improve metal oxide nanofluid stability as a function of its concentration. The dispersant alters the nanofluid properties, i.e. surface conductivity, pH and particle size distribution. A two-phase coreflood experiment was conducted by injecting the stable nanofluids as a tertiary process (nano-EOR) through core plugs with various wettabilities ranging from water-wet to oil-wet. The combination of metal oxide nanofluid and dispersant improved the oil recovery to a greater extent than either silica-based nanofluid or dispersant alone in all wettability systems. The contact angle, interfacial tension (IFT) and effluent were also measured. It was observed that metal oxide-based nanofluids altered the quartz plates to become more water-wet, and the results are consistent with those of the coreflood experiment. The particle adsorption during the transport process was identified from effluent analysis. The presence of NPs and dispersant reduced the IFT, but its reduction is sufficient to yield significant additional oil recovery. Hence, wettability alteration plays a dominant role in the oil displacement mechanism using nano-EOR.

  16. Oxidative stress: a potential link between emotional wellbeing and immune response.

    PubMed

    Salim, Samina

    2016-08-01

    Emotional wellbeing is central to normal health and good living. Persistent psychological stress often disrupts emotional wellbeing and triggers onset of neuropsychiatric ailments. An integrated, multisystemic stress response involving neuroinflammatory, neuroendocrine and metabolic cascades seem to have some causative links. Of particular interest are the neuroinflammatory processes. Psychological stress has been suggested to negatively affect normal functioning of the immune system contributing to the pathophysiology of some neuropsychiatric conditions. Thus examination of the interaction between the immune system and the central nervous system is likely to reveal molecular targets critical for development of potential therapeutic and preventive measures. This review is a summarized discussion of evidence linking impact of psychological stress on the immune system, with a particular emphasis on oxidative stress mechanisms by which mental stress potentially impacts immune function leading to activation of multiple cascades resulting in subsequent manifestation of psychiatric symptomologies.

  17. Ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp Hassel, Egon; Hellmann, Robert Bich, Eckard

    2015-06-28

    We present an analytical intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) for two rigid nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) molecules derived from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. Interaction energies for 2018 N{sub 2}O–N{sub 2}O configurations were computed utilizing the counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the CCSD(T) level of theory using basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ supplemented with bond functions. A site-site potential function with seven sites per N{sub 2}O molecule was fitted to the pair interaction energies. We validated our PES by computing the second virial coefficient as well as shear viscosity and thermal conductivity in the dilute-gas limit. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data.

  18. Ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp; Hellmann, Robert; Hassel, Egon; Bich, Eckard

    2015-06-01

    We present an analytical intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) for two rigid nitrous oxide (N2O) molecules derived from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. Interaction energies for 2018 N2O-N2O configurations were computed utilizing the counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the CCSD(T) level of theory using basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ supplemented with bond functions. A site-site potential function with seven sites per N2O molecule was fitted to the pair interaction energies. We validated our PES by computing the second virial coefficient as well as shear viscosity and thermal conductivity in the dilute-gas limit. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data.

  19. Chapter A6. Section 6.5. Reduction-Oxidation Potential (Electrode Method)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, Darrell Kirk; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2005-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) potential--also referred to as Eh--is a measure of the equilibrium potential, relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, developed at the interface between a noble metal electrode and an aqueous solution containing electroactive chemical species. Measurements of Eh are used to evaluate geochemical speciation models, and Eh data can provide insights on the evolution and status of water chemistry in an aqueous system. Nevertheless, the measurement is fraught with inherent interferences and limitations that must be understood and considered to determine applicability to the aqueous system being studied. For this reason, Eh determination is not one of the field parameters routinely measured by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes the equipment and procedures needed to measure Eh in water using a platinum electrode. Guidance as to the limitations and interpretation of Eh measurement also is included.

  20. Indium oxide thin film as potential photoanodes for corrosion protection of stainless steel under visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Jianqiang; Sun, Kai; Zhu, Yukun; Bu, Yuyu; Chen, Zhuoyuan

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: If the conduction band potential of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is more negative than the corrosion potential of stainless steel, photo-induced electrons will be transferred from In{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the steel, thus shifting the potential of the steel into a corrosion immunity region and preventing the steel from the corrosion. - Highlights: • Indium oxide performed novel application under visible light. • Indium oxide by sol–gel method behaved better photoelectrochemical properties. • Electrons were transferred to stainless steel from indium oxide once light on. - Abstract: This paper reports the photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of 304 stainless steel by In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin-film under visible-light. The films were fabricated with In{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders, synthesized by both sol–gel (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg) and solid-state (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss) processes. The photo-induced open circuit potential and the photo-to-current efficiency measurements suggested that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} could be a promising candidate material for photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of metallic alloys under visible light. Moreover, the polarization curve experimental results indicated that In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film can mitigate the corrosion potential of 304 stainless steel to much more negative values with a higher photocurrent density than the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss film under visible-light illumination. All the results demonstrated that the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film provides a better photoelectrochemical cathodic protection for 304 stainless steel than In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss thin-film under visible-light illumination. The higher photoelectrochemical efficiency is possibly due to the uniform thin films produced with the smaller particle size of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg, which facilitates the transfer of the photo-induced electrons from bulk to the surface and suppresses the charge recombination of the electrons and holes.

  1. Potential for iron oxides to control metal releases in CO2 sequestration scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, P.M.; Roy, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for the release of metals into groundwater following the injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the subsurface during carbon sequestration projects remains an open research question. Changing the chemical composition of even the relatively deep formation brines during CO2 injection and storage may be of concern because of the recognized risks associated with the limited potential for leakage of CO2-impacted brine to the surface. Geochemical modeling allows for proactive evaluation of site geochemistry before CO2 injection takes place to predict whether the release of metals from iron oxides may occur in the reservoir. Geochemical modeling can also help evaluate potential changes in shallow aquifers were CO2 leakage to occur near the surface. In this study, we created three batch-reaction models that simulate chemical changes in groundwater resulting from the introduction of CO2 at two carbon sequestration sites operated by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). In each of these models, we input the chemical composition of groundwater samples into React??, and equilibrated them with selected mineral phases and CO 2 at reservoir pressure and temperature. The model then simulated the kinetic reactions with other mineral phases over a period of up to 100 years. For two of the simulations, the water was also at equilibrium with iron oxide surface complexes. The first model simulated a recently completed enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project in south-central Illinois in which the MGSC injected into, and then produced CO2, from a sandstone oil reservoir. The MGSC afterwards periodically measured the brine chemistry from several wells in the reservoir for approximately two years. The sandstone contains a relatively small amount of iron oxide, and the batch simulation for the injection process showed detectable changes in several aqueous species that were attributable to changes in surface complexation sites. After using the batch reaction

  2. Arsenite oxidizing multiple metal resistant bacteria isolated from industrial effluent: their potential use in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Naureen, Ayesha; Rehman, Abdul

    2016-08-01

    Arsenite oxidizing bacteria, isolated from industrial wastewater, showed high resistance against arsenite (40 mM) and other heavy metals (10 mM Pb; 8 mM Cd; 6 mM Cr; 10 mM Cu and 26.6 mM As(5+)). Bacterial isolates were characterized, on the basis of morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA ribotyping, as Bacillus cereus (1.1S) and Acinetobacter junii (1.3S). The optimum temperature and pH for the growth of both strains were found to be 37 °C and 7. Both the strains showed maximum growth after 24 h of incubation. The predominant form of arsenite oxidase was extracellular in B. cereus while in A. junii both types of activities, intracellular and extracellular, were found. The extracellular aresenite oxidase activity was found to be 730 and 750 µM/m for B. cereus and A. junii, respectively. The arsenite oxidase from both bacterial strains showed maximum activity at 37 °C, pH 7 and enhanced in the presence of Zn(2+). The presence of two protein bands with molecular weight of approximately 70 and 14 kDa in the presence of arsenic points out a possible role in arsenite oxidation. Arsenite oxidation potential of B. cereus and A. junii was determined up to 92 and 88 % in industrial wastewater after 6 days of incubation. The bacterial treated wastewater improved the growth of Vigna radiata as compared to the untreated wastewater. It indicates that these bacterial strains may find some potential applications in wastewater treatment systems to transform toxic arsenite into less toxic form, arsenate.

  3. Rab27a GTPase modulates L-type Ca2+ channel function via interaction with the II-III linker of CaV1.3 subunit.

    PubMed

    Reichhart, Nadine; Markowski, Magdalena; Ishiyama, Shimpei; Wagner, Andrea; Crespo-Garcia, Sergio; Schorb, Talitha; Ramalho, José S; Milenkovic, Vladimir M; Föckler, Renate; Seabra, Miguel C; Strauß, Olaf

    2015-11-01

    In a variety of cells, secretory processes require the activation of both Rab27a and L-type channels of the Ca(V)1.3 subtype. In the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), Rab27a and Ca(V)1.3 channels regulate growth-factor secretion towards its basolateral side. Analysis of murine retina sections revealed a co-localization of both Rab27a and Ca(V)1.3 at the basolateral membrane of the RPE. Heterologously expressed Ca(V)1.3/β3/α2δ1 channels showed negatively shifted voltage-dependence and decreased current density of about 70% when co-expressed with Rab27a. However, co-localization analysis using α(5)β(1) integrin as a membrane marker revealed that Rab27a co-expression reduced the surface expression of Ca(V)1.3 only about 10%. Physical binding of heterologously expressed Rab27a with Ca(V)1.3 channels was shown by co-localization in immunocytochemistry as well as co-immunoprecipitation which was abolished after deletion of a MyRIP-homologous amino acid sequence at the II-III linker of the Ca(V)1.3 subunit. Rab27a over-expression in ARPE-19 cells positively shifted the voltage dependence, decreased current density of endogenous Ca(V)1.3 channels and reduced VEGF-A secretion. We show the first evidence of a direct functional modulation of an ion channel by Rab27a suggesting a new mechanism of Rab and ion channel interaction in the control of VEGF-A secretion in the RPE.

  4. Manganese(II,III) Oxyborate, Mn 2OBO 3: A Distorted Homometallic Warwickite—Synthesis, Crystal Structure, Band Calculations, and Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrestam, R.; Kritikos, M.; Sjödin, A.

    1995-02-01

    The manganese(II,III) oxyborate with the composition Mn2OBO3 has been synthesized by high-temperature techniques. X-ray studies show that crystals of the specimen, grown with borax as flux, are monoclinic, with space group P21/n, = 9.2866(7), b = 9.5333(10), c = 3.2438(3) Å, and β = 90.757(7)°. A model of the crystal structure has been refined with the 2064 most significant (l ≥ 5 · σ1) X-ray reflections with sin(θ)/λ ≤ 1.08 Å-1 to R = 0.40. The structure of Mn2OBO3 can be considered to be a distorted modification of the orthorhombic warwickite structure. The distortions, apparently caused by Jahn-Teller effects induced by the Mn3+ ions, remove the mirror symmetry of the parent undistorted warwickite. As a consequence, the space group symmetry is lowered from Pnam to one of its subgroups, P21/n. The structural results as well as the measured magnetic susceptibilities indicate high-spin manganese ions. The magnetic susceptibilities in the temperature region 110-300 K follow the Curie-Weiss law. The Weiss constant of -132(1) K indicates an antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperature. The bond distances and calculated bond valence sums indicate that the trivalent manganese ions are located in the two inner columns of the four-octahedra-wide walls. This metal charge distribution is supported by extended Hückel band calculations on some homometallic warwickites. The difference in metal coordination around one of the borate oxygen atoms is reflected by a significant deviation of the borate group geometry from the ideal trigonal symmetry.

  5. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Hudis, Clifford; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-A Predictor of Outcome for Patients Irradiated for Stage II-III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of tumor cell expression of FGF-2 on the outcome of 60 patients irradiated for Stage II-III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: The effect of FGF-2 expression and 13 additional factors on locoregional control (LRC), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated. These additional factors included age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic type, histologic grade, T and N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack-years, smoking during radiotherapy, and hemoglobin during radiotherapy. Locoregional failure was identified by endoscopy or computed tomography. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the Wilcoxon test and multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: On univariate analysis, improved LRC was associated with surgery (p = .017), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .036), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of LRC, surgery (relative risk [RR], 2.44; p = .037), and FGF-2 expression (RR, 5.06; p <.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, improved MFS was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (p = .020), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .007), and FGF-2 negativity (p = .001). On multivariate analysis of MFS, the hemoglobin levels (RR, 2.65; p = .019) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.05; p = .004) were significant. On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with a lower N category (p = .048), greater hemoglobin levels (p <.001), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of OS, greater hemoglobin levels (RR, 4.62; p = .002) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.25; p = .002) maintained significance. Conclusions: Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 appeared to be an independent negative predictor

  7. Enrichment processes of arsenic in oxidic sedimentary rocks - from geochemical and genetic characterization to potential mobility.

    PubMed

    Banning, Andre; Rüde, Thomas R

    2010-11-01

    Sedimentary marine iron ores of Jurassic age and Tertiary marine sandy sediments containing iron hydroxides concretions have been sampled from boreholes and outcrops in two study areas in Germany to examine iron and arsenic accumulation processes. Samples were analyzed for bulk rock geochemistry (INAA/ICP-OES), quantitative mineralogy (XRD with Rietveld analysis), element distribution (electron microprobe) and arsenic fractionation (sequential extraction). Bulk Jurassic ores contain an average arsenic content of 123 μg g(-1) hosted in mainly goethite ooids which slowly formed in times of condensed sedimentation. Enrichment occurred syndepositionally and is therefore characterized as primary. Iron concretions in Tertiary sediments mainly consist of goethite and yield arsenic up to 1860 μg g(-1). The accumulation process is secondary as it took place in the course of oxidation of the originally reduced marine sediments under terrestrial conditions, leading to element redistribution and local enrichment in the near-surface part. The scale of enrichment was assessed calculating Enrichment Factors, indicating that arsenic accumulation was favoured over other potential contaminants. In spite of higher bulk arsenic contents in the oxidic rocks, the mainly pyrite-hosted As pool within the reduced deeper part of the Tertiary sediments is shown to have a higher potential for remobilization and creation of elevated arsenic concentrations in groundwater.

  8. Oxygen distribution and potential ammonia oxidation in floating, liquid manure crusts.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Daniel Aa; Nielsen, Lars P; Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels P

    2010-01-01

    Floating, organic crusts on liquid manure, stored as a result of animal production, reduce emission of ammonia (NH3) and other volatile compounds during storage. The occurrence of NO2- and NO3- in the crusts indicate the presence of actively metabolizing NH3-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) which may be partly responsible for this mitigation effect. Six manure tanks with organic covers (straw and natural) were surveyed to investigate the prevalence and potential activity ofAOB and its dependence on the O2 availability in the crust matrix as studied by electrochemical profiling. Oxygen penetration varied from <1 mm in young, poorly developed natural crusts and old straw crusts, to several centimeters in the old natural crusts. The AOB were ubiquitously present in all crusts investigated, but nitrifying activity could only be detected in old natural crusts and young straw crust with high O2 availability. In old natural crusts, total potential NH3 oxidation rates were similar to reported fluxes of NH3 from slurry without surface crust. These results indicate that old, natural surface crusts may develop into a porous matrix with high O2 availability that harbors an active population of aerobic microorganisms, including AOB. The microbial activity may thus contribute to a considerable reduction of ammonia emissions from slurry tanks with well-developed crusts.

  9. Bio-therapeutic Potential and Cytotoxicity Assessment of Pectin-Mediated Synthesized Nanostructured Cerium Oxide.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sandeep N; Paradeshi, Jayasinh S; Chaudhari, Prapti B; Mishra, Satyendra J; Chaudhari, Bhushan L

    2016-10-01

    In the present studies, renewable and nontoxic biopolymer, pectin, was extracted from Indian red pomelo fruit peels and used for the synthesis of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2-NPs) having bio-therapeutic potential. The structural information of extracted pectin was investigated by FTIR and NMR spectroscopic techniques. Physicochemical characteristics of this pectin suggested its application in the synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles. Using this pectin as a template, CeO2-NPs were synthesized by simple, one step and eco-friendly approach. The UV-Vis spectrum of synthesized CeO2-NPs exhibited a characteristic absorption peak at wavelength 345 nm, which can be assigned to its intrinsic band gap (3.59 eV) absorption. Photoluminescence measurements of CeO2-NPs revealed that the broad emission was composed of seven different bands. FTIR analysis ensured involvement of pectin in the formation and stabilization of CeO2-NPs. FT-Raman spectra showed a sharp Raman active mode peak at 461.8 cm(-1) due to a symmetrical stretching mode of Ce-O vibration. DLS, FESEM, EDX, and XRD analysis showed that the CeO2-NPs prepared were polydispersed, spherical shaped with a cubic fluorite structure and average particle size ≤40 nm. These CeO2-NPs displayed broad spectrum antimicrobial activity, antioxidant potential, and non-cytotoxic nature.

  10. Potentiation of osteoclast bone-resorption activity by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, T P; Collin-Osdoby, P; Patel, N; Osdoby, P; Krukowski, M; Misko, T P; Settle, S L; Currie, M G; Nickols, G A

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the effects of modulating nitric oxide (NO) levels on osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in vitro and the effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on bone mineral density in vivo. Diaphorase-based histochemical staining for NOS activity of bone sections or highly enriched osteoclast cultures suggested that osteoclasts exhibit substantial NOS activity that may account for basal NO production. Chicken osteoclasts were cultured for 36 hr on bovine bone slices in the presence or absence of the NO-generating agent sodium nitroprusside or the NOS inhibitors N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and aminoguanidine. Nitroprusside markedly decreased the number of bone pits and the average pit area in comparison with control cultures. On the other hand, NOS inhibition by N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or aminoguanidine dramatically increased the number of bone pits and the average resorption area per pit. In a model of osteoporosis, aminoguanidine potentiated the loss of bone mineral density in ovariectomized rats. Aminoguanidine also caused a loss of bone mineral density in the sham-operated rats. Inhibition of NOS activity in vitro and in vivo resulted in an apparent potentiation of osteoclast activity. These findings suggest that endogenous NO production in osteoclast cultures may regulate resorption activity. The modulation of NOS and NO levels by cells within the bone microenvironment may be a sensitive mechanism for local control of osteoclast bone resorption. Images PMID:7513424

  11. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathological negative nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: an analysis from the NCDB

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuai; Jiang, Wen; Chen, Kai; Kim, Betty Y.S.; Liu, Qiang; Jacobs, Lisa K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathological negative nodes (ypN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) remains controversial. Methods A total of 1560 clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients treated with NAC and mastectomy who achieved ypN0 between 1998 and 2009 in the National Cancer Database were analyzed. The effects of PMRT on overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort and multiple subgroups were evaluated. Imputation and propensity score matching were used as sensitivity analyses to minimize biases. Results Of the entire 1560 eligible patients, 903 (57.9%) received PMRT and 657 (42.1%) didn’t. At a median follow-up of 56.0 months, no statistical difference was observed for OS between two groups by univariate and multivariate analyses (P = 0.120; HR 1.571, 95% CI 0.839-2.943). On subgroup analyses, PMRT significantly improved OS in patients with clinical stage IIIB/IIIC disease, T3/T4 tumor, or residual invasive breast cancer after NAC (P < 0.05). This improvement in OS remained significant after sensitivity analyses for the propensity score-matched patients. Conclusions This study demonstrated that PMRT showed a heterogeneous effect in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with ypN0 following NAC. PMRT improved OS for patients with clinical stage IIIB/IIIC disease, T3/T4 tumor, or residual invasive breast tumor after NAC. In the absence of definitive conclusions from prospective studies, including the ongoing NSABP B-51 trial, our findings may help identify specific groups of women with clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancers who could benefit from PMRT after NAC. PMID:26709538

  12. Ozone loss rates in the Arctic winter stratosphere during 1994-2000 derived from POAM II/III and ILAS observations: Implications for relationships among ozone loss, PSC occurrence, and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Yukio; Sugita, Takafumi; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative chemical ozone loss rates at the 475 K isentropic surface inside the Arctic polar vortex are evaluated for six winters (January through March) using a satellite-based Match technique. Satellite observational data are taken from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) II for 1994-1996, the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) for 1997, and the POAM III for 1999-2000. The largest ozone loss rates were observed in the end of January 1995 (˜50 ± 20 ppbv d-1), February 1996 (˜40-50 ± 15 ppbv d-1), February 1997 (˜40 ± 8 ppbv d-1), January 2000 (˜60 ± 30 ppbv d-1), and early March 2000 (˜40 ± 10 ppbv d-1). The probability of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) existence is estimated using aerosol extinction coefficient data from POAM II/III and ILAS. Ozone loss and the PSC probability are strongly correlated and an absolute increase of 10% in the PSC probability is found to amplify the chemical ozone loss rate during Arctic winter by approximately 25 ± 6 ppbv per day or 3.2 ± 0.7 ppbv per sunlit hour. Relationships between average Arctic winter ozone loss rates and various PSC- and temperature-related indices are investigated, including the area of polar vortex that is colder than the threshold temperature for PSC existence (APSC), the PSC formation potential (PFP), and the potential for activation of chlorine (PACl). Of these three, PACl provides the best proxy representation of interannual variability in Arctic ozone loss at the 475 K level. Large ozone loss occurred primarily for air masses that experienced low temperatures between 187 K and 195 K within the previous 10 days and the ozone loss rates clearly increase with decreasing the minimum temperature. The particularly large ozone losses of ˜9 ± 3 ppbv per sunlit hour in February 1996 and January 2000 were associated with low minimum temperatures of 187-189 K, simultaneously with high PSC probabilities.

  13. The NMR structure of the II-III-VI three-way junction from the Neurospora VS ribozyme reveals a critical tertiary interaction and provides new insights into the global ribozyme structure.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Lemieux, Sébastien; Legault, Pascale

    2015-09-01

    As part of an effort to structurally characterize the complete Neurospora VS ribozyme, NMR solution structures of several subdomains have been previously determined, including the internal loops of domains I and VI, the I/V kissing-loop interaction and the III-IV-V junction. Here, we expand this work by determining the NMR structure of a 62-nucleotide RNA (J236) that encompasses the VS ribozyme II-III-VI three-way junction and its adjoining stems. In addition, we localize Mg(2+)-binding sites within this structure using Mn(2+)-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA displays a family C topology with a compact core stabilized by continuous stacking of stems II and III, a cis WC/WC G•A base pair, two base triples and two Mg(2+) ions. Moreover, it reveals a remote tertiary interaction between the adenine bulges of stems II and VI. Additional NMR studies demonstrate that both this bulge-bulge interaction and Mg(2+) ions are critical for the stable folding of the II-III-VI junction. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA is consistent with biochemical studies on the complete VS ribozyme, but not with biophysical studies performed with a minimal II-III-VI junction that does not contain the II-VI bulge-bulge interaction. Together with previous NMR studies, our findings provide important new insights into the three-dimensional architecture of this unique ribozyme.

  14. Solar-mediated thermo-electrochemical oxidation of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate by modulating the effective oxidation potential and pathway for green remediation of wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Di; Gao, Simeng; Jiang, Tingting; Wang, Baohui

    2017-03-01

    To match the relentless pursuit of three research hot points - efficient solar utilization, green and sustainable remediation of wastewater and advanced oxidation processes, solar-mediated thermo-electrochemical oxidation of surfactant was proposed and developed for green remediation of surfactant wastewater. The solar thermal electrochemical process (STEP), fully driven with solar energy to electric energy and heat and without an input of other energy, sustainably serves as efficient thermo-electrochemical oxidation of surfactant, exemplified by SDBS, in wastewater with the synergistic production of hydrogen. The electrooxidation-resistant surfactant is thermo-electrochemically oxidized to CO2 while hydrogen gas is generated by lowing effective oxidation potential and suppressing the oxidation activation energy originated from the combination of thermochemical and electrochemical effect. A clear conclusion on the mechanism of SDBS degradation can be proposed and discussed based on the theoretical analysis of electrochemical potential by quantum chemical method and experimental analysis of the CV, TG, GC, FT-IR, UV-vis, Fluorescence spectra and TOC. The degradation data provide a pilot for the treatment of SDBS wastewater that appears to occur via desulfonation followed by aromatic-ring opening. The solar thermal utilization that can initiate the desulfonation and activation of SDBS becomes one key step in the degradation process.

  15. Solar-mediated thermo-electrochemical oxidation of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate by modulating the effective oxidation potential and pathway for green remediation of wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Di; Gao, Simeng; Jiang, TingTing; Wang, Baohui

    2017-01-01

    To match the relentless pursuit of three research hot points - efficient solar utilization, green and sustainable remediation of wastewater and advanced oxidation processes, solar-mediated thermo-electrochemical oxidation of surfactant was proposed and developed for green remediation of surfactant wastewater. The solar thermal electrochemical process (STEP), fully driven with solar energy to electric energy and heat and without an input of other energy, sustainably serves as efficient thermo-electrochemical oxidation of surfactant, exemplified by SDBS, in wastewater with the synergistic production of hydrogen. The electrooxidation-resistant surfactant is thermo-electrochemically oxidized to CO2 while hydrogen gas is generated by lowing effective oxidation potential and suppressing the oxidation activation energy originated from the combination of thermochemical and electrochemical effect. A clear conclusion on the mechanism of SDBS degradation can be proposed and discussed based on the theoretical analysis of electrochemical potential by quantum chemical method and experimental analysis of the CV, TG, GC, FT-IR, UV-vis, Fluorescence spectra and TOC. The degradation data provide a pilot for the treatment of SDBS wastewater that appears to occur via desulfonation followed by aromatic-ring opening. The solar thermal utilization that can initiate the desulfonation and activation of SDBS becomes one key step in the degradation process. PMID:28294180

  16. Solar-mediated thermo-electrochemical oxidation of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate by modulating the effective oxidation potential and pathway for green remediation of wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gu, Di; Gao, Simeng; Jiang, TingTing; Wang, Baohui

    2017-03-15

    To match the relentless pursuit of three research hot points - efficient solar utilization, green and sustainable remediation of wastewater and advanced oxidation processes, solar-mediated thermo-electrochemical oxidation of surfactant was proposed and developed for green remediation of surfactant wastewater. The solar thermal electrochemical process (STEP), fully driven with solar energy to electric energy and heat and without an input of other energy, sustainably serves as efficient thermo-electrochemical oxidation of surfactant, exemplified by SDBS, in wastewater with the synergistic production of hydrogen. The electrooxidation-resistant surfactant is thermo-electrochemically oxidized to CO2 while hydrogen gas is generated by lowing effective oxidation potential and suppressing the oxidation activation energy originated from the combination of thermochemical and electrochemical effect. A clear conclusion on the mechanism of SDBS degradation can be proposed and discussed based on the theoretical analysis of electrochemical potential by quantum chemical method and experimental analysis of the CV, TG, GC, FT-IR, UV-vis, Fluorescence spectra and TOC. The degradation data provide a pilot for the treatment of SDBS wastewater that appears to occur via desulfonation followed by aromatic-ring opening. The solar thermal utilization that can initiate the desulfonation and activation of SDBS becomes one key step in the degradation process.

  17. Understanding the sources and mitigation potential of nitrous oxide in agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, W. R.; Zhu, X.; Doane, T. A.; Burger, M.

    2014-12-01

    More than half of the global warming potential of GHG emissions from agriculture is attributed to nitrous oxide (N2O).. Many factors control the production and release of N2O from soils. In addition to fertilizer N, soil N, moisture and carbon availability control N2O emissions. In addition, a previously overlooked factor, iron, was recently found to be the most significant factor influencing N2O production. Controlled by soil and management factors, N2O production is attributed to multiple pathways, including ammonia oxidation (AO), denitrification, and abiotic chemical reactions. Ammonia oxidation or nitrifier activity N2O production, is a well known pathway, but it significance to total N2O production is also highly debated and soil conditions influencing its production are poorly understood. Studies in a variety of crops in California strongly suggest that this pathway contributes substantially to N2O emissions. It is well established that denitrification primarily occurs under O2- limiting conditions, while N2O produced from AO is also influenced by soil O2 content, with maximum production occurring at low O2 levels (~0.5%). Since emission of N2O can arise from both AO and denitrification activities at low O2 concentrations, it is difficult to discern the importance of each pathway under various soil conditions and management. Furthermore, both the N form and concentration are determinants of nitrifier N2O production. The nitrifier denitrification pathway has been shown to dominate over nitrifier nitrification and nitrification coupled denitrification pathways. Irrigation, rainfall, and fertilization events stimulate microbial activity, including AO and denitrification that produces N2O and although limited, these events contribute to the majority of annual emissions. This uncertainty and complexity surrounding N2O production pathways has hampered the development of practices to reduce N2O emissions. As agricultural production intensifies in developing

  18. Oxidative DNA damage preventive activity and antioxidant potential of plants used in Unani system of medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    . wallichii and H. antidysenterica - showed moderate antioxidant activity. Finally, potentially significant oxidative DNA damage preventive activity and antioxidant activity were noted in three plant extracts: C. icosandra, R. damascena and C. scariosus. These three plant extracts showed no cytotoxic activity against U937 cells. Conclusions The 50% methanolic extracts obtained from different plant parts contained significant amounts of polyphenols with superior antioxidant activity as evidenced by the scavenging of DPPH·, ABTS·+, NO, ·OH, O2.- and ONOO-. C. icosandra, R. damascena and C. scariosus showed significant potential for preventing oxidative DNA damage and radical scavenging activity, and the G. gummifera, A. pindrow, V. wallichii, H. antidysenterica, A. pyrethrum, A. tenuifolius and O. mascula extracts showed moderate activity. The extracts of C. icosandra, R. damascena and C. scariosus showed no cytotoxicity against U937 cells. In conclusion, these routinely used Unani plants, especially C. icosandra, R. damascena and C. scariosus, which are reported to have significant activity against several human ailments, could be exploited as potential sources of natural antioxidants for plant-based pharmaceutical industries. PMID:21159207

  19. Biochemical leaf traits as indicators of tolerance potential in tree species from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest against oxidative environmental stressors.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Solange E; Bulbovas, Patricia; Lima, Marcos E L; Domingos, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    The tolerance potential against the oxidative injury in native plants from forest ecosystems affected by environmental stressors depends on how efficiently they keep their pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance. Great variations in plant tolerance are expected, highlighting the higher relevance of measuring biochemical leaf trait indicators of oxidative injury in species with similar functions in the forest than in single species. The use of this functional approach seems very useful in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest because it still holds high plant diversity and was the focus of this study. We aimed at determining the tolerance potential of tree species from the Atlantic Forest remnants in SE Brazil against multiple oxidative environmental stressors. We assumed that pioneer tree species are more tolerant against oxidative stress than non-pioneer tree species and that their tolerance potential vary spatially in response to distinct combined effects of oxidative environmental stressors. The study was carried out in three Atlantic Forest remnants, which differ in physiognomy, species composition, climatic characteristics and air pollution exposure. Leaves of three pioneer and three non-pioneer species were collected from each forest remnant during wet (January 2015) and dry periods (June 2015), for analyses of non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants and oxidative injury indicators. Both hypotheses were confirmed. The pioneer tree species displayed biochemical leaf traits (e.g. high levels of ascorbic acid, glutathione and carotenoids and lower lipid peroxidation) that indicate their higher potential tolerance against oxidative environmental stressors than non-pioneer species. The biochemical leaf traits of both successional groups of species varied between the forest remnants, in response to a linear combination of oxidative environmental stressors, from natural (relative humidity and temperature) and anthropogenic sources (ozone and nitrogen dioxide).

  20. Different electrostatic potentials define ETGE and DLG motifs as hinge and latch in oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Tong, Kit I; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Kobayashi, Akira; Shang, Chengwei; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2007-11-01

    Nrf2 is the regulator of the oxidative/electrophilic stress response. Its turnover is maintained by Keap1-mediated proteasomal degradation via a two-site substrate recognition mechanism in which two Nrf2-Keap1 binding sites form a hinge and latch. The E3 ligase adaptor Keap1 recognizes Nrf2 through its conserved ETGE and DLG motifs. In this study, we examined how the ETGE and DLG motifs bind to Keap1 in a very similar fashion but with different binding affinities by comparing the crystal complex of a Keap1-DC domain-DLG peptide with that of a Keap1-DC domain-ETGE peptide. We found that these two motifs interact with the same basic surface of either Keap1-DC domain of the Keap1 homodimer. The DLG motif works to correctly position the lysines within the Nrf2 Neh2 domain for efficient ubiquitination. Together with the results from calorimetric and functional studies, we conclude that different electrostatic potentials primarily define the ETGE and DLG motifs as a hinge and latch that senses the oxidative/electrophilic stress.

  1. Infrared Properties of Solid Titanium Oxides: Exploring Potential Primary Dust Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, Th.; Kerschbaum, F.; Fabian, D.; Mutschke, H.; Dorschner, J.; Tamanai, A.; Henning, Th.

    2003-12-01

    We present optical constants and opacities of solid TiO2, Ti2O3, magnesium and calcium titanates, largely based on laboratory measurements. These dust species deserve interest as potential primary condensates in oxygen-rich dusty environments. Of the three known solid TiO2 phases, only one (rutile) has been extensively studied so far with respect to its mid-IR optical properties. We compare these with our measurements of the optical constants of anatase, brookite, and CaTiO3. Furthermore, for several Mg-Ti-oxides, powder transmission spectra are shown. While all known TiO2 modifications have their strongest bands between 13 and 13.5 μm (for spherical particles), CaTiO3, MgTiO3, and other Mg titanates have principal maxima of their absorption coefficients between 14 and 19 μm. This makes a spectroscopic identification of circumstellar Ti oxide particles rather difficult, because both the 13 and the 14-19 μm region are crowded with other features in the spectra of oxygen-rich circumstellar shells.

  2. Autotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing, denitrifying bacteria in groundwater, potential agents for bioremediation of nitrate contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Ceazan, M.L.; Brooks, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    Addition of hydrogen or formate significantly enhanced the rate of consumption of nitrate in slurried core samples obtained from an active zone of denitrification in a nitrate-contaminated sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.). Hydrogen uptake by the core material was immediate and rapid, with an apparent K(m) of 0.45 to 0.60 ??M and a V(max) of 18.7 nmol cm-3 h-1 at 30??C. Nine strains of hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were subsequently isolated from the aquifer. Eight of the strains grew autotrophically on hydrogen with either oxygen or nitrate as the electron acceptor. One strain grew mixotrophically. All of the isolates were capable of heterotrophic growth, but none were similar to Paracoccus denitrificans, a well-characterized hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifier. The kinetics for hydrogen uptake during denitrification were determined for each isolate with substrate depletion progress curves; the K(m)s ranged from 0.30 to 3.32 ??M, with V(max)s of 1.85 to 13.29 fmol cell-1 h-1. Because these organisms appear to be common constituents of the in situ population of the aquifer, produce innocuous end products, and could be manipulated to sequentially consume oxygen and then nitrate when both were present, these results suggest that these organisms may have significant potential for in situ bioremediation of nitrate contamination in groundwater.

  3. Autotrophic, Hydrogen-Oxidizing, Denitrifying Bacteria in Groundwater, Potential Agents for Bioremediation of Nitrate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard L.; Ceazan, Marnie L.; Brooks, Myron H.

    1994-01-01

    Addition of hydrogen or formate significantly enhanced the rate of consumption of nitrate in slurried core samples obtained from an active zone of denitrification in a nitrate-contaminated sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.). Hydrogen uptake by the core material was immediate and rapid, with an apparent Km of 0.45 to 0.60 μM and a Vmax of 18.7 nmol cm-3 h-1 at 30°C. Nine strains of hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were subsequently isolated from the aquifer. Eight of the strains grew autotrophically on hydrogen with either oxygen or nitrate as the electron acceptor. One strain grew mixotrophically. All of the isolates were capable of heterotrophic growth, but none were similar to Paracoccus denitrificans, a well-characterized hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifier. The kinetics for hydrogen uptake during denitrification were determined for each isolate with substrate depletion progress curves; the Kms ranged from 0.30 to 3.32 μM, with Vmaxs of 1.85 to 13.29 fmol cell-1 h-1. Because these organisms appear to be common constituents of the in situ population of the aquifer, produce innocuous end products, and could be manipulated to sequentially consume oxygen and then nitrate when both were present, these results suggest that these organisms may have significant potential for in situ bioremediation of nitrate contamination in groundwater. PMID:16349284

  4. Potential roles of anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation in the nitrogen cycle of wetland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guibing; Jetten, Mike S M; Kuschk, Peter; Ettwig, Katharina F; Yin, Chengqing

    2010-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME coupled to denitrification) with nitrite as electron acceptor are two of the most recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle. Currently the anammox process has been relatively well investigated in a number of natural and man-made ecosystems, while ANME coupled to denitrification has only been observed in a limited number of freshwater ecosystems. The ubiquitous presence of anammox bacteria in marine ecosystems has changed our knowledge of the global nitrogen cycle. Up to 50% of N(2) production in marine sediments and oxygen-depleted zones may be attributed to anammox bacteria. However, there are only few indications of anammox in natural and constructed freshwater wetlands. In this paper, the potential role of anammox and denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in natural and artificial wetlands is discussed in relation to global warming. The focus of the review is to explore and analyze if suitable environmental conditions exist for anammox and denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in nitrogen-rich freshwater wetlands.

  5. Cathodic shift of onset potential for water oxidation of WO3 photoanode by Zr+ ions implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hengyi; Ren, Feng; Xing, Zhuo; Zheng, Xudong; Wu, Liang; Jiang, Changzhong

    2017-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide is one of the most widely studied semiconductors for photoelectrochemical water splitting. However, its onset potential is too positive. In a photoelectrochemical system, a low onset potential and a high photocurrent for a photoanode are important for enhancing the efficiency of water splitting. It is an effective way to adjust the onset potential by changing the conduction and valence band level. Doping is a powerful way to alter the positions of the energy levels of semiconductors to improve their photoelectrochemical performance. In this paper, we present a method of ion implantation to alter the energy levels by implanting Zr+ ions into WO3. Cathodic shifts of the photocurrent onset potential for water oxidation are achieved. The systematic studies show that ion implantation followed by thermal annealing treatment can form substitutional Zr4+ in WO3. The upward shifts of the conduction band and valence band lead to the cathodic shifts of the onset potential. Two combined factors lead to the upward shift of the conduction band. One is strain induced after doping in the lattices. Another is due to the higher energy level of the Zr 4d orbital than the W 5d orbital. Meanwhile, the oxygen vacancy introduced during the ion implantation can cause an upward shift the valence band maximum. The results indicate that the upward shifts of the conduction band minimum and valence band maximum are good for the photoelectrochemical water splitting. It also shows that an ion implantation technique combined with thermal annealing could be an effective way to enhance the performance of the photoanode for water splitting.

  6. Clinical consequences of urea cycle enzyme deficiencies and potential links to arginine and nitric oxide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kleppe, Soledad; Marini, Juan; Carter, Susan; Garlick, Peter; Jahoor, Farook; O'Brien, William; Lee, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are human conditions caused by the dysregulation of nitrogen transfer from ammonia nitrogen into urea. The biochemistry and the genetics of these disorders were well elucidated. Earlier diagnosis and improved treatments led to an emerging, longer-lived cohort of patients. The natural history of some of these disorders began to point to pathophysiological processes that may be unrelated to the primary cause of acute morbidity and mortality, i.e., hyperammonemia. Carbamyl phosphate synthetase I single nucleotide polymorphisms may be associated with altered vascular resistance that becomes clinically relevant when specific environmental stressors are present. Patients with argininosuccinic aciduria due to a deficiency of argininosuccinic acid lyase are uniquely prone to chronic hepatitis, potentially leading to cirrhosis. Moreover, our recent observations suggest that there may be an increased prevalence of essential hypertension. In contrast, hyperargininemia found in patients with arginase 1 deficiency is associated with pyramidal tract findings and spasticity, without significant hyperammonemia. An intriguing potential pathophysiological link is the dysregulation of intracellular arginine availability and its potential effect on nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. By combining detailed natural history studies with the development of tissue-specific null mouse models for urea cycle enzymes and measurement of nitrogen flux through the cycle to urea and NO in UCD patients, we may begin to dissect the contribution of different sources of arginine to NO production and the consequences on both rare genetic and common multifactorial diseases.

  7. Neuroprotective potential of cerium oxide nanoparticles for focal cerebral ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Da; Fang, Ting; Lu, Lin-Qing; Yi, Li

    2016-08-01

    During the previous years, with the emerging of nanotechnology, the enormous capabilities of nanoparticles have drawn great attention from researchers in terms of their potentials in various aspects of pharmacology. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria), considered as one of the most widely used nanomaterials, due to its tempting catalytic antioxidant properties, show a promising potential in diverse disorders, such as cerebral ischemic stroke (CIS), cancer, neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases. Overwhelming generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during cerebral ischemia and reperfusion periods is known to aggravate brain damage via sophisticated cellular and molecular mechanisms, and therefore exploration of the antioxidant capacities of nanoceria becomes a new approach in reducing cerebral ischemic injury. Furthermore, utilizing nanoceria as a drug carrier might display the propensity to overcome limitations or inefficacy of other conceivable neuroprotectants and exhibit synergistic effects. In this review, we emphasize on the principle features of nanoceria and current researches concerning nanoceria as a potential therapeutic agent or carrier in improving the prognosis of CIS.

  8. Synergism of Water Shock and a Biocompatible Block Copolymer Potentiates the Antibacterial Activity of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Karahan, H Enis; Wei, Li; Goh, Kunli; Wiraja, Christian; Liu, Zhe; Xu, Chenjie; Jiang, Rongrong; Wei, Jun; Chen, Yuan

    2016-02-17

    Graphene oxide (GO) is promising in the fight against pathogenic bacteria. However, the antibacterial activity of pristine GO is relatively low and concern over human cytotoxicity further limits its potential. This study demonstrates a general approach to address both issues. The developed approach synergistically combines the water shock treatment (i.e., a sudden decrease in environmental salinity) and the use of a biocompatible block copolymer (Pluronic F-127) as a synergist co-agent. Hypoosmotic stress induced by water shock makes gram-negative pathogens more susceptible to GO. Pluronic forms highly stable nanoassemblies with GO (Pluronic-GO) that can populate around bacterial envelopes favoring the interactions between GO and bacteria. The antibacterial activity of GO at a low concentration (50 μg mL(-1) ) increases from <30% to virtually complete killing (>99%) when complemented with water shock and Pluronic (5 mg mL(-1) ) at ≈2-2.5 h of exposure. Results suggest that the enhanced dispersion of GO and the osmotic pressure generated on bacterial envelopes by polymers together potentiate GO. Pluronic also significantly suppresses the toxicity of GO toward human fibroblast cells. Fundamentally, the results highlight the crucial role of physicochemical milieu in the antibacterial activity of GO. The demonstrated strategy has potentials for daily-life bacterial disinfection applications, as hypotonic Pluronic-GO mixture is both safe and effective.

  9. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  10. Oxidative potential of some endophytic fungi using 1-indanone as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Fill, Taicia Pacheco; da Silva, Jose Vinicius; de Oliveira, Kleber Thiago; da Silva, Bianca Ferreira; Rodrigues-Fo, Edson

    2012-06-01

    The oxidative potential of the fungus Penicillium brasilianum, a strain isolated as an endophyte from a Meliaceae plant (Melia azedarach), was investigated using 1-indanone as a substrate to track the production of monooxygenases. The fungus produced the dihydrocoumarin from 1-indanone with the classical Baeyer-Villiger reaction regiochemistry, and (-)-(R)-3-hydroxy-1-indanone with 78% ee. Minor compounds resulting from lipase and SAM activities were also detected. The biotransformation procedures were also applied to a collection of Penicillium and Aspergillus fungi obtained from M. azedarach and Murraya paniculata. The results showed that Baeyer-Villiger were mostly active in fungi isolated from M. azedarach. Almost all of the fungi tested produced 3-hydroxy-1-indanone..

  11. Influence of oxygen content of the certain types of biodiesels on particulate oxidative potential.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, F; Stevanovic, S; Milic, A; Miljevic, B; Nabi, M N; Zare, A; Bottle, S E; Brown, R J; Ristovski, Z D

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative potential (OP) is related to the organic phase, specifically to its oxygenated organic fraction (OOA). Furthermore, the oxygen content of fuel molecules has significant influence on particulate OP. Thus, this study aimed to explore the actual dependency of the OOA and ROS to the oxygen content of the fuel. In order to reach the goal, different biodiesels blends, with various ranges of oxygen content; have been employed. The compact time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (c-ToF AMS) enabled better identification of OOA. ROS monitored by using two assays: DTT and BPEA-nit. Despite emitting lower mass, both assays agreed that oxygen content of a biodiesel is directly correlated with its OOA, and highly related to its OP. Hence, the more oxygen included in the considered biodiesels, the higher the OP of PM emissions. This highlights the importance of taking oxygen content into account while assessing emissions from new fuel types, which is relevant from a health effects standpoint.

  12. Potential use of Cytisus scoparius extracts in topical applications for skin protection against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    González, Noelia; Ribeiro, Daniela; Fernandes, Eduarda; Nogueira, Daniele R; Conde, Enma; Moure, Andrés; Vinardell, María Pilar; Mitjans, Montserrat; Domínguez, Herminia

    2013-08-05

    Cytisus scoparius L. is used in folk medicine for the treatment of several ailments in which the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of its carotenoid and flavonoid content is suggested to play an important role. We postulate that flavonoid- and carotenoid-rich extracts from C. scoparius may become useful in the preparation of formulations for topical application to protect the skin against oxidative damage mediated by high energy UV light radiation. The aim of this work was to apply an extraction process to obtain a bioactive extract from C. scoparius for the potential use in topical applications. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from C. scoparius were characterized for its reducing capacity, radical scavenging capacity, and on the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS). The extracts showed activities comparable to that of synthetic antioxidants, and absence of skin-irritant effects at 1%. Those make them good candidates to be used in topical applications as active ingredients.

  13. Climate change reduces warming potential of nitrous oxide by an enhanced Brewer-Dobson circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracher, Daniela; Reick, Christian H.; Manzini, Elisa; Schultz, Martin G.; Stein, Olaf

    2016-06-01

    The Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC), which is an important driver of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, is expected to accelerate with climate change. One particular consequence of this acceleration is the enhanced transport of nitrous oxide (N2O) from its sources at the Earth's surface toward its main sink region in the stratosphere, thus inducing a reduction in its lifetime. N2O is a potent greenhouse gas and the most relevant currently emitted ozone-depleting substance. Here we examine the implications of a reduced N2O lifetime in the context of climate change. We find a decrease in its global warming potential (GWP) and, due to a decline in the atmospheric N2O burden, also a reduction in its total radiative forcing. From the idealized transient global warming simulation we can identify linear regressions for N2O sink, lifetime, and GWP with temperature rise. Our findings are thus not restricted to a particular scenario.

  14. Recent knowledge concerning mammalian sperm chromatin organization and its potential weaknesses when facing oxidative challenge.

    PubMed

    Noblanc, Anais; Kocer, Ayhan; Drevet, Joël R

    2014-01-01

    Spermatozoa are the smallest and most cyto-differentiated mammalian cells. From a somatic cell-like appearance at the beginning of spermatogenesis, the male germ cell goes through a highly sophisticated process to reach its final organization entirely devoted to its mission which is to deliver the paternal genome to the oocyte. In order to fit the paternal DNA into the tiny spermatozoa head, complete chromatin remodeling is necessary. This review essentially focuses on present knowledge of this mammalian sperm nucleus compaction program. Particular attention is given to most recent advances that concern the specific organization of mammalian sperm chromatin and its potential weaknesses. Emphasis is placed on sperm DNA oxidative damage that may have dramatic consequences including infertility, abnormal embryonic development and the risk of transmission to descendants of an altered paternal genome.

  15. Six sessions of sprint interval training increases muscle oxidative potential and cycle endurance capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Burgomaster, Kirsten A; Hughes, Scott C; Heigenhauser, George J F; Bradwell, Suzanne N; Gibala, Martin J

    2005-06-01

    Parra et al. (Acta Physiol. Scand 169: 157-165, 2000) showed that 2 wk of daily sprint interval training (SIT) increased citrate synthase (CS) maximal activity but did not change "anaerobic" work capacity, possibly because of chronic fatigue induced by daily training. The effect of fewer SIT sessions on muscle oxidative potential is unknown, and aside from changes in peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2 peak)), no study has examined the effect of SIT on "aerobic" exercise capacity. We tested the hypothesis that six sessions of SIT, performed over 2 wk with 1-2 days rest between sessions to promote recovery, would increase CS maximal activity and endurance capacity during cycling at approximately 80% Vo(2 peak). Eight recreationally active subjects [age = 22 +/- 1 yr; Vo(2 peak) = 45 +/- 3 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) (mean +/- SE)] were studied before and 3 days after SIT. Each training session consisted of four to seven "all-out" 30-s Wingate tests with 4 min of recovery. After SIT, CS maximal activity increased by 38% (5.5 +/- 1.0 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.7 mmol.kg protein(-1).h(-1)) and resting muscle glycogen content increased by 26% (614 +/- 39 vs. 489 +/- 57 mmol/kg dry wt) (both P < 0.05). Most strikingly, cycle endurance capacity increased by 100% after SIT (51 +/- 11 vs. 26 +/- 5 min; P < 0.05), despite no change in Vo(2 peak). The coefficient of variation for the cycle test was 12.0%, and a control group (n = 8) showed no change in performance when tested approximately 2 wk apart without SIT. We conclude that short sprint interval training (approximately 15 min of intense exercise over 2 wk) increased muscle oxidative potential and doubled endurance capacity during intense aerobic cycling in recreationally active individuals.

  16. Genotoxic potential of copper oxide nanoparticles in the bivalve mollusk Mytilus trossulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelomin, Victor P.; Slobodskova, Valentina V.; Zakhartsev, Maksim; Kukla, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) are among the most widely used metal oxide nanoparticles, which increases the chance of their being released into the marine environment. As the applications of these particles have increased in recent years, their potential impact on the health of marine biota has also increased. However, the toxicological effects of these NPs in the marine environment are poorly known. In the present study, the DNA damaging potential of CuO-NPs in the marine eastern mussel Mytilus trossulus was evaluated and compared to that of dissolved copper exposures. Genotoxicity was assessed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay in mussel gill and digestive gland cells. The results showed that copper in both forms (CuO-NPs and dissolved copper) was accumulated to different extents in mussel tissues. The mussel exposed to the dissolved copper attained higher concentrations of copper in the gills than in the digestive gland. In contrast to these results, it was found that CuO-NPs could induce much higher copper accumulation in the digestive gland than in the gills. A clear and statistically significant increase in DNA damage was found in both tissues of the Cu-exposed group compared to the control mussels. Our results indicated that the CuO-NP exposure produced remarkable effects and increased DNA damage significantly in mussel gill cells only. It should be noted that the digestive gland cells were prone to accumulation following CuO-NPs when compared to the gill cells, while the gill cells were more sensitive to the genotoxic effects of CuO-NPs. These results also suggested the need for a complete risk assessment of engineered particles before its arrival in the consumer market.

  17. Oxidative potential and inflammatory impacts of source apportioned ambient air pollution in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyang; Baumgartner, Jill; Zhang, Yuanxun; Liu, Yanju; Sun, Yongjun; Zhang, Meigen

    2014-11-04

    Air pollution exposure is associated with a range of adverse health impacts. Knowledge of the chemical components and sources of air pollution most responsible for these health effects could lead to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of such effects and more targeted risk reduction strategies. We measured daily ambient fine particulate matter (<2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5) for 2 months in peri-urban and central Beijing, and assessed the contribution of its chemical components to the oxidative potential of ambient air pollution using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. The composition data were applied to a multivariate source apportionment model to determine the PM contributions of six sources or factors: a zinc factor, an aluminum factor, a lead point factor, a secondary source (e.g., SO4(2-), NO3(2-)), an iron source, and a soil dust source. Finally, we assessed the relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity-related PM sources and inflammatory responses in human bronchial epithelial cells. In peri-urban Beijing, the soil dust source accounted for the largest fraction (47%) of measured ROS variability. In central Beijing, a secondary source explained the greatest fraction (29%) of measured ROS variability. The ROS activities of PM collected in central Beijing were exponentially associated with in vivo inflammatory responses in epithelial cells (R2=0.65-0.89). We also observed a high correlation between three ROS-related PM sources (a lead point factor, a zinc factor, and a secondary source) and expression of an inflammatory marker (r=0.45-0.80). Our results suggest large differences in the contribution of different PM sources to ROS variability at the central versus peri-urban study sites in Beijing and that secondary sources may play an important role in PM2.5-related oxidative potential and inflammatory health impacts.

  18. Links between Ammonia Oxidizer Community Structure, Abundance, and Nitrification Potential in Acidic Soils ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huaiying; Gao, Yangmei; Nicol, Graeme W.; Campbell, Colin D.; Prosser, James I.; Zhang, Limei; Han, Wenyan; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification and is performed by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). However, the environmental drivers controlling the abundance, composition, and activity of AOA and AOB communities are not well characterized, and the relative importance of these two groups in soil nitrification is still debated. Chinese tea orchard soils provide an excellent system for investigating the long-term effects of low pH and nitrogen fertilization strategies. AOA and AOB abundance and community composition were therefore investigated in tea soils and adjacent pine forest soils, using quantitative PCR (qPCR), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and sequence analysis of respective ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. There was strong evidence that soil pH was an important factor controlling AOB but not AOA abundance, and the ratio of AOA to AOB amoA gene abundance increased with decreasing soil pH in the tea orchard soils. In contrast, T-RFLP analysis suggested that soil pH was a key explanatory variable for both AOA and AOB community structure, but a significant relationship between community abundance and nitrification potential was observed only for AOA. High potential nitrification rates indicated that nitrification was mainly driven by AOA in these acidic soils. Dominant AOA amoA sequences in the highly acidic tea soils were all placed within a specific clade, and one AOA genotype appears to be well adapted to growth in highly acidic soils. Specific AOA and AOB populations dominated in soils at particular pH values and N content, suggesting adaptation to specific niches. PMID:21571885

  19. Characterization and Functionalization of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Use as Potential Agents for Cancer Thermotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Nora

    This thesis presents experimental studies of iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis, functionalization, and intracellular hyperthermal effects on murine macrophages as a model in vitro system. Colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of particular interest in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH). Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have garnered great interest as economical, biocompatible hyperthermia agents due to their superparamagnetic activity. Here we seek to optimize the synthetic reproducibility and in vitro utilization of IONPs for application in MFH. We compared aqueous synthetic protocols and various protective coating techniques using various analytical techniques and in vitro assays to assess the biocompatibility and feasibility of the various preparations of nanoparticles. Using a co-precipitation of iron salts methodology, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with an average diameter of 6-8nm were synthesized and stabilized with carboxylates. By performing calorimetry measurements in an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) with a frequency of 500 kHz and field strength of 0.008Tesla the superparamagnetic behavior of these particles was confirmed. To further investigate these IONPs in a biological application, citric acid-stabilized particles, in conjunction with heat generated by these IONPs when exposed to an OMF, were assessed to determine their effects on cell viability in a RAW 267.4 murine macrophage model system. Our results show that 91.5-97% of cells that have ingested IONPs die follow exposure to an OMF. Importantly, neither the IONPs (at applicable concentrations) nor the OMF show cytotoxic effects. These particular particles have promising preliminary results as hyperthermic agents in both the current literature and simple, proof-of-concept experiments in our laboratory setting. We present experimental results for the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of iron oxide nanoparticles in MFH. Our results show that while IONPs have

  20. Biological versus mineralogical chromium reduction: potential for reoxidation by manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Butler, Elizabeth C; Chen, Lixia; Hansel, Colleen M; Krumholz, Lee R; Elwood Madden, Andrew S; Lan, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(vi), present predominantly as CrO4(2-) in water at neutral pH) is a common ground water pollutant, and reductive immobilization is a frequent remediation alternative. The Cr(iii) that forms upon microbial or abiotic reduction often co-precipitates with naturally present or added iron (Fe), and the stability of the resulting Fe-Cr precipitate is a function of its mineral properties. In this study, Fe-Cr solids were formed by microbial Cr(vi) reduction using Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1 in the presence of the Fe-bearing minerals hematite, aluminum substituted goethite (Al-goethite), and nontronite (NAu-2, Clay Minerals Society), or by abiotic Cr(vi) reduction by dithionite reduced NAu-2 or iron sulfide (FeS). The properties of the resulting Fe-Cr solids and their behavior upon exposure to the oxidant manganese (Mn) oxide (birnessite) differed significantly. In microcosms containing strain RCH1 and hematite or Al-goethite, there was significant initial loss of Cr(vi) in a pattern consistent with adsorption, and significant Cr(vi) was found in the resulting solids. The solid formed when Cr(vi) was reduced by FeS contained a high proportion of Cr(iii) and was poorly crystalline. In microcosms with strain RCH1 and hematite, Cr precipitates appeared to be concentrated in organic biofilms. Reaction between birnessite and the abiotically formed Cr(iii) solids led to production of significant dissolved Cr(vi) compared to the no-birnessite controls. This pattern was not observed in the solids generated by microbial Cr(vi) reduction, possibly due to re-reduction of any Cr(vi) generated upon oxidation by birnessite by active bacteria or microbial enzymes. The results of this study suggest that Fe-Cr precipitates formed in groundwater remediation may remain stable only in the presence of active anaerobic microbial reduction. If exposed to environmentally common Mn oxides such as birnessite in the absence of microbial activity, there is the potential

  1. Chlorine and temperature directed self-assembly of Mg-Ru2(ii,iii) carbonates and particle size dependent magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Hui; Cheng, Ru-Mei; Jia, Yan-Yan; Jin, Jin; Yang, Bing-Bing; Cao, Zhi; Liu, Bin

    2016-02-21

    A series of heterometallic magnesium diruthenium(ii,iii) carbonates, namely K{Mg(H2O)6}2[Ru2(CO3)4Cl2]·4H2O (1), K2[{Mg(H2O)4}2Ru2(CO3)4(H2O)Cl]Cl2·2H2O (2), K[Mg(H2O)5Ru2(CO3)4]·5H2O (3) and K[Mg(H2O)4Ru2(CO3)4]·H2O (4), were synthesized from the reaction of Ru2(CO3)4(3-) and Mg(2+) in aqueous solution. Compound 1 is composed of ionic crystals with the Ru2(CO3)4Cl2(5-) : Mg(H2O)6(2+) : K(+) ratio of 1 : 2 : 1. Compound 2 consists of two dimensional layer structures, in which each octahedral environment Mg(H2O)4(2+) bonds to two [Ru2(CO3)4(H2O)Cl](4-) units in a cis manner forming a neutral square-grid layer {Mg(H2O)4Ru2(CO3)4(H2O)Cl}n. For compound 3, one water molecule of each Mg(H2O)6(2+) is substituted by an oxygen atom of Ru2(CO3)4(3-) forming [Mg(H2O)5Ru2(CO3)4](-), and then the neighboring Ru2 dimers are linked together by the rest of the two oxygen atoms of carbonates to form a layer structure {Mg(H2O)5Ru2(CO3)4}n(n-). In compound 4, the neighboring squared-grid layers {Ru2(CO3)4}n(3n-), similar to those in compound 3, are linked by each octahedral environment Mg(H2O)4(2+) in a cis manner forming the three-dimensional network {Mg(H2O)4Ru2(CO3)4}n(n-). Compound 3 shows ferromagnetic coupling between Ru2 dimers, and a long-range ordering is observed below 3.8 K. Compound 4 displays a magnetic ordering below 3.5 K, and a systematic study of the size-dependent magnetic properties of compound 4 reveals that the coercivity of 4 has been improved with reduced sample particle size from the micrometer to the nanometer scale.

  2. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil adjuvant chemotherapy following three-field lymph node dissection for stage II/III N1, 2 esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Tadasuke; Nasu, Motomi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kuniyasu, Tetsuji; Inoue, Hirohumi; Sakai, Noritaka; Ouchi, Kazutomo; Amano, Takayuki; Isayama, Fuyumi; Tomita, Natsumi; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Tsurumaru, Masahiko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki

    2014-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel + cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (DCF) in lymph node metastasis-positive esophageal cancer, we retrospectively analyzed 139 patients with stage II/III (non-T4) esophageal cancer with lymph node metastasis (1-6 nodes), who did not receive preoperative treatment and underwent three-field lymph node dissection in the Juntendo University Hospital between December, 2004 and December, 2009. The tumors were histologically diagnossed as squamous cell carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups, a surgery alone group (S group, 88 patients) and a group that received postoperative DCF therapy (DCF group, 51 patients). The disease-free and overall survival were compared between the groups and a multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was performed. The same analysis was performed for cases classified as N1 and N2, according to the TNM classification. There were no significant differences between the S and DCF groups regarding clinicopathological factors other than intramural metastasis and main tumor location. The presence of intramural metastasis, blood vessel invasion and the number of lymph nodes were identified as prognostic factors. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival were 55.8 and 57.3%, respectively, in the S group and 52.8 and 63.0%, respectively, in the DCF group. These differences were not considered to be statistically significant (P=0.789 and 0.479 for disease-free and overall survival, respectively). Although there were no significant differences in disease-free and overall survival between the S and DCF groups in N1 cases, both disease-free and overall survival were found to be better in the DCF group (54.2 and 61.4%, respectively) compared to the S group (29.6 and 28.8%, respectively) in N2 cases (P=0.029 and 0.020 for disease-free and overall survival, respectively). Therefore, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with DCF was shown to improve disease-free and

  3. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  4. Long-term results and recurrence patterns from SCOPE-1: a phase II/III randomised trial of definitive chemoradiotherapy +/− cetuximab in oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, T; Hurt, C N; Falk, S; Gollins, S; Staffurth, J; Ray, R; Bridgewater, J A; Geh, J I; Cunningham, D; Blazeby, J; Roy, R; Maughan, T; Griffiths, G; Mukherjee, S

    2017-01-01

    Background: The SCOPE-1 study tested the role of adding cetuximab to conventional definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT), and demonstrated greater toxicity and worse survival outcomes. We present the long-term outcomes and patterns of recurrence. Methods: SCOPE-1 was a phase II/III trial in which patients were randomised to cisplatin 60 mg m−2 (day 1) and capecitabine 625 mg m−2 bd (days 1–21) for four cycles +/− cetuximab 400 mg m−2 day 1 then by 250 mg m−2 weekly. Radiotherapy consisted of 50 Gy/25# given concurrently with cycles 3 and 4. Recruitment was between February 2008 and February 2012, when the IDMC recommended closure on the basis of futility. Results: About 258 patients (dCRT=129; dCRT+cetuximab (dCRT+C)=129) were recruited from 36 centres. About 72.9% (n=188) had squamous cell histology. The median follow-up (IQR) was 46.2 (35.9–48.3) months for surviving patients. The median overall survival (OS; months; 95% CI) was 34.5 (24.7–42.3) in dCRT and 24.7 (18.6–31.3) in dCRT+C (hazard ratio (HR)=1.25, 95% CIs: 0.93–1.69, P=0.137). Median progression-free survival (PFS; months; 95% CI) was 24.1 (15.3–29.9) and 15.9 (10.7–20.8) months, respectively (HR=1.28, 95% CIs: 0.94–1.75; P=0.114). On multivariable analysis only earlier stage, full-dose RT, and higher cisplatin dose intensity were associated with improved OS. Conclusions: The mature analysis demonstrates that the dCRT regimen used in the study provided useful survival outcomes despite its use in patients who were largely unfit for surgery or who had inoperable disease. Given the competing risk of systemic and local failure, future studies should continue to focus on enhancing local control as well as optimising systemic therapy. PMID:28196063

  5. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p < 0.048), surgery (p < 0.042), no smoking during radiotherapy (p = 0.024), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). A trend was observed for a KPS of >70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of tumor cells

  6. Chemistry of layered d-metal pnictide oxides and their potential as candidates for new superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Tadashi C; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2008-01-01

    Layered d-metal pnictide oxides are a unique class of compounds which consist of characteristic d-metal pnictide layers and metal oxide layers. More than 100 of these layered compounds, including the recently discovered Fe-based superconducting pnictide oxides, can be classified into nine structure types. These structure types and the chemical and physical properties of the characteristic d-metal pnictide layers and metal oxide layers of the layered d-metal pnictide oxides are reviewed and discussed. Furthermore, possible approaches to design new superconductors based on these layered d-metal pnictide oxides are proposed. PMID:27877997

  7. The potential for mitochondrial fat oxidation in human skeletal muscle influences whole body fat oxidation during low-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, K; Mogensen, M; Bagger, M; Fernström, M; Pedersen, P K

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate fatty acid (FA) oxidation in isolated mitochondrial vesicles (mit) and its relation to training status, fiber type composition, and whole body FA oxidation. Trained (Vo(2 peak) 60.7 +/- 1.6, n = 8) and untrained subjects (39.5 +/- 2.0 ml.min(-1).kg(-1), n = 5) cycled at 40, 80, and 120 W, and whole body relative FA oxidation was assessed from respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Mit were isolated from muscle biopsies, and maximal ADP stimulated respiration was measured with carbohydrate-derived substrate [pyruvate + malate (Pyr)] and FA-derived substrate [palmitoyl-l-carnitine + malate (PC)]. Fiber type composition was determined from analysis of myosin heavy-chain (MHC) composition. The rate of mit oxidation was lower with PC than with Pyr, and the ratio between PC and Pyr oxidation (MFO) varied greatly between subjects (49-93%). MFO was significantly correlated to muscle fiber type distribution, i.e., %MHC I (r = 0.62, P = 0.03), but was not different between trained (62 +/- 5%) and untrained subjects (72 +/- 2%). MFO was correlated to RER during submaximal exercise at 80 (r = -0.62, P = 0.02) and 120 W (r = -0.71, P = 0.007) and interpolated 35% Vo(2 peak) (r = -0.74, P = 0.004). ADP sensitivity of mit respiration was significantly higher with PC than with Pyr. It is concluded that MFO is influenced by fiber type composition but not by training status. The inverse correlation between RER and MFO implies that intrinsic mit characteristics are of importance for whole body FA oxidation during low-intensity exercise. The higher ADP sensitivity with PC than that with Pyr may influence fuel utilization at low rate of respiration.

  8. Inorganic oxides with potential application in the preparation of a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator system.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Morcillo, M A

    2017-01-01

    The ion exchange properties of some tin and titanium oxides with potential application in the development of a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator were determined. The best potential candidates, SnO2 and calcined SnO2, were further characterized by powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis and its radiation stability was also determined. Two (68)Ge/(68)Ga pilot generators (1.85MBq) based on SnO2 and calcined SnO2 were developed and evaluated over 100 and 200 elution cycles respectively, using as eluent different concentrations of HCl. The generator based on calcined SnO2 showed higher (68)Ga elution yield and lower (68)Ge content in the eluate (75-80% and <3×10(-3)% respectively, 1-2M HCl) than the generator based on unheated SnO2 (60-65% and <1×10(-1)% respectively, 1-2M HCl). Nano-crystalline calcined SnO2 proved to be a promising sorbent; therefore it should be considered as an attractive candidate to develop (68)Ge/(68)Ga generators to produce gallium-68 for biomedical purposes.

  9. Enhancement of photoprotection potential of catechin loaded nanoemulsion gel against UVA induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Harwansh, Ranjit K; Mukherjee, Pulok K; Kar, Amit; Bahadur, Shiv; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Duraipandiyan, V

    2016-07-01

    The present study was aimed to develop a catechin (CA) loaded nanoemulsion based nano-gel for the protection of skin against ultraviolet radiation (UV) induced photo-damage and to ensure its enhanced skin permeability as well as bioavailability through transdermal route. The optimized nanoemulsion (CA-NE4) was prepared by spontaneous nano-emulsification method. It was composed of oil (ethyl oleate), Smix [surfactant (span 80) and co-surfactant (transcutol CG)] and aqueous system in an appropriate ratio of 15:62:23% w/w respectively. The CA-NE4 was characterized through assessment of droplet size, zeta potential, refractive index, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV, high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The average droplet size and zeta potential of CA-NE4 were found to be 98.6±1.01nm and -27.3±0.20mV respectively. The enhanced skin permeability was better with CA-NE4 based nano-gel (CA-NG4) [96.62%] compared to conventional gel (CA-CG) [53.01%] for a period of 24h. The enhanced % relative bioavailability (F) of CA (894.73), Cmax (93.79±6.19ngmL(-1)), AUC0-t∞ (2653.99±515.02nghmL(-1)) and Tmax (12.05±0.02h) was significantly obtained with CA-NG4 as compared to oral suspension for extended periods (72h). CA-NG4 could improve the level of cutaneous antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) and reduce the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBRAS) against oxidative stress induced by UVA. Nano-gel formulation of CA showed sustained release profile and enhanced photoprotection potential due to its improved permeability as well as bioavailability (P<0.05) compared to the conventional gel. Therefore, transdermal administration of nano-gel (CA-NG4) of CA offers a better way to develop the endogenous cutaneous protection system and thus could be an effective strategy for decreasing UV-induced oxidative damage in the

  10. Potential methane production and oxidation in soil reclamation covers of an oil sands mining site in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pum, Lisa; Reichenauer, Thomas; Germida, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities create a number of significant greenhouse gases and thus potentially contribute to global warming. Methane production is significant in some agricultural production systems and from wetlands. In soil, methane can be oxidised by methanotrophic bacteria. However, little is known about methane production and oxidation in oil sand reclamation covers. The purpose of this study was to investigate methane production and oxidation potential of tailing sands and six different reclamation layers of oil sands mining sites in Alberta, Canada. Methane production and oxidation potential were investigated in laboratory scale microcosms through continuous headspace analysis using gas chromatography. Samples from a reclamation layer were collected at the Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL) reclamation site at depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-40 cm in October 2014. In addition, tailing sands provided by Suncor Energy Inc. and soil from a CNRL wetland were studied for methane production. Samples were dried, crushed and sieved to 4 mm, packed into serum bottle microcosms and monitored for eight weeks. Methane production potential was assessed by providing an anoxic environment and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 100 %. Methane oxidation potential was examined by an initial application of 2 vol % methane to the microcosms and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 50 %. Microcosm headspace gas was analysed for methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and oxygen. All experiments were carried out in triplicates, including controls. SF6 and Helium were used as internal standards to detect potential leaks. Our results show differences for methane production potential between the soil depths, tailing sands and wetlands. Moreover, there were differences in the methane oxidation potential of substrate from the three depths investigated and between the reclamation layers. In conclusion, the present study shows that

  11. High-Potential Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction with Nitroxyl / NOx Mediators: Implications for Fuel Cells and Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerken, James B.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2015-07-15

    Efficient reduction of O2 to water is a central challenge in energy conversion and aerobic oxidation catalysis. In the present study, we investigate the electrochemical reduction of O2 with soluble organic nitroxyl and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mediators. When used alone, neither organic nitroxyls, such as TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl-N-oxyl), nor NOx species, such as sodium nitrite, are effective mediators of electrochemical O2 reduction. The combination of nitroxyl/NOx species, however, mediates sustained O2 reduction at electrochemical potentials of 0.19–0.33 V (vs. Fc/Fc+) in acetonitrile containing trifluoroacetic acid. Mechanistic analysis of the coupled redox reactions supports a process in which the nitrogen oxide catalyst drives aerobic oxidation of a nitroxyl mediator to an oxoammonium species, which then is reduced back to the nitroxyl at the cathode. The electrolysis potential is dictated by the oxoammonium/nitroxyl reduction potential. The high potentials observed with this ORR system benefit from the mechanism-based specificity for four-electron reduction of oxygen to water mediated by NOx species, together with kinetically efficient reduction of oxidized NOx species by TEMPO and other organic nitroxyls. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Exposure to PM2.5 in modern office buildings through elemental characterization and oxidative potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szigeti, Tamás; Kertész, Zsófia; Dunster, Christina; Kelly, Frank J.; Záray, Gyula; Mihucz, Victor G.

    2014-09-01

    Fifty samples of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 were collected onto quartz fiber and Teflon membrane filters in five office buildings equipped with heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system for 8 h daily in order to coincide with the work shift of employees. Samples were analyzed for i) mass concentration; ii) elemental concentration; and iii) oxidative potential (OP) through antioxidant depletion. The PM2.5 mass concentration exceeded the annual mean guideline of 10 μg m-3 WHO in 50% of the samples. Indoor and outdoor PM2.5 mass concentrations correlated almost linearly. Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometry was used for the monitoring of 21 elements. Quantitative determination was achieved in the case of Teflon filters only for Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe and Zn at ng m-3 concentration level. Quartz fiber filters were less adequate for the PIXE measurements due to their greater thickness and filamentary structure. Ca, Cr, Zn and Ti had generally higher concentration (mg g-1) indoors. Indoor/outdoor (I/O) OP values were higher than one in 14% and 57% of the samples in the case of ascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH), respectively. Spatial and temporal variations of OP were observed across the office buildings. The I/O ratios for OP, Cr and Zn concentrations in the case of GSH were higher for three buildings. Significant relationship was observed between GSH oxidation and Cr and Zn concentrations. Thus, employees were exposed to a higher extent to reactive oxygen species in three buildings.

  13. Protein oxidation: examination of potential lipid-independent mechanisms for protein carbonyl formation.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, D P; Ryan, T P; Jolly, R A; Petry, T W

    1998-01-01

    Previous data indicated that diquat-mediated protein oxidation (protein carbonyl formation) occurs through multiple pathways, one of which is lipid dependent, and the other, lipid independent. Studies reported here investigated potential mechanisms of the lipid-independent pathway in greater detail, using bovine serum albumin as the target protein. One hypothesized mechanism of protein carbonyl formation involved diquat-dependent production of H2O2, which would then react with site-specifically bound ferrous iron as proposed by Stadtman and colleagues. This hypothesis was supported by the inhibitory effect of catalase on diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation. However, exogenous H2O2 alone did not induce protein carbonyl formation. Hydroxyl radical-generating reactions may result from the H2O2-catalyzed oxidation of ferrous iron, which normally is bound to protein in the ferric state. Therefore, the possible reduction of site-specifically bound Fe3+ to Fe2+ by the diquat cation radical (which could then react with H2O2) was also investigated. The combination of H2O2 and an iron reductant, ascorbate, however, also failed to induce significant protein carbonyl formation. In a phospholipid-containing system, an ADP:Fe2+ complex induced both lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl formation; both indices were largely inhibitable by antioxidants. There was no substantial ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation in the absence of phospholipid under otherwise identical conditions. Based on the lipid requirement and antioxidant sensitivity, these data suggest that ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation occurs through reaction of BSA with aldehydic lipid peroxidation products. The precise mechanism of diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation remains unclear, but it appears not to be a function of H2O2 generation or diquat cation radical-dependent reduction of bound Fe3+.

  14. Nox2 as a potential target of mitochondrial superoxide and its role in endothelial oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Nazarewicz, Rafal R.; Bikineyeva, Alfiya; Dikalov, Sergey I.

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide (O2·−) production by the NADPH oxidases is implicated in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. We have previously shown that activation of NADPH oxidases increases mitochondrial O2·− which is inhibited by the ATP-sensitive K+ channel (mitoKATP) inhibitor 5-hydroxydecanoic acid and that scavenging of mitochondrial or cytoplasmic O2·− inhibits hypertension. We hypothesized that mitoKATP-mediated mitochondrial O2·− potentiates cytoplasmic O2·− by stimulation of NADPH oxidases. In this work we studied Nox isoforms as a potential target of mitochondrial O2·−. We tested contribution of reverse electron transfer (RET) from complex II to complex I in mitochondrial O2·− production and NADPH oxidase activation in human aortic endothelial cells. Activation of mitoKATP with low dose of diazoxide (100 nM) decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester probe) and increased production of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic O2·− measured by site-specific probes and mitoSOX. Inhibition of RET with complex II inhibitor (malonate) or complex I inhibitor (rotenone) attenuated the production of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic O2·−. Supplementation with a mitochondria-targeted SOD mimetic (mitoTEMPO) or a mitochondria-targeted glutathione peroxidase mimetic (mitoEbselen) inhibited production of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic O2·−. Inhibition of Nox2 (gp91ds) or Nox2 depletion with small interfering RNA but not Nox1, Nox4, or Nox5 abolished diazoxide-induced O2·− production in the cytoplasm. Treatment of angiotensin II-infused mice with RET inhibitor dihydroethidium (malate) significantly reduced blood pressure. Our study suggests that mitoKATP-mediated mitochondrial O2·− stimulates cytoplasmic Nox2, contributing to the development of endothelial oxidative stress and hypertension. PMID:23955717

  15. Polyol synthesis, functionalisation, and biocompatibility studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachani, Roxanne; Lowdell, Mark; Birchall, Martin; Hervault, Aziliz; Mertz, Damien; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Thanh, Nguy&Ecirtil; N. Thi&Cmb. B. Dot; Kim

    2016-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of low polydispersity were obtained through a simple polyol synthesis in high pressure and high temperature conditions. The control of the size and morphology of the nanoparticles was studied by varying the solvent used, the amount of iron precursor and the reaction time. Compared with conventional synthesis methods such as thermal decomposition or co-precipitation, this process yields nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distribution in a simple, reproducible and cost effective manner without the need for an inert atmosphere. For example, IONPs with a diameter of ca. 8 nm could be made in a reproducible manner and with good crystallinity as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis and high saturation magnetization value (84.5 emu g-1). The surface of the IONPs could be tailored post synthesis with two different ligands which provided functionality and stability in water and phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Their potential as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was confirmed as they exhibited high r1 and r2 relaxivities of 7.95 mM-1 s-1 and 185.58 mM-1 s-1 respectively at 1.4 T. Biocompatibility and viability of IONPs in primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was studied and confirmed.Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of low polydispersity were obtained through a simple polyol synthesis in high pressure and high temperature conditions. The control of the size and morphology of the nanoparticles was studied by varying the solvent used, the amount of iron precursor and the reaction time. Compared with conventional synthesis methods such as thermal decomposition or co-precipitation, this process yields nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distribution in a simple, reproducible and cost effective manner without the need for an inert atmosphere. For example, IONPs with a diameter of ca. 8 nm could be made in a reproducible manner and with good crystallinity as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis and high

  16. Pharmacology and potential therapeutic applications of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and related nitric oxide-donating drugs

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, J E; Moore, P K

    2002-01-01

    This review examines the biological significance, therapeutic potential and mechanism(s) of action of a range of nitric oxide-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAID) and related nitric oxide-releasing donating drugs (NODD). The slow release of nitric oxide (NO) from these compounds leads to subtle changes in the profile of pharmacological activity of the parent, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). For example, compared with NSAID, NO-NSAID cause markedly diminished gastrointestinal toxicity and improved anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy. In addition, nitroparacetamol exhibits hepatoprotection as opposed to the hepatotoxic activity of paracetamol. The possibility that NO-NSAID or NODD may be of therapeutic benefit in a wide variety of disease states including pain and inflammation, thrombosis and restenosis, neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system, colitis, cancer, urinary incontinence, liver disease, impotence, bronchial asthma and osteoporosis is discussed. PMID:12237248

  17. Influence of oxic/anoxic fluctuations on ammonia oxidizers and nitrification potential in a wet tropical soil.

    PubMed

    Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Petersen, Dorthe G; Nuccio, Erin; Firestone, Mary K

    2013-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation is a key process in the global nitrogen cycle. However, in tropical soils, little is known about ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms and how characteristically variable oxygen regimes affect their activity. We investigated the influence of brief anaerobic periods on ammonia oxidation along an elevation, moisture, and oxygen availability gradient in wet tropical soils. Soils from three forest types were incubated for up to 36 weeks in lab microcosms under three regimes: (1) static aerobic; (2) static anaerobic; and (3) fluctuating (aerobic/anaerobic). Nitrification potential was measured in field-fresh soils and incubated soils. The native ammonia-oxidizing community was also characterized, based on diversity assessments (clone libraries) and quantification of the ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene. These relatively low pH soils appear to be dominated by ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and AOA communities in the three soil types differed significantly in their ability to oxidize ammonia. Soils from an intermediate elevation, and those incubated with fluctuating redox conditions, tended to have the highest nitrification potential following an influx of oxygen, although all soils retained the capacity to nitrify even after long anoxic periods. Together, these results suggest that wet tropical soil AOA are tolerant of extended periods of anoxia.

  18. High-Potential Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction with Nitroxyl/NOx Mediators: Implications for Fuel Cells and Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficient reduction of O2 to water is a central challenge in energy conversion and many aerobic oxidation reactions. Here, we show that the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be achieved at high potentials by using soluble organic nitroxyl and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mediators. When used alone, neither organic nitroxyls, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl-N-oxyl (TEMPO), nor NOx species, such as sodium nitrite, are effective ORR mediators. The combination of nitroxyl/NOx species, however, mediates sustained O2 reduction with overpotentials as low as 300 mV in acetonitrile containing trifluoroacetic acid. Mechanistic analysis of the coupled redox reactions supports a process in which the nitrogen oxide catalyst drives aerobic oxidation of a nitroxyl mediator to an oxoammonium species, which then is reduced back to the nitroxyl at the cathode. The electrolysis potential is dictated by the oxoammonium/nitroxyl reduction potential. The overpotentials accessible with this ORR system are significantly lower than widely studied molecular metal-macrocycle ORR catalysts and benefit from the mechanism-based specificity for four-electron reduction of oxygen to water mediated by NOx species, together with kinetically efficient reduction of oxidized NOx species by TEMPO and other organic nitroxyls. PMID:27162977

  19. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase potentiates nitric oxide production in LPS-activated J774 cells

    PubMed Central

    Baydoun, Anwar R; Morgan, David M L

    1998-01-01

    We have examined whether modulation of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, through inhibition by α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) of the rate limiting enzyme, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), modulates NO synthesis in J774 macrophages.DFMO potentiated LPS-stimulated nitrite production in both a concentration- and time-dependent manner, increasing nitrite levels by 48±5% at 10 mM. This effect was observed in cells pre-treated with DFMO for 24 h prior to stimulation with LPS. Addition of DFMO 12 h after LPS failed to potentiate LPS-induced nitrite production.Supplementation of the culture medium with horse serum (10%) in place of foetal calf serum (10%) caused no significant change in either LPS-induced nitrite production or in the ability of DFMO (10  mM) to potentiate LPS-induced NO synthesis.Metabolism of L-[3H]arginine to L-[3H]citrulline by partially purified inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was not significantly altered by either DFMO (1–10 mM) or by putrescine (0.001–1 mM), spermidine (0.001–1 mM) or spermine (0.001–1 mM). iNOS activity was also unaffected by 1 mM EGTA but was markedly attenuated (70±0.07%) by L-NMMA (100 μM).Pre-incubation of cells with DFMO (10 mM; 24 h) prior to activation with LPS resulted in enhanced (∼2 fold) iNOS protein expression.These results show that DFMO potentiates LPS-induced nitrite production in the murine macrophage cell line J774. Since the only known mechanism of action of DFMO is inhibition of ODC, and thus polyamine biosynthesis, we conclude that expression of iNOS can be critically regulated by endogenous polyamines. PMID:9884080

  20. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Tang, Ming-Chi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  1. The Loss Of Macrophage Fatty Acid Oxidation Does Not Potentiate Systemic Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Selen Alpergin, Ebru S; Collins, Samuel L; Horton, Maureen R; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2017-02-21

    Fatty acid oxidation in macrophages has been suggested to play a causative role in high-fat diet-induced metabolic dysfunction, particularly in the etiology of adipose driven insulin resistance. To understand the contribution of macrophage fatty acid oxidation directly to metabolic dysfunction in high-fat diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with a myeloid-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2 Mϕ-KO), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation. While fatty acid oxidation was clearly induced upon IL-4 stimulation, fatty acid oxidation deficient CPT2 Mϕ-KO bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) displayed canonical markers of M2 polarization following IL-4 stimulation in vitro. In addition, loss of macrophage fatty acid oxidation in vivo did not alter the progression of high-fat diet induced obesity, inflammation, macrophage polarization, oxidative stress, or glucose intolerance. These data suggest that although alternatively activated macrophages up-regulate fatty acid oxidation, fatty acid oxidation is dispensable for macrophage polarization and high-fat diet-induced metabolic dysfunction. Macrophage fatty acid oxidation likely plays a correlative rather than causative role in systemic metabolic dysfunction.

  2. Particle emissions from microalgae biodiesel combustion and their relative oxidative potential.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Stevanovic, S; Islam, M A; Heimann, K; Nabi, M N; Thomas, G; Feng, B; Brown, R J; Ristovski, Z D

    2015-09-01

    Microalgae are considered to be one of the most viable biodiesel feedstocks for the future due to their potential for providing economical, sustainable and cleaner alternatives to petroleum diesel. This study investigated the particle emissions from a commercially cultured microalgae and higher plant biodiesels at different blending ratios. With a high amount of long carbon chain lengths fatty acid methyl esters (C20 to C22), the microalgal biodiesel used had a vastly different average carbon chain length and level of unsaturation to conventional biodiesel, which significantly influenced particle emissions. Smaller blend percentages showed a larger reduction in particle emission than blend percentages of over 20%. This was due to the formation of a significant nucleation mode for the higher blends. In addition measurements of reactive oxygen species (ROS), showed that the oxidative potential of particles emitted from the microalgal biodiesel combustion were lower than that of regular diesel. Biodiesel oxygen content was less effective in suppressing particle emissions for biodiesels containing a high amount of polyunsaturated C20-C22 fatty acid methyl esters and generated significantly increased nucleation mode particle emissions. The observed increase in nucleation mode particle emission is postulated to be caused by very low volatility, high boiling point and high density, viscosity and surface tension of the microalgal biodiesel tested here. Therefore, in order to achieve similar PM (particulate matter) emission benefits for microalgal biodiesel likewise to conventional biodiesel, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) with high amounts of polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids (≥C20) may not be desirable in microalgal biodiesel composition.

  3. Dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria populations and contributions to soil nitrification potentials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anne E; Zeglin, Lydia H; Wanzek, Thomas A; Myrold, David D; Bottomley, Peter J

    2012-11-01

    It is well known that the ratio of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) ranges widely in soils, but no data exist on what might influence this ratio, its dynamism, or how changes in relative abundance influences the potential contributions of AOA and AOB to soil nitrification. By sampling intensively from cropped-to-fallowed and fallowed-to-cropped phases of a 2-year wheat/fallow cycle, and adjacent uncultivated long-term fallowed land over a 15-month period in 2010 and 2011, evidence was obtained for seasonal and cropping phase effects on the soil nitrification potential (NP), and on the relative contributions of AOA and AOB to the NP that recovers after acetylene inactivation in the presence and absence of bacterial protein synthesis inhibitors. AOB community composition changed significantly (P0.0001) in response to cropping phase, and there were both seasonal and cropping phase effects on the amoA gene copy numbers of AOA and AOB. Our study showed that the AOA:AOB shifts were generated by a combination of different phenomena: an increase in AOA amoA abundance in unfertilized treatments, compared with their AOA counterparts in the N-fertilized treatment; a larger population of AOB under the N-fertilized treatment compared with the AOB community under unfertilized treatments; and better overall persistence of AOA than AOB in the unfertilized treatments. These data illustrate the complexity of the factors that likely influence the relative contributions of AOA and AOB to nitrification under the various combinations of soil conditions and NH(4)(+)-availability that exist in the field.

  4. The potential for biologically catalyzed anaerobic methane oxidation on ancient Mars.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Jeffrey J; Larowe, Douglas E; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Amend, Jan P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2014-04-01

    This study examines the potential for the biologically mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction on ancient Mars. Seven distinct fluids representative of putative martian groundwater were used to calculate Gibbs energy values in the presence of dissolved methane under a range of atmospheric CO2 partial pressures. In all scenarios, AOM is exergonic, ranging from -31 to -135 kJ/mol CH4. A reaction transport model was constructed to examine how environmentally relevant parameters such as advection velocity, reactant concentrations, and biomass production rate affect the spatial and temporal dependences of AOM reaction rates. Two geologically supported models for ancient martian AOM are presented: a sulfate-rich groundwater with methane produced from serpentinization by-products, and acid-sulfate fluids with methane from basalt alteration. The simulations presented in this study indicate that AOM could have been a feasible metabolism on ancient Mars, and fossil or isotopic evidence of this metabolic pathway may persist beneath the surface and in surface exposures of eroded ancient terrains.

  5. Reproducing kernel potential energy surfaces in biomolecular simulations: Nitric oxide binding to myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviov, Maksym; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-09-14

    Multidimensional potential energy surfaces based on reproducing kernel-interpolation are employed to explore the energetics and dynamics of free and bound nitric oxide in myoglobin (Mb). Combining a force field description for the majority of degrees of freedom and the higher-accuracy representation for the NO ligand and the Fe out-of-plane motion allows for a simulation approach akin to a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics treatment. However, the kernel-representation can be evaluated at conventional force-field speed. With the explicit inclusion of the Fe-out-of-plane (Fe-oop) coordinate, the dynamics and structural equilibrium after photodissociation of the ligand are correctly described compared to experiment. Experimentally, the Fe-oop coordinate plays an important role for the ligand dynamics. This is also found here where the isomerization dynamics between the Fe–ON and Fe–NO state is significantly affected whether or not this co-ordinate is explicitly included. Although the Fe–ON conformation is metastable when considering only the bound {sup 2}A state, it may disappear once the {sup 4}A state is included. This explains the absence of the Fe–ON state in previous experimental investigations of MbNO.

  6. Enhancing graphene oxide reinforcing potential in composites by combined latex compounding and spray drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yingyan; Zhang, Shubai; Zhang, Dandan; Chan, Tung W.; Liu, Li

    2014-04-01

    A new strategy was developed to prepare graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with highly exfoliated GO sheets and strong interfaces. In particular, GO/SBR microparticles, in which exfoliated GO sheets (with a thickness of ˜1 nm and diameter of tens of nanometers) are trapped in a well-dispersed state throughout the SBR matrix, were made by a combined latex-compounding and spray-drying method. Subsequently, a chemical bridge between GO and rubber matrix through KH550 and Si69 was built during vulcanization, and the interfacial strength of the cured GO/SBR composite was remarkably improved. Due to the highly exfoliated structure and the strong interface, the GO/SBR composite exhibited 7.8 times higher modulus at 300% strain and 6.4 times higher tensile strength compared with cured pure SBR. The combined latex-compounding and spray-drying method presented here is feasible and water-mediated and has great potential for industrial applications.

  7. Effect of voltage polarity on oxidation-reduction potential by plasma in water

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Takashi; Oizumi, Masanobu; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki; Sato, Takehiko

    2014-04-15

    Use of plasma in water for water treatment and medical treatment is growing and raises expectations of finding advanced functions such as an increase of biological compatibility. In the present study with a focus on the variation of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), relationships between the electrode polarities of plasma in water and the change of water quality such as conductivity, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, dissolved hydrogen concentration, pH and ORP were revealed. Similar line spectra of radiation at the electrode tip were observed for each case of positive and negative electrode polarity. The emission intensities of OH (309 nm), Hα (656 nm), and OI (777 nm) for the positive discharge were significantly higher than those for the negative one, though the energy consumption during the discharge period of both cases was nearly the same. Positive electrode polarity was found to be more suitable than negative electrode polarity for increasing dissolved hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide. The ORP for the positive polarity decreased from 460 to 45 mV and that for the negative polarity decreased from 460 to 183 mV, although the pH and conductivity were not significantly changed.

  8. Photocontrolled nitric oxide release from two nitrosylruthenium isomer complexes and their potential biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiao; Duan, Qingqing; Wang, Jianru; Song, Zhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hongfei

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has key regulatory roles in various biological and medical processes. The control of its local concentration, which is crucial for obtaining the desired effect, can be achieved with exogenous NO donors. Release of NO from metal-nitrosyl complexes upon exposure to light is a strategy that could allow for the site-specific delivery of the reactive species NO to physiological targets. The photodissociation of NO from two nitrosylruthenium(II) isomer complexes {cis- and trans-[Ru(OAc)2NO]} was demonstrated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry spectra, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra further prove the photoinduced NO release by spin trapping of NO free radicals upon photoirradiation. Real-time NO release was quantitatively measured by electrochemistry with an NO-specific electrode. The quantitative control of NO release from [Ru(OAc)2NO] in aqueous solutions was done by photoirradiation at different wavelengths. Both isomers show photoinduced damage on plasmid DNA, but the trans isomer has higher cytotoxicity and photocytotoxicity activity against the HeLa tumor cell line than that of the cis isomer. Nitrosylruthenium(II) complex, with 8-quinolinol derivatives as ligands, has a great potential as a photoactivated NO donor reagent for biomedical applications.

  9. Computational study on nitronium and nitrosonium oxalate: potential oxidizers for solid rocket propulsion?

    PubMed

    Gökçinar, Elif; Klapötke, Thomas M; Kramer, Michael P

    2010-08-26

    The enthalpies of formation for solid ionic nitrosonium oxalate, [NO](2)[O(2)C-CO(2)], nitronium oxalate, [NO(2)](2)[O(2)C-CO(2)], as well as covalent bis(nitroso)oxalic acid, ON-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO, and oxalic acid dinitrate ester, O(2)N-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO(2), were calculated using the complete basis set (CBS-4M) method of Petersson and coworkers to obtain very accurate energies. For the nitrosonium species, the ionic form ([NO](2)[O(2)C-CO(2)]) was identified as the more stable isomer, whereas for the nitrosonium compound, the covalently bound dinitrate ester (O(2)N-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO(2)) was found to be more stable. The combustion parameters with respect to possible use as ingredients in solid rocket motors for both stable species were calculated using the EXPLO5 and the ICT code. The performance of an aluminized formulation with covalently bound dinitrate ester (O(2)N-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO(2)) was shown to be comparable to that of ammonium perchlorate/aluminum. This makes oxalic acid dinitrate ester a potentially interesting perchlorate-free and environmentally benign oxidizer for solid rocket propulsion.

  10. Copper Oxide Nanomaterials Prepared by Solution Methods, Some Properties, and Potential Applications: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thi Ha; Nguyen, Viet Tuyen

    2014-01-01

    Cupric oxide (CuO), having a narrow bandgap of 1.2 eV and a variety of chemophysical properties, is recently attractive in many fields such as energy conversion, optoelectronic devices, and catalyst. Compared with bulk material, the advanced properties of CuO nanostructures have been demonstrated; however, the fact that these materials cannot yet be produced in large scale is an obstacle to realize the potential applications of this material. In this respect, chemical methods seem to be efficient synthesis processes which yield not only large quantities but also high quality and advanced material properties. In this paper, the effect of some general factors on the morphology and properties of CuO nanomaterials prepared by solution methods will be overviewed. In terms of advanced nanostructure synthesis, microwave method in which copper hydroxide nanostructures are produced in the precursor solution and sequentially transformed by microwave into CuO may be considered as a promising method to explore in the near future. This method produces not only large quantities of nanoproducts in a short reaction time of several minutes, but also high quality materials with advanced properties. A brief review on some unique properties and applications of CuO nanostructures will be also presented. PMID:27437488

  11. Assessment of the toxic potential of engineered metal oxide nanomaterials using an acellular model: citrated rat blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Patrick Thomas; Callaghan, Neal Ingraham; MacCormack, Tyson James; Dieni, Christopher Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Citrated Sprague-Dawley rat blood plasma was used as a biologically relevant exposure medium to assess the acellular toxic potential of two metal oxide engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), zinc oxide (nZnO), and cerium oxide (nCeO2). Plasma was incubated at 37 °C for up to 48 h with ENM concentrations ranging between 0 and 200 mg/L. The degree of ENM-induced oxidation was assessed by assaying for reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels using dichlorofluorescein (DCF), pH, ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), lipase activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyls (PC). Whereas previous in vitro studies showed linear-positive correlations between ENM concentration and oxidative damage, our results suggested that low concentrations were generally pro-oxidant and higher concentrations appeared antioxidant or protective, as indicated by DCF fluorescence trends. nZnO and nCeO2 also affected pH in a manner dependent on concentration and elemental composition; higher nZnO concentrations maintained a more alkaline pH, while nCeO2 tended to decrease pH. No other biomarkers of oxidative damage (FRAP, MDA, PC, lipase activity) showed changes at any ENM concentration or time-point tested. Differential dissolution of the two ENMs was also observed, where as much as ∼31.3% of nZnO was instantaneously dissolved to Zn(2+ )and only negligible nCeO2 was degraded. The results suggest that the direct oxidative potential of nZnO and nCeO2 in citrated rat blood plasma is low, and that a physiological or immune response is needed to generate appreciable damage biomarkers. The data also highlight the need for careful consideration when selecting a model for assessing ENM toxicity.

  12. Redox equilibria of iron oxides in aqueous-based magnetite dispersions: effect of pH and redox potential.

    PubMed

    Pang, Suh Cem; Chin, Suk Fun; Anderson, Marc A

    2007-07-01

    The effect of pH and redox potential on the redox equilibria of iron oxides in aqueous-based magnetite dispersions was investigated. The ionic activities of each dissolved iron species in equilibrium with magnetite nanoparticles were determined and contoured within the Eh-pH framework of a composite stability diagram. Both standard redox potentials and equilibrium constants for all major iron oxide redox equilibria in magnetite dispersions were found to differ from values reported for noncolloidal systems. The "triple point" position of redox equilibrium among Fe(II) ions, magnetite, and hematite shifted to a higher standard redox potential and an equilibrium constant which was several orders of magnitude higher. The predominant area of magnetite stability was enlarged to cover a wider range of both pH and redox potentials as compared to that of a noncolloidal magnetite system.

  13. Computational prediction of one-electron reduction potentials and acid dissociation constants for guanine oxidation intermediates and products.

    PubMed

    Psciuk, Brian T; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2013-08-15

    Reduction potentials and pK(a) values were calculated for intermediates and products along three major pathways for guanine oxidation using the B3LYP and CBS-QB3 levels of theory with the SMD implicit solvation model. N-methylated nucleobases were used as models for nucleoside species. Ensemble averaged reduction potentials at pH 7 (E7) were obtained by combining calculated standard reduction potentials with calculated pKa values in addition to accounting for tautomerization energies. Calculated pK(a) values are reasonable based on experimental estimates and chemical intuition. Pathway A leads to guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp). The first step is the oxidation of 8-oxoguanine which proceeds by the loss of an electron followed by the loss of two protons and loss of another electron, yielding 8-oxopurine. The calculated E7 values for the remaining intermediates and products are at least 0.3 V higher than that of guanine, indicating that further oxidation of these species is unlikely. Pathway B leads to two formamidopyrimidine isomers (FAPyG and 2,5FAPyG). Species along this pathway have calculated reduction potentials that are much lower than the oxidation potential for guanine and would likely be very short-lived in an oxidatively stressed environment. Pathway C leads to reduced spiroiminodihydantoin and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih). Similar to pathway A, the calculated reduction potentials for species along this pathway are at least 0.4 V higher than that of guanine.

  14. Oxidation potential and state of some vanadium ores and the relation of woody material to their deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, Alfred Michael

    1956-01-01

    Oxidation potential studies with a multiple pH-potential recorder designed and constructed for this purpose demonstrated that some uranium-vanadium ores in the Colorado Plateau were in a reduced state when deposited. Any oxidation which took place occurred after deposition. Experimental and theoretical reducing studies on fresh wood, wood degraded by burial for 450 years, and lignite, indicate that such ores may have been deposited by reduction of oxidized vanadium solutions by woody material. A vanadium (III) mineral, V2O(OH)4, was prepared synthetically by reduction of a vanadium (V) solution with wood. This is the only reported synthesis of any reduced vanadium mineral by any method. It was shown that the origin of almost all vanadium deposits currently of commercial importance involves life processes and products.

  15. Potential Dependence of the Conductivity of Highly Oxidized Polythiophenes, Polypyrroles, and Polyaniline: Finite Windows of High Conductivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-16

    protonation/deprotonation mechanism . Conductivity increases by at least 108 upon oxidizing polyani-ine from neutral to maximally conducting, and decreases...reversible, potential dependent changes in conductivity in liquid S02/electrolyte in the apparent absence of a protonation/deprotonation mechanism ...polyaniline is similar in 0.5 M H2SO4 ,1 liquid S02 /electrolyte, and poly(vinyl alchohol )/H 3PO4.nH20.8 However, the positive potential limit in aqueous

  16. *Evaluating the toxicity of airborne particulate matter and nanoparticles by measuring oxidative strett potential - A workshop report and consensus statement

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: There is a strong need for laboratory in vitro test systems for the toxicity of airborne particulate matter and nanoparticles. The measurement of oxidative stress potential offers a promising way forward. OBJECTIVES: A workshop was convened involving leading workers f...

  17. Determination of real oxidation potentials of the Bk /SUP IV/ -Bk /SUP III/ pair in phosphoric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Kulyako, Y.M.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-03-01

    The authors measure the oxidation potential of the Bk(IV)-Bk(III) pair in H3PO4 solutions by a direct spectroelectrchemical method. When the phosphoric acid concentration is increased from 3 to 10 M, its value decreases from 1.123 to 1.065 V (with respect to a normal hydrogen electrode).

  18. Characterization of apoplast phenolics: Invitro oxidation of acetosyringone results in a rapid prolonged increase in the redox potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study we observed that if tobacco cell suspensions were inoculated with certain bacterial strains, several hours later the redox potential of the suspensions would increase (oxidative), as much as 100 mV, and in some cases last more than an hour. To discover possible contributors to t...

  19. Deciphering potential chemical compounds of gaseous oxidized mercury in Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Miller, Matthieu B.; Edgerton, Eric; Sexauer Gustin, Mae

    2017-02-01

    The highest mercury (Hg) wet deposition in the United States of America (USA) occurs along the Gulf of Mexico, and in the southern and central Mississippi River Valley. Gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM) is thought to be a major contributor due to high water solubility and reactivity. Therefore, it is critical to understand concentrations, potential for wet and dry deposition, and GOM compounds present in the air. Concentrations and dry-deposition fluxes of GOM were measured and calculated for Naval Air Station Pensacola Outlying Landing Field (OLF) in Florida using data collected by a Tekran® 2537/1130/1135, the University of Nevada Reno Reactive Mercury Active System (UNRRMAS) with cation exchange and nylon membranes, and the Aerohead samplers that use cation-exchange membranes to determine dry deposition. Relationships with Tekran®-derived data must be interpreted with caution, since the GOM concentrations measured are biased low depending on the chemical compounds in air and interferences with water vapor and ozone.Criteria air pollutants were concurrently measured. This allowed for comparison and better understanding of GOM.In addition to other methods previously applied at OLF, use of the UNRRMAS provided a platform for determination of the chemical compounds of GOM in the air. Results from nylon membranes with thermal desorption analyses indicated seven GOM compounds in this area, including HgBr2, HgCl2, HgO, Hg-nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and two unknown compounds. This indicates that the site is influenced by different gaseous phase reactions and sources. Using back-trajectory analysis during a high-GOM event related to high CO, but average SO2, indicated air parcels moved from the free troposphere and across Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama at low elevation (< 300 m). This event was initially characterized by HgBr2, followed by a mixture of GOM compounds. Overall, GOM chemistry indicates oxidation reactions with local mobile source pollutants and long

  20. Potential biological chemistry of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with the nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Bruce King, S

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, an important gaseous signaling agent generated in numerous biological tissues, influences many physiological processes. This biological profile seems reminiscent of nitric oxide, another important endogenously synthesized gaseous signaling molecule. Hydrogen sulfide reacts with nitric oxide or oxidized forms of nitric oxide and nitric oxide donors in vitro to form species that display distinct biology compared to both hydrogen sulfide and NO. The products of these interesting reactions may include small-molecule S-nitrosothiols or nitroxyl, the one-electron-reduced form of nitric oxide. In addition, thionitrous acid or thionitrite, compounds structurally analogous to nitrous acid and nitrite, may constitute a portion of the reaction products. Both the chemistry and the biology of thionitrous acid and thionitrite, compared to nitric oxide or hydrogen sulfide, remain poorly defined. General mechanisms for the formation of S-nitrosothiols, nitroxyl, and thionitrous acid based upon the ability of hydrogen sulfide to act as a nucleophile and a reducing agent with reactive nitric oxide-based intermediates are proposed. Hydrogen sulfide reactivity seems extensive and could have an impact on numerous areas of redox-controlled biology and chemistry, warranting more work in this exciting and developing area.

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORROSION OF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM MATERIALS, AND OXIDANT AND REDOX POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scale build-up, corrosion rate, and metal release associated with drinking water distribution system pipes have been suggested to relate to the oxidant type and concentration. Conversely, different distribution system metals may exert different oxidant demands. The impact of ox...

  2. The Effect of Oxidant and Redox Potential on Metal Corrosion in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Future drinking water regulatory action may require some water utilities to consider additional and/or alternative oxidation and disinfection practices. There is little known about the effect of oxidant changes on the corrosion of drinking water distribution system materials and ...

  3. Unbalanced Oxidant-Antioxidant Status: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Coronary Chronic Total Occlusion in Very Old Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Unbalanced oxidant and antioxidant status played an important role in myocardial infarction. The present study was a clinical trial combined preclinically with targeted agent against cardiovascular injuries and ischemia in vivo model. We tried to confirm the association of unbalanced oxidant and antioxidant status with coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) in 399 very old patients (80~89 years) and investigated the potential therapeutic value of purified polysaccharide from endothelium corneum gigeriae galli (PECGGp). We analyzed levels of circulating superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3), nitric oxide (NO), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in very old patients with coronary CTO. Levels of SOD3, NO, eNOS, and MDA in the cardiac tissue were measured in myocardial infarction rats. Levels of SOD3, eNOS, and NO were lowered (p < 0.001) and levels of MDA were increased (p < 0.001). PECGGp treatment increased levels of SOD3, eNOS, and NO (p < 0.01) in cardiac tissue, while decreasing levels of MDA (p < 0.01). PECGGp may suppress unbalanced oxidant and antioxidant status in infarcted myocardium by inhibiting levels of MDA and elevating NO, eNOS, and SOD3 levels. PECGGp could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent for coronary CTO in very old patients. PMID:28044093

  4. Ceriodaphnia dubia as a Potential Bio-Indicator for Assessing Acute Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticle Toxicity in Fresh Water Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Humayun, Ahmed; Chakravarty, Sujay; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Growing nanomaterials based consumer applications have raised concerns about their potential release into the aquatic ecosystems and the consequent toxicological impacts. So environmental monitoring of the nanomaterials in aqueous systems becomes imperative. The current study reveals the potential of Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) as a bio-indicator for aluminum oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water aquatic ecosystem where it occupies an important ecological niche as a primary consumer. This study aims to investigate the aluminium oxide nanoparticle induced acute toxicity on Ceriodaphnia dubia in a freshwater system. The bioavailability of the aluminum oxide nanoparticles has been studied with respect to their aggregation behavior in the system and correlated with the toxicity endpoints. The oxidative stress generated by the particles contributed greatly toward their toxicity. The crucial role of leached aluminium ion mediated toxicity in the later phases (48 h and 72 h) in conjunction with the effects from the nano-sized particles in the initial phases (24 h) puts forth the dynamics of nanotoxicity in the test system. The internalization of nanoparticles (both gross and systemic uptake) as substantiated through the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectral (ICP-OES) analysis was another major contributor toward acute toxicity. Concluding the present study, Ceriodaphnia dubia can be a promising candidate for bio-monitoring the aluminium oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water system. PMID:24040143

  5. Ceriodaphnia dubia as a potential bio-indicator for assessing acute aluminum oxide nanoparticle toxicity in fresh water environment.

    PubMed

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Humayun, Ahmed; Chakravarty, Sujay; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Growing nanomaterials based consumer applications have raised concerns about their potential release into the aquatic ecosystems and the consequent toxicological impacts. So environmental monitoring of the nanomaterials in aqueous systems becomes imperative. The current study reveals the potential of Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) as a bio-indicator for aluminum oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water aquatic ecosystem where it occupies an important ecological niche as a primary consumer. This study aims to investigate the aluminium oxide nanoparticle induced acute toxicity on Ceriodaphnia dubia in a freshwater system. The bioavailability of the aluminum oxide nanoparticles has been studied with respect to their aggregation behavior in the system and correlated with the toxicity endpoints. The oxidative stress generated by the particles contributed greatly toward their toxicity. The crucial role of leached aluminium ion mediated toxicity in the later phases (48 h and 72 h) in conjunction with the effects from the nano-sized particles in the initial phases (24 h) puts forth the dynamics of nanotoxicity in the test system. The internalization of nanoparticles (both gross and systemic uptake) as substantiated through the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectral (ICP-OES) analysis was another major contributor toward acute toxicity. Concluding the present study, Ceriodaphnia dubia can be a promising candidate for bio-monitoring the aluminium oxide nanoparticles in a fresh water system.

  6. Mesoporous titanium zirconium oxide nanospheres with potential for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Chen, Dehong; Cao, Lu; Li, Yuncang; Boyd, Ben J; Caruso, Rachel A

    2013-11-13

    Mesoporous titanium zirconium (TiZr) oxide nanospheres with variable Ti to Zr ratios were synthesized using sol-gel chemistry followed by solvothermal treatment. These oxide nanospheres exhibited similar diameters (~360 nm), high surface areas (from 237 ± 2 to 419 ± 4 m(2) g(-1)), and uniform pore diameters (~3.7 nm). Three drugs, ibuprofen, dexamethasone, and erythromycin, were loaded into the TiZr oxide nanospheres. The TiZr oxide nanospheres exhibited a high loading capacity, up to 719 mg g(-1), and sustained release profiles in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.4. The mesoporous TiZr oxide nanospheres also exhibited hydrolytic stability, as evidenced by the retention of the integrity of the mesostructures after drug release in PBS for 21 days.

  7. Effects of Calcination Temperature and Acid-Base Properties on Mixed Potential Ammonia Sensors Modified by Metal Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Satsuma, Atsushi; Katagiri, Makoto; Kakimoto, Shiro; Sugaya, Satoshi; Shimizu, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Mixed potential sensors were fabriated using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as a solid electrolyte and a mixture of Au and various metal oxides as a sensing electrode. The effects of calcination temperature ranging from 600 to 1,000 °C and acid-base properties of the metal oxides on the sensing properties were examined. The selective sensing of ammonia was achieved by modification of the sensing electrode using MoO3, Bi2O3 and V2O5, while the use of WO3, Nb2O5 and MgO was not effective. The melting points of the former group were below 820 °C, while those of the latter group were higher than 1,000 °C. Among the former group, the selective sensing of ammonia was strongly dependent on the calcination temperature, which was optimum around melting point of the corresponding metal oxides. The good spreading of the metal oxides on the electrode is suggested to be one of the important factors. In the former group, the relative response of ammonia to propene was in the order of MoO3 > Bi2O3 > V2O5, which agreed well with the acidity of the metal oxides. The importance of the acidic properties of metal oxides for ammonia sensing was clarified. PMID:22319402

  8. Effects of calcination temperature and acid-base properties on mixed potential ammonia sensors modified by metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Satsuma, Atsushi; Katagiri, Makoto; Kakimoto, Shiro; Sugaya, Satoshi; Shimizu, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Mixed potential sensors were fabriated using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as a solid electrolyte and a mixture of Au and various metal oxides as a sensing electrode. The effects of calcination temperature ranging from 600 to 1,000 °C and acid-base properties of the metal oxides on the sensing properties were examined. The selective sensing of ammonia was achieved by modification of the sensing electrode using MoO(3), Bi(2)O(3) and V(2)O(5), while the use of WO(3,) Nb(2)O(5) and MgO was not effective. The melting points of the former group were below 820 °C, while those of the latter group were higher than 1,000 °C. Among the former group, the selective sensing of ammonia was strongly dependent on the calcination temperature, which was optimum around melting point of the corresponding metal oxides. The good spreading of the metal oxides on the electrode is suggested to be one of the important factors. In the former group, the relative response of ammonia to propene was in the order of MoO(3) > Bi(2)O(3) > V(2)O(5), which agreed well with the acidity of the metal oxides. The importance of the acidic properties of metal oxides for ammonia sensing was clarified.

  9. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  10. Effect of nitric oxide on spinal evoked potentials and survival rate in rats with decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, T; Meehan, C F; Broholm, H; Hyldegaard, O

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) releasing agents have, in experimental settings, been shown to decrease intravascular nitrogen bubble formation and to increase the survival rate during decompression sickness (DCS) from diving. The effect has been ascribed to a possible removal of preexisting micronuclei or an increased nitrogen washout on decompression through augmented blood flow rate. The present experiments were conducted to investigate whether a short- or long-acting NO donor [glycerol trinitrate (GTN) or isosorbide-5-mononitrate (ISMN), respectively] would offer the same protection against spinal cord DCS evaluated by means of spinal evoked potentials (SEPs). Anesthetized rats were decompressed from a 1-h hyperbaric air dive at 506.6 kPa (40 m of seawater) for 3 min and 17 s, and spinal cord conduction was studied by measurements of SEPs. Histological samples of the spinal cord were analyzed for lesions of DCS. In total, 58 rats were divided into 6 different treatment groups. The first three received either saline (group 1), 300 mg/kg iv ISMN (group 2), or 10 mg/kg ip GTN (group 3) before compression. The last three received either 300 mg/kg iv ISMN (group 4), 1 mg/kg iv GTN (group 5), or 75 μg/kg iv GTN (group 6) during the dive, before decompression. In all groups, decompression caused considerable intravascular bubble formation. The ISMN groups showed no difference compared with the control group, whereas the GTN groups showed a tendency toward faster SEP disappearance and shorter survival times. In conclusion, neither a short- nor long-acting NO donor had any protective effect against fatal DCS by intravenous bubble formation. This effect is most likely due to a fast ascent rate overriding the protective effects of NO, rather than the total inert tissue gas load.

  11. The role of action potentials in determining neuron-type-specific responses to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Estes, Stephen; Zhong, Lei Ray; Artinian, Liana; Tornieri, Karine; Rehder, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    The electrical activity in developing and mature neurons determines the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which in turn is translated into biochemical activities through various signaling cascades. Electrical activity is under control of neuromodulators, which can alter neuronal responses to incoming signals and increase the fidelity of neuronal communication. Conversely, the effects of neuromodulators can depend on the ongoing electrical activity within target neurons; however, these activity-dependent effects of neuromodulators are less well understood. Here, we present evidence that the neuronal firing frequency and intrinsic properties of the action potential (AP) waveform set the [Ca(2+)]i in growth cones and determine how neurons respond to the neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO). We used two well-characterized neurons from the freshwater snail Helisoma trivolvis that show different growth cone morphological responses to NO: B5 neurons elongate filopodia, while those of B19 neurons do not. Combining whole-cell patch clamp recordings with simultaneous calcium imaging, we show that the duration of an AP contributes to neuron-specific differences in [Ca(2+)]i, with shorter APs in B19 neurons yielding lower growth cone [Ca(2+)]i. Through the partial inhibition of voltage-gated K(+) channels, we increased the B19 AP duration resulting in a significant increase in [Ca(2+)]i that was then sufficient to cause filopodial elongation following NO treatment. Our results demonstrate a neuron-type specific correlation between AP shape, [Ca(2+)]i, and growth cone motility, providing an explanation to how growth cone responses to guidance cues depend on intrinsic electrical properties and helping explain the diverse effects of NO across neuronal populations.

  12. F2-dihomo-isoprostanes as potential early biomarkers of lipid oxidative damage in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Claudio; Signorini, Cinzia; Durand, Thierry; Oger, Camille; Guy, Alexandre; Bultel-Poncé, Valérie; Galano, Jean-Marie; Ciccoli, Lucia; Leoncini, Silvia; D'Esposito, Maurizio; Filosa, Stefania; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Hayek, Joussef

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage has been reported in Rett syndrome (RTT), a pervasive developmental disorder caused in up to 95% of cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene. Herein, we have synthesized F2-dihomo-isoprostanes (F2-dihomo-IsoPs), peroxidation products from adrenic acid (22:4 n-6), a known component of myelin, and tested the potential value of F2-dihomo-IsoPs as a novel disease marker and its relationship with clinical presentation and disease progression. F2-dihomo-IsoPs were determined by gas chromatography/negative-ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Newly synthesized F2-dihomo-IsoP isomers [ent-7(RS)-F2t-dihomo-IsoP and 17-F2t-dihomo-IsoP] were used as reference standards. The measured ions were the product ions at m/z 327 derived from the [M–181]− precursor ions (m/z 597) produced from both the derivatized ent-7(RS)-F2t-dihomo-IsoP and 17-F2t-dihomo-IsoP. Average plasma F2-dihomo-IsoP levels in RTT were about one order of magnitude higher than those in healthy controls, being higher in typical RTT as compared with RTT variants, with a remarkable increase of about two orders of magnitude in patients at the earliest stage of the disease followed by a steady decrease during the natural clinical progression. hese data indicate for the first time that quantification of F2-dihomo-IsoPs in plasma represents an early marker of the disease and may provide a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms behind the neurological regression in patients with RTT PMID:21917727

  13. Imaging of oxide charges and contact potential difference fluctuations in atomic layer deposited Al2O3 on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, J. M.; Zinine, A. I.; Wormeester, H.; Poelsema, Bene; Bankras, R. G.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2005-03-01

    Ultrathin 2.5nm high-k aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films on p-type silicon (001) deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated with noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) in ultrahigh vacuum, using a conductive tip. Constant force gradient images revealed the presence of oxide charges and experimental observations at different tip-sample potentials were compared with calculations of the electric force gradient based on a spherical tip model. This model could be substantially improved by the incorporation of the image of the tip in the semiconductor substrate. Based on the signals of different oxide charges observed, a homogenous depth distribution of those charges was derived. Application of a potential difference between sample and tip was found to result in a net electric force depending on the contact potential difference (CPD) and effective tip-sample capacitance, which depends on the depletion or accumulation layer that is induced by the bias voltage. CPD images could be constructed from height-voltage spectra with active feedback. Apart from oxide charges large-scale (150-300nm lateral size) and small-scale (50-100nm) CPD fluctuations were observed, the latter showing a high degree of correlation with topography features. This correlation might be a result from the surface-inhibited growth mode of the investigated layers.

  14. Oxidative Stress: A Potential Recipe For Anxiety, Hypertension and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Samina; Asghar, Mohammad; Chugh, Gaurav; Taneja, Manish; Xia, Zhilian; Saha, Kaustav

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported involvement of oxidative stress in anxiety-like behavior of rats. Others in separate studies have demonstrated a link between oxidative stress and hypertension as well as with type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance. In the present study, we have tested a putative role of oxidative stress in anxiety-like behavior, hypertension and insulin resistance using a rat model of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in rats was produced by xanthine (0.1%; drinking water) and xanthine oxidase (5U/kg; i.p.). X+XO-treated rats had increased plasma and urinary 8-isoprostane levels (a marker of oxidative stress) and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the hippocampus and amygdala as compared to control rats. Serum corticosterone (a systemic marker of stress and anxiety) levels also increased with X+XO treatment. Moreover, anxiety-like behavior measured via open-field and light-dark exploration behavior tests significantly increased in X+XO-treated rats. Mean arterial blood pressure measured in anesthetized rats increased in X+XO-treated compared to control rats. Furthermore, plasma insulin but not glucose levels together with homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), an index of insulin resistance, were higher in X+XO-treated rats. Our studies suggest that oxidative stress is a common factor that link anxiety-like behavior, hypertension and insulin resistance in rats. PMID:20816762

  15. First principles scheme to evaluate band edge positions in potential transition metal oxide photocatalysts and photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Kanan, Dalal K; Alidoust, Nima; Isseroff, Leah Y; Liao, Peilin; Carter, Emily A

    2011-10-06

    The positions of electronic band edges are one important metric for determining a material's capability to function in a solar energy conversion device that produces fuels from sunlight. In particular, the position of the valence band maximum (conduction band minimum) must lie lower (higher) in energy than the oxidation (reduction) reaction free energy in order for these reactions to be thermodynamically favorable. We present first principles quantum mechanics calculations of the band edge positions in five transition metal oxides and discuss the feasibility of using these materials in photoelectrochemical cells that produce fuels, including hydrogen, methane, methanol, and formic acid. The band gap center is determined within the framework of DFT+U theory. The valence band maximum (conduction band minimum) is found by subtracting (adding) half of the quasiparticle gap obtained from a non-self-consistent GW calculation. The calculations are validated against experimental data where possible; results for several materials including manganese(ii) oxide, iron(ii) oxide, iron(iii) oxide, copper(i) oxide and nickel(ii) oxide are presented.

  16. [Potential protective role of nitric oxide and Hsp70 linked to functional foods in the atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Camargo, Alejandra B; Manucha, Walter

    Atherosclerosis, one of the main pathologic entities considered epidemic and a worldwide public health problem, is currently under constant review as regards its basic determining mechanisms and therapeutic possibilities. In this regard, all patients afflicted with the disease exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation. Interestingly, nitric oxide - a known vasoactive messenger gas - has been closely related to the inflammatory, oxidative and mitochondrial dysfunctional process that characterizes atherosclerosis. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that alterations in the bioavailability of nitric oxide would induce the expression of heat shock proteins. This agrees with the use of functional foods as a strategy to prevent both vascular aging and the development of atherosclerosis. Finally, a greater knowledge regarding the mechanisms implied in the development of atherosclerosis will enable proposing new and possible hygiene, health and therapeutic interventions.

  17. Implication of Land Use and Belowground Weather on Nitrous Oxide Soil Depth Profiles and Denitrification Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. L.; Song, B.; Saliendra, N.; Liebig, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural soils are the largest single source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, which is largely attributed to the expansion in the use of synthetic fertilizer nitrogen (N). Alfalfa crops often do not require synthetic N addition because N is fixed symbiotically belowground. Some biologically fixed N leaks into soil, which could affect production and consumption of N2O. While many studies have reported net fluxes of N2O at the soil surface, few have quantified variation in N2O concentration at multiple soil depths under variable climatic conditions without synthetic N inputs. A no-till crop field, seeded to alfalfa (Medicago sativa) in 2009, was compared to neighboring native prairie in North Dakota, U.S.A. to determine if N2O, CO2 and CH4 concentrations varied with depth between fields for 4 years. Both fields (> 15 ha) were harvested for hay without N-fertilizer inputs between 2009 and 2013. Soils and instrumentation were similar. Sensors and soil gas well collection chambers were buried at near-surface (15 and 30 cm) and sub-surface (60 and 90 cm) soil depths. Temperature, moisture, oxygen, relative humidity, and pressure data were collected every 30 minutes, and gas well concentration data were collected twice weekly until spring 2013. Cores were collected for each depth increment in 2012, and potential rates of denitrification and anammox were measured for the 0-15 cm depth using soil slurry incubation experiments with 15N tracer treatments. We evaluated temporal variability in N2O concentration with depth and found N2O spikes beneath alfalfa tended to be an order of magnitude higher and more persistent than N2O peaks beneath prairie. Median N2O concentrations at sub-surface depths were greater than near-surface depths. Alfalfa median N2O concentrations for near-surface (24 nmols N2O L-1) and sub-soils (30 nmols N2O L-1) were higher than N2O concentrations beneath prairie (15 nmols N2O L-1 and 17 nmols N2O L-1, respectively). Soil

  18. Microbial Phosphite Oxidation and Its Potential Role in the Global Phosphorus and Carbon Cycles.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, I A; Coates, J D

    2017-01-01

    Phosphite [Formula: see text] is a highly soluble, reduced phosphorus compound that is often overlooked in biogeochemical analyses. Although the oxidation of phosphite to phosphate is a highly exergonic process (E(o)(')=-650mV), phosphite is kinetically stable and can account for 10-30% of the total dissolved P in various environments. There is also evidence that phosphite was more prevalent under the reducing conditions of the Archean period and may have been involved in the development of early life. Its role as a phosphorus source for a variety of extant microorganisms has been known since the 1950s, and the pathways involved in assimilatory phosphite oxidation have been well characterized. More recently, it was demonstrated that phosphite could also act as an electron donor for energy metabolism in a process known as dissimilatory phosphite oxidation (DPO). The bacterium described in this study, Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans strain FiPS-3, was isolated from brackish sediments and is capable of growing by coupling phosphite oxidation to the reduction of either sulfate or carbon dioxide. FiPS-3 remains the only isolated organism capable of DPO, and the prevalence of this metabolism in the environment is still unclear. Nonetheless, given the widespread presence of phosphite in the environment and the thermodynamic favorability of its oxidation, microbial phosphite oxidation may play an important and hitherto unrecognized role in the global phosphorus and carbon cycles.

  19. Essential role of Glu-C66 for menaquinol oxidation indicates transmembrane electrochemical potential generation by Wolinella succinogenes fumarate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, C. Roy D.; Groß, Roland; Haas, Alexander; Ritter, Michaela; Mäntele, Werner; Simon, Jörg; Kröger, Achim

    2000-01-01

    Quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR) is a membrane protein complex that couples the reduction of fumarate to succinate to the oxidation of quinol to quinone, in a reaction opposite to that catalyzed by the related enzyme succinate:quinone reductase (succinate dehydrogenase). In the previously determined structure of QFR from Wolinella succinogenes, the site of fumarate reduction in the flavoprotein subunit A of the enzyme was identified, but the site of menaquinol oxidation was not. In the crystal structure, the acidic residue Glu-66 of the membrane spanning, diheme-containing subunit C lines a cavity that could be occupied by the substrate menaquinol. Here we describe that, after replacement of Glu-C66 with Gln by site-directed mutagenesis, the resulting mutant is unable to grow on fumarate and the purified enzyme lacks quinol oxidation activity. X-ray crystal structure analysis of the Glu-C66 → Gln variant enzyme at 3.1-Å resolution rules out any major structural changes compared with the wild-type enzyme. The oxidation-reduction potentials of the heme groups are not significantly affected. We conclude that Glu-C66 is an essential constituent of the menaquinol oxidation site. Because Glu-C66 is oriented toward a cavity leading to the periplasm, the release of two protons on menaquinol oxidation is expected to occur to the periplasm, whereas the uptake of two protons on fumarate reduction occurs from the cytoplasm. Thus our results indicate that the reaction catalyzed by W. succinogenes QFR generates a transmembrane electrochemical potential. PMID:11186225

  20. Spatiotemporal relationships between the abundance, distribution, and potential activities of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying microorganisms in intertidal sediments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason M; Mosier, Annika C; Francis, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to gain an understanding of how key microbial communities involved in nitrogen cycling in estuarine sediments vary over a 12-month period. Furthermore, we sought to determine whether changes in the size of these communities are related to, or indicative of, seasonal patterns in fixed nitrogen dynamics in Elkhorn Slough--a small, agriculturally impacted estuary with a direct connection to Monterey Bay. We assessed sediment and pore water characteristics, abundance of functional genes for nitrification (bacterial and archaeal amoA, encoding ammonia monooxygenase subunit A) and denitrification (nirS and nirK, encoding nitrite reductase), and measurements of potential nitrification and denitrification activities at six sites. No seasonality in the abundance of denitrifier or ammonia oxidizer genes was observed. A strong association between potential nitrification activity and the size of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial communities was observed across the estuary. In contrast, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal abundances remained relatively constant in space and time. Unlike many other estuaries, salinity does not appear to regulate the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing communities in Elkhorn Slough. Instead, their distributions appear to be governed over two different time scales. Long-term niche characteristics selected for the gross size of archaeal and bacterial ammonia-oxidizing communities, yet covariation in their abundances between monthly samples suggests that they respond in a similar manner to short-term changes in their environment. Abundances of denitrifier and ammonia oxidizer genes also covaried, but site-specific differences in this relationship suggest differing levels of interaction (or coupling) between nitrification and denitrification.

  1. Chemical potential of oxygen in (U, Pu) mixed oxide with Pu/(U+Pu) = 0.46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Rimpi; Chandramouli, V.; Anthonysamy, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical potential of oxygen in (U,Pu) mixed oxide with Pu/(U + Pu) = 0.46 was measured for the first time using H2/H2O gas equilibration combined with solid electrolyte EMF technique at 1073, 1273 and 1473 K covering an oxygen potential range of -525 to -325 kJ mol-1. The effect of oxygen potential on the oxygen to metal ratio was determined. Increase in oxygen potential increases the O/M. In this study the minimum O/M obtained was 1.985 below which reduction was not possible. Partial molar enthalpy ΔHbar O2 and entropy ΔSbar O2 of oxygen were calculated from the oxygen potential data. The values of -752.36 kJ mol-1 and 0.25 kJ mol-1 were obtained for ΔHbar O2 and ΔSbar O2 respectively.

  2. Increased Nitration and Carbonylation of Proteins in MRL +/+ Mice Exposed to Trichloroethene: Potential Role of Protein Oxidation in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Ma, Huaxian; Firoze Khan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Even though reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated as mediators of autoimmune diseases (ADs), little is known about contribution of protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) in the pathogenesis of such diseases. The focus of this study was, therefore, to establish a link between protein oxidation and induction and/or exacerbation of autoimmunity. To achieve this, female MRL +/+ mice were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 6 or 12 weeks (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day). TCE treatment resulted in significantly increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT) and induction of iNOS in the serum at both 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, but the response was greater at 12 weeks. Likewise, TCE treatment led to greater NT formation, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the livers and kidneys. Moreover, TCE treatment also caused significant increases (~3 fold) in serum protein carbonyls (a marker of protein oxidation) at both 6 and 12 weeks. Significantly increased protein carbonyls were also observed in the livers and kidneys (2.1 and 1.3 fold, respectively) at 6 weeks, and to a greater extent at 12 weeks (3.5 and 2.1 fold, respectively) following TCE treatment. The increases in TCE-induced protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) were associated with significant increases in Th1 specific cytokine (IL-2, IFN-γ) release into splenocyte cultures. These results suggest an association between protein oxidation and induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response. The results present a potential mechanism by which oxidatively modified proteins could contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response and necessitates further investigations for clearly establishing the role of protein oxidation in the pathogenesis of ADs. PMID:19332086

  3. Increased nitration and carbonylation of proteins in MRL +/+ mice exposed to trichloroethene: Potential role of protein oxidation in autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Gangduo; Wang Jianling; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2009-06-01

    Even though reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated as mediators of autoimmune diseases (ADs), little is known about contribution of protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) in the pathogenesis of such diseases. The focus of this study was, therefore, to establish a link between protein oxidation and induction and/or exacerbation of autoimmunity. To achieve this, female MRL +/+ mice were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 6 or 12 weeks (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4{sup th} day). TCE treatment resulted in significantly increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT) and induction of iNOS in the serum at both 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, but the response was greater at 12 weeks. Likewise, TCE treatment led to greater NT formation, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the livers and kidneys. Moreover, TCE treatment also caused significant increases ({approx}3 fold) in serum protein carbonyls (a marker of protein oxidation) at both 6 and 12 weeks. Significantly increased protein carbonyls were also observed in the livers and kidneys (2.1 and 1.3 fold, respectively) at 6 weeks, and to a greater extent at 12 weeks (3.5 and 2.1 fold, respectively) following TCE treatment. The increases in TCE-induced protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) were associated with significant increases in Th1 specific cytokine (IL-2, IFN-{gamma}) release into splenocyte cultures. These results suggest an association between protein oxidation and induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response. The results present a potential mechanism by which oxidatively modified proteins could contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response and necessitates further investigations for clearly establishing the role of protein oxidation in the pathogenesis of ADs.

  4. Ion Channels and Oxidative Stress as a Potential Link for the Diagnosis or Treatment of Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Ana; Vázquez-Sánchez, Alma Yolanda; Carrión-Robalino, Natalia; Camacho, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress results from a disturbed balance between oxidation and antioxidant systems. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) may be either harmful or beneficial to the cells. Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that participate in a large variety of cellular functions and have been implicated in the development of a variety of diseases. A significant amount of the available drugs in the market targets ion channels. These proteins have sulfhydryl groups of cysteine and methionine residues in their structure that can be targeted by ROS and RNS altering channel function including gating and conducting properties, as well as the corresponding signaling pathways associated. The regulation of ion channels by ROS has been suggested to be associated with some pathological conditions including liver diseases. This review focuses on understanding the role and the potential association of ion channels and oxidative stress in liver diseases including fibrosis, alcoholic liver disease, and cancer. The potential association between ion channels and oxidative stress conditions could be used to develop new treatments for major liver diseases. PMID:26881024

  5. Ion Channels and Oxidative Stress as a Potential Link for the Diagnosis or Treatment of Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Ana; Vázquez-Sánchez, Alma Yolanda; Carrión-Robalino, Natalia; Camacho, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress results from a disturbed balance between oxidation and antioxidant systems. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) may be either harmful or beneficial to the cells. Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that participate in a large variety of cellular functions and have been implicated in the development of a variety of diseases. A significant amount of the available drugs in the market targets ion channels. These proteins have sulfhydryl groups of cysteine and methionine residues in their structure that can be targeted by ROS and RNS altering channel function including gating and conducting properties, as well as the corresponding signaling pathways associated. The regulation of ion channels by ROS has been suggested to be associated with some pathological conditions including liver diseases. This review focuses on understanding the role and the potential association of ion channels and oxidative stress in liver diseases including fibrosis, alcoholic liver disease, and cancer. The potential association between ion channels and oxidative stress conditions could be used to develop new treatments for major liver diseases.

  6. Potential atmospheric production of small volatile organic compounds from soot oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, A.; Carpenter, L.; Daly, H.; Jones, C.

    2003-04-01

    In the polluted troposphere, VOCs are involved in a range of interlinked chemical and photochemical cycles with a direct bearing on the production of ozone. The rates of emission, production and reaction of VOC are therefore an important component of atmospheric models. Recent urban measurements using 2D-GC methods show that there are a large number of unidentified and unattributed VOC components. Any new sources of such material with high photochemical ozone creation potentials may therefore be significant. Hydrocarbon, fossil fuel and biomass burning produces particulate carbonaceous aerosols (soot) in addition to gas phase products. Soot in the atmosphere is known to undergo oxidation becoming hydrophilic in aged urban plumes and the process is also known to produce water soluble organic compounds. In our experiments, soot samples are prepared by combustion of appropriate liquid hydrocarbons and reacted with ozone in a glass reaction vessel. Analysis of the surface and gas-phase during the course of this reaction confirms kinetic measurements showing irreversible uptake of O_3 on soot and further identify that the reaction has oxidised the surface. Transmission electron micrographs of the fresh and ozonised soot reveal small, coagulated particles: fresh soot particle size ranges from 50--90 nm which reduces to 40--50 nm after ozonolysis. Separation of the soluble components of fresh and ozonised soot samples analysed by GC/MS reveal the presence of polyaromatic and unsaturated components in unreacted soot and partially oxidised components post-ozonolysis. ATR-IR spectra of soot extracts and ozonised soot confirm that surface features due to the creation of oxidised surface products grow in with exposure time. These include carbonyl, ester and alcohol functional groups. Direct sampling of the gas-phase during the ozone reaction allows some gaseous products to be identified as small organic acids, ketones and alcohols. Overall, the reaction of ozone with soot

  7. Alkylating potential of styrene oxide: reactions and factors involved in the alkylation process.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Marina; Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Pérez-Prior, M Teresa; Arenas-Valgañón, Jorge; García-Santos, M Pilar; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2014-10-20

    The chemical reactivity of styrene-7,8-oxide (SO), an alkylating agent with high affinity for the guanine–N7 position and a probable carcinogen for humans, with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP), a trap for alkylating agents with nucleophilic characteristics similar to those of DNA bases, was investigated kinetically in water/dioxane media. UV–vis spectrophotometry and ultrafast liquid chromatography were used to monitor the reactions involved. It was found that in the alkylation process four reactions occur simultaneously: (a) the formation of a β-NBP–SO adduct through an SN2 mechanism; (b) the acid-catalyzed formation of the stable α-NBP–SO adduct through an SN2′ mechanism; (c) the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of the β-adduct, and (d) the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of SO. At 37.5 °C and pH = 7.0 (in 7:3 water/dioxane medium), the values of the respective reaction rate constants were as follows: kalkβ = (2.1 ± 0.3) × 10–4 M–1 s–1, kalkα = (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10–4 M–1 s–1, khydAD = (3.06 ± 0.09) × 10–6 s–1, and khyd = (4.2 ± 0.9) × 10–6 s–1. These values show that, in order to determine the alkylating potential of SO, none of the four reactions involved can be neglected. Temperature and pH were found to exert a strong influence on the values of some parameters that may be useful to investigate possible chemicobiological correlations (e.g., in the pH 5.81–7.69 range, the fraction of total adducts formed increased from 24% to 90% of the initial SO, whereas the adduct lifetime of the unstable β-adduct, which gives an idea of the permanence of the adduct over time, decreased from 32358 to 13313 min). A consequence of these results is that the conclusions drawn in studies addressing alkylation reactions at temperatures and/or pH far from those of biological conditions should be considered with some reserve.

  8. Classification of metal-oxide bonded interactions based on local potential- and kinetic-energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David; Crawford, T Daniel; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ross, Nancy; Downs, R. T.

    2006-02-28

    A classification of the HF bonded interactions comprising a large number of molecules has been proposed by Espinosa et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 5529 (2002)] based on the ratio |V(rc)|/G(rc) where |V(rc)| is the magnitude of the local potential energy density and G(rc) is the local kinetic density evaluated at the bond critical points, rc. A calculation of the ratio for the MO bonded interactions comprising a relatively large number of molecules and earth materials, together with the constraints imposed by the values of Ñ2ρ(rc) and the local electronic energy density H(rc) = G(rc) + V(rc) in the HF study, yielded the same classification for the oxides as found for the fluorides. This is true despite the different trends of the bond critical point and local energy properties with the bond length displayed by the HF and MO bonded interactions. LiO, NaO and MgO bonded interactions classify as closed shell ionic bonds, BeO, AlO, SiO, BO and PO bonded interactions classify as bonds of intermediate character and NO bonded interactions classify as shared covalent bonds. CO and SO bonded interactions classify as both intermediate and covalent bonded interactions. The CO triple bonded interaction classifies as a bond of intermediate character and the CO single bonded interaction classifies as a covalent bond whereas their H(rc) value indicates that they are both covalent bonds. The |V(rc)|/G(rc) ratios for the BeO, AlO and SiO bonded interactions indicate that they have a substantial component of ionic character despite their classification as bonds of intermediate character. The trend between |V(rc)|/G(rc) and the character of the bonded interaction is consistent with trends expected from electronegativity considerations. The connection between the net charges and the experimental SiO bond length evaluated for the Si and O atoms comprising two orthosilicates are examined in terms of the |V(rc)|/G(rc) values.

  9. Wet air oxidation as a pretreatment option for selective biodegradability enhancement and biogas generation potential from complex effluent.

    PubMed

    Padoley, K V; Tembhekar, P D; Saratchandra, T; Pandit, A B; Pandey, R A; Mudliar, S N

    2012-09-01

    This study looks at the possibility of wet air oxidation (WAO) based pretreatment of complex effluent to selectively enhance the biodegradability (without substantial COD destruction) and facilitate biogas generation potential. A lab-scale wet air oxidation reactor with biomethanated distillery wastewater (B-DWW) as a model complex effluent (COD 40,000 mg L(-1)) was used to demonstrate the proof-of-concept. The studies were conducted using a designed set of experiments and reaction temperature (150-200°C), air pressure (6-12 bar) and reaction time (15-120 min) were the main process variables of concern for WAO process optimization. WAO pretreatment of B-DWW enhanced the biodegradability of the complex wastewater by the virtue of enhancing its biodegradability index (BI) from 0.2 to 0.88, which indicate favorable Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) for biogas generation. The kinetics of COD destruction and BI enhancement has also been reported.

  10. Semiconducting large bandgap oxides as potential thermoelectric materials for high-temperature power generation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus-Ricoult, M.; Rustad, J.; Moore, L.; Smith, C.; Brown, J.

    2014-08-01

    Semiconducting large bandgap oxides are considered as interesting candidates for high-temperature thermoelectric power generation (700-1,200 °C) due to their stability, lack of toxicity and low cost, but so far they have not reached sufficient performance for extended application. In this review, we summarize recent progress on thermoelectric oxides, analyze concepts for tuning semiconductor thermoelectric properties with view of their applicability to oxides and determine key drivers and limitations for electrical and thermal transport properties in oxides based on our own experimental work and literature results. For our experimental assessment, we have selected representative multicomponent oxides that range from materials with highly symmetric crystal structure (SrTiO3 perovskite) over oxides with large densities of planar crystallographic defects (Ti n O2 n-1 Magnéli phases with a single type of shear plane, NbO x block structures with intersecting shear planes and WO3- x with more defective block and channel structures) to layered superstructures (Ca3Co4O9 and double perovskites) and also include a wide range of their composites with a variety of second phases. Crystallographic or microstructural features of these oxides are in 0.3-2 nm size range, so that oxide phonons can efficiently interact with them. We explore in our experiments the effects of doping, grain size, crystallographic defects, superstructures, second phases, texturing and (to a limited extend) processing on electric conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity and figure of merit. Jonker and lattice-versus-electrical conductivity plots are used to compare specific materials and material families and extract levers for future improvement of oxide thermoelectrics. We show in our work that oxygen vacancy doping (reduction) is a more powerful driver for improving the power factor for SrTiO3, TiO2 and NbO x than heterovalent doping. Based on our Seebeck-conductivity plots, we derived

  11. Catalyzed Electrolytic Plutonium Oxide Dissolution (CEPOD): The past seventeen years and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.L.; Bray, L.A.; Wheelwright, E.J.; Bryan, G.H.

    1990-07-01

    Catalyzed Electrolytic Plutonium Oxide Dissolution (CEPOD) was first demonstrated at PNL in early 1974 in work funded by EXXON Corporation. That work was aimed at dissolution of Pu-containing residues remaining in mixed-oxide reactor fuels dissolution and was first publicly disclosed in 1981. The process dissolves PuO{sub 2} in an anolyte containing small (catalytic) amounts of elements that form kinetically fast, strongly oxidizing ions. These are continuously regenerated at the anode. Catalysts used, in their oxidized form, include Ag{sup 2+}, Ce{sup 4+}, Co{sup 3+}, and AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. This paper reviews the chemistry involved in CEPOD and the results of its application to the dissolution of the Pu content of a variety of PuO{sub 2}-containing materials such as off-standard oxide, fuels dissolution residues, incinerator ash, contaminated soils, and other scrapes or wastes. Results are presented for both laboratory-scale and plant-scale dissolvers. Spin-off applications such as decontamination of metallic surfaces and destruction of organics are discussed. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  12. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles for Selective Destruction of Tumor Cells and Potential for Drug Delivery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, John W.; Martinez, Ezequiel; Louka, Panagiota; Wingett, Denise G.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Metal oxide nanoparticles, including zinc oxide, are versatile platforms for biomedical applications and therapeutic intervention. There is an urgent need to develop new classes of anticancer agents, and recent studies demonstrate that ZnO nanomaterials hold considerable promise. Areas covered in this review This review analyzes the biomedical applications of metal oxide and ZnO nanomaterials under development at the experimental, preclinical, and clinical levels. A discussion regarding the advantages, approaches, and limitations surrounding the use of metal oxide nanoparticles for cancer applications and drug delivery is presented. The scope of this article is focused on ZnO, and other metal oxide nanomaterial systems, and their proposed mechanisms of cytotoxic action, as well as current approaches to improve their targeting and cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Take home message Through a better understanding of the mechanisms of action and cellular consequences resulting from nanoparticles interactions with cells, the inherent toxicity and selectivity of ZnO nanoparticles against cancer may be further improved to make them attractive new anti-cancer agents. PMID:20716019

  13. Methionine sulfoxides in serum proteins as potential clinical biomarkers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Satoko; Kodera, Yoshio; Saito, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Kazumi; Momozono, Akari; Hayashi, Akinori; Kamata, Yuji; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases, and circulating biomarkers of its severity remains a topic of great interest for researchers. Our peptidomic strategy enables accurate and reproducible analysis of circulating proteins/peptides with or without post-translational modifications. Conventional wisdom holds that hydrophobic methionines exposed to an aqueous environment or experimental handling procedures are vulnerable to oxidation. However, we show that the mass spectra intensity ratio of oxidized to non-oxidized methionine residues in serum tryptic proteins can be accurately quantified using a single drop of human serum and give stable and reproducible results. Our data demonstrate that two methionine residues in serum albumin (Met-111 and Met-147) are highly oxidized to methionine sulfoxide in patients with diabetes and renal failure and in healthy smokers versus non-smoker controls. This label-free mass spectrometry approach to quantify redox changes in methionine residues should facilitate the identification of additional circulating biomarkers suitable for predicting the development or progression of human diseases. PMID:27929071

  14. Beta-Ga2O3: A transparent conductive oxide for potential resistive switching applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaohao

    My primary research focus is controlling conductivity in Ga2O3, with the broader goal of seeking both new materials science and possible applications. Regarding new materials science, the key goal is to elucidate connections between defects and conductivity in β- Ga2O3, then, based on an understanding of the conduction mechanism of Ga2O3, determine and evaluate the potential of β-Ga2O3 as a resistive switching (RS) material. To systematically investigate the feasibility of Ga2O3 in memristor applications, several aspects was examined. One of the first questions to be answered is how defects play a role in the conductivity of Ga2O3. To establish connections between conductivity and defects, a direct approach is to investigate the connections between the local structure and the concomitant electronic responses, paying particular attention to the role of both intrinsic and extrinsic defects. The approach I used was to compare the directional and thermal dependence of the conductivity induced through annealing in various environments (i.e., intentionally changing the intrinsic and extrinsic defect concentrations), and elucidate the roles of dimensionality and sample processing in controlling these processes through a comparison of the bulk. Such a strategy involves careful characterization of both the atomic and electronic structure at both nanoscopic and macroscopic length scales. Although various calculations has predicted conductivity is independent from oxygen vacancy, no experimental work is reported as supports to theoretical studies due to the hardness to dissociate oxygen vacancy increase from other defect changes, such as Hydrogen interstitial increase, surface band bending reduction from surface population of charged vacancies, metal contact to Ga2O3 interface changes, etc . We intentionally inject and/or remove oxygen defects through annealing in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The effects of such annealing treatments were investigated using X

  15. Microbiology and potential applications of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Mengdong; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Weixiang; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) is an important link between the global methane and nitrogen cycles. This mini-review updates discoveries regarding aerobic methanotrophs and denitrifiers, as a prelude to spotlight the microbial mechanism and the potential applications of AME-D. Until recently, AME-D was thought to be accomplished by a microbial consortium where denitrifying bacteria utilize carbon intermediates, which are excreted by aerobic methanotrophs, as energy and carbon sources. Potential carbon intermediates include methanol, citrate and acetate. This mini-review presents microbial thermodynamic estimations and postulates that methanol is the ideal electron donor for denitrification, and may serve as a trophic link between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. More excitingly, new discoveries have revealed that AME-D is not only confined to the conventional synergism between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. Specifically, an obligate aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas denitrificans FJG1, has been demonstrated to couple partial denitrification with methane oxidation, under hypoxia conditions, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. This finding not only substantially advances the understanding of AME-D mechanism, but also implies an important but unknown role of aerobic methanotrophs in global climate change through their influence on both the methane and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems. Hence, further investigation on AME-D microbiology and mechanism is essential to better understand global climate issues and to develop niche biotechnological solutions. This mini-review also presents traditional microbial techniques, such as pure cultivation and stable isotope probing, and powerful microbial techniques, such as (meta-) genomics and (meta-) transcriptomics, for deciphering linked methane oxidation and denitrification. Although AME-D has immense potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater, drinking

  16. Soil Oxidation-Reduction Potential and Plant Photosynthetic Capacity in the Northern Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathuilliere, M. J.; Johnson, M. S.; Dalmagro, H. J.; Pinto Junior, O. B.; Couto, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    Plant communities of the Pantanal wetland are able to survive long periods of climatic and physiological stress in the dry and wet seasons. During inundation, soil oxygen demand increases dramatically as reducing soil conditions create stress in the root system with possible impacts on photosynthetic capacity of plants. We look at inundation cycles of a tree island (locally known as a cordilheira) in the Northern Pantanal near Poconé, Mato Grosso, and relate soil oxidation-reduction potential and soil oxygen depletion to the photosynthetic capacity of two plant communities of flooded scrub forest (Vochysia divergens and Curatela americana). Results show a drop in soil oxidation-reduction potential of over 400 mV, to levels below the absolute value of -200 mV, following inundation around the tree island. Both plant species showed increased carbon assimilation at highest soil oxygen demand despite a change in stomatal conductance, suggesting adaptation to the inundated environment. Absolute values of soil oxidation-reduction potential also allow for the determination of specific soil chemical reactions characteristic of the tree island environment, namely the reduction of iron(III), or carbon dioxide which in turn produces methane. Our combined analysis of soil chemistry with plant ecophysiology allows for a better understanding of soil-plant interactions in the Pantanal, specifically the drivers of biogeochemical processes between inundation periods.

  17. Oxidative potential of secondary organic aerosols produced from photooxidation of different hydrocarbons using outdoor chamber under ambient sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huanhuan; Jang, Myoseon; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Robinson, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidative potential of various secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was measured using dithiothreitol (DTT) assay to understand how organic aerosols react with cellular materials. SOA was produced via the photooxidation of four different hydrocarbons (toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, isoprene and α-pinene) in the presence of NOx using a large outdoor photochemical smog chamber. The DTT consumption rate was normalized by the aerosol mass, which is expressed as DTTmass. Toluene SOA and isoprene SOA yielded higher DTTmass than 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA or α-pinene SOA. In order to discover the correlation between the molecular structure and oxidative potential, the DTT responses of selected model compounds were also measured. Among them, conjugated aldehydes, quinones, and H2O2 showed considerable DTT response. To investigate the correlation between DTT response and cell responses in vitro, the expression of biological markers, i.e. IL-6, IL-8, and HMOX-1 were studied using small airway epithelial cells. Higher cellular expression of IL-8 was observed with toluene SOA exposure compared to 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA exposure, which aligned with the results from DTT assay. Our study also suggests that within the urban atmosphere, the contribution of toluene SOA and isoprene SOA to the oxidative potential of ambient SOA will be more significant than that of α-pinene SOA.

  18. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M.; Gilbert, Jack A.; ...

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiablemore » carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.« less

  19. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  20. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M; Gilbert, Jack A; Kostka, Joel E

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  1. Iron Oxides from Volcanic Soils as Potential Catalysts in the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pizarro, C.; Escudey, M.; Moya, S.A.; Fabris, J.D.

    2005-04-26

    This study was focused on changes of the iron oxide mineralogy with temperature of two Chilean soils (Andisol and Ultisol) derived from volcanic materials and their use as iron-based catalysts in the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). Ultisol materials produced about twice as much hydrogen than did those from Andisol upon WGSR, but in both cases hydrogen yielding increased as the heating temperature of the soil materials increased from 124 deg. C to 500 deg. C. The room temperature Moessbauer spectra showed an increase of the relative proportion of the magnetically ordered components as temperature increased. Higher heating temperature produced a negative effect on the catalytic activity, whereas the organic matter destruction led to a positive effect, due to an increasing exposition of the iron oxide surfaces; heating the soil sample at 600 deg. C induced changes on the iron oxide mineralogy with a significant decrease of the catalytic activity.

  2. The Arsenite Oxidation Potential of Native Microbial Communities from Arsenic-Rich Freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Stefano; Crognale, Simona; Casentini, Barbara; Amalfitano, Stefano; Lotti, Francesca; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in speciation and mobility of arsenic in the environment, by mediating redox transformations of both inorganic and organic species. Since arsenite [As(III)] is more toxic than arsenate [As(V)] to the biota, the microbial driven processes of As(V) reduction and As(III) oxidation may play a prominent role in mediating the environmental impact of arsenic contamination. However, little is known about the ecology and dynamics of As(III)-oxidizing populations within native microbial communities exposed to natural high levels of As. In this study, two techniques for single cell quantification (i.e., flow cytometry, CARD-FISH) were used to analyze the structure of aquatic microbial communities across a gradient of arsenic (As) contamination in different freshwater environments (i.e., groundwaters, surface and thermal waters). Moreover, we followed the structural evolution of these communities and their capacity to oxidize arsenite, when experimentally exposed to high As(III) concentrations in experimental microcosms. Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria were the main groups retrieved in groundwaters and surface waters, while Beta and Gammaproteobacteria dominated the bacteria community in thermal waters. At the end of microcosm incubations, the communities were able to oxidize up to 95 % of arsenite, with an increase of Alphaproteobacteria in most of the experimental conditions. Finally, heterotrophic As(III)-oxidizing strains (one Alphaproteobacteria and two Gammaproteobacteria) were isolated from As rich waters. Our findings underlined that native microbial communities from different arsenic-contaminated freshwaters can efficiently perform arsenite oxidation, thus contributing to reduce the overall As toxicity to the aquatic biota.

  3. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinical Stage II-III Breast Cancer Patients With pN0: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study (KROG 12-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Su Jung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Nam Kwon; Suh, Chang-Ok; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Su Ssan; Ha, Sung W.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pN0. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 417 clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients who achieved an ypN0 at surgery after receiving NAC between 1998 and 2009. Of these, 151 patients underwent mastectomy after NAC. The effect of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log–rank test and Cox proportional regression analysis. Results: Of the 151 patients who underwent mastectomy, 105 (69.5%) received PMRT and 46 patients (30.5%) did not. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 5 patients (3.3%) developed LRR (8 sites of recurrence) and 14 patients (9.3%) developed distant metastasis. The 5-year DFS, LRRFS, and OS rates were 91.2, 98.1, and 93.3% with PMRT and 83.0%, 92.3%, and 89.9% without PMRT, respectively (all P values not significant). By univariate analysis, only age (≤40 vs >40 years) was significantly associated with decreased DFS (P=.027). By multivariate analysis, age (≤40 vs >40 years) and pathologic T stage (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) were significant prognostic factors affecting DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.353, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.135-0.928, P=.035; HR 2.223, 95% CI 1.074-4.604, P=.031, respectively). PMRT showed no correlation with a difference in DFS, LRRFS, or OS by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: PMRT might not be necessary for pN0 patients after NAC, regardless of clinical stage. Prospective randomized clinical trial data are needed to assess whether PMRT can be safely omitted in pN0 patients after NAC and mastectomy for clinical stage II-III breast cancer.

  4. Determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) using ultrasound digestion and oxidation-reduction potential-based titration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunook; Lim, Honglae; Colosimo, Mark F

    2007-09-01

    A new method for determining wastewater chemical oxygen demand (COD) using ultrasonic digestion and titration based on oxidation reduction potential (ORP) was developed. COD values of potassium hydrogen phthalate solution obtained by ultrasonic digestion were well matched with those obtained using Standard Methods. When applied to determine COD of real wastewater collected from a local treatment plant, results from the new method were within 80% to 90% of those obtained using Standard Methods. Nonetheless, the proposed strategy has the potential to be implemented into an online COD analyzing system.

  5. Rates and potential mechanism of anaerobic nitrate-dependent microbial pyrite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2012-12-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) is a major iron- and sulfur-containing mineral phase in the environment. Oxidation of pyrite by aerobic micro-organisms has been well investigated. However, the reactivity of pyrite under anoxic conditions is still an open question. In the present paper, we summarize field and laboratory data on this chemolithotrophic respiration process with nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Geochemical and stable isotope field data indicate that this process is occurring. Laboratory studies are more ambiguous, but recent positive results provide evidence that anaerobic microbial pyrite oxidation can, in fact, occur with nitrate as electron acceptor.

  6. Eco-friendly approach towards green synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals and its potential applications.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Park, Jung-Hee; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Yi, Young-Joo; Cho, Min; Jang, Jum-Suk; Myung, Hyun; Bang, Keuk-Soo; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated a novel green route for synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals using Prunus × yedoensis Matsumura leaf extract as a reducing agent without using any surfactant or external energy. Standard characterization studies were carried out to confirm the obtained product using UV-Vis spectra, SEM-EDS, FTIR, TEM, and XRD. In addition, the synthesized ZnO nanocrystals were coated onto fabric and leather samples to study their bacteriostatic effect against odor-causing bacteria Brevibacterium linens and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Zinc oxide nanocrystal-coated fabric and leather showed good activity against both bacteria.

  7. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Melissa M.; Hoarfrost, Adrienne L.; Bose, Arpita; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C2), propane (C3), and butane (C4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV, Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C1–C4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C1–C4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75°C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C1–C4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C2–C4 alkanes. Maximum C1–C4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55°C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C4, C2, and C1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C2–C4alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C1 derived from these hydrothermal systems. PMID:23717305

  8. Oxidative stability, phenolic compounds and antioxidant potential of a virgin olive oil enriched with natural bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Adámez, Jonathan; Baltasar, M Nieves Franco; Yuste, María Concepción Ayuso; Martín-Vertedor, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate strategies for the development of a virgin olive oil (VOO) enriched with aqueous extracts of olive leaf and cake to increase the necessary dose in the diet of phenolic compounds with a natural product, as phenolic compounds are involved on the healthy properties of olive oil. Different extraction procedures were evaluated with the aim of increasing the phenol content and antioxidant potential of extracts of olive leaf and cake. As leaves extract presented a higher total phenolic content, it was characterized in order to determine its phenolic profile, and was employed to enrich VOO. Diverse procedures were used to prepare enriched VOO with the leaves extract, and finally the effects of phenol enrichment were evaluated based on the antioxidant potential and oxidative stability of the prepared phenol-enriched virgin olive oils. These enriched VOOs increased significantly the content in phenolic compounds, antioxidant potential and oxidative stability 40, 4 and 1.5 fold more, respectively, than the Control oil. Furthermore, the addition of lecithin had a positive effect both on the phenolic compounds content, and on the antioxidant potential of the oils. Besides, the use of the olive leaves extract, with and without lecithin respectively, supposes a strategy potential for reducing the harmful effects that inflicts long-term preservation of VOOs and its possible deterioration.

  9. A comparison of the sorption reactivity of bacteriogenic and mycogenic Mn oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Droz, Boris; Dumas, Naomi; Duckworth, Owen W; Peña, Jasquelin

    2015-04-07

    Biogenic MnO2 minerals affect metal fate and transport in natural and engineered systems by strongly sorbing metals ions. The ability to produce MnO2 is widely dispersed in the microbial tree of life, leading to potential differences in the minerals produced by different organisms. In this study, we compare the structure and reactivity of biogenic Mn oxides produced by the biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1 and the white-rot fungus Coprinellus sp. The rate of Mn(II) oxidation, and thus biomineral production, was 45 times lower for Coprinellus sp. (5.1 × 10(-2) mM d(-1)) than for P. putida (2.32 mM d(-1)). Both organisms produced predominantly Mn(IV) oxides with hexagonal-sheet symmetry, low sheet stacking, small particle size, and Mn(II/III) in the interlayer. However, we found that mycogenic MnO2 could support a significantly lower quantity of Ni sorbed via inner-sphere coordination at vacancy sites than the bacteriogenic MnO2: 0.09 versus 0.14 mol Ni mol(-1) Mn. In addition, 50-100% of the adsorbed Ni partitioned to the MnO2, which accounts for less than 20% of the sorbent on a mass basis. The vacancy content, which appears to increase with the kinetics of MnO2 precipitation, exerts significant control on biomineral reactivity.

  10. Actinide thermodynamic predictions. 3. Thermodynamics of compounds and aquo ions of the 2+, 3+ and 4+ oxidation states and standard electrode potentials at 298. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Bratsch, S.G.; Lagowski, J.J.

    1986-01-16

    A modified ionic model is applied to selected actinide thermodynamic measurements to allow the evaluation of gas-phase ion thermodynamics across the actinide series. These are used to predict the thermodynamic properties of a number of actinide compounds and aquo ions at 298.15 K. General guidelines are offered for predicting the relative stabilities of actinide(II), -(III), and -(IV) compounds in various chemical environments. 40 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  11. Design of ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides with potential good p-type conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao -Hua; Singh, David J.; Zhang, Lijun; Li, Yuwei; Xu, Qiaoling; Ma, Yanming; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-04-19

    Oxides with good p-type conductivity have been long sought after to achieve high performance all-oxide optoelectronic devices. Divalent Sn(II) based oxides are promising candidates because of their rather dispersive upper valence bands caused by the Sn-5s/O-2p anti-bonding hybridization. There are so far few known Sn(II) oxides being p-type conductive suitable for device applications. Here, we present via first-principles global optimization structure searches a material design study for a hitherto unexplored Sn(II)-based system, ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides in the stoichiometry of MSn2O3 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). We identify two stable compounds of SrSn2O3 and BaSn2O3, which can be stabilized by Sn-rich conditions in phase stability diagrams. Their structures follow the Zintl behaviour and consist of basic structural motifs of SnO3 tetrahedra. Unexpectedly they show distinct electronic properties with band gaps ranging from 1.90 (BaSn2O3) to 3.15 (SrSn2O3) eV, and hole effective masses ranging from 0.87 (BaSn2O3) to above 6.0 (SrSn2O3) m0. Further exploration of metastable phases indicates a wide tunability of electronic properties controlled by the details of the bonding between the basic structural motifs. Lastly, this suggests further exploration of alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides for potential applications requiring good p-type conductivity such as transparent conductors and photovoltaic absorbers.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium release potentiates the ER stress and cell death caused by an oxidative stress in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Dejeans, Nicolas; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Beck, Raphaël; Verrax, Julien; Taper, Henryk; Gailly, Philippe; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2010-05-01

    Increase in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+](c)), release of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium ([Ca2+](er)) and ER stress have been proposed to be involved in oxidative toxicity. Nevertheless, their relative involvements in the processes leading to cell death are not well defined. In this study, we investigated whether oxidative stress generated during ascorbate-driven menadione redox cycling (Asc/Men) could trigger these three events, and, if so, whether they contributed to Asc/Men cytoxicity in MCF-7 cells. Using microspectrofluorimetry, we demonstrated that Asc/Men-generated oxidative stress was associated with a slow and moderate increase in [Ca2+](c), largely preceding permeation of propidium iodide, and thus cell death. Asc/Men treatment was shown to partially deplete ER calcium stores after 90 min (decrease by 45% compared to control). This event was associated with ER stress activation, as shown by analysis of eIF2 phosphorylation and expression of the molecular chaperone GRP94. Thapsigargin (TG) was then used to study the effect of complete [Ca2+](er) emptying during the oxidative stress generated by Asc/Men. Surprisingly, the combination of TG and Asc/Men increased ER stress to a level considerably higher than that observed for either treatment alone, suggesting that [Ca2+](er) release alone is not sufficient to explain ER stress activation during oxidative stress. Finally, TG-mediated [Ca2+](er) release largely potentiated ER stress, DNA fragmentation and cell death caused by Asc/Men, supporting a role of ER stress in the process of Asc/Men cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results highlight the involvement of ER stress and [Ca2+](er) decrease in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death in MCF-7 cells.

  13. Metal inhibition on the reactivity of manganese dioxide toward organic contaminant oxidation in relation to metal adsorption and ionic potential.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Wang, Zhuopu; Chen, Yang; He, Anfei; Li, Jianliang; Sheng, G Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Coexisting metal ions may significantly inhibit the oxidative reactivity of manganese oxides toward organic contaminants in metal-organic multi-pollutant waters. While the metal inhibition on the oxidation of organic contaminants by manganese oxides has previously been reported, the extent of the inhibition in relation to metal properties has not been established. Six alkali, alkaline, and transition metals, as well as two testing metals were evaluated for their abilities to inhibit the reactivity of birnessite. Regardless of the pathways of phenol and diuron oxidation (polymerization vs. breakdown), the extent of metal inhibition depended mainly on the metal itself and its concentration. The observed metal inhibition efficiency followed the order of Mn(2+) > Co(2+) > Cu(2+) > Al(3+) > Mg(2+) > K(+), consistent with metal adsorption on birnessite. The first-order organic oxidation rate constant (kobs) was linearly negatively correlated with metal adsorption (qe) on birnessite. These observations demonstrated that the metal inhibition efficiency was determined by metal adsorption on birnessite. The slopes of the kobs-qe varied among metals and followed the order of K(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Mn(2+) > Cd(2+) > Co(2+) > Cu(2+) > Al(3+). These slopes defined intrinsic inhibitory abilities of metals. As metals were adsorbed hydrated on birnessite, the intrinsic inhibitory ability was significantly linearly correlated with ionic potentials of metals, leading to a single straight line. Metals with multiple d electrons in the outermost orbit with polarizing energy that promotes hydrolysis sat slightly below the line, and vice versa.

  14. Design of ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides with potential good p-type conductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Mao -Hua; Singh, David J.; Zhang, Lijun; ...

    2016-04-19

    Oxides with good p-type conductivity have been long sought after to achieve high performance all-oxide optoelectronic devices. Divalent Sn(II) based oxides are promising candidates because of their rather dispersive upper valence bands caused by the Sn-5s/O-2p anti-bonding hybridization. There are so far few known Sn(II) oxides being p-type conductive suitable for device applications. Here, we present via first-principles global optimization structure searches a material design study for a hitherto unexplored Sn(II)-based system, ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides in the stoichiometry of MSn2O3 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). We identify two stable compounds of SrSn2O3 and BaSn2O3, which can bemore » stabilized by Sn-rich conditions in phase stability diagrams. Their structures follow the Zintl behaviour and consist of basic structural motifs of SnO3 tetrahedra. Unexpectedly they show distinct electronic properties with band gaps ranging from 1.90 (BaSn2O3) to 3.15 (SrSn2O3) eV, and hole effective masses ranging from 0.87 (BaSn2O3) to above 6.0 (SrSn2O3) m0. Further exploration of metastable phases indicates a wide tunability of electronic properties controlled by the details of the bonding between the basic structural motifs. Lastly, this suggests further exploration of alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides for potential applications requiring good p-type conductivity such as transparent conductors and photovoltaic absorbers.« less

  15. Potential impact of microbial activity on the oxidant capacity and organic carbon budget in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaïtilingom, Mickael; Deguillaume, Laurent; Vinatier, Virginie; Sancelme, Martine; Amato, Pierre; Chaumerliac, Nadine; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Within cloud water, microorganisms are metabolically active and, thus, are expected to contribute to the atmospheric chemistry. This article investigates the interactions between microorganisms and the reactive oxygenated species that are present in cloud water because these chemical compounds drive the oxidant capacity of the cloud system. Real cloud water samples with contrasting features (marine, continental, and urban) were taken from the puy de Dôme mountain (France). The samples exhibited a high microbial biodiversity and complex chemical composition. The media were incubated in the dark and subjected to UV radiation in specifically designed photo-bioreactors. The concentrations of H2O2, organic compounds, and the ATP/ADP ratio were monitored during the incubation period. The microorganisms remained metabolically active in the presence of ●OH radicals that were photo-produced from H2O2. This oxidant and major carbon compounds (formaldehyde and carboxylic acids) were biodegraded by the endogenous microflora. This work suggests that microorganisms could play a double role in atmospheric chemistry; first, they could directly metabolize organic carbon species, and second, they could reduce the available source of radicals through their oxidative metabolism. Consequently, molecules such as H2O2 would no longer be available for photochemical or other chemical reactions, which would decrease the cloud oxidant capacity.

  16. The protective potential of Yucca schidigera (Sarsaponin 30) against nitrite-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Cigerci, I Hakki; Fidan, A Fatih; Konuk, Muhsin; Yuksel, Hayati; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Eryavuz, Abdullah; Sozbilir, Nalan Baysu

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to determine the protective effects of Yucca schidigera (Ys) against oxidative damage induced by acute nitrite intoxication as well as the histopathological evaluation of Ys in rats. The rats were divided into three groups each containing 12 rats: control (C); nitrite intoxication (N); Ys + nitrite intoxication (NY). C and N groups were fed standard rat feed (SRF). The NY group was fed SRF + 100 ppm Ys powder for 4 weeks. Acute nitrite intoxication was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of sodium nitrite (60 mg/kg) 1 day after the feeding period. Fifty minutes after sodium nitrite administration, blood samples and tissues including lung, liver, and kidney were collected for clinical biochemistry and histopathological investigations. Ys treatment was found to decrease methemoglobin, blood and tissue malondialdehyde, and tissue nitric oxide concentrations, and to increase the glutathione in blood and various tissues. However, plasma nitric oxide, total antioxidant activity, beta-carotene, and vitamin A did not differ between N and NY groups. While the N group rats showed distinct pathology in various tissues (compared with controls), the NY group had similar lung and liver pathology to the control. Only moderate or mild hemorrhage and hyperemia were seen in kidneys of NY group rats. Consequently, the natural compounds found in Ys, such as polyphenols, steroidal saponins, and other phytonutrients, could be used to substantially protect the organism from nitrite-induced oxidative damage and its complications.

  17. Simulation of deep water wet weld microstructures using electrodes with high oxidizing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    The properties of underwater wet (UWW) welds are greatly affected by water depth. Ibarra and Olson [1] showed that the oxygen content of the weld increases with increasing depth while the amount of deoxidants such as Mn and Si decreases. This change in chemical composition adversely affects both the tensile strength and toughness of the weld. The present research was designed to understand the influence of oxidizing ingredients in the electrode covering on the chemical composition, weld bead appearance and microstructure of wet welds. Changes in the ability of the electrode to supply oxygen to the weld pool were made through modifications of the hematite to rutile (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}) ratio in the covering.The weld deposited by the rutile electrode (no hematite addition) presented the lowest oxygen content (1700 ppm). When the oxidizing character of the electrode increased the concentration of inclusions, mainly FeO, in the weld also increased. However, the increase in oxygen pickup was not monotonous but reached a `saturation` value at approximately 2100 ppm. These results suggest that the microstructure and properties of wet welds deposited at great depths by rutile electrodes will be similar to those made by oxidizing electrodes at much shallower depths. Hence studying oxidizing electrodes and improving their properties will help the development of electrodes for wet welding at greater depths. It is also a much cheaper way of `simulating` welding at higher pressures.

  18. Ternary and coupled binary zinc tin oxide nanopowders: Synthesis, characterization, and potential application in photocatalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ivetić, T.B.; Finčur, N.L.; Đačanin, Lj. R.; Abramović, B.F.; Lukić-Petrović, S.R.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Mechanochemically synthesized nanocrystalline zinc tin oxide (ZTO) powders. • Photocatalytic degradation of alprazolam in the presence of ZTO water suspensions. • Coupled binary ZTO exhibits enhanced photocatalytic activity compared to ternary ZTO. - Abstract: In this paper, ternary and coupled binary zinc tin oxide nanocrystalline powders were prepared via simple solid-state mechanochemical method. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman and reflectance spectroscopy were used to study the structure and optical properties of the obtained powder samples. The thermal behavior of zinc tin oxide system was examined through simultaneous thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetric analysis. The efficiencies of ternary (Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} and ZnSnO{sub 3}) and coupled binary (ZnO/SnO{sub 2}) zinc tin oxide water suspensions in the photocatalytic degradation of alprazolam, short-acting anxiolytic of the benzodiazepine class of psychoactive drugs, under UV irradiation were determined and compared with the efficiency of pure ZnO and SnO{sub 2}.

  19. Preliminary assessment of the potential for nitrous oxide offsets in a cap and trade program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whether a greenhouse gas cap-and-trade program is implemented is questionable at this time. However, our findings are also relevant for any program that pays farmers to reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Our findings also point out the importance of considering the entire nitrogen cycle when targetin...

  20. The potential to control Haemonchus contortus in indigenous South African goats with copper oxide wire particles

    PubMed Central

    Vatta, A.F.; Waller, P.J.; Githiori, J.B.; Medley, G.F.

    2009-01-01

    The high prevalence of resistance of Haemonchus contortus to all major anthelmintic groups has prompted investigations into alternative control methods in South Africa, including the use of copper oxide wire particle (COWP) boluses. To assess the efficacy of COWP against H. contortus in indigenous South African goats, 18 male faecal egg-count-negative goats were each given ca.1200 infective larvae of H. contortus three times per week during weeks 1 and 2 of the experiment. These animals made up an “established” infection group (ESTGRP). At the start of week 7, six goats were each given a 2-g COWP bolus orally; six goats received a 4-g COWP bolus each and six animals were not treated. A further 20 goats constituted a “developing” infection group (DEVGRP). At the beginning of week 1, seven of the DEVGRP goats were given a 2-g COWP bolus each; seven goats were treated with a 4-g COWP bolus each and no bolus was given to a further six animals. During weeks 1–6, each of these DEVGRP goats was given ca. 400 H. contortus larvae three times per week. All 38 goats were euthanized for worm recovery from the abomasa and small intestines in week 11. In the ESTGRP, the 2-g and 4-g COWP boluses reduced the worm burdens by 95% and 93%, respectively compared to controls (mean burden ± standard deviation, SD: 23 ± 33, 30 ± 56 and 442 ± 518 worms, P = 0.02). However, in the DEVGRP goats, both the 2-g and 4-g COWP treatments were ineffective in reducing the worm burdens relative to the controls (mean burdens ± SD: 1102 ± 841, 649 ± 855, 1051 ± 661 worms, P = 0.16). Mean liver copper levels did not differ between the ESTGRP goats treated with 2-g COWP, 4-g COWP or no COWP (mean ± standard error of the mean, SEM, in ppm: 93.7 ± 8.3; 101.5 ± 8.3; 71.8 ± 8.3, P = 0.07) nor did they differ between the DEVGRP goats (mean ± SEM, in ppm: 74.1 ± 9.1; 75.4 ± 9.1; 74.9 ± 10.0, P > 0.99). The copper values were considered adequate

  1. Cobalt (II) oxide and nickel (II) oxide alloys as potential intermediate-band semiconductors: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Alidoust, Nima; Lessio, Martina; Carter, Emily A.

    2016-01-14

    Solar cells based on single pn junctions, employing single-gap semiconductors can ideally achieve efficiencies as high as 34%. Developing solar cells based on intermediate-band semiconductors (IBSCs), which can absorb light across multiple band gaps, is a possible way to defy this theoretical limit and achieve efficiencies as high as 60%. Here, we use first principles quantum mechanics methods and introduce CoO and Co{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.75}O as possible IBSCs. We show that the conduction band in both of these materials is divided into two distinct bands separated by a band gap. We further show that the lower conduction band (i.e., the intermediate band) is wider in Co{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.75}O compared with CoO. This should enhance light absorption from the valence band edge to the intermediate band, making Co{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.75}O more appropriate for use as an IBSC. Our findings provide the basis for future attempts to partially populate the intermediate band and to reduce the lower band gap in Co{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.75}O in order to enhance the potential of this material for use in IBSC solar cell technologies. Furthermore, with proper identification of heterojunctions and dopants, CoO and Co{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.75}O could be used in multi-color light emitting diode and laser technologies.

  2. Randomized phase II/III trial of post-operative chemoradiotherapy comparing 3-weekly cisplatin with weekly cisplatin in high-risk patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1008).

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Futoshi; Kiyota, Naomi; Tahara, Makoto; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Fujii, Masato

    2014-08-01

    A randomized Phase II/III study was launched in Japan to evaluate the non-inferiority of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) compared with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with 3-weekly cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) for post-operative high-risk patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. This study began in October 2012, and a total of 260 patients will be accrued from 18 institutions within 5 years. The primary endpoint of the Phase II part is proportion of treatment completion and that of the Phase III part is overall survival. The secondary endpoints are relapse-free survival, local relapse-free survival, nutrition-support-free survival, non-hospitalized treatment period during permissible treatment period and adverse events. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000009125 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/].

  3. Mulberry leaf phenolics ameliorate hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and stabilize mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu-Xiao; Shen, Wei-Zhi; Liao, Sen-Tai; Liu, Fan; Zheng, Shan-Qing; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effect of phenolics in mulberry leaves (mulberry leaf phenolics; MLP) on hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in HepG2 cells; we treated HepG2 with glucose [5.5 (N-Glc) or 50 mmol/L (Hi-Glc)] with or without MLP at 10 or 100 µmol/L gallic acid equivalents and assessed level of reactive oxidant species (ROS), ΔΨm, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation. Hi-Glc-induced oxidative damage was demonstrated by a series of increase in superoxides (560%, 0.5 h), MDA (400%, 24 h), NF-κB activation (474%, 4 h) and a wild fluctuation of ΔΨm relative to the control cells (p ≤ 0.05). MLP treatments ameliorate Hi-Glc-induced negative effects by a 40% reduction in ROS production, 34-44% reduction in MDA production, over 35% inhibition of NF-κB activation, as well as exert protective effect on HepG2 cells from change in ΔΨm. Our data show that MLP in vitro can protect hepatoctyes from hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damages.

  4. Single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet impacts and underlying potential mechanism assessment in germinating faba bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Anjum, Naser A; Singh, Neetu; Singh, Manoj K; Sayeed, Iqbal; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2014-02-15

    This study investigates the impact of different single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet (hereafter 'graphene oxide', GO; size: 0.5-5 μm) concentrations (0, 100, 200, 400, 800 and 1,600 mg L(-1)) and underlying potential mechanisms in germinating faba bean (Vicia faba L.) seedlings. The study revealed both positive and negative concentration-dependent GO-effects on V. faba. Significant negative impacts of GO concentrations (ordered by magnitude of effect: 1600>200>100 mg GO L(-1)) were indicated by decreases in growth parameters and the activity of H2O2-decomposing enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, APX; catalase, CAT), and by increases in the levels of electrolyte leakage (EL), H2O2, and lipid and protein oxidation. The positive impacts of 400 and 800 mg GO L(-1) included significant improvements in V. faba health status indicated by decreased levels of EL, H2O2, and lipid and protein oxidation, and by enhanced H2O2-decomposing APX and CAT activity, and increased proline and seed-relative water content. V. faba seedlings-polypeptide patterns strongly substantiated these GO-concentration effects. Overall, the positive effects of these two GO concentrations (800>400 mg L(-1)) on V. faba seedlings indicate their safe nature and allow to suggest further studies.

  5. Gamma radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential and results in electric current production.

    PubMed

    Turick, Charles E; Ekechukwu, Amy A; Milliken, Charles E; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2011-08-01

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  6. The Potential Role of Azadirachta indica Treatment on Cisplatin-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dkhil, Mohamed A.; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Aref, Ahmed M.; Othman, Mohamed S.; El-Deib, Kamal M.; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E.

    2013-01-01

    Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (neem, family: Meliaceae) is perhaps the most commonly used traditional medicinal plant of India. In this study we investigated the protective effect of methanolic neem leaves extract (MNLE; 500 mg/Kg bwt) on rats treated with cisplatin (CDDP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Adult rats were randomly divided into four groups. CDDP was given to rats by intraperitoneal injection, while MNLE was given by oral gavage for 5 days after the CDDP injection. The injury and oxidative stress caused by CDDP on the liver and the effect of MNLE were evaluated by measuring (a) histological changes, (b) tissue biochemical oxidant and antioxidant parameters, and (c) investigating apoptosis markers immunohistochemically and by real time PCR. After treatment with MNLE, the histological damage and apoptosis induction caused by cisplatin were improved. Malondialdehyde and nitric oxide were significantly decreased; the antioxidant system, namely, glutathione content, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly elevated. In conclusion, MNLE may have a potential role when combined with cisplatin in chemotherapy to alleviate cisplatin-induced damage and oxidative stress in liver. PMID:24369490

  7. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  8. Cerium neodymium oxide solid solution synthesis as a potential analogue for substoichiometric AmO2 for radioisotope power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkinson, E. J.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Williams, H. R.; Sarsfield, M. J.; Stephenson, K.; Weston, D. P.; Marsh, N.; Haidon, C.

    2017-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) is sponsoring a research programme on the development of americium oxides for radioisotope generators and heater units. Cubic AmO2-(x/2) with an O/Am ratio between 1.65 and 1.75 is a potentially suitable compound for pellet sintering. C-type (Ia-3) Ce1-xNdxO2-(x/2) oxides with 0.5 < x < 0.7 could be used as a surrogate for some Ia-3 AmO2-(x/2). A new Ce1-xNdxO2-(x/2) production process has been investigated where a nominally selected x value of 0.6 was targeted: Ce and Nd nitrates and oxalic acid were added drop-wise into a vessel, where they continuously reacted to create oxalate precipitates. The effect of temperature (25 °C, 60 °C) of the reactants (mixed at 250 revolutions per minute) on oxalate particle shape and size were investigated. Oxalates were calcined at 900 °C to produce oxide particles. Oxalate particle properties were characterised as these are expected to influence oxides particle properties and fuel pellet sintering.

  9. The potential role of Azadirachta indica treatment on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in female rats.

    PubMed

    Dkhil, Mohamed A; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Aref, Ahmed M; Othman, Mohamed S; El-Deib, Kamal M; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2013-01-01

    Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (neem, family: Meliaceae) is perhaps the most commonly used traditional medicinal plant of India. In this study we investigated the protective effect of methanolic neem leaves extract (MNLE; 500 mg/Kg bwt) on rats treated with cisplatin (CDDP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Adult rats were randomly divided into four groups. CDDP was given to rats by intraperitoneal injection, while MNLE was given by oral gavage for 5 days after the CDDP injection. The injury and oxidative stress caused by CDDP on the liver and the effect of MNLE were evaluated by measuring (a) histological changes, (b) tissue biochemical oxidant and antioxidant parameters, and (c) investigating apoptosis markers immunohistochemically and by real time PCR. After treatment with MNLE, the histological damage and apoptosis induction caused by cisplatin were improved. Malondialdehyde and nitric oxide were significantly decreased; the antioxidant system, namely, glutathione content, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly elevated. In conclusion, MNLE may have a potential role when combined with cisplatin in chemotherapy to alleviate cisplatin-induced damage and oxidative stress in liver.

  10. Nonlinear response of the surface electrostatic potential formed at metal oxide/electrolyte interfaces. A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of surface potential nonlinearity at metal oxide/electrolyte interfaces is presented. By using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a simple lattice model of an interface, we show a correlation exists between ionic strength as well as surface site densities and the non-Nernstian response of a metal oxide electrode. We propose two approaches to deal with the 0-nonlinearity: one based on perturbative expansion of the Gibbs free energy and another based on assumption of the pH-dependence of surface potential slope. The theoretical anal ysis based on our new potential form gives excellent performance at extreme pH regions, where classical formulae based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation fail. The new formula is general and independent of any underlying assumptions. For this reason, it can be directly applied to experimental surface potential measurements, including those for individual surfaces of single crystals, as we present for data reported by Kallay and Preocanin [Kallay, Preocanin J. Colloid and Interface20 Sci. 318 (2008) 290].

  11. Development of a novel in silico model of zeta potential for metal oxide nanoparticles: a nano-QSPR approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowska, Ewelina; Mikolajczyk, Alicja; Sikorska, Celina; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2016-11-01

    Once released into the aquatic environment, nanoparticles (NPs) are expected to interact (e.g. dissolve, agglomerate/aggregate, settle), with important consequences for NP fate and toxicity. A clear understanding of how internal and environmental factors influence the NP toxicity and fate in the environment is still in its infancy. In this study, a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) approach was employed to systematically explore factors that affect surface charge (zeta potential) under environmentally realistic conditions. The nano-QSPR model developed with multiple linear regression (MLR) was characterized by high robustness ({{{Q}}{{2}}}{{CV}}=0.90) and external predictivity ({{{Q}}{{2}}}{{EXT}}=0.93). The results clearly showed that zeta potential values varied markedly as functions of the ionic radius of the metal atom in the metal oxides, confirming that agglomeration and the extent of release of free MexOy largely depend on their intrinsic properties. A developed nano-QSPR model was successfully applied to predict zeta potential in an ionized solution of NPs for which experimentally determined values of response have been unavailable. Hence, the application of our model is possible when the values of zeta potential in the ionized solution for metal oxide nanoparticles are undetermined, without the necessity of performing more time consuming and expensive experiments. We believe that our studies will be helpful in predicting the conditions under which MexOy is likely to become problematic for the environment and human health.

  12. Antioxidant capacity of phytochemicals and their potential effects on oxidative status in animals — A review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. T.; Lin, W. C.; Yu, B.; Lee, T. T.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress suppresses animal health, performance, and production, subsequently impacting economic feasibility; hence, maintaining and improving oxidative status especially through natural nutrition strategy are essential for normal physiological process in animals. Phytochemicals are naturally occurring antioxidants that could be considered as one of the most promising materials used in animal diets in various forms. In this review, their antioxidant effects on animals are discussed as reflected by improved apparent performance, productivity, and the internal physiological changes. Moreover, the antioxidant actions toward animals further describe a molecular basis to elucidate their underlying mechanisms targeting signal transduction pathways, especially through the antioxidant response element/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 transcription system. PMID:27660026

  13. Pre-freezing raw hams affects quality traits in cooked hams: potential influence of protein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Utrera, M; Armenteros, M; Ventanas, S; Solano, F; Estévez, M

    2012-12-01

    The influence of protein carbonylation and lipid oxidation on colour and texture changes in cooked hams from fresh and pre-frozen (frozen/thawed) raw material was studied. Samples from three muscles, biceps femoris (BF) quadriceps femoris (QF) and semimembranosus (SM) were analysed for the gain of specific protein carbonyls, α-aminoadipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes, the gain of TBA-RS and their colour and texture properties by instrumental and sensory techniques. The formation of protein carbonyls occurred concomitantly with an intense loss of redness and increase of hardness. Both phenomena were found to be more intense in QF and SM muscles in cooked hams elaborated from frozen material. Lipid oxidation played a negligible role on the impaired quality traits observed in cooked hams as a result of pre-freezing. Plausible mechanisms by which protein carbonylation may be implicated in the loss of quality in cooked hams produced from pre-frozen material are discussed.

  14. Oxidation potential in the Earth's lower mantle as recorded by ferropericlase inclusions in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, Felix V.; Ryabchikov, Igor D.; McCammon, Catherine A.; Longo, Micaela; Abakumov, Artem M.; Turner, Stuart; Heidari, Hamed

    2015-05-01

    Ferropericlase (fPer) inclusions from kimberlitic lower-mantle diamonds recovered in the Juina area, Mato Grosso State, Brazil were analyzed with transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy and the flank method. The presence of exsolved non-stoichiometric Fe3+-enriched clusters, varying in size from 1-2 nm to 10-15 nm and comprising ∼3.64 vol.% of fPer was established. The oxidation conditions necessary for fPer formation within the uppermost lower mantle (P = 25 GPa, T = 1960 K) vary over a wide range: Δlog ⁡fO2 (IW) from 1.58 to 7.76 (Δ = 6.2), reaching the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) oxygen buffer position. This agrees with the identification of carbonates and free silica among inclusions within lower-mantle Juina diamonds. On the other hand, at the base of the lower mantle Δlog ⁡fO2 values may lie at and below the iron-wüstite (IW) oxygen buffer. Hence, the variations of Δlog ⁡fO2 values within the entire sequence of the lower mantle may reach ten logarithmic units, varying from the IW buffer to the FMQ buffer values. The similarity between lower- and upper-mantle redox conditions supports whole mantle convection, as already suggested on the basis of nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions in lower- and upper-mantle diamonds. The mechanisms responsible for redox differentiation in the lower mantle may include subduction of oxidized crustal material, mechanical separation of metallic phase(s) and silicate-oxide mineral assemblages enriched in ferric iron, as well as transfer of fused silicate-oxide material presumably also enriched in ferric iron through the mantle.

  15. Natural attenuation potential of tricholoroethene in wetland plant roots: role of native ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ke; Struckhoff, Garrett C; Agrawal, Abinash; Shelley, Michael L; Dong, Hailiang

    2015-01-01

    Bench-scale microcosms with wetland plant roots were investigated to characterize the microbial contributions to contaminant degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) with ammonium. The batch system microcosms consisted of a known mass of wetland plant roots in aerobic growth media where the roots provided both an inoculum of root-associated ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms and a microbial habitat. Aqueous growth media, ammonium, and TCE were replaced weekly in batch microcosms while retaining roots and root-associated biomass. Molecular biology results indicated that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were enriched from wetland plant roots while analysis of contaminant and oxygen concentrations showed that those microorganisms can degrade TCE by aerobic cometabolism. Cometabolism of TCE, at 29 and 46 μg L(-1), was sustainable over the course of 9 weeks, with 20-30 mg L(-1) ammonium-N. However, at 69 μg L(-1) of TCE, ammonium oxidation and TCE cometabolism were completely deactivated in two weeks. This indicated that between 46 and 69 μg L(-1) TCE with 30 mg L(-1) ammonium-N there is a threshold [TCE] below which sustainable cometabolism can be maintained with ammonium as the primary substrate. However, cometabolism-induced microbial deactivation of ammonium oxidation and TCE degradation at 69 μg L(-1) TCE did not result in a lower abundance of the amoA gene in the microcosms, suggesting that the capacity to recover from TCE inhibition was still intact, given time and removal of stress. Our study indicates that microorganisms associated with wetland plant roots can assist in the natural attenuation of TCE in contaminated aquatic environments, such as urban or treatment wetlands, and wetlands impacted by industrial solvents.

  16. The evaluation of the genotoxic and oxidative damage potentials of Ulothrix tenuissima (Kutz.) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Türkez, Hasan; Gürbüz, Hasan; Aydin, Elanur; Aslan, Ali; Dirican, Ebubekir

    2012-03-01

    Several alga species are known to produce a variety of toxic metabolites that pose a threat to aquatic organisms, animals and humans. Moreover, these metabolites have been thought to cause serious diseases including certain cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. On the other hand, Ulothrix is a genus of filamentous green algae, generally found in fresh water and marine and abundantly available in some lakes and rivers of Turkey. To our best knowledge, no study has been performed to assess the genotoxic and biochemical effects of U. tenuissima on cultured human blood cells. Therefore, in order to determine clastogenic or aneugenic effects of aqueous alga extracts the micronucleus assay was carried out. Nuclear division index (NDI) in peripheral lymphocytes was also analyzed for cytotoxicity evaluations. In addition, biochemical parameters (total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidative stress (TOS)) were examined to determine oxidative effects. For this aim, we obtained heparinized blood samples from three healthy persons. The alga samples were collected from Porsuk Pond in Hasankale (Erzurum, Turkey) in summer period of the year 2010. The aqueous extracts of this species were added to cultures at different concentrations (0 to 5000 ppm) for 72 h. Our results showed that this alga did not cause any statistically important changes in the rates of studied genotoxicity endpoint. But dose-dependent alterations were observed in TAC and TOS levels and NDI rates. In conclusion, U. tenuissima was found to be non-genotoxic but caused sterility at higher concentrations due to oxidative stress.

  17. Marigold flower-powder exhibits significant potential to inhibit lipid oxidation in rice bran tea.

    PubMed

    Wanyo, Pitchaporn; Kaewseejan, Niwat; Meeso, Naret; Siriamornpun, Sirithon

    2015-06-01

    We supplemented marigold flower-powder (MFP) in rice bran tea at different proportions as a source of natural antioxidant compounds. Changes of phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity, fatty acid composition and lipid oxidation in the rice bran tea with MFP after 30 days of storage were investigated, comparing results with the initial data. Adding MFP in rice bran tea resulted in an increased content and composition of phenolics and flavonoids along with enhanced antioxidant activities, which were increased in a dose-dependent manner. As a result, MFP supplementation of rice bran tea was able to retard the lipid oxidation as determined by the peroxide value (PV), due to the protection of essential fatty acids during 30 days of storage. The PVs were strongly negatively correlated (p < 0.01) with phenolic compounds, total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC), but were positively correlated with tocopherols and γ-oryzanol contents. We also found that the PV was positively correlated with the PUFA (poly unsaturated fatty acid) content but adverse results were found for SFA (saturated fatty acid) and MUFA (mono unsaturated fatty acid) contents. These findings suggest that MFP could be used as a natural antioxidant in foods for preventing lipid oxidation as well as extending the shelf-life of food products.

  18. Genomic analysis reveals versatile heterotrophic capacity of a potentially symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium in sponge.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Wang, Yong; Bougouffa, Salim; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Cai, Lin; Bajic, Vladimir; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Sulfur-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) play essential roles in marine sponges. However, the detailed characteristics and physiology of the bacteria are largely unknown. Here, we present and analyse the first genome of sponge-associated SOB using a recently developed metagenomic binning strategy. The loss of transposase and virulence-associated genes and the maintenance of the ancient polyphosphate glucokinase gene suggested a stabilized SOB genome that might have coevolved with the ancient host during establishment of their association. Exclusive distribution in sponge, bacterial detoxification for the host (sulfide oxidation) and the enrichment for symbiotic characteristics (genes-encoding ankyrin) in the SOB genome supported the bacterial role as an intercellular symbiont. Despite possessing complete autotrophic sulfur oxidation pathways, the bacterium developed a much more versatile capacity for carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, in comparison with its closest relatives (Thioalkalivibrio) and to other representative autotrophs from the same order (Chromatiales). The ability to perform both autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolism likely results from the unstable supply of reduced sulfur in the sponge and is considered critical for the sponge-SOB consortium. Our study provides insights into SOB of sponge-specific clade with thioautotrophic and versatile heterotrophic metabolism relevant to its roles in the micro-environment of the sponge body.

  19. Water-Soluble Poly(ethylenimine)-Based Nitric Oxide Donors: Preparation, Characterization and Potential Application in Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhengrong; Annich, Gail M.; Wu, Yiduo; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to potentially resolve serious thrombosis issues associated with kidney dialysis (hemodialysis) therapies is described. New water-soluble polymeric nitric oxide (NO) donors, based on the diazeniumdiolated branched poly(ethylenimine)s and their derivatives, are prepared and characterized. These macromolecular NO donors (with up to 4.15 μmol/mg of total NO release) are utilized as additives to the dialysate solution of model dialysis filters. The presence of these species can create a localized increase in NO levels at the high surface area dialysis fiber/blood interface within the hemodialyzers. Nitric oxide is a naturally occurring and potent anti-platelet agent, and is expected to greatly decrease the risk of thrombosis in the dialysis units. PMID:16961319

  20. Influence of extraction technique on the anti-oxidative potential of hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) extracts in bovine muscle homogenates.

    PubMed

    Shortle, E; O'Grady, M N; Gilroy, D; Furey, A; Quinn, N; Kerry, J P

    2014-12-01

    Six extracts were prepared from hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves and flowers (HLF) and berries (HB) using solid-liquid [traditional (T) (HLFT, HBT), sonicated (S) (HLFS, HBS)] and supercritical fluid (C) extraction (HLFC, HBC) techniques. The antioxidant activities of HLF and HB extracts were characterised using in vitro antioxidant assays (TPC, DPPH, FRAP) and in 25% bovine muscle (longissimus lumborum) homogenates (lipid oxidation (TBARS), oxymyoglobin (% of total myoglobin)) after 24h storage at 4°C. Hawthorn extracts exhibited varying degrees of antioxidant potency. In vitro and muscle homogenate (TBARS) antioxidant activity followed the order: HLFS>HLFT and HBT>HBS. In supercritical fluid extracts, HLFC>HBC (in vitro antioxidant activity) and HLFC≈HBC (TBARS). All extracts (except HBS) reduced oxymyoglobin oxidation. The HLFS extract had the highest antioxidant activity in all test systems. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) exhibited potential as a technique for the manufacture of functional ingredients (antioxidants) from hawthorn for use in muscle foods.

  1. Oxidative stress in health and disease: the therapeutic potential of Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Hybertson, Brooks M; Gao, Bifeng; Bose, Swapan K; McCord, Joe M

    2011-08-01

    For the past 40 years or so, oxidative stress has been increasingly recognized as a contributing factor in aging and in various forms of pathophysiology generally associated with aging. Our view of oxidative stress has been largely "superoxide-centric", as we focused on the pathological sources of this oxygen-derived free radical and the types of molecular havoc it can wreak, as well as on the protection provided by the antioxidant enzymes, especially the superoxide dismutases, catalases, and glutathione peroxidases. In the last decade our view of oxidative stress has broadened considerably, and it is now often seen as an imbalance that has its origins in our genes, and the ways in which gene expression is regulated. At the center of this new focus is the transcription factor called nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, or Nrf2. Nrf2 is referred to as the "master regulator" of the antioxidant response, modulating the expression of hundreds of genes, including not only the familiar antioxidant enzymes, but large numbers of genes that control seemingly disparate processes such as immune and inflammatory responses, tissue remodeling and fibrosis, carcinogenesis and metastasis, and even cognitive dysfunction and addictive behavior. Thus, the dysregulation of Nrf2-regulated genes provides a logical explanation for the connections, both direct and indirect, between observable oxidative stress and perhaps 200 human diseases involving these various physiological processes, each reflecting a network involving many gene products. The evolutionary self-association of these many genes under the common control of Nrf2 suggests that the immune and inflammatory systems may present the largest demand for increased antioxidant protection, apart from constitutive oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial oxygen consumption for metabolic purposes. Gene expression microarray data on human primary vascular endothelial cells and on the SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma-derived cell

  2. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis accelerates the recovery of polysynaptic reflex potentials after transient spinal cord ischemia in cats.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, T; Sekikawa, T; Suzuki, T; Moriya, H; Nakaya, H

    1997-04-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) has been implicated as a mediator of neuronal injury in vascular stroke. On the other hand, NO is suggested to play a neuroprotective role by increasing blood flow during cerebral ischemia. In order to evaluate the role of NO in the spinal cord ischemia, effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition on the recovery of reflex potentials after a transient spinal cord ischemia were examined in urethane-chloralose anesthetized spinal cats. Spinal cord ischemia was produced by occlusion of the thoracic aorta and the both internal mammary arteries for 10 min. Regional blood flow (RBF) in the spinal cord was continuously measured with a laser-Doppler flow meter. The monosynaptic (MSR) and polysynaptic reflex (PSR) potentials elicited by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve, were recorded from the L7 or S1 ventral root. The recovery process of spinal reflex potentials was reproducible when the oclusion was repeated twice at an interval of 120 min. Pretreatment with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 10 mg/kg), a NOS inhibitor significantly accelerated the recovery of PSR potentials after spinal cord ischemia. The accelerating effect of L-NMMA on the recovery of PSR potentials was abolished by co-administration of L-arginine (1 mg/kg/min) but not by that of D-arginine (1 mg/kg/min). L-NMMA failed to improve RBF in the spinal cord during ischemia and reperfusion. Nitroprusside (10 microg/kg/min), a NO donor, retarded the recovery of PSR potentials after spinal cord ischemia. These results suggest that NO production has a significant influence on the functional recovery after transient spinal cord ischemia.

  3. KINETIC CONTROL OF OXIDATION STATE AT THERMODYNAMICALLY BUFFERED POTENTIALS IN SUBSURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) and organic carbon (Corg) are among the highest- and lowest-potential reactants, respectively, of redox couples in natural waters. When DO and Corg are present in subsurface settings, other couples are drawn toward potentials imposed by them, generating a b...

  4. Nrf2 and HSF-1 Pathway Activation via Hydroquinone-Based Proelectrophilic Small Molecules is Regulated by Electrochemical Oxidation Potential.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takumi; Stalder, Romain; McKercher, Scott R; Williamson, Robert E; Roth, Gregory P; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and heat-shock protein 90/heat-shock factor-1 signal-transduction pathways plays a central role in combatting cellular oxidative damage and related endoplasmic reticulum stress. Electrophilic compounds have been shown to be activators of these transcription-mediated responses through S-alkylation of specific regulatory proteins. Previously, we reported that a prototype compound (D1, a small molecule representing a proelectrophilic, para-hydroquinone species) exhibited neuroprotective action by activating both of these pathways. We hypothesized that the para-hydroquinone moiety was critical for this activation because it enhanced transcription of these neuroprotective pathways to a greater degree than that of the corresponding ortho-hydroquinone isomer. This notion was based on the differential oxidation potentials of the isomers for the transformation of the hydroquinone to the active, electrophilic quinone species. Here, to further test this hypothesis, we synthesized a pair of para- and ortho-hydroquinone-based proelectrophilic compounds and measured their redox potentials using analytical cyclic voltammetry. The redox potential was then compared with functional biological activity, and the para-hydroquinones demonstrated a superior neuroprotective profile.

  5. Study of the thermodynamics of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) binding to iron(II/III)oxide or magnetite or ferrite and magnanese(II) iron (III) oxide or jacobsite or manganese ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Luther, Steven; Brogfeld, Nathan; Kim, Jisoo; Parsons, J G

    2013-06-15

    Removal of chromium(III) or (VI) from aqueous solution was achieved using Fe3O4, and MnFe2O4 nanomaterials. The nanomaterials were synthesized using a precipitation method and characterized using XRD. The size of the nanomaterials was determined to be 22.4±0.9 nm (Fe3O4) and 15.5±0.5 nm (MnFe2O4). The optimal binding pH for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) were pH 6 and pH 3. Isotherm studies were performed, under light and dark conditions, to determine the capacity of the nanomaterials. The capacities for the light studies with MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were determined to be 7.189 and 10.63 mg/g, respectively, for chromium(III). The capacities for the light studies with MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were 3.21 and 3.46 mg/g, respectively, for chromium(VI). Under dark reaction conditions the binding of chromium(III) to the MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanomaterials were 5.74 and 15.9 mg/g, respectively. The binding capacity for the binding of chromium(VI) to MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 under dark reaction conditions were 3.87 and 8.54 mg/g, respectively. The thermodynamics for the reactions showed negative ΔG values, and positive ΔH values. The ΔS values were positive for the binding of chromium(III) and for chromium(VI) binding under dark reaction conditions. The ΔS values for chromium(VI) binding under the light reaction conditions were determined to be negative.

  6. Potential Role of Oxidative Stress in mediating the Effect of Hypergravity on the Developing CNS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Nguon, K.; Sulkowski, Z. L.; Lipinski, B.

    The present studies will explore the mechanisms through which altered gravity affects the developing CNS We have previously shown that exposure to hypergravity during the perinatal period adversely impacts cerebellar structure and function Pregnant rat dams were exposed to 1 65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge at NASA-ARC from gestational day G 5 through giving birth Both dams and their offspring remained at 1 65 G until pups reached postnatal day P 21 Control rats were raised under identical conditions in stationary cages On P21 motor behavior as determined by performance on a rotorod was more negatively impacted in hypergravity-exposed HG male 39 5 than in HG female pups 29 1 The total number of Purkinje cells determined stereologically in cerebella isolated from a subset of P21 rats was decreased in both HG males and HG female pups but the correlation between Purkinje cell number and rotorod performance was more consistent in male pups The level of 3-nitrosotyrosine 3-NT an index of oxidative damage to proteins was determined by ELISA in cerebellar tissue derived from a separate subset of P21 rats The level of 3-NT was increased by 127 in HG males but only 42 in HG females These results suggest that the effect of altered gravity on the developing brain may be mediated by oxidative stress These results also suggest that the developing male CNS may be more sensitive to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress than the developing female CNS Supported by NIEHS grant ES11946-01

  7. Species-Specific Standard Redox Potential of Thiol-Disulfide Systems: A Key Parameter to Develop Agents against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Noszál, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic standard redox potential, a new physico-chemical parameter was introduced and determined to quantify thiol-disulfide equilibria of biological significance. The highly composite, codependent acid-base and redox equilibria of thiols could so far be converted into pH-dependent, apparent redox potentials (E’°) only. Since the formation of stable metal-thiolate complexes precludes the direct thiol-disulfide redox potential measurements by usual electrochemical techniques, an indirect method had to be elaborated. In this work, the species-specific, pH-independent standard redox potentials of glutathione were determined primarily by comparing it to 1-methylnicotinamide, the simplest NAD+ analogue. Secondarily, the species-specific standard redox potentials of the two-electron redox transitions of cysteamine, cysteine, homocysteine, penicillamine, and ovothiol were determined using their microscopic redox equilibrium constants with glutathione. The 30 different, microscopic standard redox potential values show close correlation with the respective thiolate basicities and provide sound means for the development of potent agents against oxidative stress. PMID:27869189

  8. Species-Specific Standard Redox Potential of Thiol-Disulfide Systems: A Key Parameter to Develop Agents against Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Noszál, Béla

    2016-11-01

    Microscopic standard redox potential, a new physico-chemical parameter was introduced and determined to quantify thiol-disulfide equilibria of biological significance. The highly composite, codependent acid-base and redox equilibria of thiols could so far be converted into pH-dependent, apparent redox potentials (E’°) only. Since the formation of stable metal-thiolate complexes precludes the direct thiol-disulfide redox potential measurements by usual electrochemical techniques, an indirect method had to be elaborated. In this work, the species-specific, pH-independent standard redox potentials of glutathione were determined primarily by comparing it to 1-methylnicotinamide, the simplest NAD+ analogue. Secondarily, the species-specific standard redox potentials of the two-electron redox transitions of cysteamine, cysteine, homocysteine, penicillamine, and ovothiol were determined using their microscopic redox equilibrium constants with glutathione. The 30 different, microscopic standard redox potential values show close correlation with the respective thiolate basicities and provide sound means for the development of potent agents against oxidative stress.

  9. Photochemical oxidants potentiate yield losses in snap beans attributable to sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Heggestad, H.E.; Bennett, J.H.

    1981-08-28

    Field-grown snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) were given recurring midday exposures to sulfur dioxide in open-top field chambers containing ambient photochemical oxidants. There was a linear correlation (correlation coefficient = -.99) between increasing concentrations of sulfur dioxide and the yields of snap beans. Synergism was indicated for the mixtures of ambient ozone plus sulfur dioxide, leading to threefold greater yield losses in nonfiltered air than in charcoal-filtered air (to remove the ozone). Even the lowest sulfur dioxide dose in nonfiltered air reduced the yields of Astro, a cultivar that exhibited no visible pollutant-induced foliar injury. 16 referances, 1 figure, 1 table.

  10. The Potential Role of Nitric Oxide in Halting Cancer Progression Through Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Vahora, Huzefa; Khan, Munawwar Ali; Alalami, Usama; Hussain, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in general plays a beneficial physiological role as a vasorelaxant and the role of NO is decided by its concentration present in physiological environments. NO either facilitates cancer-promoting characters or act as an anti-cancer agent. The dilemma in this regard still remains unanswered. This review summarizes the recent information on NO and its role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, as well as dietary chemopreventive agents which have NO-modulating properties with safe cytotoxic profile. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and cross-talk modulating NO effect by these chemopreventive agents can allow us to develop better therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:27051643

  11. Cardiovascular and Hepatic Toxicity of Cocaine: Potential Beneficial Effects of Modulators of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Manuela; Antonilli, Letizia; Togna, Anna Rita; Grassi, Maria Caterina; Badiani, Aldo; Saso, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is thought to play an important role in the pharmacological and toxic effects of various drugs of abuse. Herein we review the literature on the mechanisms responsible for the cardiovascular and hepatic toxicity of cocaine with special focus on OS-related mechanisms. We also review the preclinical and clinical literature concerning the putative therapeutic effects of OS modulators (such as N-acetylcysteine, superoxide dismutase mimetics, nitroxides and nitrones, NADPH oxidase inhibitors, xanthine oxidase inhibitors, and mitochondriotropic antioxidants) for the treatment of cocaine toxicity. We conclude that available OS modulators do not appear to have clinical efficacy. PMID:26823954

  12. Isatin based thiosemicarbazone derivatives as potential bioactive agents: Anti-oxidant and molecular docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haribabu, J.; Subhashree, G. R.; Saranya, S.; Gomathi, K.; Karvembu, R.; Gayathri, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new series of isatin based thiosemicarbazones has been synthesized from benzylisatin and unsubstituted/substituted thiosemicarbazides (1-5). The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, and UV-Visible, FT-IR, 1H &13C NMR and mass spectroscopic techniques. Three dimensional molecular structure of three compounds (1, 3 and 4) was determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Anti-oxidant activity of the thiosemicarbazone derivatives showed their excellent scavenging effect against free radicals. In addition, all the compounds showed good anti-haemolytic activity. In silico molecular docking studies were performed to screen the anti-inflammatory and anti-tuberculosis properties of thiosemicarbazone derivatives.

  13. Radiation induced failures of complementary metal oxide semiconductor containing pacemakers: a potentially lethal complication

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.A.; Serago, C.F.; Schwade, J.G.; Abitbol, A.A.; Margolis, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    New multi-programmable pacemakers frequently employ complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). This circuitry appears more sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation when compared to the semiconductor circuits used in older pacemakers. A case of radiation induced runaway pacemaker in a CMOS device is described. Because of this and other recent reports of radiation therapy-induced CMOS type pacemaker failure, these pacemakers should not be irradiated. If necessary, the pacemaker can be shielded or moved to a site which can be shielded before institution of radiation therapy. This is done to prevent damage to the CMOS circuit and the life threatening arrythmias which may result from such damage.

  14. Quasi-SMILES and nano-QFPR: The predictive model for zeta potentials of metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropov, Andrey A.; Achary, P. Ganga Raju; Toropova, Alla P.

    2016-09-01

    Building up of the predictive quantitative structure-property/activity relationships (QSPRs/QSARs) for nanomaterials usually are impossible owing to the complexity of the molecular architecture of the nanomaterials. Simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) is a tool to represent the molecular architecture of "traditional" molecules for "traditional" QSPR/QSAR. The quasi-SMILES is a tool to represent features (conditions and circumstances), which accompany the behavior of nanomaterials. Having, the training set and validation set, so-called quantitative feature-property relationships (QFPRs), based on the quasi-SMILES, one can build up model for zeta potentials of metal oxide nanoparticles for situations characterized by different features.

  15. Preventive or potential therapeutic value of nutraceuticals against ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in exposed subjects and frequent fliers.

    PubMed

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Touloupakis, Eleftherios; Bertolotto, Delfina; Mascetti, Gabriele

    2013-08-20

    Humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation deriving from outer space sources or activities related to medical care. Absorption of ionizing radiation doses over a prolonged period of time can result in oxidative damage and cellular dysfunction inducing several diseases, especially in ageing subjects. In this report, we analyze the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly at low doses, in relation to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, and cardiovascular and retinal diseases. We discuss scientific data in support of protection strategies by safe antioxidant formulations that can provide preventive or potential therapeutic value in response to long-term diseases that may develop following exposure.

  16. Requirement of low oxidation-reduction potential for photosynthesis in a blue-green alga (Phormidium sp.).

    PubMed

    Weller, D; Doemel, W; Brock, T D

    1975-06-20

    Photosynthesis in a Phormidium species which forms dense conical-shaped structures in thermal springs is strongly inhibited by aeration but is stimulated by sulfide and other agents (cysteine, thioglycolate, sulfite) which lower the oxidation-reduction potential. The compact structures which this alga forms in nature may restrict oxygen penetration from the enviroment so that the anaerobic or microaerophilic conditions necessary ofr photosynthesis can develop. The alga may be defective in a regulatory mechanism that controls the reoxidation of reduced pyridine nucleotides formed during photosynthesis. It is suggested that other mat-forming and benthic blue-green algae may also prefer anaerobib conditions for growth and photosynthesis.

  17. Preventive or Potential Therapeutic Value of Nutraceuticals against Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Exposed Subjects and Frequent Fliers

    PubMed Central

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Touloupakis, Eleftherios; Bertolotto, Delfina; Mascetti, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation deriving from outer space sources or activities related to medical care. Absorption of ionizing radiation doses over a prolonged period of time can result in oxidative damage and cellular dysfunction inducing several diseases, especially in ageing subjects. In this report, we analyze the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly at low doses, in relation to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, and cardiovascular and retinal diseases. We discuss scientific data in support of protection strategies by safe antioxidant formulations that can provide preventive or potential therapeutic value in response to long-term diseases that may develop following exposure. PMID:23965979

  18. Drug resistance in trypanosomes; effects of metabolic inhibitors, ph and oxidation-reduction potential on normal and resistant trypanosoma rhodesiense

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, J.

    1959-01-01

    A wide variety of metabolic inhibitors tested in vitro for trypanocidal activity on normal and drug-resistant strains of Trypanosoma rhodesiense showed no relation between acquired drug resistance and changes in specific enzymatic function. Oxidation-reduction potential is an important factor in trypanocidal action but is not obviously related to the development of resistance. The dependence on pH of the trypanocidal action of ionizing drugs against both normal and resistant trypanosomes supports the postulate that the development of resistance involves physical changes in cell structures associated with the uptake of drug. PMID:13844959

  19. Potential climate change effects on water tables and pyrite oxidation in headwater catchments in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Richard M.; Mast, M. Alisa; Manning, Andrew H.; Clow, David W.; Campbell, Donald H.; Medley, C. Nicholas; Patterson, Glenn; Parker, Melanie J.

    2011-01-01

    A water, energy, and biogeochemical model (WEBMOD) was constructed to simulate hydrology and pyrite oxidation for the period October 1992 through September 1997. The hydrologic model simulates processes in Loch Vale, a 6.6-km² granitic watershed that drains the east side of the Continental Divide. Parameters describing pyrite oxidation were derived sulfate concentrations measured in pore water and stream water in Handcart Gulch, a naturally acidic watershed in the Colorado Mineral Belt. Average monthly differences in precipitation and temperature between current and future climates, as predicted by using six global circulation models and three carbondioxide emission scenarios, were input into WEBMOD to identify possible shifts in the quantity and quality of the water flowing from the watershed for the period 2005 through 2100. Initial results suggest that increased air temperatures will result in earlier snowmelt compared to current conditions. Average sulfate concentrations and acidity in streams draining hydrothermally altered terrain may decrease as water tables rise in response to greater overall precipitation and earlier snowmelt, although a net increase of sulfate load was simulated as a result of greater overall discharge. Evapotranspiration is expected to increase but not enough to offset the increase in precipitation.

  20. [Oxidative stress hypothesis for Alzheimer's disease and its potential therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Nunomura, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Significantly increased levels of oxidized nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids have been described in the brains of subjects with Alzheimer disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as well as young adults with Down syndrome, compared to age-matched controls. Therefore, it is speculated that oxidative stress (OS) and consequent cellular damage occur at an early-stage in the pathological cascade of AD. Until now, several antioxidants, mitochondrial protective agents, anti-inflammatory agents and metal chelators have been tested as possible OS-targeting therapeutics for AD. Although some of these agents have shown significant neuroprotective effects in cellular and animal models of AD, their efficacies in AD clinical trials have not been fully established. When limited efficacies of exogenous antioxidants in previous trials are taken into account, early-stage interventions aimed to activate endogenous antioxidants may be promising as OS-targeting therapeutic strategies for AD. A recent randomized controlled trial of dietary intervention for amnestic MCI is a good example of such an approach, where an OS-marker in cerebrospinal fluid is decreased and cognitive function is successfully improved by a diet with low-saturated fat and low-glycemic index. Indeed, transcriptional activators of endogenous antioxidants should be researched and tested in future clinical trials for AD.

  1. HCB11(CF3)(n)F(11-n)-: inert anions with high anodic oxidation potentials.

    PubMed

    Fete, Matthew G; Havlas, Zdeněk; Michl, Josef

    2011-03-23

    Cs salts of four of the title anions were prepared by fluorination of salts of partly methylated (n = 11, 10) or partly methylated and partly iodinated (n = 6, 5) CB(11)H(12)(-) anions. The CH vertex is acidic, and in the unhindered anion with n = 6 it has been alkylated. Neat Cs(+)[1-H-CB(11)(CF(3))(11)](-) is as treacherously explosive as Cs(+)[CB(11)(CF(3))(12)](-), but no explosions occurred with the salts of the other three anions. BL3YP/6-31G* gas-phase electron detachment energies of the title anions are remarkably high, 5-8 eV. Treated with NiF(3)(+) in anhydrous liquid HF at -60 °C, anions with n = 11 or 10 resist oxidation, whereas anions with n = 6 or 5 are converted to colored EPR-active species, presumably the neutral radicals [HCB(11)(CF(3))(n)F(11-n)](•). These are stable for hours at -60 °C after extraction into cold perfluorohexane or perfluorotri-n-butylamine solutions. On warming to -20 °C in a Teflon or quartz tube, the color and EPR activity disappear, and the original anions are recovered nearly quantitatively, suggesting that the radicals oxidize the solvent.

  2. Loss of Adipose Fatty Acid Oxidation Does Not Potentiate Obesity at Thermoneutrality.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Aja, Susan; Scafidi, Susanna; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2016-02-16

    Ambient temperature affects energy intake and expenditure to maintain homeostasis in a continuously fluctuating environment. Here, mice with an adipose-specific defect in fatty acid oxidation (Cpt2(A-/-)) were subjected to varying temperatures to determine the role of adipose bioenergetics in environmental adaptation and body weight regulation. Microarray analysis of mice acclimatized to thermoneutrality revealed that Cpt2(A-/-) interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) failed to induce the expression of thermogenic genes such as Ucp1 and Pgc1α in response to adrenergic stimulation, and increasing ambient temperature exacerbated these defects. Furthermore, thermoneutral housing induced mtDNA stress in Cpt2(A-/-) BAT and ultimately resulted in a loss of interscapular BAT. Although the loss of adipose fatty acid oxidation resulted in clear molecular, cellular, and physiologic deficits in BAT, body weight gain and glucose tolerance were similar in control and Cpt2(A-/-) mice in response to a high-fat diet, even when mice were housed at thermoneutrality.

  3. Hyperglycemia Potentiates H2O2 Production in Adipocytes and Enhances Insulin Signal Transduction: Potential Role for Oxidative Inhibition of Thiol-Sensitive Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    WU, XIANGDONG; ZHU, LI; ZILBERING, ASSAF; MAHADEV, KALYANKAR; MOTOSHIMA, HIROYUKI; YAO, JUNLI; GOLDSTEIN, BARRY J.

    2006-01-01

    Insulin signal transduction in adipocytes is accompanied by a burst of cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 facilitates insulin signaling by inhibiting thiol-dependent protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs)) that are negative regulators of insulin action. As hyperglycemia is associated with increased cellular reactive oxygen species, we postulated that high glucose conditions might potentiate the H2O2 generated by insulin and modulate insulin-stimulated protein phosphorylation. Basal H2O2 generation was increased threefold in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes by growth in 25 mM glucose versus 5 mM glucose. High glucose increased the sensitivity of the insulin-stimulated H2O2 signal to lower concentrations of insulin. Basal endogenous total PTP activity and the activity of PTP1B, a PTP implicated in the negative regulation of insulin signaling, were reduced in high glucose conditions, and their further reduction by insulin stimulation was more enhanced in high versus low glucose medium. Phosphorylation of the insulin receptor, IRS-1, and Akt in response to insulin was also significantly enhanced in high glucose conditions, especially at submaximal insulin concentrations. In primary rat adipocytes, high glucose increased insulin-stimulated H2O2 the oxidative inhibition of total PTP production and potentiated and PTP1B activity; however, insulin signaling was not enhanced in the primary cells in high glucose apparently due to cross-regulation of insulin-stimulated protein phosphorylation by activation of protein kinase C (PKC). These studies indicate that high glucose can enhance insulin-stimulated H2O2 generation and augment oxidative PTP inhibition in cultured and primary adipocytes, but the overall balance of insulin signal transduction is determined by additional signal effects in high glucose, including the activation of PKC. PMID:15889998

  4. Lactosylated poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers for potential active targeting: synthesis and physicochemical and self-aggregation characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuestas, María L.; Glisoni, Romina J.; Mathet, Verónica L.; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to develop polymeric self-assembly nanocarriers with potential applications in active drug targeting to the liver, linear and branched poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) amphiphiles were conjugated to lactobionic acid (LA), a disaccharide of galactose and gluconic acid, by the conventional Steglich esterification reaction. The conjugation was confirmed by ATR/FT-IR, 1H-NMR, and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Elemental analysis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry were employed to elucidate the conjugation extent and the final molecular weight, respectively. The critical micellar concentration (CMC), the size and size distribution and zeta potential of the pristine and modified polymeric micelles under different conditions of pH and temperature were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Conjugation with LA favored the micellization process, leading to a decrease of the CMC with respect to the pristine counterpart, this phenomenon being independent of the pH and the temperature. At 37 °C, micelles made of pristine copolymers showed a monomodal size distribution between 12.8 and 24.4 nm. Conversely, LA-conjugated micelles showed a bimodal size pattern that comprised a main fraction of relatively small size (11.6-22.2 nm) and a second one with remarkably larger sizes of up to 941.4 nm. The former corresponded to single micelles, while the latter would indicate a secondary aggregation phenomenon. The spherical morphology of LA-micelles was visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Finally, to assess the ability of the LA-conjugated micelles to interact with lectin-like receptors, samples were incubated with concanavalin A at 37 °C and the size and size distribution were monitored by DLS. Findings indicated that regardless of the relatively weak affinity of this vegetal lectin for galactose, micelles underwent agglutination probably through the interaction of a secondary site in the lectin with the gluconic acid unit of LA.

  5. Antioxidant Potential of Spirulina platensis Mitigates Oxidative Stress and Reprotoxicity Induced by Sodium Arsenite in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Bashandy, Samir A E; El Awdan, Sally A; Ebaid, Hossam; Alhazza, Ibrahim M

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the protective role of Spirulina platensis (S. platensis) against arsenic-induced testicular oxidative damage in rats. Arsenic (in the form of NaAsO2 at a dose of 6.3 mg/kg body weight for 8 weeks) caused a significant accumulation of arsenic in testicular tissues as well as a decrease in the levels of testicular superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione, and zinc. Moreover, it significantly decreased plasma testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) levels and reduced sperm motility and sperm count. Arsenic (AS) led to a significant increase in testicular malondialdehyde (MDA), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO), and sperm abnormalities. S. platensis at a dose of 300 mg/kg was found to attenuate As-induced oxidative stress, testicular damage, and sperm abnormalities by its potent antioxidant activity. S. platensis may represent a potential therapeutic option to protect the testicular tissue from arsenic intoxication.

  6. Antioxidant Potential of Spirulina platensis Mitigates Oxidative Stress and Reprotoxicity Induced by Sodium Arsenite in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bashandy, Samir A. E.; El Awdan, Sally A.; Ebaid, Hossam; Alhazza, Ibrahim M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the protective role of Spirulina platensis (S. platensis) against arsenic-induced testicular oxidative damage in rats. Arsenic (in the form of NaAsO2 at a dose of 6.3 mg/kg body weight for 8 weeks) caused a significant accumulation of arsenic in testicular tissues as well as a decrease in the levels of testicular superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione, and zinc. Moreover, it significantly decreased plasma testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) levels and reduced sperm motility and sperm count. Arsenic (AS) led to a significant increase in testicular malondialdehyde (MDA), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO), and sperm abnormalities. S. platensis at a dose of 300 mg/kg was found to attenuate As-induced oxidative stress, testicular damage, and sperm abnormalities by its potent antioxidant activity. S. platensis may represent a potential therapeutic option to protect the testicular tissue from arsenic intoxication. PMID:26881036

  7. In vivo (1)H MRS study of potential associations between glutathione, oxidative stress and anhedonia in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Lapidus, Kyle A B; Gabbay, Vilma; Mao, Xiangling; Johnson, Amy; Murrough, James W; Mathew, Sanjay J; Shungu, Dikoma C

    2014-05-21

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are important mechanisms that have been implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant antioxidant in human tissue, and a key index of antioxidant capacity and, hence, of oxidative stress. The aims of this investigation were to examine possible relationships between occipital GSH and dimensional measures of depressive symptom severity, including anhedonia - the reduced capacity to experience pleasure - and fatigue. We hypothesized that the magnitude of anhedonia and fatigue will be negatively correlated with occipital GSH levels in subjects with MDD and healthy controls (HC). Data for eleven adults with MDD and ten age- and sex-matched HC subjects were included in this secondary analysis of data from a previously published study. In vivo levels of GSH in a 3cm×3cm×2cm voxel of occipital cortex were obtained by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) on a 3T MR system, using the standard J-edited spin-echo difference technique. Anhedonia was assessed by combining interest items from depression and fatigue rating scales, and fatigue by use of the multidimensional fatigue inventory. Across the full sample of participants, anhedonia severity and occipital GSH levels were negatively correlated (r=-0.55, p=0.01). No associations were found between fatigue severity and GSH in this sample. These preliminary findings are potentially consistent with a pathophysiological role for GSH and oxidative stress in anhedonia and MDD. Larger studies in anhedonic depressed patients are indicated.

  8. Potential of Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 in Protecting against Aluminum Toxicity Mediated by Intestinal Barrier Function and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Tian, Fengwei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Narbad, Arjan; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a ubiquitous metal that can seriously harm the health of animals and humans. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 can decrease Al burden in the tissues of mice by inhibiting intestinal Al absorption. The main aim of the present research was to investigate whether the protection by the strain is also associated with enhancement of the intestinal barrier, alleviation of oxidative stress and modulation of the inflammatory response. In an in vitro cell model, two protection modes (intervention and therapy) were examined and the results indicated that L. plantarum CCFM639 alleviated Al-induced cytotoxicity. In a mouse model, L. plantarum CCFM639 treatment was found to significantly alleviate oxidative stress in the intestinal tract, regulate the function of the intestinal mucosal immune system, restore the integrity of tight junction proteins and maintain intestinal permeability. These results suggest that in addition to Al sequestration, L. plantarum CCFM639 can also inhibit Al absorption by protecting the intestinal barrier, alleviating Al-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Therefore, L. plantarum CCFM639 has the potential to be a dietary supplement ingredient that provides protection against Al-induced gut injury. PMID:27918411

  9. Potential of Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 in Protecting against Aluminum Toxicity Mediated by Intestinal Barrier Function and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Tian, Fengwei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Narbad, Arjan; Chen, Wei

    2016-12-02

    Aluminum (Al) is a ubiquitous metal that can seriously harm the health of animals and humans. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 can decrease Al burden in the tissues of mice by inhibiting intestinal Al absorption. The main aim of the present research was to investigate whether the protection by the strain is also associated with enhancement of the intestinal barrier, alleviation of oxidative stress and modulation of the inflammatory response. In an in vitro cell model, two protection modes (intervention and therapy) were examined and the results indicated that L. plantarum CCFM639 alleviated Al-induced cytotoxicity. In a mouse model, L. plantarum CCFM639 treatment was found to significantly alleviate oxidative stress in the intestinal tract, regulate the function of the intestinal mucosal immune system, restore the integrity of tight junction proteins and maintain intestinal permeability. These results suggest that in addition to Al sequestration, L. plantarum CCFM639 can also inhibit Al absorption by protecting the intestinal barrier, alleviating Al-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Therefore, L. plantarum CCFM639 has the potential to be a dietary supplement ingredient that provides protection against Al-induced gut injury.

  10. The oxidative potential of PM10 from coal, briquettes and wood charcoal burnt in an experimental domestic stove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Longyi; Hou, Cong; Geng, Chunmei; Liu, Junxia; Hu, Ying; Wang, Jing; Jones, Tim; Zhao, Chengmei; BéruBé, Kelly

    2016-02-01

    Coal contains many potentially harmful trace elements. Coal combustion in unvented stoves, which is common in most parts of rural China, can release harmful emissions into the air that when inhaled cause health issues. However, few studies have dealt specifically with the toxicological mechanisms of the particulate matter (PM) released by coal and other solid fuel combustion. In this paper, PM10 particles that were generated during laboratory stove combustion of raw powdered coal, clay-mixed honeycomb briquettes, and wood charcoal were analysed for morphology, trace element compositions, and toxicity as represented by oxidative DNA damage. The analyses included Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Plasmid Scission Assay (PSA). Gravimetric analysis indicated that the equivalent mass concentration of PM10 emitted by burning raw powdered coal was higher than that derived by burning honeycomb briquette. FESEM observation revealed that the coal burning-derived PM10 particles were mainly soot aggregates. The PSA results showed that the PM10 emitted by burning honeycomb briquettes had a higher oxidative capacity than that from burning raw powdered coal and wood charcoal. It is also demonstrated that the oxidative capacity of the whole particle suspensions were similar to those of the water soluble fractions; indicating that the DNA damage induced by coal burning-derived PM10 were mainly a result of the water-soluble fraction. An ICP-MS analysis revealed that the amount of total analysed water-soluble elements in the PM10 emitted by burning honeycomb briquettes was higher than that in PM produced by burning raw powdered coal, and both were higher than PM from burning wood charcoal. The total analysed water-soluble elements in these coal burning-derived PM10 samples had a significantly positive correlation with the level of DNA damage; indicating that the oxidative capacity of the coal burning

  11. Antifungal Metabolites (Monorden, Monocillins I, II, III) from Colletotrichum graminicola (Ces.) G.W. Wils. NRRL 47511, a Systemic Vascular Pathogen of Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colletotricum graminicola is a systemic vascular pathogen that causes anthracnose stalk rot and leaf blight of maize. In the course of an effort to explore the potential presence and roles of C. graminicola metabolites in maize, ethyl acetate extracts of solid substrate fermentations of several C. ...

  12. Theoretical Study of Triboelectric-Potential Gated/Driven Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wenbo; Yu, Ruomeng; He, Yongning; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-26

    Triboelectric nanogenerator has drawn considerable attentions as a potential candidate for harvesting mechanical energies in our daily life. By utilizing the triboelectric potential generated through the coupling of contact electrification and electrostatic induction, the "tribotronics" has been introduced to tune/control the charge carrier transport behavior of silicon-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Here, we perform a theoretical study of the performances of tribotronic MOSFET gated by triboelectric potential in two working modes through finite element analysis. The drain-source current dependence on contact-electrification generated triboelectric charges, gap separation distance, and externally applied bias are investigated. The in-depth physical mechanism of the tribotronic MOSFET operations is thoroughly illustrated by calculating and analyzing the charge transfer process, voltage relationship to gap separation distance, and electric potential distribution. Moreover, a tribotronic MOSFET working concept is proposed, simulated and studied for performing self-powered FET and logic operations. This work provides a deep understanding of working mechanisms and design guidance of tribotronic MOSFET for potential applications in micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), human-machine interface, flexible electronics, and self-powered active sensors.

  13. Sampling the oxidative weathering products and the potentially acidic permafrost on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Large areas of Mars' surface are covered by oxidative weathering products containing ferric and sulfate ions having analogies to terrestrial gossans derived from sulfide mineralization associated with iron-rich basalts. Chemical weathering of such massive and disseminated pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages and host basaltic rocks in the Martian environment could have produced metastable gossaniferous phases (limonite containing poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates and oxyhydroxides, clay silicates and opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost on Mars, may still be acidic due to incomplete buffering reactions by wall-rock alteration of unfractured host rock. Such acidic solutions stabilize temperature-sensitive complex ions and sols which flocculate to colloidal precipitates at elevated temperatures. Sampling procedures of Martian regolith will need to be designed bearing in mind that the frozen permafrost may be corrosive and be stabilizing unique complex ions and sols of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni and other minor elements.

  14. Nitric oxide (NO) signaling as a potential therapeutic modality against psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Liddie, Shervin; Balda, Mara A; Itzhak, Yossef

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of psychostimulants presents a significant health and social problem worldwide. Traditionally, the dopaminergic system has received much attention for its role in the development and manifestation of addictive behavior. The identification of the close interaction between the dopaminergic and glutamatergic pathway and by extension the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway (the nitrergic system) have provided a broader scope on the mechanisms underlying the development of addictive behavior following exposure to cocaine and methamphetamine. NO signaling is associated with the acquisition and maintenance of several behavioral phenotypes induced by cocaine and methamphetamine (METH), as well as in METH-induced dopaminergic depletion. Because it appears that NO signaling influences response to reward, memory formation, and free radical-induced neurotoxicity, pharmacotherapies targeting NO signaling pathway may prove beneficial in the treatment of psychostimulants abuse.

  15. Obesity and oxidative stress: potential roles of melatonin as antioxidant and metabolic regulator.

    PubMed

    Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an oxidative stress status, defined as an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to the level of antioxidants acting in the natural defence systems. Several sources of ROS can be identified in obesity (e.g., mitochondrial respiratory chain, or NADPH oxidase) and could contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity. Indeed, these conditions favour the development of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome through deregulation of adipokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines, so that it could be of interest to associate antioxidant therapeutic strategies with strategies of weight loss. Among antioxidants, melatonin holds a special place, on the one hand for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and on the other hand for its role as a metabolic regulator. As melatonin modulates several processes involved in obesity and its related metabolic alterations, it could have a therapeutic interest in the treatment of obesity.

  16. Evaluation of haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms with potential application in the effluent treatment of the petroleum industry.

    PubMed

    Olguín-Lora, P; Le Borgne, S; Castorena-Cortés, G; Roldán-Carrillo, T; Zapata-Peñasco, I; Reyes-Avila, J; Alcántara-Pérez, S

    2011-02-01

    Haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing mixed cultures for the treatment of alkaline-saline effluents containing sulfide were characterized and evaluated. The mixed cultures (IMP-PB, IMP-XO and IMP-TL) were obtained from Mexican alkaline soils collected in Puebla (PB), Xochimilco (XO) and Tlahuac (TL), respectively. The Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA) revealed bacteria related to Thioalkalibacterium and Thioalkalivibrio in IMP-XO and IMP-PB mixed cultures. Halomonas strains were detected in IMP-XO and IMP-TL. In addition, an uncultured Bacteroides bacterium was present in IMP-TL. Mixed cultures were evaluated at different pH and NaCl concentrations at 30°C. IMP-PB and IMP-TL expressed thiosulfate-oxidizing activity in the 7.5-10.5 pH range, whereas IMP-XO presented its maximal activity with 19.0 mg O₂ g (protein)⁻¹ min⁻¹, at pH 10.6; it was not affected by NaCl concentrations up to 1.7 M. In continuous culture, IMP-XO showed a growth rate of 15 day⁻¹, productivity of 433.4 mg(protein) l⁻¹ day⁻¹ and haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing activity was also detected up to 170 mM by means of N-methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA). Saline-alkaline soil samples are potential sources of haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and the mixed cultures could be applied in the treatment of inorganic sulfur compounds in petroleum industry effluents under alkaline-saline conditions.

  17. Phytochemicals in regulating fatty acid β-oxidation: Potential underlying mechanisms and their involvement in obesity and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Sekhon-Loodu, Satvir; Mantso, Theodora; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I

    2016-09-01

    Excessive accumulation of fat as the result of more energy intake and less energy expenditure is known as obesity. Lipids are essential components in the human body and are vital for maintaining homeostasis and physiological as well as cellular metabolism. Fatty acid synthesis and catabolism (by fatty acid oxidation) are normal part of basic fuel metabolism in animals. Fatty acids are degraded in the mitochondria by a biochemical process called β-oxidation in which two-carbon fragments are produced in each cycle. The increase in fatty acid β-oxidation is negatively correlated with body mass index. Although healthy life style, avoiding Western diet, dieting and strenuous exercise are the commonly used methods to lose weight, they are not considered a permanent solution in addition to risk attenuation of basal metabolic rate (BMR). Pharmacotherapy offers benefits of weight loss by altering the satiety and lowering absorption of fat from the food; however, its side effects may outweigh the benefits of weight loss. Alternatively, dietary phytochemicals and natural health products offer great potential as an efficient weight loss strategy by modulating lipid metabolism and/or increasing BMR and thermogenesis. Specifically, polyphenols such as citrus flavonoids, green tea epigallocatechin gallate, resveratrol, capsaicin and curcumin, have been reported to increase lipolysis and induce fatty acid β-oxidation through modulation of hormone sensitive lipase, acetyl-coA carboxylase, carnitine acyl transferase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1. In this review article, we discuss selected phytochemicals in relation to their integrated functionalities and specific mechanisms for weight loss.

  18. Excitatory Post-Synaptic Potential Mimicked in Indium-Zinc-Oxide Synaptic Transistors Gated by Methyl Cellulose Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liqiang; Wen, Juan; Ding, Jianning; Wan, Changjin; Cheng, Guanggui

    2016-12-01

    The excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) of biological synapses is mimicked in indium-zinc-oxide synaptic transistors gated by methyl cellulose solid electrolyte. These synaptic transistors show excellent electrical performance at an operating voltage of 0.8 V, Ion/off ratio of 2.5 × 106, and mobility of 38.4 cm2/Vs. After this device is connected to a resistance of 4 MΩ in series, it exhibits excellent characteristics as an inverter. A threshold potential of 0.3 V is achieved by changing the gate pulse amplitude, width, or number, which is analogous to biological EPSP.

  19. Excitatory Post-Synaptic Potential Mimicked in Indium-Zinc-Oxide Synaptic Transistors Gated by Methyl Cellulose Solid Electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liqiang; Wen, Juan; Ding, Jianning; Wan, Changjin; Cheng, Guanggui

    2016-01-01

    The excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) of biological synapses is mimicked in indium-zinc-oxide synaptic transistors gated by methyl cellulose solid electrolyte. These synaptic transistors show excellent electrical performance at an operating voltage of 0.8 V, Ion/off ratio of 2.5 × 106, and mobility of 38.4 cm2/Vs. After this device is connected to a resistance of 4 MΩ in series, it exhibits excellent characteristics as an inverter. A threshold potential of 0.3 V is achieved by changing the gate pulse amplitude, width, or number, which is analogous to biological EPSP. PMID:27924838

  20. Potential Effects of Methane and Nitrous Oxide on the Recovery of Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wuebbles, D. J.

    2005-05-01

    Stratospheric ozone concentrations have been significantly reduced in recent decades as a result of human activities. The international agreement to protect stratospheric ozone, the Montreal Protocol, has effectively reduced the human-related emissions of halocarbons containing chlorine and bromine. Since the implementation of the international controls on ozone depleting chemicals, an important focus in studies of stratospheric ozone has been on the detection of a turnaround in the downward trend and determination of when a recovery will occur, where a recovery is defined as a return to levels of ozone in the 1970s before the existence of the Antarctica ozone "hole". If halocarbons remained the only relevant human-related factor affecting ozone, the ozone layer would be expected to recover by roughly 2040-2045. However, there are a number of other factors, including non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions, affecting the future recovery of ozone. In this study, we considered a range of scenarios for future trace gases emissions developed by IPCC (2001) using the UIUC two-dimensional Chemical-Transport Model (UIUC 2D CTM). We found that the future recovery depended greatly on future emissions of two major greenhouse gases, methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Evaluation of the effects of scenarios developed by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001) for future emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, and other gases suggests that these gases could greatly affect ozone recovery, including the possibility of ozone not recovering in this century. In addition, under all cases, the ozone distribution is always greatly different than that in the pre-1980 atmosphere.

  1. Protein-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: time efficient potential-water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoli, Chuka; Boutonnet, Magali; Järås, Sven; Rajarao-Kuttuva, Gunaratna

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience suggest that the existing issues involving water quality could be resolved or greatly improved using nanomaterials, especially magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for the development and use, in association with natural coagulant protein for water treatment. The nanoparticles size, morphology, structure, and magnetic properties were characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Purified Moringa oleifera protein was attached onto microemulsions-prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ME-MION) to form stable protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PMO+ME-MION). The turbidity removal efficiency in both synthetic and surface water samples were investigated and compared with the commonly used synthetic coagulant (alum) as well as PMO. More than 90 % turbidity could be removed from the surface waters within 12 min by magnetic separation of PMO+ME-MION; whereas gravimetrically, 70 % removal in high and low turbid waters can be achieved within 60 min. In contrast, alum requires 180 min to reduce the turbidity of low turbid water sample. These data support the advantage of separation with external magnetic field (magnetophoresis) over gravitational force. Time kinetics studies show a significant enhancement in ME-MION efficiency after binding with PMO implying the availability of large surface of the ME-MION. The coagulated particles (impurities) can be removed from PMO+ME-MION by washing with mild detergent or cleaning solution. To our knowledge, this is the first report on surface water turbidity removal using protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle.

  2. Oxidation of parenteral lipid emulsion by ambient and phototherapy lights: potential toxicity of routine parenteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Neuzil, J; Darlow, B A; Inder, T E; Sluis, K B; Winterbourn, C C; Stocker, R

    1995-05-01

    Vitamin E can be a prooxidant in isolated lipoprotein suspensions. Because lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition are lipoprotein-like suspensions rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E, we hypothesized that vitamin E may act as a prooxidant in lipid emulsions, as it is in lipoprotein suspensions. We therefore exposed an intravenously administered lipid emulsion (Intralipid) to a single spotlight commonly used in the treatment of neonatal jaundice, and measured the formation of triglyceride hydroperoxides by using high-performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn chemiluminescence detection. Concentrations of these hydroperoxides in different batches of fresh intralipid were usually approximately 10 mumol/L but increased up to 60 times after exposure to phototherapy light for a period of 24 hours, even though significant amounts of vitamin E were present at the end of the exposure. Triglyceride hydroperoxides were formed during phototherapy light exposure whether the intralipid was in plastic tubing used routinely for infusion or in glass containers. Ambient light also caused significant peroxidation of the formula lipids, although to a much lesser extent than observed with phototherapy light. For infants in the neonatal intensive care unit who were receiving intralipid but not phototherapy, solutions being infused at the end of 24 hours contained a mean of 40 mumol/L hydroperoxides. For infants receiving phototherapy, the mean was 97 mumol/L. Phototherapy light-induced formation of triglyceride hydroperoxides was prevented by covering the intralipid with aluminum foil or supplementation with sodium ascorbate before light exposure. We conclude that intralipid is highly susceptible to oxidation and that elevated levels of oxidized lipids can be formed during its clinical use, especially when intralipid infusion is combined with phototherapy. Because lipid hydroperoxides are cytotoxic and can cause adverse effects, inadvertent infusion of rancid

  3. Background Signal as an in Situ Predictor of Dopamine Oxidation Potential: Improving Interpretation of Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Data.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Carl J; Roberts, James G; McCarty, Gregory S; Sombers, Leslie A

    2017-02-15

    Background-subtracted fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has emerged as a powerful analytical technique for monitoring subsecond molecular fluctuations in live brain tissue. Despite increasing utilization of FSCV, efforts to improve the accuracy of quantification have been limited due to the complexity of the technique and the dynamic recording environment. It is clear that variable electrode performance renders calibration necessary for accurate quantification; however, the nature of in vivo measurements can make conventional postcalibration difficult, or even impossible. Analyte-specific voltammograms and scaling factors that are critical for quantification can shift or fluctuate in vivo. This is largely due to impedance changes, and the effects of impedance on these measurements have not been characterized. We have previously reported that the background current can be used to predict electrode-specific scaling factors in situ. In this work, we employ model circuits to investigate the impact of impedance on FSCV measurements. Additionally, we take another step toward in situ electrode calibration by using the oxidation potential of quinones on the electrode surface to accurately predict the oxidation potential for dopamine at any point in an electrochemical experiment, as both are dependent on impedance. The model, validated both in adrenal slice and live brain tissue, enables information encoded in the shape of the background voltammogram to determine electrochemical parameters that are critical for accurate quantification. This improves data interpretation and provides a significant next step toward more automated methods for in vivo data analysis.

  4. Cell toxicity and oxidative potential of engine exhaust particles: impact of using particulate filter or biodiesel fuel blend.

    PubMed

    Gerlofs-Nijland, Miriam E; Totlandsdal, Annike I; Tzamkiozis, Theodoros; Leseman, Daan L A C; Samaras, Zissis; Låg, Marit; Schwarze, Per; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Cassee, Flemming R

    2013-06-04

    The link between emissions of vehicular particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects is well established. However, the influence of new emission control technologies and fuel types on both PM emissions and health effects has been less well investigated. We examined the health impact of PM emissions from two vehicles equipped with or without a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Both vehicles were powered either with diesel (B0) or a 50% v/v biodiesel blend (B50). The DPF effectively decreased PM mass emissions (∼85%), whereas the fuel B50 without DPF lead to less reduction (∼50%). The hazard of PM per unit distance driven was decreased for the DPF-equipped vehicle as indicated by a reduced cytotoxicity, oxidative, and pro-inflammatory potential. This was not evident and even led to an increase when the hazard was expressed on a per unit of mass basis. In general, the PM oxidative potential was similar or reduced for the B50 compared to the B0 powered vehicle. However, the use of B50 resulted in increased cytotoxicity and IL-6 release in BEAS-2B cells irrespective of the expression metric. This study shows that PM mass reduction achieved by the use of B50 will not necessarily decrease the hazard of engine emissions, while the application of a DPF has a beneficial effect on both PM mass emission and PM hazard.

  5. Evaluation of Potential Oxidative Stress in Egyptian Patients with Acute Zinc Phosphide Poisoning and the Role of Vitamin C

    PubMed Central

    Sagah, Ghada A.; Oreby, Merfat M.; El-Gharbawy, Rehab M.; Ahmed Fathy, Amal S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate potential oxidative stress in patients with acute phosphide poisoning and the effect of vitamin C. Methods Participants were females and divided into three groups; group I: healthy volunteers group II: healthy volunteers received vitamin C, group III: patients with acute phosphide poisoning received the supportive and symptomatic treatment and group IV: patients with acute phosphide poisoning received the supportive and symptomatic treatment in addition to vitamin C. All the participants were subjected to thorough history, clinical examination, ECG and laboratory investigations were carried on collected blood and gastric lavage samples on admission. Blood samples were divided into two parts, one for measurement of routine investigations and the second part was used for evaluation of malondialdehyde and total thiol levels before and after receiving the treatment regimen. Results Most of the cases in this study were among the age group of 15–25 years, females, single, secondary school education, from rural areas and suicidal. All vital signs were within normal range and the most common complaint was vomiting and abdominal pain. All cases in this study showed normal routine investigations. The mean MDA levels after receiving treatment decreased significantly in groups II and IV. The mean total thiol levels increased significantly after receiving treatment in groups II and IV. Conclusion It can be concluded that vitamin C has a potential benefit due to its antioxidant property on zinc phosphide induced-oxidative stress in acute zinc phosphide poisoned patients. PMID:26715917

  6. Rye and Wheat Bran Extracts Isolated with Pressurized Solvents Increase Oxidative Stability and Antioxidant Potential of Beef Meat Hamburgers.

    PubMed

    Šulniūtė, Vaida; Jaime, Isabel; Rovira, Jordi; Venskutonis, Petras Rimantas

    2016-02-01

    Rye and wheat bran extracts containing phenolic compounds and demonstrating high DPPH• (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl), ABTS(•+) (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) scavenging and oxygen radical absorbance capacities (ORAC) were tested in beef hamburgers as possible functional ingredients. Bran extracts significantly increased the indicators of antioxidant potential of meat products and their global antioxidant response (GAR) during physiological in vitro digestion. The extracts also inhibited the formation of oxidation products, hexanal and malondialdehyde, of hamburgers during their storage; however, they did not have significant effect on the growth of microorganisms. Hamburgers with 0.8% wheat bran extract demonstrated the highest antioxidant potential. Some effects of bran extracts on other quality characteristics such as pH, color, formation of metmyoglobin were also observed, however, these effects did not have negative influence on the overall sensory evaluation score of hamburgers. Consequently, the use of bran extracts in meat products may be considered as promising means of increasing oxidative product stability and enriching with functional ingredients which might possess health benefits.

  7. Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of iron(II/III), cobalt(II) and copper(II) cluster complexes of the polytopic ligand: N-(2-pyridyl)-3-carboxypropanamide.

    PubMed

    Russell, Mark E; Hawes, Chris S; Ferguson, Alan; Polson, Matthew I J; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Kruger, Paul E

    2013-10-07

    Herein we describe the synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of three transition metal cluster complexes that feature the polytopic ligand N-(2-pyridyl)-3-carboxypropanamide (H2L): [Fe3(III)Fe2(II)(HL)6(O)(H2O)3][ClO4]5·3MeCN·4H2O, 1, [Co8(HL)8(O)(OH)4(MeOH)3(H2O)]-[ClO4]3·5MeOH·2H2O, 2, and [Cu6(L(ox))4(MeOH)(H2O)3]·MeOH, 3. Complex 1 is a mixed valence penta-nuclear iron cluster containing the archetypal {Fe3(III)O} triangular basic carboxylate cluster at its core, with two Fe(II) ions above and below the core coordinated to three bidentate pyridyl-amide groups. The structure of the octanuclear Co(II) complex, 2, is based upon a central Co4 square with the remaining four Co(II) centres at the 'wing-tips' of the complex. The cluster core is replete with bridging oxide, hydroxide and carboxylate groups. Cluster 3 contains an oxidised derivative of the ligand, L(ox), generated in situ through hydroxylation of an α-carbon atom. This hexanuclear cluster has a 'barrel-like' core and contains Cu(II) ions in both square planar and square-based pyramidal geometries. Bridging between Cu(II) centres is furnished by alkoxide and carboxylate groups. Magnetic studies on 1-3 reveals dominant antiferro-magnetic interactions for 1 and 2, leading to small non-zero spin ground states, while 3 shows ferro-magnetic exchange between the Cu(II) centres to give an S = 3 spin ground state.

  8. Shifts between Nitrospira- and Nitrobacter-like nitrite oxidizers underlie the response of soil potential nitrite oxidation to changes in tillage practices.

    PubMed

    Attard, E; Poly, F; Commeaux, C; Laurent, F; Terada, A; Smets, B F; Recous, S; Roux, X Le

    2010-02-01

    Despite their role in soil functioning, the ecology of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, NOB, and their response to disturbances such as those generated by agricultural practices are scarcely known. Over the course of 17 months, we surveyed the potential nitrite oxidation, PNO, the abundance of the Nitrobacter- and Nitrospira-like NOB (by quantitative PCR) and the community structure of the Nitrobacter-like NOB (by PCR-DGGE and cloning-sequencing targeting the nxrA gene) in soils for four treatments: after establishment of tillage on a previously no-tillage system, after cessation of tillage on a previously tillage system, and on control tillage and no-tillage systems. Key soil variables (moisture, organic carbon content and gross mineralization--i.e. ammonification--measured by the 15N dilution technique) were also surveyed. PNO was always higher for the no-tillage than tillage treatments. Establishment of tillage led to a strong and rapid decrease in PNO whereas cessation of tillage did not change PNO even after 17 months. PNO was strongly and positively correlated to the abundance of Nitrobacter-like NOB and was also strongly related to gross mineralization, a proxy of N-availability; in contrast, PNO was weakly and negatively correlated to the abundance of Nitrospira-like NOB. Selection of a dominant population was observed under no-tillage, and PNO was loosely correlated to the community structure of Nitrobacter-like NOB. Our results demonstrate that Nitrobacter-like NOB are the key functional players within the NOB community in soils with high N availability and high activity level, and that changes in PNO are due to shifts between Nitrospira-like and Nitrobacter-like NOB and to a weaker extent by shifts of populations within Nitrobacter-like NOB.

  9. First-principles model potentials for lattice-dynamical studies: general methodology and example of application to ferroic perovskite oxides.

    PubMed

    Wojdeł, Jacek C; Hermet, Patrick; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ghosez, Philippe; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2013-07-31

    We present a scheme to construct model potentials, with parameters computed from first principles, for large-scale lattice-dynamical simulations of materials. We mimic the traditional solid-state approach to the investigation of vibrational spectra, i.e., we start from a suitably chosen reference configuration of the compound and describe its energy as a function of arbitrary atomic distortions by means of a Taylor series. Such a form of the potential-energy surface is general, trivial to formulate for any material, and physically transparent. Further, such models involve clear-cut approximations, their precision can be improved in a systematic fashion, and their simplicity allows for convenient and practical strategies to compute/fit the potential parameters. We illustrate our scheme with two challenging cases in which the model potential is strongly anharmonic, namely, the ferroic perovskite oxides PbTiO3 and SrTiO3. Studying these compounds allows us to better describe the connection between the so-called effective-Hamiltonian method and ours (which may be seen as an extension of the former), and to show the physical insight and predictive power provided by our approach-e.g., we present new results regarding the factors controlling phase-transition temperatures, novel phase transitions under elastic constraints, an improved treatment of thermal expansion, etc.

  10. Latent Oxidative Polymerization of Catecholamines as Potential Cross-linkers for Biocompatible and Multifunctional Biopolymer Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Chetna; Barathi, Veluchamy Amutha; Ong, Seow Theng; Venkatesh, Mayandi; Harini, Sriram; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Goh, Eunice Tze Leng; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Diaz, Silvia Marrero; Fazil, Mobashar Hussain Urf Turabe; Loh, Xian Jun; Ping, Liu Shou; Beuerman, Roger W; Verma, Navin Kumar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani

    2016-11-30

    Electrospinning of naturally occurring biopolymers for biological applications requires postspinning cross-linking for endurance in protease-rich microenvironments and prevention of rapid dissolution. The most commonly used cross-linkers often generate cytotoxic byproducts, which necessitate high concentrations or time-consuming procedures. Herein, we report the addition of "safe" catecholamine cross-linkers to collagen or gelatin dope solutions followed by electrospinning yielded junction-containing nanofibrous mats. Subsequent in situ oxidative polymerization of the catecholamines increased the density of soldered junctions and maintained the porous nanofiber architecture. This protocol imparted photoluminescence to the biopolymers, a smooth noncytotoxic coating, and good mechanical/structural stability in aqueous solutions. The utility of our approach was demonstrated by the preparation of durable antimicrobial wound dressings and mineralized osteoconductive scaffolds via peptide antibiotics and calcium chloride (CaCl2) incorporation into the dope solutions. The mineralized composite mats consist of amorphous calcium carbonate that enhanced the osteoblasts cell proliferation, differentiation, and expression of important osteogenic marker proteins. In proof-of-concept experiments, antibiotic-loaded mats displayed superior antimicrobial properties relative to silver (Ag)-based dressings, and accelerated wound healing in a porcine deep dermal burn injury model.

  11. Evaluating the potential impact of proton carriers on syntrophic propionate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste-Poinapen, Natacha M. S.; Turner, Mark S.; Rabaey, Korneel; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J.

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic propionic acid degradation relies on interspecies electron transfer (IET) between propionate oxidisers and electron acceptor microorganisms, via either molecular hydrogen, formate or direct transfers. We evaluated the possibility of stimulating direct IET, hence enhancing propionate oxidation, by increasing availability of proton carriers to decrease solution resistance and reduce pH gradients. Phosphate was used as a proton carrying anion, and chloride as control ion together with potassium as counter ion. Propionic acid consumption in anaerobic granules was assessed in a square factorial design with ratios (1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 0:1) of total phosphate (TP) to Cl-, at 1X, 10X, and 30X native conductivity (1.5 mS.cm-1). Maximum specific uptake rate, half saturation, and time delay were estimated using model-based analysis. Community profiles were analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The strongest performance was at balanced (1:1) ratios at 10X conductivity where presumptive propionate oxidisers namely Syntrophobacter and Candidatus Cloacamonas were more abundant. There was a shift from Methanobacteriales at high phosphate, to Methanosaeta at low TP:Cl ratios and low conductivity. A lack of response to TP, and low percentage of presumptive electroactive organisms suggested that DIET was not favoured under the current experimental conditions.

  12. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as a Potential Iron Fertilizer for Peanut (Arachis hypogaea).

    PubMed

    Rui, Mengmeng; Ma, Chuanxin; Hao, Yi; Guo, Jing; Rui, Yukui; Tang, Xinlian; Zhao, Qi; Fan, Xing; Zhang, Zetian; Hou, Tianqi; Zhu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in practically every aspect of modern life, including agriculture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3 NPs) as a fertilizer to replace traditional Fe fertilizers, which have various shortcomings. The effects of the Fe2O3 NPs and a chelated-Fe fertilizer (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-Fe; EDTA-Fe) fertilizer on the growth and development of peanut (Arachis hypogaea), a crop that is very sensitive to Fe deficiency, were studied in a pot experiment. The results showed that Fe2O3 NPs increased root length, plant height, biomass, and SPAD values of peanut plants. The Fe2O3 NPs promoted the growth of peanut by regulating phytohormone contents and antioxidant enzyme activity. The Fe contents in peanut plants with Fe2O3 NPs and EDTA-Fe treatments were higher than the control group. We used energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to quantitatively analyze Fe in the soil. Peanut is usually cultivated in sandy soil, which is readily leached of fertilizers. However, the Fe2O3 NPs adsorbed onto sandy soil and improved the availability of Fe to the plants. Together, these results show that Fe2O3 NPs can replace traditional Fe fertilizers in the cultivation of peanut plants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research on the Fe2O3 NPs as the iron fertilizer.

  13. Evaluating the potential impact of proton carriers on syntrophic propionate oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Juste-Poinapen, Natacha M. S.; Turner, Mark S.; Rabaey, Korneel; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic propionic acid degradation relies on interspecies electron transfer (IET) between propionate oxidisers and electron acceptor microorganisms, via either molecular hydrogen, formate or direct transfers. We evaluated the possibility of stimulating direct IET, hence enhancing propionate oxidation, by increasing availability of proton carriers to decrease solution resistance and reduce pH gradients. Phosphate was used as a proton carrying anion, and chloride as control ion together with potassium as counter ion. Propionic acid consumption in anaerobic granules was assessed in a square factorial design with ratios (1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 0:1) of total phosphate (TP) to Cl−, at 1X, 10X, and 30X native conductivity (1.5 mS.cm−1). Maximum specific uptake rate, half saturation, and time delay were estimated using model-based analysis. Community profiles were analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The strongest performance was at balanced (1:1) ratios at 10X conductivity where presumptive propionate oxidisers namely Syntrophobacter and Candidatus Cloacamonas were more abundant. There was a shift from Methanobacteriales at high phosphate, to Methanosaeta at low TP:Cl ratios and low conductivity. A lack of response to TP, and low percentage of presumptive electroactive organisms suggested that DIET was not favoured under the current experimental conditions. PMID:26670292

  14. Synthesis and potential applications of silver-porous aluminium oxide nanocomposites as prospective antiseptics and bactericides.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Marina; Lemkina, Larisa; Lebedeva, Irina; Kisel'kov, Dmitriy; Chekanova, Larisa

    2017-03-01

    Alumina micro-spheres with mesoporous structure called porous aluminium oxide (POA) were prepared through a hydrothermal method using Al2(SO4)3·18H2O followed by a thermal decomposition process. Silver nanocomposites of POA (Ag/POAs) with high biochemical activity were synthesized by sorption of silver nanoparticles in the matrix of POA. Synthesis of Ag/POAs using photochemical reduction enables the producing silver nanoparticles preventing their aggregation. Ag/POAs demonstrated a stronger bactericidal activity than POA. The colony-forming ability of Escherichia coli was completely lost in 1 day on Ag/POAs at silver nanoparticles concentration of 0.241 ppm. Staphylococcus epidermidis displayed higher tolerance to Ag/POAs at all silver nanoparticles concentrations, the growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis was stopped at concentration of 0.374 ppm. The bactericidal activity of Ag/POAs against bacteria in drinking water was found to be highly effective, the growth of bacteria was completely lost in 1 day at silver nanoparticles concentration of 0.108 ppm.

  15. Order-disorder transitions in gadolinium zirconate: A potential electrolyte material in solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meilicke, S.; Haile, S.

    1995-12-31

    Rare-earth, yttrium, and calcium doped zirconates are the materials of choice for electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells. The dopant in these materials serves not only to stabilized the cubic phase of zirconia, but also to introduce anion defects that presumably increase the ionic conductivity. In order to understand the relationships between anion defect distribution, thermal history and ionic conductivity, the structural properties of gadolinium zirconate, Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, have been examined via high-temperature x-ray powder diffraction. Gadolinium zirconate is an ideal material for such a structure-property-processing study: it shows ordering of defects at low temperatures, taking on a pyrochlore structure, and disordering at elevated temperature, taking on a defect fluorite structure. Diffraction experiments, performed as functions of time and temperature, confirmed the transition temperature to lie between 1,500 and 1,550 C. They also revealed that the transformation takes place most rapidly just below the transition temperature, indicating that the ordering process is kinetically constrained at low temperatures. Moreover, x-ray data collected at room temperature from quenched samples were found to be as useful, if not more so, than those collected in situ at high temperature. The latter are affected by thermal scattering, severely compromising data quality.

  16. Nitrogen oxides from high-altitude aircraft - An update of potential effects on ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Harold S.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    In the study of fuel consumption rate by stratospheric aircraft, the range of nitric oxide injection is interpreted as an eightfold range of emission index (5-40) with both the one- and the two-dimensional models. Possible effects of future aircraft NO(x) emissions on stratospheric ozone are considered for a broad range in magnitude, altitude, and latitude of the assumed NO(x) emissions. Results of the sensitivity studies using both models are discussed. Large ozone reductions are found to be outside the expected range of validity of these models and are to be anticipated if there should be a large fleet of stratospheric aircraft with NO(x) emission characteristics of current commercial aircraft. Under the test conditions, a global ozone reduction of about 9 percent is estimated for a jet engine emission index of 15 in both models. If engines are redesigned to reduce the emission index to the NASA goal of 5, global average ozone reductions are between 2 and 3 percent, and those of the Northern Hemisphere are about 4 percent. The effects of stratospheric aircraft on ozone could be further reduced through operation at lower altitudes, reduction of aircraft, and efficient fuel consumption.

  17. Gold(I) carbene complexes causing thioredoxin 1 and thioredoxin 2 oxidation as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Esther; Pflüger, Carolin; Citta, Anna; Folda, Alessandra; Rigobello, Maria Pia; Bindoli, Alberto; Casini, Angela; Mohr, Fabian

    2012-06-14

    Gold(I) complexes with 1,3-substituted imidazole-2-ylidene and benzimidazole-2-ylidene ligands of the type NHC-Au-L (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene L = Cl or 2-mercapto-pyrimidine) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The compounds were evaluated for their antiproliferative properties in human ovarian cancer cells sensitive and resistant to cisplatin (A2780S/R), as well in the nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293T), showing in some cases important cytotoxic effects. Some of the complexes were comparatively tested as thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione reductase (GR) inhibitors, directly against the purified proteins or in cell extracts. The compounds showed potent and selective TrxR inhibition properties in particular in cancer cell lines. Remarkably, the most effective TrxR inhibitors induced extensive oxidation of thioredoxins (Trxs), which was more relevant in the cancerous cells than in HEK-293T cells. Additional biochemical assays on glutathione systems and reactive oxygen species formation evidenced important differences with respect to the classical cytotoxic Au(I)-phosphine compound auranofin.

  18. Size-Tunable Synthesis of Stable Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Potential Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Faquan; Yang, Victor C.

    2009-01-01

    Dextran-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have widespread biomedical applications. The superparamagnetic behavior, specifically regulated size, and smooth morphology are crucial requirements for essentially all of these applications. Presented herein is an innovative double-coating strategy that would allow for a size-controlled synthesis of MNPs. Small monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) were first synthesized, which served as the source of superparamagnetic properties. These MIONs were then treated in an acetate buffer containing biocompatible dextran polymer. Under such an environment, the colloidal MIONs would be quickly agglomerated by the acetate ions, and the formed coalescent body of MION would then be stabilized simultaneously by coating with dextran. By regulating the MION or dextran concentration as well as the thermal incubation time, the sizes of these first formed nanoparticles (termed 1st-NPs) could be readily controlled. A second dextran coating step was further applied to smoothen the 1st-NPs in attaining a final product (termed 2nd-NPs). The 2nd-NPs exhibited robustly storage stability due to the additional coating shell. Results successfully confirmed the plausibility of this approach, as these MNPs displayed not only a smooth outline and a narrow size distribution, but also the essential superparamagnetic behavior and a significantly prolonged stability upon storage. PMID:19402138

  19. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as a Potential Iron Fertilizer for Peanut (Arachis hypogaea)

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Mengmeng; Ma, Chuanxin; Hao, Yi; Guo, Jing; Rui, Yukui; Tang, Xinlian; Zhao, Qi; Fan, Xing; Zhang, Zetian; Hou, Tianqi; Zhu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in practically every aspect of modern life, including agriculture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3 NPs) as a fertilizer to replace traditional Fe fertilizers, which have various shortcomings. The effects of the Fe2O3 NPs and a chelated-Fe fertilizer (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-Fe; EDTA-Fe) fertilizer on the growth and development of peanut (Arachis hypogaea), a crop that is very sensitive to Fe deficiency, were studied in a pot experiment. The results showed that Fe2O3 NPs increased root length, plant height, biomass, and SPAD values of peanut plants. The Fe2O3 NPs promoted the growth of peanut by regulating phytohormone contents and antioxidant enzyme activity. The Fe contents in peanut plants with Fe2O3 NPs and EDTA-Fe treatments were higher than the control group. We used energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to quantitatively analyze Fe in the soil. Peanut is usually cultivated in sandy soil, which is readily leached of fertilizers. However, the Fe2O3 NPs adsorbed onto sandy soil and improved the availability of Fe to the plants. Together, these results show that Fe2O3 NPs can replace traditional Fe fertilizers in the cultivation of peanut plants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research on the Fe2O3 NPs as the iron fertilizer. PMID:27375665

  20. Toxicity potential of residual ethylene oxide on fresh or frozen embryos maintained in plastic straws.

    PubMed

    Schiewe, M C; Schmidt, P M; Pontbriand, D; Wildt, D E

    1988-01-01

    The toxic effects of residual ethylene oxide (EtO), a frequently used gas-sterilant, on embryos either frozen for long-term purposes or stored acutely for 30 min to 9 hr in a fresh condition in 0.25-ml straw containers were evaluated. In Experiment 1, fresh embryos were frozen (using conventional technology) in straws previously aerated for 0 hr to 8 mo after EtO sterilization. With the exception of the 8-mo group in which survival and quality ratings were depressed, embryo viability was not affected significantly by short-term prefreeze and post-thaw exposure to EtO residues. Experiment 2 was conducted to analyze the influence of prefreeze exposure to EtO residues on embryo development in vitro for embryos temporarily stored in previously sterilized straws aerated for different intervals. Compared to non-EtO-sterilized control straws, the development, quality, and viability of embryos exposed to EtO-treated straws were compromised (p less than 0.05) as the aeration interval decreased and the exposure interval increased. The combined results of both experiments indicate that EtO-treated straws can be used to cryopreserve gametes efficiently, but only if the aeration interval is greater than or equal to 72 hr and the prefreeze duration of exposure is less than or equal to 3 hr.

  1. Gallic acid grafting modulates the oxidative potential of ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic SC-45.

    PubMed

    Corazzari, Ingrid; Tomatis, Maura; Turci, Francesco; Ferraris, Sara; Bertone, Elisa; Prenesti, Enrico; Vernè, Enrica

    2016-12-01

    Magnetite-containing glass-ceramics are promising bio-materials for replacing bone tissue after tumour resection. Thanks to their ferrimagnetic properties, they generate heat when subjected to an alternated magnetic field. In virtue of this they can be employed for the hyperthermic treatment of cancer. Moreover, grafting anti-cancer drugs onto their surface produces specific anti-neoplastic activity in these biomaterials. Gallic acid (GA) exhibits antiproliferative activity which renders it a promising candidate for anticancer applications. In the present paper, the reactivity of ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic SC-45 grafted with GA (SC-45+GA) was studied in terms of ROS release, rupture of the C-H bond of the formate molecule and Fenton reactivity by EPR/spin trapping in acellular systems. The ability of these materials to cause lipid peroxidation was assessed by UV-vis/TBA assay employing linoleic acid as a model of membrane lipid. The results, compared to those obtained with SC-45, showed that GA grafting (i) significantly enhanced the Fenton reactivity and (ii) restored the former reactivity of SC-45 towards both the C-H bond and linoleic acid which had been completely suppressed by prolonged contact with water. Fe(2+) centres at the surface are probably implicated. GA, acting as a pro-oxidant, reduces Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) by maintaining a supply of Fe(2+) at the surface of SC-45+GA.

  2. The role of oxygen in low-potential Li insertion in metal oxide anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Leroux, F.; Nazar, L.F.

    2000-07-01

    Transition metal oxides are high-capacity lithium storage materials of interest as possible anode materials in the next generation of Li ion batteries. By using X-ray absorption spectroscopy the authors have obtained an understanding of the process of Li uptake and removal within Na{sub 0.25}MoO{sub 3}. Results show the Li{sub 2}O matrix on reduction is not inert; Mo-O bonds are reversibly consumed on discharge and are regenerated on charge, with the Li{sub 2}O matrix acting as the oxygen reservoir. The migration of oxygen atoms from the matrix to the active centers occurs at a voltage below that expected for the Li{sub 2}O free energy of formation. Polarization on charge is not due only to oxygen migration but also to metal rearrangement within the electrode material. The reversibility of the Mo-O bond formation on repeated cycles is a function of the depth of discharge, with 200 mV being the lower limit.

  3. Use of ORP (oxidation-reduction potential) to control oxygen dosing for online sulfide oxidation in anaerobic treatment of high sulfate wastewater.

    PubMed

    Khanal, S K; Shang, C; Huang, J C

    2003-01-01

    In this study, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) was used as a controlling parameter to regulate oxygen dosing to the recycled biogas for online sulfide oxidation in an upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) system. The UAF was operated with a constant influent COD of 18,000 mg/L, but with different influent sulfates of 1000, 3000 and 6000 mg/L. The reactor was initially operated under a natural ORP of -290 mV (without oxygen injection), and was then followed by oxygenation to raise its ORP by 25 mV above the natural level for each influent sulfate condition. At 6,000 mg/L sulfate without oxygen injection, the dissolved sulfide reached 733.8 mg S/L with a corresponding free sulfide of 250.3 mg S/L, thus showing a considerable inhibition to methanogens. Upon oxygenation to raise its ORP to -265 mV (i.e., a 25 mV increase), the dissolved sulfide was reduced by more than 98.5% with a concomitant 45.9% increase of the methane yield. Under lower influent sulfate levels of 1,000 and 3,000 mg/L, the levels of sulfides produced, even under the natural ORP, did not impose any noticeable toxicity to methanogens. Upon oxygenation to raise the ORP by +25 mV, the corresponding methane yields were actually reduced by 15.5% and 6.2%, respectively. However, such reductions were not due to the adverse impact of the elevated ORP; instead, they were due to a diversion of some organic carbon to support the facultative activities inside the reactor as a result of excessive oxygenation. In other words, to achieve satisfactory sulfide oxidation for the lower influent sulfate conditions, it was not necessary to raise the ORP by as much as +25 mV. The ORP increase actually needed depended on both the influent sulfate and also actual wastewater characteristics. This study had proved that the ORP controlled oxygenation was reliable for achieving consistent online sulfide control.

  4. Salinity induced oxidative stress enhanced biofuel production potential of microalgae Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077.

    PubMed

    Pancha, Imran; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Maurya, Rahulkumar; Trivedi, Khanjan; Patidar, Shailesh Kumar; Ghosh, Arup; Mishra, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Microalgal biomass is considered as potential feedstock for biofuel production. Enhancement of biomass, lipid and carbohydrate contents in microalgae is important for the commercialization of microalgal biofuels. In the present study, salinity stress induced physiological and biochemical changes in microalgae Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077 were studied. During single stage cultivation, 33.13% lipid and 35.91% carbohydrate content was found in 400 mM NaCl grown culture. During two stage cultivation, salinity stress of 400 mM for 3 days resulted in 24.77% lipid (containing 74.87% neutral lipid) along with higher biomass compared to single stage, making it an efficient strategy to enhance biofuel production potential of Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077. Apart from biochemical content, stress biomarkers like hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation, ascorbate peroxidase, proline and mineral contents were also studied to understand the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated lipid accumulation in microalgae Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077.

  5. High level predictions on the potential energy hypersurface of the nitric oxide dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Q.; Magers, D.H.; Leszczynski, J.

    1994-12-31

    The potential energy hypersurface of the NO dimer is investigated at the SCF and MP2 levels of theory using three spit-valence basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311G(2d), 6-311G(3df). Seven minimum energy conformers are identified. Their molecular structures, energetics, and harmonic vibrational frequencies are discussed and compared to available experimental data.

  6. Spectroelectrochemical Properties of Ultra-Thin Indium Tin Oxide Films under Electric Potential Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue; Mendes, Sergio B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the spectroscopic properties of ultra-thin ITO films are characterized under an applied electric potential modulation. To detect minute spectroscopic features, the ultra-thin ITO film was coated over an extremely sensitive single-mode integrated optical waveguide, which provided a long pathlength with more than adequate sensitivity for optical interrogation of the ultra-thin film. Experimental configurations with broadband light and several laser lines at different modulation schemes of an applied electric potential were utilized to elucidate the nature of intrinsic changes. The imaginary component of the refractive index (absorption coefficient) of the ultra-thin ITO film is unequivocally shown to have a dependence on the applied potential and the profile of this dependence changes substantially even for wavelengths inside a small spectral window (500–600 nm). The characterization technique and the data reported here can be crucial to several applications of the ITO material as a transparent conductive electrode, as for example in spectroelectrochemical investigations of surface-confined redox species. PMID:26973359

  7. Oxidation of naturally reduced uranium in aquifer sediments by dissolved oxygen and its potential significance to uranium plume persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. A.; Smith, R. L.; Bohlke, J. K.; Jemison, N.; Xiang, H.; Repert, D. A.; Yuan, X.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of naturally reduced zones is common in alluvial aquifers in the western U.S.A. due to the burial of woody debris in flood plains. Such reduced zones are usually heterogeneously dispersed in these aquifers and characterized by high concentrations of organic carbon, reduced mineral phases, and reduced forms of metals, including uranium(IV). The persistence of high concentrations of dissolved uranium(VI) at uranium-contaminated aquifers on the Colorado Plateau has been attributed to slow oxidation of insoluble uranium(IV) mineral phases found in association with these reducing zones, although there is little understanding of the relative importance of various potential oxidants. Four field experiments were conducted within an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO, wherein groundwater associated with the naturally reduced zones was pumped into a gas-impermeable tank, mixed with a conservative tracer (Br-), bubbled with a gas phase composed of 97% O2 and 3% CO2, and then returned to the subsurface in the same well from which it was withdrawn. Within minutes of re-injection of the oxygenated groundwater, dissolved uranium(VI) concentrations increased from less than 1 μM to greater than 2.5 μM, demonstrating that oxygen can be an important oxidant for uranium in such field systems if supplied to the naturally reduced zones. Dissolved Fe(II) concentrations decreased to the detection limit, but increases in sulfate could not be detected due to high background concentrations. Changes in nitrogen species concentrations were variable. The results contrast with other laboratory and field results in which oxygen was introduced to systems containing high concentrations of mackinawite (FeS), rather than the more crystalline iron sulfides found in aged, naturally reduced zones. The flux of oxygen to the naturally reduced zones in the alluvial aquifers occurs mainly through interactions between groundwater and gas phases at the water table

  8. Biological durability and oxidative potential of man-made vitreous fibres as compared to crocidolite asbestos fibres.

    PubMed

    Hippeli, S; Dornisch, K; Wiethege, T; Gillissen, A; Müller, K M; Elstner, E F

    2001-01-01

    In this study we investigated relationships between redox properties and biodurability of crocidolite asbestos fibres and three different man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF): traditional stone wool fibres (MMVF 21), glass fibres (MMVF 11) and refractory ceramic fibres (RCF). Each fibre type was incubated up to 22 weeks in four different incubation media: gamble solution (GS) pH 5.0 and pH 7.4, representing blood plasma without proteins, and surfactant-like solution (SLS) pH 5.0 and pH 7.4. During incubation time aliquots of incubation mixtures were removed and analysed in a biochemical model reaction, mimicking activated phagocytes. In addition, changes of fibre morphology and chemical composition were examined using SEM- and EDX-technology. In the presence of crocidolite asbestos fibres and MMVF 21 the formation of OH*-radicals according to the Haber-Weiss sequence could be demonstrated, whereas MMVF 11 and RCF showed no reactivity. Crocidolite asbestos fibres exhibited a significant higher activity compared with the stone wool fibres at the onset of incubation. The oxidative capacities of these fibre types were shown to depend on both specific surface area and iron content. The oxidative potentials of crocidolite asbestos fibres as well as MMVF 21 were not constant during incubation over several weeks in each incubation medium. The reactivities showed sinoidal curves including reactivities much higher than those at the onset of incubation time. These irregular changes of oxidative capacity may be explained by changes of the redox state of fibre surface-complexed iron. Furthermore our results showed clear differences between incubation of fibres in GS and SLS, respectively, indicating that phospholipids play an important part in fibre dissolution behaviour and oxidative reactivity. In conclusion we suggest, that biodurability testing procedures should not exclusively concentrate on dissolution rates of fibres. They should include fibre characteristics concerning known

  9. Benzo-α-pyrene induced oxidative stress in Caenorhabditis elegans and the potential involvements of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongmei; Huang, Chenping; Taki, Faten A; Zhang, Yanqiong; Dobbins, Dorothy L; Li, Lin; Yan, Hongtao; Pan, Xiaoping

    2015-11-01

    In the present study oxidative stress induced by Benzo-α-pyrene (BaP) exposure and the potential involvements of microRNA were investigated. The Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) was applied as model organism. The C. elegans at L1-stage were randomly divided into 4 groups and exposed to 0, 0.2, 2.0, and 20μM BaP for 30h. Expressions of SKiNhead-1 (SKN-1), gamma-glutamine cysteine synthase heavy chain (GCS-1), and their potential regulatory factors in insulin/IGF-1/FOXO signaling pathway and the p38 MAPK pathway were analyzed. The expressions of potentially involved microRNAs were investigated as well. Results demonstrated that expressions of SKN-1 and GCS-1 were altered significantly following BaP exposure (P<0.05). Meanwhile, expressions of multiple related factors were changed after BaP treatments. The altered factors include AKT-1, DAF-16, glutathione synthetase (GSS-1), glutathione S-transferase-24 (GST-24), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-4 (MKK-4), multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1), and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 (PDHK-2) (P<0.05). In addition, results showed that exposure to BaP led to altered expressions of microRNA. Out of the 28 tested microRNAs, expressions of miR-1, miR-355, miR-50, miR-51, miR-58, miR-796, miR-797, and miR-84 were modified. Findings of the present study include that BaP exposure caused oxidative stress in C. elegans. The expressional response of GCS-1 to BaP exposure might be independent of the regulation of SKN-1 in C. elegans. The microRNAs might be involved in the regulations of SKN-1 and GCS-1 expression following BaP exposure in C. elegans.

  10. Theoretical reduction potentials for nitrogen oxides from CBS-QB3 energetics and (C)PCM solvation calculations.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Andrew S; Fukuto, Jon M; Houk, Kendall N

    2005-05-30

    The complete basis set method, CBS-QB3, is used in combination with two continuum solvation models for aqueous solvation to compute reduction potentials previously determined experimentally for 36 nitrogen oxides and related species of the general formula H(V)C(W)N(X)O(Y)Cl(Z). The PCM model led to the correlation E(o)exp (vs NHE) = 0.84E(o)calc + 0.03 V with an average error of 0.12 V (2.8 kcal/mol) and a maximum error of 0.32 V (7.4 kcal/mol). The CPCM/UAKS model gave E(o)exp (vs NHE) = 0.83E(o)calc + 0.11 V with the same average error. This general method was used to predict reduction potentials (+/-0.3 V) for nitrogen oxides for which reduction potentials are not known with certainty: NO2/NO2- (0.6 V), NO3/NO3- (1.9 V), N2O3-/N2O3(2-) (0.5 V), HN2O3/HN2O3- (0.9 V), HONNO,H+/HONNOH (1.6 V), 2NO,H+/HONNO (0.0 V), 2NO/ONNO- (-0.1 V), ONNO-/ONNO(2-) (-0.4 V), HNO,H+/H2NO (0.6 V), H2NO,H+/H2NOH (0.9 V), HNO,2H+/H2NOH (0.8 V), and HNO/HNO- (-0.7 V).

  11. The influence of oxidation reduction potential and water treatment processes on quartz lamp sleeve fouling in ultraviolet disinfection reactors.

    PubMed

    Wait, Isaac W; Johnston, Cliff T; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2007-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection systems are incorporated into drinking water production facilities because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial capabilities, and the minimal disinfection by-product formation that generally accompanies their use. Selection of an optimal location for a UV system within a drinking water treatment facility depends on many factors; a potentially important consideration is the effect of system location on operation and maintenance issues, including the potential for fouling of quartz surfaces. To examine the effect of system location on fouling, experiments were conducted at a groundwater treatment facility, wherein aeration, chlorination, and sand filtration were applied sequentially for treatment. In this facility, access to the water stream was available prior to and following each of the treatment steps. Therefore, it was possible to examine the effects of each of these unit operations on fouling dynamics within a UV system. Results indicated zero-order formation kinetics for the fouling reactions at all locations. Increases in oxidation reduction potential, caused by water treatment steps such as aeration and chlorination, increased the rate of sleeve fouling and the rate of irradiance loss within the reactor. Analysis of metals in the sleeve foulant showed that calcium and iron predominate, and relative comparisons of foulant composition to water chemistry highlighted a high affinity for incorporation into the foulant matrix for both iron and manganese, particularly after oxidizing treatment steps. Fouling behavior was observed to be in qualitative agreement with representations of the degree of saturation, relative to the metal:ligand combinations that are believed to comprise a large fraction of the foulants that accumulate on the surfaces of quartz jackets in UV systems used to treat water.

  12. Packed Red Blood Cells Are an Abundant and Proximate Potential Source of Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zwemer, Charles F.; Davenport, Robertson D.; Gomez-Espina, Juan; Blanco-Gonzalez, Elisa; Whitesall, Steven E.; D'Alecy, Louis G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We determined, for packed red blood cells (PRBC) and fresh frozen plasma, the maximum content, and ability to release the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethylarginine (LNMMA). Background ADMA and LNMMA are near equipotent NOS inhibitors forming blood’s total NOS inhibitory content. The balance between removal from, and addition to plasma determines their free concentrations. Removal from plasma is by well-characterized specific hydrolases while formation is restricted to posttranslational protein methylation. When released into plasma they can readily enter endothelial cells and inhibit NOS. Fresh rat and human whole blood contain substantial protein incorporated ADMA however; the maximum content of ADMA and LNMMA in PRBC and fresh frozen plasma has not been determined. Methods We measured total (free and protein incorporated) ADMA and LNMMA content in PRBCs and fresh frozen plasma, as well as their incubation induced release, using HPLC with fluorescence detection. We tested the hypothesis that PRBC and fresh frozen plasma contain substantial inhibitory methylarginines that can be released chemically by complete in vitro acid hydrolysis or physiologically at 37°C by enzymatic blood proteolysis. Results In vitro strong-acid-hydrolysis revealed a large PRBC reservoir of ADMA (54.5 ± 9.7 µM) and LNMMA (58.9 ± 28.9 μM) that persisted over 42-d at 6° or -80°C. In vitro 5h incubation at 37°C nearly doubled free ADMA and LNMMNA concentration from PRBCs while no change was detected in fresh frozen plasma. Conclusion The compelling physiological ramifications are that regardless of storage age, 1) PRBCs can rapidly release pathologically relevant quantities of ADMA and LNMMA when incubated and 2) PRBCs have a protein-incorporated inhibitory methylarginines reservoir 100 times that of normal free inhibitory methylarginines in blood and thus could represent a clinically relevant and proximate

  13. Potential of using cerium oxide nanoparticles for protecting healthy tissue during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI)