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Sample records for iiasa rains model

  1. The IIASA set of energy models: Its design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, P. S.; Agnew, M.; Holzl, A.; Kononov, Y.; Papin, A.; Rogner, H. H.; Schrattenholzer, L.

    1980-12-01

    The models studied include an accounting framework type energy demand model, a dynamic linear programming energy supply and conversion system model, an input-output model, a macroeconomic model, and an oil trade gaming model. They are incorporated in an integrated set for long-term, global analyses. This set makes use of a highly iterative process for energy scenario projections and analyses. Each model is quite simple and straightforward in structure; a great deal of human judgement is necessary in applying the set. The models are applied to study two alternative energy scenarios for a coming fifty year period. Examples are presented revealing the wealth of information that can be obtained from multimodel techniques. Details are given for several models (equations employed, assumptions made, data used).

  2. IIASA`s climate-vegetation-biogeochemical cycle module as a part of an integrated model for climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Ganopolski, A.V.; Jonas, M.; Krabec, J.; Olendrzynski, K.; Petoukhov, V.K.; Venevsky, S.V.

    1994-12-31

    The main objective of this study is the development of a hierarchy of coupled climate biosphere models with a full description of the global biogeochemical cycles. These models are planned for use as the core of a set of integrated models of climate change and they will incorporate the main elements of the Earth system (atmosphere, hydrosphere, pedosphere and biosphere) linked with each other (and eventually with the antroposphere) through the fluxes of heat, momentum, water and through the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen. This set of integrated models can be considered to fill the gap between highly simplified integrated models of climate change and very sophisticated and computationally expensive coupled models, developed on the basis of general circulation models (GCMs). It is anticipated that this range of integrated models will be an effective tool for investigating the broad spectrum of problems connected with the coexistence of human society and biosphere.

  3. IIASA Energy Study unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Meeting the energy needs of the world in 2030, when the projected population will be 8 billion, can be done, but not without international cooperation, a mix of energy technologies, and an understanding of the dependence of resources and use. That's the optimistic conclusion of the 7-year golbal energy study by the International Insitute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).

  4. Fellowship Available: 2005 IIASA Young Scientists Summer Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-12-01

    The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) near Vienna, Austria, will host its annual Young Scientists's Summer Program (YSSP) for a selected group of graduate students from around the world. These students, primarily doctoral, will work closely with IIASA's senior scientists on projects within the institute's theme areas: natural resources and environment (e.g., transboundary air pollution and greenhouse gas initiative), population and society (e.g., risk, modeling, and society, and sustainable rural development), and energy and technology (e.g., transitions to new technologies and dynamic systems). Applicants must be advanced graduate students at a U.S. university; have comparable experience with ongoing research at IIASA; students who would benefit from interactions with scientists worldwide; and be interested in investigating the policy implications of his/her work.The U.S. Committee for IIASA provides airfare and a living allowance for those selected to participate in the fellowship.

  5. Acid rain: Mesoscale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A mesoscale numerical model of the Florida peninsula was formulated and applied to a dry, neutral atmosphere. The prospective use of the STAR-100 computer for the submesoscale model is discussed. The numerical model presented is tested under synoptically undisturbed conditions. Two cases, differing only in the direction of the prevailing geostrophic wind, are examined: a prevailing southwest wind and a prevailing southeast wind, both 6 m/sec at all levels initially.

  6. Acid rain: Microphysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1980-01-01

    A microphysical model was used to simulate the case of a ground cloud without dilution by entrainment and without precipitation. The numerical integration techniques of the model are presented. The droplet size spectra versus time and the droplet molalities for each value of time are discussed.

  7. A probability distribution model for rain rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedem, Benjamin; Pavlopoulos, Harry; Guan, Xiaodong; Short, David A.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic approach is suggested for modeling the probability distribution of rain rate. Rain rate, conditional on rain and averaged over a region, is modeled as a temporally homogeneous diffusion process with appropiate boundary conditions. The approach requires a drift coefficient-conditional average instantaneous rate of change of rain intensity-as well as a diffusion coefficient-the conditional average magnitude of the rate of growth and decay of rain rate about its drift. Under certain assumptions on the drift and diffusion coefficients compatible with rain rate, a new parametric family-containing the lognormal distribution-is obtained for the continuous part of the stationary limit probability distribution. The family is fitted to tropical rainfall from Darwin and Florida, and it is found that the lognormal distribution provides adequate fits as compared with other members of the family and also with the gamma distribution.

  8. A scattering model for rain depolarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, P. H.; Stutzman, W. L.; Bostian, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the amount of depolarization caused by precipitation for a propagation path. In the model the effects of each scatterer and their interactions are accounted for by using a series of simplifying steps. It is necessary only to know the forward scattering properties of a single scatterer. For the case of rain the results of this model for attenuation, differential phase shift, and cross polarization agree very well with the results of the only other model available, that of differential attenuation and differential phase shift. Calculations presented here show that horizontal polarization is more sensitive to depolarization than is vertical polarization for small rain drop canting angle changes. This effect increases with increasing path length.

  9. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  10. Multidimensional Modeling of Coronal Rain Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  11. Modelling of rain decay parameter for attenuation estimation at a tropical location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Gargi; Adhikari, Arpita; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-06-01

    Owing to the wide rain variability of the tropical region, the Simple Attenuation Model (SAM) estimated rain attenuation values are often found to exhibit substantial deviation from the actual measurements over the location, Kolkata (22°34‧N, 88°22‧E). This is due to the variability in rain cell sizes resulting from the diverse rain characteristics of the region. Thus, an attempt has been made to model the rain decay parameter in SAM on the basis of the tropical rain characteristics. A model of rain decay parameter in terms of rain rate is proposed which accounts for different types of rain at the present location. The incorporation of the model of decay parameter provides a better estimation of rain attenuation than the existing SAM and ITU-R model.

  12. Heavy pollution suppresses light rain in China: observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Gong, Daoyi; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai R.; Bennartz, Ralph; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Weiguo

    2009-08-15

    Long-term observational data reveal that both the frequency and amount of light rain have decreased in eastern China (EC) for 1956-2005 with high spatial coherency. This is different from the trend of total rainfall observed in EC, which decreases in northern EC and increases in southern EC. To examine the cause of the light rain trends, we analyzed the long-term variability of atmospheric water vapor and its correlation with light rain events. Results show very weak relationships between large-scale moisture transport and light rain in EC. This suggests that light rain trend in EC is not driven by large-scale circulation changes. Because of human activities, pollutant emission has increased dramatically in China for the last few decades, leading to significant reductions in visibility between 1960 and 2000. Cloud-resolving model simulations show that aerosols corresponding to heavily polluted conditions can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and reduce droplet sizes compared to pristine conditions. This can lead to a significant decline in raindrop concentration and delay raindrop formation because smaller cloud droplets are less efficient in the collision and coalescence processes. Together with weaker convection, the precipitation frequency and amount are significantly reduced in the polluted case. Satellite data also reveal higher CDNC and smaller droplet size over polluted land in EC relative to pristine regions, which is consistent with the model results. This evidence suggests that the significantly increased aerosol particles produced by air pollution are at least partly responsible for the decreased light rain events observed in China over the past fifty years.

  13. A cloud model-radiative model combination for determining microwave TB-rain rate relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szejwach, Gerard; Adler, Robert F.; Jobard, Esabelle; Mack, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a cloud model-radiative transfer model combination for computing average brightness temperature, T(B), is discussed. The cloud model and radiative transfer model used in this study are described. The relations between rain rate, cloud and rain water, cloud and precipitation ice, and upwelling radiance are investigated. The effects of the rain rate relations on T(B) under different climatological conditions are examined. The model-derived T(B) results are compared to the 92 and 183 GHz aircraft observations of Hakkarinen and Adler (1984, 1986) and the radar-estimated rain rate of Hakkarinen and Adler (1986); good correlation between the data is detected.

  14. Comparison between natural Rain drop size distributions and corresponding models near equilibrium state during warm rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Laurent; Mallet, Cécile

    2010-05-01

    Keywords: Rain Drop Size Distribution, Breakup, coalescence, disdrometer The study of the vertical evolution of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) during rainfall, from the freezing level isotherm to ground level, is a key to improving our understanding of the microphysics of rain. In numerous domains such as remote sensing, telecommunications, soil erosion, and the study of the rain's efficiency in 'washing' the atmosphere, the DSD plays an important role. Among the different processes affecting the evolution of DSD, breakup and coalescence are two of the most significant. Models of coalescence and breakup lead to equilibrium of the raindrop size distribution (DSD) after a fall through sufficient vertical height. At equilibrium, the DSD no longer evolves, and its shape is unique whatever the rain rate or LWC. This implies that the DSD is known, to within a multiplication constant. These models based on experimental measurements have been developed over the past 40 years. The Low and List (1982a,b) parameterization (hereinafter LL82) and the Greg M. McFarquhar (2004) model are both based on the same laboratory experiments, which lead to an equilibrium drop size distribution (EDSD) with two or three peaks, and an exponential tail with a slope of approximately Λ=65 cm-1. Numerous measurements using disdrometer collected in different climatic areas: Paris, France (Mars to October 2000), Iowa-City (April to October 2002), and Djougou (Benin June to September 2006) corresponding to 537 hours of rain period have shown that for high rain rates, close to a state of equilibrium, this slope lies between Λ=20 - 22 cm-1. This latter value is corroborated by others measurements found in the literature (Hu & Srivastava, 1995). Hu & Srivastava suggested that the Low and List parameterization may overestimate the effects of the breakup process. This hypothesis is in adequation with recent laboratory experiments (A.P. Barros 2008) in which the authors conclude that the number of

  15. A collaborative effort to model plant response to acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.; Irving, P.; Kuja, A.; Lee, J.; Shriner, D.; Troiano, J.; Perrigan, S.; Cullinan, V.

    1989-01-01

    Radish plants were exposed three times per week to simulated acidic rain at pH values of 2.6 to 5.4 over the course of four weeks in trials performed at Argonne, Illinois; Ithaca and Upton, New York; Corvallis, Oregon; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Toronto, Canada. Uniform genotype, soil media and planting techniques, treatment procedures, biological measurements, and experimental design were employed. Growth of plants differed among trials as a result of variation in greenhouse environmental conditions according to location and facilities. Larger plants underwent greater absolute but lower relative reductions in biomass after exposure to the higher levels of acidity. A generalized Mitscherlich function was used to model the effects of acidity of simulated rain on dry mass of hypocotyls using data from three laboratories that performed duplicate trials. The remaining data, from three other laboratories that performed only one trial each, were used to test the model. 14 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. A meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain in Fujian Province, China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi Yong; Lin, Chang Cheng; Liu, Jing Xiong; Wu, De Hui; Lian, Dong Ying; Chen, Bin Bin

    2010-05-01

    Based on the acid rain and concurrent meteorological observational data during the past 10 years in Fujian Province, China, the dependence of distribution characteristics of acid rain on season, rain rate, weather pattern and dominant airflow in four regions of Fujian Province is analyzed. On the annual average, the acid rain frequency is the highest (above 40%) in the southern and mid-eastern regions, and the lowest (16.2%) in the western region. The acid rain occurs most frequently in spring and winter, and least frequent in summer. The acid rain frequency in general increases with the increase of precipitation. It also depend on the direction of dominant airflows at 850 hPa. In the mid-eastern region, more than 40% acid rains appear when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW, S and SE. In the southern region, high acid rain occurrence happens when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW and S. In the northern region, 41.8% acid rains occur when the southwesterly is pronounced. In the western region, the southwesterly is associated with a 17% acid rain rate. The examination of meteorological sounding conditions over Fuzhou, Xiamen and Shaowu cities shows that the acid rain frequency increases with increased inversion thickness. Based on the results above, a meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain is established and tested in 2007. The result is encouraging. The model provides an objective basis for the development of acid rain forecasting operation in the province.

  17. A simple model for the estimation of rain-induced attenuation along earth-space paths at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Dishman, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    A simple attenuation model (SAM) is presented for estimating rain-induced attenuation along an earth-space path. The rain model uses an effective spatial rain distribution which is uniform for low rain rates and which has an exponentially shaped horizontal rain profile for high rain rates. When compared to other models, the SAM performed well in the important region of low percentages of time, and had the lowest percent standard deviation of all percent time values tested.

  18. A simple model for the estimation of rain-induced attenuation along earth-space paths at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Dishman, W. K.

    1982-12-01

    A simple attenuation model (SAM) is presented for estimating rain-induced attenuation along an earth-space path. The rain model uses an effective spatial rain distribution which is uniform for low rain rates and which has an exponentially shaped horizontal rain profile for high rain rates. When compared to other models, the SAM performed well in the important region of low percentages of time, and had the lowest percent standard deviation of all percent time values tested.

  19. A simple model for the estimation of rain-induced attenuation along earth-space paths at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Dishman, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    A simple attenuation model (SAM) is presented for estimating rain-induced attenuation along an earth-space path. The rain model uses an effective spatial rain distribution which is uniform for low rain rates and which has an exponentially shaped horizontal rain profile for high rain rates. When compared to other models, the SAM performed well in the important region of low percentages of time, and had the lowest percent standard deviation of all percent time values tested.

  20. Millimeter wave propagation modeling of inhomogeneous rain media for satellite communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persinger, R. R.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical propagation model that represents the scattering properties of an inhomogeneous rain often found on a satellite communications link is presented. The model includes the scattering effects of an arbitrary distribution of particle type (rain or ice), particle shape, particle size, and particle orientation within a given rain cell. An associated rain propagation prediction program predicts attenuation, isolation and phase shift as a function of ground rain rate. A frequency independent synthetic storm algorithm is presented that models nonuniform rain rates present on a satellite link. Antenna effects are included along with a discussion of rain reciprocity. The model is verified using the latest available multiple frequency data from the CTS and COMSTAR satellites. The data covers a wide range of frequencies, elevation angles, and ground site locations.

  1. Introduction of prognostic rain in ECHAM5: design and Single Column Model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, R.; Lohmann, U.

    2007-10-01

    Prognostic equations for the rain mass mixing ratio and the rain drop number concentration are introduced into the large-scale cloud microphysics parameterization of the ECHAM5 general circulation model (ECHAM5-RAIN). For this a rain flux from one level to the next with the appropriate fall speed is introduced. This maintains rain water in the atmosphere to be available for the next time step. Rain formation in ECHAM5-RAIN is, therefore, less dependent on the autoconversion rate than the standard ECHAM5 but shifts the emphasis towards the accretion rates in accordance with observations. ECHAM5-RAIN is tested and evaluated with two cases: the continental mid-latitude ARM Cloud IOP (shallow frontal cloud case - March 2000) and EPIC (a marine stratocumulus study - October 2001). The prognostic equations for rain hardly affect the amount and timing of precipitation at the surface in different Single Column Model (SCM) simulations for heavy precipitating clouds because heavy rain depends mainly on the large-scale forcing. In case of thin, drizzling clouds (i.e., stratocumulus), an increase in surface precipitation is caused by more sub-time steps used in the prognostic rain scheme until convergence is reached. Cloud microphysical quantities, such as liquid and rain water, are more sensitive to the number of sub-time steps for light precipitation. This results from the decreasing autoconversion rate and increasing accretion rate.

  2. Analysis of Rain Attenuation Models for South East Asia Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeep, J. S.; Nalinggam, Renuka; Bt Ismail, Widad

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of experimental data compared with existing rain attenuation prediction models, namely, the Yamada, R&K, Crane, DAH and ITU models, which have been previously used in satellite communication systems. The experimental data were measured at the Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang in the northern region of Peninsular Malaysia from 2007 to 2009 by receiving a Ku-band signal from the satellite SuperBird-C (geostationary at 144 °E). Data from Nigeria, Kenya, Indonesia, and PNG were obtained from the respective countries' researchers. The DAH and ITU models were recommended as the most suitable models. The recommendation was made based on the model's good performance compared with the measured data from the selected tropical countries.

  3. Collaborative effort to model plant response to acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.; Kuja, A.; Shriner, D.; Perrigan, S.; Irving, P.; Lee, J.; Troiano, J.; Cullinan, V.

    1988-06-01

    Radish plants were exposed three times per week to simulated acidic rain at pH values of 2.6 to 5.4 over the course of four weeks in trials performed at Argonne, Illinois; Ithaca and Upton, New York; Corvallis, Oregon; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Toronto, Canada. Uniform genotype, soil media and planting techniques, treatment procedures, biological measurements, and experimental design were employed. Growth of plants differed among trials as a result of variation in greenhouse environmental conditions according to location and facilities. Larger plants underwent greater absolute but lower relative reductions in biomass after exposure to the higher levels of acidity. A generalized Mitscherlich function was used to model the effects of acidity of simulated rain or dry mass of hypocotyls using data from three laboratories that performed duplicate trials. The remaining data, from three other laboratories that performed only one trial each, were used to test the model. When the laboratory by trial effect was removed, lack of fit to the Mitscherlich function was insignificant. Thus, a single mathematical model satisfactorily characterized the relationship between acidity and mean plant response.

  4. A modeling study on acid rain and recommended emission control strategies in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. J.; Jin, L. S.; Li, Z. K.; Lam, K. S.

    This paper presents a brief description of the sources and characteristics of air pollution in China, documenting acid rain aggravation and its regional distribution in the past years. Simulation of SO 2 ground-level concentration and sulfur deposition in 1995 was performed with the Nanjing University developed acid deposition model system (NJUADMS) and compared with the national observations and the model output of the RAINS-ASIA. Furthermore, the acid rain control policy and its countermeasures adopted for the country are presented.

  5. Introduction of prognostic rain in ECHAM5: design and single column model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, R.; Lohmann, U.

    2008-06-01

    Prognostic equations for the rain mass mixing ratio and the rain drop number concentration are introduced into the large-scale cloud microphysics parameterization of the ECHAM5 general circulation model (ECHAM5-PROG). To this end, a rain flux from one level to the next with the appropriate fall speed is introduced. This maintains rain water in the atmosphere to be available for the next time step. Rain formation in ECHAM5-PROG is, therefore, less dependent on the autoconversion rate than the standard ECHAM5 but shifts the emphasis towards the accretion rates in accordance with observations. ECHAM5-PROG is tested and evaluated with Single Column Model (SCM) simulations for two cases: the marine stratocumulus study EPIC (October 2001) and the continental mid-latitude ARM Cloud IOP (shallow frontal cloud case - March 2000). In case of heavy precipitation events, the prognostic equations for rain hardly affect the amount and timing of precipitation at the surface in different SCM simulations because heavy rain depends mainly on the large-scale forcing. In case of thin, drizzling clouds (i.e., stratocumulus), surface precipitation is sensitive to the number of sub-time steps used in the prognostic rain scheme. Cloud microphysical quantities, such as cloud liquid and rain water within the atmosphere, are sensitive to the number of sub-time steps in both considered cases. This results from the decreasing autoconversion rate and increasing accretion rate.

  6. Rain effect on Aquarius L-band Emissivity and Backscatter Model Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W.; Yueh, S. H.; Fore, A.; Neumann, G.; Hayashi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing of sea surface salinity (SSS) is being performed by Aquarius and SMOS missions, which are using L-band radiometry to sense the microwave emissions from sea surfaces. To enable accurate SSS retrieval, it is essential to correct the impact of sea surface roughness on L-band brightness temperatures. In addition, the impact of rain has to be carefully assessed and accounted for. Although the atmospheric attenuation caused by raindrops are likely negligible at 1.4GHz, other factors must be considered because they may have indirect but important contribution to the surface roughness and consequently L-band brightness temperatures. For example, the wind speed dependent roughness correction will be corrupted when rain striking the water, creating rings, stalks, and crowns from which the signal scatters. It is also unknown how long the freshwater stays at surface while through the oceanic mixing process at various regions over global oceans. We collocated the Aquarius L-band data with various wind products, including SSM/I, NCEP, ASCAT and WindSAT, as well as the SSM/I and WindSAT rain products. During the first four months of Aquarius mission, near 1.9 million pixels are identified under rain conditions by either SSM/I or WindSAT. We derived the L-band emissivity and backscatter geophysical model functions (GMF), parameterized by SSM/I and NCEP winds for rain-free conditions. However, the residual ocean surface emissivity (the Aquarius measured minus the rain-free model predictions) reveals profound resemblance with global precipitation pattern. In region dominated by rain, e.g. ITCZ, northern hemisphere storm track, and Indian Ocean partially under the influence of summer monsoon, the GMF built using rain free data underestimates excess emissivity about 0.5 to 1 K. The dependence of residual of emissivity and backscatter is shown as a function of wind speed and rain rate. A modified GMF is developed including rain rate as one of the parameters. Due to

  7. Modelling of HVDC wall bushing flashover in nonuniform rain

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, F.A.M. ); Kamel, S.I. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-10-01

    This paper presents the first mathematical model to provide necessary and sufficient conditions for flashover of an HVDC wall bushing under nonuniform rain. The suggested mechanism is initiated by streamer bridging of the dry zone enhanced by nonuniform voltage distribution along the bushing and within the dry zone. Fast voltage collapse across the dry zone die to energy stored in the bushing stray capacitance to ground leads to impulsive stressing of the wet part of the bushing. The nonuniform distribution of the impulse stress and the process of streamer bridging, fast voltage collapse as well as subsequent recharging of the bushing capacitances can lead to continued discharge propagation and flashover of the complete bushing. The findings of the model have been satisfactorily compared with previous experiments and field observations and can, for the first time, account for the following aspects of the flashover mechanism: critical dry zone length, polarity effect, specific leakage path, wet layer conductance per unit leakage length as well as the DC system voltage.

  8. Slant path rain attenuation comparison of prediction models for satellite applications in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeep, J. S.

    2009-09-01

    A 2-year campaign of slant path rain attenuation measurements has been carried out in Malaysia using the Superbird-C satellite beacon at 12.255 GHz. The rain intensity time series have been recorded with a conventional tipping-bucket rain gauge located at the station, during a continuous observation period spanning the same 2 years of the beacon measurements. The experimental cumulative distributions of rainfall rate and rain attenuation are presented. Two years of rain attenuation measurements at 12.255 GHz shows high values that have been detected for small percentage of time; for example, the attenuation exceeded 25 dB for 0.01% of time. The rainfall rate is compared with International Telecommunications Union-Radiocommunication (ITU-R) maps, and the measured rain rate distribution is close to that derived from the ITU-R maps. Measured rain attenuation values are compared with several prediction models. A good agreement has been found in the comparison of the experimental distribution with some prediction models (Ramachandran, Bryant, Matricciani, and Exponential Cell (EXCELL) with percentage errors below 11%) calculated using the measured rainfall rate distribution. The lack of rain measurement data from equatorial and tropical regions for verification causes predictions obtained from existing models to deviate from direct measurements.

  9. Integrated assessment modeling in Canada: The case of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Y.K.G.; Barr, M.; Lam, D.

    1998-12-31

    In the past, environmental decision making has been based on analysis of policy options with respect to emission reduction, deposition or concentration of pollutants and the design of preventive strategies using disparate single-model and discipline results. It was impossible to obtain optimal solution to environmental problems because it is difficult to conduct a coherent, systematic and sound analysis of environmental problems using a single disciplinary model. Thus, a need arises for an integrated approach in environmental policy making. The trend in environmental management is a move from single pollutant/single-effect to multi-pollutant/multi-effect approach and to the inclusion of socioeconomic issues for the purposes of determining the interaction of the environment with the economy. Integrated assessment modeling (IAM) enables us to examine these kinds of issues by creating logical and scientific relationship between the functioning of various ecosystems and the manner in which they respond to external stimuli. Recognizing the crucial role that an integrative approach could play in the development of sound environmental decision making, Environment Canada and other government agencies have jointly participated in the development of IAM. Using data on emissions, depositions, source-receptor matrix, costs of emission abatement, models describing the functioning of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, IAM can be used to identify optimal emission reduction strategies that benefit both the economy and ecology. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how economic aspects of emission abatement can be incorporated into IAM using acid rain as a case. The present study compared findings of optimal abatement strategies when economic abatement costs are included and when they are not.

  10. Physical-mathematical model of the dynamics of rain attenuation based on rain rate time series and a two-layer vertical structure of precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matricciani, Emilio

    1996-03-01

    We have developed and discussed the theory and applications of a physical-mathematical model of the dynamics of rain attenuation and have tested it as a rain attenuation prediction model in slant paths. Other parameters, however, such as fade durations and rates of change of fades, can be calculated. The main physical input is the 1-min rain rate time series of a site, which is converted to a rain rate space series along horizontal or slant paths by using an estimate of the storm translation speed v method known as "synthetic storm technique." However, the long-term predictions are found to be insensitive to v. The vertical structure of precipitation is modeled with two layers. The model was tested against the probability distributions of rain long-term 11.6-GHz attenuation collected at the three Italian stations (Fucino, Gera Lario, and Spino d'Adda) during the SIRIO propagation experiment (13 years of data) for which concurrent rain rate time series are available. In the outage probability range 10-1 to 5×10-3% defined the prediction error ɛ = ( Ap - Am) / Am (where Am and Ap are respectively, the measured and predicted rain attenuations, dB), <ɛ> = -10.6%, σ=7.6% and rms=13%. Compared to nine other well-known prediction methods, the present model surmounts all of them in the three sites tested.

  11. Comparing Satellite Rainfall Estimates with Rain-Gauge Data: Optimal Strategies Suggested by a Spectral Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Kundu, Prasun K.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Validation of satellite remote-sensing methods for estimating rainfall against rain-gauge data is attractive because of the direct nature of the rain-gauge measurements. Comparisons of satellite estimates to rain-gauge data are difficult, however, because of the extreme variability of rain and the fact that satellites view large areas over a short time while rain gauges monitor small areas continuously. In this paper, a statistical model of rainfall variability developed for studies of sampling error in averages of satellite data is used to examine the impact of spatial and temporal averaging of satellite and gauge data on intercomparison results. The model parameters were derived from radar observations of rain, but the model appears to capture many of the characteristics of rain-gauge data as well. The model predicts that many months of data from areas containing a few gauges are required to validate satellite estimates over the areas, and that the areas should be of the order of several hundred km in diameter. Over gauge arrays of sufficiently high density, the optimal areas and averaging times are reduced. The possibility of using time-weighted averages of gauge data is explored.

  12. Growth and yield model application in tropical rain forest management

    Treesearch

    James Atta-Boateng; John W., Jr. Moser

    2000-01-01

    Analytical tools are needed to evaluate the impact of management policies on the sustainable use of rain forest. Optimal decisions concerning the level of management inputs require accurate predictions of output at all relevant input levels. Using growth data from 40 l-hectare permanent plots obtained from the semi-deciduous forest of Ghana, a system of 77 differential...

  13. Rain rate and modeled fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from five years of network rain gauge measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Krichevsky, Vladimir; Gebo, Norman

    1992-01-01

    Five years of rain rate and modeled slant path attenuation distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from a network of 10 tipping bucket rain gages was examined. The rain gage network is located within a grid 70 km north-south and 47 km east-west in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States in the vicinity of Wallops Island, Virginia. Distributions were derived from the variable integration time data and from one minute averages. It was demonstrated that for realistic fade margins, the variable integration time results are adequate to estimate slant path attenuations at frequencies above 20 GHz using models which require one minute averages. An accurate empirical formula was developed to convert the variable integration time rain rates to one minute averages. Fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz were derived employing Crane's Global model because it was demonstrated to exhibit excellent accuracy with measured COMSTAR fades at 28.56 GHz.

  14. Model-estimated microwave emissions from rain systems for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Mikhail T.; Meischner, Peter F.

    1996-12-01

    A simple model for estimating the upward and downward microwave emission from rain layer types above ground is presented. The emission properties of the rain layers are estimated from physical quantities such as the optical depth, the single-scattering albedo, the physical temperature, and a given drop size distribution for Mie scattering calculations. The underlying surface is characterized by the emissivity and the physical temperature. The transparency coefficient q and the reflection coefficient r of the rain layer are expressed by these physical quantities. The brightness temperature then is given by the physical temperature T, q, and r. The radiation transfer is estimated by the method of layer addition, described by Sobolev [1956], which avoids the necessity of solving the equation of radiation transfer. The accuracy of this simple model was estimated by comparisons with three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations. The error is estimated to be less than 3 K for common situations and less than 8 K for unrealistic high optical depths. It is shown that any one of the quantities rain rate, rain layer depth, and physical temperature can be estimated with sufficient accuracy if the others are known. The basic model has been extended for application to inhomogeneous cloud layers and to include differences in brightness temperatures for horizontal and vertical polarizations for oblate raindrops. The main intended application of this model is rain rate estimation from space with low data processing efforts, especially for the Priroda mission. The model was tested for the downwelling emission during the field experiment CLEOPATRA by measurements with a polarimetric weather radar and rain gauges. The results verify the principles, and promising agreement was found at least for stratiform rain. The polarimetric extension of the model too showed promising results under quite different measurement conditions in Russia and southern Germany.

  15. Comparison of rain gauge and radar data as input to an urban rainfall-runoff model.

    PubMed

    Quirmbach, M; Schultz, G A

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an application of radar data (DX-product of the German Weather Service) with a high resolution in space (1 degree x 1 km) and time (delta t = 5 minutes) in urban hydrology. The radar data and data of rain gauges with different locations in the test catchment were compared concerning their suitability as input into an urban rainfall-runoff model. In order to evaluate the accuracy of model simulation results, five evaluation criteria have been specified which are relevant for an efficient management of sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants. The results demonstrate that radar data should be used in urban hydrology if distances > 4 km between rain gauge and catchment exist and for catchments with a density of rain gauges smaller than 1 rain gauge per 16 km2.

  16. A two-component rain model for the prediction of attenuation statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    A two-component rain model has been developed for calculating attenuation statistics. In contrast to most other attenuation prediction models, the two-component model calculates the occurrence probability for volume cells or debris attenuation events. The model performed significantly better than the International Radio Consultative Committee model when used for predictions on earth-satellite paths. It is expected that the model will have applications in modeling the joint statistics required for space diversity system design, the statistics of interference due to rain scatter at attenuating frequencies, and the duration statistics for attenuation events.

  17. A heterogeneous chemistry model for acid rain`s effect on ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tao

    1995-11-01

    A computer model for simulating heterogeneous reactions in cloud is developed to determine the S(IV) species` effect on ozone. Crutzen claims that NO{sub x}, HO{sub x} families and H{sub 2}CO in the troposphere can decrease ozone by 5 to 10%. However, is this claim valid for a SO{sub x} polluted atmosphere? The SO{sub x} family reacts with the ozone destroyers. These reactions seem to be significant enough to reduce the H{sub 2}CO`s destructive effect on ozone.

  18. RAINS-ASIA: An assessment model for acid deposition in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.J.; Ramankutty, R.; Shah, J.J.

    1997-08-31

    Asia`s rapid economic growth has fueled a growing appetite for commercial energy, which is satisfied by fossil fuels that emit pollutants. These pollutants are oxidized and transported into the atmosphere, creating acidic depositions known as acid rain that can damage foliage, soils, and surface waters. At current energy consumption growth rates, by the year 2000 sulfur dioxide emissions from Asia will surpass the emissions of North America and Europe combined. RAINS-ASIA is an assessment tool developed by the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and donors to study the implications of alternative energy development strategies for air pollution and acid rain and to help identify cost-effective abatement methods. This report provides an overview of the model and some results of analyses that have been conducted as part of the RAINS-ASIA program.

  19. Aerosol effect on the warm rain formation process: Satellite observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kentaroh; Stephens, Graeme L.; Lebsock, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates how aerosols influence the liquid precipitation formation process. This demonstration is provided by the combined use of satellite observations and global high-resolution model simulations. Methodologies developed to examine the warm cloud microphysical processes are applied to both multi-sensor satellite observations and aerosol-coupled global cloud-resolving model (GCRM) results to illustrate how the warm rain formation process is modulated under different aerosol conditions. The observational analysis exhibits process-scale signatures of rain suppression due to increased aerosols, providing observational evidence of the aerosol influence on precipitation. By contrast, the corresponding statistics obtained from the model show a much faster rain formation even for polluted aerosol conditions and much weaker reduction of precipitation in response to aerosol increase. It is then shown that this reduced sensitivity points to a fundamental model bias in the warm rain formation process that in turn biases the influence of aerosol on precipitation. A method of improving the model bias is introduced in the context of a simplified single-column model (SCM) that represents the cloud-to-rain water conversion process in a manner similar to the original GCRM. Sensitivity experiments performed by modifying the model assumptions in the SCM and their comparisons to satellite statistics both suggest that the auto-conversion scheme has a critical role in determining the precipitation response to aerosol perturbations and also provide a novel way of constraining key parameters in the auto-conversion schemes of global models.

  20. Morphology of Rain Water Channeling in Systematically Varied Model Sandy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuli; Cejas, Cesare M.; Barrois, Rémi; Dreyfus, Rémi; Durian, Douglas J.

    2014-10-01

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different rain conditions using a quasi-2D experimental setup and systematically determine the impact of the soil grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the water channeling phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of the soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed rain condition, we combine the effects of the grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on the water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to the rain water channeling phenomenon, including prewetting sandy soils at different levels before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  1. A two-component rain model for the prediction of attenuation and diversity improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    A new model was developed to predict attenuation statistics for a single Earth-satellite or terrestrial propagation path. The model was extended to provide predictions of the joint occurrences of specified or higher attenuation values on two closely spaced Earth-satellite paths. The joint statistics provide the information required to obtain diversity gain or diversity advantage estimates. The new model is meteorologically based. It was tested against available Earth-satellite beacon observations and terrestrial path measurements. The model employs the rain climate region descriptions of the Global rain model. The rms deviation between the predicted and observed attenuation values for the terrestrial path data was 35 percent, a result consistent with the expectations of the Global model when the rain rate distribution for the path is not used in the calculation. Within the United States the rms deviation between measurement and prediction was 36 percent but worldwide it was 79 percent.

  2. A Stochastic Fractional Dynamics Model of Space-time Variability of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Travis, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Rainfall varies in space and time in a highly irregular manner and is described naturally in terms of a stochastic process. A characteristic feature of rainfall statistics is that they depend strongly on the space-time scales over which rain data are averaged. A spectral model of precipitation has been developed based on a stochastic differential equation of fractional order for the point rain rate, that allows a concise description of the second moment statistics of rain at any prescribed space-time averaging scale. The model is thus capable of providing a unified description of the statistics of both radar and rain gauge data. The underlying dynamical equation can be expressed in terms of space-time derivatives of fractional orders that are adjusted together with other model parameters to fit the data. The form of the resulting spectrum gives the model adequate flexibility to capture the subtle interplay between the spatial and temporal scales of variability of rain but strongly constrains the predicted statistical behavior as a function of the averaging length and times scales. We test the model with radar and gauge data collected contemporaneously at the NASA TRMM ground validation sites located near Melbourne, Florida and in Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands in the tropical Pacific. We estimate the parameters by tuning them to the second moment statistics of radar data. The model predictions are then found to fit the second moment statistics of the gauge data reasonably well without any further adjustment.

  3. A Unified Statistical Rain-Attenuation Model for Communication Link Fade Predictions and Optimal Stochastic Fade Control Design Using a Location-Dependent Rain-Statistic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A static and dynamic rain-attenuation model is presented which describes the statistics of attenuation on an arbitrarily specified satellite link for any location for which there are long-term rainfall statistics. The model may be used in the design of the optimal stochastic control algorithms to mitigate the effects of attenuation and maintain link reliability. A rain-statistics data base is compiled, which makes it possible to apply the model to any location in the continental U.S. with a resolution of 0-5 degrees in latitude and longitude. The model predictions are compared with experimental observations, showing good agreement.

  4. A Unified Statistical Rain-Attenuation Model for Communication Link Fade Predictions and Optimal Stochastic Fade Control Design Using a Location-Dependent Rain-Statistic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A static and dynamic rain-attenuation model is presented which describes the statistics of attenuation on an arbitrarily specified satellite link for any location for which there are long-term rainfall statistics. The model may be used in the design of the optimal stochastic control algorithms to mitigate the effects of attenuation and maintain link reliability. A rain-statistics data base is compiled, which makes it possible to apply the model to any location in the continental U.S. with a resolution of 0-5 degrees in latitude and longitude. The model predictions are compared with experimental observations, showing good agreement.

  5. A Model for Estimation of Rain Rate on Tropical Land from TRMM Microwave Imager Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2004-01-01

    Over the tropical land regions observations of the 85 GHz brightness temperature (T(sub 85v)) made by the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) radiometer when analyzed with the help of rain rate (R(sub pR)) deduced from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) indicate that there are two maxima in rain rate. One strong maximum occurs when T(sub 85) has a value of about 220 K and the other weaker one when T(sub 85v) is much colder approx. 150 K. Together with the help of earlier studies based on airborne Doppler Radar observations and radiative transfer theoretical simulations, we infer the maximum near 220 K is a result of relatively weak scattering due to super cooled rain drops and water coated ice hydrometeors associated with a developing thunderstorm (Cb) that has a strong updraft. The other maximum is associated with strong scattering due to ice particles that are formed when the updraft collapses and the rain from the Cb is transit2oning from convective type to stratiform type. Incorporating these ideas and with a view to improve the estimation of rain rate from existing operational method applicable to the tropical land areas, we have developed a rain retrieval model. This model utilizes two parameters, that have a horizontal scale of approx. 20km, deduced from the TMI measurements at 19, 21 and 37 GHz (T(sub 19v), T(sub 21v), T(sub 37v). The third parameter in the model, namely the horizontal gradient of brightness temperature within the 20 km scale, is deduced from TMI measurements at 85 GHz. Utilizing these parameters our retrieval model is formulated to yield instantaneous rain rate on a scale of 20 km and seasonal average on a mesoscale that agree well with that of the PR.

  6. A Model for Estimation of Rain Rate on Tropical Land from TRMM Microwave Imager Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2004-01-01

    Over the tropical land regions observations of the 85 GHz brightness temperature (T(sub 85v)) made by the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) radiometer when analyzed with the help of rain rate (R(sub pR)) deduced from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) indicate that there are two maxima in rain rate. One strong maximum occurs when T(sub 85) has a value of about 220 K and the other weaker one when T(sub 85v) is much colder approx. 150 K. Together with the help of earlier studies based on airborne Doppler Radar observations and radiative transfer theoretical simulations, we infer the maximum near 220 K is a result of relatively weak scattering due to super cooled rain drops and water coated ice hydrometeors associated with a developing thunderstorm (Cb) that has a strong updraft. The other maximum is associated with strong scattering due to ice particles that are formed when the updraft collapses and the rain from the Cb is transit2oning from convective type to stratiform type. Incorporating these ideas and with a view to improve the estimation of rain rate from existing operational method applicable to the tropical land areas, we have developed a rain retrieval model. This model utilizes two parameters, that have a horizontal scale of approx. 20km, deduced from the TMI measurements at 19, 21 and 37 GHz (T(sub 19v), T(sub 21v), T(sub 37v). The third parameter in the model, namely the horizontal gradient of brightness temperature within the 20 km scale, is deduced from TMI measurements at 85 GHz. Utilizing these parameters our retrieval model is formulated to yield instantaneous rain rate on a scale of 20 km and seasonal average on a mesoscale that agree well with that of the PR.

  7. Rain Impact Model V2.0 for Sea Surface Salinity: A Flag for Salinity Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Garcia, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Central Florida Remote Sensing Laboratory has analyzed Aquarius (AQ) sea surface salinity (SSS) and ESA's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) retrievals in the presence of rain and has developed a Rain Impact Model (RIM V2.0) that predicts transient near-surface salinity stratification based upon the corresponding rain accumulation over the previous 24 hours and the effect of the wind speed. For both of the satellite SSS measurements, a common reference for comparison is the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) for ocean salinity, but there is a significant mismatch between the remote sensing sampling depth of approximately 0.01 m and the typical range of 5 m to 10 m of in situ instruments. Under normal ocean conditions the upper layer of the ocean is well mixed and there is an approximately uniform salinity for the first 10 m depth; therefore satellite measurements are good estimates of the bulk salinity. Conversely, under rainy conditions, there is a dilution of the near-surface salinity that mixed downward by diffusion and mechanical mixing of gravity waves, where the wind speed information play a significant role in the model. This transient phenomena, known as salinity stratification, significantly modifies the salinity gradient in the upper 1 m of the ocean; and therefore invalidates the usual assumption of well-mixed salinity. Generally, these salinity stratifications dissipate in less than a couple of hours and the upper layer becomes well mixed at a slightly fresher salinity. The Rain Impact Model V2.0 is based on the RIM V1.0, previously published, which includes the rain accumulation effect but ignores the variations on wind speed using a constant vertical diffusivity value. This research addresses the effects of rainfall on the AQ and SMOS SSS retrieval using a macro-scale Rain Impact Model (RIM) in regions of high convective rain. This model, based on the superposition of a one-dimension eddy diffusion (turbulent diffusion) model, relates sea

  8. Spatiotemporal rain-fed wheat modeling using a land surface model and a crop stress index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfari, Sadegh; Alizadeh, Amin; Faridhosseini, Alireza; Pande, Saket

    2013-04-01

    Rain-fed wheat yield estimation is an important issue in crop modeling. Regression and empirical equations are generally used to estimate wheat yields based on effective factors. These equations also need to be calibrated for each study area. Further, employing inaccurate inputs increases prediction uncertainty. Precipitation is the most important input for the rain-fed crops modeling and often interpolated data for areas without rain gauges is used. In this study, the outputs of two precipitation estimation models based on remotely sensed data, PERSIANN and TRMM, are used as alternatives to interpolated data. Results show that the precipitation estimation models outputs are more correlated with observed data than the interpolated precipitation data. Correlation coefficient at a meteorological station in Iran based on Kendall's test is 0.8 for PERSIANN while it is 0.4 and 0.5 for two interpolation methods, Inverse Distance Weighting and Kriging respectively. A simple evaporation/transpiration scheme (SETS), which is a distributed land surface model, has also been developed to estimate actual evaporation and transpiration. Finally a new crop stress index based on actual by potential transpiration (APT) is introduced to model crop yield by using SETS outputs at field scale. Results show that modeling crop yields based on APT, when SETS is forced by local field datasets at 10 sites, can estimate yields reasonably well when compared with other methods. The correlation coefficient with the observed yield data is at least 0.5 and the LSD (Least Significant Difference) test show no significant difference between measured and modeled yields at all sites. Our estimation method performs better than other methods in estimating yields based on the yields predicted by the other methods at the same sites.

  9. A simple rain attenuation model for earth-space radio links operating at 10-35 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Yon, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The simple attenuation model has been improved from an earlier version and now includes the effect of wave polarization. The model is for the prediction of rain attenuation statistics on earth-space communication links operating in the 10-35 GHz band. Simple calculations produce attenuation values as a function of average rain rate. These together with rain rate statistics (either measured or predicted) can be used to predict annual rain attenuation statistics. In this paper model predictions are compared to measured data from a data base of 62 experiments performed in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. Comparisons are also made to predictions from other models.

  10. Rain rate modeling of 1-min from various integration times in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sujan; Park, Jung-Jin; Choi, Dong-You

    2016-01-01

    Rain plays a major impairment factor for propagation of electromagnetic waves in atmosphere for systems operating at frequencies above 10 GHz. Several effects are noted such as depolarization, scintillation, interference due to scattering and extra attenuation which seems to increase with frequency. To mitigate its effect in satellite communication, knowledge of local rainfall statistics is necessary which act as milestone for design of radio link. Rain attenuation is best visualize by the 1-min rainfall rate statistic but the measurement of this rain rate distribution is rare on a worldwide basis and observation of rain rate are done with longer integration times typically 30 min or more. In this paper, efforts have been made to develop model that can convert rain rate complementary cumulative distribution function to shorter integration times. The average relative error margin of about 5, 14, 43, 71 and 115 % are noted for 5 to 1-, 10 to 1-, 20 to 1, 30 to 1- and 60 to 1-min respectively from ITU-R P.837-6 method which have been analyzed in further section of this article. The empirical natures of conversion methods as such Segal method, Burgueno's method, Chebil and Rahman method and Logarithmic model are studied along with the proposed new model that seems to be applicable in derivation of 1-min rain rate of the South Korea rain rate statistics. International Telecommunication Union-Radio communication Sector (ITU-R) has developed a recommendation ITU-R P.837-6 that enables the user to estimate the local 1-min rainfall rate statistical distribution which is compared with calculated 1-min rain rate distribution from experimental 1-min rainfall accumulation. Unfortunately, ITU-R P.837-6 estimated 1-min values show greater error percentages. In order to get better approximation of local 1-min rain rate estimation, a novel method is proposed and it's efficiency have been compared with rainfall rate statistics obtained from nine different locations in the South

  11. Sea surface temperature and torrential rains in the Valencia region: modelling the role of recharge areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy rain events are frequently recorded in the Western Mediterranean causing economic and human losses. A main factor in the development of torrential rains is ocean-atmosphere exchange of heat and moisture that can destabilize air masses travelling over the sea. The study of air mass trajectories previous to the rain event permits the identification of sea areas that could probably contribute to the development or intensification of rainfall. From a Mediterranean sea surface temperature climatology, its spatio-temporal distribution patterns have been studied showing two main distribution modes in winter and summer and transitional regimes in spring and autumn. Hence, three heavy precipitation events, for such winter and summer sea temperature regimes and for fall transition, affecting the Valencia region have been selected to study the effect of sea surface temperature in torrential rains. Simulations with perturbed sea surface temperature in different areas along the air mass path were run to compare results with unperturbed simulation. The variation of sea surface temperature in certain areas caused significant changes in model accumulated values and its spatial distribution. Therefore, the existence of areas that at a greater extent favour air-sea interaction leading to the development of torrential rainfall in the Valencia region is shown. This methodology could be extended to other Mediterranean regions to look for such potential recharge areas. The identification of sea areas that contribute to the development or intensification of heavy rain events in the Mediterranean countries could be a useful prognosis and/or monitoring tool.

  12. Freezing Rain Diagnostic Study Over Eastern Canada Using the 5th Generation Canadian Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresson, É.; Paquin, D.; Laprise, R.; Theriault, J. M.; de Elía, R.

    2015-12-01

    Northeastern North America is often affected by freezing rain events during the cold season. They can have significant consequences (from road accidents, to severe power outages) despite their intensity and duration. The 1998 Ice Storm over Eastern Canada and Northeastern United States is an example of an extreme event with catastrophic consequences. A total of up to 150 mm of ice accumulated during 10 days were observed in some areas. This natural disaster has highlighted the need to better understand how such phenomena will evolve with future climate scenario. The goal is to investigate the feasibility of using regional climate modeling to diagnose the occurrence of freezing rain events over Quebec (Canada). To address this issue, we used the 5th generation of the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5), from 1979 to 2014. An empirical method (Bourgouin, 2000) developed to determine the type of winter precipitations was chosen to diagnose freezing rain events. The study focused in the Montreal area and the St. Lawrence River Valley (Quebec, Canada). The sensitivity of the model to horizontal resolution was explored by using three resolutions: 0.44°, 0.22° and 0.11°. In general, freezing rain was diagnosed consistently at all resolutions but the higher one (0.11°) produced more realistic results due to a better representation of the orography. Using the higher resolution, the results showed that the climatology of the freezing rain occurrence in the Montreal area is comparable to available observations. It also suggested that the role of the specific orography of the region with the St. Lawrence River Valley can impact the characteristics of freezing rain events in this area. Overall, this study will contribute to a better preparedness for such events in the future. High resolution regional climate simulations are essential to improve the reproduction of local scale orographically-forced phenomena.

  13. Near-surface salinity stratification following rainfall using the Aquarius Rain Impact Model (RIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Maria; Jones, Linwood; Asher, Bill; Drushka, Kyla; Santos-Garcia, Andrea; Scavuzzo, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall freshens the near-surface ocean, producing a vertical salinity profile that is fresher at the surface than at a depth of a few meters. As a result, there is a discrepancy between sea surface salinity (SSS) measured by satellites (which sample only the top few centimeters of the ocean surface) and salinity measured by in situ platforms (e.g., Argo floats, drifters, and moorings) that typically sample at a 1-5 m depth. Therefore, accurate comparisons between satellite and in-situ salinities in rainy conditions requires knowledge of how the upper ocean responds to rainfall. At moderate wind speeds in the absence of rain, the ocean upper layer (i.e. from the surface to a depth of 5 m) is well-mixed and SSS is constant as a function of depth. However, under rainy conditions the near-surface salinity is diluted by the freshwater input from rain. This fresher water is mixed downward by turbulent diffusion through gravity waves and the wind stress. These processes create a salinity gradient in the upper 1-2 m of the ocean, which dissipates over a few hours until the upper layer becomes well mixed at a slightly fresher salinity value. As part of the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, a rain impact model (RIM) was developed to estimate the change in SSS due to precipitation near the time of the satellite observation. RIM uses ocean surface salinities from HYCOM (Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model), which does not include the short-term rain effects, and the NOAA global rainfall product CMORPH to model transient changes in the near-surface salinity profile in 0.5 h time increments. The mechanical mixing of the ocean caused by wind and waves rapidly reduces the salinity stratification caused by rain. The persistence of rain-induced salinity gradients has been shown to depend on wind speed, with rain freshening during weak winds (less than 2 m/s) persisting for 8 hours or more. The original RIM assumes a constant vertical diffusivity, which neglects the effect of wind speed on the

  14. Rain Gauges Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed rain gauges located near disdrometers (DISD and VDIS data streams). This handbook deals specifically with the rain gauges that make the observations for the RAIN data stream. Other precipitation observations are made by the surface meteorology instrument suite (i.e., MET data stream).

  15. A phase screen model for simulating numerically the propagation of a laser beam in rain

    SciTech Connect

    Lukin, I P; Rychkov, D S; Falits, A V; Lai, Kin S; Liu, Min R

    2009-09-30

    The method based on the generalisation of the phase screen method for a continuous random medium is proposed for simulating numerically the propagation of laser radiation in a turbulent atmosphere with precipitation. In the phase screen model for a discrete component of a heterogeneous 'air-rain droplet' medium, the amplitude screen describing the scattering of an optical field by discrete particles of the medium is replaced by an equivalent phase screen with a spectrum of the correlation function of the effective dielectric constant fluctuations that is similar to the spectrum of a discrete scattering component - water droplets in air. The 'turbulent' phase screen is constructed on the basis of the Kolmogorov model, while the 'rain' screen model utiises the exponential distribution of the number of rain drops with respect to their radii as a function of the rain intensity. Theresults of the numerical simulation are compared with the known theoretical estimates for a large-scale discrete scattering medium. (propagation of laser radiation in matter)

  16. Rain Impact Model Assessment of Near-Surface Salinity Stratification Following Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drushka, K.; Jones, L.; Jacob, M. M.; Asher, W.; Santos-Garcia, A.

    2016-12-01

    Rainfall over oceans produces a layer of fresher surface water, which can have a significant effect on the exchanges between the surface and the bulk mixed layer and also on satellite/in-situ comparisons. For satellite sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements, the standard is the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), but there is a significant difference between the remote sensing sampling depth of 0.01 m and the typical range of 5-10 m of in-situ instruments. Under normal conditions the upper layer of the ocean is well mixed and there is uniform salinity; however, under rainy conditions, there is a dilution of the near-surface salinity that mixes downward by diffusion and by mechanical mixing (gravity waves/wind speed). This significantly modifies the salinity gradient in the upper 1-2 m of the ocean, but these transient salinity stratifications dissipate in a few hours, and the upper layer becomes well mixed at a slightly fresher salinity. Based upon research conducted within the NASA/CONAE Aquarius/SAC-D mission, a rain impact model (RIM) was developed to estimate the change in SSS due to rainfall near the time of the satellite observation, with the objective to identify the probability of salinity stratification. RIM uses HYCOM (which does not include the short-term rain effects) and a NOAA global rainfall product CMORPH to model changes in the near-surface salinity profile in 0.5 h increments. Based upon SPURS-2 experimental near-surface salinity measurements with rain, this paper introduces a term in the RIM model that accounts for the effect of wind speed in the mechanical mixing, which translates into a dynamic vertical diffusivity; whereby a Generalized Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) is used to investigate the response to rain events of the upper few meters of the ocean. The objective is to determine how rain and wind forcing control the thickness, stratification strength, and lifetime of fresh lenses and to quantify the impacts of rain-formed fresh lenses

  17. Modeling of rain attenuation and site diversity predictions for tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semire, F. A.; Mohd-Mokhtar, R.; Ismail, W.; Mohamad, N.; Mandeep, J. S.

    2015-03-01

    Presented in this paper is an empirical model for long-term rain attenuation prediction and statistical prediction of site diversity gain on a slant path. Rain attenuation prediction on a slant path is derived using data collected from tropical regions, and the formula proposed is based on Gaussian distribution. The proposed rain attenuation model shows a considerable reduction in prediction error in terms of standard deviation and root-mean-square (rms) error. The site diversity prediction model is derived as a function of site separation distance, frequency of operation, elevation angle and baseline orientation angle. The novelty of the model is the inclusion of low elevation angles and a high link frequency up to 70 GHz in the model derivation. The results of comparison with Hodge, Panagopoulos and Nagaraja empirical predictions show that the proposed model provides a better performance for site separation distance and elevation angle. The overall performance of the proposed site diversity model is good, and the percentage error is within the allowable error limit approved by International Telecommunication Union - Region (ITU-R).

  18. Adjusting weather radar data to rain gauge measurements with data-driven models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschl, Reinhard; Randeu, Walter; Teschl, Franz

    2010-05-01

    Weather radar networks provide data with good spatial coverage and temporal resolution. Hence they are able to describe the variability of precipitation. Typical radar stations determine the rain rate for every square kilometre and make a full volume scan within about 5 minutes. A weakness however, is their often poor metering precision limiting the applicability of the radar for hydrological purposes. In contrast to rain gauges, which measure precipitation directly on the ground, the radar determines the reflectivity aloft and remote. Due to this principle, several sources of possible errors occur. Therefore improving the radar estimates of rainfall is still a vital topic in radar meteorology and hydrology. This paper presents data-driven approaches to improve radar estimates of rainfall by mapping radar reflectivity measurements Z to rain gauge data R. The analysis encompasses several input configurations and data-driven models. Reflectivity measurements at a constant altitude and the vertical profiles of reflectivity above a rain gauge are used as input parameters. The applied models are Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Model Tree (MT), and IBk a k-nearest-neighbour classifier. The relationship found between the data of a rain gauge and the reflectivity measurements is subsequently applied to another site with comparable terrain. Based on this independent dataset the performance of the data-driven models in the various input configurations is evaluated. For this study, rain gauge and radar data from the province of Styria, Austria, were available. The data sets extend over a two-year period (2001 and 2002). The available rain gauges use the tipping bucket principle with a resolution of 0.1 mm. Reflectivity measurements are obtained from the Doppler weather radar station on Mt. Zirbitzkogel (by courtesy of AustroControl GmbH). The designated radar is a high-resolution C-band weather-radar situated at an altitude of 2372 m above mean sea level. The data

  19. After the Rain: Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Elk, Arlene; Stoklas, Jackie

    The Heard Museum (Phoenix, Arizona) has developed and updated an integrated curriculum for use in grades K-3. The goals for this curriculum are to: (1) share museum resources with schools; (2) promote cross-cultural understanding through a focus on rain, a universal requirement for life; (3) help students understand that Native Americans are…

  20. A new model for rain scatter interference for coordination between Earth stations and terrestrial stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbins, Chris J.

    2005-08-01

    Scattering from rain is known to be a source of possible interference between communications systems sharing the same frequency bands. A new model has been developed for estimating the transmission loss due to bistatic rain scatter between an Earth station and a terrestrial station. This model has particular application in the process of coordination of Earth stations with terrestrial stations operating in the same frequency bands, whereby detailed interference studies are carried out only for stations within an area beyond which harmful interference may be considered negligible. The new model includes the Earth station elevation angle as an input parameter, together with the most recent information on rainfall rates and surface water vapor densities included in the recommendations of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), and is more flexible yet neutral in its overall impact when applied to the process of coordination as defined in Appendix 7 of the ITU Radio Regulations.

  1. Sea surface temperature and torrential rains in the Valencia region: modelling the role of recharge areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, F.; Valiente, J. A.; Estrela, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    Heavy rain events are frequently recorded in the Western Mediterranean causing economic losses and even human casualties. The Western Mediterranean is a deep and almost closed sea surrounded by high mountain ranges and with little exchange of water with the Atlantic ocean. A main factor in the development of torrential rains are ocean-atmosphere exchanges of heat and moisture that can potentially destabilize air masses travelling over the sea. The study of air mass trajectories previous to the rain event permits the identification of sea areas that could probably contribute to the development or intensification of rainfall. From a previous Mediterranean sea surface temperature climatology, its spatio-temporal distribution patterns have been studied showing two main distribution modes in winter and summer and transitional regimes in spring and autumn. Hence, three heavy precipitation events, for such winter and summer sea temperature regimes and for fall transition, affecting the Valencia region have been selected to study the effect of sea surface temperature in torrential rains. Simulations with perturbed sea surface temperature in different areas along the air mass path were run to compare results with unperturbed simulation. The variation of sea surface temperature in certain areas caused significant changes in model accumulated values and its spatial distribution. Therefore, the existence of recharge areas where air-sea interaction favors the development of torrential rainfall in Valencia region has been shown. This methodology could be extended to the whole Mediterranean basin to look for such potential recharge areas. The identification of sea areas that contribute to the development or intensification of heavy rain events in the Mediterranean countries could be a useful prognosis and/or monitoring tool.

  2. Sea surface temperature and torrential rains in the Valencia region: modelling the role of recharge areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, F.; Valiente, J. A.; Estrela, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    Heavy rain events are frequently recorded in the Western Mediterranean causing economic losses and even human casualties. The Western Mediterranean is a deep and almost closed sea surrounded by high mountain ranges and with little exchange of water with the Atlantic ocean. A main factor in the development of torrential rains is ocean-atmosphere exchanges of heat and moisture that can potentially destabilize air masses travelling over the sea. The study of air mass trajectories previous to the rain event permits the identification of sea areas that could probably contribute to the development or intensification of rainfall. From a previous Mediterranean sea surface temperature climatology, its spatio-temporal distribution patterns have been studied showing two main distribution modes in winter and summer and transitional regimes in spring and autumn. Hence, three heavy precipitation events, for such winter and summer sea temperature regimes and for fall transition, affecting the Valencia region have been selected to study the effect of sea surface temperature in torrential rains. Simulations with perturbed sea surface temperature in different areas along the air mass path were run to compare results with unperturbed simulation. The variation of sea surface temperature in certain areas caused significant changes in model accumulated values and its spatial distribution. Therefore, the existence of areas that at a greater extent favour air-sea interaction leading to the development of torrential rainfall in the Valencia region has been shown. This methodology could be extended to the whole Mediterranean basin to look for such potential recharge areas. The identification of sea areas that contribute to the development or intensification of heavy rain events in the Mediterranean countries could be a useful prognosis and/or monitoring tool.

  3. Assessing Applications of GPM and IMERG Passive Microwave Rain Rates in Modeling and Operational Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodsky, B.; Le Roy, A.; Smith, M. R.; Case, J.

    2016-12-01

    In support of NASA's recently launched GPM `core' satellite, the NASA-SPoRT project is leveraging experience in research-to-operations transitions and training to provide feedback on the operational utility of GPM products. Thus far, SPoRT has focused on evaluating the Level 2 GPROF passive microwave and IMERG rain rate estimates. Formal evaluations with end-users have occurred, as well as internal evaluations of the datasets. One set of end users for these products is National Weather Service Forecast Offices (WFOs) and National Weather Service River Forecast Centers (RFCs), comprising forecasters and hydrologists. SPoRT has hosted a series of formal assessments to determine uses and utility of these datasets for NWS operations at specific offices. Forecasters primarily have used Level 2 swath rain rates to observe rainfall in otherwise data-void regions and to confirm model QPF for their nowcasting or short-term forecasting. Hydrologists have been evaluating both the Level 2 rain rates and the IMERG rain rates, including rain rate accumulations derived from IMERG; hydrologists have used these data to supplement gauge data for post-event analysis as well as for longer-term forecasting. Results from specific evaluations will be presented. Another evaluation of the GPM passive microwave rain rates has been in using the data within other products that are currently transitioned to end-users, rather than as stand-alone observations. For example, IMERG Early data is being used as a forcing mechanism in the NASA Land Information System (LIS) for real-time soil moisture product over eastern Africa. IMERG is providing valuable precipitation information to LIS in an otherwise data-void region. Results and caveats will briefly be discussed. A third application of GPM data is using the IMERG Late and Final products for model verification in remote regions where high-quality gridded precipitation fields are not readily available. These datasets can now be used to verify NWP

  4. Forecasting rain events - Meteorological models or collective intelligence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazy, Ofer; Halfon, Noam; Malkinson, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Collective intelligence is shared (or group) intelligence that emerges from the collective efforts of many individuals. Collective intelligence is the aggregate of individual contributions: from simple collective decision making to more sophisticated aggregations such as in crowdsourcing and peer-production systems. In particular, collective intelligence could be used in making predictions about future events, for example by using prediction markets to forecast election results, stock prices, or the outcomes of sport events. To date, there is little research regarding the use of collective intelligence for prediction of weather forecasting. The objective of this study is to investigate the extent to which collective intelligence could be utilized to accurately predict weather events, and in particular rainfall. Our analyses employ metrics of group intelligence, as well as compare the accuracy of groups' predictions against the predictions of the standard model used by the National Meteorological Services. We report on preliminary results from a study conducted over the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 winters. We have built a web site that allows people to make predictions on precipitation levels on certain locations. During each competition participants were allowed to enter their precipitation forecasts (i.e. 'bets') at three locations and these locations changed between competitions. A precipitation competition was defined as a 48-96 hour period (depending on the expected weather conditions), bets were open 24-48 hours prior to the competition, and during betting period participants were allowed to change their bets with no limitation. In order to explore the effect of transparency, betting mechanisms varied across study's sites: full transparency (participants able to see each other's bets); partial transparency (participants see the group's average bet); and no transparency (no information of others' bets is made available). Several interesting findings emerged from

  5. Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Durian, D J

    2014-10-01

    We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

  6. Scale Dependence of Statistics of Spatially Averaged Rain Rate Seen in TOGA COARE -- Comparison with Predictions from a Stochastic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, P. K.; Bell, T. L.

    2002-05-01

    A characteristic feature of rainfall statistics is that they in general depend on the space and time scales over which rain data are averaged. As a part of an earlier effort to determine the sampling error of satellite rain averages, a space-time model of rainfall statistics was developed to describe the statistics of gridded rain observed in GATE. The model allows one to compute the second moment statistics of space- and time-averaged rain rate which can be fitted to satellite or rain gauge data to determine the four model parameters appearing in the precipitation spectrum -- an overall strength parameter, a characteristic length separating the long and short wavelength regimes and a characteristic relaxation time for decay of the autocorrelation of the instantaneous local rain rate and a certain ``fractal" power law exponent. For area-averaged instantaneous rain rate, this exponent governs the power law dependence of these statistics on the averaging length scale L predicted by the model in the limit of small L. In particular, the variance of rain rate averaged over an L x L area exhibits a power law singularity as L -> 0. In the present work the model is used to investigate how the statistics of area-averaged rain rate over the tropical Western Pacific measured with ship borne radar during TOGA COARE and gridded on a 2 km grid depends on the size of the spatial averaging scale. Good agreement is found between the data and predictions from the model over a wide range of averaging length scales.

  7. Scale Dependence of Statistics of Spatially Averaged Rain Rate Seen in TOGA COARE Comparison with Predictions from a Stochastic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Bell, T. L.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A characteristic feature of rainfall statistics is that they in general depend on the space and time scales over which rain data are averaged. As a part of an earlier effort to determine the sampling error of satellite rain averages, a space-time model of rainfall statistics was developed to describe the statistics of gridded rain observed in GATE. The model allows one to compute the second moment statistics of space- and time-averaged rain rate which can be fitted to satellite or rain gauge data to determine the four model parameters appearing in the precipitation spectrum - an overall strength parameter, a characteristic length separating the long and short wavelength regimes and a characteristic relaxation time for decay of the autocorrelation of the instantaneous local rain rate and a certain 'fractal' power law exponent. For area-averaged instantaneous rain rate, this exponent governs the power law dependence of these statistics on the averaging length scale $L$ predicted by the model in the limit of small $L$. In particular, the variance of rain rate averaged over an $L \\times L$ area exhibits a power law singularity as $L \\rightarrow 0$. In the present work the model is used to investigate how the statistics of area-averaged rain rate over the tropical Western Pacific measured with ship borne radar during TOGA COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmospheric Response Experiment) and gridded on a 2 km grid depends on the size of the spatial averaging scale. Good agreement is found between the data and predictions from the model over a wide range of averaging length scales.

  8. Scale Dependence of Statistics of Spatially Averaged Rain Rate Seen in TOGA COARE Comparison with Predictions from a Stochastic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Bell, T. L.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A characteristic feature of rainfall statistics is that they in general depend on the space and time scales over which rain data are averaged. As a part of an earlier effort to determine the sampling error of satellite rain averages, a space-time model of rainfall statistics was developed to describe the statistics of gridded rain observed in GATE. The model allows one to compute the second moment statistics of space- and time-averaged rain rate which can be fitted to satellite or rain gauge data to determine the four model parameters appearing in the precipitation spectrum - an overall strength parameter, a characteristic length separating the long and short wavelength regimes and a characteristic relaxation time for decay of the autocorrelation of the instantaneous local rain rate and a certain 'fractal' power law exponent. For area-averaged instantaneous rain rate, this exponent governs the power law dependence of these statistics on the averaging length scale $L$ predicted by the model in the limit of small $L$. In particular, the variance of rain rate averaged over an $L \\times L$ area exhibits a power law singularity as $L \\rightarrow 0$. In the present work the model is used to investigate how the statistics of area-averaged rain rate over the tropical Western Pacific measured with ship borne radar during TOGA COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmospheric Response Experiment) and gridded on a 2 km grid depends on the size of the spatial averaging scale. Good agreement is found between the data and predictions from the model over a wide range of averaging length scales.

  9. A statistical rain attenuation prediction model with application to the advanced communication technology satellite project. Part 2: Theoretical development of a dynamic model and application to rain fade durations and tolerable control delays for fade countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A dynamic rain attenuation prediction model is developed for use in obtaining the temporal characteristics, on time scales of minutes or hours, of satellite communication link availability. Analagous to the associated static rain attenuation model, which yields yearly attenuation predictions, this dynamic model is applicable at any location in the world that is characterized by the static rain attenuation statistics peculiar to the geometry of the satellite link and the rain statistics of the location. Such statistics are calculated by employing the formalism of Part I of this report. In fact, the dynamic model presented here is an extension of the static model and reduces to the static model in the appropriate limit. By assuming that rain attenuation is dynamically described by a first-order stochastic differential equation in time and that this random attenuation process is a Markov process, an expression for the associated transition probability is obtained by solving the related forward Kolmogorov equation. This transition probability is then used to obtain such temporal rain attenuation statistics as attenuation durations and allowable attenuation margins versus control system delay.

  10. Effect of wind-driven rain on deterioration of a tall building: Numerical modeling and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei

    Wind-driven rain is an important factor in determining the extent of calcareous stone erosion and the patterns of surface soiling on buildings. In this study, both numerical modeling and field measurements have been employed to investigate the effect of wind-driven rain on building walls. The work has been conducted at the Cathedral of Learning, a 42-story Indiana limestone building on the University of Pittsburgh campus in Pittsburgh, PA. The numerical method utilizes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques and comprises three steps: (a) using the Re-Normalization Group (RNG) k-epsilon model to calculate the airflow field around the building, (b) simulating raindrop trajectories in the flow field by solving the force balance equations, and (c) estimating driving rain fluxes on building walls by combining raindrop trajectory results and meteorological data. To validate the model, wind-driven rain fluxes have been measured at the Cathedral for a 21-month period. Comparison of model estimates and field measurements for 94 rain events show reasonably good agreement, suggesting that the numerical method is effective in predicting driving rain fluxes on building surfaces. Both model and measurement results show that wind-driven rain is strongly influenced by rainfall intensity, wind speed, wind direction, and building geometry. Qualitative comparisons of the observed soiling patterns with the modeled and measured driving rain fluxes show that white eroded areas on the building surfaces generally receive more driving rain than soiled but less eroded areas. The current soiling patterns are most likely due to the non-uniform distribution of wind-driven rain as a result of long-term trends in wind and rain that interact with the building. This work will enhance the understanding of processes involved in the erosion of buildings by providing a quantitative tool for studying the impact of wind-driven rain on building surfaces. This tool will be useful for the selection

  11. Analysis of a Mesoscale Model for Depicting Rain-on-Snow Flooding Events in Mountainous Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, M. D.; Dawson, P.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2002-12-01

    Cold season rain-on-snow events are one of the major sources of flooding in the Pacific Northwest. Accurate modeling of the atmospheric fields forcing these events is leading to a better understanding of the atmospheric conditions behind these events and to better prediction of these floods. A mesoscale atmospheric model (RAMS) with nested grids is being used for high resolution simulations of winter precipitation and other climate variables in the Owyhee mountains of southwestern Idaho. The Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) contains a dense array of meteorologic and hydrologic instrumentation with which to test the spatial and temporal hydrologic and atmospheric models. The large number of precipitation gauges in the RCEW cover a wide range of precipitation zones found in mountainous terrain. These gauges allow for a thorough assessment of the areal distribution and timing of modeled versus measured precipitation and temperature. A comparison of the modeled and measured data from two winter storms associated with rain-on-snow events shows close agreement in the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitation, temperature and other variables. The model correctly predicts the spatial distribution of precipitation and the temporal conversion from snow to rain-on-snow in the lower elevations of the watershed. The modeled precipitation is typically slightly lower than the measured values. Some of the high frequency (hourly) weather variability was not captured by the model, presumably due to lack of sufficient data in the initialization process. The longer term goal is to develop a tool for generating detailed weather information for winter time hydrologic studies including cold season flooding processes and to better understand the processes controlling winter flooding.

  12. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Stensland, G.J.

    1983-11-01

    A series of definitions for the field of acid rain studies are presented. Protocols for acid rain sampling and monitoring are also presented. A procedure for calculatory precipitation pH is discussed. 11 references, 1 table.

  13. Rooftop dew, fog and rain collection in southwest Morocco and predictive dew modeling using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekouch, Imad; Lekouch, Khalid; Muselli, Marc; Mongruel, Anne; Kabbachi, Belkacem; Beysens, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    SummaryTwo coastal sites were investigated in an arid region of southwest Morocco to determine the amount of dew, fog and rain that could be collected from rooftops for household use. Systematic measurements were performed in Mirleft (43 m asl, 200 m from the coast) for 1 year (May 1, 2007 to April 30, 2008) and in Id Ouasskssou (240 m asl, 8 km from the coast) for three summer months (July 1, 2007 to September 30, 2007). Dew water was collected using standard passive dew condensers and fog water by utilizing planar fog collectors. The wind flow was simulated on the rooftop to establish the location of the fog collector. At both sites, dew yields and, to a lesser extent, fog water yields, were found to be significant in comparison to rain events. Mirleft had 178 dew events (48.6% of the year, 18 ± 2 L m-2 cumulated amount) and 20 fog episodes (5.5% of the year, 1.4 L m-2 with uncertainty -0.2/+0.4 L m-2 cumulated amount), corresponding to almost 40% of the yearly rain contribution (31 rain events, 8.5% of the year, 49 ± 7 mm cumulated amount). At Id Ouasskssou there were 50 dew events (7.1 ± 0.3 L m-2, 54.3% frequency), 16 fog events (6.5 L m-2 with uncertainty -0.1/+1.8 L m-2, 17.4% frequency) and six rain events (16 ± 2 mm, 6.5% frequency). Meteorological data (air and dew point temperature and/or relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction, cloud cover) were recorded continuously at Mirleft to assess the influence of local meteorological conditions on dew and fog formation. Using the set of collected data, a new model for dew yield prediction based on artificial neural networks was developed and tested for the Mirleft site. This model was then extrapolated to 15 major cities in Morocco to assess their potential for dew water collection. It was found that the location of the cities with respect to the Atlas mountain chain, which controls the circulation of the humid marine air, is the main factor that influences dew production.

  14. Yearly variations of rain-rate statistics at Wallops Island and their impact on modeled slant path attenuation distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1983-01-01

    Rain gauge measurements at Wallops Island, VA over a five-year period have been reduced and cumulative rain-date distributions have been determined for yearly, successively combined years, and overall average cases. Yearly variations of the predicted slant path attenuation statistics for two International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) models (referred to as modified method I and method II) and the global model at 28.56 GHz were calculated using the yearly measured rain rates at Wallops Island. This frequency was selected as it coincided with the beacon frequency of te COMSTAR geostationary satellite which was also simultaneously monitored at Wallops Island for a period of three years enabling a comparison with the measured rain-fade statistics. The year to year variations of the predicted fades as well as the percent deviations relative to the five-year average case were examined.

  15. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable. PMID:3203639

  16. RAIN-Droplet: A Novel 3-D in vitro Angiogenesis Model

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Benjamin D.; Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is fundamentally required for the initialization, development and metastatic spread of cancer. A rapidly expanding number of new experimental, chemical modulators of endothelial cell function have been described for the therapeutic inhibition of angiogenesis in cancer. Despite this expansion there has been very limited parallel growth of in vitro angiogenesis models or experimental tools. Here we present the Responsive Angiogenic Implanted Network (RAIN)-Droplet model and novel angiogenesis assay using an endothelial cell culture model of microvascular endothelial cells encapsulated in a spontaneously self-assembling, toroidal hydrogel droplet uniquely yielding discrete, pre-formed, angiogenic networks that may be embedded in 3-D matrices. On embedding, radial growth of capillary-like sprouts and cell invasion was observed. The sprouts formed as both outgrowths from endothelial cells on the surface of the droplets but also, uniquely, from the pre-formed network structures within the droplet. We demonstrate proof-of-principle for the utility of the model showing significant inhibition of sprout formation (p<0.001) in the presence of bevacizumab, an anti-angiogenic antibody. Using the RAIN-Droplet assay we also demonstrate a novel dose dependent pro-angiogenic function for the characteristically anti-angiogenic multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Exposure of endothelial cells in 3-D culture to low, non-lethal doses (<1 μM) of sorafenib after initiation of sprouting resulted in the formation of significantly (p<0.05) more endothelial sprouts compared to controls over a 48-hour period. Higher doses of sorafenib (5 μM) resulted in a significant (p<0.05) reduction of sprouting over the same time period. The RAIN-Droplet model is a highly versatile and simply constructed 3-D focal sprouting approach well suited for the study of vascular morphogenesis and for preclinical testing of drugs. Furthermore, the RAIN-Droplet model has facilitated the discovery of a

  17. Using snowboards and lysimeters to constrain snow model choices in a rain-snow transitional environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayand, N. E.; Massmann, A.; Clark, M. P.; Lundquist, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Physically based models of the hydrological cycle are critical for testing our understanding of the natural world and enabling forecasting of extreme events. Previous intercomparison studies (i.e. SNOWMIP I & II, PILPS) of existing snow models that vary in complexity have been hampered by multiple differences in model structure. Recent efforts to encompass multiple model hypothesizes into a single framework (i.e. the Structure for Understanding Multiple Modeling Alternatives [SUMMA] model), have provided the tools necessary for a more rigorous validation of process representation. However, there exist few snow observatories that measure sufficient physical states and fluxes to fully constrain the possible combinations within these multiple model frameworks. In practice, observations of bulk snow states, such as the snow water equivalent (SWE) or snow depth, are most commonly available. The downfall of calibrating a snow model using such single bulk variables can lead to parameter equanimity and compensatory errors, which ultimately impacts the skill of a model as a predictive tool. This study provides two examples of diagnosing modeled snow processes through novel error source identification. Simulations were performed at a recently upgraded (Oct. 2012) snow study site located at Snoqualmie Pass (917 m), in the Washington Cascades, USA. We focused on two physical processes, new snow accumulation and snowpack outflow during mid-winter rain-on-snow events, for their importance towards controlling runoff and flooding in this rain-snow transitional basin. Main results were: 1) modifying the snow model structure to match what was actually observed (i.e. a snow board), allowed the attribution of daily errors in model new snow accumulation to either partitioning, new snow density, or compaction. 2) Observed snow pit temperature profiles from infrared cameras and manual thermometers found that cold biases in the model snowpack temperature prior to rain-on-snow events could

  18. Rain-triggered lahar susceptibility using a shallow landslide and surface erosion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Stuart; Magill, Christina; Hilton, James

    2016-11-01

    Lahars are mass flows containing variable concentrations of water and volcanic debris that can cause catastrophic impacts to life, livelihoods and infrastructure downstream from their volcanic origin. Accurate and quantitative information on lahar hazards are essential for reducing the impact of these events. Lahar hazard assessments often focus on the use of numeric or empirical models to describe flow behaviour and inundation areas, which rely on historic lahar events and expert elicitation to define model inputs. This results in qualitative or semi-quantitative estimates of hazard that do not account for the mechanics of lahar initiation or, in the case of rain-triggered lahars, the dependence of rainfall intensity and duration on initiation. Here we develop a method for calculating rain-triggered lahar susceptibility, defined as the occurrence probability of a particular lahar initial volume at a specific location. The model relies on terrain and deposit characteristics and a probabilistic measure of rainfall in the form of rainfall intensity-frequency-duration relationships. Results for a case study of the October 28, 1995 lahar at Mangatoetoenui stream, Ruapehu Volcano, New Zealand, indicate lahar volume is controlled by a characteristic timescale, relating the deposit depth H to the hydraulic diffusivity D0 in the ratio H2/D0. The timescale describes the transmission of positive pore pressures within the deposit, leading to shallow failure. As a consequence of this timescale, rainfall duration is the most important factor determining initial lahar sediment volume. Rainfall intensity plays a minor role, controlling the volume of water in the lahar mixture. This observation is consistent with power-law relationships used to determine lahar triggering rainfall thresholds. The rain-triggered lahar susceptibility approach developed here is anticipated to improve probabilistic lahar hazard assessments by providing quantitative, reproducible estimates of initial

  19. Extension of the prognostic model of sea surface temperature to rain-induced cool and fresh lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellenger, Hugo; Drushka, Kyla; Asher, William; Reverdin, Gilles; Katsumata, Masaki; Watanabe, Michio

    2017-01-01

    The Zeng and Beljaars (2005) sea surface temperature prognostic scheme, developed to represent diurnal warming, is extended to represent rain-induced freshening and cooling. Effects of rain on salinity and temperature in the molecular skin layer (first few hundred micrometers) and the near-surface turbulent layer (first few meters) are separately parameterized by taking into account rain-induced fluxes of sensible heat and freshwater, surface stress, and mixing induced by droplets penetrating the water surface. Numerical results from this scheme are compared to observational data from two field studies of near-surface ocean stratifications caused by rain, to surface drifter observations and to previous computations with an idealized ocean mixed layer model, demonstrating that the scheme produces temperature variations consistent with in situ observations and model results. It reproduces the dependency of salinity on wind and rainfall rate and the lifetime of fresh lenses. In addition, the scheme reproduces the observed lag between temperature and salinity minimum at low wind speed and is sensitive to the peak rain rate for a given amount of rain. Finally, a first assessment of the impact of these fresh lenses on ocean surface variability is given for the near-equatorial western Pacific. In particular, the variability due to the mean rain-induced cooling is comparable to the variability due to the diurnal warming so that they both impact large-scale horizontal surface temperature gradients. The present parameterization can be used in a variety of models to study the impact of rain-induced fresh and cool lenses at different spatial and temporal scales.

  20. Modeling rain-driven overland flow: Empirical versus analytical friction terms in the shallow water approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, G.; Hu, J.; Delestre, O.; Darboux, F.; Lagrée, P.-Y.; Popinet, S.; Fullana, J. M.; Josserand, C.

    2016-05-01

    Modeling and simulating overland flow fed by rainfall is a common issue in watershed surface hydrology. Modelers have to choose among various friction models when defining their simulation framework. The purpose of this work is to compare the simulation quality for the Manning, Darcy-Weisbach, and Poiseuille friction models on the simple case of a constant rain on a thin experimental flume. Results show that the usual friction law of Manning is not suitable for this type of flow. The Poiseuille friction model gave the best results both on the flux at the outlet and the velocity and depth profile along the flume. The Darcy-Weisbach model shows good results for laminar flow. Additional testing should be carried out for turbulent cases.

  1. Fade Dynamics and Its Evolution: The Other Part of the Acts Rain Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The inception of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project has required as similarly advanced statistical mathematical modeling formalism to describe the behavior of the 30/20 GHz links emanating to and from the earth terminals through the deleterious effects of the earth's atmosphere. The resulting ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model has been thoroughly described in [Manning, 1990]. In the present paper, the basic rudiments of this model will be reviewed; Section 1 covers the static or time-independent portion of the model and Section 2 covers the dynamic of time-dependent portion. The results of Section 2 are then applied to a new approximate solution of the famous problem of the time duration tau of a fade of random process below some threshold. This is known as the fade duration. The new approximate solution was published in Russian [Denisenko] and, unfortunately, was never published into English. Hence, this work is restated following [Denisenko] in Section 3 which is immediately applied to the random rain fade process. The results for all five ACTS propagation sites as well as Tampa, FL are then given.

  2. Fade Dynamics and its Evolution: The Other Part of the ACTS Rain Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The inception of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project has required a similarly advanced statistical mathematical modeling formalism to describe the behavior of the 30/20 GHz links emanating to and from the earth terminals through the deleterious effects of the earth's atmosphere. The resulting ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model has been thoroughly described in (Manning). In the present paper, the basic rudiments of this model will be reviewed; Section 1 covers the static or time-independent portion of the model and Section 2 covers the dynamic or time-dependent portion. The results of Section 2 are then applied to a new approximate solution of the famous problem of the time duration tau of a fade of a random process below some threshold. This is known as the fade duration. The new approximate solution was published in Russian (Denisenko) and, unfortunately, was never published into English. Hence, this work is restated following (Denisenko) in Section 3 which is immediately applied to the random rain fade process. The results for all five ACTS propagation sites as well as Tampa, FL are then given.

  3. Results of APL rain gauge network measurements in mid-Atlantic coast region and comparisons of distributions with CCIR models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Gebo, Norman; Rowland, John

    1988-08-01

    In this effort are described cumulative rain rate distributions for a network of nine tipping bucket rain gauge systems located in the mid-Atlantic coast region in the vicinity of the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia. The rain gauges are situated within a gridded region of dimensions of 47 km east-west by 70 km north-south. Distributions are presented for the individual site measurements and the network average for the year period June 1, 1986 through May 31, 1987. A previous six year average distribution derived from measurements at one of the site locations is also presented. Comparisons are given of the network average, the CCIR (International Radio Consultative Committee) climatic zone, and the CCIR functional model distributions, the latter of which approximates a log normal at the lower rain rate and a gamma function at the higher rates.

  4. Results of APL rain gauge network measurements in mid-Atlantic coast region and comparisons of distributions with CCIR models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Gebo, Norman; Rowland, John

    1988-01-01

    In this effort are described cumulative rain rate distributions for a network of nine tipping bucket rain gauge systems located in the mid-Atlantic coast region in the vicinity of the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia. The rain gauges are situated within a gridded region of dimensions of 47 km east-west by 70 km north-south. Distributions are presented for the individual site measurements and the network average for the year period June 1, 1986 through May 31, 1987. A previous six year average distribution derived from measurements at one of the site locations is also presented. Comparisons are given of the network average, the CCIR (International Radio Consultative Committee) climatic zone, and the CCIR functional model distributions, the latter of which approximates a log normal at the lower rain rate and a gamma function at the higher rates.

  5. Modeling and monitoring avalanches caused by rain-on-snow events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, S.; Marshall, H. P.; Trisca, G. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Nicholson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Direct-action avalanches occur during large storm cycles in mountainous regions, when stresses on the snowpack increase rapidly due to the load of new snow and outpace snow strengthening due to compaction. If temperatures rise above freezing during the storm and snowfall turns to rain, the near-surface snow undergoes rapid densification caused by the introduction of liquid water. This shock to the snowpack, if stability is near critical, can cause widespread immediate avalanching due to the large induced strain rates in the slab, followed by secondary delayed avalanches due to both the increased load as well as water percolation to the depth of a weak layer. We use the semi-empirical SNOow Slope Stability model (SNOSS) to estimate the evolution of stability prior to large avalanches during rain-on-snow events on Highway 21 north of Boise, Idaho. We have continuously monitored avalanche activity using arrays of infrasound sensors in the avalanche-prone section of HW21 near Stanley, in collaboration with the Idaho Transportation Department's avalanche forecasting program. The autonomous infrasound avalanche monitoring system provides accurate timing of avalanche events, in addition to capturing avalanche dynamics during some major releases adjacent to the array. Due to the remote location and low winter traffic volume, the highway is typically closed for multiple days during major avalanche cycles. Many major avalanches typically release naturally and reach the road, but due the complex terrain and poor visibility, manual observations are often not possible until several days later. Since most avalanche programs typically use explosives on a regular basis to control slope stability, the infrasound record of avalanche activity we have recorded on HW21 provides a unique opportunity to study large naturally triggered avalanches. We use a first-order physically based stability model to estimate the importance of precipitation phase, amount, and rate during major rain

  6. Estimation of Mesoscale Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM Rain Statistics Utilizing a Simple One-Dimensional Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacovazzi, Robert A., Jr.; Prabhakara, C.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a model is developed to estimate mesoscale-resolution atmospheric latent heating (ALH) profiles. It utilizes rain statistics deduced from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and cloud vertical velocity profiles and regional surface thermodynamic climatologies derived from other available data sources. From several rain events observed over tropical ocean and land, ALH profiles retrieved by this model in convective rain regions reveal strong warming throughout most of the troposphere, while in stratiform rain regions they usually show slight cooling below the freezing level and significant warming above. The mesoscale-average, or total, ALH profiles reveal a dominant stratiform character, because stratiform rain areas are usually much larger than convective rain areas. Sensitivity tests of the model show that total ALH at a given tropospheric level varies by less than +/- 10 % when convective and stratiform rain rates and mesoscale fractional rain areas are perturbed individually by 1 15 %. This is also found when the non-uniform convective vertical velocity profiles are replaced by one that is uniform. Larger variability of the total ALH profiles arises when climatological ocean- and land-surface temperatures (water vapor mixing ratios) are independently perturbed by +/- 1.0 K (+/- 5 %) and +/- 5.0 K (+/- 15 %), respectively. At a given tropospheric level, such perturbations can cause a +/- 25 % variation of total ALH over ocean, and a factor-of-two sensitivity over land. This sensitivity is reduced substantially if perturbations of surface thermodynamic variables do not change surface relative humidity, or are not extended throughout the entire model evaporation layer. The ALH profiles retrieved in this study agree qualitatively with tropical total diabatic heating profiles deduced in earlier studies. Also, from January and July 1999 ALH-profile climatologies generated separately with TRMM Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar rain

  7. Estimation of Mesoscale Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM Rain Statistics Utilizing a Simple One-Dimensional Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacovazzi, Robert A., Jr.; Prabhakara, C.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a model is developed to estimate mesoscale-resolution atmospheric latent heating (ALH) profiles. It utilizes rain statistics deduced from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and cloud vertical velocity profiles and regional surface thermodynamic climatologies derived from other available data sources. From several rain events observed over tropical ocean and land, ALH profiles retrieved by this model in convective rain regions reveal strong warming throughout most of the troposphere, while in stratiform rain regions they usually show slight cooling below the freezing level and significant warming above. The mesoscale-average, or total, ALH profiles reveal a dominant stratiform character, because stratiform rain areas are usually much larger than convective rain areas. Sensitivity tests of the model show that total ALH at a given tropospheric level varies by less than +/- 10 % when convective and stratiform rain rates and mesoscale fractional rain areas are perturbed individually by 1 15 %. This is also found when the non-uniform convective vertical velocity profiles are replaced by one that is uniform. Larger variability of the total ALH profiles arises when climatological ocean- and land-surface temperatures (water vapor mixing ratios) are independently perturbed by +/- 1.0 K (+/- 5 %) and +/- 5.0 K (+/- 15 %), respectively. At a given tropospheric level, such perturbations can cause a +/- 25 % variation of total ALH over ocean, and a factor-of-two sensitivity over land. This sensitivity is reduced substantially if perturbations of surface thermodynamic variables do not change surface relative humidity, or are not extended throughout the entire model evaporation layer. The ALH profiles retrieved in this study agree qualitatively with tropical total diabatic heating profiles deduced in earlier studies. Also, from January and July 1999 ALH-profile climatologies generated separately with TRMM Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar rain

  8. Stochastic modeling of total suspended solids (TSS) in urban areas during rain events.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Luca; Krejci, Vladimir; Rauch, Wolfgang; Kreikenbaum, Simon; Fankhauser, Rolf; Gujer, Willi

    2005-10-01

    The load of total suspended solids (TSS) is one of the most important parameters for evaluating wet-weather pollution in urban sanitation systems. In fact, pollutants such as heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phosphorous and organic compounds are adsorbed onto these particles so that a high TSS load indicates the potential impact on the receiving waters. In this paper, a stochastic model is proposed to estimate the TSS load and its dynamics during rain events. Information on the various simulated processes was extracted from different studies of TSS in urban areas. The model thus predicts the probability of TSS loads arising from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) in combined sewer systems as well as from stormwater in separate sewer systems in addition to the amount of TSS retained in treatment devices in both sewer systems. The results of this TSS model illustrate the potential of the stochastic modeling approach for assessing environmental problems.

  9. Pre-rain green-up is ubiquitous across southern tropical Africa: implications for temporal niche separation and model representation.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Casey M; Williams, Mathew; Grace, John; Woollen, Emily; Lehmann, Caroline E R

    2017-01-01

    Tree phenology mediates land-atmosphere mass and energy exchange and is a determinant of ecosystem structure and function. In the dry tropics, including African savannas, many trees grow new leaves during the dry season - weeks or months before the rains typically start. This syndrome of pre-rain green-up has long been recognized at small scales, but the high spatial and interspecific variability in leaf phenology has precluded regional generalizations. We used remote sensing data to show that this precocious phenology is ubiquitous across the woodlands and savannas of southern tropical Africa. In 70% of the study area, green-up preceded rain onset by > 20 d (42% > 40 d). All the main vegetation formations exhibited pre-rain green-up, by as much as 53 ± 18 d (in the wet miombo). Green-up showed low interannual variability (SD between years = 11 d), and high spatial variability (> 100 d). These results are consistent with a high degree of local phenological adaptation, and an insolation trigger of green-up. Tree-tree competition and niche separation may explain the ubiquity of this precocious phenology. The ubiquity of pre-rain green-up described here challenges existing model representations and suggests resistance (but not necessarily resilience) to the delay in rain onset predicted under climate change.

  10. A Satellite and Numerical Model Combined Approach to Study Extreme Rain Events over the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laviola, S.; Moscatello, A.; Miglietta, M. M.; Cattani, E.; Levizzani, V.

    2012-04-01

    The Mediterranean extreme rainfall events often develop at the end of the warm season when the sea surface temperature is higher than 15°C and the environmental conditions allow for the deepening of convection up to the formation of intense isolated cells and multicellular systems. Although the genesis of these phenomena are connected to the cold fronts in the westerlies with lifting of the oceanic systems operated by the Atlas mountains, the variation of a few local meteorological variables contributes to differentiate the developing stage of such systems. A study is proposed in which two heavy rain events over Mediterranean basin are analysed (Laviola et al., 2011). The investigation of cloud and precipitation properties are first assessed using a geostationary multifrequency satellite method for the identification of cloud type, hydrometeor phase, and cloud vertical extension. Then the study is carried out by means of a triple approach: (1) surface rain gauges, (2) satellite data, and (3) numerical model simulations. The satellite retrieval method 183-WSL (Laviola and Levizzani, 2009; 2011) is used to retrieve precipitation amount and classify precipitation type in terms of stratiform and convective rain. Furthermore, starting from two case studies, almost ten years of autumnal rain events over the Mediterranean are studied using a new method to identify the cloud type on the basis of the perturbation of the nominal signal in the microwave due to the presence of clouds. This technique exploits the properties of the three water vapour channels in the band at 183 GHz on board the NOAA-AMSU-B/MHS satellites. Due to the vertical development of the different cloud types, the typical extinction of radiation in clear sky conditions is perturbed as a function of cloud type and cloud top height. Stratified thin clouds, for example, usually impact less over the water vapour channels peaking at lower altitudes and often appear transparent or completely masked by the

  11. Evaluating the catching performance of aerodynamic rain gauges through field comparisons and CFD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Michael; Colli, Matteo; Stagnaro, Mattia; Lanza, Luca; Quinn, Paul; Dutton, Mark; O'Donnell, Greg; Wilkinson, Mark; Black, Andrew; O'Connell, Enda

    2016-04-01

    Accurate rainfall measurement is a fundamental requirement in a broad range of applications including flood risk and water resource management. The most widely used method of measuring rainfall is the rain gauge, which is often also considered to be the most accurate. In the context of hydrological modelling, measurements from rain gauges are interpolated to produce an areal representation, which forms an important input to drive hydrological models and calibrate rainfall radars. In each stage of this process another layer of uncertainty is introduced. The initial measurement errors are propagated through the chain, compounding the overall uncertainty. This study looks at the fundamental source of error, in the rainfall measurement itself; and specifically addresses the largest of these, the systematic 'wind-induced' error. Snowfall is outside the scope. The shape of a precipitation gauge significantly affects its collection efficiency (CE), with respect to a reference measurement. This is due to the airflow around the gauge, which causes a deflection in the trajectories of the raindrops near the gauge orifice. Computational Fluid-Dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to evaluate the time-averaged airflows realized around the EML ARG100, EML SBS500 and EML Kalyx-RG rain gauges, when impacted by wind. These gauges have a similar aerodynamic profile - a shape comparable to that of a champagne flute - and they are used globally. The funnel diameter of each gauge, respectively, is 252mm, 254mm and 127mm. The SBS500 is used by the UK Met Office and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency. Terms of comparison are provided by the results obtained for standard rain gauge shapes manufactured by Casella and OTT which, respectively, have a uniform and a tapered cylindrical shape. The simulations were executed for five different wind speeds; 2, 5, 7, 10 and 18 ms-1. Results indicate that aerodynamic gauges have a different impact on the time-averaged airflow patterns

  12. Model for a surface film of fatty acids on rain water and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Winfried

    Organic compounds with polar groups can form films on the water surface which lower the surface tension and may hinder the transport of water vapor and trace gases through the interface. A model is presented which describes in detail surface films formed by fatty acids. The model has been applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids on rain water and atmospheric aerosol particles. In most cases only a diluted film has been calculated which does not affect their physical and chemical properties. The exception was a clean region in the western USA, where the fatty acid concentrations are sufficiently high to form a dense film on atmospheric aerosol particles. An algorithm for the identification of the sources of fatty acids was developed. It showed leaf abrasion or biomass burning as a major source of fatty acids in the western USA.

  13. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  14. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  15. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  16. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  17. A model for the beam-filling effect associated with the microwave retrieval of rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Estimating rain rate from environmental microwave emissions is hampered by several difficulties. One of these difficulties is known as the beam-filling effect. Beam filling is the systematic error introduced when the microwave radiometer's field of view is not filled with uniform rain. Beam filling can have dramatic effects on rain-rate estimation, causing rain rates to be underestimated by as much as a factor of 2. The present study derives an approximate expression for beam filling that provides, in principle, a way to estimate this effect. In addition, this study deals only with single-channel microwave rain estimation over the ocean. The final results reveal that beam filling is essentially determined by the freezing level, the mean fraction of the footprint raining, and the footprint-averaged rain rate. Also, the numerical results appear to agree with other empirical studies. Furthermore, the analysis brings to light an interesting connection with rain threshold techniques for estimating area-averaged rain rates.

  18. The tropical rain belts with an annual cycle and a continent model intercomparison project: TRACMIP: TRACMIP

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, Aiko; Biasutti, Michela; Scheff, Jacob; Bader, Jürgen; Bordoni, Simona; Codron, Francis; Dixon, Ross D.; Jonas, Jeffrey; Kang, Sarah M.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Leung, Ruby; Lu, Jian; Mapes, Brian; Maroon, Elizabeth A.; McDermid, Sonali; Park, Jong-yeon; Roehrig, Romain; Russell, Gary L.; Seo, Jeongbin; Toniazzo, Thomas; Wei, Ho-Hsuan; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Vargas Zeppetello, Lucas R.

    2016-12-02

    This paper introduces the Tropical Rain belts with an Annual cycle and a Continent Model Intercomparison Project (TRACMIP). TRACMIP studies the dynamics of tropical rain belts and their response to past and future radiative forcings through simulations with 13 comprehensive and one simplified atmosphere models coupled to a slab ocean and driven by seasonally-varying insolation. Five idealized experiments, two with an aquaplanet setup and three with a setup with an idealized tropical continent, fill the space between prescribed-SST aquaplanet simulations and realistic simulations provided by CMIP5/6. The simulations reproduce key features of the present-day climate and expected future climate change, including an annual-mean intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) that is located north of the equator and Hadley cells and eddy-driven jets that are similar to the present-day climate. Quadrupling CO2 leads to a northward ITCZ shift and preferential warming in Northern high-latitudes. The simulations show interesting CO2-induced changes in the seasonal excursion of the ITCZ and indicate a possible state-dependence of climate sensitivity. The inclusion of an idealized continent modulates both the control climate and the response to increased CO2; for example it reduces the northward ITCZ shift associated with warming and, in some models, climate sensitivity. In response to eccentricity-driven seasonal insolation changes, seasonal changes in oceanic rainfall are best characterized as a meridional dipole, while seasonal continental rainfall changes tend to be symmetric about the equator. This survey illustrates TRACMIP’s potential to engender a deeper understanding of global and regional climate phenomena and to address pressing questions on past and future climate change.

  19. The tropical rain belts with an annual cycle and a continent model intercomparison project: TRACMIP

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, Aiko; Biasutti, Michela; Scheff, Jacob; Bader, Jürgen; Bordoni, Simona; Codron, Francis; Dixon, Ross D.; Jonas, Jeffrey; Kang, Sarah M.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Leung, Ruby; Lu, Jian; Mapes, Brian; Maroon, Elizabeth A.; McDermid, Sonali; Park, Jong -yeon; Roehrig, Romain; Rose, Brian E. J.; Russell, Gary L.; Seo, Jeongbin; Toniazzo, Thomas; Wei, Ho -Hsuan; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Vargas Zeppetello, Lucas R.

    2016-11-16

    This paper introduces the Tropical Rain belts with an Annual cycle and a Continent Model Intercomparison Project (TRACMIP). TRACMIP studies the dynamics of tropical rain belts and their response to past and future radiative forcings through simulations with 13 comprehensive and one simplified atmosphere models coupled to a slab ocean and driven by seasonally-varying insolation. Five idealized experiments, two with an aquaplanet setup and three with a setup with an idealized tropical continent, fill the space between prescribed-SST aquaplanet simulations and realistic simulations provided by CMIP5/6. The simulations reproduce key features of the present-day climate and expected future climate change, including an annual-mean intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) that is located north of the equator and Hadley cells and eddy-driven jets that are similar to the present-day climate. Quadrupling CO2 leads to a northward ITCZ shift and preferential warming in Northern high-latitudes. The simulations show interesting CO2-induced changes in the seasonal excursion of the ITCZ and indicate a possible state-dependence of climate sensitivity. The inclusion of an idealized continent modulates both the control climate and the response to increased CO2; for example it reduces the northward ITCZ shift associated with warming and, in some models, climate sensitivity. In response to eccentricity-driven seasonal insolation changes, seasonal changes in oceanic rainfall are best characterized as a meridional dipole, while seasonal continental rainfall changes tend to be symmetric about the equator. Finally, this survey illustrates TRACMIP’s potential to engender a deeper understanding of global and regional climate phenomena and to address pressing questions on past and future climate change.

  20. The tropical rain belts with an annual cycle and a continent model intercomparison project: TRACMIP

    DOE PAGES

    Voigt, Aiko; Biasutti, Michela; Scheff, Jacob; ...

    2016-11-16

    This paper introduces the Tropical Rain belts with an Annual cycle and a Continent Model Intercomparison Project (TRACMIP). TRACMIP studies the dynamics of tropical rain belts and their response to past and future radiative forcings through simulations with 13 comprehensive and one simplified atmosphere models coupled to a slab ocean and driven by seasonally-varying insolation. Five idealized experiments, two with an aquaplanet setup and three with a setup with an idealized tropical continent, fill the space between prescribed-SST aquaplanet simulations and realistic simulations provided by CMIP5/6. The simulations reproduce key features of the present-day climate and expected future climate change,more » including an annual-mean intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) that is located north of the equator and Hadley cells and eddy-driven jets that are similar to the present-day climate. Quadrupling CO2 leads to a northward ITCZ shift and preferential warming in Northern high-latitudes. The simulations show interesting CO2-induced changes in the seasonal excursion of the ITCZ and indicate a possible state-dependence of climate sensitivity. The inclusion of an idealized continent modulates both the control climate and the response to increased CO2; for example it reduces the northward ITCZ shift associated with warming and, in some models, climate sensitivity. In response to eccentricity-driven seasonal insolation changes, seasonal changes in oceanic rainfall are best characterized as a meridional dipole, while seasonal continental rainfall changes tend to be symmetric about the equator. Finally, this survey illustrates TRACMIP’s potential to engender a deeper understanding of global and regional climate phenomena and to address pressing questions on past and future climate change.« less

  1. Aboveground Biomass Modeling from Field and LiDAR Data in Brazilian Amazon Tropical Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. A.; Hudak, A. T.; Vierling, L. A.; Keller, M. M.; Klauberg Silva, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forests are an important component of global carbon stocks, but tropical forest responses to climate change are not sufficiently studied or understood. Among remote sensing technologies, airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) may be best suited for quantifying tropical forest carbon stocks. Our objective was to estimate aboveground biomass (AGB) using airborne LiDAR and field plot data in Brazilian tropical rain forest. Forest attributes such as tree density, diameter at breast height, and heights were measured at a combination of square plots and linear transects (n=82) distributed across six different geographic zones in the Amazon. Using previously published allometric equations, tree AGB was computed and then summed to calculate total AGB at each sample plot. LiDAR-derived canopy structure metrics were also computed at each sample plot, and random forest regression modelling was applied to predict AGB from selected LiDAR metrics. The LiDAR-derived AGB model was assessed using the random forest explained variation, adjusted coefficient of determination (Adj. R²), root mean square error (RMSE, both absolute and relative) and BIAS (both absolute and relative). Our findings showed that the 99th percentile of height and height skewness were the best LiDAR metrics for AGB prediction. The AGB model using these two best predictors explained 59.59% of AGB variation, with an Adj. R² of 0.92, RMSE of 33.37 Mg/ha (20.28%), and bias of -0.69 (-0.42%). This study showed that LiDAR canopy structure metrics can be used to predict AGC stocks in Tropical Forest with acceptable precision and accuracy. Therefore, we conclude that there is good potential to monitor carbon sequestration in Brazilian Tropical Rain Forest using airborne LiDAR data, large field plots, and the random forest algorithm.

  2. Electromagnetic Waves Attenuation due to Rain: A Prediction Model for Terrestrial or L.O.S SHF and EHF Radio Communication Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moupfouma, Fidèle

    2009-06-01

    Because of the interest raised for SHF and EHF radio communications, the attenuation of electromagnetic waves by rain will always constitute a major concern for telecommunication engineers and scientists. The rain attenuation prediction models exposed in literature calculate the attenuation related to a given rain rate or else to a given percentage of time. The new model proposed in this paper, predicts with a good accuracy the percentage of time for which any given rain attenuation will be exceeded on terrestrial SHF, EHF radiowaves links, provided the rain rate R001 (mm/h) that represents rain rate value exceeded for 0.01% of time in the locality of interest is available. R001 (mm/h) data being available for most of the localities across the world in ITU-R data base, we may conclude that this new model proposed here, can be broadly and successfully used.

  3. Measurement errors in tipping bucket rain gauges under different rainfall intensities and their implication to hydrologic models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measurements from tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRs) consist of systematic and random errors as an effect of external factors, such as mechanical limitations, wind effects, evaporation losses, and rainfall intensity. Two different models of TBRs, viz. ISCO-674 and TR-525 (TexasInstr., Inc.), being us...

  4. Using Bayesian Belief Networks to model volcanic hazards interaction: an application for rain-triggered lahars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierz, Pablo; Odbert, Henry; Phillips, Jeremy; Woodhouse, Mark; Sandri, Laura; Selva, Jacopo; Marzocchi, Warner

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of volcanic hazards is a challenging task for modern volcanology. Assessing the large uncertainties involved in the hazard analysis requires the combination of volcanological data, physical and statistical models. This is a complex procedure even when taking into account only one type of volcanic hazard. However, volcanic systems are known to be multi-hazard environments where several hazardous phenomena (tephra fallout, Pyroclastic Density Currents -PDCs-, lahars, etc.) may occur whether simultaneous or sequentially. Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) are a flexible and powerful way of modelling uncertainty. They are statistical models that can merge information coming from data, physical models, other statistical models or expert knowledge into a unified probabilistic assessment. Therefore, they can be applied to model the interaction between different volcanic hazards in an efficient manner. In this work, we design and preliminarily parametrize a BBN with the aim of forecasting the occurrence and volume of rain-triggered lahars when considering: (1) input of pyroclastic material, in the form of tephra fallout and PDCs, over the catchments around the volcano; (2) remobilization of this material by antecedent lahar events. Input of fresh pyroclastic material can be modelled through a combination of physical models (e.g. advection-diffusion models for tephra fallout such as HAZMAP and shallow-layer continuum models for PDCs such as Titan2D) and uncertainty quantification techniques, while the remobilization efficiency can be constrained from datasets of lahar observations at different volcanoes. The applications of this kind of probabilistic multi-hazard approach can range from real-time forecasting of lahar activity to calibration of physical or statistical models (e.g. emulators) for long-term volcanic hazard assessment.

  5. Modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate for the sensitivity to acid rain of 21 plant species.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shihuai; Gou, Shuzhen; Sun, Baiye; Lv, Wenlin; Li, Yuanwei; Peng, Hong; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Yingjun

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the sensitivity of plant species to acid rain based on the modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate (P (N)) of 21 types of plant species, subjected to the exposure of simulated acid rain (SAR) for 5 times during a period of 50 days. Variable responses of P (N) to SAR occurred depending on the type of plant. A majority (13 species) of the dosage-response relationship could be described by an S-shaped curve and be fitted with the Boltzmann model. Model fitting allowed quantitative evaluation of the dosage-response relationship and an accurate estimation of the EC(10), termed as the pH of the acid rain resulting in a P (N) 10 % lower than the reference value. The top 9 species (Camellia sasanqua, Cinnamomum camphora, etc. EC(10) ≤ 3.0) are highly endurable to very acid rain. The rare, relict plant Metasequoia glyptostroboides was the most sensitive species (EC(10) = 5.1) recommended for protection.

  6. Rain Rate Statistics in Southern New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulic, Frank J., Jr.; Horan, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    The methodology used in determining empirical rain-rate distributions for Southern New Mexico in the vicinity of White Sands APT site is discussed. The hardware and the software developed to extract rain rate from the rain accumulation data collected at White Sands APT site are described. The accuracy of Crane's Global Model for rain rate predictions is analyzed.

  7. Linking ice accretion and crown structure: towards a model of the effect of freezing rain on tree canopies

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Charles A.; Lecigne, Bastien; Taugourdeau, Olivier; Greene, David F.; Dauzat, Jean; Delagrange, Sylvain; Messier, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite a longstanding interest in variation in tree species vulnerability to ice storm damage, quantitative analyses of the influence of crown structure on within-crown variation in ice accretion are rare. In particular, the effect of prior interception by higher branches on lower branch accumulation remains unstudied. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intra-crown ice accretion can be predicted by a measure of the degree of sheltering by neighbouring branches. Methods Freezing rain was artificially applied to Acer platanoides L., and in situ branch-ice thickness was measured directly and from LiDAR point clouds. Two models of freezing rain interception were developed: ‘IceCube’, which uses point clouds to relate ice accretion to a voxel-based index (sheltering factor; SF) of the sheltering effect of branch elements above a measurement point; and ‘IceTree’, a simulation model for in silico evaluation of the interception pattern of freezing rain in virtual tree crowns. Key Results Intra-crown radial ice accretion varied strongly, declining from the tips to the bases of branches and from the top to the base of the crown. SF for branches varied strongly within the crown, and differences among branches were consistent for a range of model parameters. Intra-crown variation in ice accretion on branches was related to SF (R2 = 0·46), with in silico results from IceTree supporting empirical relationships from IceCube. Conclusions Empirical results and simulations confirmed a key role for crown architecture in determining intra-crown patterns of ice accretion. As suspected, the concentration of freezing rain droplets is attenuated by passage through the upper crown, and thus higher branches accumulate more ice than lower branches. This is the first step in developing a model that can provide a quantitative basis for investigating intra-crown and inter-specific variation in freezing rain damage. PMID:27107412

  8. Entropy theory based multi-criteria resampling of rain gauge networks for hydrological modelling - a case study of humid area in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongliang; Xu, Chongyu; Roar Sælthun, Nils; Zhou, Bin; Xu, Youpeng

    2014-05-01

    Rain gauge networks are usually used to provide estimates of area average rainfall or point rainfalls at catchment scale and provide the most important input for hydrological models. Due to economical, technical and other constraints, rain gauge networks are usually not dense enough or not properly placed to measure precipitation at the resolution and extent necessary for determining the spatial variability of rainfall. It is therefore desirable to study the effect of rain gauge distribution and to design well distributed rain gauge networks with minimal gauge densities to provide best possible estimations with both rainfall amount and spatial-temporal variability. Based on a dense rain gauge network of 185 rain gauges in Xiangjiang River Basin, southern China, this study applied an entropy theory based multi-criteria method which simultaneously considering the information derived from rainfall series and minimizing the bias of areal mean rainfall as well as the information overlapped by different gauges to resample the rain gauge networks with different gauge densities. The optimal networks are tested using two hydrological models: the lumped Xinanjiang Model and distributed SWAT Model in order to investigate how the lumped and distributed models react to the number of rain gauges and their spatial distribution. The hydrological simulation results reveal that the performances of the lumped Xinanjiang Model using different optimized networks are stable while the distributed SWAT Model shows an improved trend in model performances with more rain gauges are included in simulation. The results indicate that the entropy theory based multi-criteria strategy provide a robust design of rain gauge networks and more stations are needed in order to realize the advantages of distributed models in hydrological simulations.

  9. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  10. Superposition of the Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses Model and the Poisson White Noise Model for the Representation of Tropical Rain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    A point process model for tropical rain rates is developed through the derivation of the third moment expression for a combined point process model. The model is a superposition of a Neyman-Scott rectangular pulse model and a Poisson white noise process model. The model is scalable in the temporal dimension. The derivation of the third moment for this model allows the inclusion of the skewness parameter which is necessary to adequately represent rainfall intensity. Analysis of the model fit to tropical tipping bucket raingauge data ranging in temporal scale from 5 minutes to one day indicates that it can adequately produce synthesized rainfall having the statistical characteristics of rain rate over the range of scales tested. Of special interest is the model’s capability to accurately preserve the probability of extreme tropical rain rates at different scales. In addition to various hydrological applications, the model also has many potential uses in the field of meteorology, such as the study and development of radar rain rate algorithms for the tropics which need to parameterized attenuation due to heavy rain.

  11. Improvement of Tidal Analysis Results by a Priori Rain Fall Modelling at the Vienna and Membach stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurers, B.; van Camp, M.; Petermans, T.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate how far tidal analysis results can be improved when a rain fall admittance model is applied on the superconducting gravity (SG) data. For that purpose both Vienna and Membach data have been analysed with and without a priori rain fall correction. In Membach the residual drop for most events (80%) can be explained by the rain water load, while in Vienna only 50% of all events fit the model in detail. In the other cases the Newtonian effect of vertical air mass redistribution (vertical density variation without air pressure change), predominantly connected with high vertical convection activity, e.g. thunderstorms, plays an essential role: short-term atmospheric signals show up steep gravity residual decreases of a few nms-2 within 10 - 60 min, well correlated with outdoor air temperature in most cases. However, even in those cases the water load model is able to explain the dominating part of the residual drop especially during heavy rain fall. In Vienna more than 110 events have been detected over 10 years. 84% of them are associated with heavy rain starting at or up to 10 min later than the residual drop while the rest (16%) shows no or only little rainfall. The magnitude of the gravity drop depends on the total amount of rainfall accumulated during the meteorological event. Step like signals deteriorate the frequency spectrum estimates. This even holds for tidal analysis. As the drops are of physical origin, they should not be eliminated blindly but corrected using water load modeling constrained by high temporal resolution (1 min) rain data. 3D modeling of the water mass load due to a rain event is based on the following assumptions: (1) Rain water intrudes into the uppermost soil layer (close to the topography surface) and remains there at least until rain has stopped. This is justified for a period of some hours after the rainfall as evapotranspiration is not yet effective. (2) No run-off except of sealed areas or building roofs, where water can

  12. Model studies of the beam-filling error for rain-rate retrieval with microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Eunho; North, Gerald R.

    1995-01-01

    Low-frequency (less than 20 GHz) single-channel microwave retrievals of rain rate encounter the problem of beam-filling error. This error stems from the fact that the relationship between microwave brightness temperature and rain rate is nonlinear, coupled with the fact that the field of view is large or comparable to important scales of variability of the rain field. This means that one may not simply insert the area average of the brightness temperature into the formula for rain rate without incurring both bias and random error. The statistical heterogeneity of the rain-rate field in the footprint of the instrument is key to determining the nature of these errors. This paper makes use of a series of random rain-rate fields to study the size of the bias and random error associated with beam filling. A number of examples are analyzed in detail: the binomially distributed field, the gamma, the Gaussian, the mixed gamma, the lognormal, and the mixed lognormal ('mixed' here means there is a finite probability of no rain rate at a point of space-time). Of particular interest are the applicability of a simple error formula due to Chiu and collaborators and a formula that might hold in the large field of view limit. It is found that the simple formula holds for Gaussian rain-rate fields but begins to fail for highly skewed fields such as the mixed lognormal. While not conclusively demonstrated here, it is suggested that the notionof climatologically adjusting the retrievals to remove the beam-filling bias is a reasonable proposition.

  13. Dissolved nutrients and atrazine removal by column-scale monophasic and biphasic rain garden model systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hanbae; McCoy, Edward L; Grewal, Parwinder S; Dick, Warren A

    2010-08-01

    Rain gardens are bioretention systems that have the potential to reduce peak runoff flow and improve water quality in a natural and aesthetically pleasing manner. We compared hydraulic performance and removal efficiencies of nutrients and atrazine in a monophasic rain garden design versus a biphasic design at a column-scale using simulated runoff. The biphasic rain garden was designed to increase retention time and removal efficiency of runoff pollutants by creating a sequence of water saturated to unsaturated conditions. We also evaluated the effect of C substrate availability on pollutant removal efficiency in the biphasic rain garden. Five simulated runoff events with various concentrations of runoff pollutants (i.e. nitrate, phosphate, and atrazine) were applied to the monophasic and biphasic rain gardens once every 5d. Hydraulic performance was consistent over the five simulated runoff events. Peak flow was reduced by approximately 56% for the monophasic design and 80% for the biphasic design. Both rain garden systems showed excellent removal efficiency of phosphate (89-100%) and atrazine (84-100%). However, significantly (p<0.001) higher removal of nitrate was observed in the biphasic (42-63%) compared to the monophasic rain garden (29-39%). Addition of C substrate in the form of glucose increased removal efficiency of nitrate significantly (p<0.001), achieving up to 87% removal at a treatment C/N ratio of 2.0. This study demonstrates the importance of retention time, environmental conditions (i.e. saturated/unsaturated conditions), and availability of C substrate for bioremediation of pollutants, especially nitrates, in rain gardens. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Coupled isotopic and process-based modeling of gaseous nitrogen losses from tropical rain forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Edith; Houlton, Benjamin Z.

    2009-06-01

    Gaseous nitrogen (N) losses remove fixed N from the biosphere and play an important role in regulating Earth's climate system. Current techniques for measuring gaseous N fluxes are still limited, however, and many uncertainties remain. We used the natural isotopes of N, 15N/14N, to constrain process-based model (DAYCENT, the daily version of CENTURY) estimates of gaseous N emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. The isotope model considers two scenarios. In the first, soil 15N/14N is a linear function of a fraction of gaseous N losses. In the second, underexpression of denitrification's isotope effect is considered, and soil 15N/14N is determined by both the fraction of gaseous losses and the proportion of NO3- consumed locally by denitrification. We examined the coupled process- and isotope-based model along two Hawaiian rain forest gradients which span a range of tropical climates, soil biogeochemical ages, and ecosystem 15N/14N. Under most conditions (mean annual precipitation (MAP) <4050 mm), modeled soil 15N/14N ratios agreed well with measurements (r2 = 0.89), consistent with full expression of denitrification's isotope effect (scenario 1). In very wet sites (MAP ≥ 4050 mm), locally complete NO3- consumption appears to lower the isotopic expression of denitrification at ecosystem levels, resulting in soil 15N/14N ratios that approach those of the N inputs (i.e., scenario 2). Replacing modeled gaseous N emissions with field-based measures of oxidized N, gas fluxes (NOx + N2O) resulted in consistently lower estimates of soil 15N/14N ratios across the forests. This points to a missing gas N loss term (i.e., N2), inadequate coverage of spatial and temporal heterogeneity by empirical measures, or both. These results demonstrate the potential for soil N isotopes to constrain N gas fluxes at large geographic scales, providing a quantitative tracer of gaseous N emissions from land.

  15. Diabatic forcing and initialization with assimilation of cloud and rain water in a forecast model: Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, William H.; Olson, William S.; Callan, Geary

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this part of the investigation is to find one or more general modeling techniques that will help reduce the time taken by numerical forecast models to initiate or spin-up precipitation processes and enhance storm intensity. If the conventional data base could explain the atmospheric mesoscale flow in detail, then much of our problem would be eliminated. But the data base is primarily synoptic scale, requiring that a solution must be sought either in nonconventional data, in methods to initialize mesoscale circulations, or in ways of retaining between forecasts the model generated mesoscale dynamics and precipitation fields. All three methods are investigated. The initialization and assimilation of explicit cloud and rainwater quantities computed from conservation equations in a mesoscale regional model are examined. The physical processes include condensation, evaporation, autoconversion, accretion, and the removal of rainwater by fallout. The question of how to initialize the explicit liquid water calculations in numerical models and how to retain information about precipitation processes during the 4-D assimilation cycle are important issues that are addressed. The explicit cloud calculations were purposely kept simple so that different initialization techniques can be easily and economically tested. Precipitation spin-up processes associated with three different types of weather phenomena are examined. Our findings show that diabatic initialization, or diabatic initialization in combination with a new diabatic forcing procedure, work effectively to enhance the spin-up of precipitation in a mesoscale numerical weather prediction forecast. Also, the retention of cloud and rain water during the analysis phase of the 4-D data assimilation procedure is shown to be valuable. Without detailed observations, the vertical placement of the diabatic heating remains a critical problem.

  16. Assessment of prediction and predictability of short rains over equatorial East Africa using a multi-model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahaga, T. K.; Kucharski, F.; Tsidu, G. Mengistu; Yang, Hongwei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the performance of dynamical seasonal forecast systems is evaluated for the prediction of short rain anomalies over equatorial East Africa. The evaluation is based on observational datasets and the Asia-Pacific Climate Center (APCC) Ocean-Atmosphere coupled multi-model ensemble (MME) retrospective forecasts (hindcasts). These forecast systems have different hindcast periods; here, we have selected common years from 1982 to 2005. The ensembles of individual models and their MME mean are evaluated. Hindcasts initialized on the 1st of August from each year alone are considered, as these are the most relevant to short rain predictions. The coupled climate model ensemble reproduces the spatial distribution of mean September-October-November (SON) rainfall and seasonal climate variations over equatorial East Africa with further improvement in MME mean. Individual coupled models and MME mean also show statistically significant skill in forecasting sea surface temperatures anomalies (SSTAs) over the western and eastern parts of the equatorial Indian Ocean, giving significant correlation at 99 % confidence level for Indian Ocean dipole (IOD). Moreover, five out of ten coupled models and MME mean show statistically significant skill in predicting equatorial East Africa short rains. The fidelity of hindcasts is further measured by anomaly correlation coefficient (ACC) and four models as well as MME mean show significant skill over East Africa. It is shown that the reproduction of the observed variability in the East African region is mainly due to a realistic relationship of East African rainfall with the Indian Ocean dipole. Overall, the skill of the dynamical models is attributed to the fact that slowly evolving SSTs are the primary source of predictability and to the fact that coupled climate models produce skillful predictions of SON SST anomalies over the tropical Indian Ocean. This information opens the possibility of using readily available seasonal

  17. Modelling Hydrologic Processes in the Mekong River Basin Using a Distributed Model Driven by Satellite Precipitation and Rain Gauge Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Hui; Yang, Dawen; Sothea, Khem; Jiao, Yang; Gao, Bin; Peng, Xueting; Pang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    The Mekong River is the most important river in Southeast Asia. It has increasingly suffered from water-related problems due to economic development, population growth and climate change in the surrounding areas. In this study, we built a distributed Geomorphology-Based Hydrological Model (GBHM) of the Mekong River using remote sensing data and other publicly available data. Two numerical experiments were conducted using different rainfall data sets as model inputs. The data sets included rain gauge data from the Mekong River Commission (MRC) and remote sensing rainfall data from the Tropic Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM 3B42V7). Model calibration and validation were conducted for the two rainfall data sets. Compared to the observed discharge, both the gauge simulation and TRMM simulation performed well during the calibration period (1998–2001). However, the performance of the gauge simulation was worse than that of the TRMM simulation during the validation period (2002–2012). The TRMM simulation is more stable and reliable at different scales. Moreover, the calibration period was changed to 2, 4, and 8 years to test the impact of the calibration period length on the two simulations. The results suggest that longer calibration periods improved the GBHM performance during validation periods. In addition, the TRMM simulation is more stable and less sensitive to the calibration period length than is the gauge simulation. Further analysis reveals that the uneven distribution of rain gauges makes the input rainfall data less representative and more heterogeneous, worsening the simulation performance. Our results indicate that remotely sensed rainfall data may be more suitable for driving distributed hydrologic models, especially in basins with poor data quality or limited gauge availability. PMID:27010692

  18. Modelling Hydrologic Processes in the Mekong River Basin Using a Distributed Model Driven by Satellite Precipitation and Rain Gauge Observations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Hui; Yang, Dawen; Sothea, Khem; Jiao, Yang; Gao, Bin; Peng, Xueting; Pang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    The Mekong River is the most important river in Southeast Asia. It has increasingly suffered from water-related problems due to economic development, population growth and climate change in the surrounding areas. In this study, we built a distributed Geomorphology-Based Hydrological Model (GBHM) of the Mekong River using remote sensing data and other publicly available data. Two numerical experiments were conducted using different rainfall data sets as model inputs. The data sets included rain gauge data from the Mekong River Commission (MRC) and remote sensing rainfall data from the Tropic Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM 3B42V7). Model calibration and validation were conducted for the two rainfall data sets. Compared to the observed discharge, both the gauge simulation and TRMM simulation performed well during the calibration period (1998-2001). However, the performance of the gauge simulation was worse than that of the TRMM simulation during the validation period (2002-2012). The TRMM simulation is more stable and reliable at different scales. Moreover, the calibration period was changed to 2, 4, and 8 years to test the impact of the calibration period length on the two simulations. The results suggest that longer calibration periods improved the GBHM performance during validation periods. In addition, the TRMM simulation is more stable and less sensitive to the calibration period length than is the gauge simulation. Further analysis reveals that the uneven distribution of rain gauges makes the input rainfall data less representative and more heterogeneous, worsening the simulation performance. Our results indicate that remotely sensed rainfall data may be more suitable for driving distributed hydrologic models, especially in basins with poor data quality or limited gauge availability.

  19. Areal rainfall estimation using moving cars as rain gauges - modeling study and laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiei, E.; Haberlandt, U.; Sester, M.; Fitzner, D.

    2012-04-01

    Areal rainfall estimation is still one of the concerns in hydrological analyses. Low density of the conventional rainfall measurement devices as well as the errors in radar data developed the new idea of using moving cars, called raincars, as a possible new source for measuring rainfall. This idea is easily technically feasible if the cars are provided with GPS and a small memory chip for recording the coordinates, car speed and data from the sensors, either for the frequency measurement of the wipers or the optical sensors on cars. According to the modeling study, which is done on the Bode catchment in Germany, a high number of possibly inaccurate sensors, raincars, provide more reliable areal rainfall estimation than a lower number of highly accurate, stationary sensors. In this study, data for the stationary gauges and the cars are extracted from the radar data. A valid relationship between wiper frequency and rainfall with a known error is assumed where the radar data is considered as the reference. Areal precipitation is estimated by different interpolation techniques, ordinary kriging for the stationary stations and indicator kriging for the cars. The results are then compared and evaluated with the reference, radar. After proving the feasibility of the hypothesis in the modeling study, field and laboratory experiment have been arranged. A certain number of cars has been equipped with sensors and in the laboratory, to produce the rainfall as close as possible to nature, sprinkler irrigation system has been designed for producing different rain intensities, from 1 mm/hr to 55 mm/hr. Here, we can develop an empirical approach for the relationship between the wiper frequency and rainfall intensity as well as for the optical sensors on the cars under different rainfall intensities.

  20. Optical Rain Gauge Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2016-04-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deploys several types of rain gauges (MET, RAIN, and optical rain gauge [ORG] datastreams) as well as disdrometers (DISD and VDIS datastreams) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site. This handbook deals specifically with the independent analog ORG (i.e., the ORG datastream).

  1. Geostatistical upscaling of rain gauge data to support uncertainty analysis of lumped urban hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusamy, Manoranjan; Schellart, Alma; Tait, Simon; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.

    2017-04-01

    Geostatistical methods have been used to analyse the spatial correlation structure of rainfall at various spatial scales, but its application to estimate the level of uncertainty in rainfall upscaling has not been fully explored mainly due to its inherent complexity and demanding data requirements. In this study we presented a method to overcome these challenges and predict AARI together with associated uncertainty using geostatistical upscaling. Rainfall data collected from a cluster of eight paired rain gauges in a 400 × 200 sq. m. urban catchment are used in combination with spatial stochastic simulation to obtain optimal predictions of the spatially averaged rainfall intensity at any point in time within the urban catchment. The uncertainty in the prediction of catchment average rainfall intensity is obtained for multiple combinations of intensity ranges and temporal averaging intervals. The two main challenges addressed in this study are scarcity of rainfall measurement locations and non-normality of rainfall data, both of which need to be considered when adopting a geostatistical approach. Scarcity of measurement points is dealt with by pooling sample variograms of repeated rainfall measurements with similar characteristics. Normality of rainfall data is achieved through the use of Normal Score Transformation. Geostatistical models in the form of variograms are derived for transformed rainfall intensity. Next spatial stochastic simulation which is robust to nonlinear data transformation is applied to produce realisations of rainfall fields. These realisations in transformed space are first back-transformed and next spatially aggregated to derive a random sample of the spatially averaged rainfall intensity. This study shows that for small time and space scales the use of a single geostatistical model based on a single variogram is not appropriate and a distinction between rainfall intensity classes and length of temporal averaging intervals should be made

  2. Dependence of Satellite Sampling Error on Monthly Averaged Rain Rates:Comparison of Simple Models and Recent Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Kundu, Prasun K.

    2000-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years with using satellite data to generate maps of rain rate with grid resolutions of 1°-5° square. In parallel with these efforts, much work has been devoted to the problem of attaching error estimates to these products. There are two main sources of error, the intrinsic errors in the remote sensing measurements themselves (retrieval errors) and the lack of continuity in the coverage by low earth-orbiting satellites (sampling error). Perhaps a dozen or so studies have attempted to estimate the sampling-error component. These studies have been based on rain gauge and radar-derived data, and the estimates vary so much that it is clear that the sampling error cannot be represented satisfactorily by a single value.These studies are reviewed. Some of the results reported in these studies are based on a method referred to in this paper as `resampling by shifts.' The authors find that the method unfortunately tends to produce estimates that are subject to too much uncertainty to be used quantitatively. After setting these results aside, the authors find that the variability in the remaining sampling-error estimates can be explained to a considerable extent using assumptions common to many statistical models of rain. All such models predict that sampling error relative to the average rain rate R is proportional to R1/2. Although the sampling error at any given site seems (to the extent that data have been examined) to change with R in the way predicted by the model, the proportionality constant in this relationship seen in the various studies appears to change from site to site. This constant can be obtained from the satellite estimates themselves if retrieval errors are not correlated over scales of the order of the grid-box size.

  3. Geostatistical upscaling of rain gauge data to support uncertainty analysis of lumped urban hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusamy, Manoranjan; Schellart, Alma; Tait, Simon; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this study we develop a method to estimate the spatially averaged rainfall intensity together with associated level of uncertainty using geostatistical upscaling. Rainfall data collected from a cluster of eight paired rain gauges in a 400 m × 200 m urban catchment are used in combination with spatial stochastic simulation to obtain optimal predictions of the spatially averaged rainfall intensity at any point in time within the urban catchment. The uncertainty in the prediction of catchment average rainfall intensity is obtained for multiple combinations of intensity ranges and temporal averaging intervals. The two main challenges addressed in this study are scarcity of rainfall measurement locations and non-normality of rainfall data, both of which need to be considered when adopting a geostatistical approach. Scarcity of measurement points is dealt with by pooling sample variograms of repeated rainfall measurements with similar characteristics. Normality of rainfall data is achieved through the use of normal score transformation. Geostatistical models in the form of variograms are derived for transformed rainfall intensity. Next spatial stochastic simulation which is robust to nonlinear data transformation is applied to produce realisations of rainfall fields. These realisations in transformed space are first back-transformed and next spatially aggregated to derive a random sample of the spatially averaged rainfall intensity. Results show that the prediction uncertainty comes mainly from two sources: spatial variability of rainfall and measurement error. At smaller temporal averaging intervals both these effects are high, resulting in a relatively high uncertainty in prediction. With longer temporal averaging intervals the uncertainty becomes lower due to stronger spatial correlation of rainfall data and relatively smaller measurement error. Results also show that the measurement error increases with decreasing rainfall intensity resulting in a higher

  4. Rain-on-snow events over North America based on two Canadian regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il Jeong, Dae; Sushama, Laxmi

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluates projected changes to rain-on-snow (ROS) characteristics (i.e., frequency, rainfall amount, and runoff) for the future 2041-2070 period with respect to the current 1976-2005 period over North America using six simulations, based on two Canadian RCMs, driven by two driving GCMs for RCP4.5 and 8.5 emission pathways. Prior to assessing projected changes, the two RCMs are evaluated by comparing ERA-Interim driven RCM simulations with available observations, and results indicate that both models reproduce reasonably well the observed spatial patterns of ROS event frequency and other related features. Analysis of current and future simulations suggest general increases in ROS characteristics during the November-March period for most regions of Canada and for northwestern US for the future period, due to an increase in the rainfall frequency with warmer air temperatures in future. Future ROS runoff is often projected to increase more than future ROS rainfall amounts, particularly for northeastern North America, during snowmelt months, as ROS events usually accelerate snowmelt. The simulations show that ROS event is a primary flood generating mechanism over most of Canada and north-western and -central US for the January-May period for the current period and this is projected to continue in the future period. More focused analysis over selected basins shows decreases in future spring runoff due to decreases in both snow cover and ROS runoff. The above results highlight the need to take into consideration ROS events in water resources management adaptation strategies for future climate.

  5. Regional modeling sensitivity experiments for interpreting the UK Winter 2013-2014 extreme rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrani, H.; Vautard, R.; Schaller, N.; Allen, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    During the winter 2013/2014, the UK saw heavy rainfalls associated with a succession of storms reaching Southern England causing widespread flooding, power cuts and major disruptions to transport. The January precipitation set a record for several rain gauge stations in Southern England. The aim of this study is to evaluate the contribution of the anthropogenic climate change, represented by a modification of the sea surface temperature (SST) on the January precipitation. For that, we conducted a sensitivity experiment by running a set of 108 four-months simulations using WRF model with 9 different physics and 12 different SST fields; 9 for the factual world and 99 for the counter-factual world. A spectral nudging technique was used here to ensure a same atmospheric circulation patterns for all the simulations. Therefore, only the thermodynamic effect is considered here. The analysis is focused on January precipitation over the southern England. Results show for 0,5°C SST difference over the Northern Atlantic, the precipitation in the factual simulations is between 0,4 and 8% higher than the precipitation in the counter-factual simulations depending on the physic. A validation test shows that this value is closer to 8% for the "best physic" simulation. It also show a strong spatial variability where in some region the precipitation is higher in the counter-factual world compared the factual world. Finally, a backward trajectories were calculated to evaluate the sensitivity of the moisture sources and air mass trajectories to the SST in the factual and the counter-factual world.

  6. Rain rate intensity model for communication link design across the Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Aravind; Kotamraju, Sarat K.; Avlonitis, Nicholas; Sri Kavya, K. Ch.

    2016-07-01

    A study on rain statistical parameters such as one minute rain intensity, possible number of minute occurrences with respective percentage of time in a year has been evaluated for the purpose of communication link design at Ka, Q, V bands as well as at Free-Space Optical communication links (FSO). To understand possible outage period of a communication links due to rainfall and to investigate rainfall pattern, Automatic Weather Station (AWS) rainfall data is analysed due its ample presence across India. The climates of the examined AWS regions vary from desert to cold climate, heavy rainfall to variable rainfall regions, cyclone effective regions, mountain and coastal regions. In this way a complete and unbiased picture of the rainfall statistics for Indian region is evaluated. The analysed AWS data gives insight into yearly accumulated rainfall, maximum hourly accumulated rainfall, mean hourly accumulated rainfall, number of rainy days and number of rainy hours from 668 AWS locations. Using probability density function the one minute rainfall measurements at KL University is integrated with AWS measurements for estimating number of rain occurrences in terms of one minute rain intensity for annual rainfall accumulated between 100 mm and 5000 mm to give an insight into possible one minute accumulation pattern in an hour for comprehensive analysis of rainfall influence on a communication link for design engineers. So that low availability communications links at higher frequencies can be transformed into a reliable and economically feasible communication links for implementing High Throughput Services (HTS).

  7. A Cold Rain-on-Snow Event in a Canadian Rockies Alpine Catchment: Characteristics and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Fang, X.; Marks, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Over three days in late June 2013, 250 mm of precipitation fell on the partially snow-covered and heavily instrumented Marmot Creek Research Basin, Canadian Rockies, causing the largest recorded flood in the region, the destruction of most gauging stations in the research basin and the most expensive natural disaster in Canadian history. Precipitation was remarkable in that similar depths fell at all elevations from forest-grassland valley bottom to mid-elevation montane forest to alpine ridge-top and started with relatively warm conditions even at high elevations (6 oC), turning to snowfall at the highest elevations towards the end of the event. Snowfall in the alpine zone of the basin is highly redistributed by wind and forms deep drifts on lee slopes and in tree-line forests. These snowdrifts persist into summer and form a critical water supply for the creek. Snow surveys six days before and one day after the event show alpine snowdrift water equivalent declining from 350 to 150 mm and snow-covered area declining from 97% to 55% The snowpack ablation of 120 mm during the heavy precipitation period enhanced water delivery to alpine surfaces from rainfall by 50%. The event was simulated using the modular, physically-based Cold Regions Hydrological Model which was set up here to include a blowing snow model and infiltration to frozen soil model coupled to the SNOBAL energy balance snowmelt model. The results show substantially slower snowmelt rates during the rain-on-snow (ROS) event than before or after the ROS. ROS was characterized by greatly reduced solar irradiance, which was not compensated for by increased net longwave radiation, advected heat from rainfall and small but consistently downward fluxes of sensible and latent heat. Turbulent fluxes did not drive melt as has been suggested for more temperate ROS melts and energy sources can be ranked as K*>L*>Qa>Qh>Qe>>Qg. Nevertheless the combination of rainfall, snowmelt and frozen soils caused alpine

  8. An Iron-Rain Model for Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is differentiated into a crust, mantle, and core, as demonstrated by studies of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites and by data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Most models for the differentiation and thermal evolution of Vesta assume that the metal phase completely melts within 20 degrees of the eutectic temperature, well before the onset of silicate melting. In such a model, core formation initially happens by Darcy flow, but this is an inefficient process for liquid metal and solid silicate. However, the likely chemical composition of Vesta, similar to H chondrites with perhaps some CM or CV chondrite, has 13-16 weight percent S. For such compositions, metal-sulfide melting will not be complete until a temperature of at least 1350 degrees Centigrade. The silicate solidus for Vesta's composition is between 1100 and 1150 degrees Centigrade, and thus metal and silicate melting must have substantially overlapped in time on Vesta. In this chemically and physically more likely view of Vesta's evolution, metal sulfide drops will sink by Stokes flow through the partially molten silicate magma ocean in a process that can be envisioned as "iron rain". Measurements of eucrites show that moderately siderophile elements such as Ni, Mo, and W reached chemical equilibrium between the metal and silicate phases, which is an important test for any Vesta differentiation model. The equilibration time is a function of the initial metal grain size, which we take to be 25-45 microns based on recent measurements of H6 chondrites. For these sizes and reasonable silicate magma viscosities, equilibration occurs after a fall distance of just a few meters through the magma ocean. Although metal drops may grow in size by merger with other drops, which increases their settling velocities and decreases the total core formation time, the short equilibration distance ensures that the moderately siderophile elements will reach chemical equilibrium between metal and silicate before

  9. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (μ) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a μ of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing μ to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  10. Linking ice accretion and crown structure: towards a model of the effect of freezing rain on tree canopies.

    PubMed

    Nock, Charles A; Lecigne, Bastien; Taugourdeau, Olivier; Greene, David F; Dauzat, Jean; Delagrange, Sylvain; Messier, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Despite a longstanding interest in variation in tree species vulnerability to ice storm damage, quantitative analyses of the influence of crown structure on within-crown variation in ice accretion are rare. In particular, the effect of prior interception by higher branches on lower branch accumulation remains unstudied. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intra-crown ice accretion can be predicted by a measure of the degree of sheltering by neighbouring branches. Freezing rain was artificially applied to Acer platanoides L., and in situ branch-ice thickness was measured directly and from LiDAR point clouds. Two models of freezing rain interception were developed: 'IceCube', which uses point clouds to relate ice accretion to a voxel-based index (sheltering factor; SF) of the sheltering effect of branch elements above a measurement point; and 'IceTree', a simulation model for in silico evaluation of the interception pattern of freezing rain in virtual tree crowns. Intra-crown radial ice accretion varied strongly, declining from the tips to the bases of branches and from the top to the base of the crown. SF for branches varied strongly within the crown, and differences among branches were consistent for a range of model parameters. Intra-crown variation in ice accretion on branches was related to SF (R(2) = 0·46), with in silico results from IceTree supporting empirical relationships from IceCube. Empirical results and simulations confirmed a key role for crown architecture in determining intra-crown patterns of ice accretion. As suspected, the concentration of freezing rain droplets is attenuated by passage through the upper crown, and thus higher branches accumulate more ice than lower branches. This is the first step in developing a model that can provide a quantitative basis for investigating intra-crown and inter-specific variation in freezing rain damage. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of

  11. Land-Ocean Difference of the Warm Rain Formation Process in Satellite Observations, Ground-Based Observations, and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Stephens, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the difference in the warm rain formation process between over land and over ocean using a combination of CloudSat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. Previous studies (Nakajima et al. 2010; Suzuki et al. 2010) have devised a novel methodology for combining the CloudSat and MODIS satellite observations to investigate the microphysical processes. The statistics constructed with the methodology, referred to as the Contoured Frequency by Optical Depth Diagram (CFODD), provides a lifecycle view of warm clouds. Following the previous studies, we conduct detailed analyses of CFODD with a particular focus on comparisons between land and ocean. Our result shows that the coalescence process starts faster in the oceanic warm clouds than continental warm clouds. Also, oceanic clouds tend to produce more drizzle than continental clouds. Moreover, it is found that the difference between oceanic and continental cloud-to-precipitation process can be explained by different environmental conditions. For example, the cloud-to-precipitation processes in continental clouds are more similar to those in oceanic clouds over unstable environments than those over stable environments. Furthermore, ground-based measurement data obtained from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data and a cloud model simulation are analyzed to test how vertical velocity affects the warm rain formation process. Our result suggests that although the intensities of convective updrafts in warm clouds have been paid less attention, intensities of convective updrafts play a critical role in the warm rain formation process.

  12. Analysis of rain fade duration models for Earth-to-satellite path based on data measured in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Hassan; Rafiqul, Islam Md; Al-Khateeb, Khalid A. S.

    2013-12-01

    Statistical analysis of rain fade duration is crucial information for system engineer to design and plan a fade mitigation technique (FMT) for the satellite communication system. An investigation is carried out based on data measured of one year period in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from satellite path of MEASAT3. This paper presents statistical analysis of measured fade duration on high elevation angle (77.4°) in Ku-band compared to three prediction models of fade duration. It is found that none of the models could predict measured fade duration distribution accurately.

  13. The Acid Rain Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  14. The Acid Rain Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  15. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1993-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  16. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  17. Compilation and Analysis of 20 and 30 GHz Rain Fade Events at the ACTS NASA Ground Station: Statistics and Model Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the propagation studies within the ACTS Project Office is to acquire 20 and 30 GHz rain fade statistics using the ACTS beacon links received at the NGS (NASA Ground Station) in Cleveland. Other than the raw, statistically unprocessed rain fade events that occur in real time, relevant rain fade statistics derived from such events are the cumulative rain fade statistics as well as fade duration statistics (beyond given fade thresholds) over monthly and yearly time intervals. Concurrent with the data logging exercise, monthly maximum rainfall levels recorded at the US Weather Service at Hopkins Airport are appended to the database to facilitate comparison of observed fade statistics with those predicted by the ACTS Rain Attenuation Model. Also, the raw fade data will be in a format, complete with documentation, for use by other investigators who require realistic fade event evolution in time for simulation purposes or further analysis for comparisons with other rain fade prediction models, etc. The raw time series data from the 20 and 30 GHz beacon signals is purged of non relevant data intervals where no rain fading has occurred. All other data intervals which contain rain fade events are archived with the accompanying time stamps. The definition of just what constitutes a rain fade event will be discussed later. The archived data serves two purposes. First, all rain fade event data is recombined into a contiguous data series every month and every year; this will represent an uninterrupted record of the actual (i.e., not statistically processed) temporal evolution of rain fade at 20 and 30 GHz at the location of the NGS. The second purpose of the data in such a format is to enable a statistical analysis of prevailing propagation parameters such as cumulative distributions of attenuation on a monthly and yearly basis as well as fade duration probabilities below given fade thresholds, also on a monthly and yearly basis. In addition, various subsidiary

  18. Compilation and Analysis of 20 and 30 GHz Rain Fade Events at the ACTS NASA Ground Station: Statistics and Model Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the propagation studies within the ACTS Project Office is to acquire 20 and 30 GHz rain fade statistics using the ACTS beacon links received at the NGS (NASA Ground Station) in Cleveland. Other than the raw, statistically unprocessed rain fade events that occur in real time, relevant rain fade statistics derived from such events are the cumulative rain fade statistics as well as fade duration statistics (beyond given fade thresholds) over monthly and yearly time intervals. Concurrent with the data logging exercise, monthly maximum rainfall levels recorded at the US Weather Service at Hopkins Airport are appended to the database to facilitate comparison of observed fade statistics with those predicted by the ACTS Rain Attenuation Model. Also, the raw fade data will be in a format, complete with documentation, for use by other investigators who require realistic fade event evolution in time for simulation purposes or further analysis for comparisons with other rain fade prediction models, etc. The raw time series data from the 20 and 30 GHz beacon signals is purged of non relevant data intervals where no rain fading has occurred. All other data intervals which contain rain fade events are archived with the accompanying time stamps. The definition of just what constitutes a rain fade event will be discussed later. The archived data serves two purposes. First, all rain fade event data is recombined into a contiguous data series every month and every year; this will represent an uninterrupted record of the actual (i.e., not statistically processed) temporal evolution of rain fade at 20 and 30 GHz at the location of the NGS. The second purpose of the data in such a format is to enable a statistical analysis of prevailing propagation parameters such as cumulative distributions of attenuation on a monthly and yearly basis as well as fade duration probabilities below given fade thresholds, also on a monthly and yearly basis. In addition, various subsidiary

  19. Distributed modeling of storm flow generation in an Amazonian rain forest catchment: Effects of model parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertessy, Robert A.; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    1999-07-01

    We describe a process-based storm flow generation model, Topog_SBM consisting of a simple bucket model for soil water accounting, a one-dimensional kinematic wave overland flow scheme, and a contour-based element network for routing surface and subsurface flows. Aside from topographic data and rainfall the model has only six input parameters: soil depth (z), saturated hydraulic conductivity at the soil surface (K0), the rate of decay in K0 with depth (m), the Manning surface roughness parameter (n), the maximum (saturated) soil water content (θs), and the minimum (residual) soil water content (θr). However, the model is fully distributed, so these values can vary in magnitude across space. The model was applied to La Cuenca, a very small rainforest catchment in western Amazonia that has been well characterized in several hydrometric and hydrochemical investigations. Total runoff, peak runoff, time of rise, and lag time were predicted for 34 events of varying magnitudes and antecedent moisture conditions. We compared results for eight different model parameterizations or "sets"; four of these were freely calibrated to yield the best possible model fit to runoff data, whereas the other four were constrained (in various ways) by the use of actual K0 data gathered for the catchment. The eight sets were calibrated on either one of three events or on the three events jointly to illustrate the importance of calibration event selection on model performance. Model performance was evaluated by comparing observed and predicted (1) storm flow hydrograph attributes and (2) spatiotemporal patterns of overland flow occurrence across the catchment. The model generally predicted the right amount of runoff but usually underpredicted the peak runoff rate and overpredicted the time of rise. The "best" parameterization could credibly predict hydrographs for only about half of the events. Significant, and sometimes gross, errors were encountered for about one fourth of the events

  20. Evaluating a slope-stability model for shallow rain-induced landslides using gage and satellite data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yatheendradas, S.; Kirschbaum, D.; Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Improving prediction of landslide early warning systems requires accurate estimation of the conditions that trigger slope failures. This study tested a slope-stability model for shallow rainfall-induced landslides by utilizing rainfall information from gauge and satellite records. We used the TRIGRS model (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-based Regional Slope-stability analysis) for simulating the evolution of the factor of safety due to rainfall infiltration. Using a spatial subset of a well-characterized digital landscape from an earlier study, we considered shallow failure on a slope adjoining an urban transportation roadway near the Seattle area in Washington, USA.We ran the TRIGRS model using high-quality rain gage and satellite-based rainfall data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Preliminary results with parameterized soil depth values suggest that the steeper slope values in this spatial domain have factor of safety values that are extremely close to the failure limit within an extremely narrow range of values, providing multiple false alarms. When the soil depths were constrained using a back analysis procedure to ensure that slopes were stable under initial condtions, the model accurately predicted the timing and location of the landslide observation without false alarms over time for gage rain data. The TRMM satellite rainfall data did not show adequately retreived rainfall peak magnitudes and accumulation over the study period, and as a result failed to predict the landslide event. These preliminary results indicate that more accurate and higher-resolution rain data (e.g., the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission) are required to provide accurate and reliable landslide predictions in ungaged basins.

  1. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  2. Simulation of water drainage of a rain forest and forest conversion plots using a soil water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinge, R.; Schmidt, J.; Fölster, H.

    2001-06-01

    The water budgets were estimated for a rain forest plot and two conversion plots (cut and burn) in a rain forest region of eastern Amazonia, Brazil, using a soil water model (SilVlow) to estimate the drainage and soil water storage compartments. A quantification of drainage was required to determine element leaching associated with conversion. The plots were equipped with fast recording tensiometer fields down to 5 m depth. Soil water tension and meteorological data were recorded at 15 min intervals. Monitoring was maintained for 18 months from July 1992 to December 1993. The special feature of the model is that soil parameter functions (matric potential/ volumetric moisture content and matric potential/ hydraulic conductivity) are introduced in tabular form, and can be changed deliberately during a fitting procedure adjusting simulated to measured matric potential. This fitting requires a vegetation-free period, which was provided by the conversion plots after clear-cutting the forest. For this fitting procedure, high-resolution recording was essential. Actual evapotranspiration in the soil water model is derived from potential (Penman) evaporation using a matric potential-dependent transpiration reduction function. The adjustment of these parameter functions was performed on plots under vegetation, also by fitting. The annual rainfall of 2479-2706 mm (depending on time interval chosen), fell short of the long-term average of 3000 mm. The forest intercepted 15% of the rain while total evapotranspiration was about 1350 mm. Drainage decreased from 1484-1733 mm at 110 cm to 1130-1331 mm at 500 cm suggesting a water uptake by roots of 350-400 mm from the depth zone 110-500 cm. On the conversion plots that were planted with eucalypts but regularly weeded, drainage at 500 cm depth amounted to >90% of rainfall.

  3. Inter-comparison of automatic rain gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nystuen, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    The Ocean Acoustics Division (OAD) of the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), in cooperation with NOAA/NESDIS and NASA, has deployed six rain gauges for calibration and intercomparison purposes. These instruments include: (1) a weighing rain gauge, (2) a RM Young Model 50202 capacitance rain gauge, (3) a ScTI ORG-705 (long path) optical rain gauge, (4) a ScTI ORG-105 (mini-ORG) optical rain gauge, (5) a Belfort Model 382 tipping bucket rain gauge, and (6) a Distromet RD-69 disdrometer. The system has been running continuously since July 1993. During this time period, roughly 150 events with maximum rainfall rate over 10 mm/hr and 25 events with maximum rainfall rates over 100 mm/hr have been recorded. All rain gauge types have performed well, with intercorrelations 0.9 or higher. However, limitations for each type of rain gauge have been observed.

  4. Modelling the influence of elevation and snow regime on winter stream temperature in the rain-on-snow zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, J.; Moore, D.

    2015-12-01

    Winter stream temperature of coastal mountain catchments influences fish growth and development. Transient snow cover and advection associated with lateral throughflow inputs are dominant controls on stream thermal regimes in these regions. Existing stream temperature models lack the ability to properly simulate these processes. Therefore, we developed and evaluated a conceptual-parametric catchment-scale stream temperature model that includes the role of transient snow cover and lateral advection associated with throughflow. The model provided reasonable estimates of observed stream temperature at three test catchments. We used the model to simulate winter stream temperature for virtual catchments located at different elevations within the rain-on-snow zone. The modelling exercise examined stream temperature response associated with interactions between elevation, snow regime, and changes in air temperature. Modelling results highlight that the sensitivity of winter stream temperature response to changes in climate may be dependent on catchment elevation and landscape position.

  5. Rain, fog, and clouds for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental chamber creates realistic fog and rain effects in aircraft simulator. It reproduces clouds, homogeneous fog, patches of fog, rain and fog, and rain only. It is used with real time digital computer, color computer generated image display that simulates airport lights, or color television camera that produces moving display of airport runway as depicted on model terrain board.

  6. Rain, fog, and clouds for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental chamber creates realistic fog and rain effects in aircraft simulator. It reproduces clouds, homogeneous fog, patches of fog, rain and fog, and rain only. It is used with real time digital computer, color computer generated image display that simulates airport lights, or color television camera that produces moving display of airport runway as depicted on model terrain board.

  7. Acid rain control: the costs of compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Gilleland, D.S.; Swisher, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    This document is the proceedings from a conference sponsored by the Illinois Energy Resources Commission and the Coal Extraction and Utilization Research Center, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and held in Carbondale on March 18, 1984. Topics addressed include: the sources and impacts of acid rain, the problems inherent in modeling the impacts of acid rain legislation, the effects of acid rain legislation on the socio-economic sector, compliance costs, and the impact of acid rain legislation on related industries (railroads).

  8. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.H.; Boyle, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acid rain, says Boyle is a chemical leprosy eating into the face of North America and Europe, perhaps the major ecological problem of our time. Boyle describes the causes and scope of the phenomenon; the effects on man, wildlife, water, and our cultural heritage. He probes the delays of politicians and the frequent self-serving arguments advanced by industry in the face of what scientists have proved. The solutions he offers are to strengthen the Clean Air Act and require emission reductions that can be accomplished by establishing emission standards on a regional or bubble basis, burn low-sulfur coal, install scrubbers at critical plants, and invest in alternative energy sources. 73 references, 1 figure.

  9. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  10. Rain dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    The concept of altering weather soon may get some added credibility. Residents of Mexico's parched state of Coahuila just hope to get some rain.In a program that links scientists from the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) with others working for the Mexican government and agricultural and industrial labs, researchers will test a new technique to enhance and perhaps induce rainfall. In field trials planned for June through October for the next four years, scientists will use pyrotechnic flares mounted on aircraft to seed clouds: as the plane flies at the base of the cloud, the burning flares produce moisture-retaining particles that rise into the cloud and attract water vapor. When the technique succeeds, the water particles become droplets which can become bonafide precipitation.

  11. Raining Rocks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-01

    Impact ejecta is material that is thrown up and out of the surface of a planet as a result of the impact of an meteorite, asteroid or comet. The material that was originally beneath the surface of the planet then rains down onto the environs of the newly formed impact crater. Some of this material is deposited close to the crater, folding over itself to form the crater rim, visible here as a yellowish ring. Other material is ejected faster and falls down further from the crater rim creating two types of ejecta: a "continuous ejecta blanket" and "discontinuous ejecta." Both are shown in this image. The blocky area at the center of the image close to the yellowish crater rim is the "continuous" ejecta. The discontinuous ejecta is further from the crater rim, streaking away from the crater like spokes on a bicycle. (Note: North is to the right.) http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11180

  12. One-Dimensional Modelling of Biofilm Activity in Bioretention Cells (Rain Gardens) Engineered to Treat Organic Matter and Nitrogen Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeo, C.; Yu, T.; Chu, A.; Khan, U. T.; Bhiladvala, R. B.; He, J.

    2016-12-01

    Bioremediation of stormwater pollutants using bioretention cells (a.k.a rain gardens) involve biological processes functioning within the biofilm formed on the vegetation's root system. Modelling this bioremediation at the scale at which bioretention cells are implemented in practice can further understanding of the mitigation process and thereby improve designs as well as operation and maintenance procedures. This poster provides the results of two simple, one-dimensional micro-scale models of biofilm activity for bioremediation. The models are validated using field-scale experimental data of BOD5 and NO3- contaminant (substrate) levels in the effluent observed post-treatment from a bioretention cell. The first model is a modified version of the Suidan and Wang Model and provides solutions of substrate and biomass concentration while the second model, the Sáez and Rittmann Model, uses a modified expression for the substrate flux into the biofilm. A detailed sensitivity analysis on the solution of pollutant concentration S(x) revealed that dimensionless biofilm thickness and dimensionless substrate concentration outside of the biofilm were the two most significantly influencing parameters on S(x). Simulations of a field scale bioretention cell were conducted and model output of BOD5 and NO3- were compared to field observations in the effluent of the bioretention cell when subjected to 100 year rain events. The analysis showed that biofilm activity mostly occurs in the summer (as expected) but substrate flux takes an entire season to change after stabilization, suggesting that the spatial scaling involved in modeling such activity is coupled to temporal scaling.

  13. Soak Up the Rain

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Soak Up the Rain promotes green infrastructure practices such as rain barrels, rain gardens, permeable pavements and green roofs to reduce stormwater runoff and prevent water pollution while bringing about a broad range of community benefits.

  14. A statistical rain attenuation prediction model with application to the advanced communication technology satellite project. 3: A stochastic rain fade control algorithm for satellite link power via non linear Markow filtering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic and composite nature of propagation impairments that are incurred on Earth-space communications links at frequencies in and above 30/20 GHz Ka band, i.e., rain attenuation, cloud and/or clear air scintillation, etc., combined with the need to counter such degradations after the small link margins have been exceeded, necessitate the use of dynamic statistical identification and prediction processing of the fading signal in order to optimally estimate and predict the levels of each of the deleterious attenuation components. Such requirements are being met in NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project by the implementation of optimal processing schemes derived through the use of the Rain Attenuation Prediction Model and nonlinear Markov filtering theory.

  15. Combining rainfall data from rain gauges and TRMM in hydrological modelling of Laotian data-sparse basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Liu, Fa Ming; Wang, Xiao Xia; Li, Xiao Dong; Fan, Yu Yan; Cai, Shi Xiang; Ao, Tian Qi

    2017-06-01

    At present, prediction of streamflow simulation in data-sparse basins of the South East Asia is a challenging task due to the absence of reliable ground-based rainfall information, while satellite-based rainfall estimates are immensely useful to improve our understanding of spatio-temporal variation of rainfall, particularly for data-sparse basins. In this study the TRMM 3B42 V7 and its bias-corrected data were, respectively, used to drive a physically based distributed hydrological model BTOPMC to perform daily streamflow simulations in Nam Khan River and Nam Like River basins during the years from 2000 to 2004 so as to investigate the potential use of the TRMM in complementing rain gauge data in hydrological modelling of data-sparse basins. The results show that although larger difference exists in the high streamflow process and the low streamflow process, the daily simulations fed with TRMM precipitation data could basically reflect the daily streamflow processes at the four stations and determine the time to peak. Furthermore, the calibrated parameters in the Nam Khan River basin are more suitable than that in the Nam Like River basin. By comparing the two precipitation data, it indicates that the integration of TRMM precipitation data and rain gauge data have a promising prospect on the hydrological process simulation in data-sparse basin.

  16. Modeling the influence of hypsometry, vegetation, and storm energy on snowmelt contributions to basins during rain-on-snow floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayand, Nicholas E.; Lundquist, Jessica D.; Clark, Martyn P.

    2015-10-01

    Point observations and previous basin modeling efforts have suggested that snowmelt may be a significant input of water for runoff during extreme rain-on-snow floods within western U.S. basins. Quantifying snowmelt input over entire basins is difficult given sparse observations of snowmelt. In order to provide a range of snowmelt contributions for water managers, a physically based snow model coupled with an idealized basin representation was evaluated in point simulations and used to quantify the maximum basin-wide input from snowmelt volume during flood events. Maximum snowmelt basin contributions and uncertainty ranges were estimated as 29% (11-47%), 29% (8-37%), and 7% (2-24%) of total rain plus snowmelt input, within the Snoqualmie, East North Fork Feather, and Upper San Joaquin basins, respectively, during historic flooding events between 1980 and 2008. The idealized basin representation revealed that both hypsometry and forest cover of a basin had similar magnitude of impacts on the basin-wide snowmelt totals. However, the characteristics of a given storm (antecedent SWE and available energy for melt) controlled how much hypsometry and forest cover impacted basin-wide snowmelt. These results indicate that for watershed managers, flood forecasting efforts should prioritize rainfall prediction first, but cannot neglect snowmelt contributions in some cases. Efforts to reduce the uncertainty in the above snowmelt simulations should focus on improving the meteorological forcing data (especially air temperature and wind speed) in complex terrain.

  17. Application of the NCAR regional climate model to eastern Africa: 1. Simulation of the short rains of 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liqiang; Semazzi, Fredrick H. M.; Giorgi, Filippo; Ogallo, Laban

    1999-03-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Regional Climate Model (RegCM2) is employed to investigate the physical mechanisms that govern the October-December rains over eastern Africa. The model employs the Mercator conformai projection, with a domain of 5580 km × 5040 km centered at 31°E, 4°S, and a horizontal grid point spacing of 60 km. The simulation period is October-December 1988, and the model initial and lateral boundary conditions are taken from ECMWF reanalysis. A number of month-long simulations have been conducted to optimize various parameterizations of the model which include the following factors: cumulus convection, moisture parameterization, radiative transfer formulation, surface processes, boundary layer physics, and the lateral boundary conditions. The model was successfully customized over eastern Africa. The model simulates the large-scale circulation characteristics over the region as well as local features such as the dominant precipitation maxima, the Turkana low-level jet, and the diurnal reversal in the lake/land breeze circulation over Lake Victoria. Several model deficiencies are also identified. They include a negative rainfall bias over the western portions of the domain and the Kenya Highlands and a temperature bias over the tropical forest regions. Systematic analysis of surface water budget reveals that evapotranspiration is a major sink in the water budget over the regions where precipitation is moderate or small, while the role of runoff and drainage becomes important over the regions where precipitation is abundant. The model simulations also suggest that during the short-rains season, the large-scale circulation anomalies play the most important role in shaping the precipitation anomalies.

  18. Dynamic gauge adjustment of high-resolution X-band radar data for convective rain storms: Model-based evaluation against measured combined sewer overflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borup, Morten; Grum, Morten; Linde, Jens Jørgen; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that radar rainfall estimates need to be adjusted against rain gauge measurements in order to be useful for hydrological modelling. In the current study we investigate if adjustment can improve radar rainfall estimates to the point where they can be used for modelling overflows from urban drainage systems, and we furthermore investigate the importance of the aggregation period of the adjustment scheme. This is done by continuously adjusting X-band radar data based on the previous 5-30 min of rain data recorded by multiple rain gauges and propagating the rainfall estimates through a hydraulic urban drainage model. The model is built entirely from physical data, without any calibration, to avoid bias towards any specific type of rainfall estimate. The performance is assessed by comparing measured and modelled water levels at a weir downstream of a highly impermeable, well defined, 64 ha urban catchment, for nine overflow generating rain events. The dynamically adjusted radar data perform best when the aggregation period is as small as 10-20 min, in which case it performs much better than static adjusted radar data and data from rain gauges situated 2-3 km away.

  19. The Implications of ACTS Technology on the Requirements of Rain Attenuation Modeling for Communication System Specification and Analysis at 30/20 GHz and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of the use of the Ka-Band for space communications, coupled with the introduction of digital modulation techniques as well as multiple-beam methodology for satellites, has deemed it necessary to reassess the plethora of rain attenuation prediction models in use. The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project, undertaken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in 1983, offered such challenges to rain attenuation prediction modeling. Up to 1983, no such single modeling formalism existed that could fill such requirements. Not even the work done by the NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Group had envisioned such requirements, so no dynamic Ka-Band data existed from which one could draw conclusions. In this paper, the basic rudiments of what has become to be known as the 'ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model' will be presented. The concept of rain fade mitigation control availability will be introduced. A new evaluation is then presented for the performance of satellite communication systems, in particular, those to be operating within the Ka-Band and above, that will necessarily employ some type of dynamic rain fade mitigation procedure.

  20. A model for estimating rains' area, using the dependence of the time correlation of sites' monthly precipitation totals on the distance between sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walanus, Adam; Cebulska, Marta; Twardosz, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Based on the monthly precipitation series from 16 sites (in the Polish Carpathian Mountains), of 132 years' length, a relatively precise scatterplot of correlation coefficients between sites versus distance between sites is obtained. The "rains" of Gaussian shape, in the spatial sense, are a good model, which produces a scatterplot very closely resembling the observed one. The essential parameter of the model is the area covered by the modeled rains, which results to be of order 30-50 km, though with about a twice lower value for the N-S direction.

  1. Correction of the High-Latitude Rain Day Anomaly in the NCEP NCAR Reanalysis for Land Surface Hydrological Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Justin; Ziegler, Alan D.; Wood, Eric F.; Chen, Yangbo

    2004-10-01

    A spurious wavelike pattern in the monthly rain day statistics exists within the National Centers for Environmental Prediction National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP NCAR) reanalysis precipitation product. The anomaly, which is an artifact of the parameterization of moisture diffusion, occurs during the winter months in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. The anomaly is corrected by using monthly statistics from three different global precipitation products from 1) the University of Washington (UW), 2) the Global Precipitation Climate Project (GPCP), and 3) the Climatic Research Unit (CRU), resulting in three slightly different corrected precipitation products. The correction methodology, however, compromises spatial consistency (e.g., storm tracking) on a daily time scale. The effect that the precipitation correction has on the reanalysis-derived global land surface water budgets is investigated by forcing the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface model with all four datasets (i.e., the original reanalysis product and the three corrected datasets). The main components of the land surface water budget cycle are not affected substantially; however, the increased spatial variability in precipitation is reflected in the evaporation and runoff components but reduced in the case of soil moisture. Furthermore, the partitioning of precipitation into canopy evaporation and throughfall is sensitive to the rain day statistics of the correcting dataset, especially in the Tropics, and this has implications for the required accuracy of the correcting dataset. The output fields from these long-term land surface simulations provide a global, consistent dataset of water and energy states and fluxes that can be used for model intercomparisons, studies of annual and seasonal climate variability, and comparisons with current versions of numerical weather prediction models.


  2. Heavy rain field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, ED

    1991-01-01

    A weight-measuring rain gauge was developed to collect rain data and configured to operate at a high sample rate (one sample pre second). Instead of averaging the rain rate in minutes, hours, and sometime days as normally performed, the rain data collected are examined in seconds. The results of six field sites are compiled. Rain rate levels, duration of downpours, and frequency of heavy rainfall events are presented.

  3. Quasar Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Velocity resolved reverberation mapping (VRRM) has shown clear evidence for inflows in the broad emission line (BEL) region of active galactic nuclei: redshifted BELs at zero lag (AGNs, e.g. Arp 151, Bentz et al. 2010; Grier et al. 2013). While radiative transfer in rotating disks can give shorter red side lags than blue, a zero lag has to be along our line of sight, so it is hard to escape infall. The BEL region is normally considered to be rotating or in outflow so this result is a surprise. Infalling BEL gas cannot fall far without the need to lose angular momentum for accreting gas producing an accretion disk.I suggest that quasar continuum irradiation induced cooling instabilities (Chakravorty et al 2009; Krolik, McKee & Tarter 1981) lead to dense BEL clouds condensing out of the semi-ubiquitous warm absorber (WA) outflows found in AGNs and that these clouds may produce a VRRM inflow signature.Unlike WA gas, dense high column density BEL clouds are hard to accelerate with radiation pressure (Risaliti & Elvis 2010; Mushotzky, Solomon & Strittmatter 1972). BEL clouds will thus stall in the outflow and begin to fall back toward the central black hole after a dynamical time, 'raining out' of the WA medium. If these BEL clouds condense out before these outflows reach escape velocity [v(esc)] then this inflow can potentially produce the observed VRRM signature. As the clouds fall back in they will be moving on elliptical orbits supersonically through the WA gas with Mach number ~(2000 km/s)/(100km/s) ~20. This will produce comet-like structures with narrow opening angles, as seen in asymmetric X-ray absorbing 'eclipses' (Maiolino et al. 2010). They will survive only a few months, as required to avoid forming a disk. For this picture to work the condensation time must be less than the acceleration time to v(esc) and the destruction time must be longer than the dynamical time.

  4. Exchange processes of volatile organic compounds above a tropical rain forest: Implications for modeling tropospheric chemistry above dense vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Thomas; Potosnak, Mark; Guenther, Alex; Clark, Deborah; Walker, John; Herrick, Jeffrey D.; Geron, Chris

    2004-09-01

    Disjunct eddy covariance in conjunction with continuous in-canopy gradient measurements allowed for the first time to quantify the fine-scale source and sink distribution of some of the most abundant biogenic (isoprene, monoterpenes, methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and photooxidized (MVK+MAC, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetic, and formic acid) VOCs in an old growth tropical rain forest. Our measurements revealed substantial isoprene emissions (up to 2.50 mg m-2 h-1) and light-dependent monoterpene emissions (up to 0.33 mg m-2 h-1) at the peak of the dry season (April and May 2003). Oxygenated species such as methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde were typically emitted during daytime with net fluxes up to 0.50, 0.36, and 0.20 mg m-2 h-1, respectively. When generalized for tropical rain forests, these fluxes would add up to a total emission of 36, 16, 19, 106, and 7.2 Tg/yr for methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene, and monoterpenes, respectively. During nighttime we observed strong sinks for oxygenated and nitrogen-containing compounds such as methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, MVK+MAC, and acetonitrile with deposition velocities close to the aerodynamic limit. This suggests that the canopy resistance (Rc) is very small and not the rate-limiting step for the nighttime deposition of many VOCs. Our measured mean dry deposition velocities of methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, MVK+MAC, and acetonitrile were a factor 10-20 higher than estimated from traditional deposition models. If our measurements are generalized, this could have important implications for the redistribution of VOCs in atmospheric chemistry models. Our observations indicate that the current understanding of reactive carbon exchange can only be seen as a first-order approximation.

  5. Quantifying Rain Frequency Susceptibility Metric for Constraining Cloud Liquid Water Response to Aerosols in a Regional Aerosol-climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Wang, M.; Yang, Q.; Ma, P. L.; Huang, X.; Bai, H.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainties in the estimate of aerosol indirect forcing associated with the cloud liquid water response to aerosols (so called cloud lifetime effects) are large. Previous studies have shown that a metric called rain frequency susceptibility to aerosols (Spop,Spop=-dln(POP)/dln(AI)) can be used to evaluate and constrain cloud lifetime effects of aerosols in global climate models. Here we quantify this metric for constraining cloud liquid water response to aerosols in a regional aerosol-climate model WRF-Chem. The model were run over the Southeastern Pacific from October 15th and November 16th, 2008, the period of VOCALS Rex intensive airborne observations. Both ground and satellite observations are used to evaluated model simulations. We quantify the scale-dependence of Spop by running WRF-Chem at different horizontal resolutions (from 9km to 100km), and the model simulations were further performed with different physical packages to examine the relationship between Spop and cloud liquid water response to aerosols.

  6. Rain floods regime in the Amur Basin under climate changes impact: assessing by dynamic-stochastic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartsmsn, Boris; Lupakov, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    A number of extraordinarily rare hydrological events, occurred in the Amur Basin over the past 20 years, support the reality of runoff regime alteration along evident climate changes. The most suitable tools to study the hydrological consequences of climate changes impact is the dynamic-stochastic modeling. For assessment of climate changes impact we used prediction scheme with basin-indicators, the core of that is regional rainfall-runoff model (Flood Cycle Model, FCM). Indicators are the small basins, which were used to calibration and parameterization of FCM. Input data is daily total precipitation. Output is calculated hydrograph as sequence of daily hydrographs. The climate scenarios used are very simple: just increasing sum of precipitation for 10 and 20%. Only 2 statistical moments (norm and variation coefficient) and only for 2 hydrological parameters (maximal discharges of rain floods Qmax and seasonal total runoff during Jun-Sept WVI-IX) were estimated with the model runs Two test-bed basins were selected (every of which includes few small catchments) for experiments - Ussuri river near Kirovsky, 24400 km2, and Bureya river near Malinovka, 67400 km2. First stage of work includes the simulation experiments with real precipitation from nearest meteo-station. Thereby we got model frequency curves of for each small basins, that seems in good accordance with observed ones, lying inside of their confidential intervals and reproduce individual features of different basins. Next stage was trying the climate scenarios. Two approaches were used to increase precipitation. One (analog) was to attract the precipitation data from others meteo-stations, located in much rainy conditions, second one was just to multiply the precipitation by coefficient. It was found, that results with analog scenarios are very different, but in average is very similar to just increasing the precipitation for 20%. So at last we used only real precipitation, increased by 10 and 20%. Finally

  7. A statistical rain attenuation prediction model with application to the advanced communication technology satellite project. 1: Theoretical development and application to yearly predictions for selected cities in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    A rain attenuation prediction model is described for use in calculating satellite communication link availability for any specific location in the world that is characterized by an extended record of rainfall. Such a formalism is necessary for the accurate assessment of such availability predictions in the case of the small user-terminal concept of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project. The model employs the theory of extreme value statistics to generate the necessary statistical rainrate parameters from rain data in the form compiled by the National Weather Service. These location dependent rain statistics are then applied to a rain attenuation model to obtain a yearly prediction of the occurrence of attenuation on any satellite link at that location. The predictions of this model are compared to those of the Crane Two-Component Rain Model and some empirical data and found to be very good. The model is then used to calculate rain attenuation statistics at 59 locations in the United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) for the 20 GHz downlinks and 30 GHz uplinks of the proposed ACTS system. The flexibility of this modeling formalism is such that it allows a complete and unified treatment of the temporal aspects of rain attenuation that leads to the design of an optimum stochastic power control algorithm, the purpose of which is to efficiently counter such rain fades on a satellite link.

  8. Don't blame it on the precipitation input: A hydrological modeling case study with a very dense and redundant rain gauge network in southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwala, Christian; Schlenk, Ulla; Fersch, Benjamin; Kunstmann, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Accurate rainfall input is the key component in hydrological modeling, in particular for model development. However, accurately capturing precipitation is a challenging, not to say impossible task, due to its high variability in time and space. Typical rain gauge networks are too coarse to deliver spatially representative measurements, while remote sensing techniques suffer from uncertainties of their indirect measurement principle. To rule out the uncertainty from rainfall input as good as possible, we have carried out two intensive measurements campaigns in 2015 and 2016, using 66 rain gauges, installed at 22 sites within a catchment of 70 km2 in the pre-alpine region of southern Germany. The rain gauge observations were part of the ScaleX campaign (http://scalex.imk-ifu.kit.edu), aiming at concertedly investigating atmospheric, hydrological and biogeochemical processes over a large range of scales. The average distance between the 22 observation sites was 2.5 km. We further improved the spatial representativeness of our data set using C-band weather radar data from the German Weather Service research radar, only 10 km away from our catchment. To account for the uncertainties of the radar observations, we adjusted the radar rainfall with data from our dense rain gauge network, providing the best possible estimation of ground rainfall for our catchment. We will present results from hydrological modeling in our catchment, using the stand-alone WRF-Hydro model, driven by different derived rainfall fields from rain gauge, radar and a combination of the two. We will highlight the advantage of having reliable ground rainfall to identify model inherent uncertainties and potential improvements.

  9. Monsoons and ITCZ in TRACMIP, the Tropical Rain belts with an Annual cycle and Continent - Model Intercomparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasutti, M.; Voigt, A.; Scheff, J.

    2016-12-01

    TRACMIP consists of a set of five experiments performed by an ensemble of GCMs and conceived as a link in the hierarchy between the CFMIP/CMIP5 Aqua experiments and the CMIP5 comprehensive simulations. The basic configuration is an aquaplanet AGCM coupled to a slab ocean. By using interactive sea-surface temperatures and seasonally-varying insolation TRACMIP fills the gap between Aquaplanets with prescribed SSTs and fully-coupled realistic CMIP5 simulations. Adding to the basic Aquaplanet configuration a highly-idealized tropical continent allows the investigation of the role of zonal asymmetries in the dynamics of the ITCZ and of the source of the observed differences between land convection and monsoon circulations on one hand, and oceanic convection in the ITCZ and the Warm Pool on the other. Finally, by including both key forcings of the future (greenhouse gases) and of the Holocene (orbital changes in insolation), TRACMIP contributes to the "past to future (P2F)" efforts to connect the climate response to different forcings via a basic understanding of the mechanisms at play. TRACMIP includes the participation of both CMIP5 comprehensive climate models and a simplified model that neglects cloud and water-vapor radiative feedbacks, thus allowing a more direct connection between GCMs results and theoretical studies of tropical rain belt dynamics. We will present preliminary results from the ensemble, aiming to examine the mechanisms controlling tropical precipitation in the context of forced variability. First and foremost, we are interested in the largest forced variation: the annual cycle. We will draw out the similarities and the distinctions between the climatologies of the oceanic and continental rain bands, study the ways in which the two interact with each other, and investigate the extent to which established zonal-mean ITCZ frameworks contain information about regional rainfall characteristics. Second, we will investigate the response to quadrupling the

  10. Neutralization of soil aerosol and its impact on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia: Observations and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zifa; Akimoto, Hajime; Uno, Itsushi

    2002-10-01

    A comprehensive Air Quality Prediction Modeling System is applied to simulate the pH values in precipitation and to investigate neutralization by soil aerosols and their influence on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia. A modified deflation module is designed to provide explicit information on the soil aerosol loading. Numerical simulation was performed for 1 year, from 15 December 1998 to 31 December 1999. Wet deposition monitoring data at 17 sites of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in east Asia in addition to State Environmental Protection Agency data were used to evaluate the model, and a reasonable agreement was obtained. Observed evidence clearly shows that in northern China acid deposition is heavily influenced and buffered by natural soil dust from desert and semiarid areas. The observed mean rainwater pH value in northern China is the highest, between 6.0 and 7.2, while in southern China, where many areas severely impacted by acid precipitation are located, the pH value is much lower, between 3.5 and 5. In Japan the mean pH value is 4.7, significantly higher than that in southern China, while in South Korea the pH value is intermediate between those in northern China and Japan. The model is capable of reproducing this geographical distribution of rainwater pH over east Asia. The simulation results for 1999 demonstrated strong neutralization of precipitation by soil aerosols over northeast Asia, and the distribution pattern of acid rain was also altered. The annual mean pH values in northern China and Korea show a remarkable increase of 0.8-2.5, while the increase in mean pH values over southern China and Japan are less than 0.1. The neutralization effects vary by season, with the greatest influence in spring, when pH values increased by 0.1-0.4 in Japan, 0.5-1.5 in Korea, and more than 2 in northern China.

  11. Development of a succession model for subtropical rain forest and its application to assess the effects of timber harvest at Wiangaree State Forest, New South Wales

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, H.H. Jr.; Hopkins, M.S.; Burgess, I.P.; Mortlock, A.T.

    1980-11-01

    The KIAMBRAM model, a computer model of complex notophyll vine forest (subtropical rain forest) in Australia near the New South Wales/Queensland border, is documented and results of the model are presented. The model simulates a 1/20-ha forest stand by considering explicitly the birth, death, and growth of each tree in the stand. The model also allows the selective harvest of any of the 125 species considered at any desired frequency. The model is tested on its ability to simulate species dynamics following disturbance and to predict the composition of mature forest. The model is used to assess the consequences of the harvest of commercial species from the complex notophyll vine forest both in terms of a single harvest and of a repeated harvest. The KIAMBRAM model predicts that repeated logging on a 30-year cycle would lead to rain forest in which cover was maintained but species composition altered. The composition would shift toward species of earlier successional stages, of lower value as logs. The volume available for harvest would be smaller. Application of the model to other tropical rain forests in discussed.

  12. Testing mixing models of old and young groundwater in a tropical lowland rain forest with environmental tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solomon, D. Kip; Genereux, David P.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2010-01-01

    We tested three models of mixing between old interbasin groundwater flow (IGF) and young, locally derived groundwater in a lowland rain forest in Costa Rica using a large suite of environmental tracers. We focus on the young fraction of water using the transient tracers CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 3H, and bomb 14C. We measured 3He, but 3H/3He dating is generally problematic due to the presence of mantle 3He. Because of their unique concentration histories in the atmosphere, combinations of transient tracers are sensitive not only to subsurface travel times but also to mixing between waters having different travel times. Samples fall into three distinct categories: (1) young waters that plot along a piston flow line, (2) old samples that have near-zero concentrations of the transient tracers, and (3) mixtures of 1 and 2. We have modeled the concentrations of the transient tracers using (1) a binary mixing model (BMM) of old and young water with the young fraction transported via piston flow, (2) an exponential mixing model (EMM) with a distribution of groundwater travel times characterized by a mean value, and (3) an exponential mixing model for the young fraction followed by binary mixing with an old fraction (EMM/BMM). In spite of the mathematical differences in the mixing models, they all lead to a similar conceptual model of young (0 to 10 year) groundwater that is locally derived mixing with old (>1000 years) groundwater that is recharged beyond the surface water boundary of the system.

  13. Testing mixing models of old and young groundwater in a tropical lowland rain forest with environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, D. Kip; Genereux, David P.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2010-04-01

    We tested three models of mixing between old interbasin groundwater flow (IGF) and young, locally derived groundwater in a lowland rain forest in Costa Rica using a large suite of environmental tracers. We focus on the young fraction of water using the transient tracers CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 3H, and bomb 14C. We measured 3He, but 3H/3He dating is generally problematic due to the presence of mantle 3He. Because of their unique concentration histories in the atmosphere, combinations of transient tracers are sensitive not only to subsurface travel times but also to mixing between waters having different travel times. Samples fall into three distinct categories: (1) young waters that plot along a piston flow line, (2) old samples that have near-zero concentrations of the transient tracers, and (3) mixtures of 1 and 2. We have modeled the concentrations of the transient tracers using (1) a binary mixing model (BMM) of old and young water with the young fraction transported via piston flow, (2) an exponential mixing model (EMM) with a distribution of groundwater travel times characterized by a mean value, and (3) an exponential mixing model for the young fraction followed by binary mixing with an old fraction (EMM/BMM). In spite of the mathematical differences in the mixing models, they all lead to a similar conceptual model of young (0 to 10 year) groundwater that is locally derived mixing with old (>1000 years) groundwater that is recharged beyond the surface water boundary of the system.

  14. An integrated acid rain assessment model for Canada using the RAISON for windows system

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, D.C.L.; Jeffries, D.S.; Wong, I.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past decade, a variety of mathematical models have been developed in Canada and elsewhere to simulate the long-range atmospheric transport, geochemical pathways and ecological impacts of acidifying chemicals such as sulfur and nitrogen oxides. While these models have been applied successfully within disciplinary domains, the solution to environmental issues such as acidification requires the integration of these models across disciplines. In addition, socio-economic constraints, in terms of both the control and damage costs, have to be considered in the same integrated framework, because they are an integral part of the solution. The approach adopted uses the PC/Windows-based environmental information system, RAISON, developed by Environment Canada. The system allows data and model results to be displayed in a Geographical Information System (GIS) format and presented in a tightly linked and interactive system. It offers a generic set of software tools to connect databases, spreadsheets, maps, models, expert systems and optimization procedures. Its strength lies in its ability to meet the needs of team members who want to bring simple to complex disciplinary models into the Integrated Assessment Model (IAM). There are three general ways of incorporating component models: (a) connect the model {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} to the IAM, (b) replace the model with a simpler version such as an input-output model and (c) rewrite the entire code in the RAISON system. We have been successful with all three approaches, as circumstances dictated. For example, wildlife and fishery ecological models were used {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} by directly linking their input and output files to RAISON; a complex air pollutant trajectory model was modified to a much shorter source-receptor version; and steady-state geochemical models were completely rewritten.

  15. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  16. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  17. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  18. The Children's Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Carol A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a unit on rain forests in which first graders studied about rain forests, built a classroom rain forest, and created a bulletin board. They also graphed rainfall, estimated body water, and estimated the number of newspapers that could be produced from one canopy tree. (MKR)

  19. No Rain, No Gain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Marketing is like the rain. Some people are quickly aware of it, while others take repeated and consistent drops for quite an extended period of time before they take action. Building on the marketing principles discussed in previous issues, the next key principle to smart marketing is the "Rain Effect." The Rain Effect is the use of consistent…

  20. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  1. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  2. No Rain, No Gain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Marketing is like the rain. Some people are quickly aware of it, while others take repeated and consistent drops for quite an extended period of time before they take action. Building on the marketing principles discussed in previous issues, the next key principle to smart marketing is the "Rain Effect." The Rain Effect is the use of consistent…

  3. A 3D model for rain-induced landslides based on molecular dynamics with fractal and fractional water diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Bagnoli, Franco; Guarino, Alessio

    2017-09-01

    We present a three-dimensional model of rain-induced landslides, based on cohesive spherical particles. The rainwater infiltration into the soil follows either the fractional or the fractal diffusion equations. We analytically solve the fractal partial differential equation (PDE) for diffusion with particular boundary conditions to simulate a rainfall event. We developed a numerical integration scheme for the PDE, compared with the analytical solution. We adapt the fractal diffusion equation obtaining the gravimetric water content that we use as input of a triggering scheme based on Mohr-Coulomb limit-equilibrium criterion. This triggering is then complemented by a standard molecular dynamics algorithm, with an interaction force inspired by the Lennard-Jones potential, to update the positions and velocities of particles. We present our results for homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, i.e., systems composed by particles with same or different radius, respectively. Interestingly, in the heterogeneous case, we observe segregation effects due to the different volume of the particles. Finally, we analyze the parameter sensibility both for the triggering and the propagation phases. Our simulations confirm the results of a previous two-dimensional model and therefore the feasible applicability to real cases.

  4. Retrospective analysis of a nonforecasted rain-on-snow flood in the Alps - a matter of model limitations or unpredictable nature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, O.; Froidevaux, P.; Börst, U.; Rickli, R.; Martius, O.; Weingartner, R.

    2014-06-01

    A rain-on-snow flood occurred in the Bernese Alps, Switzerland, on 10 October 2011, and caused significant damage. As the flood peak was unpredicted by the flood forecast system, questions were raised concerning the causes and the predictability of the event. Here, we aimed to reconstruct the anatomy of this rain-on-snow flood in the Lötschen Valley (160 km2) by analyzing meteorological data from the synoptic to the local scale and by reproducing the flood peak with the hydrological model WaSiM-ETH (Water Flow and Balance Simulation Model). This in order to gain process understanding and to evaluate the predictability. The atmospheric drivers of this rain-on-snow flood were (i) sustained snowfall followed by (ii) the passage of an atmospheric river bringing warm and moist air towards the Alps. As a result, intensive rainfall (average of 100 mm day-1) was accompanied by a temperature increase that shifted the 0° line from 1500 to 3200 m a.s.l. (meters above sea level) in 24 h with a maximum increase of 9 K in 9 h. The south-facing slope of the valley received significantly more precipitation than the north-facing slope, leading to flooding only in tributaries along the south-facing slope. We hypothesized that the reason for this very local rainfall distribution was a cavity circulation combined with a seeder-feeder-cloud system enhancing local rainfall and snowmelt along the south-facing slope. By applying and considerably recalibrating the standard hydrological model setup, we proved that both latent and sensible heat fluxes were needed to reconstruct the snow cover dynamic, and that locally high-precipitation sums (160 mm in 12 h) were required to produce the estimated flood peak. However, to reproduce the rapid runoff responses during the event, we conceptually represent likely lateral flow dynamics within the snow cover causing the model to react "oversensitively" to meltwater. Driving the optimized model with COSMO (Consortium for Small-scale Modeling)-2

  5. HYDROLOGIC MODELING OF AN EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA WATERSHED WITH NEXRAD AND RAIN GAUGE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper applies the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to model the hydrology in the Pocono Creek watershed located in Monroe County, Pa. The calibrated model will be used in a subsequent study to examine the impact of population growth and rapid urbanization in the watershed o...

  6. HYDROLOGIC MODELING OF AN EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA WATERSHED WITH NEXRAD AND RAIN GAUGE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper applies the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to model the hydrology in the Pocono Creek watershed located in Monroe County, Pa. The calibrated model will be used in a subsequent study to examine the impact of population growth and rapid urbanization in the watershed o...

  7. More rain compensation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sworder, D. D.; Vojak, R.

    1992-01-01

    To reduce the impact of rain-induced attenuation in the 20/30 GHz band, the attenuation at a specified signal frequency must be estimated and extrapolated forward in time on the basis of a noisy beacon measurement. Several studies have used model based procedures for solving this problem in statistical inference. Perhaps the most widely used model-based paradigm leads to the Kalman filter and its lineal variants. In this formulation, the dynamic features of the attenuation are represented by a state process (x(sub t)). The observation process (y(sub t)) is derived from beacon measurements. Some ideas relating to the signal processing problems related to uplink power control are presented. It is shown that some easily implemented algorithms hold promise for use in estimating rain induced fades. The algorithms were applied to actual data generated at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI) test facility. Because only one such event was studied, it is not clear that the algorithms will have the same effectiveness when a wide range of events are studied.

  8. Kinematics of coronal rain in a transversely oscillating loop: Ponderomotive force and rain-excited oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verwichte, E.; Antolin, P.; Rowlands, G.; Kohutova, P.; Neukirch, T.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Coronal rain is composed of cool dense blobs that form in solar coronal loops and are a manifestation of catastrophic cooling linked to thermal instability. Once formed, rain falls towards the solar surface at sub-ballistic speeds, which is not well understood. Pressure forces seem to be the prime candidate to explain this. In many observations rain is accompanied by transverse oscillations and the interaction between rain and these oscillations needs to be explored. Aims: Therefore, an alternative kinematic model for coronal rain kinematics in transversely oscillating loops is developed to understand the physical nature of the observed sub-ballistic falling motion of rain. This model explicitly explores the role of the ponderomotive force arising from the transverse oscillation on the rain motion and the capacity of rain to excite wave motion. Methods: An analytical model is presented that describes a rain blob guided by the coronal magnetic field supporting a one-dimensional shear Alfvén wave as a point mass on an oscillating string. The model includes gravity and the ponderomotive force from the oscillation acting on the mass and the inertia of the mass acting on the oscillation. Results: The kinematics of rain in the limit of negligible rain mass are explored and falling and trapped regimes are found, depending on wave amplitude. In the trapped regime for the fundamental mode, the rain blob bounces back and forth around the loop top at a long period that is inversely proportional to the oscillation amplitude. The model is compared with several observational rain studies, including one in-depth comparison with an observation that shows rain with up-and-down bobbing motion. The role of rain inertia in exciting transverse oscillations is explored in inclined loops. Conclusions: It is found that the model requires displacement amplitudes of the transverse oscillation that are typically an order of magnitude larger than observed to explain the measured sub

  9. Bayesian Thermal Evolution Models for Giant Planets: Helium rain and double-diffusive convection in Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankovich, C.; Fortney, J. J.; Moore, K. L.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen and helium demix when sufficiently cool, and this bears on the thermal evolution of all cool giant planets at or below one Jupiter mass. Over the past few years, ab initio simulations have put us in the era of quantitative predictions for this H-He immiscibility at megabar pressures. We present models for the thermal evolution of Jupiter, including its evolving helium distribution following one such ab initio H-He phase diagram. After 4 Gyr of homogeneous evolution, differentiation establishes a helium gradient between 1 and 2 Mbar that dynamically stabilizes the fluid to overturning convection. The result is a region undergoing overstable double-diffusive convection (ODDC), whose relatively weak vertical heat transport maintains a superadiabatic temperature gradient. With a general parameterization for the ODDC efficiency, the models can reconcile Jupiter's intrinsic flux, atmospheric helium content, and radius at the age of the solar system if this H-He phase diagram is translated to cooler temperatures. We cast our nonadiabatic thermal evolution models in a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation framework, retrieving the total heavy element mass, the superadiabaticity in the convectively stable region, and the phase diagram temperature offset. Models using the interpolated Saumon, Chabrier and van Horn (1995) equation of state (SCvH-I) favor very inefficient ODDC, forming a thermal boundary layer that allows the molecular envelope to cool rapidly while the deeper interior (most of the planet's mass) actually heats up over time. If the overall cooling time is modulated with an additional free parameter, mimicking the effect of a colder or warmer EOS, the models favor those that are colder than SCvH-I; this class of EOS is also favored by shock experiments. The models in this scenario have more modest deep superadiabaticities such that the envelope cools more gradually, and a cooling or warming deep interior are equally likely.

  10. A Predictor Model for SHF and EHF MILSATCOM System Availabilities in the Presence of Rain.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-21

    A numerical method for computing MILSATCOM system availability based on predicted link availability is described. Link availability can be computed in the model for frequencies of 10-50 GHz, arbitrary geostationary satellite subpoint, and arbitrary value of link margin in dB. Computed availability contours are plotted on a Mercator grid of the world . (Author)

  11. Comparison of SWAT Model Water Balance Calibration Using NEXRAD and Surface Rain Gauge Data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The value of watershed-scale, water quality models to ecosystem management is increasingly evident as more programs adopt these tools to help assess the effectiveness of different management scenarios on the environment. The USDA-Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is one such program whi...

  12. Chance-constrained/stochastic linear programming model for acid rain abatement—I. Complete colinearity and noncolinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J. H.; McBean, E. A.; Farquhar, G. J.

    A Linear Programming model is presented for development of acid rain abatement strategies in eastern North America. For a system comprised of 235 large controllable point sources and 83 uncontrolled area sources, it determines the least-cost method of reducing SO 2 emissions to satisfy maximum wet sulfur deposition limits at 20 sensitive receptor locations. In this paper, the purely deterministic model is extended to a probabilistic form by incorporating the effects of meteorologic variability on the long-range pollutant transport processes. These processes are represented by source-receptor-specific transfer coefficients. Experiments for quantifying the spatial variability of transfer coefficients showed their distributions to be approximately lognormal with logarithmic standard deviations consistently about unity. Three methods of incorporating second-moment random variable uncertainty into the deterministic LP framework are described: Two-Stage Programming Under Uncertainty (LPUU), Chance-Constrained Programming (CCP) and Stochastic Linear Programming (SLP). A composite CCP-SLP model is developed which embodies the two-dimensional characteristics of transfer coefficient uncertainty. Two probabilistic formulations are described involving complete colinearity and complete noncolinearity for the transfer coefficient covariance-correlation structure. Complete colinearity assumes complete dependence between transfer coefficients. Complete noncolinearity assumes complete independence. The completely colinear and noncolinear formulations are considered extreme bounds in a meteorologic sense and yield abatement strategies of largely didactic value. Such strategies can be characterized as having excessive costs and undesirable deposition results in the completely colinear case and absence of a clearly defined system risk level (other than expected-value) in the noncolinear formulation.

  13. Bayesian thermal evolution models for giant planets: Helium rain and double-diffusive convection in Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankovich, Christopher; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Nettelmann, Nadine; Moore, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen and helium unmix when sufficiently cool, and this bears on the thermal evolution of all cool giant planets at or below one Jupiter mass. Over the past few years, ab initio simulations have put us in the era of quantitative predictions for this H-He immiscibility at megabar pressures. We present models for the thermal evolution of Jupiter, including its evolving helium distribution following one such ab initio H-He phase diagram. After 4 Gyr of homogeneous evolution, differentiation establishes a helium gradient between 1 and 2 Mbar that dynamically stabilizes the fluid to overturning convection. The result is a region undergoing overstable double-diffusive convection (ODDC), whose relatively weak vertical heat transport maintains a superadiabatic temperature gradient. With a general parameterization for the ODDC efficiency, the models can reconcile Jupiter's intrinsic flux, atmospheric helium content, and mean radius at the age of the solar system if the H-He phase diagram is translated to cooler temperatures.We cast our nonadiabatic thermal evolution models in a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation framework, retrieving the total heavy element mass, the superadiabaticity of the deep temperature gradient, and the phase diagram temperature offset. Models using the interpolated Saumon, Chabrier and van Horn (1995) equation of state (SCvH-I) favor very inefficient ODDC such that the deep temperature gradient is strongly superadiabatic, forming a thermal boundary layer that allows the molecular envelope to cool quickly while the deeper interior (most of the planet's mass) actually heats up over time. If we modulate the overall cooling time with an additional free parameter, mimicking the effect of a colder or warmer EOS, the models favor those that are colder than SCvH-I; this class of EOS is also favored by shock experiments. The models in this scenario have more modest deep superadiabaticities such that the envelope cools more gradually and the deep

  14. Bayesian Evolution Models for Jupiter with Helium Rain and Double-diffusive Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankovich, Christopher; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Moore, Kevin L.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen and helium demix when sufficiently cool, and this bears on the evolution of all giant planets at large separations at or below roughly a Jupiter mass. We model the thermal evolution of Jupiter, including its evolving helium distribution following results of ab initio simulations for helium immiscibility in metallic hydrogen. After 4 Gyr of homogeneous evolution, differentiation establishes a thin helium gradient below 1 Mbar that dynamically stabilizes the fluid to convection. The region undergoes overstable double-diffusive convection (ODDC), whose weak heat transport maintains a superadiabatic temperature gradient. With a generic parameterization for the ODDC efficiency, the models can reconcile Jupiter’s intrinsix flux, atmospheric helium content, and radius at the age of the solar system if the Lorenzen et al. H-He phase diagram is translated to lower temperatures. We cast the evolutionary models in an MCMC framework to explore tens of thousands of evolutionary sequences, retrieving probability distributions for the total heavy-element mass, the superadiabaticity of the temperature gradient due to ODDC, and the phase diagram perturbation. The adopted SCvH-I equation of state (EOS) favors inefficient ODDC such that a thermal boundary layer is formed, allowing the molecular envelope to cool rapidly while the deeper interior actually heats up over time. If the overall cooling time is modulated with an additional free parameter to imitate the effect of a colder or warmer EOS, the models favor those that are colder than SCvH-I. In this case the superadiabaticity is modest and warming and cooling deep interiors are equally likely.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hytönen, Marjo K; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Hundi, Sruthi; Salmela, Elina; Venta, Patrick; Sarkiala, Eva; Jokinen, Tarja; Gorgas, Daniela; Kere, Juha; Nieminen, Pekka; Drögemüller, Cord; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-05-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined genome-wide association and next generation sequencing, to investigate the clinico-pathological features and genetic causes of three developmental syndromes in dogs, including craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO), a previously undescribed skeletal syndrome, and dental hypomineralization, for which we identified pathogenic variants in the canine SLC37A2 (truncating splicing enhancer variant), SCARF2 (truncating 2-bp deletion) and FAM20C (missense variant) genes, respectively. CMO is a clinical equivalent to an infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease), for which SLC37A2 is a new candidate gene. SLC37A2 is a poorly characterized member of a glucose-phosphate transporter family without previous disease associations. It is expressed in many tissues, including cells of the macrophage lineage, e.g. osteoclasts, and suggests a disease mechanism, in which an impaired glucose homeostasis in osteoclasts compromises their function in the developing bone, leading to hyperostosis. Mutations in SCARF2 and FAM20C have been associated with the human van den Ende-Gupta and Raine syndromes that include numerous features similar to the affected dogs. Given the growing interest in the molecular characterization and treatment of human rare diseases, our study presents three novel physiologically relevant models for further research and therapy approaches, while providing the molecular identity for the canine conditions.

  16. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Marjo K.; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K.; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Hundi, Sruthi; Salmela, Elina; Venta, Patrick; Sarkiala, Eva; Jokinen, Tarja; Gorgas, Daniela; Kere, Juha; Nieminen, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined genome-wide association and next generation sequencing, to investigate the clinico-pathological features and genetic causes of three developmental syndromes in dogs, including craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO), a previously undescribed skeletal syndrome, and dental hypomineralization, for which we identified pathogenic variants in the canine SLC37A2 (truncating splicing enhancer variant), SCARF2 (truncating 2-bp deletion) and FAM20C (missense variant) genes, respectively. CMO is a clinical equivalent to an infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease), for which SLC37A2 is a new candidate gene. SLC37A2 is a poorly characterized member of a glucose-phosphate transporter family without previous disease associations. It is expressed in many tissues, including cells of the macrophage lineage, e.g. osteoclasts, and suggests a disease mechanism, in which an impaired glucose homeostasis in osteoclasts compromises their function in the developing bone, leading to hyperostosis. Mutations in SCARF2 and FAM20C have been associated with the human van den Ende-Gupta and Raine syndromes that include numerous features similar to the affected dogs. Given the growing interest in the molecular characterization and treatment of human rare diseases, our study presents three novel physiologically relevant models for further research and therapy approaches, while providing the molecular identity for the canine conditions. PMID:27187611

  17. The value of data availability versus model complexity to estimate snow, glacier and rain water in mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, David; Vis, Marc; Seibert, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of snow, glacier and rainwater to runoff in mountain streams is of major importance for water resources managers as climate change is expected to impact on all three sources (e.g. Huss, 2012). While glaciers are retreating worldwide, the snow cover during winter becomes shorter and precipitations events become more intense (e.g. Finger et al., 2012). Besides field investigation such as chemical fingerprints in water samples and artificial tracer experiments (e.g. Finger et al., 2013), the contribution of snow, glacier and rain can also be estimated with hydrological models, given that the modeling accounts adequately for snow-, glacier and rainwater runoff (Finger et al., 2011). We present a multi-variable calibration technique to estimate runoff composition using the conceptual HBV-light model (Seibert and Vis, 2012). The model code was extended to allow calibration and validation of simulations against glacier mass balances and satellite derived snow cover area, in addition to the usual comparison against measured discharge. We tested the value of these additional data sets on three meso-scale catchments in Switzerland: i) Rhoneglacier (39km2; ~50% glaciation), ii) Hinterrhein (53km2; ~17% glaciation) and iii) Silvretta glacier (103km2; ~8% glaciation). We also compared the results to a similar study performed with a physically based, fully distributed hydrological model (Finger et al., 2011). Preliminary results indicate that all three observational datasets are reproduced adequately by the model, allowing an accurate estimation of the runoff composition in the three mountain streams. However, the use of runoff alone to calibrate the model leads to unrealistic snow- and glacier melt, expressed by a low overall model performance. These results are in line with previous studies carried out with a more complex, physically based fully distributed hydrological model (Finger et al. 2011). Based on these results we conclude that it is essential to use

  18. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  19. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  20. Raining on black holes and massive galaxies: the top-down multiphase condensation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Temi, P.; Brighenti, F.

    2017-04-01

    The plasma haloes filling massive galaxies, groups and clusters are shaped by active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating and subsonic turbulence (σv ∼ 150 km s-1), as probed by Hitomi. Novel 3D high-resolution simulations show the soft X-ray, keV hot plasma cools rapidly via radiative emission at the high-density interface of the turbulent eddies, stimulating a top-down condensation cascade of warm 104 K filaments. The kpc-scale ionized (optical/ultraviolet) filaments form a skin enveloping the neutral filaments (optical/infrared/21 cm). The peaks of the warm filaments further condense into cold molecular clouds (<50 K; radio) with total mass of several 107 M⊙ and inheriting the turbulent kinematics. In the core, the clouds collide inelastically, mixing angular momentum and leading to Chaotic Cold Accretion (CCA). The black hole accretion rate (BHAR) can be modelled via quasi-spherical viscous accretion, dot{M}_bullet ∝ ν _c, with clump collisional viscosity νc ≡ λc σv and λc ∼ 100 pc. Beyond the core, pressure torques shape the angular momentum transport. In CCA, the BHAR is recurrently boosted up to 2 dex compared with the disc evolution, which arises as turbulence becomes subdominant. With negligible rotation too, compressional heating inhibits the molecular phase. The CCA BHAR distribution is lognormal with pink noise, f-1 power spectrum characteristic of fractal phenomena. Such chaotic fluctuations can explain the rapid luminosity variability of AGN and high-mass X-ray binaries. An improved criterium to trace non-linear condensation is proposed: σv/vcool ≲ 1. The three-phase CCA reproduces key observations of cospatial multiphase gas in massive galaxies, including Chandra X-ray images, SOAR Hα filaments and kinematics, Herschel [C+] emission and ALMA molecular associations. CCA plays important role in AGN feedback and unification, the evolution of BHs, galaxies and clusters.

  1. ACTS Rain Fade Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, Thom A.

    1996-01-01

    Performance status of the Adaptive Rain Fade Compensation includes: (1) The rain fade protocol is functional detecting fades, providing an additional 10 dB of margin and seamless transitions to and from coded operation; (2) The stabilization of the link margins and the optimization of rain fade decision thresholds has resulted in improved BER performance; (3) Characterization of the fade compensation algorithm is ongoing.

  2. Rain forest preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, R.F. )

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the possible impact the destruction of the tropical rain forest in South America has had on the atmosphere. Slash-and-burn agricultural practices have caused laterization of the soils, because rain forest vegetation carries nutrients, rather than the soil. The fact that the vegetation of the rain forest can help metabolize the excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is also mentioned.

  3. ACTS Rain Fade Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, Thom A.

    1996-01-01

    Performance status of the Adaptive Rain Fade Compensation includes: (1) The rain fade protocol is functional detecting fades, providing an additional 10 dB of margin and seamless transitions to and from coded operation; (2) The stabilization of the link margins and the optimization of rain fade decision thresholds has resulted in improved BER performance; (3) Characterization of the fade compensation algorithm is ongoing.

  4. Retrospective analysis of a non-forecasted rain-on-snow flood in the Alps - a matter of model-limitations or unpredictable nature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, O.; Froidevaux, P.; Börst, U.; Rickli, R.; Martius, O.; Weingartner, R.

    2013-10-01

    On 10 October 2011, a rain-on-snow flood occurred in the Bernese Alps, Switzerland, and caused significant damage. As this flood peak was unpredicted by the flood forecast system, questions were raised concerning what has caused this flood and whether it was predictable at all. In this study, we focused on one valley that was heavily hit by the event, the Loetschen valley (160 km2), and aimed to reconstruct the anatomy of this rain-on-snow flood from the synoptic conditions represented by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ECWMF analysis data, and the local meteorology within the valley recorded by an extensive met-station network. In addition, we applied the hydrological model WaSiM-ETH to improve our hydrological process understanding about this event and to demonstrate the predictability of this rain-on-snow flood. We found an atmospheric river bringing moist and warm air to Switzerland that followed an anomalous cold front with sustained snowfall to be central for this rain-on-snow event. Intensive rainfall (average 100 mm day-1) was accompanied by a drastic temperature increase (+8 K) that shifted the zero degree line from 1500 m a.s.l. to 3200 m a.s.l. in 12 h. The northern flank of the valley received significantly more precipitation than the southern flank, leading to an enormous flood in tributaries along the northern flank, while the tributaries along the southern flank remained nearly unchanged. We hypothesized that the reason for this was a cavity circulation combined with a seeder-feeder-cloud system enhancing both local rainfall and snow melt by condensation of the warm, moist air on the snow. Applying and adjusting the hydrological model, we show that both the latent and the sensible heat fluxes were responsible for the flood and that locally large amounts of precipitation (up to 160 mm rainfall in 12 h) was necessary to produce the estimated flood peak. With considerable adjustments to the model and meteorological input data, we were

  5. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  6. Estimation of Effective Transmission Loss Due to Subtropical Hydrometeor Scatters using a 3D Rain Cell Model for Centimeter and Millimeter Wave Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, J. S.; Owolawi, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of hydrometeor scattering on microwave radio communication down links continues to be of interest as the number of the ground and earth space terminals continually grows The interference resulting from the hydrometeor scattering usually leads to the reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR) at the affected terminal and at worst can even end up in total link outage. In this paper, an attempt has been made to compute the effective transmission loss due to subtropical hydrometeors on vertically polarized signals in Earth-satellite propagation paths in the Ku, Ka and V band frequencies based on the modified Capsoni 3D rain cell model. The 3D rain cell model has been adopted and modified using the subtropical log-normal distributions of raindrop sizes and introducing the equivalent path length through rain in the estimation of the attenuation instead of the usual specific attenuation in order to account for the attenuation of both wanted and unwanted paths to the receiver. The co-channels, interference at the same frequency is very prone to the higher amount of unwanted signal at the elevation considered. The importance of joint transmission is also considered.

  7. Calculation of Individual Tree Water Use in a Bornean Tropical Rain Forest Using Individual-Based Dynamic Vegetation Model SEIB-DGVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, T.; Kumagai, T.; Saito, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Kume, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Sato, H.

    2015-12-01

    Bornean tropical rain forests are among the moistest biomes of the world with abundant rainfall throughout the year, and considered to be vulnerable to a change in the rainfall regime; e.g., high tree mortality was reported in such forests induced by a severe drought associated with the ENSO event in 1997-1998. In order to assess the effect (risk) of future climate change on eco-hydrology in such tropical rain forests, it is important to understand the water use of trees individually, because the vulnerability or mortality of trees against climate change can depend on the size of trees. Therefore, we refined the Spatially Explicit Individual-Based Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (SEIB-DGVM) so that the transpiration and its control by stomata are calculated for each individual tree. By using this model, we simulated the transpiration of each tree and its DBH-size dependency, and successfully reproduced the measured data of sap flow of trees and eddy covariance flux data obtained in a Bornean lowland tropical rain forest in Lambir Hills National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia.

  8. ACID RAIN MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides an overview of existing statistical methodologies for the estimation of site-specific and regional trends in wet deposition. The interaction of atmospheric processes and emissions tend to produce wet deposition data patterns that show large spatial and tempora...

  9. ACID RAIN MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides an overview of existing statistical methodologies for the estimation of site-specific and regional trends in wet deposition. The interaction of atmospheric processes and emissions tend to produce wet deposition data patterns that show large spatial and tempora...

  10. The potential influence of rain on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The potential influence of heavy rain on airfoil performance is discussed. Experimental methods for evaluating rain effects are reviewed. Important scaling considerations for extrapolating model data are presented. It is shown that considerable additional effort, both analytical and experimental, is necessary to understand the degree of hazard associated with flight operations in rain.

  11. Scale Dependence of Spatiotemporal Intermittence of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Siddani, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    It is a common experience that rainfall is intermittent in space and time. This is reflected by the fact that the statistics of area- and/or time-averaged rain rate is described by a mixed distribution with a nonzero probability of having a sharp value zero. In this paper we have explored the dependence of the probability of zero rain on the averaging space and time scales in large multiyear data sets based on radar and rain gauge observations. A stretched exponential fannula fits the observed scale dependence of the zero-rain probability. The proposed formula makes it apparent that the space-time support of the rain field is not quite a set of measure zero as is sometimes supposed. We also give an ex.planation of the observed behavior in tenus of a simple probabilistic model based on the premise that rainfall process has an intrinsic memory.

  12. Scale Dependence of Spatiotemporal Intermittence of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Siddani, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    It is a common experience that rainfall is intermittent in space and time. This is reflected by the fact that the statistics of area- and/or time-averaged rain rate is described by a mixed distribution with a nonzero probability of having a sharp value zero. In this paper we have explored the dependence of the probability of zero rain on the averaging space and time scales in large multiyear data sets based on radar and rain gauge observations. A stretched exponential fannula fits the observed scale dependence of the zero-rain probability. The proposed formula makes it apparent that the space-time support of the rain field is not quite a set of measure zero as is sometimes supposed. We also give an ex.planation of the observed behavior in tenus of a simple probabilistic model based on the premise that rainfall process has an intrinsic memory.

  13. Optimal rain rate estimation algorithm for light and heavy rain using polarimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmzoughi, A.; Abdelfattah, R.; Santalla Del Rio, V.; Belhadj, Z.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we propose an ameliorated physically-based rain rate estimation algorithm for semi-arid regions using the Rayleigh approximation. The proposed algorithm simultaneously uses the reflectivity and the specific differential phase to provide an accurate estimation for both small and large rain rates. In order to validate the proposed estimator, simulated polarimetric rain rate data based on a dual approach, referring to both physical and statistical models of the rain target, are used. Moreover, experimental radar data (the same as used in Matrosov et al., 2006) taken in light to moderate stratiform rainfalls with rain rates varying between 2 and 15 mm h-1 were collected as part of the GPM pilot experiment. It is shown that the proposed algorithm for rain rate estimation based on the full set of polarimetric radar measurements agree better with in situ disdrometer ones.

  14. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  15. Rain Forest Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiner, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The rain forest murals in the author's school began as a request from her principal to have students decorate the cafeteria with their own paintings. She decided to brainstorm ideas with her eighth-grade students. Taking into consideration the architectural space and the environmental concerns they wanted to convey, students chose the rain forest…

  16. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  17. Rain Forest Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiner, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The rain forest murals in the author's school began as a request from her principal to have students decorate the cafeteria with their own paintings. She decided to brainstorm ideas with her eighth-grade students. Taking into consideration the architectural space and the environmental concerns they wanted to convey, students chose the rain forest…

  18. Interference by rain scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1988-01-01

    The data from Japan and the U.S. (the Virginia Precipitation Scatter Experiment) show excellent agreement between the two-component rain scatter model predictions and bistatic scatter measurements. In employing the model, all the scattering geometries should be classified as backscattering as defined by Crane (1974). The forward scatter model should only be used for great circle paths with both antennas pointed at the horizon and at each other in a typical troposcatter communication system geometry. The forward scatter model can also be used for main-lobe, side-lobe coupling when one antenna is pointed toward the other along the great circle path. The forward scatter observations made over the Prospect Hill - Mt Tug path show that the two-component model is incomplete. Much stronger signals were observed at Ku-band than expected based on simultaneous C-band measurements. The discrepancies may be due to: (1) scattering by ice/snow at height (posssible in April) at the 1 km height of the scattering volume), (2) the coherent effects of turbulent fluctuations in the hydrometeor number densities and (3) errors in the modeling of the statistical relationship between attenuation along the path and scattering in the common volume.

  19. Interference by rain scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1988-08-01

    The data from Japan and the U.S. (the Virginia Precipitation Scatter Experiment) show excellent agreement between the two-component rain scatter model predictions and bistatic scatter measurements. In employing the model, all the scattering geometries should be classified as backscattering as defined by Crane (1974). The forward scatter model should only be used for great circle paths with both antennas pointed at the horizon and at each other in a typical troposcatter communication system geometry. The forward scatter model can also be used for main-lobe, side-lobe coupling when one antenna is pointed toward the other along the great circle path. The forward scatter observations made over the Prospect Hill - Mt Tug path show that the two-component model is incomplete. Much stronger signals were observed at Ku-band than expected based on simultaneous C-band measurements. The discrepancies may be due to: (1) scattering by ice/snow at height (posssible in April) at the 1 km height of the scattering volume), (2) the coherent effects of turbulent fluctuations in the hydrometeor number densities and (3) errors in the modeling of the statistical relationship between attenuation along the path and scattering in the common volume.

  20. Comprehensive evaluation of multi-satellite precipitation products with a dense rain gauge network and optimally merging their simulated hydrological flows using the Bayesian model averaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanhu; Ren, Liliang; Hong, Yang; Yong, Bin; Yang, Xiaoli; Yuan, Fei; Ma, Mingwei

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThis study first focuses on comprehensive evaluating three widely used satellite precipitation products (TMPA 3B42V6, TMPA 3B42RT, and CMORPH) with a dense rain gauge network in the Mishui basin (9972 km2) in South China and then optimally merge their simulated hydrologic flows with the semi-distributed Xinanjiang model using the Bayesian model averaging method. The initial satellite precipitation data comparisons show that the reanalyzed 3B42V6, with a bias of -4.54%, matched best with the rain gauge observations, while the two near real-time satellite datasets (3B42RT and CMORPH) largely underestimated precipitation by 42.72% and 40.81% respectively. With the model parameters first benchmarked by the rain gauge data, the behavior of the streamflow simulation from the 3B42V6 was also the most optimal amongst the three products, while the two near real-time satellite datasets produced deteriorated biases and Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients (NSCEs). Still, when the model parameters were recalibrated by each individual satellite data, the performance of the streamflow simulations from the two near real-time satellite products were significantly improved, thus demonstrating the need for specific calibrations of the hydrological models for the near real-time satellite inputs. Moreover, when optimally merged with respect to the streamflows forced by the two near real-time satellite precipitation products and all the three satellite precipitation products using the Bayesian model averaging method, the resulted streamflow series further improved and became more robust. In summary, the three current state-of-the-art satellite precipitation products have demonstrated potential in hydrological research and applications. The benchmarking, recalibration, and optimal merging schemes for streamflow simulation at a basin scale described in the present work will hopefully be a reference for future utilizations of satellite precipitation products in global and regional

  1. After the Rain: Using the Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Elk, Arlene; Stoklas, Jackie

    The Heard Museum (Phoenix, Arizona) has developed and updated an integrated curriculum for use in grades K-3. The goals for this curriculum are to: (1) share museum resources with schools; (2) promote cross-cultural understanding through a focus on rain, a universal requirement for life; (3) help students understand that Native Americans are…

  2. Life in Tropical Rain Forests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the diversity of rain forest life, the adaptations of rain forest plants and animals, and ways these organisms interact. Includes activities on canopy critters with a copyable sheet, rain forest revue, design a plant, and jungle sleuths. (RT)

  3. Life in Tropical Rain Forests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the diversity of rain forest life, the adaptations of rain forest plants and animals, and ways these organisms interact. Includes activities on canopy critters with a copyable sheet, rain forest revue, design a plant, and jungle sleuths. (RT)

  4. Rain gauge calibration and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, John

    1994-01-01

    Prior to the Tropical Oceans Global Atmosphere-Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE), 42 Model 100 series optical gauges were tested in the rain simulator facility at Wallops Island before shipment to the field. Baseline measurements at several rain rates were made simultaneously with collector cans, tipping bucket, and a precision weighing gauge and held for post-COARE evaluation with a repeat set of measurements that were to be recorded after the instruments were returned. This was done as a means of detecting any calibration changes that might have occurred while deployed. Although it was known that the artificial rain in the simulator did not contain the required exponential distribution for accurate optical rain gauge rate measurements, use of the facility was necessary because it was the only means available for taking controlled observations with instruments that were received, tested, and shipped out in groups over a period of months. At that point, it was believed that these measurements would be adequately precise for detecting performance changes over time. However, analysis of the data by STI now indicates that this may not be true. Further study of the data will be undertaken to resolve this.

  5. Observation and modeling analyses of the macro- and microphysical characteristics of a heavy rain storm in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chunwei; Xiao, Hui; Yang, Huiling; Tang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    Beijing and its surrounding areas experienced a heavy rain event from 21 to 22 July 2012. The event can be divided into two phases: a warm-sector precipitation phase, ahead of the cold front, and a cold front precipitation phase. Observational analyses indicated that this rain event resulted from the cooperation of upper- and lower-level weather systems, and also the development and merging of mesoscale convective storm clusters in cumulus-embedded stratus. Simulation results showed that water vapor and hydrometeors transported into Beijing came mainly from the west and south and then exited from the north and east in general. All hydrometeors except ice crystals showed net inflow during the warm-sector phase, while all hydrometeors showed net outflow during the cold front phase overall. The interactions between cold and warm cloud microphysical processes generated the severe precipitation, with melting of graupel into rainwater contributing the most. Cold cloud processes contributed more to rain in the cold front phase compared to that in the warm-sector phase. The general precipitation and hydrometeor precipitation efficiencies were 67.0% and 86.3% in the warm-sector phase, while those in the cold front phase were 44.0% and 74.6%, respectively.

  6. Global precipitation estimates based on a technique for combining satellite-based estimates, rain gauge analysis, and NWP model precipitation information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo; Keehn, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The 'satellite-gauge model' (SGM) technique is described for combining precipitation estimates from microwave satellite data, infrared satellite data, rain gauge analyses, and numerical weather prediction models into improved estimates of global precipitation. Throughout, monthly estimates on a 2.5 degrees x 2.5 degrees lat-long grid are employed. First, a multisatellite product is developed using a combination of low-orbit microwave and geosynchronous-orbit infrared data in the latitude range 40 degrees N - 40 degrees S (the adjusted geosynchronous precipitation index) and low-orbit microwave data alone at higher latitudes. Then the rain gauge analysis is brougth in, weighting each field by its inverse relative error variance to produce a nearly global, observationally based precipitation estimate. To produce a complete global estimate, the numerical model results are used to fill data voids in the combined satellite-gauge estimate. Our sequential approach to combining estimates allows a user to select the multisatellite estimate, the satellite-gauge estimate, or the full SGM estimate (observationally based estimates plus the model information). The primary limitation in the method is imperfections in the estimation of relative error for the individual fields. The SGM results for one year of data (July 1987 to June 1988) show important differences from the individual estimates, including model estimates as well as climatological estimates. In general, the SGM results are drier in the subtropics than the model and climatological results, reflecting the relatively dry microwave estimates that dominate the SGM in oceanic regions.

  7. Global precipitation estimates based on a technique for combining satellite-based estimates, rain gauge analysis, and NWP model precipitation information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo; Keehn, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The 'satellite-gauge model' (SGM) technique is described for combining precipitation estimates from microwave satellite data, infrared satellite data, rain gauge analyses, and numerical weather prediction models into improved estimates of global precipitation. Throughout, monthly estimates on a 2.5 degrees x 2.5 degrees lat-long grid are employed. First, a multisatellite product is developed using a combination of low-orbit microwave and geosynchronous-orbit infrared data in the latitude range 40 degrees N - 40 degrees S (the adjusted geosynchronous precipitation index) and low-orbit microwave data alone at higher latitudes. Then the rain gauge analysis is brougth in, weighting each field by its inverse relative error variance to produce a nearly global, observationally based precipitation estimate. To produce a complete global estimate, the numerical model results are used to fill data voids in the combined satellite-gauge estimate. Our sequential approach to combining estimates allows a user to select the multisatellite estimate, the satellite-gauge estimate, or the full SGM estimate (observationally based estimates plus the model information). The primary limitation in the method is imperfections in the estimation of relative error for the individual fields. The SGM results for one year of data (July 1987 to June 1988) show important differences from the individual estimates, including model estimates as well as climatological estimates. In general, the SGM results are drier in the subtropics than the model and climatological results, reflecting the relatively dry microwave estimates that dominate the SGM in oceanic regions.

  8. The process-based stand growth model Formix 3-Q applied in a GIS environment for growth and yield analysis in a tropical rain forest.

    PubMed

    Ditzer, T.; Glauner, R.; Förster, M.; Köhler, P.; Huth, A.

    2000-03-01

    Managing tropical rain forests is difficult because few long-term field data on forest growth and the impact of harvesting disturbance are available. Growth models may provide a valuable tool for managers of tropical forests, particularly if applied to the extended forest areas of up to 100,000 ha that typically constitute the so-called forest management units (FMUs). We used a stand growth model in a geographic information system (GIS) environment to simulate tropical rain forest growth at the FMU level. We applied the process-based rain forest growth model Formix 3-Q to the 55,000 ha Deramakot Forest Reserve (DFR) in Sabah, Malaysia. The FMU was considered to be composed of single and independent small-scale stands differing in site conditions and forest structure. Field data, which were analyzed with a GIS, comprised a terrestrial forest inventory, site and soil analyses (water, nutrients, slope), the interpretation of aerial photographs of the present vegetation and topographic maps. Different stand types were determined based on a classification of site quality (three classes), slopes (four classes), and present forest structure (four strata). The effects of site quality on tree allometry (height-diameter curve, biomass allometry, leaf area) and growth (increment size) are incorporated into Formix 3-Q. We derived allometric relations and growth factors for different site conditions from the field data. Climax forest structure at the stand level was shown to depend strongly on site conditions. Simulated successional pattern and climax structure were compared with field observations. Based on the current management plan for the DFR, harvesting scenarios were simulated for stands on different sites. The effects of harvesting guidelines on forest structure and the implications for sustainable forest management at Deramakot were analyzed. Based on the stand types and GIS analysis, we also simulated undisturbed regeneration of the logged-over forest in the DFR at

  9. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  10. Thinking in the Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Albert A.

    1989-01-01

    Four questions related to rain concerning aerodynamic drag force, pressure from the impact of raindrops, impact of wind on the pressure, and stopping force extended on the car by the water are proposed. (YP)

  11. Acid rain information book

    SciTech Connect

    Bubenick, D.V.

    1984-01-01

    The potential consequences of widespread acid precipitation demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Review of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations. It follows the logical progression from sources of pollutants affecting acid rain formation to the atmospheric transport and transformation of those pollutants and finally to the deposition of acid rain, the effects of that deposition, and possible mitigative measures. This information is followed by a discussion of uncertainties in the understanding of the acid rain phenomenon and a description of current and proposed research.

  12. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  13. Thinking in the Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Albert A.

    1989-01-01

    Four questions related to rain concerning aerodynamic drag force, pressure from the impact of raindrops, impact of wind on the pressure, and stopping force extended on the car by the water are proposed. (YP)

  14. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  15. Contrast Transmission In Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, L. W., Jr.; Gimmestad, G. G.; Jackovich, J. E.

    1983-09-01

    While the propagation of visible and infrared radiation in adverse weather has been studied by many investigators, the effect of rain on contrast transmission or visual range have received little attention. A theoretical and experimental program examining contrast transmission in adverse weather will be described in this paper. Measurements of contrast transmission were made using bar targets consisting of parallel flourescent light bulbs. The bulb spacing is four times the bulb diameter. Data is obtained by photographing the target from a distance of two hundred meters using a camera fitted with an eight-hundred millimeter lens under both clear and obscured conditions. The negatives are then analyzed using a microdensitometer and contrast is defined by C = (I MAX - i MAX + i MIN)-1 where I-MAX and I-MIN are the intensity maximum and minimum, respectively. In addition to contrast measurements, simultaneous measurements of atmospheric transmission, snow particle phase function, and all relevant weather parameters are made. A computer model, based on scattering theory, has been developed for predicting contrast transmission. The model computes zero, first and second order scattering contributions in a three-dimensional atmosphere using phase function computations based on Mie theory.

  16. A modelling approach to evaluate the long-term effect of soil texture on spring wheat productivity under a rain-fed condition

    PubMed Central

    He, Yong; Hou, Lingling; Wang, Hong; Hu, Kelin; McConkey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Soil surface texture is an important environmental factor that influences crop productivity because of its direct effect on soil water and complex interactions with other environmental factors. Using 30-year data, an agricultural system model (DSSAT-CERES-Wheat) was calibrated and validated. After validation, the modelled yield and water use (WU) of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) from two soil textures (silt loam and clay) under rain-fed condition were analyzed. Regression analysis showed that wheat grown in silt loam soil is more sensitive to WU than wheat grown in clay soil, indicating that the wheat grown in clay soil has higher drought tolerance than that grown in silt loam. Yield variation can be explained by WU other than by precipitation use (PU). These results demonstrated that the DSSAT-CERES-Wheat model can be used to evaluate the WU of different soil textures and assess the feasibility of wheat production under various conditions. These outcomes can improve our understanding of the long-term effect of soil texture on spring wheat productivity in rain-fed condition. PMID:25074796

  17. A modelling approach to evaluate the long-term effect of soil texture on spring wheat productivity under a rain-fed condition.

    PubMed

    He, Yong; Hou, Lingling; Wang, Hong; Hu, Kelin; McConkey, Brian

    2014-07-30

    Soil surface texture is an important environmental factor that influences crop productivity because of its direct effect on soil water and complex interactions with other environmental factors. Using 30-year data, an agricultural system model (DSSAT-CERES-Wheat) was calibrated and validated. After validation, the modelled yield and water use (WU) of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) from two soil textures (silt loam and clay) under rain-fed condition were analyzed. Regression analysis showed that wheat grown in silt loam soil is more sensitive to WU than wheat grown in clay soil, indicating that the wheat grown in clay soil has higher drought tolerance than that grown in silt loam. Yield variation can be explained by WU other than by precipitation use (PU). These results demonstrated that the DSSAT-CERES-Wheat model can be used to evaluate the WU of different soil textures and assess the feasibility of wheat production under various conditions. These outcomes can improve our understanding of the long-term effect of soil texture on spring wheat productivity in rain-fed condition.

  18. Storm Water Infiltration and Focused Groundwater Recharge in a Rain Garden: Finite Volume Model and Numerical Simulations for Different Configurations and Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, J.; Dussaillant, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    Source control is the fundamental principle behind sustainable management of stormwater. Rain gardens are an infiltration practice that provides volume and water quality control, recharge, and multiple landscape, ecological and economic potential benefits. The fulfillment of these objectives requires understanding their behavior during events as well as long term, and tools for their design. We have developed a model based on Richards equation coupled to a surface water balance, solved with a 2D finite volume Fortran code which allows alternating upper boundary conditions, including ponding, which is not present in available 2D models. Also, it can simulate non homogeneous water input, heterogeneous soil (layered or more complex geometries), and surface irregularities -e.g. terracing-, so as to estimate infiltration and recharge. The algorithm is conservative; being an advantage compared to available finite difference and finite element methods. We will present performance comparisons to known models, to experimental data from a bioretention cell, which receives roof water to its surface depression planted with native species in an organic-rich root zone soil layer (underlain by a high conductivity lower layer that, while providing inter-event storage, percolates water readily), as well as long term simulations for different rain garden configurations. Recharge predictions for different climates show significant increases from natural recharge, and that the optimal area ratio (raingarden vs. contributing impervious area) reduces from 20% (humid) to 5% (dry).

  19. Presenting the Rain-Sea Interaction Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, Larry F.; Elfouhaily, Tonas M.

    1993-01-01

    The new Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) was established at GSFC/WFF and the first finds are presented. The unique feature of this laboratory is the ability to systematically study microwave scattering from a water surface roughened by artificial rain, for which the droplets are at terminal velocity. The fundamental instruments and systems (e.g., the rain simulator, scatterometers, and surface elevation probes) were installed and evaluated during these first experiments - so the majority of the data were obtained with the rain simulator at 1 m above the water tank. From these initial experiments, three new models were proposed: the square-root function for NCS vs. R, the log Gaussian model for ring-wave elevation frequency spectrum, and the Erland probability density distribution for back scattered power. Rain rate is the main input for these models, although the coefficients may be dependent upon other factors (drop-size distribution, fall velocity, radar configuration, etc.). The facility is functional and we foresee collaborative studies with investigators who are engaged in measuring and modeling rain-sea interaction processes.

  20. Theoretical Analysis of Rain Attenuation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Surendra Kr.; Jha, Santosh Kr.; Jha, Lallan

    2007-07-01

    Satellite communication technologies are now highly developed and high quality, distance-independent services have expanded over a very wide area. As for the system design of the Hokkaido integrated telecommunications(HIT) network, it must first overcome outages of satellite links due to rain attenuation in ka frequency bands. In this paper theoretical analysis of rain attenuation probability on a slant path has been made. The formula proposed is based Weibull distribution and incorporates recent ITU-R recommendations concerning the necessary rain rates and rain heights inputs. The error behaviour of the model was tested with the loading rain attenuation prediction model recommended by ITU-R for large number of experiments at different probability levels. The novel slant path rain attenuastion prediction model compared to the ITU-R one exhibits a similar behaviour at low time percentages and a better root-mean-square error performance for probability levels above 0.02%. The set of presented models exhibits the advantage of implementation with little complexity and is considered useful for educational and back of the envelope computations.

  1. Rain rate duration statistics derived from the Mid-Atlantic coast rain gauge network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius

    1993-01-01

    A rain gauge network comprised of 10 tipping bucket rain gauges located in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States has been in continuous operation since June 1, 1986. Rain rate distributions and estimated slant path fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz covering the first five year period were derived from the gauge network measurements, and these results were described by Goldhirsh. In this effort, rain rate time duration statistics are presented. The rain duration statistics are of interest for better understanding the physical nature of precipitation and to present a data base which may be used by modelers to convert to slant path fade duration statistics. Such statistics are important for better assessing optimal coding procedures over defined bandwidths.

  2. Microwave scattering from wind- and rain-roughened seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, Larry F.; Giovanangeli, Jean-Paul

    1990-01-01

    Microwave scattering from wind- and rain-roughened seas is studied under the assumption that, for light wind and light rain, the processes contributing to the scatterometer signal are independent. It is argued that calibrations from exclusively rain and exclusively wind conditions are all that is needed to predict scatterometer cross section for combined conditions. It is demonstrated that scatterometer response to a rain-roughened water surface is linear, but the slope of the relationship is sensitive to drop-size distribution. It is concluded that first-order wind and rain can be regarded as independent processes. Average cross section varies linearly with rainfall rate, but the slope of the relationship is a function of drop-size distribution. For combined light rain plus light wind, sigma-c is found to be well predicted by the addition of wind and rain models.

  3. A Formula for the Conversion of 5-Minute Average, 10 Minute Average Rain Rate into 1-Minute Average Rain Rate for Prediction of Rain Induced Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Parshotam; Hudiara, I. S.; Singh, M. L.

    2009-09-01

    The attenuation of microwave signal due to rain is a well established fact now. Localized models based on the rain rate and attenuation statistics is the basic necessity for a RF communication system designer. For development of any such model, we need long term statistics. These days most of the metrological data that is available is in the form of either 5-min or 10-min average rain rate and if we want to utilize this data, we need to convert this into 1-min equivalent average rain fall. In this paper, a formula has been purposed for the conversion of 5 min and 10 min average rain rate into 1 min equivalent average rain rate.

  4. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  5. Sampling Errors in Monthly Rainfall Totals for TRMM and SSM/I, Based on Statistics of Retrieved Rain Rates and Simple Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Kundu, Prasun K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Estimates from TRMM satellite data of monthly total rainfall over an area are subject to substantial sampling errors due to the limited number of visits to the area by the satellite during the month. Quantitative comparisons of TRMM averages with data collected by other satellites and by ground-based systems require some estimate of the size of this sampling error. A method of estimating this sampling error based on the actual statistics of the TRMM observations and on some modeling work has been developed. "Sampling error" in TRMM monthly averages is defined here relative to the monthly total a hypothetical satellite permanently stationed above the area would have reported. "Sampling error" therefore includes contributions from the random and systematic errors introduced by the satellite remote sensing system. As part of our long-term goal of providing error estimates for each grid point accessible to the TRMM instruments, sampling error estimates for TRMM based on rain retrievals from TRMM microwave (TMI) data are compared for different times of the year and different oceanic areas (to minimize changes in the statistics due to algorithmic differences over land and ocean). Changes in sampling error estimates due to changes in rain statistics due 1) to evolution of the official algorithms used to process the data, and 2) differences from other remote sensing systems such as the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), are analyzed.

  6. Sampling Errors in Monthly Rainfall Totals for TRMM and SSM/I, Based on Statistics of Retrieved Rain Rates and Simple Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Kundu, Prasun K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Estimates from TRMM satellite data of monthly total rainfall over an area are subject to substantial sampling errors due to the limited number of visits to the area by the satellite during the month. Quantitative comparisons of TRMM averages with data collected by other satellites and by ground-based systems require some estimate of the size of this sampling error. A method of estimating this sampling error based on the actual statistics of the TRMM observations and on some modeling work has been developed. "Sampling error" in TRMM monthly averages is defined here relative to the monthly total a hypothetical satellite permanently stationed above the area would have reported. "Sampling error" therefore includes contributions from the random and systematic errors introduced by the satellite remote sensing system. As part of our long-term goal of providing error estimates for each grid point accessible to the TRMM instruments, sampling error estimates for TRMM based on rain retrievals from TRMM microwave (TMI) data are compared for different times of the year and different oceanic areas (to minimize changes in the statistics due to algorithmic differences over land and ocean). Changes in sampling error estimates due to changes in rain statistics due 1) to evolution of the official algorithms used to process the data, and 2) differences from other remote sensing systems such as the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), are analyzed.

  7. Energy budget increases reduce mean streamflow more than snow-rain transitions: using integrated modeling to isolate climate change impacts on Rocky Mountain hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Lauren M.; Bearup, Lindsay A.; Molotch, Noah P.; Brooks, Paul D.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2016-04-01

    In snow-dominated mountain regions, a warming climate is expected to alter two drivers of hydrology: (1) decrease the fraction of precipitation falling as snow; and (2) increase surface energy available to drive evapotranspiration. This study uses a novel integrated modeling approach to explicitly separate energy budget increases via warming from precipitation phase transitions from snow to rain in two mountain headwaters transects of the central Rocky Mountains. Both phase transitions and energy increases had significant, though unique, impacts on semi-arid mountain hydrology in our simulations. A complete shift in precipitation from snow to rain reduced streamflow between 11% and 18%, while 4 °C of uniform warming reduced streamflow between 19% and 23%, suggesting that changes in energy-driven evaporative loss, between 27% and 29% for these uniform warming scenarios, may be the dominant driver of annual mean streamflow in a warming climate. Phase changes induced a flashier system, making water availability more susceptible to precipitation variability and eliminating the runoff signature characteristic of snowmelt-dominated systems. The impact of a phase change on mean streamflow was reduced as aridity increased from west to east of the continental divide.

  8. RAINE Public Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The file geodatabase (fgdb) contains the New England Town Boundaries and information related specifically to the Resilience and Adaptation in New England (RAINE) web application. This includes data tables relating to particular aspects of towns notably features, funding, impacts, partners, plans, and programs (refer to V_MAP_STATIC tables). New England Town Boundary coverage is a compilation of coverages received from the six New England State GIS Offices. The EPA New England GIS Center appended the coverages together into a single file and generated attrributes to link to the Facility Identification Online system. These feature class points represent the communities (Communities in gdb) and featured RAINE communities (RAINE_Communities_201609), which contain more detailed information that is contained within the included data tables.

  9. Estimating Rain Rates from Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Fisher, Brad L.; Wolff, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the cubic spline based operational system for the generation of the TRMM one-minute rain rate product 2A-56 from Tipping Bucket (TB) gauge measurements. Methodological issues associated with applying the cubic spline to the TB gauge rain rate estimation are closely examined. A simulated TB gauge from a Joss-Waldvogel (JW) disdrometer is employed to evaluate effects of time scales and rain event definitions on errors of the rain rate estimation. The comparison between rain rates measured from the JW disdrometer and those estimated from the simulated TB gauge shows good overall agreement; however, the TB gauge suffers sampling problems, resulting in errors in the rain rate estimation. These errors are very sensitive to the time scale of rain rates. One-minute rain rates suffer substantial errors, especially at low rain rates. When one minute rain rates are averaged to 4-7 minute or longer time scales, the errors dramatically reduce. The rain event duration is very sensitive to the event definition but the event rain total is rather insensitive, provided that the events with less than 1 millimeter rain totals are excluded. Estimated lower rain rates are sensitive to the event definition whereas the higher rates are not. The median relative absolute errors are about 22% and 32% for 1-minute TB rain rates higher and lower than 3 mm per hour, respectively. These errors decrease to 5% and 14% when TB rain rates are used at 7-minute scale. The radar reflectivity-rainrate (Ze-R) distributions drawn from large amount of 7-minute TB rain rates and radar reflectivity data are mostly insensitive to the event definition.

  10. The role of convection permitting modeling to evaluate the contribution of the anthropogenic climate change on the UK Winter 2013-2014 extreme rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrani, Hiba; Vautard, Robert

    2016-04-01

    During the winter 2013/2014, the UK saw heavy rainfalls associated with a succession of storms reaching Southern England causing widespread flooding, power cuts and major disruptions to transport. The January precipitation set a record for several rain gauge stations in Southern England. The aim of this study is to evaluate the contribution of the anthropogenic climate change, represented by a modification of the sea surface temperature (SST) on the January precipitation. For that, we conducted a sensitivity experiment by running a set of two-months simulations using WRF model with 50km horizontal resolution simulation and 2 km convection permitting simulation centered over the southern UK. We also investigated the sensitivity to the model physics. Results show that the horizontal resolution plays an important role for interpreting the results. Indeed, the low resolution simulation showed no robust signal to attribute this event. However, the convection permitting simulations gave more consistent results over the studied area.

  11. Acid rain information clearinghouse

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Twenty-one research institutions, environmental organizations, trade associations and government agencies from the United States and Canada are co-sponsoring Acid Rain: The Relationship Between Sources and Receptors, a conference to be held December 3-4, 1986 at the Sheraton National Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. The conference, designed for a nontechnical audience as well as specialists in acid rain research, will cover the nature and scope of scientific understanding and research programs, identify areas of consensus and disagreement, and assess policy options in the light of current understanding. A special session on December 3 will address the legal aspects of source-receptor relationships.

  12. Whither acid rain?

    PubMed

    Brimblecombe, P

    2001-04-04

    Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  13. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  14. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  15. Influence of rain gauge network density on flood model prediction: a statistical investigation using synthetic rainfall fields on basins of different size and a comparison with a real case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoni, Alessandro; Deidda, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    The accuracy of simulation of the catchment hydrologic response is strongly affected by the reliable representation of the spatial rainfall pattern. The present work investigates the role of rainfall sampling and network density on the performance of a lumped and a distributed rainfall-runoff model in predicting extreme floods. The analysis is conducted on a suite of 12 basins of different size ranging from 15 to 1793 km2 , located in Sardinia, Italy. In order to create a reference framework uncorrupted by errors of measure and of modelling, we assume as reference precipitation an high resolution rainfall field (1.5 km x 1.5 km x 5 min, 80 years long) derived through a downscaling procedure, and as reference discharge the corresponding hydrograph obtained by the two rainfall-runoff models. In order to investigate the sensitivity of the hydrological response to the rain gauge network density we assume that a rainfall series from a single cell (1.5 km x 1.5 km) is equivalent to a potential fictitious rain gauge record and consequently we activate a number of potential gauges ranging from 1 up to 30 (for each considered basin). Then for each fixed network size, we randomly select 100 independent spatial combinations of rain gauge positions providing the rainfall pattern scenarios which are used as input of the two rainfall-runoff models to produce an ensemble of 100 corresponding discharge scenarios. Performances are evaluated by comparing the discharge scenarios (obtained by a limited number of potential rain gauges) with the reference discharge (obtained by the entire high resolution rainfall fields) and applying different metrics. A critical analysis of the advantage of using distributed vs lumped modelling is performed considering: model performance variability related to the number of rain gauges; model performance dependence on event magnitude; minimum number of rain gauges for a satisfying model performance and its relationship with event magnitude; dependence

  16. Rain-rate data base development and rain-rate climate analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    The single-year rain-rate distribution data available within the archives of Consultative Committee for International Radio (CCIR) Study Group 5 were compiled into a data base for use in rain-rate climate modeling and for the preparation of predictions of attenuation statistics. The four year set of tip-time sequences provided by J. Goldhirsh for locations near Wallops Island were processed to compile monthly and annual distributions of rain rate and of event durations for intervals above and below preset thresholds. A four-year data set of tropical rain-rate tip-time sequences were acquired from the NASA TRMM program for 30 gauges near Darwin, Australia. They were also processed for inclusion in the CCIR data base and the expanded data base for monthly observations at the University of Oklahoma. The empirical rain-rate distributions (edfs) accepted for inclusion in the CCIR data base were used to estimate parameters for several rain-rate distribution models: the lognormal model, the Crane two-component model, and the three parameter model proposed by Moupfuma. The intent of this segment of the study is to obtain a limited set of parameters that can be mapped globally for use in rain attenuation predictions. If the form of the distribution can be established, then perhaps available climatological data can be used to estimate the parameters rather than requiring years of rain-rate observations to set the parameters. The two-component model provided the best fit to the Wallops Island data but the Moupfuma model provided the best fit to the Darwin data.

  17. Estimation of Rain Intensity Spectra over the Continental US Using Ground Radar-Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Xin; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution surface rainfall product is used to estimate rain characteristics over the continental US as a function of rain intensity. By defining each data at 4-km horizontal resolutions and 1-h temporal resolutions as an individual precipitating/nonprecipitating sample, statistics of rain occurrence and rain volume including their geographical and seasonal variations are documented. Quantitative estimations are also conducted to evaluate the impact of missing light rain events due to satellite sensors' detection capabilities. It is found that statistics of rain characteristics have large seasonal and geographical variations across the continental US. Although heavy rain events (> 10 mm/hr.) only occupy 2.6% of total rain occurrence, they may contribute to 27% of total rain volume. Light rain events (< 1.0 mm/hr.), occurring much more frequently (65%) than heavy rain events, can also make important contributions (15%) to the total rain volume. For minimum detectable rain rates setting at 0.5 and 0.2 mm/hr which are close to sensitivities of the current and future space-borne precipitation radars, there are about 43% and 11% of total rain occurrence below these thresholds, and they respectively represent 7% and 0.8% of total rain volume. For passive microwave sensors with their rain pixel sizes ranging from 14 to 16 km and the minimum detectable rain rates around 1 mm/hr., the missed light rain events may account for 70% of train occurrence and 16% of rain volume. Statistics of rain characteristics are also examined on domains with different temporal and spatial resolutions. Current issues in estimates of rain characteristics from satellite measurements and model outputs are discussed.

  18. Impact of Cloud Model Microphysics on Passive Microwave Retrievals of Cloud Properties. Part II: Uncertainty in Rain, Hydrometeor Structure, and Latent Heating Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Biggerstaff, Michael I.

    2006-07-01

    The impact of model microphysics on the retrieval of cloud properties based on passive microwave observations was examined using a three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, adaptive-grid cloud model to simulate a mesoscale convective system over ocean. Two microphysical schemes, based on similar bulk two-class liquid and three-class ice parameterizations, were used to simulate storms with differing amounts of supercooled cloud water typical of both the tropical oceanic environment, in which there is little supercooled cloud water, and midlatitude continental environments in which supercooled cloud water is more plentiful. For convective surface-level rain rates, the uncertainty varied between 20% and 60% depending on which combination of passive and active microwave observations was used in the retrieval. The uncertainty in surface rain rate did not depend on the microphysical scheme or the parameter settings except for retrievals over stratiform regions based on 85-GHz brightness temperatures TB alone or 85-GHz TB and radar reflectivity combined. In contrast, systematic differences in the treatment of the production of cloud water, cloud ice, and snow between the parameterization schemes coupled with the low correlation between those properties and the passive microwave TB examined here led to significant differences in the uncertainty in retrievals of those cloud properties and latent heating. The variability in uncertainty of hydrometeor structure and latent heating associated with the different microphysical parameterizations exceeded the inherent variability in TB cloud property relations. This was true at the finescales of the cloud model as well as at scales consistent with satellite footprints in which the inherent variability in TB cloud property relations are reduced by area averaging.

  19. After the Rain: Clouds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Elk, Arlene; Stoklas, Jackie

    The Heard Museum (Phoenix, Arizona) has developed and updated an integrated curriculum for use in grades K-3. The goals for this curriculum are to: (1) share museum resources with schools; (2) promote cross-cultural understanding through a focus on rain, a universal requirement for life; (3) help students understand that Native Americans are…

  20. After the Rain: Rainbows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Elk, Arlene; Stoklas, Jackie

    The Heard Museum (Phoenix, Arizona) has developed and updated an integrated curriculum for use in grades K-3. The goals for this curriculum are to: (1) share museum resources with schools; (2) promote cross-cultural understanding through a focus on rain, a universal requirement for life; (3) help students understand that Native Americans are…

  1. After the Rain: Dryspell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Elk, Arlene; Stoklas, Jackie

    The Heard Museum (Phoenix, Arizona) has developed and updated an integrated curriculum for use in grades K-3. The goals for this curriculum are to: (1) share museum resources with schools; (2) promote cross-cultural understanding through a focus on rain, a universal requirement for life; (3) help students understand that Native Americans are…

  2. After the Rain: Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Elk, Arlene; Stoklas, Jackie

    The Heard Museum (Phoenix, Arizona) has developed and updated an integrated curriculum for use in grades K-3. The goals for this curriculum are to: (1) share museum resources with schools; (2) promote cross-cultural understanding through a focus on rain, a universal requirement for life; (3) help students understand that Native Americans are…

  3. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  4. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  5. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)

  6. Acid rain bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, C.S.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography identifies 900 citations on various aspects of Acid Rain, covering published bibliographies, books, reports, conference and symposium proceedings, audio visual materials, pamphlets and newsletters. It includes five sections: citations index (complete record of author, title, source, order number); KWIC index; title index; author index; and source index. 900 references.

  7. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides opportunities for role-playing as industrialists, ecologists, and government officials. The activity involves forming an international commission on acid rain, taking testimony, and, based on the testimony, making recommendations to governments on specific ways to solve the problem. Includes suggestions for…

  8. Slouching in the Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Herb

    2013-01-01

    A number of papers find the velocity that minimizes the wetness of a traveler caught in the rain. In this capsule we determine, in addition, the necessary amount of forward bend (slouching) so that the traveler stays as dry as possible.

  9. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  10. Acid rain sourcebook

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, T.C.; Schwieger, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the problem of acid rain and how it can be controlled. The book is divided into seven key sections: the problem and the legislative solutions; international mitigation programs; planning the US program; emissions reduction-before combustion; emissions/reduction-during combustion; emissions reduction-after combustion and engineering solutions under development. 13 papers have been abstracted separately.

  11. The acid rain sourcebook

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, T.C.; Schwieger, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    A reference collection of specialized information discussions on areas critical to the acid rain issue: problem definition, impact of legislation, emissions standards, international perspective, cost scenarios, and engineering solutions. The text is reinforced with 130 illustrations and about 50 tables. Contents: International mitigation programs. Emissions reduction: before combustion; during combustion; after combustion. Engineering solutions under development.

  12. Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures." Contents are organized into the…

  13. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  14. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)

  15. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  16. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides opportunities for role-playing as industrialists, ecologists, and government officials. The activity involves forming an international commission on acid rain, taking testimony, and, based on the testimony, making recommendations to governments on specific ways to solve the problem. Includes suggestions for…

  17. People & Tropical Rain Forests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses ways people who live in rain forests make a living and some of the products that enrich our lives. Provides activities covering forest people, tropical treats, jungle in the pantry, treetop explorers, and three copyable pages to accompany activities. (Author/RT)

  18. Slouching in the Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Herb

    2013-01-01

    A number of papers find the velocity that minimizes the wetness of a traveler caught in the rain. In this capsule we determine, in addition, the necessary amount of forward bend (slouching) so that the traveler stays as dry as possible.

  19. Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures." Contents are organized into the…

  20. Torrential Rain in China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Concentric ovals of red, orange, yellow, and green are draped over southern China, showing rainfall totals for the week of June 4 through June 11, 2007. The rainfall totals are from the Goddard Space Flight Center Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis, which is based on rainfall measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Though seasonal rains are not unexpected in the area, the rain that fell during the week was torrential and relentless. As the image shows, a broad stretch of China received up to 200 millimeters (8 inches) of rain, and some areas were inundated with up to 500 millimeters (20 inches). Floods and landslides resulted, destroying crops and forcing some 643,000 people from their homes, reported the Xinhua News Agency on ReliefWeb. As of June 11, 71 people had died and 13 were missing. The most affected area was the southern coast, where rainfall totals are highest in this image. Heavy tropical rains combined with steep mountains make southeastern China prone to devastating landslides. Monitoring landslide-producing conditions typically requires extensive networks of ground-based rain gauges and weather instruments. But many developing countries in high-risk areas lack the resources to maintain such systems; heavy rains and flooding often wash away ground-based instruments. Robert Adler, a senior scientist in the Laboratory for Atmospheres at Goddard Space Flight Center, and Yang Hong, a research scientist at Goddard Earth Sciences Technology Center, are confronting the problem by developing a satellite-based system for predicting landslides. The system relies on TRMM data to predict when rainfall in different areas has reached a landslide-triggering threshold. The system makes data available on the Internet just a few hours after the satellite makes its observations. To read more about the landslide-monitoring system, please read the feature article Satellite Monitors Rains That Trigger Landslides, http

  1. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  2. Torrential Rain in China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Concentric ovals of red, orange, yellow, and green are draped over southern China, showing rainfall totals for the week of June 4 through June 11, 2007. The rainfall totals are from the Goddard Space Flight Center Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis, which is based on rainfall measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Though seasonal rains are not unexpected in the area, the rain that fell during the week was torrential and relentless. As the image shows, a broad stretch of China received up to 200 millimeters (8 inches) of rain, and some areas were inundated with up to 500 millimeters (20 inches). Floods and landslides resulted, destroying crops and forcing some 643,000 people from their homes, reported the Xinhua News Agency on ReliefWeb. As of June 11, 71 people had died and 13 were missing. The most affected area was the southern coast, where rainfall totals are highest in this image. Heavy tropical rains combined with steep mountains make southeastern China prone to devastating landslides. Monitoring landslide-producing conditions typically requires extensive networks of ground-based rain gauges and weather instruments. But many developing countries in high-risk areas lack the resources to maintain such systems; heavy rains and flooding often wash away ground-based instruments. Robert Adler, a senior scientist in the Laboratory for Atmospheres at Goddard Space Flight Center, and Yang Hong, a research scientist at Goddard Earth Sciences Technology Center, are confronting the problem by developing a satellite-based system for predicting landslides. The system relies on TRMM data to predict when rainfall in different areas has reached a landslide-triggering threshold. The system makes data available on the Internet just a few hours after the satellite makes its observations. To read more about the landslide-monitoring system, please read the feature article Satellite Monitors Rains That Trigger Landslides, http

  3. Acid rain: Reign of controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Acid Rain is a primer on the science and politics of acid rain. Several introductory chapters describe in simple terms the relevant principles of water chemistry, soil chemistry, and plant physiology and discuss the demonstrated or postulated effects of acid rain on fresh waters and forests as well as on statuary and other exposed objects. There follow discussions on the economic and social implications of acid rain (for example, possible health effects) and on the sources, transport, and distribution of air pollutants.

  4. Lessons from the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Shelley

    2002-01-01

    Presents a first-grade art project after students learned about the rain forest and heard the story, "The Great Kapok Tree: A Tale of the Amazon Rain Forest" (Lynn Cherry). Explains that the students created pictures of the rain forest. (CMK)

  5. When It Rains, It Pours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Linda

    2012-01-01

    "It's raining, it's pouring, the old man is snoring!" "The itsy, bitsy spider crawled up the waterspout, down came the rain and washed the spider out. Out came the sun and dried up all the rain, and the itsy, bitsy spider went up the spout again." What do children's nursery rhymes have to do with the school library? The author begins by telling a…

  6. Lessons from the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Shelley

    2002-01-01

    Presents a first-grade art project after students learned about the rain forest and heard the story, "The Great Kapok Tree: A Tale of the Amazon Rain Forest" (Lynn Cherry). Explains that the students created pictures of the rain forest. (CMK)

  7. When It Rains, It Pours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Linda

    2012-01-01

    "It's raining, it's pouring, the old man is snoring!" "The itsy, bitsy spider crawled up the waterspout, down came the rain and washed the spider out. Out came the sun and dried up all the rain, and the itsy, bitsy spider went up the spout again." What do children's nursery rhymes have to do with the school library? The author begins by telling a…

  8. Data set: A modeling dataset that spans the rain - snow transition zone: Johnston Draw catchment, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Idaho, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hydrometeorological data from the rain-to-snow transition zone in mountain basins are limited. As the climate warms, the transition from rain to snow in mountain regions is moving to higher elevations, and these changes are altering the timing of water delivery to the downstream streams, lakes and w...

  9. Rainfall estimates for hydrological models: Comparing rain gauge, radar and microwave link data as input for the Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Claudia; Overeem, Aart; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    Several rainfall measurement techniques are available for hydrological applications, each with its own spatial and temporal resolution. We investigated the effect of differences in rainfall estimates on discharge simulations in a lowland catchment by forcing a novel rainfall-runoff model (WALRUS) with rainfall data from gauges, radars and microwave links. The hydrological model used for this analysis is the recently developed Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS). WALRUS is a rainfall-runoff model accounting for hydrological processes relevant to areas with shallow groundwater (e.g. groundwater-surface water feedback). Here, we used WALRUS for case studies in the Hupsel Brook catchment. We used two automatic rain gauges with hourly resolution, located inside the catchment (the base run) and 30 km northeast. Operational (real-time) and climatological (gauge-adjusted) C-band radar products and country-wide rainfall maps derived from microwave link data from a cellular telecommunication network were also used. Discharges simulated with these different inputs were compared to observations. Traditionally, the precipitation research community places emphasis on quantifying spatial errors and uncertainty, but for hydrological applications, temporal errors and uncertainty should be quantified as well. Its memory makes the hydrologic system sensitive to missed or badly timed rainfall events, but also emphasizes the effect of a bias in rainfall estimates. Systematic underestimation of rainfall by the uncorrected operational radar product leads to very dry model states and an increasing underestimation of discharge. Using the rain gauge 30 km northeast of the catchment yields good results for climatological studies, but not for forecasting individual floods. Simulating discharge using the maps derived from microwave link data and the gauge-adjusted radar product yields good results for both events and climatological studies. This indicates that these products can be

  10. SNP-Based QTL Mapping of 15 Complex Traits in Barley under Rain-Fed and Well-Watered Conditions by a Mixed Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Freddy; Quitral, Yerko A.; Matus, Ivan; Russell, Joanne; Waugh, Robbie; del Pozo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    This study identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with 15 complex traits in a breeding population of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) consisting of 137 recombinant chromosome substitution lines (RCSL), evaluated under contrasting water availability conditions in the Mediterranean climatic region of central Chile. Given that markers showed a very strong segregation distortion, a quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) mapping mixed model was used to account for the heterogeneity in genetic relatedness between genotypes. Fifty-seven QTL were detected under rain-fed conditions, which accounted for 5–22% of the phenotypic variation. In full irrigation conditions, 84 SNPs were significantly associated with the traits studied, explaining 5–35% of phenotypic variation. Most of the QTL were co-localized on chromosomes 2H and 3H. Environment-specific genomic regions were detected for 12 of the 15 traits scored. Although most QTL-trait associations were environment and trait specific, some important and stable associations were also detected. In full irrigation conditions, a relatively major genomic region was found underlying hectoliter weight (HW), on chromosome 1H, which explained between 27% (SNP 2711-234) and 35% (SNP 1923-265) of the phenotypic variation. Interestingly, the locus 1923-265 was also detected for grain yield at both environmental conditions, accounting for 9 and 18%, in the rain-fed and irrigation conditions, respectively. Analysis of QTL in this breeding population identified significant genomic regions that can be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) of barley in areas where drought is a significant constraint. PMID:27446139

  11. SNP-Based QTL Mapping of 15 Complex Traits in Barley under Rain-Fed and Well-Watered Conditions by a Mixed Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Mora, Freddy; Quitral, Yerko A; Matus, Ivan; Russell, Joanne; Waugh, Robbie; Del Pozo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    This study identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with 15 complex traits in a breeding population of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) consisting of 137 recombinant chromosome substitution lines (RCSL), evaluated under contrasting water availability conditions in the Mediterranean climatic region of central Chile. Given that markers showed a very strong segregation distortion, a quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) mapping mixed model was used to account for the heterogeneity in genetic relatedness between genotypes. Fifty-seven QTL were detected under rain-fed conditions, which accounted for 5-22% of the phenotypic variation. In full irrigation conditions, 84 SNPs were significantly associated with the traits studied, explaining 5-35% of phenotypic variation. Most of the QTL were co-localized on chromosomes 2H and 3H. Environment-specific genomic regions were detected for 12 of the 15 traits scored. Although most QTL-trait associations were environment and trait specific, some important and stable associations were also detected. In full irrigation conditions, a relatively major genomic region was found underlying hectoliter weight (HW), on chromosome 1H, which explained between 27% (SNP 2711-234) and 35% (SNP 1923-265) of the phenotypic variation. Interestingly, the locus 1923-265 was also detected for grain yield at both environmental conditions, accounting for 9 and 18%, in the rain-fed and irrigation conditions, respectively. Analysis of QTL in this breeding population identified significant genomic regions that can be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) of barley in areas where drought is a significant constraint.

  12. Rain erosion considerations for launch vehicle insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, D. J.; Sieker, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years the Delta launch vehicle has incorporated the capability to be launched through rain. This capability was developed to eliminate a design constraint which could result in a costly launch delay. This paper presents the methodology developed to implement rain erosion protection for the insulated exterior vehicle surfaces. The effect of the interaction between insulation material rain erosion resistance, rainstorm models, surface geometry and trajectory variations is examined. It is concluded that rain erosion can significantly impact the performance of launch vehicle insulation systems and should be considered in their design.

  13. Rain erosion considerations for launch vehicle insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, D. J.; Sieker, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years the Delta launch vehicle has incorporated the capability to be launched through rain. This capability was developed to eliminate a design constraint which could result in a costly launch delay. This paper presents the methodology developed to implement rain erosion protection for the insulated exterior vehicle surfaces. The effect of the interaction between insulation material rain erosion resistance, rainstorm models, surface geometry and trajectory variations is examined. It is concluded that rain erosion can significantly impact the performance of launch vehicle insulation systems and should be considered in their design.

  14. Estimating rainfall in the tropics using the fractional time raining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, Mark L.; Krajewski, Witold F.; Mcphaden, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between the fractional time raining and tropical rainfall amount is investigated using raingage data and a point process model of tropical rainfall. Both the strength and the nature of the relationship are dependent upon the resolution of the data used to estimate the fractional time raining. It is found that highly accurate estimates of rainfall amounts over periods of one month or greater can be obtained from the fractional time raining so long as high-time-resolution data are used. It is demonstrated that the relationship between the fractional time raining and monthly atoll rainfall is quasi-homogeneous within the monsoon trough region of the equatorial western Pacific.

  15. The politics of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcher, M.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This work examines and compares the acid rain policies through the different political systems of Canada, Great Britain and the United States. Because the flow of acid rain can transcend national boundaries, acid rain has become a crucial international problem. According to the author, because of differences in governmental institutions and structure, the extent of governmental intervention in the industrial economy, the degree of reliance on coal for power generation, and the extent of acid rain damage, national responses to the acid rain problem have varied.

  16. Maximum rain intensity and discharge of the Santa Tecla flash flood (1874) in Conesa (Catalonia, NE Iberian Peninsula) from the step-backwater method and hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles Balasch, Josep; Tuset, Jordi; Jurado, Kevin; Furdada, Glòria; Lluis Ruiz-Bellet, Josep

    2017-04-01

    Flash floods cause most of the deaths and economic loss due to natural risks in the western Mediterranean region. However, these phenomena have not been deeply studied so far. In this study, we provide new results for the analysis of one of the most devastating flash floods in Catalonia: 22-23 September 1874, known as Santa Tecla floods. More specifically, we studied this flood in the small town of Conesa, in the headwaters of the Corb River basin. We have calculated the flood's peak flow and the rainstorm's hyetograph using flood marks and hydraulic and hydrological models. The hydrological model was calibrated with the 2 September 2015 flood event. Santa Tecla flood in Conesa was caused by a rain of 188 mm in six hours, with a maximum intensity of 84 mm·h-1. The peak flow was 60 m3·s-1 that, in a 3.2 km2 basin is a specific peak flow of 18.7 m3·s-1·km-2. These numbers confirm the exceptional quality of the event, and place it among the most extreme known events in the Mediterranean region. It has an approximate return period of 500 years. A sensitivity analysis on the hydrologic modelling estimated a minimum error of 10-15%, which is acceptable in this kind of study.

  17. Policy analysis model incorporating acid rain and sulfur dioxide damages associated with power plant conversions from oil to coal in the state of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The analysis described demonstrates the use of benefit/cost sensitivity analysis in examining the wide range of potential damages and savings associated with converting oil-fired electric utility boilers to burn coal in Florida. This model, for the first time incorporates, in quantitative terms, environmental economic externalities into a benefit/cost ratio sensitivity analysis framework. Five different dose-response estimates of morbidity and mortality costs, property devaluation, and willing-to-pay estimates are used in combination with four acid rain dose-response models to estimate the net present worth of externality costs. The model estimates the net present worth of benefits by incorporating into a dynamic framework all relevant construction, O + M, and fuel costs of converting an electrical generation facility from using oil to coal. These benefits of fuel savings are then weighted against various combinations of externality costs associated with increased sulfur oxide emission from the converted units. The policy analysis simulations provided in this study demonstrate that the economic externalities associated with uncontrolled emissions are frequently far greater than the higher operation and maintenance and capital costs of the most expensive emission control equipment.

  18. Mechanics of interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The vector physics of wind-driven rain (WDR) differs from that of wind-free rain, and the interrill soil detachment equations in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model were not originally developed to deal with this phenomenon. This article provides an evaluation of the performance of the...

  19. Simplified optical path-averaged rain gauge.

    PubMed

    Wang, T I; Earnshaw, K B; Lawrence, R S

    1978-02-01

    It has previously been shown that the scintillations produced by raindrops falling through a collimated laser beam can be used to measure the drop-size distribution and the rainfall rate, both averaged over the path. We now present a theoretical analysis, verified by observation, showing that the variance of the scintillations detected by a line-detector measured at frequencies near 1 kHz is closely related to rain rate and is nearly independent of drop-size distribution. If only rain rate is desired, the variance type of optical rain gauge has several advantages over the earlier model. It could use a diverging beam, thus eliminating the practical difficulties of maintaining adjustment and pointing of a collimated beam. Furthermore, it is less sensitive to the presence of updrafts and downdrafts along the beam and can thus be used over rough terrain.

  20. Rain effects on radio frequency propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, D. J.; Lo, C. S.

    1986-03-01

    Rain is a principal cause of signal degradation in a terrestrial or satellite transmission in a frequency range from UHF to EHF. This study proceeded with a format for compiling and editing the relevant data, and for making engineering inferences to supplement relevant yet inadequate data, as required for practical applications on a terrestrial or a slant path link. The format was to model the rain-induced attenuation by an empirical relationship on a = aRb L type of power law equation. Five well recognized models (CCIR, Fedi, French, Lin and SAM) were chosen for comparison with database. As for immediate applications, the Lin model is recommended for percentage of time over 0.35 of a year; and for percentage of time less than 0.3%, the French model is considered to be applicable. For more specific applications, such as for cases of low rain-rate regions to high rain-rate regions, low elevation angle paths to high elevation angle paths, etc., best performance models are identified.

  1. Rain attenuation statistics over millimeter wave bands in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Choi, Dong-You

    2017-01-01

    Rain induced degradations are significant for terrestrial microwave links operating at frequencies higher than 10 GHz. Paper presents analyses done on rain attenuation and rainfall data for three years between 2013 till 2015, in 3.2 km experimental link of 38 GHz and 0.1 km link at 75 GHz. The less link distance is maintained for 75 GHz operating frequency in order to have better recording of propagation effect as such attenuation induced by rain. OTT Parsivel is used for collection of rain rate database which show rain rate of about 50 mm/h and attenuation values of 20.89 and 28.55 dB are obtained at 0.01% of the time for vertical polarization under 38 and 75 GHz respectively. Prediction models, namely, ITU-R P. 530-16, Da Silva Mello, Moupfouma, Abdulrahman, Lin and differential equation approach are analyzed. This studies help to identify most suitable rain attenuation model for higher microwave bands. While applying ITU-R P. 530-16, the relative error margin of about 3%, 38% and 42% along with 80, 70, 61% were obtained in 0.1%, 0.01% and 0.001% of the time for vertical polarization under 38 and 75 GHz respectively. Interestingly, ITU-R P. 530-16 shows relatively closer estimation to measured rain attenuation at 75 GHz with relatively less error probabilities and additionally, Abdulrahman and ITU-R P. 530-16 results in better estimation to the measured rain attenuation at 38 GHz link. The performance of prominent rain attenuation models are judged with different error matrices as recommended by ITU-R P. 311-15. Furthermore, the efficacy of frequency scaling technique of rain attenuation between links distribution are also discussed. This study shall be useful for making good considerations in rain attenuation predictions for terrestrial link operating at higher frequencies.

  2. Using an extended 2D hydrodynamic model for evaluating damage risk caused by extreme rain events: Flash-Flood-Risk-Map (FFRM) Upper Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, Günter; Reithofer, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Using an extended 2D hydrodynamic model for evaluating damage risk caused by extreme rain events: Flash-Flood-Risk-Map (FFRM) Upper Austria Considering the increase in flash flood events causing massive damage during the last years in urban but also rural areas [1-4], the requirement for hydrodynamic calculation of flash flood prone areas and possible countermeasures has arisen to many municipalities and local governments. Besides the German based URBAS project [1], also the EU-funded FP7 research project "SWITCH-ON" [5] addresses the damage risk caused by flash floods in the sub-project "FFRM" (Flash Flood Risk Map Upper Austria) by calculating damage risk for buildings and vulnerable infrastructure like schools and hospitals caused by flash-flood driven inundation. While danger zones in riverine flooding are established as an integral part of spatial planning, flash floods caused by overland runoff from extreme rain events have been for long an underrated safety hazard not only for buildings and infrastructure, but man and animals as well. Based on the widespread 2D-model "hydro_as-2D", an extension was developed, which calculates the runoff formation from a spatially and temporally variable precipitation and determines two dimensionally the land surface area runoff and its concentration. The conception of the model is to preprocess the precipitation data and calculate the effective runoff-volume for a short time step of e.g. five minutes. This volume is applied to the nodes of the 2D-model and the calculation of the hydrodynamic model is started. At the end of each time step, the model run is stopped, the preprocessing step is repeated and the hydraulic model calculation is continued. In view of the later use for the whole of Upper Austria (12.000 km²) a model grid of 25x25 m² was established using digital elevation data. Model parameters could be estimated for the small catchment of river Ach, which was hit by an intense rain event with up to 109 mm per hour

  3. A Summary of Scatterometer Returns from Water Surfaces Agitated by Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, Larry F.; Giovanangeli, Jean-Paul; Branger, Hubert; Sobieski, Piotr W.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize our initial findings from K(a)- and K(u)-band scatterometers which include: a scaling law for backscattered power as a function of rain rate; a linear superposition model for light rains and low wind speeds; evidence of the importance of scattering from rain-generated ring-waves; and progress towards development of a scattering model for computing normalized radar cross sections from wind and rain roughened water surfaces.

  4. A Summary of Scatterometer Returns from Water Surfaces Agitated by Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, Larry F.; Giovanangeli, Jean-Paul; Branger, Hubert; Sobieski, Piotr W.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize our initial findings from K(a)- and K(u)-band scatterometers which include: a scaling law for backscattered power as a function of rain rate; a linear superposition model for light rains and low wind speeds; evidence of the importance of scattering from rain-generated ring-waves; and progress towards development of a scattering model for computing normalized radar cross sections from wind and rain roughened water surfaces.

  5. Remote sensing of rain over the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Computer models of the microwave emission from the earth's atmosphere were used to study the problem of retrieving meteorological information from the SMMR instrument that will be flown on NIMBUS-G. Methods for retrieving rain rate, wind speed, cloud height, and ocean temperature are described for the case when the satellite is over the ocean.

  6. Lake sensitivity to acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Shurkin, J.; Goldstein, R.

    1985-06-01

    Research in the Adirondacks suggests that watershed dynamics are the key to a lake's vulnerability to acidification. The Electric Power Research Institute's Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) produced a computer model that successfully integrated the physical and chemical factors that determine these dynamics. The research required an unprecedented level of awareness of how watersheds work and how rain, soil, forests, and rocks interact. One outcome of the field and laboratory studies was the finding that some soils act as buffers, taking certain ions out of the water, while some added ions. While the ability of the watershed as a whole to neutralize acid is the main determinant of a lake's vulnerability, seasonal changes demonstrate that time is a factor. The model is in demand to test water in other locations and to explore buffering agents. 2 figures.

  7. Simulated acid rain on crops

    SciTech Connect

    Plocher, M.D.; Perrigan, S.C.; Hevel, R.J.; Cooper, R.M.; Moss, D.N.

    1985-10-01

    In 1981, simulated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ acid rain was applied to alfalfa and tall fescue and a 2:1 ratio of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/:HNO/sub 3/ acid rain was applied to alfalfa, tall fescue, barley, wheat, potato, tomato, radish, and corn crops growing in the open field at Corvallis, Oregon. Careful attention was given to effects of the acid rain on the appearance of the foliage, and the effects on yield were measured. Because the effect of pH 4.0 rain on corn yield was the only significant effect noted in the 1981 studies, in 1982, more-extensive studies of the effect of simulated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//HNO/sub 3/ rain on corn were conducted. No significant effects of acid rain were found on foliage appearance, or on yield of grain or stover in the 1982 studies.

  8. Acid rain: effects on fish and wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.S.; Multer, E.P.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The following questions concerning acid rain are discussed: what is acid rain; what causes acid rain; where do sulfur and nitrogen oxides originate; what areas in the U.S. are susceptible to acid rain; are there early warning signals of acidification to aquatic resources; how does acid rain affect fishery resources; does acid rain affect wildlife; and how can effects of acid rain be reduced.

  9. Rain and deicing experiments in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasso, G.

    1983-01-01

    Comments on films of tests simulating rain and ice conditions in a wind tunnel are presented, with the aim of studying efficient methods of overcoming the adverse effects of rain and ice on aircraft. In the experiments, lifesize models and models of the Mirave 4 aircraft were used. The equipment used to simulate rain and ice is described. Different configurations of landing and takeoff under conditions of moderate or heavy rain at variable angles of incidence and of skipping and at velocities varying from 30 to 130 m/sec are reproduced in the wind tunnel. The risks of erosion of supersonic aircraft by the rain during the loitering and approach phases are discussed.

  10. Spatial Analysis of Weather-induced Annual and Decadal Average Yield Variability as Modeled by EPIC for Rain-fed Wheat in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarov, Nikolay; Balkovic, Juraj; Schmid, Erwin; Schwartz, Alexander; Obersteiner, Michael; Azevedo, Ligia B.

    2016-04-01

    In our analysis we evaluate the accuracy of near-term (decadal) average crop yield assessments as supported by the biophysical crop growth model EPIC. A spatial assessment of averages and variability has clear practical implications for agricultural producers and investors concerned with an estimation of the basic stochastic characteristics of a crop yield distribution. As a reliable weather projection for a time period of several years will apparently remain a challenge in the near future, we have employed the existing gridded datasets on historical weather as a best proxy for the current climate. Based on different weather inputs to EPIC, we analyzed the model runs for the rain-fed wheat for 1968-2007 employing AgGRID/GGCMI simulations using harmonized inputs and assumptions (weather datasets: GRASP and Princeton). We have explored the variability of historical ten-year yield averages in the past forty years as modeled by the EPIC model, and found that generally the ten-year average yield variability is less than 20% ((max-min)/average), whereas there are mid/low yielding areas with a higher ten-years average variability of 20-50%. The location of these spots of high variability differs between distinctive model-weather setups. Assuming that historical weather can be used as a proxy of the weather in the next ten years, a best possible EPIC-based assessment of a ten-year average yield is a range of 20% width ((max-min)/average). For some mid/low productive areas the range is up to 50% wide.

  11. Rainfall-runoff modelling by using SM2RAIN-derived and state-of-the-art satellite rainfall products over Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatta, Luca; Brocca, Luca; Massari, Christian; Moramarco, Tommaso; Gabellani, Simone; Puca, Silvia; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Satellite rainfall products (SRPs) are becoming more accurate with ever increasing spatial and temporal resolution. This evolution can be beneficial for hydrological applications, providing new sources of information and allowing to drive models in ungauged areas. Despite the large availability of rainfall satellite data, their use in rainfall-runoff modelling is still very scarce, most likely due to measurement issues (bias, accuracy) and the hydrological community acceptability of satellite products. In this study, the real-time version (3B42-RT) of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis, TMPA, and a new SRP based on the application of SM2RAIN algorithm (Brocca et al., 2014) to the ASCAT (Advanced SCATterometer) soil moisture product, SM2RASC, are used to drive a lumped hydrologic model over four basins in Italy during the 4-year period 2010-2013. The need of the recalibration of model parameter values for each SRP is highlighted, being an important precondition for their suitable use in flood modelling. Results shows that SRPs provided, in most of the cases, performance scores only slightly lower than those obtained by using observed data with a reduction of Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NS) less than 30% when using SM2RASC product while TMPA is characterized by a significant deterioration during the validation period 2012-2013. Moreover, the integration between observed and satellite rainfall data is investigated as well. Interestingly, the simple integration procedure here applied allows obtaining more accurate rainfall input datasets with respect to the use of ground observations only, for 3 out 4 basins. Indeed, discharge simulations improve when ground rainfall observations and SM2RASC product are integrated, with an increase of NS between 2 and 42% for the 3 basins in Central and Northern Italy. Overall, the study highlights the feasibility of using SRPs in hydrological applications over the Mediterranean region with

  12. Acid rain: Rhetoric and reality

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Acid rain is now one of the most serious environmental problems in developed countries. Emissions and fallout were previously extremely localized, but since the introduction of tall stacks policies in both Britain and the US - pardoxically to disperse particulate pollutants and hence reduce local damage - emissions are now lifted into the upper air currents and carried long distances downwind. The acid rain debate now embraces many western countries - including Canada, the US, England, Scotland, Wales, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, West Germany, the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland - and a growing number of eastern countries - including the Soviet Union, Poland, East Germany, and Czechoslovakia. The problem of acid rain arises, strictly speaking, not so much from the rainfall itself as from its effects on the environment. Runoff affects surface water and groundwater, as well as soils and vegetation. Consequently changes in rainfall acidity can trigger off a range of impacts on the chemistry and ecology of lakes and rivers, soil chemistry and processes, the health and productivity of plants, and building materials, and metallic structures. The most suitable solutions to the problems of acid rain require prevention rather than cure, and there is broad agreement in both the political scientific communities on the need to reduce emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides to the atmosphere. Book divisions discuss: the problem of acid rain, the science of acid rain, the technology of acid rain, and the politics of acid rain, in an effort to evaluate this growing global problem of acid rain.

  13. Acid rain: the Canada connection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    A review of a controversial new book called The Silent Alliance is presented. The book deals with very sensitive issues: acid rain, electricity imports from Canada, and Canada's alleged role in US acid rain legislation. Canadian officials are accused of lobbying strenuously for acid rain legislation in the US so Canada can increase its already large electricity exports to the US. It is concluded that the wide divergence between Canada's statements and practice on acid rain, and the numerous incentives to export additional electricity, should cause the US to examine Canada's lobbying efforts critically.

  14. A Robust, Microwave Rain Gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansheim, T. J.; Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.

    2008-12-01

    Researchers at The University of Iowa have developed an all-electronic rain gauge that uses microwave sensors operating at either 10 GHz or 23 GHz, and measures the Doppler shift caused by falling raindrops. It is straightforward to interface these sensors with conventional data loggers, or integrate them into a wireless sensor network. A disadvantage of these microwave rain gauges is that they consume significant power when they are operating. However, this may be partially negated by using data loggers' or sensors networks' sleep-wake-sleep mechanism. Advantages of the microwave rain gauges are that one can make them very robust, they cannot clog, they don't have mechanical parts that wear out, and they don't have to be perfectly level. Prototype microwave rain gauges were collocated with tipping-bucket rain gauges, and data were collected for two seasons. At higher rain rates, microwave rain gauge measurements compare well with tipping-bucket measurements. At lower rain rates, the microwave rain gauges provide more detailed information than tipping buckets, which quantize measurement typically in 1 tip per 0.01 inch, or 1 tip per mm of rainfall.

  15. Comparing statistical and process-based flow duration curve models in ungauged basins and changing rain regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M. F.; Thompson, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    The prediction of flow duration curves (FDCs) in ungauged basins remains an important task for hydrologists given the practical relevance of FDCs for water management and infrastructure design. Predicting FDCs in ungauged basins typically requires spatial interpolation of statistical or model parameters. This task is complicated if climate becomes non-stationary, as the prediction challenge now also requires extrapolation through time. In this context, process-based models for FDCs that mechanistically link the streamflow distribution to climate and landscape factors may have an advantage over purely statistical methods to predict FDCs. This study compares a stochastic (process-based) and statistical method for FDC prediction in both stationary and non-stationary contexts, using Nepal as a case study. Under contemporary conditions, both models perform well in predicting FDCs, with Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients above 0.80 in 75 % of the tested catchments. The main drivers of uncertainty differ between the models: parameter interpolation was the main source of error for the statistical model, while violations of the assumptions of the process-based model represented the main source of its error. The process-based approach performed better than the statistical approach in numerical simulations with non-stationary climate drivers. The predictions of the statistical method under non-stationary rainfall conditions were poor if (i) local runoff coefficients were not accurately determined from the gauge network, or (ii) streamflow variability was strongly affected by changes in rainfall. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that the streamflow regimes in catchments characterized by frequent wet-season runoff and a rapid, strongly non-linear hydrologic response are particularly sensitive to changes in rainfall statistics. In these cases, process-based prediction approaches are favored over statistical models.

  16. Coupled atmospheric-hydrological modelling of the Canadian Rockies rain-on-snow flood of June 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroniro, A.; Davison, B.; Fortin, V.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last several years there has been some convergence in both atmospheric and hydrological sciences in the application of coupled atmospheric-hydrological modelling systems. In Canada the result of many years of research in academic and government facilities resulted in a prototype hydrology land-surface modelling system know as MESH. Following the devastating floods in Calgary which occurred July 2013, Environment Canada has re-evaluated it modelling systems to look at the ability provide guidance to our partner agencies at the national scale by building upon existing Numerical Weather Prediction technology (NWP) developed largely for weather forecasting applications. The development of these types of guidance systems will rely mainly on the Canadian Precipitation Analysis system (CaPA), the Canadian Land Data Assimilation system (CaLDAS) and the deterministic weather prediction system using the GEM atmospheric model and grund-based real-time flow observations. Preliminary results of our MESH land-surface hydrology scheme forced by GEM forecasted precipitation were evaluated for the specific flood event in and around the headwaters of the Eastern flowing tributaries of the Rocky Mountains. Discussion on model performance, calibration of important water balance and routing parameters along with the feasibility of operationalizing these systems with real-time observational networks is discussed.

  17. A model of rapid preferential hillslope runoff contributions to peak flow generation in a temperate rain forest watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Jos; Alila, Younes

    2004-03-01

    A model for the 10 km2 Carnation Creek watershed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, is used to assess preferential hillslope runoff contributions to peak flow generation. The model combines the matrix flow algorithm of the distributed hydrology soil vegetation model with a Green-Ampt formulation for calculating matrix and by-pass infiltration, preferential hillslope runoff initiation controlled by rainfall depth, and downslope subsurface flow rates prescribed based on at-site tracer tests. Model evaluation using 1972-1990 hydrometeorological data reveals that this formulation is successful in simulating subannual and larger peak flows. Model results suggest that preferential flow contributions to streamflow generation become greater than matrix flow contributions for unit area discharge values in excess of 2.8 mm/hr, corresponding to a peak flow return period of 2-3 months. This transition from matrix flow dominated runoff to preferential flow dominated runoff is consistent with an observed upper limit of groundwater response to precipitation for return periods in excess of 2 months. A break in slope in peak flow frequency curves at a return period of about 20 months appears to correspond to a change in storm characteristics. Thus at least three physically distinct populations of peak flows may exist at Carnation Creek. The ability of the model to simulate peak flows and groundwater responses for small and large storms suggests that it may be useful for addressing runoff process considerations in the debate whether forest management effects for annual and larger peak flows are similar to those inferred from analyses dominated by subannual peak flows.

  18. Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew. MJ

    2009-12-01

    The Distromet disdrometer model RD-80 and NovaLynx tipping bucket rain gauge model 260-2500E-12 are two devices deployed a few meters apart to measure the character and amount of liquid precipitation. The main purpose of the disdrometer is to measure drop size distribution, which it does over 20 size classes from 0.3 mm to 5.4 mm. The data from both instruments can be used to determine rain rate. The disdrometer results can also be used to infer several properties including drop number density, radar reflectivity, liquid water content, and energy flux. Two coefficients, N0 and Λ, from an exponential fit between drop diameter and drop number density, are routinely calculated. Data are collected once a minute. The instruments make completely different kinds of measurements. Rain that falls on the disdrometer sensor moves a plunger on a vertical axis. The disdrometer transforms the plunger motion into electrical impulses whose strength is proportional to drop diameter. The rain gauge is the conventional tipping bucket type. Each tip collects an amount equivalent to 0.01 in. of water, and each tip is counted by a data acquisition system anchored by a Campbell CR1000 data logger.

  19. Environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators is described. The electronic elements of the system include a real time digital computer, a caligraphic color display which simulates landing lights of selective intensity, and a color television camera for producing a moving color display of the airport runway as depicted on a model terrain board. The mechanical simulation elements of the system include an environmental chamber which can produce natural fog, nonhomogeneous fog, rain and fog combined, or rain only. A pilot looking through the aircraft wind screen will look through the fog and/or rain generated in the environmental chamber onto a viewing screen with the simulated color image of the airport runway thereon, and observe a very real simulation of actual conditions of a runway as it would appear through actual fog and/or rain.

  20. Estimating the exceedance probability of rain rate by logistic regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Long S.; Kedem, Benjamin

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the fraction of an area with rain intensity above a fixed threshold is highly correlated with the area-averaged rain rate. To estimate the fractional rainy area, a logistic regression model, which estimates the conditional probability that rain rate over an area exceeds a fixed threshold given the values of related covariates, is developed. The problem of dependency in the data in the estimation procedure is bypassed by the method of partial likelihood. Analyses of simulated scanning multichannel microwave radiometer and observed electrically scanning microwave radiometer data during the Global Atlantic Tropical Experiment period show that the use of logistic regression in pixel classification is superior to multiple regression in predicting whether rain rate at each pixel exceeds a given threshold, even in the presence of noisy data. The potential of the logistic regression technique in satellite rain rate estimation is discussed.

  1. Estimating the exceedance probability of rain rate by logistic regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Long S.; Kedem, Benjamin

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the fraction of an area with rain intensity above a fixed threshold is highly correlated with the area-averaged rain rate. To estimate the fractional rainy area, a logistic regression model, which estimates the conditional probability that rain rate over an area exceeds a fixed threshold given the values of related covariates, is developed. The problem of dependency in the data in the estimation procedure is bypassed by the method of partial likelihood. Analyses of simulated scanning multichannel microwave radiometer and observed electrically scanning microwave radiometer data during the Global Atlantic Tropical Experiment period show that the use of logistic regression in pixel classification is superior to multiple regression in predicting whether rain rate at each pixel exceeds a given threshold, even in the presence of noisy data. The potential of the logistic regression technique in satellite rain rate estimation is discussed.

  2. Rain patterns motion over a region deduced from radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlina, A.

    1986-04-01

    The knowledge of spatial and temporal evolution of precipitation patterns becomes important in the design of communication systems operating at the frequencies above 10 GHz (SHF) that have to counteract the attenuation by rain. One year of ground rain data obtained from weather radar measurements performed near Milan in Italy is analyzed to find out the preferential directions of motion of precipitation patterns over the observed region. The pattern motion is estimated by means of the cross-correlation procedure applied to 461 pairs of ground rain maps 18 minutes apart, originating from 88 separate rain events. The average velocity field of pattern displacement is found, showing an evident polarization towards east directions. The results may be seen as a contribution to the radio-climatological characterization of the region, aimed to improve rain-attenuation models required in the engineering of the SHF systems.

  3. Estimating 1 min rain rate distributions from numerical weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, Kevin S.

    2017-01-01

    Internationally recognized prognostic models of rain fade on terrestrial and Earth-space EHF links rely fundamentally on distributions of 1 min rain rates. Currently, in Rec. ITU-R P.837-6, these distributions are generated using the Salonen-Poiares Baptista method where 1 min rain rate distributions are estimated from long-term average annual accumulations provided by numerical weather prediction (NWP). This paper investigates an alternative to this method based on the distribution of 6 h accumulations available from the same NWPs. Rain rate fields covering the UK, produced by the Nimrod network of radars, are integrated to estimate the accumulations provided by NWP, and these are linked to distributions of fine-scale rain rates. The proposed method makes better use of the available data. It is verified on 15 NWP regions spanning the UK, and the extension to other regions is discussed.

  4. Come rain or shine: Multi-model Projections of Climate Hazards affecting Transportation in the South Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullens, E.; Mcpherson, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    This work develops detailed trends in climate hazards affecting the Department of Transportation's Region 6, in the South Central U.S. Firstly, a survey was developed to gather information regarding weather and climate hazards in the region from the transportation community, identifying key phenomena and thresholds to evaluate. Statistically downscaled datasets were obtained from the Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogues (MACA) project, and the Asynchronous Regional Regression Model (ARRM), for a total of 21 model projections, two coupled model intercomparisons (CMIP3, and CMIP5), and four emissions pathways (A1Fi, B1, RCP8.5, RCP4.5). Specific hazards investigated include winter weather, freeze-thaw cycles, hot and cold extremes, and heavy precipitation. Projections for each of these variables were calculated for the region, utilizing spatial mapping, and time series analysis at the climate division level. The results indicate that cold-season phenomena such as winter weather, freeze-thaw, and cold extremes, decrease in intensity and frequency, particularly with the higher emissions pathways. Nonetheless, specific model and downscaling method yields variability in magnitudes, with the most notable decreasing trends late in the 21st century. Hot days show a pronounced increase, particularly with greater emissions, producing annual mean 100oF day frequencies by late 21st century analogous to the 2011 heatwave over the central Southern Plains. Heavy precipitation, evidenced by return period estimates and counts-over-thresholds, also show notable increasing trends, particularly between the recent past through mid-21st Century. Conversely, mean precipitation does not show significant trends and is regionally variable. Precipitation hazards (e.g., winter weather, extremes) diverge between downscaling methods and their associated model samples much more substantially than temperature, suggesting that the choice of global model and downscaled data is particularly

  5. Characteristics of rain penetration through a gravity ventilator used for natural ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyeung; Lee, Dong Ho; Ahn, Kwangseog; Ha, Hyunchul; Park, Heechang; Piao, Cheng Xu; Li, Xiaoyu; Seo, Jeoungyoon

    2008-01-01

    Gravity ventilators rely simply on air buoyancy to extract air and are widely used to exhaust air contaminants and heat from workplaces using minimal energy. They are designed to maximize the exhaust flow rate, but the rain penetration sometimes causes malfunctioning. In this study, the characteristics of rain penetration through a ventilator were examined as a preliminary study to develop a ventilator with the maximum exhaust capacity while minimizing rain penetration. A model ventilator was built and exposed to artificial rain and wind. The paths, intensities and amounts of penetration through the ventilator were observed and measured in qualitative and quantitative fashions. In the first phase, the pathways and intensities of rain penetration were visually observed. In the second phase, the amounts of rain penetration were quantitatively measured under the different configurations of ventilator components that were installed based on the information obtained in the first-phase experiment. The effects of wind speed, grill direction, rain drainage width, outer wall height, neck height and leaning angle of the outer wall from the vertical position were analyzed. Wind speed significantly affected rain penetration. Under the low crosswind conditions, the rain penetration intensities were under the limit of detection. Under the high crosswind conditions, grill direction and neck height were the most significant factors in reducing rain penetration. The installation of rain drainage was also important in reducing rain penetration. The experimental results suggest that, with proper configurations of its components, a gravity ventilator can be used for natural ventilation without significant rain penetration problems.

  6. Acid rain: a background report

    SciTech Connect

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  7. Acid rain & electric utilities II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This document presents reports which were presented at the Acid Rain and Electric Utilities Conference. Topics include environmental issues and electric utilities; acid rain program overview; global climate change and carbon dioxide; emissions data management; compliance; emissions control; allowance and trading; nitrogen oxides; and assessment. Individual reports have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  8. Acid Rain: The Scientific Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Documents the workings and findings of the Massachusetts Acid Rain Monitoring Project, which has pooled the volunteer efforts of more than 1,000 amateur and professional scientists since 1983. Reports on the origins of air pollution, the prediction of acid rain, and its effects on both water life and land resources. (JJK)

  9. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  10. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  11. Acid Rain: What's the Forecast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various types of acid rain, considered to be a century-old problem. Topics include: wet and dry deposition, effects on a variety of environments, ecosystems subject to detrimental effects, and possible solutions to the problem. A list of recommended resources on acid rain is provided. (BC)

  12. Acid Rain: An Educational Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, James I.

    1984-01-01

    Deals with how educators can handle the subject of acid rain; illustrates suggestions with experiences of grade nine students visiting Frost Valley Environmental Education Center (Oliverea, New York) to learn scientific concepts through observation of outdoor phenomena, including a stream; and discusses acid rain, pH levels, and pollution control…

  13. The Rain-Powered Cart

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-05

    the rain . The treatment is accessible to a student in a calculus-based mechanics course. Keywords: elastic collisions, rainfall, terminal speed...renewable energy (Some figures may appear in colour only in the online journal) A familiar problem treats how wet a person walking in rain becomes as they

  14. Rain Gardens: Stormwater Infiltrating Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrological dynamics and changes in stormwater nutrient concentrations within rain gardens were studied by introducing captured stormwater runoff to rain gardens at EPA’s Urban Water Research Facility in Edison, New Jersey. The runoff used in these experiments was collected...

  15. Acid Rain: What's the Forecast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various types of acid rain, considered to be a century-old problem. Topics include: wet and dry deposition, effects on a variety of environments, ecosystems subject to detrimental effects, and possible solutions to the problem. A list of recommended resources on acid rain is provided. (BC)

  16. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  17. Acid Rain: The Scientific Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Documents the workings and findings of the Massachusetts Acid Rain Monitoring Project, which has pooled the volunteer efforts of more than 1,000 amateur and professional scientists since 1983. Reports on the origins of air pollution, the prediction of acid rain, and its effects on both water life and land resources. (JJK)

  18. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  19. Acid Rain: An Educational Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, James I.

    1984-01-01

    Deals with how educators can handle the subject of acid rain; illustrates suggestions with experiences of grade nine students visiting Frost Valley Environmental Education Center (Oliverea, New York) to learn scientific concepts through observation of outdoor phenomena, including a stream; and discusses acid rain, pH levels, and pollution control…

  20. Rain Gardens: Stormwater Infiltrating Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrological dynamics and changes in stormwater nutrient concentrations within rain gardens were studied by introducing captured stormwater runoff to rain gardens at EPA’s Urban Water Research Facility in Edison, New Jersey. The runoff used in these experiments was collected...

  1. Acid rain trends summarized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In the northeastern United States, the acidity of precipitation has changed little in recent years, although the acidity is increasing in other regions. That's the latest word from a comprehensive review by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) of more than 200 published reports of acid rain research from the past 30 years. The report contributes to the controversy over whether increased sulfur emissions from Midwest powerplants increase the acidity of precipitation in the Northeast.“When the results of the many individual studies are combined, they show that acidification of precipitation in the Northeast, which has the most damaging level of acidity on a regional basis, occurred primarily before the mid-1950's and has been largely stabilized since the mid-1960s,” said John T. Turk, a research hydrologist at the USGS Denver office and author of the 18-page summary report.

  2. Modeling the MJO rain rates using parameterized large scale dynamics: vertical structure, radiation, and horizontal advection of dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Sobel, A. H.; Nie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Two Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) events were observed during October and November 2011 in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the DYNAMO field campaign. Precipitation rates and large-scale vertical motion profiles derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array are simulated in a small-domain cloud-resolving model using parameterized large-scale dynamics. Three parameterizations of large-scale dynamics --- the conventional weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximation, vertical mode based spectral WTG (SWTG), and damped gravity wave coupling (DGW) --- are employed. The target temperature profiles and radiative heating rates are taken from a control simulation in which the large-scale vertical motion is imposed (rather than directly from observations), and the model itself is significantly modified from that used in previous work. These methodological changes lead to significant improvement in the results.Simulations using all three methods, with imposed time -dependent radiation and horizontal moisture advection, capture the time variations in precipitation associated with the two MJO events well. The three methods produce significant differences in the large-scale vertical motion profile, however. WTG produces the most top-heavy and noisy profiles, while DGW's is smoother with a peak in midlevels. SWTG produces a smooth profile, somewhere between WTG and DGW, and in better agreement with observations than either of the others. Numerical experiments without horizontal advection of moisture suggest that that process significantly reduces the precipitation and suppresses the top-heaviness of large-scale vertical motion during the MJO active phases, while experiments in which the effect of cloud on radiation are disabled indicate that cloud-radiative interaction significantly amplifies the MJO. Experiments in which interactive radiation is used produce poorer agreement with observation than those with imposed time-varying radiative heating. Our results highlight the

  3. Relation between cloud thickness-cloud number concentration differences and rain occurrence based on Koren-Feingold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulistyowati, R.; Viridi, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Srigutomo, W.

    2016-11-01

    Koren-Feingold (KF) model, a model that relates growth of cloud thickness (H) and cloud number concentration (N) is discussed and analyzed in this work. Two boundary conditions are required by this model, where the first is cloud thickness potential H0 and the second is aerosol concentration N0 . The initial conditions are simply H(0) = 0 and N(0) = 0. Several pairs of (H0, N0) values are chosen in calculating the precipitation. Three categories of rainfall are used in this work, which are no drizzle D0, light drizzle D1, and drizzle D2. As H evolves in time t, it produces maximum cloud thickness Hmax and saturation cloud thickness Hsat , as also N does Nmax and Nsat . Two kinds of cloud thickness difference, ΔH1 = H0 - Hma x and ΔH2 = H0 - H sat are proposed and also for cloud concentration difference ΔN1 and ΔN2 with similar definitions. Pairs of (ΔH1 , ΔN1 ) and (ΔH2 , ΔN2 ) are used in analyzing simulation results. The first pair can be used as prediction of rainfall occurrence, while the second pair is more for confirmation and understanding the relation between cloud thickness and cloud concentration in producing rainfall. It is observed that H < H0 and N < N0 are always fulfilled. Rainfall in category D2 will have significant differences in H and N, while in category D0 will not. Typical differences for H are about 80% and 30-50% for both cases. Deeper discussion about (ΔH1 , ΔN1 ) and (ΔH2 , ΔN2 ) is presented in this work.

  4. Radar modeling of space diversity associated with slant path rain attenuation at variable path angles, frequencies, and drop size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1983-01-01

    Single and joint terminal slant path attenuation statistics at frequencies of 28.56 and 19.04 GHz were derived from radar data. Statistics were independently obtained for path angles of 20, 45, and 90 deg, in order to examine how path angle influences both single terminal and joint probability distributions. A prediction technique is demonstrated to work well for calculating both single and joint terminal distributions at other path angles. Diversity gains and autocorrelation function dependence on site spacing were determined employing the radar modeling results.

  5. Acid rain in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  6. Modeling rain-fed maize vulnerability to droughts using the standardized precipitation index from satellite estimated rainfall—Southern Malawi case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, Christopher C.; Verdin, James; Adams Chavula,; Gregory J. Husak,; Harikishan Jayanthi,; Tamuka Magadzire,

    2013-01-01

    During 1990s, disaster risk reduction emerged as a novel, proactive approach to managing risks from natural hazards. The World Bank, USAID, and other international donor agencies began making efforts to mainstream disaster risk reduction in countries whose population and economies were heavily dependent on rain-fed agriculture. This approach has more significance in light of the increasing climatic hazard patterns and the climate scenarios projected for different hazard prone countries in the world. The Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS NET) has been monitoring the food security issues in the sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and in Haiti. FEWS NET monitors the rainfall and moisture availability conditions with the help of NOAA RFE2 data for deriving food security status in Africa. This paper highlights the efforts in using satellite estimated rainfall inputs to develop drought vulnerability models in the drought prone areas in Malawi. The satellite RFE2 based SPI corresponding to the critical tasseling and silking phases (in the months of January, February, and March) were statistically regressed with drought-induced yield losses at the district level. The analysis has shown that the drought conditions in February and early March lead to most damage to maize yields in this region. The district-wise vulnerabilities to drought were upscaled to obtain a regional maize vulnerability model for southern Malawi. The results would help in establishing an early monitoring mechanism for drought impact assessment, give the decision makers additional time to assess seasonal outcomes, and identify potential food-related hazards in Malawi.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Extrapolation of Disdrometer Size Distributions Based on a Lagrangian Trajectory Model of Falling Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Kasparis, Takis; Jones, W. Linwood; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-01-01

    Methodologies to improve disdrometer processing, loosely based on mathematical techniques common to the field of particle flow and fluid mechanics, are examined and tested. The inclusion of advection and vertical wind field estimates appear to produce significantly improved results in a Lagrangian hydrometeor trajectory model, in spite of very strict assumptions of noninteracting hydrometeors, constant vertical air velocity, and time independent advection during the scan time interval. Wind field data can be extracted from each radar elevation scan by plotting and analyzing reflectivity contours over the disdrometer site and by collecting the radar radial velocity data to obtain estimates of advection. Specific regions of disdrometer spectra (drop size versus time) often exhibit strong gravitational sorting signatures, from which estimates of vertical velocity can be extracted. These independent wind field estimates become inputs and initial conditions to the Lagrangian trajectory simulation of falling hydrometeors.

  8. PUB, Space-time Multifractal Simulations of Clouds, Rain, Radar and Satellite rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.

    2004-05-01

    A key PUB objective is the determination of areal rainfall as a basic hydrological input. However, at present, it is hardly an exaggeration to state that direct estimates of areal rainfall are not currently possible. The main techniques - in situ gauges and remote radar measurements - each involve a series of assumptions; classically these have been of strong (mathematical) regularity in the rain (and reflectivity factor) fields. However, as rain is measured at finer and finer space-time resolutions, one sees increasingly detailed structures, stereophotography has recently revealed that hierarchical structures continue down to scales where the turbulent wind eventually decouples from the drops. Apparently, this often occurs at scales <1m. For realistic estimates of time-space rainfall, we must therefore replace the standard homogeneity assumptions by wide scale range heterogeneity assumptions, the only scaling assumptions being the only practical method. However, due to vertical (as well as space-time) stratification, the scaling must be anisotropic, we therefore lead to consider the corresponding anisotropic cascade models. In these models the variability / intermittency builds up scale by scale yielding extremely intermittent fields with singular multifractal statistics. In this talk, we review some of these results and show how the resulting causal space-time multifractal models of clouds and rain can be used for solving difficult observer problems including the estimation of rain from tipping bucket networks and from radar reflectivities (including for example the effect of "speckle") as well as simulating the accociated visible and infra red fields and hence the simulation of visible/IR satellite rain algorithms such RAINSAT. In the models the true cloud anad rain fields are known with arbitrary precision and resolution avoiding validation problems. With the help of numerical simulations, we show how to correct for systematic biases introduced by these

  9. Quantifying uncertainties in sulphur and nitrogen deposition to wales, uk using the hull acid rain model (harm) within the generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation (glue) framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, T.; Whyatt, D.; Beven, K.; Metcalfe, S.; Nicholson, J.

    2003-04-01

    The Hull Acid Rain Model (HARM) is a receptor orientated Lagrangian trajectory model used to represent the processes of emission, transformation and deposition of acidifying species. HARM employs a simplified representation of meteorological conditions. It has a coupled chemical scheme and includes a parameterisation of orographic enhancement which is believed to make a significant contribution to wet deposition in upland UK. An uncertainty analysis of the model using the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation methodology (GLUE) is presented, as constrained on multiple observations at 25 sites across Wales, UK. The quantified uncertainty is used to investigate the effect of predictive uncertainty on critical load exceedance. The GLUE analysis comprised 100,000 model realisations from Monte Carlo sampling of pre-specified parameter ranges, which were evaluated on the basis of how well simulated fluxes matched those measured at all observation sites. Only 2101 simulations were deemed to produce adequate representations of the observed fluxes and were used to create weighted prediction bounds for each site. Overall, the uncertainty prediction bounds spanned the observed data satisfactorily for most sites, but there was a tendency for high rainfall sites to be overestimated and sites close to major source areas to be underestimated. For wet-deposited oxidised-N there was a systematic overestimation at the majority of sites. The overestimation of wet-deposited oxidised-N for Wales is in contrast to other regions of the UK, where it is underestimated. The predictive capability of HARM was tested with a ‘hindcast’ to 44 Welsh observation sites for 1984 by using the 2101 acceptable parameterizations for 1995 with a 1984 emissions inventory. The spatial pattern of model predictions was consistent between 1984 and 1995 leading to the conclusion that either: model structural change is required to improve HARMs ability to represent the spatial deposition pattern or

  10. Rain attenuation measurements: Variability and data quality assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1989-01-01

    Year to year variations in the cumulative distributions of rain rate or rain attenuation are evident in any of the published measurements for a single propagation path that span a period of several years of observation. These variations must be described by models for the prediction of rain attenuation statistics. Now that a large measurement data base has been assembled by the International Radio Consultative Committee, the information needed to assess variability is available. On the basis of 252 sample cumulative distribution functions for the occurrence of attenuation by rain, the expected year to year variation in attenuation at a fixed probability level in the 0.1 to 0.001 percent of a year range is estimated to be 27 percent. The expected deviation from an attenuation model prediction for a single year of observations is estimated to exceed 33 percent when any of the available global rain climate model are employed to estimate the rain rate statistics. The probability distribution for the variation in attenuation or rain rate at a fixed fraction of a year is lognormal. The lognormal behavior of the variate was used to compile the statistics for variability.

  11. Synoptic and mesoscale controls on Sierra Nevada rain shadow intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatchett, B.; Kaplan, M.; Rutz, J. J.; Garner, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Sierra Nevada of California casts one of the world's greatest rain shadows with windward-leeside precipitation differences approaching an order of magnitude. Leeside rivers and terminal lakes provide critical water resources for ecosystem services and human consumptive use in this water-limited environment. They also offer important archives of paleohydroclimatic change. Understanding the drivers of rain shadow intensity represents an important step in properly evaluating how leeside hydrology will respond to projected climate change and for interpreting increasingly well spatially distributed paleoproxy evidence of past hydroclimates. Recent theoretical and modeling studies have shown rain shadow intensity to be controlled by multiscalar dynamics during storms such as the vertical structure of mountain waves, the presence of mid-level moisture, and position of the warm sector with respect to the mountain crest. Here, we provide a 35-year station-based climatology of strong and weak rain shadow events for the central Sierra Nevada during extended winter (November-April). Wetter (drier) years in leeside basins are characterized by higher (lower) fractions of lee-crest precipitation suggesting weaker (stronger) rain shadow effects during precipitation events. In general, as contributions of precipitation on the climatological top 5% of wet days increases, rain shadow intensity decreases. This suggests a key role for atmospheric rivers in weakening the rain shadow. A separate population of very dry years is found, regardless of number of dry days, when no precipitation is contributed by the climatological top 5% of wet days. These years show stronger rain shadow effects with few exceptions. Using the North American Regional Reanalysis and both surface and satellite-based remote sensing data in conjunction with the derived rain shadow climatology, we demonstrate the additional importance of atmospheric rivers, offshore and upstream mesoscale convection, and

  12. Seven Guideposts for Tropical Rain Forest Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Identifies seven guideposts for tropical rain forest education. Aids teachers in finding structure and creating educational experiences that promote more complete understanding of tropical rain forests. (CCM)

  13. Seven Guideposts for Tropical Rain Forest Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Identifies seven guideposts for tropical rain forest education. Aids teachers in finding structure and creating educational experiences that promote more complete understanding of tropical rain forests. (CCM)

  14. Long-term observations of cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon rain forest – Part 1: Aerosol size distribution, hygroscopicity, and new model parametrizations for CCN prediction

    DOE PAGES

    Pöhlker, Mira L.; Pöhlker, Christopher; Ditas, Florian; ...

    2016-12-20

    Size-resolved long-term measurements of atmospheric aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and hygroscopicity were conducted at the remote Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) in the central Amazon Basin over a 1-year period and full seasonal cycle (March 2014–February 2015). Our measurements provide a climatology of CCN properties characteristic of a remote central Amazonian rain forest site.The CCN measurements were continuously cycled through 10 levels of supersaturation (S=0.11 to 1.10 %) and span the aerosol particle size range from 20 to 245 nm. The mean critical diameters of CCN activation range from 43 nm at S = 1.10 % to 172 nmmore » at S = 0.11 %. Furthermore, the particle hygroscopicity exhibits a pronounced size dependence with lower values for the Aitken mode (κAit = 0.14 ± 0.03), higher values for the accumulation mode (κAcc = 0.22 ± 0.05), and an overall mean value of κmean = 0.17 ± 0.06, consistent with high fractions of organic aerosol.The hygroscopicity parameter, κ, exhibits remarkably little temporal variability: no pronounced diurnal cycles, only weak seasonal trends, and few short-term variations during long-range transport events. In contrast, the CCN number concentrations exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle, tracking the pollution-related seasonality in total aerosol concentration. Here, we find that the variability in the CCN concentrations in the central Amazon is mostly driven by aerosol particle number concentration and size distribution, while variations in aerosol hygroscopicity and chemical composition matter only during a few episodes.For modeling purposes, we compare different approaches of predicting CCN number concentration and present a novel parametrization, which allows accurate CCN predictions based on a small set of input data.« less

  15. Long-term observations of cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon rain forest - Part 1: Aerosol size distribution, hygroscopicity, and new model parametrizations for CCN prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlker, Mira L.; Pöhlker, Christopher; Ditas, Florian; Klimach, Thomas; Hrabe de Angelis, Isabella; Araújo, Alessandro; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Cheng, Yafang; Chi, Xuguang; Ditz, Reiner; Gunthe, Sachin S.; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Könemann, Tobias; Lavrič, Jošt V.; Martin, Scot T.; Mikhailov, Eugene; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Rose, Diana; Saturno, Jorge; Su, Hang; Thalman, Ryan; Walter, David; Wang, Jian; Wolff, Stefan; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    Size-resolved long-term measurements of atmospheric aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and hygroscopicity were conducted at the remote Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) in the central Amazon Basin over a 1-year period and full seasonal cycle (March 2014-February 2015). The measurements provide a climatology of CCN properties characteristic of a remote central Amazonian rain forest site.The CCN measurements were continuously cycled through 10 levels of supersaturation (S = 0.11 to 1.10 %) and span the aerosol particle size range from 20 to 245 nm. The mean critical diameters of CCN activation range from 43 nm at S = 1.10 % to 172 nm at S = 0.11 %. The particle hygroscopicity exhibits a pronounced size dependence with lower values for the Aitken mode (κAit = 0.14 ± 0.03), higher values for the accumulation mode (κAcc = 0.22 ± 0.05), and an overall mean value of κmean = 0.17 ± 0.06, consistent with high fractions of organic aerosol.The hygroscopicity parameter, κ, exhibits remarkably little temporal variability: no pronounced diurnal cycles, only weak seasonal trends, and few short-term variations during long-range transport events. In contrast, the CCN number concentrations exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle, tracking the pollution-related seasonality in total aerosol concentration. We find that the variability in the CCN concentrations in the central Amazon is mostly driven by aerosol particle number concentration and size distribution, while variations in aerosol hygroscopicity and chemical composition matter only during a few episodes.For modeling purposes, we compare different approaches of predicting CCN number concentration and present a novel parametrization, which allows accurate CCN predictions based on a small set of input data.

  16. Quantification and modelling of water flow in rain-fed paddy fields in NE Thailand: Evidence of soil salinization under submerged conditions by artesian groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammecker, Claude; Maeght, Jean-Luc; Grünberger, Olivier; Siltacho, Siwaporn; Srisruk, Kriengsak; Noble, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    SummaryWater flow and solute transport in soils forms an essential part in many groundwater hydrology studies. This is especially true for Northeast Thailand, where the agricultural land is affected by the soil salinity, which is a widespread and an increasing phenomenon affecting 25% of the agricultural land. Salinization appears as scattered discrete patches of 10-100 m2 in the lowlands, illustrated by white efflorescences during the dry season and bare soil during the cropping season. A field study was undertaken in farm plots to measure the water flow and solute transport within the soil surface and the vadose zone, both inside and outside a saline patch. The water flow was measured on the soil surface with lysimeters and infiltration rings, and was derived in the soil from the hydraulic gradients measured with tensiometers placed at different depths. The salt transport was evaluated with water traps also placed at different depths, where the soil water's electrical conductivity was measured throughout the rainy season. Field study results demonstrated that the accumulation of saline solutions in rain fed paddy fields, occurred mainly during the rainy season while the soil surface remained flooded. During this period the saline water table rose towards the soil surface independently of infiltration into the soil. It happened in specific places where the compacted soil layer, generally ubiquitous in the area at a depth of 40-50 cm, is interrupted. Therefore salinity appeareds in discret points as patches. Artesian upward flow already described in this area (Haworth et al., 1966; Williamson et al., 1989; Imaizumi et al., 2002) is most probably responsible for this water table rise, thereby affecting crop productivity. Numerical modelling of water flow using HYDRUS-3D further supported these results and showed that managing the depth of flooding within the plot can significantly reduce the outbreak of these saline plumes.

  17. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    endangers the existing biota. Concerns about acid (or acidic) rain in its modern sense were publicized by the Swedish soil scientist Svante Odén (1968). He argued, initially in the Swedish press, that long-term increases in the atmospheric deposition of acid could lower the pH of surface waters, cause a decline in fish stocks, deplete soils of nutrients, and accelerate damage to materials. By the 1970s, acidification of surface waters was reported in many countries in Europe as well as in North America. The late twentieth-century rush to understand the impact of acid rain was driven by: (i) reports of damaged or threatened freshwater fisheries and (ii) damaged forests. Perhaps the earliest linkage between acidic surface water and damage to fish was made by Dahl (1921) in southern Norway. There, spring runoff was sufficiently acidic to kill trout. It was not until the 1970s that a strong link was established between depressed pH, mobilization of aluminum from soil, and fish status ( Schofield and Trojnar,1980). The relationship between acidification of soils and forest health started with hypotheses in the 1960s and has slowly developed. Acid rain enhances the availability of some nutrients (e.g., nitrogen), and may either enhance or diminish the availability of others (e.g., calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus). Damage to anthropogenic structures, human health, and visibility have also raised concerns. The history of these early developments was summarized by Cowling (1982). Since the 1970s, sulfur and nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere have been reduced by 50-85% and 0-30%, respectively, both in North America and Europe. The emission reductions have occurred as a consequence of knowledge gained and economic factors. While recovery of water quality is underway in some areas, problems of acidification persist, and are now complicated by the effects of climate change ( Schindler, 1997).

  18. Rain waves-wind waves interaction application to scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharif, C.; Giovanangeli, J. P.; Bliven, L.

    1989-01-01

    Modulation of a rain wave pattern by longer waves has been studied. An analytical model taking into account capillarity effects and obliquity of short waves has been developed. Modulation rates in wave number and amplitude have been computed. Experiments were carried out in a wave tank. First results agree with theoretical models, but higher values of modulation rates are measured. These results could be taken into account for understanding the radar response from the sea surface during rain.

  19. Impacts from Time-dependent Freezing of Rain and Wet Hail on Deep Convection Simulated by a Cloud Model with Spectral Bin Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, V. T.; Khain, A.; Ilotoviz, E.; BenMoshe, N.

    2014-12-01

    Any hydrometeor containing some supercooled liquid can only freeze it as fast as latent heat is dissipated to the ambient air. Consequently, at sub-zero temperatures any given particle in a cloud can contain both ice and liquid water. Wet growth of hail occurs when supercooled cloud-liquid is accreted faster than it can freeze immediately on impact. Equally, raindrops in clear air can take up to a few mins to freeze. A new theory of time-dependent freezing is proposed in this presentation. First, wet growth of hail is represented by treating inhomogeneities of liquid coverage and temperature over the surface of the particle. Radial heat fluxes from the sponge layer through the liquid skin to the air are predicted, as well as heat fluxes between its wet and dry parts. Gradual internal freezing of liquid that soaks the interior of the hail or graupel particle during dry growth ('riming') is represented. The microphysical recycling with alternating episodes of wet and dry growth is predicted. Second, the time-dependent process of raindrop freezing is represented by including thermodynamic effects from accretion of cloud-liquid and -ice. Freezing drops larger than about 0.1 mm are represented as a new microphysical species in a cloud model with spectral bin microphysics. The freezing drops consist of interior water covered by ice initially. Possibilities of both dry and wet growth of freezing drops are represented. Schemes of time-dependent freezing for rain and wet growth of hail and graupel were implemented in a spectral bin microphysics cloud model. The model predicted that accretion of liquid produces giant freezing drops of 0.5-2 cm in diameter, due to downdraft-updraft recirculation and wet growth of freezing drops. Appreciable contents of freezing drops reach a height level of 7 km (-30 degC) in the simulated storm. The critical diameter separating wet and dry growth regimes is predicted to increase with height for freezing drops. It is more vertically uniform

  20. Variations in the width of the Indo-Pacific tropical rain belt over the last millennium: synthesis of stalagmite proxy records and climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummenhofer, Caroline; Denniston, Rhawn

    2017-04-01

    The seasonal north-south migration of the intertropical convergence zone defines the tropical rain belt (TRB), a region of enormous terrestrial biodiversity and home to 40% of the world's population. The TRB is dynamic and has been shown to shift south as a coherent system during periods of Northern Hemisphere cooling. However, recent studies of Indo-Pacific hydroclimate suggest that during the Little Ice Age (AD 1400-1850), the TRB in this region contracted rather than being displaced uniformly southward. This behaviour is not well understood, particularly during climatic fluctuations less pronounced than those of the Little Ice Age, the largest centennial-scale cool period of the last millennium. Using state-of-the-art climate model simulations conducted as part of the Last Millennium Ensemble with the Community Earth System Model (CESM), we evaluate variations in the width of the Indo-Pacific TRB, as well as movements in the position of its northward and southward edges, across a range of timescales over the pre-Industrial portion of the last millennium (AD 850-1850). The climate model results complement a recent reconstruction of late Holocene variability of the Indo-Pacific TRB, based on a precisely-dated, monsoon-sensitive stalagmite reconstruction from northern Australia (cave KNI-51), located at the southern edge of the TRB and thus highly sensitive to variations at its southern edge. Integrating KNI-51 with a record from Dongge Cave in southern China allows a stalagmite-based TRB reconstruction. Our results reveal that rather than shifting meridionally, the Indo-Pacific TRB expanded and contracted over multidecadal/centennial time scales during the late Holocene, with symmetric weakening/strengthening of summer monsoons in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres of the Indo-Pacific (the East Asian summer monsoon in China and the Australian summer monsoon in northern Australia). Links to large-scale climatic conditions across the Indo-Pacific region

  1. Be an acid rain detective

    SciTech Connect

    Atwill, L.

    1982-07-01

    Acid rain is discussed in a question and answer format. The article is aimed at educating sport fishermen on the subject, and also to encourage them to write their congressmen, senators, and the President about the acid rain problem. The article also announces the availability of an acid rain test kit available through the magazine, ''Sports Afield.'' The kit consists of pH-test paper that turns different shades of pink and blue according to the pH of the water tested. The color of the test paper is then compared to a color chart furnished in the kit and an approximate pH can be determined.

  2. Structural characteristics of rain fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesnard, FréDéRic; Sauvageot, Henri

    2003-07-01

    This paper analyzes the shape of rain area size distributions (RASDs) observed by radar in tropical and midlatitude regions. The rain area is defined, with respect to a rain threshold τ, as the area, inside a contour, where the rain rate is higher than τ. The size considered is the diameter of the equivalent circular area D. The reflectivity peaks inside the rain areas are numbered and the rain areas put together by classes having the same peak number. The size distributions of the rain areas containing the same number of peaks p are well fitted by lognormal functions, the parameters of which, μp and σp, are weakly dependent on the conditions of the peak determination. The parameters μp and σp are found to be linked by a power relation. For D < 6 km most of the rain areas are single peaked. The RASD without peak number distinction is a lognormal mixture. Using the relations obtained for μp, σp, and the rain area number as functions of p enables one to simulate RASDs with results in good agreement with the observations. Because of the limitation in the radar sampling at both ends of the RASD and the decrease of area number with increasing size, the radar-observed RASDs are severely truncated. The possibility of an approximate fitting of the truncated RASD with diverse functions is discussed. At the intermediary values of the threshold, i.e., for τ ranging between 3 and 12 mm h-1, where the RASD is easiest to compute, the slope of these truncated distributions is not strongly dependent on the threshold. This slope appears not to be very sensitive to the minimum and maximum distances bounding the domain where the rain field is observed. The RASD is found to be sloping more over sea than over land. The slope of the RASDs shows a small diurnal variation but no significant annual variation. The "perimeter to area" (fractal) dimension of the rain area for the sample without peak number distinction is around 1.35. Single-peaked and multipeaked rain areas have

  3. Can crops tolerate acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.K.

    1989-11-01

    This brief article describes work by scientists at the ARS Air Quality-Plant Growth and Development Laboratory in Raleigh, North Carolina, that indicates little damage to crops as a result of acid rain. In studies with simulated acid rain and 216 exposed varieties of 18 crops, there were no significant injuries nor was there reduced growth in most species. Results of chronic and acute exposures were correlated in sensitive tomato and soybean plants and in tolerant winter wheat and lettuce plants. These results suggest that 1-hour exposures could be used in the future to screen varieties for sensitivity to acid rain.

  4. Coronal Rain, Solar Storm

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Explanation: In this picture, the Sun's surface is quite dark. A frame from a movie recorded on November 9th by the orbiting TRACE telescope, it shows coronal loops lofted over a solar active region. Glowing brightly in extreme ultraviolet light, the hot plasma entrained above the Sun along arching magnetic fields is cooling and raining back down on the solar surface. Hours earlier, on November 8th, astronomers had watched this particular active region produce a not so spectacular solar flare. Still, the M-class flare spewed forth an intense storm of particles, suddenly showering satellites near the Earth with high energy protons. The flare event was also associated with a large coronal mass ejection, a massive cloud of material which impacted our fair planet's magnetic field about 31 hours later. The result ... a strong geomagnetic storm. Credit: NASA/GSFC/TRACE To learn more go to: nasascience.nasa.gov/missions/trace To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  5. Rain rate distributions for China from hourly rain gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Zhu, Yuan-Jing; Zhao, Bolin

    1998-05-01

    Rain rate cumulative lognormal and Gamma distributions are calculated from hourly rain gauge data collected in 1991 at 333 locations in China. The Gamma distribution better represents the statistical rain rate distribution. So 1-min cumulative distribution to every gauge station is derived from the piecewise regression results of Gamma distribution through half-empirical conversion coefficients. We suggest the following actions: (1) In south China, there should be an approximately 9°E×5°N area of rain climatic zone K centered at about 112°E, 26°N inside International Telecommunication Union(ITU)-R designed zone M. (2) A geostationary communication satellite for China should be placed over eastern China (between 100°E and 125°E) in order to generally reduce the rain attenuation of Earth-satellite links all over China, based on rain rate distributions characteristic of China. Our data treatment procedure and results presented in this paper may be practical and useful in engineering design.

  6. Model State Acid Rain Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  7. Next generation paradigm for urban pluvial flood modelling, prediction, management and vulnerability reduction - Interaction between RainGain and Blue Green Dream projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, C.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of climate change and increasing urbanisation call for a new paradigm for efficient planning, management and retrofitting of urban developments to increase resilience to climate change and to maximize ecosystem services. Improved management of urban floods from all sources in required. Time scale for well documented fluvial and coastal floods allows for timely response but surface (pluvial) flooding caused by intense local storms had not been given appropriate attention, Pitt Review (UK). Urban surface floods predictions require fine scale data and model resolutions. They have to be tackled locally by combining central inputs (meteorological services) with the efforts of the local entities. Although significant breakthrough in modelling of pluvial flooding was made there is a need to further enhance short term prediction of both rainfall and surface flooding. These issues are dealt with in the EU Iterreg project Rain Gain (RG). Breakthrough in urban flood mitigation can only be achieved by combined effects of advanced planning design, construction and management of urban water (blue) assets in interaction with urban vegetated areas' (green) assets. Changes in design and operation of blue and green assets, currently operating as two separate systems, is urgently required. Gaps in knowledge and technology will be introduced by EIT's Climate-KIC Blue Green Dream (BGD) project. The RG and BGD projects provide synergy of the "decoupled" blue and green systems to enhance multiple benefits to: urban amenity, flood management, heat island, biodiversity, resilience to drought thus energy requirements, thus increased quality of urban life at lower costs. Urban pluvial flood management will address two priority areas: Short Term rainfall Forecast and Short term flood surface forecast. Spatial resolution of short term rainfall forecast below 0.5 km2 and lead time of a few hours are needed. Improvements are achievable by combining data sources of raingauge networks

  8. Mechanism of HVDC wall bushing flashover in nonuniform rain

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, H.M.; Lux, A.E. )

    1991-01-01

    A model which assumes a dry zone of changing length is used to determine conditions which may lead to flashover of HVDC wall bushings in non-uniform rain. The key parameter in the proposed mechanism is the ratio of the resistance per unit length of the wet region to the resistance per unit length of the drier region. Measurements of the surface resistivity are presented for horizontal insulators, including wall bushings, with different surface conditions subjected to rain. Such measurements can be utilized to evaluate the potential capability of various materials to prevent wall bushing surface flashover in nonuniform rain.

  9. Acid rain and dry deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Canter, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides information on the formation of acid rain and the long-range transport of air pollutants. The effects of acid precipitation on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are highlighted and technical and policy issues associated with the delineation and implementation of control strategies for acid rain and dry deposition are covered. Dry deposition is addressed, with emphasis given to precipitation metals and organics.

  10. Sampling and analysis of rain

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents papers on the chemical analysis of acid rain as given at a conference on the sampling of atmospheric precipitations. Topics considered at the conference included the measurement of pH and acidity, quality control of rainwater analysis, the analysis of rain by ion chromatography, atmospheric sulfur analysis using rateometric colorimetry, precipitation chemistry measurements, and the updating process in precipitation quality networks.

  11. Rain rate instrument for deployment at sea, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Jimmy W.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes, in detail, the SBIR Phase 2 contracting effort provided for by NASA Contract Number NAS8-38481 in which a prototype Rain Rate Sensor was developed. FWG Model RP101A is a fully functional rain rate and droplet size analyzing instrument. The RP101A is a fully functional rain rate and droplet size analyzing instrument. The RP101A consists of a fiber optic probe containing a 32-fiber array connected to an electronic signal processor. When interfaced to an IBM compatible personal computer and configured with appropriate software, the RP101A is capable of measuring rain rates and particles ranging in size from around 300 microns up to 6 to 7 millimeters. FWG Associates, Inc. intends to develop a production model from the prototype and continue the effort under NASA's SBIR Phase 3 program.

  12. Relating Convective and Stratiform Rain to Latent Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen; Zeng, Xiping; Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari

    2010-01-01

    The relationship among surface rainfall, its intensity, and its associated stratiform amount is established by examining observed precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The results show that for moderate-high stratiform fractions, rain probabilities are strongly skewed toward light rain intensities. For convective-type rain, the peak probability of occurrence shifts to higher intensities but is still significantly skewed toward weaker rain rates. The main differences between the distributions for oceanic and continental rain are for heavily convective rain. The peak occurrence, as well as the tail of the distribution containing the extreme events, is shifted to higher intensities for continental rain. For rainy areas sampled at 0.58 horizontal resolution, the occurrence of conditional rain rates over 100 mm/day is significantly higher over land. Distributions of rain intensity versus stratiform fraction for simulated precipitation data obtained from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations are quite similar to those from the satellite, providing a basis for mapping simulated cloud quantities to the satellite observations. An improved convective-stratiform heating (CSH) algorithm is developed based on two sources of information: gridded rainfall quantities (i.e., the conditional intensity and the stratiform fraction) observed from the TRMM PR and synthetic cloud process data (i.e., latent heating, eddy heat flux convergence, and radiative heating/cooling) obtained from CRM simulations of convective cloud systems. The new CSH algorithm-derived heating has a noticeably different heating structure over both ocean and land regions compared to the previous CSH algorithm. Major differences between the new and old algorithms include a significant increase in the amount of low- and midlevel heating, a downward emphasis in the level of maximum cloud heating by about 1 km, and a larger variance between land and ocean in

  13. Convective and stratiform rain: Multichannel microwave sensing over oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Nucciarone, J. J.; Dalu, G.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements made by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) radiometer over the oceans, at 19, 37, and 85 GHz in dual polarization, are used to develop a model to classify rain into light-stratiform, moderately convective, and heavy convective types in the mesoscale convective systems (MCS). It is observed that the bulk of the 19- and 37-GHz data are linearly correlated with respect to one another, and generally increase together in brightness as the mean rain rate in the field of view (FOV) of the radiometer increases. However, a significant fraction of the data from these channels departs from this linear relationship, reflecting the nonuniform rain that is convective vs. the relatively light stratiform rain. It is inferred from the SSM/I data, in a MCS, when the slope dT sub 3/dT sub 19 is greater than unity there are optically thin clouds which produce light uniform rain. On the other hand, when dT sub 3/dT sub 19 is close to unity, the rain cells have an open structure and correspond to the convective type of rain. The openings between the cells are apparently a result of the downdrafts and/or entrainment. Relatively low values of 85-GHz brightness temperatures that are present when dT sub 37/dT sub 19 is close to unity support these views and, in addition, leads us to conclude that when the convection is heavy this brightness temperature decreases due to scattering by hydrometeors. On the basis of this explanation of the SSM/I data, an empirical rain retrieval algorithm is developed. Radar backscatter observations over the Atlantic Ocean next to Florida are used to demonstrate the applicability of this method. Three monthly mean maps of rainfall over the oceans from 50 degrees N to 50 degrees S, are presented to illustrate the ability of this method to sense seasonal and interannual variations of rain.

  14. Long-term observations of cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon rain forest – Part 1: Aerosol size distribution, hygroscopicity, and new model parametrizations for CCN prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Pöhlker, Mira L.; Pöhlker, Christopher; Ditas, Florian; Klimach, Thomas; Hrabe de Angelis, Isabella; Araújo, Alessandro; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Cheng, Yafang; Chi, Xuguang; Ditz, Reiner; Gunthe, Sachin S.; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Könemann, Tobias; Lavrič, Jošt V.; Martin, Scot T.; Mikhailov, Eugene; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Rose, Diana; Saturno, Jorge; Su, Hang; Thalman, Ryan; Walter, David; Wang, Jian; Wolff, Stefan; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2016-12-20

    Size-resolved long-term measurements of atmospheric aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and hygroscopicity were conducted at the remote Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) in the central Amazon Basin over a 1-year period and full seasonal cycle (March 2014–February 2015). Our measurements provide a climatology of CCN properties characteristic of a remote central Amazonian rain forest site.The CCN measurements were continuously cycled through 10 levels of supersaturation (S=0.11 to 1.10 %) and span the aerosol particle size range from 20 to 245 nm. The mean critical diameters of CCN activation range from 43 nm at S = 1.10 % to 172 nm at S = 0.11 %. Furthermore, the particle hygroscopicity exhibits a pronounced size dependence with lower values for the Aitken mode (κAit = 0.14 ± 0.03), higher values for the accumulation mode (κAcc = 0.22 ± 0.05), and an overall mean value of κmean = 0.17 ± 0.06, consistent with high fractions of organic aerosol.The hygroscopicity parameter, κ, exhibits remarkably little temporal variability: no pronounced diurnal cycles, only weak seasonal trends, and few short-term variations during long-range transport events. In contrast, the CCN number concentrations exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle, tracking the pollution-related seasonality in total aerosol concentration. Here, we find that the variability in the CCN concentrations in the central Amazon is mostly driven by aerosol particle number concentration and size distribution, while variations in aerosol hygroscopicity and chemical composition matter only during a few episodes.For modeling purposes, we compare different approaches of predicting CCN number concentration and present a novel parametrization, which allows accurate CCN predictions based on a small set of input data.

  15. Runoff simulation using radar and rain gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Mao, J. T.; Zhu, Y. J.; Li, J. R.

    2003-03-01

    The conceptual rainfall-runoff model TOPMODEL is used to simulate runoffs of the Meishan and Nianyushan catchments during the summers of 1998 and 1999 in the GAME/HUBEX (GEWEX Asia Monsoon Experiment /HUAIHE River Basin Experiment) project. The rainfall distributions are estimated by weather radar and rain gauge networks according to different methods. Observed and simulated runoffs are compared and analyzed for both catchments. Results show that (1) the runoff of the catchment is best simulated by radar data combined with rain gauge network data from inside the catchment, and (2) the rainfall estimated by radar adjusted by a few rain gauges outside the catchment can be used to simulate runoff equally as well as using the dense rain gauge network alone.

  16. Copper complexation in marine and terrestrial rain water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Melanie; Jickells, Tim

    The complexation of copper was studied in rainwater collected in Norwich, UK, and during Atlantic and Indian Ocean cruises. The complexation was measured with Chelex resin, Sep-Pak columns and adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry with tropolone as a competing ligand. Strong organic complexation was observed in semi-urban and marine rain samples with conditional stability constants between 10 11 and 10 14. Model solutions of copper and humic matter found organic complexes of a similar strength to those observed in the rain samples suggesting humic material as a potential ligand. A large proportion of the copper in the rains was associated with strong organic complexes over the pH range 4-8 in both filtered and unfiltered rain samples suggesting organic complexation is an important process both in the atmosphere and on arrival to oceans.

  17. Rain cell statistics experiment. [from radar transmission measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.

    1975-01-01

    Communication links suffer from interference caused by precipitation along the transmission path. Terminals established to take advantage of space diversity must be spaced in a manner dependent on rain intensities, rain cell sizes, and spacings. A NASA sponsored radar experiment was conducted at Wallops Island, Va. in 1972 and 1973 to provide statistical data on rain shower intensities and their geometrical properties. The objectives of the experiment were to determine the statistics of the field of rain cells in terms of cell size, intensity, spacing, number density, and altitude dependence, and to find the detailed structure of individual cells leading to a model of an individual cell. The experimental system is described, emphasizing the frequency diversity aspects, the computer control of the antenna, and the digital and analog video recording.

  18. Rain: relaxations in the sky.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ole; Christensen, Kim

    2002-09-01

    We demonstrate how, from the point of view of energy flow through an open system, rain is analogous to many other relaxational processes in nature such as earthquakes. By identifying rain events as the basic entities of the phenomenon, we show that the number density of rain events per year is inversely proportional to the released water column raised to the power of 1.4. This is the rain equivalent of the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes. The event durations and the waiting times between events are also characterized by scaling regions, where no typical time scale exists. The Hurst exponent of the rain intensity signal H=0.76>0.5. It is valid in the temporal range from minutes up to the full duration of the signal of half a year. All of our findings are consistent with the concept of self-organized criticality, which refers to the tendency of slowly driven nonequilibrium systems towards a state of scale-free behavior.

  19. Low-Latitude Ethane Rain on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years. These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally. Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the "methanological" cycle on Titan. I use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a spectroscopic investigation of multiple rain-wetted areas. I compute "before-and-after" spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane, I find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. I show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, I show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form.

  20. Low-Latitude Ethane Rain on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years. These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally. Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the "methanological" cycle on Titan. I use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a spectroscopic investigation of multiple rain-wetted areas. I compute "before-and-after" spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane, I find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. I show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, I show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form.

  1. Atmospheric dust and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, L.O.; Likens, G.E.

    1996-12-01

    Why is acid rain still an environmental problem in Europe and North America despite antipollution reforms? The answer really is blowing in the wind: atmospheric dust. These airborne particles can help neutralize the acids falling on forests, but dust levels are unusually low these days. In the air dust particles can neutralize acid rain. What can we do about acid rain and atmospheric dust? Suggestions range from the improbable to the feasible. One reasonable suggestion is to reduce emissions of acidic pollutants to levels that can be buffered by natural quantities of basic compounds in the atmosphere; such a goal would mean continued reductions in sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, perhaps even greater than those prescribed in the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act in the U.S. 5 figs.

  2. The regional costs and benefits of acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Berkman, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    Congress recently enacted acid rain control legislation as part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments following a decade-long debate among disparate regional interests. Although Congress succeeded in drafting a law acceptable to all regions, the regional costs and benefits of the legislation remain uncertain. The research presented here attempts to estimate the regional costs and benefits and the economic impacts of acid rain controls. These estimates are made using a modeling system composed of econometric, linear programming and input-output models. The econometric and linear programming components describe markets for electricity and coal. The outputs of these components including capital investment, electricity demand, and coal production are taken as exogenous inputs by a multiregional input-output model. The input-output model produces estimates of changes in final demand, gross output, and employment. The utility linear programming model also predicts sulfur dioxide emissions (an acid-rain precursor). According to model simulations, the costs of acid rain control exceed the benefits for many regions including several regions customarily thought to be the major beneficiaries of acid rain control such as New England.

  3. MAP3S/RAINE modeling abstracts, 1980. [Concise descriptions of models and availability for calculation of airborne concentration of sulfur dioxide and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, P.

    1980-07-01

    The MultiState Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study (MAP3S) has produced as a primary research output a number of numerical models for the calculation of airborne concentrations of sulfur dioxide and sulfate resulting from anthropogenic sources. Concise descriptions of these models, and of related modeling developments, are collected in this report. For each model, or model component, there is included a listing of the authors, a summary of what it is the model calculates and the method used, a list of references, and a statement of availability.

  4. Sensitivity of hydrometeor profiles and satellite brightness temperatures to model microphysics for MCSs over land and ocean: Model comparison using EOF analysis and implications for rain and latent heat retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    The impact of model microphysics on the relationships between microphysical variables and derived satellite microwave brightness temperatures (T B's) and on the retrievals of microphysical variables was using a three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, adaptive-grid cloud model to simulate two mesoscale convective systems, one over land and one over ocean. Four microphysical schemes (each employing 3-ice bulk parameterizations) were compared in both convective and stratiform precipitation using Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis. The validity of the microphysical schemes suggests that over land the model microphysical schemes produce too much reflectivity aloft and too rapid a decrease in reflectivity from the melting level to the surface, and over ocean the simulations produced more graupel and not enough rain. Model microphysics had a noticeable impact on the relations between the hydrometeor structure and TB's. Classified in terms of TB 's, the microphysical schemes produce significantly different mean vertical profiles of cloud water, cloud ice, snow, vertical velocity, and latent heating, especially in stratiform clouds. Vertical velocity and latent heating in simulated stratiform clouds were not well correlated with TB's for any of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) frequencies. Differences in the amount of supercooled cloud water produced in the various schemes accounted for much of the variation in TB relations. The uncertainty in retrieving hydrometeor and latent heating profiles for passive microwave measurements has been examined quantitatively. The four microphysical schemes exhibited analogous uncertainties in retrieving rain and graupel, but very different uncertainties in retrieving cloud water, cloud ice, and snow. The uncertainty in retrieving latent heating appears to be related to the insensitivity of TMI frequencies to cloud water, cloud ice, and snow. Structural differences in hydrometeor and latent heating

  5. Scatterometer directional response during rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, L.; Norcross, G.; Giovanangeli, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    Rainfall modification of directional scatterometer response from the sea surface was simulated in wind-wave tank experiments. Data show that for the range of conditions in laboratory experiments, rain enhances radar cross section for all azimuthal angles relative to wind direction. This result broadens previous measurements, which showed that scatterometer response increases with increasing rainfall for radars pointing upwind. But more to the point, the data also show that the directional dynamic-range of scatterometry diminishes rapidly as rainfall rate increases. Thus, while it may be possible to determine wind speed and direction during rain, it will require adequate system sensitivity.

  6. Benefits of acid rain controls

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, D.G.

    1984-04-01

    The acid rain debate has been distorted by a mistaken political paradigm. This paradigm holds that acid rain controls will benefit only a few lakes and streams, mostly in the Adirondack Mountains in northeastern New York State. It holds that the costs of a control program will fall on the Midwest but that none of the benefits will occur there since no sensitive lakes and streams are found in that area. The author discussed this problem and pointed out that sulfur dioxide was responsible for several types of pollution damage and that all the states would benefit from the reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions.

  7. On validation of the rain climatic zone designations for Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiyemi, O. O.; Ibiyemi, T. S.; Ojo, J. S.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, validation of rain climatic zone classifications for Nigeria is presented based on global radio-climatic models by the International Telecommunication Union-Radiocommunication (ITU-R) and Crane. Rain rate estimates deduced from several ground-based measurements and those earlier estimated from the precipitation index on the Tropical Rain Measurement Mission (TRMM) were employed for the validation exercise. Although earlier classifications indicated that Nigeria falls into zones P, Q, N, and K for the ITU-R designations, and zones E and H for Crane's climatic zone designations, the results however confirmed that the rain climatic zones across Nigeria can only be classified into four, namely P, Q, M, and N for the ITU-R designations, while the designations by Crane exhibited only three zones, namely E, G, and H. The ITU-R classification was found to be more suitable for planning microwave and millimeter wave links across Nigeria. The research outcomes are vital in boosting the confidence level of system designers in using the ITU-R designations as presented in the map developed for the rain zone designations for estimating the attenuation induced by rain along satellite and terrestrial microwave links over Nigeria.

  8. On validation of the rain climatic zone designations for Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiyemi, O. O.; Ibiyemi, T. S.; Ojo, J. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, validation of rain climatic zone classifications for Nigeria is presented based on global radio-climatic models by the International Telecommunication Union-Radiocommunication (ITU-R) and Crane. Rain rate estimates deduced from several ground-based measurements and those earlier estimated from the precipitation index on the Tropical Rain Measurement Mission (TRMM) were employed for the validation exercise. Although earlier classifications indicated that Nigeria falls into zones P, Q, N, and K for the ITU-R designations, and zones E and H for Crane's climatic zone designations, the results however confirmed that the rain climatic zones across Nigeria can only be classified into four, namely P, Q, M, and N for the ITU-R designations, while the designations by Crane exhibited only three zones, namely E, G, and H. The ITU-R classification was found to be more suitable for planning microwave and millimeter wave links across Nigeria. The research outcomes are vital in boosting the confidence level of system designers in using the ITU-R designations as presented in the map developed for the rain zone designations for estimating the attenuation induced by rain along satellite and terrestrial microwave links over Nigeria.

  9. Winter stream temperature in the rain-on-snow zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, J. A.; Moore, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    Stream temperature is a principal determinant of aquatic ecosystem composition and productivity. There are increasing concerns that changes in land cover and climatic conditions could produce changes in stream thermal regimes that would be deleterious to existing aquatic communities. Most stream temperature research has focused on summer periods and few studies have examined winter periods despite the growing recognition of its biological importance. The winter thermal regimes of Pacific Northwest headwater streams, which provide vital winter habitat for salmonids and their food sources, may be particularly sensitive to changes in climate because they can remain ice-free throughout the year and are often located in rain-on-snow zones. This study examined winter stream temperature patterns and controls in small headwater catchments within the rain-on-snow zone at the Malcolm Knapp Research Forest, near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Two working hypotheses were addressed by this study: (1) winter stream temperatures are primarily controlled by advective fluxes associated with runoff processes and (2) stream temperatures should be depressed during rain-on-snow events, compared to rain on bare ground, due to the cooling effect of rain passing through the snowpack prior to infiltrating the soil or being delivered to the stream as saturation-excess overland flow. These hypotheses were tested statistically using historical stream temperature data and modelled snowpack dynamics for a forested headwater catchment. When snow was not present, daily stream temperature during winter rain events tended to increase with increasing air temperature. However, when snow was present, stream temperature was capped at about 5 °C, regardless of air temperature. This historical analysis was complemented with detailed field data collected during the winter of 2011-2012 from an ongoing field study in a partially logged catchment. Stream temperature response to a large rain

  10. Scientist, researchers, and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Alm, L.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The role of the hidden participants in agenda-setting for environmental issues is discussed. These personnel involve academics, researchers, career bureaucrats, congressional staffers, consultants, and administration appointees below the top level. Scientists have been publicly involved in the acid rain issue from the beginning, using the media to dramatize the possible catastrophic consequences of acid rain. Presently, the scientific community is not in consensus about the solutions to the problem. Since the initial enactment of the National Acid Precipitation Act in 1980, not a single acid rain law has been passed, although many bills have been proposed. Spokesman for the coal and utility industries and Reagan administration personnel have used the scientific disagreements to delay abatement actions and refute claims that acid rain is a severe problem. Another result of the confusion is a distrust and even disdain for academic work. One possible solution to the stalemate is an accurate form for resolving scientific disputes that have a strong political component and that the forum should have a mechanism for converging on accurate science. 19 refs.

  11. Vegetable production after heavy rains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is not clear if extraordinary precipitation stored in the soil was able to support vegetable crops planted after rains events returned to normal levels. Cucumber and sweet corn were established from seed and non-pungent jalapeno peppers were established from 8-week old transplants on beds. Half...

  12. THE ACID RAIN NOX PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 350,000 and 400,000 tons of annual NOx emissions have been eliminated as a result of Phase I of the Acid Rain NOx Program. As expected. the utilities have chosen emissions averaging as the primary compliance option. This reflects that, in general, NO x reductions have ...

  13. THE ACID RAIN NOX PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 350,000 and 400,000 tons of annual NOx emissions have been eliminated as a result of Phase I of the Acid Rain NOx Program. As expected. the utilities have chosen emissions averaging as the primary compliance option. This reflects that, in general, NO x reductions have ...

  14. Acid Rain: The Silent Environmental Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmud, Mia

    1992-01-01

    Describes the silent environmental threat posed by acid rain. Caused mainly by manmade pollutants, acid rain damages water and trees, decreases visibility, corrodes monuments, and threatens public health. The article includes guidelines for action. (SM)

  15. Nature in the Classroom: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Charles

    1982-01-01

    As a lesson topic, acid rain is defined, its chemistry given, and its development since the 1950s described. The worldwide effects of acid rain are discussed along with the available technology for controlling the problem. (CM)

  16. Nature in the Classroom: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Charles

    1982-01-01

    As a lesson topic, acid rain is defined, its chemistry given, and its development since the 1950s described. The worldwide effects of acid rain are discussed along with the available technology for controlling the problem. (CM)

  17. Acid Rain: The Silent Environmental Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmud, Mia

    1992-01-01

    Describes the silent environmental threat posed by acid rain. Caused mainly by manmade pollutants, acid rain damages water and trees, decreases visibility, corrodes monuments, and threatens public health. The article includes guidelines for action. (SM)

  18. Acid Rain Program Opt-in Factsheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the Opt-in Program, which allows sources not required to participate in the Acid Rain Program the opportunity to enter the program on a voluntary basis and receive Acid Rain Program allowances.

  19. Rain Hampers Tsunami Relief Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The cleanup and relief efforts from the recent tsunamis continue in coastal communities that were ravaged by the waves all across the Indian Ocean. Heavy rains have further complicated the matter and added to the misery in parts of eastern Sri Lanka. Between December 28, 2004, and January 5, 2005, up to 10 to 15 inches of rain may have fallen along the southeast coast of the island, and as much as 20 inches (red areas) fell just offshore. This rainfall map was created by the TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, which monitors rainfall over the global tropics. The map shows that many other regions around the Indian Ocean were also affected by the rains, including Malaysia and parts of Sumatra. The heaviest rains fell on December 31 and January 4. The rains were likely the result of a combination of the northeast monsoon interacting with the topography and an active phase of what is known as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) (or 30-60 day oscillation). The MJO is a large-scale disturbance that propagates eastward from the Indian Ocean into the West Pacific Ocean, bringing extended periods of unsettled weather with it. Individual convective complexes within the MJO can last on the order of a day. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA. NASA image produced by Hal Pierce (SSAI/NASA GSFC) and caption by Steve Lang (SSAI/NASA GSFC).

  20. Rain Hampers Tsunami Relief Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The cleanup and relief efforts from the recent tsunamis continue in coastal communities that were ravaged by the waves all across the Indian Ocean. Heavy rains have further complicated the matter and added to the misery in parts of eastern Sri Lanka. Between December 28, 2004, and January 5, 2005, up to 10 to 15 inches of rain may have fallen along the southeast coast of the island, and as much as 20 inches (red areas) fell just offshore. This rainfall map was created by the TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, which monitors rainfall over the global tropics. The map shows that many other regions around the Indian Ocean were also affected by the rains, including Malaysia and parts of Sumatra. The heaviest rains fell on December 31 and January 4. The rains were likely the result of a combination of the northeast monsoon interacting with the topography and an active phase of what is known as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) (or 30-60 day oscillation). The MJO is a large-scale disturbance that propagates eastward from the Indian Ocean into the West Pacific Ocean, bringing extended periods of unsettled weather with it. Individual convective complexes within the MJO can last on the order of a day. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA. NASA image produced by Hal Pierce (SSAI/NASA GSFC) and caption by Steve Lang (SSAI/NASA GSFC).

  1. On-Disk Coronal Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, Patrick; Vissers, Gregal; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc

    2012-10-01

    Small and elongated, cool and dense blob-like structures are being reported with high resolution telescopes in physically different regions throughout the solar atmosphere. Their detection and the understanding of their formation, morphology, and thermodynamical characteristics can provide important information on their hosting environment, especially concerning the magnetic field, whose understanding constitutes a major problem in solar physics. An example of such blobs is coronal rain, a phenomenon of thermal non-equilibrium observed in active region loops, which consists of cool and dense chromospheric blobs falling along loop-like paths from coronal heights. So far, only off-limb coronal rain has been observed, and few reports on the phenomenon exist. In the present work, several data sets of on-disk Hα observations with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish 1- m Solar Telescope (SST) are analyzed. A special family of on-disk blobs is selected for each data set, and a statistical analysis is carried out on their dynamics, morphology, and temperature. All characteristics present distributions which are very similar to reported coronal rain statistics. We discuss possible interpretations considering other similar blob-like structures reported so far and show that a coronal rain interpretation is the most likely one. The chromospheric nature of the blobs and the projection effects (which eliminate all direct possibilities of height estimation) on one side, and their small sizes, fast dynamics, and especially their faint character (offering low contrast with the background intensity) on the other side, are found as the main causes for the absence until now of the detection of this on-disk coronal rain counterpart.

  2. Characterization of tropical precipitation using drop size distribution and rain rate-radar reflectivity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Saurabh; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-03-01

    Characterization of precipitation is important for proper interpretation of rain information from remotely sensed data. Rain attenuation and radar reflectivity (Z) depend directly on the drop size distribution (DSD). The relation between radar reflectivity/rain attenuation and rain rate (R) varies widely depending upon the origin, topography, and drop evolution mechanism and needs further understanding of the precipitation characteristics. The present work utilizes 2 years of concurrent measurements of DSD using a ground-based disdrometer at five diverse climatic conditions in Indian subcontinent and explores the possibility of rain classification based on microphysical characteristics of precipitation. It is observed that both gamma and lognormal distributions are performing almost similar for Indian region with a marginally better performance by one model than other depending upon the locations. It has also been found that shape-slope relationship of gamma distribution can be a good indicator of rain type. The Z-R relation, Z = ARb, is found to vary widely for different precipitation systems, with convective rain that has higher values of A than the stratiform rain for two locations, whereas the reverse is observed for the rest of the three locations. Further, the results indicate that the majority of rainfall (>50%) in Indian region is due to the convective rain although the occurrence time of convective rain is low (<10%).

  3. Characterization of Rain Attenuation and Depolarization at W/V Bands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-30

    investigating effects of the atmosphere on electromagnetic signal propagation at W-band (81 – 86 GHz) and V-band (71 – 76 GHz). We compared modeling...parameters such as frequency, rain, temperature, and rain drop size distribution [13]. Depolarization of a propagating electromagnetic wave is usually due...Laws and Parsons Distribution (LP): mainly used when the rain rate is below 35 mm/h in continental temperate rainfall with a mean drop size spectrum

  4. An analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: to what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects.

  5. Acid Rain: What We Must Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Eville

    1983-01-01

    Addresses questions about the nature, source, and history of acid rain. In addition, discusses the questions: Why is acid rain a problem? Is acid rain getting worse? What is the threat of further problems? Concludes that it is time to act on the problem and recommends an appropriate course of action. (JN)

  6. A Walk in the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    Presents a learning project in which students prepare a guided, multisensory rain forest tour representing its ecology. Develops five stop points presenting a theme or an important aspect of the rain forest. Includes a list of selected resources for rain forest studies. (YDS)

  7. Create a Rain Forest in the Gym.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Karen

    1995-01-01

    Describes a creative interdisciplinary program for K-3 students that involves setting up a rain forest in the gymnasium to teach students gymnastic skills in the context of the Amazon rain forest. The paper describes how to set up the rain forest and teach a variety of classes. Rainforest resources are included. (SM)

  8. Rain, Snow, and Spring Runoff Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the theory behind the correlation between warm rain, rapid snowmelt, and the subsequent runoff using the concepts of enthalpy, thermal transfer, and energy transfer. Concludes that rapid runoff is not a consequence of rain per se but of the high humidities associated with the rain. (JRH)

  9. Acid Rain: What We Must Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Eville

    1983-01-01

    Addresses questions about the nature, source, and history of acid rain. In addition, discusses the questions: Why is acid rain a problem? Is acid rain getting worse? What is the threat of further problems? Concludes that it is time to act on the problem and recommends an appropriate course of action. (JN)

  10. Rain, Snow, and Spring Runoff Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the theory behind the correlation between warm rain, rapid snowmelt, and the subsequent runoff using the concepts of enthalpy, thermal transfer, and energy transfer. Concludes that rapid runoff is not a consequence of rain per se but of the high humidities associated with the rain. (JRH)

  11. Create a Rain Forest in the Gym.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Karen

    1995-01-01

    Describes a creative interdisciplinary program for K-3 students that involves setting up a rain forest in the gymnasium to teach students gymnastic skills in the context of the Amazon rain forest. The paper describes how to set up the rain forest and teach a variety of classes. Rainforest resources are included. (SM)

  12. A Walk in the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    Presents a learning project in which students prepare a guided, multisensory rain forest tour representing its ecology. Develops five stop points presenting a theme or an important aspect of the rain forest. Includes a list of selected resources for rain forest studies. (YDS)

  13. A recent and abrupt decline in the East African long rains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Bradfield; DeWitt, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The successive failure of the East African short rains (typically October-December) and subsequent long rains (March-May) in 2010-11 plunged much of the region into severe drought, impacting millions of people and triggering a humanitarian crisis. While poor short rains in 2010 were generally anticipated given linkages with La Niña, the subsequent long rains do not exhibit similar predictability. Here we show the long rains failure in boreal spring of 2011 is consistent with a recurrent large-scale precipitation pattern that followed their abrupt decline around 1999. Using observations and climate model simulations, we show the abrupt decline in long rains precipitation is linked to similarly abrupt changes in sea surface temperatures, predominately in the tropical Pacific basin.

  14. Research Spotlight: Rain modifies ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-01-01

    Exchanges of carbon dioxide (CO2) between the atmosphere and the oceans play an important role in the global carbon cycle and in determining how much CO2 is stored in the atmosphere and how much is stored in the ocean. A new study shows that rain can be an important, though often overlooked, factor in this exchange. Rain can contribute to the air-sea carbon exchange in several ways. Rain dilutes the CO2 in the surface layer of the ocean, increases the speed at which gas is transferred between the atmosphere and ocean, and deposits carbon from the atmosphere into the ocean. To determine the effects of rain on the air-sea carbon flux in the western equatorial Pacific, Turk et al. analyzed rain measurements from a buoy at 0°, 156°E during 2002 as well as a dilution model based on observational ocean studies and output from an ocean carbon cycle model. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL045520, 2010)

  15. Acid rain attack on outdoor sculpture in perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, Richard A.

    2016-12-01

    A major concern motivating research in acid rain materials effects has been the potential for damage to cultural heritage, particularly outdoor marble and bronze sculpture. However, a combination of field and laboratory studies has failed to show a correlation between rain pH and loss of materials. In order to understand this counterintuitive lack of acid rain effect, an aqueous geochemical modeling approach was used to analyze rain runoff chemistry for the relative importance of acid rain neutralization, dry deposition, and in the case of marble, natural carbonate dissolution. This approach involved the development of pH - SO42- phase diagrams for marble (calcium carbonate) and bronze (copper) under ambient environmental conditions. This then enabled reaction path modeling of the acid neutralization process using the pH range typically found in wet deposition (3.5-6). The results were for marble that the theoretical maximum amount of Ca2+ ion that could be lost due acid rain neutralization would be 0.158 mmol/l compared to 10.5 mmol/l by dry deposition, and for bronze, the Cu2+ ion losses would be 0.21 mmol/l and 47.3 mmol/l respectively. Consequently dry deposition effects on these materials have the potential to dominate over wet deposition effects. To test these predictions the geochemical models were applied to examples of data sets from mass balance (runoff vs rainfall) studies on a marble statue in New York City and some bronze memorial plaques at Gettysburg PA. Although these data sets were collected in the early 1980s they remain valid for demonstrating the mass balance method. For the marble statue, the mean Ca2+ losses by dry deposition was about 69% of the total compared 0.3% for acid rain neutralization, which was less than the natural carbonate dissolution losses of 0.8%. For the bronze, the mean Cu2+ losses were 70.6% by SO42- dry deposition and 23% by NO3- dry deposition compared to 6.4% by acid rain neutralization. Thus for both cases the wet

  16. Rain fade in Ku-band VSAT networks - A design consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raust, Eric H.

    The components of a Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) network are shown to determine the effect that rainfall has on Ku-band satellite communications. This paper considers the effect of the signal attenuation caused by rain as predicted by a well known rain fade model. The result, of considering the highest rain attenuations experienced is related to both transmission availabilities and signal margins. The results of link calculations are tabulated for typical network designs. These results show that proper selection of the VSAT's components and the satellite transponder power can all but eliminate rain outages while maintaining the economics of a Ku-band VSAT network.

  17. Dispersal of Salmonella Typhimurium by rain splash onto tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M; Danyluk, Michelle D; Gu, Ganyu; Vallad, Gary E; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2012-03-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica have increasingly been associated with tomatoes and traced back to production areas, but the spread of Salmonella from a point source onto plants has not been described. Splash dispersal by rain could be one means of dissemination. Green fluorescent protein-labeled, kanamycin-resistant Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium dispensed on the surface of plastic mulch, organic mulch, or soil at 10⁸ CFU/cm² was used as the point source in the center of a rain simulator. Tomato plants in soil with and without plastic or organic mulch were placed around the point source, and rain intensities of 60 and 110 mm/h were applied for 5, 10, 20, and 30 min. Dispersal of Salmonella followed a negative exponential model with a half distance of 3 cm at 110 mm/h. Dispersed Salmonella survived for 3 days on tomato leaflets, with a total decline of 5 log and an initial decimal reduction time of 10 h. Recovery of dispersed Salmonella from plants at the maximum observed distance ranged from 3 CFU/g of leaflet after a rain episode of 110 mm/h for 10 min on soil to 117 CFU/g of leaflet on plastic mulch. Dispersal of Salmonella on plants with and without mulch was significantly enhanced by increasing rain duration from 0 to 10 min, but dispersal was reduced when rainfall duration increased from 10 to 30 min. Salmonella may be dispersed by rain to contaminate tomato plants in the field, especially during rain events of 10 min and when plastic mulch is used.

  18. Acid Rain: What It Is -- How You Can Help!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication discusses the nature and consequences of acid precipitation (commonly called acid rain). Topic areas include: (1) the chemical nature of acid rain; (2) sources of acid rain; (3) geographic areas where acid rain is a problem; (4) effects of acid rain on lakes; (5) effect of acid rain on vegetation; (6) possible effects of acid rain…

  19. Acid Rain: What It Is -- How You Can Help!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication discusses the nature and consequences of acid precipitation (commonly called acid rain). Topic areas include: (1) the chemical nature of acid rain; (2) sources of acid rain; (3) geographic areas where acid rain is a problem; (4) effects of acid rain on lakes; (5) effect of acid rain on vegetation; (6) possible effects of acid rain…

  20. Low-Latitude Ethane Rain on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years (Barnes, J. W. et al. 2012, Icarus, submitted). These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally (Turtle, E. P. et al. 2011, Science, 331, 1414-1417). Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the “methanological” cycle that dominates Titan's surface and atmosphere. In this study, we use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a thorough spectroscopic investigation of rain-wetted areas near Yalaing Terra, Hetpet Regio and central Adiri on Titan. We compute “before-and-after” spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain at any point in the time span of August 2009 to January 2012. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane that was calculated to match the resolution and sampling interval of VIMS (Brown, R. H. et al. 2008, Nature, 454, 607-610), we find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fortunately fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. We show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, we show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form as well. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

  1. Low-latitude ethane rain on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, P. A.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years (Barnes, J. W. et al. 2012, Icarus, submitted). These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally (Turtle, E. P. et al. 2011, Science, 331, 1414-1417). Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the "methanological" cycle that dominates Titan's surface and atmosphere. In this study, we use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a thorough spectroscopic investigation of rain-wetted areas near Yalaing Terra, Hetpet Regio and central Adiri on Titan. We compute "before-and-after" spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain at any point in the time span of August 2009 to January 2012. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane that was calculated to match the resolution and sampling interval of VIMS (Brown, R. H. et al. 2008, Nature, 454, 607-610), we find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fortunately fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. We show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, we show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form as well. Funded by NASA.

  2. The rain-powered cart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.; Lipscombe, Trevor C.

    2016-09-01

    A frictionless cart in the shape of a right triangle (with the vertical side forward) is elastically impacted by vertically falling raindrops. The speed of the cart as a function of time can be analytically deduced as an exercise in the use of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. A characteristic time defines the approach to a terminal speed which is a sizeable fraction of the speed of the rain. The treatment is accessible to a student in a calculus-based mechanics course.

  3. Observing the Formation of Flare-driven Coronal Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, E.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Antolin, P.; Wedemeyer, S.; Vissers, G.; Kontar, E. P.; Gallagher, P. T.

    2016-12-01

    Flare-driven coronal rain can manifest from rapidly cooled plasma condensations near coronal loop tops in thermally unstable postflare arcades. We detect five phases that characterize the postflare decay: heating, evaporation, conductive cooling dominance for ˜120 s, radiative/enthalpy cooling dominance for ˜4700 s, and finally catastrophic cooling occurring within 35-124 s, leading to rain strands with a periodicity of 55-70 s. We find an excellent agreement between the observations and model predictions of the dominant cooling timescales and the onset of catastrophic cooling. At the rain-formation site, we detect comoving, multithermal rain clumps that undergo catastrophic cooling from ˜1 MK to ˜22,000 K. During catastrophic cooling, the plasma cools at a maximum rate of 22,700 K s-1 in multiple loop-top sources. We calculated the density of the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma from the differential emission measure of the multithermal source employing regularized inversion. Assuming a pressure balance, we estimate the density of the chromospheric component of rain to be 9.21 × 1011 ± 1.76 × 1011 cm-3, which is comparable with quiescent coronal rain densities. With up to eight parallel strands in the EUV loop cross section, we calculate the mass loss rate from the postflare arcade to be as much as 1.98 × 1012 ± 4.95 × 1011 g s-1. Finally, we reveal a close proximity between the model predictions of {10}5.8 K and the observed properties between {10}5.9 and {10}6.2 K, which defines the temperature onset of catastrophic cooling. The close correspondence between the observations and numerical models suggests that indeed acoustic waves (with a sound travel time of 68 s) could play an important role in redistributing energy and sustaining the enthalpy-based radiative cooling.

  4. Convective rain cells: radar-derived spatio-temporal characteristics and synoptic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, N.; Morin, E.

    2012-04-01

    In this study we present the spatiotemporal characteristics of convective rain cells over the Eastern Mediterranean (northern Israel) and their relationship to synoptic patterns. Information on rain cell features was extracted from high-resolution weather radar data for a total of 191,586 radar volume scans from 12 hydrological years. The convective rain cell features (i.e., cell area, rainfall intensity and cell orientation) were obtained using cell segmentation technique. Cell tracking algorithm was used to analyze the changes of those features over time. Convective rain cells were clustered into three synoptic types (two extratropical winter lows: deep Cyprus low and shallow low, and a tropical intrusion: Active Red Sea Trough) using several NCEP/NCAR parameters, and empirical distributions were computed for their spatial and temporal features. In the study region, it was found that the Active Red Sea Trough rain cells are larger, live for less time and possess lower rain intensities than the rain cells generated by the winter lows. The Cyprus low rain cells were found to be less intense and slightly larger on average than the shallow low rain cells. It was further discovered that the preferential orientation of the rain cells is associated with the direction and velocity of the wind. The effect of distance from the coastline was also examined. An increase in the number and area of the rain cells near the coastline was observed, presumably due to the sea breeze convection. The mean rainfall intensity was found to peak near the shore and decrease with distance inland. This information is of great importance for understanding rain patterns and can be further applied in exploring the hydrological responses of the basins in this region. The presented study is the first step in achieving the long-term goal: to develop a high space-time resolution weather generator for creating rainfall ensembles under different climatology scenarios. Those rainfall ensembles will be

  5. Dust Rains Deliver Diverse Assemblages of Microorganisms to the Eastern Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Itani, Ghida Nouhad; Smith, Colin Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Dust rains may be particularly effective at delivering microorganisms, yet their biodiversities have been seldom examined. During 2011 and 2012 in Beirut, Lebanon, 16 of 21 collected rainfalls appeared dusty. Trajectory modelling of air mass origins was consistent with North African sources and at least one Southwest Asian source. As much as ~4 g particulate matter, ~20 μg DNA, and 50 million colony forming units were found deposited per square meter during rainfalls each lasting less than one day. Sequencing of 93 bacteria and 25 fungi cultured from rain samples revealed diverse bacterial phyla, both Gram positive and negative, and Ascomycota fungi. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of amplified 16S rDNA of 13 rains revealed distinct and diverse assemblages of bacteria. Dust rain 16S libraries yielded 131 sequences matching, in decreasing order of abundance, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria. Clean rain 16S libraries yielded 33 sequences matching only Betaproteobacteria family Oxalobacteraceae. Microbial composition varied between dust rains, and more diverse and different microbes were found in dust rains than clean rains. These results show that dust rains deliver diverse communities of microorganisms that may be complex products of revived desert soil species and fertilized cloud species. PMID:26939571

  6. Dust Rains Deliver Diverse Assemblages of Microorganisms to the Eastern Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Itani, Ghida Nouhad; Smith, Colin Andrew

    2016-03-04

    Dust rains may be particularly effective at delivering microorganisms, yet their biodiversities have been seldom examined. During 2011 and 2012 in Beirut, Lebanon, 16 of 21 collected rainfalls appeared dusty. Trajectory modelling of air mass origins was consistent with North African sources and at least one Southwest Asian source. As much as ~4 g particulate matter, ~20 μg DNA, and 50 million colony forming units were found deposited per square meter during rainfalls each lasting less than one day. Sequencing of 93 bacteria and 25 fungi cultured from rain samples revealed diverse bacterial phyla, both Gram positive and negative, and Ascomycota fungi. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of amplified 16S rDNA of 13 rains revealed distinct and diverse assemblages of bacteria. Dust rain 16S libraries yielded 131 sequences matching, in decreasing order of abundance, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria. Clean rain 16S libraries yielded 33 sequences matching only Betaproteobacteria family Oxalobacteraceae. Microbial composition varied between dust rains, and more diverse and different microbes were found in dust rains than clean rains. These results show that dust rains deliver diverse communities of microorganisms that may be complex products of revived desert soil species and fertilized cloud species.

  7. Dust Rains Deliver Diverse Assemblages of Microorganisms to the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itani, Ghida Nouhad; Smith, Colin Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Dust rains may be particularly effective at delivering microorganisms, yet their biodiversities have been seldom examined. During 2011 and 2012 in Beirut, Lebanon, 16 of 21 collected rainfalls appeared dusty. Trajectory modelling of air mass origins was consistent with North African sources and at least one Southwest Asian source. As much as ~4 g particulate matter, ~20 μg DNA, and 50 million colony forming units were found deposited per square meter during rainfalls each lasting less than one day. Sequencing of 93 bacteria and 25 fungi cultured from rain samples revealed diverse bacterial phyla, both Gram positive and negative, and Ascomycota fungi. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of amplified 16S rDNA of 13 rains revealed distinct and diverse assemblages of bacteria. Dust rain 16S libraries yielded 131 sequences matching, in decreasing order of abundance, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria. Clean rain 16S libraries yielded 33 sequences matching only Betaproteobacteria family Oxalobacteraceae. Microbial composition varied between dust rains, and more diverse and different microbes were found in dust rains than clean rains. These results show that dust rains deliver diverse communities of microorganisms that may be complex products of revived desert soil species and fertilized cloud species.

  8. Raindrop and flow interactions for interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wind-driven rain (WDR) experiments were conducted to evaluate interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model with two-dimensional experimental set-up in wind tunnel. Synchronized wind and rain simulations were applied to soil surfaces on windward and leeward slopes of 7, 15...

  9. Comparison of Instantaneous Frequency Scaling from Rain Attenuation and Optical Disdrometer Measurements at K/Q bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Zemba, Michael; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Rain attenuation is strongly dependent on the rain rate, but also on the rain drop size distribution (DSD). Typically, models utilize an average drop size distribution, such as those developed by Laws and Parsons, or Marshall and Palmer. However, individual rain events may possess drop size distributions which could be significantly different from the average and will impact, for example, fade mitigation techniques which utilize channel performance estimates from a signal at a different frequency. Therefore, a good understanding of the characteristics and variability of the raindrop size distribution is extremely important in predicting rain attenuation and instantaneous frequency scaling parameters on an event-toevent basis. Since June 2014, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have measured the attenuation due to rain in Milan, Italy, on the 20/40 GHz beacon signal broadcast from the Alphasat TDP#5 Aldo Paraboni Q/V-band Payload. Concomitant with these measurements are the measurements of drop size distribution and rain rate utilizing a Thies Clima laser precipitation monitor (disdrometer). In this paper, we discuss the comparison of the predicted rain attenuation at 20 and 40 GHz derived from the drop size distribution data with the measured rain attenuation. The results are compared on statistical and real-time bases. We will investigate the performance of the rain attenuation model, instantaneous frequency scaling, and the distribution of the scaling factor. Further, seasonal rain characteristics will be analysed.

  10. Nonlinear response in runoff magnitude to fluctuating rain patterns.

    PubMed

    Curtu, R; Fonley, M

    2015-03-01

    The runoff coefficient of a hillslope is a reliable measure for changes in the streamflow response at the river link outlet. A high runoff coefficient is a good indicator of the possibility of flash floods. Although the relationship between runoff coefficient and streamflow has been the subject of much study, the physical mechanisms affecting runoff coefficient including the dependence on precipitation pattern remain open topics for investigation. In this paper, we analyze a rainfall-runoff model at the hillslope scale as that hillslope is forced with different rain patterns: constant rain and fluctuating rain with different frequencies and amplitudes. When an oscillatory precipitation pattern is applied, although the same amount of water may enter the system, its response (measured by the runoff coefficient) will be maximum for a certain frequency of precipitation. The significant increase in runoff coefficient after a certain pattern of rainfall can be a potential explanation for the conditions preceding flash-floods.

  11. A rain splash transport equation assimilating field and laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Thomas; Malmon, Daniel V.; Mudd, Simon M.

    2010-03-01

    Process-based models of hillslope evolution require transport equations relating sediment flux to its major controls. An equation for rain splash transport in the absence of overland flow was constructed by modifying an approach developed by Reeve (1982) and parameterizing it with measurements from single-drop laboratory experiments and simulated rainfall on a grassland in East Africa. The equation relates rain splash to hillslope gradient, the median raindrop diameter of a storm, and ground cover density; the effect of soil texture on detachability can be incorporated from other published results. The spatial and temporal applicability of such an equation for rain splash transport in the absence of overland flow on uncultivated hillslopes can be estimated from hydrological calculations. The predicted transport is lower than landscape-averaged geologic erosion rates from Kenya but is large enough to modify short, slowly eroding natural hillslopes as well as microtopographic interrill surfaces between which overland flow transports the mobilized sediment.

  12. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A program for the measurement and analysis of the depolarization and differential attenuation that occur when millimeter wave signals propagate through rain is described. Initial data are taken along a 1.43 km path at 17.65 GHz and a supporting theoretical model is developed to relate the propagation effects to rainfall rate and wind velocity. A block diagram of the overall experiment is included. It consists of: (1) an RF system (millimeter wave transmitter and receiver), (2) transmitting and receiving antennas, (3) a weather system with rain gauges, wind sensors, and drop counters, and (4) a digital control, processing, and data storage system.

  13. A numerical study of the acid rain in northern Taiwan in winter season

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ching-Sen; Deng, Zen-Sing

    1996-12-31

    Two-thirds of the land mass of Taiwan island is covered by mountains. In winter precipitation could occur in northern Taiwan when the prevailing wind was from northeastern direction. In northern Taiwan the acid rain (pH value less than 5.0) in winter time could contribute about 30 rain in the whole year. A three-dimensional numerical model with terrain following coordinated system was used to simulate the precipitation system and the characteristics of acid rain. A smooth terrain was assumed in the model. A mean sounding was used to initialize the numerical model when acid rain occurred in northern Taiwan during winter time from 1991 to 1993. Investigations of the effect of pollutions from abroad on the acid rain in northern Taiwan in winter are considered for the future.

  14. `Scientific uncertainty` scuttles new acid rain standard

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, R.

    1995-10-01

    An EPA report to Congress due this month will report on the controversial question of whether the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) adequately protect sensitive areas of the United States from acid rain, and recommends against establishing a new `acid deposition standard` to protect sensitive areas of the United States from acid rain. Rebecca Renner reports on the scientific issues underlying that decision and the efforts of one state to overturn it. The report to Congress, required by the CAAA, asked the Agency to report on the feasibility of setting an acid deposition standard to protect sensitive areas. EPA missed the original 1993 deadline and is under court order to issue the final report by October 15. The draft report identifies the lakes and streams of the Appalachian mountains as sensitive resources that receive damaging concentrations of acidic deposition. Three areas where sensitive water resources have been well studied were selected as providing the best available data for modeling case studies: the Adirondacks; the mid-Appalachian region, including parts of Pennsylvania. West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia; and the Southern Blue Ridge in Tennessee, North Carolina, and Georgia. Results are discussed. 6 refs.

  15. Annual monsoon rains recorded by Jurassic dunes.

    PubMed

    Loope, D B; Rowe, C M; Joeckel, R M

    2001-07-05

    Pangaea, the largest landmass in the Earth's history, was nearly bisected by the Equator during the late Palaeozoic and early Mesozoic eras. Modelling experiments and stratigraphic studies have suggested that the supercontinent generated a monsoonal atmospheric circulation that led to extreme seasonality, but direct evidence for annual rainfall periodicity has been lacking. In the Mesozoic era, about 190 million years ago, thick deposits of wind-blown sand accumulated in dunes of a vast, low-latitude desert at Pangaea's western margin. These deposits are now situated in the southwestern USA. Here we analyse slump masses in the annual depositional cycles within these deposits, which have been described for some outcrops of the Navajo Sandstone. Twenty-four slumps, which were generated by heavy rainfall, appear within one interval representing 36 years of dune migration. We interpret the positions of 20 of these masses to indicate slumping during summer monsoon rains, with the other four having been the result of winter storms. The slumped lee faces of these Jurassic dunes therefore represent a prehistoric record of yearly rain events.

  16. Study of rain attenuation in Ka band for satellite communication in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Choi, Dong-You

    2016-10-01

    The important factor to be considered in the link budget estimation for satellite communication systems, operating at frequencies above 10 GHz is the rain attenuation. Scattering and absorption are the main concern for system designers at these frequency bands. This has resulted in the need for suitable prediction models that can best provide estimates of attenuation due to rain with available information of rain attenuation data. Researchers have developed models that can be used to estimate 1-min rainfall attenuation distribution for earth space link but there is still some confusion with regard to choosing the right model to predict attenuation for the location of interest. In this context, the existing prediction models need to be tested against the measured results. This paper presents studies on rain attenuation at 19.8 GHz, which specifies the performance parameters for Ka-Band under earth space communication system. It presents the experimental result of rain rates and rain-induced attenuation in 19.8 and 20.73 GHz for vertical and circular polarization respectively. The received signal data for rain attenuation and rain rate were collected at 10 s intervals over a three year periods from 2013 to 2015. The data highlights the impact of clear air variation and rain fade loss. Rain rate data was measured through OTT Parsivel. During the observation period, rain rates of about 50 mm/h and attenuation values of 11.6 dB for 0.01% of the time were noted. The experimental link was set up at Korea Radio Promotion Association, Mokdong, Seoul. Out of several models, this paper present discussion and comparison of ITU-R P.618-12, Unified Method, Dissanayake Allnutt and Haidara (DAH), Simple Attenuation (SAM), Crane Global and Ramachandran and Kumar models. The relative error margin of 27.51, 89.84,72.46% and 67.24, 130.84, 166.48% are obtained for 0.1%, 0.01% and 0.001% of the time for 19.8 and 20.73 GHz under vertical and circular polarization respectively from ITU

  17. Integration of rain gauge measurement errors with the overall rainfall uncertainty estimation using kriging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecinati, Francesca; Moreno Ródenas, Antonio Manuel; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel Angel; ten Veldhuis, Marie-claire; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    In many research studies rain gauges are used as a reference point measurement for rainfall, because they can reach very good accuracy, especially compared to radar or microwave links, and their use is very widespread. In some applications rain gauge uncertainty is assumed to be small enough to be neglected. This can be done when rain gauges are accurate and their data is correctly managed. Unfortunately, in many operational networks the importance of accurate rainfall data and of data quality control can be underestimated; budget and best practice knowledge can be limiting factors in a correct rain gauge network management. In these cases, the accuracy of rain gauges can drastically drop and the uncertainty associated with the measurements cannot be neglected. This work proposes an approach based on three different kriging methods to integrate rain gauge measurement errors in the overall rainfall uncertainty estimation. In particular, rainfall products of different complexity are derived through 1) block kriging on a single rain gauge 2) ordinary kriging on a network of different rain gauges 3) kriging with external drift to integrate all the available rain gauges with radar rainfall information. The study area is the Eindhoven catchment, contributing to the river Dommel, in the southern part of the Netherlands. The area, 590 km2, is covered by high quality rain gauge measurements by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), which has one rain gauge inside the study area and six around it, and by lower quality rain gauge measurements by the Dommel Water Board and by the Eindhoven Municipality (six rain gauges in total). The integration of the rain gauge measurement error is accomplished in all the cases increasing the nugget of the semivariogram proportionally to the estimated error. Using different semivariogram models for the different networks allows for the separate characterisation of higher and lower quality rain gauges. For the kriging with

  18. Development of one-minute rain-rate and rain-attenuation contour maps for satellite propagation system planning in a subtropical country: South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, J. S.; Owolawi, P. A.

    2014-10-01

    Millimeter and microwave system design at higher frequencies require as input a 1-min rain-rate cumulative distribution function for estimating the level of degradation that can be encountered at such frequency bands. Owing to the lack of 1-min rain-rate data in South Africa and the availability of 5-min and hourly rainfall data, we have used rain-rate conversion models and the refined Moupfouma model to convert the available data into 1-min rain-rate statistics. The attenuation caused by these rain rates was predicted using the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) recommendations model. The Kriging interpolation method was used to draw contour maps over different percentages of time for spatial interpolation of rain-rate values into a regular grid in order to obtain a highly consistent and predictable inter-gauge rain-rate variation over South Africa. The present results will be useful for system designers of modern broadband wireless access (BWA) and high-density cell-based Ku/Ka, Q/V band satellite systems, over the desired area of coverage in order to determine the appropriate effective isotropically radiated power (EIRP) and receiver characteristics of this region.

  19. Mechanics of Interrill Erosion with Wind-Driven Rain (WDR)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article provides an evaluation analysis for the performance of the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for Wind-Driven Rain (WDR) events. The interrill delivery rates (Di) were collected in the wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility of the International Cen...

  20. Rain on small tropical islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, A. H.; Burleyson, C. D.; Yuter, S. E.

    2011-04-01

    A high-resolution rainfall climatology based on observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument is used to evaluate the influence of small tropical islands on climatological rainfall. Islands with areas between one hundred and several thousand km2 are considered in both the Indo-Pacific Maritime Continent and Caribbean regions. Annual mean climatological (1997-2007) rainfall over each island is compared with that over the surrounding ocean region, and the difference is expressed as a percentage. In addition to total rainfall, rain frequency and intensity are also analyzed. Results are stratified into two 12 h halves of the diurnal cycle as well as eight 3 h periods, and also by a measure of each island's topographic relief. In both regions, there is a clear difference between larger islands (areas of a few hundred km2 or greater) and smaller ones. Both rain frequency and total rainfall are significantly enhanced over larger islands compared to the surrounding ocean. For smaller islands the enhancement is either negligibly small, statistically insignificant, or, in the case of Caribbean rain frequency, negative. The enhancement in total rainfall over larger islands is partly attributable to greater frequency and partly to greater intensity. A diurnal cycle in island enhancement is evident in frequency but not intensity, except over small Caribbean islands where the converse is true. For the larger islands, higher orography is associated with greater rainfall enhancements. The orographic effect is larger (percentagewise) in the Caribbean than in the Maritime Continent. Orographic precipitation enhancement manifests more strongly as increased frequency of precipitation rather than increased intensity and is present at night as well as during the day. The lack of a clear diurnal cycle in orographic enhancement suggests that much of the orographic rainfall enhancement is attributable to mechanically forced upslope flow

  1. The critical slope for orographic rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenthal, Robert; Zagar, Nedjeljka

    2013-11-01

    Krishnamurti has shown that orographic rain depends on the slope of the windward terrain rather than just the total elevation gain. A simple physical model is proposed to account for the effect of slope. Based on the inhibiting effect of vortex (rotational) acceleration on entrainment, a critical slope angle is derived. If the rate of orographic lifting is sufficiently large, the enhanced buoyancy from latent heat release increases the acceleration parameter. As a consequence, the entrainment rate of under-saturated air is reduced. The critical slope corresponds to the situation where the rate of condensation in a rising adiabatic parcel just equals the rate of evaporation due to the entrainment of under-saturated air. The model is also applied to the trigger conditions for towering cumulus in general.

  2. The critical slope angle for orographic rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenthal, R. E.; Zagar, N.

    2013-12-01

    Krishnamurti has shown that orographic rain depends on the slope of the windward terrain rather than just the total elevation gain. A simple physical model is proposed to account for the effect of slope. Based on the inhibiting effect of vortex (rotational) acceleration on entrainment, a critical slope angle is derived. If the rate of orographic lifting is sufficiently large, the enhanced buoyancy from latent heat release increases the acceleration parameter. As a consequence, the entrainment rate of under-saturated air is reduced. The critical slope corresponds to the situation where the rate of condensation in a rising adiabatic parcel just equals the rate of evaporation due to the entrainment of under-saturated air. The model is also applied to the trigger conditions for towering cumulus in general.

  3. Acid rain: rhetoric and reality

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-one governments have now resolved to cut their nations' own emissions of sulfur dioxide by at least 30% (over 1980 levels) by 1993, and hope to persuade the main producers of sulfur oxides to join them in an international attack on the problem. This book discusses the complex political maneuvers of the countries that are major exporters and importers of acid rain and its precursors. The scientific and technological aspects of the acid ran problem and strategies for alleviating it take up two-thirds of the book.

  4. Acid rain. Rhetoric and reality

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.

    1988-01-01

    The book examines the implications of recent scientific studies, and sets the political debate in the main 'polluting' countries--Britain and the United States--into its proper international context. It provides a wealth of U.S. data, including a history of the development of U.S. acid rain policy. The author presents a review of the evidence for damage and the statistics of change. Data is drawn from around the world, with particular emphasis on damage in Scandinavia and West Germany.

  5. Two groups challenge US acid rain efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    In its report, Acid Rain Invades Our National Parks, the National Parks and Conservation Association (NPCA) says acid rain is being detected at all 27 national park monitoring sites. In 1980, 87 national parks expressed concern in a NPCA survey over acid rain. Repolled in 1986, more than half of the respondents reported that no research on acid rain was under way. The NPCA report concludes that the alarm that was sounded in 1980 fell largely on deaf ears, and calls for the structural and scientific reorganization of the National Park Service. The National Audubon Society shares NPCA's dissatisfaction with federal efforts to tackle the problem of acid rain and has taken testing into its own hands. Through its Citizens Acid Rain Monitoring Network, Audubon volunteers have collected readings of acidity at 64 monitoring stations in 31 states since July.

  6. Acid rain information book. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of widespread acid rain demand that the phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Review of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty and summarizes current and projected research. The report is organized by a logical progression from sources of pollutants affecting acid rain formation to the atmospheric transport and transformation of those pollutants and finally to the deposition of acid rain, the effects of that deposition, and possible mitigative measures and regulatory options. This information is followed by a discussion of uncertainties in the understanding of the acid rain phenomenon and a description of current and proposed research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  7. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1984-12-11

    Although science has largely determined that man-made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to await better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weigh the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: To what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects. 5 figures, 20 tables.

  8. Acid rain said to threaten Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-29

    A report on April 25, 1988 by the Environmental Defense Fund blames acid rain for pollution of Chesapeake Bay. The nitrates in the rain are reported to account for 25% of the nitrogen load of the bay. This increases the acidity of the bay, thereby acting as a fertilizer to promote algal growth. It is postulated that acid rain contributes as much nitrogen to the bay as point sources, which include raw sewage and industrial plants.

  9. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  10. Rain Effects on Radio Frequency Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Rain is a principal cause of signal degradation in a terrestrial or satellite trans...Predicted Attenuation, dB AS = Specific Rain Attenuation, dB/km av = Vertical Polarized Value of a Anooi A at 0.01% B = Satellite Beacon b = Empirical...Isotherm Height Ho = Height above Mean Sea Level, km Hr = the Rain Height, km ITU = International Telecommunications Union IWP = International

  11. Volcanoes magnify Metro Manila's southwest monsoon rains and lethal floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar; Bagtasa, Gerry; Crisologo, Irene; Racoma, Bernard Alan; David, Carlos Primo

    Many volcanoes worldwide are located near populated cities that experience monsoon seasons, characterised by shifting winds each year. Because of the severity of flood impact to large populations, it is worthy of investigation in the Philippines and elsewhere to better understand the phenomenon for possible hazard mitigating solutions, if any. During the monsoon season, the change in flow direction of winds brings moist warm air to cross the mountains and volcanoes in western Philippines and cause lift into the atmosphere, which normally leads to heavy rains and floods. Heavy southwest monsoon rains from 18-21 August 2013 flooded Metro Manila (population of 12 million) and its suburbs paralyzing the nation’s capital for an entire week. Called the 2013 Habagat event, it was a repeat of the 2012 Habagat or extreme southwest monsoon weather from 6-9 August, which delivered record rains in the mega city. In both the 2012 and 2013 Habagat events, cyclones, the usual suspects for the delivery of heavy rains, were passing northeast of the Philippine archipelago, respectively, and enhanced the southwest monsoon. Analysis of Doppler data, rainfall measurements, and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations show that two large stratovolcanoes, Natib and Mariveles, across from Manila Bay and approximately 70 km west of Metro Manila, played a substantial role in delivering extreme rains and consequent floods to Metro Manila. The study highlights how volcanoes, with their shape and height create an orographic effect and dispersive tail of rain clouds which constitutes a significant flood hazard to large communities like Metro Manila.

  12. Airborne scientists begin Ohio acid rain study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    Atmospheric scientists spent June flying through storm clouds over Ohio to collect rain and air samples to better understand rain chemistry, the conditions that cause acid rain and methods for controlling it. The authors will be collecting samples in the Columbus, Ohio area because many of the materials suspected of causing acid rain, such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrogen peroxide, can be found in this vicinity. The study is part of the US Department of the Energy's Processing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation program (PRECP).

  13. Measurement of rain parameters by optical scintillation.

    PubMed

    Wang, T I; Lerfald, G; Lawrence, R S; Clifford, S F

    1977-08-01

    We describe a technique for measuring path-averaged rain parameters by analyzing the rainfall-induced scintillations of a laser beam. From the time-lagged covariance function of two vertically spaced line detectors, we determine the average rainfall rate and drop-size distribution along the optical path. This technique requires no prior assumption of the form of the drop-size distribution. Sample measurements on a 140-m path confirm that the path-averaged drop-size distribution of a steady rain follows a Marshall-Palmer distribution. The optically measured path-averaged rain rate also shows good agreement with conventional tipping-bucket rain-gauge data.

  14. Vibration (?) spikes during natural rain events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Limited analysis of optical rain gauge (ORG) data from shipboard and ground based sensors has shown the existence of spikes, possibly attributable to sensor vibration, while rain is occurring. An extreme example of this behavior was noted aboard the PRC#5 on the evening of December 24, 1992 as the ship began repositioning during a rain event in the TOGA/COARE IFA. The spikes are readily evident in the one-second resolution data, but may be indistinguishable from natural rain rate fluctuations in subsampled or averaged data. Such spikes result in increased rainfall totals.

  15. Soak Up the Rain: What's the Problem?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Why citizens and communities should soak up the rain with green infrastructure: to prevent water pollution, reduce flooding, protect water resources, beautify neighborhoods and other community benefits

  16. Flushing effect of rain on container-inhabiting mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Koenraadt, C J M; Harrington, L C

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of heavy rain on container-inhabiting mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) populations, and how different species may have adapted to such conditions. Rains were created with a rain simulator calibrated to natural rain intensities in the habitats of two important vector species: Aedes aegypti (L.) from northern Thailand and Culex pipiens L. from New York state, USA. Immature stages of Ae. aegypti were able to resist the flushing effect of rain better than Cx. pipiens. This difference was most dramatic during the pupal stage. Fourth instars of Ae. aegypti were not affected by flushing when exposed for longer rain intervals (30 versus 60 min) or at a colder water temperature (24 versus 16 degrees C). In contrast, significantly more Cx. pipiens larvae flushed out with longer rain exposure. Warmer water temperatures also increased the proportion of Cx. pipiens flushed out, but mostly at the longest exposure time. Container position (tilted at a 7 degrees angle or level) did not affect proportions of fourth instars flushed out for both species. More accurate models of vector-borne diseases can be developed by incorporating the described effects of rain on container-breeding mosquito populations. Such models may provide more realistic assessments of disease risk and ensure optimal use of limited financial resources of mosquito control agencies.

  17. Rain from Tropical Storm Noel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Though not the most powerful storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane season, Tropical Storm Noel was among the most deadly. Only Category 5 Hurricane Felix and its associated flooding had a higher toll. The slow-moving Tropical Storm Noel inundated the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, and the Bahamas with heavy rain between October 28 and November 1, 2007. The resulting floods and mudslides left at least 115 dead and thousands homeless throughout the Caribbean, reported the Associated Press on November 2, 2007. This image shows the distribution of the rainfall that made Noel a deadly storm. The image shows rainfall totals as measured by the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from October 26 through November 1, 2007. The analysis is based on measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas, northeast of Noel's center. Areas of dark red show that rainfall totals over the south-central Dominican Republic and parts of the Bahamas were over 551 millimeters (21 inches). Much of eastern Hispaniola, including both the Dominican Republic and Haiti received at least 200 mm (about 8 inches) of rain, shown in yellow. Rainfall totals over Haiti and Cuba were less, with a range of at least 50 mm (2 inches) to over 200 mm (8 inches).

  18. Acid rain threatens marine life

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    In freshwater, acid rain harms aquatic organisms because one of its components, sulfur dioxide, lowers the water's pH. In seawater, the damage comes from other components of acid precipitation: nitrogen oxides. Acting as a nutrient, nitrogen promotes excessive algal growth, which blocks sunlight and depletes dissolved oxygen, thereby suffocating other plants and animals. Known as eutrophication, this phenomenon has been increasing in both frequency and intensity on the Atlantic coast during the past few years. The New York City-based Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), study focused on the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary and an important spawning ground for many species of economic importance. It has long been known that the bay is suffering from nitrogen pollution. Until now, it was assumed that most of the nitrogen was coming from sewage and agricultural runoff. However, based on data collected from both federal and state agencies, EDF scientists estimated that nitrates from acid rain are responsible for 25% of the nitrogen entering the bay. The report says that if present trends continue, airborne nitrates will contribute 42% of annual nitrogen deposits into the Chesapeake Bay by the year 2030.

  19. Rain effects on the hurricane observations over the ocean by C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guosheng; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A composite radar scattering model composed of the atmosphere radiative transfer model, and the ocean surface Bragg wave theory is developed to analyze the impact of hurricane rain on the normalized radar-backscatter cross section (NRCS) measured in the VV and cross-polarized C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) channels. The model results are validated against SAR and SFMR measured wind speeds and rain rates for two hurricane cases. The contribution of rain to the NRCS is backscatter from two parts: the atmosphere column and the ocean surface. In the atmosphere, microwave attenuation and the rain-induced volume backscattering are simulated by the model. We find that the impact of raindrops in the atmosphere is almost negligible for the VV polarization, but important for the cross polarization. On the ocean surface, comparisons between our model and other existing models without rain lead to the conclusion that the VV polarization NRCS can be simulated reasonably well without considering the non-Bragg scattering mechanisms. Similar to the wave breaking mechanism, the microwave diffraction on the craters, crowns, and stalks, produced by rain drops, is also negligible for VV polarization. However, the non-Bragg scattering is important for the cross-polarized NRCS simulations. Finally, we performed simulations to understand the VV-polarized NRCS behavior under different wind speeds at various rain rates.

  20. Humid tropical rain forest has expanded into eucalypt forest and savanna over the last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Tng, David Y P; Murphy, Brett P; Weber, Ellen; Sanders, Gregor; Williamson, Grant J; Kemp, Jeanette; Bowman, David M J S

    2012-01-01

    Tropical rain forest expansion and savanna woody vegetation thickening appear to be a global trend, but there remains uncertainty about whether there is a common set of global drivers. Using geographic information techniques, we analyzed aerial photography of five areas in the humid tropics of northeastern Queensland, Australia, taken in the 1950s and 2008, to determine if changes in rain forest extent match those reported for the Australian monsoon tropics using similar techniques. Mapping of the 1950s aerial photography showed that of the combined study area (64,430 ha), 63% was classified as eucalypt forests/woodland and 37% as rain forest. Our mapping revealed that although most boundaries remained stable, there was a net increase of 732 ha of the original rain forest area over the study period, and negligible conversion of rain forest to eucalypt forest/woodland. Statistical modeling, controlling for spatial autocorrelation, indicated distance from preexisting rain forest as the strongest determinant of rain forest expansion. Margin extension had a mean rate across the five sites of 0.6 m per decade. Expansion was greater in tall open forest types but also occurred in shorter, more flammable woodland vegetation types. No correlations were detected with other local variables (aspect, elevation, geology, topography, drainage). Using a geographically weighted mean rate of rain forest margin extension across the whole region, we predict that over 25% of tall open forest (a forest type of high conservation significance) would still remain after 2000 years of rain forest expansion. This slow replacement is due to the convoluted nature of the rain forest boundary and the irregular shape of the tall open forest patches. Our analyses point to the increased concentration of atmospheric CO2 as the most likely global driver of indiscriminate rain forest expansion occurring in northeastern Australia, by increasing tree growth and thereby overriding the effects of fire

  1. Humid tropical rain forest has expanded into eucalypt forest and savanna over the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Tng, David Y P; Murphy, Brett P; Weber, Ellen; Sanders, Gregor; Williamson, Grant J; Kemp, Jeanette; Bowman, David M J S

    2012-01-01

    Tropical rain forest expansion and savanna woody vegetation thickening appear to be a global trend, but there remains uncertainty about whether there is a common set of global drivers. Using geographic information techniques, we analyzed aerial photography of five areas in the humid tropics of northeastern Queensland, Australia, taken in the 1950s and 2008, to determine if changes in rain forest extent match those reported for the Australian monsoon tropics using similar techniques. Mapping of the 1950s aerial photography showed that of the combined study area (64,430 ha), 63% was classified as eucalypt forests/woodland and 37% as rain forest. Our mapping revealed that although most boundaries remained stable, there was a net increase of 732 ha of the original rain forest area over the study period, and negligible conversion of rain forest to eucalypt forest/woodland. Statistical modeling, controlling for spatial autocorrelation, indicated distance from preexisting rain forest as the strongest determinant of rain forest expansion. Margin extension had a mean rate across the five sites of 0.6 m per decade. Expansion was greater in tall open forest types but also occurred in shorter, more flammable woodland vegetation types. No correlations were detected with other local variables (aspect, elevation, geology, topography, drainage). Using a geographically weighted mean rate of rain forest margin extension across the whole region, we predict that over 25% of tall open forest (a forest type of high conservation significance) would still remain after 2000 years of rain forest expansion. This slow replacement is due to the convoluted nature of the rain forest boundary and the irregular shape of the tall open forest patches. Our analyses point to the increased concentration of atmospheric CO(2) as the most likely global driver of indiscriminate rain forest expansion occurring in northeastern Australia, by increasing tree growth and thereby overriding the effects of fire

  2. La Nina and Indian Ocean Dipole Influence on Distribution of Daily Rain Intensities in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswamy, J.; Srinivas, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Indian monsoon (IM) and daily extreme rainfall events (EREs) have a major influence on the welfare of 1.2 billion people in South Asia. ERE s have killed tens of thousands of people and severely affected millions of people in the past decade alone in India. Current evidence suggests that the dynamics of the IM, as well as the corresponding frequency and magnitude of daily EREs are changing (Krishnaswamy et al 45(1-2), 175-184, Climate Dynamics 2014).Variability in the Indian monsoon (IM)and associated rain intensitiesis known to be modulated by two ocean atmosphere phenomena, El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). This is compounded by changes in the hydrological cycle due to global warming. There is growing evidence that the proportion of moderate rains have declined and those of sparse and more intense rains have increased. We investigated the role of La Nina and IOD on the time-aggregated as well as time-evolving distribution of daily rain intensities India using data from rain gauges and gridded rain data. We applied dynamic linear models, generalized linear and additive to compare the relative influence of La Nina and IOD on frequency of different daily rain exceedance levels (25, 50,100,150 and 200 mm day-1) as well as trends since 1950. Our results indicate that La Nina has a very significant influence on annual frequency of moderate rain intensities (<100 mm day-1), whereas IOD has a greater influence on annual proportion of total rain accounted for by rain intensities above 100 and 150 mm day-1. The observed declining role of La Nina in India in recent decades, potentially more moisture availability under climate change, and the strengthening of the IOD due to warming of the Western Indian Ocean could strengthen the shift towards more extreme rain events in the coming decades.

  3. Differential evolution based prediction of rain attenuation over a LOS terrestrial link situated in the southern United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Develi, Ibrahim

    2007-06-01

    The principal objective of a rain attenuation prediction method is to achieve acceptable estimates of the attenuation incurred on the signal due to rain. In this paper, a differential evolution (DE) based model for predicting rain attenuation in a terrestrial point-to-point line of sight (LOS) link at 97 GHz is proposed using previously available experimental data obtained in the southern United Kingdom. Rainfall rate and percentage of time are used as input data in the proposed prediction model. Excellent agreement between the experimental data and the model output indicates that the presented DE based method may efficiently be used for accurate prediction of the rain attenuation levels.

  4. Rain Attenuation Analysis using Synthetic Storm Technique in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lwas, A. K.; Islam, Md R.; Chebil, J.; Habaebi, M. H.; Ismail, A. F.; Zyoud, A.; Dao, H.

    2013-12-01

    Generated rain attenuation time series plays an important role for investigating the rain fade characteristics in the lack of real fade measurements. A suitable conversion technique can be applied to measured rain rate time series to produce rain attenuation data and be utilized to understand the rain fade characteristics. This paper focuses on applicability of synthetic storm technique (SST) to convert measured rain rate data to rain attenuation time series. Its performance is assessed for time series generation over a tropical location Kuala Lumpur, in Malaysia. From preliminary analysis, it is found that SST gives satisfactory results to estimate the rain attenuation time series from the rain rate measurements over this region.

  5. Evaluation of TRMM Ground-Validation Radar-Rain Errors Using Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Wolff, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground-validation (GV) radar-rain products are often utilized for validation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spaced-based rain estimates, and hence, quantitative evaluation of the GV radar-rain product error characteristics is vital. This study uses quality-controlled gauge data to compare with TRMM GV radar rain rates in an effort to provide such error characteristics. The results show that significant differences of concurrent radar-gauge rain rates exist at various time scales ranging from 5 min to 1 day, despite lower overall long-term bias. However, the differences between the radar area-averaged rain rates and gauge point rain rates cannot be explained as due to radar error only. The error variance separation method is adapted to partition the variance of radar-gauge differences into the gauge area-point error variance and radar rain estimation error variance. The results provide relatively reliable quantitative uncertainty evaluation of TRMM GV radar rain estimates at various times scales, and are helpful to better understand the differences between measured radar and gauge rain rates. It is envisaged that this study will contribute to better utilization of GV radar rain products to validate versatile spaced-based rain estimates from TRMM, as well as the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement, and other satellites.

  6. Coastal and rain-induced wind variability depicted by scatterometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portabella, M.; Lin, W.; Stoffelen, A.; Turiel, A.; Verhoef, A.; Verspeek, J.; Ballabrera, J.; Vogelzang, J.

    2012-04-01

    A detailed knowledge of local wind variability near the shore is very important since it strongly affects the weather and microclimate in coastal regions. Since coastal areas are densely populated and most activity at sea occurs near the shore, sea-surface wind field information is important for a number of applications. In the vicinity of land sea-breeze, wave fetch, katabatic and current effects are more likely than in the open ocean, thus enhancing air-sea interaction. Also very relevant for air-sea interaction are the rain-induced phenomena, such as downbursts and convergence. Relatively cold and dry air is effectively transported to the ocean surface and surface winds are enhanced. In general, both coastal and rain-induced wind variability are poorly resolved by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. Satellite real aperture radars (i.e., scatterometers) are known to provide accurate mesoscale (25-50 km resolution) sea surface wind field information used in a wide variety of applications. Nowadays, there are two operating scatterometers in orbit, i.e., the C-band Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard Metop-A and the Ku-band scatterometer (OSCAT) onboard Oceansat-2. The EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) delivers several ASCAT level 2 wind products with 25 km and 12.5 km Wind Vector Cell (WVC) spacing, including a pre-operational coastal wind product as well as an OSCAT level 2 wind product with 50 km spacing in development status. Rain is known to both attenuate and scatter the microwave signal. In addition, there is a "splashing" effect. The roughness of the sea surface is increased because of splashing due to rain drops. The so-called "rain contamination" is larger for Ku-band scatterometer systems than for C-band systems. Moreover, the associated downdrafts lead to variable wind speeds and directions, further complicating the wind retrieval. The C-band ASCAT high resolution wind processing is validated under rainy

  7. The Rain Ratio Hypothesis: Can it be Rescued?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munhoven, Guy

    2010-05-01

    The Rain Ratio Hypothesis (Archer and Maier-Reimer, 1994, Nature 367, 260-263) ascribes an important part of the observed glacial-interglacial variations of CO2 in the atmosphere to reduced sea-floor rain ratio (i.e., carbonate-C/organic-C in the biogenic particle flux at the sea-floor) during glacial times. With a lower sea-floor rain ratio the influence of organic carbon respiration on carbonate dissolution is stronger. The deep-sea carbonate ion concentration required for global ocean carbonate compensation will then be higher, which in turn contributes to lower atmospheric pCO2. Munhoven (2007, Deep-Sea Research II, 722-746) showed that the suggested rain ratio reductions lead to unrealistic sedimentary records for %CaCO3: the transition zone changes in the model sedimentary record were too large and opposite in phase to available observational data. The rain ratio reduction applied by Munhoven (2007) was uniform over the ocean and the author hypothesised that a non-uniform reduction could change the complete picture. If the rain ratio variations had primarily taken place in open ocean areas of great depth-essentially in regions where the sea floor was deeper than the saturation horizon or the CCD-then the transition zone boundaries could possibly have moved less. Here, we test this hypothesis and analyse the effect of depth dependent variations. It is shown that concentrating rain ratio changes over areas of greatest water depth completely alters the sedimentary imprint: the phase relationship of the signal reverts (compared to the uniform case) and the amplitude of the change decreases, bringing it into better agreement with the observations. However, the pCO2 response is also reduced. The global average rain ratio reduction of 40% that yielded a 40 ppm reduction of atmospheric pCO2 in the uniform case only leads to 25 ppm in this non-uniform case. Results for other depth-dependent reductions will also be discussed.

  8. Fog and rain in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anber, Usama; Gentine, Pierre; Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.

    2015-09-01

    The diurnal and seasonal water cycles in the Amazon remain poorly simulated in general circulation models, exhibiting peak evapotranspiration in the wrong season and rain too early in the day. We show that those biases are not present in cloud-resolving simulations with parameterized large-scale circulation. The difference is attributed to the representation of the morning fog layer, and to more accurate characterization of convection and its coupling with large-scale circulation. The morning fog layer, present in the wet season but absent in the dry season, dramatically increases cloud albedo, which reduces evapotranspiration through its modulation of the surface energy budget. These results highlight the importance of the coupling between the energy and hydrological cycles and the key role of cloud albedo feedback for climates over tropical continents.

  9. Fog and rain in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Anber, Usama; Gentine, Pierre; Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H

    2015-09-15

    The diurnal and seasonal water cycles in the Amazon remain poorly simulated in general circulation models, exhibiting peak evapotranspiration in the wrong season and rain too early in the day. We show that those biases are not present in cloud-resolving simulations with parameterized large-scale circulation. The difference is attributed to the representation of the morning fog layer, and to more accurate characterization of convection and its coupling with large-scale circulation. The morning fog layer, present in the wet season but absent in the dry season, dramatically increases cloud albedo, which reduces evapotranspiration through its modulation of the surface energy budget. These results highlight the importance of the coupling between the energy and hydrological cycles and the key role of cloud albedo feedback for climates over tropical continents.

  10. Fog and rain in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Anber, Usama; Gentine, Pierre; Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.

    2015-01-01

    The diurnal and seasonal water cycles in the Amazon remain poorly simulated in general circulation models, exhibiting peak evapotranspiration in the wrong season and rain too early in the day. We show that those biases are not present in cloud-resolving simulations with parameterized large-scale circulation. The difference is attributed to the representation of the morning fog layer, and to more accurate characterization of convection and its coupling with large-scale circulation. The morning fog layer, present in the wet season but absent in the dry season, dramatically increases cloud albedo, which reduces evapotranspiration through its modulation of the surface energy budget. These results highlight the importance of the coupling between the energy and hydrological cycles and the key role of cloud albedo feedback for climates over tropical continents. PMID:26324902

  11. Can Hail and Rain Nucleate Cloud Droplets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, Prasanth; Weiss, Stephan; Krekhov, Alexei; Pumir, Alain; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2017-09-01

    We present results from moist convection in a mixture of pressurized sulfur hexafluoride (liquid and vapor), and helium (gas) to model the wet and dry components of the Earth's atmosphere. To allow for homogeneous nucleation, we operate the experiment close to critical conditions. We report on the nucleation of microdroplets in the wake of large cold liquid drops falling through the supersaturated atmosphere and show that the homogeneous nucleation is caused by isobaric cooling of the saturated sulfur hexafluoride vapor. Our results carry over to atmospheric clouds: falling hail and cold rain drops may enhance the heterogeneous nucleation of microdroplets in their wake under supersaturated atmospheric conditions. We also observed that under appropriate circumstances settling microdroplets form a rather stable horizontal cloud layer, which separates regions of super- and subcritical saturation.

  12. Fog and rain in the Amazon

    DOE PAGES

    Anber, Usama; Gentine, Pierre; Wang, Shuguang; ...

    2015-08-31

    The diurnal and seasonal water cycles in the Amazon remain poorly simulated in general circulation models, exhibiting peak evapotranspiration in the wrong season and rain too early in the day. We show that those biases are not present in cloud-resolving simulations with parameterized large-scale circulation. The difference is attributed to the representation of the morning fog layer, and to more accurate characterization of convection and its coupling with large-scale circulation. The morning fog layer, present in the wet season but absent in the dry season, dramatically increases cloud albedo, which reduces evapotranspiration through its modulation of the surface energy budget.more » Finally, these results highlight the importance of the coupling between the energy and hydrological cycles and the key role of cloud albedo feedback for climates over tropical continents.« less

  13. Pollen selection under acid rain stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.

    1994-01-01

    To investigate whether acid rain stress induces pollen selection in nature, three different approaches were used, based on the assumption that the response of pollen grains to acid rain is controlled by an acid sensitive gene product. Germination of pollen from homozygous and heterozygous individuals under acid rain stress was examined to detect any differences in rate of germination between populations of homogeneous and heterogeneous pollen grains. In vitro and in vivo bulked segregant analysis using RAPDs was used to search for differences in DNA constitution between the survivors of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed pollen populations in vitro and between the progenies of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed populations during pollination, respectively. No evidence for the pollen selection under acid rain stress was obtained in any of the test systems. Inhibition of protein synthesis using cycloheximide led to significant reduction of tube elongation at 4 hr and had no effect on pollen germination at any time interval tested. Total proteins extracted from control and acid rain stressed pollen grain populations exhibited no differences. The reduction of corn pollen germination in vitro under acid rain stress was mainly due to pollen rupture. The present data indicates the reduction of pollen germination and tube growth under acid rain stress may be a physiological response rather than a genetic response. A simple, nontoxic, and effective method to separate germinated from ungerminated pollen grains has been developed using pollen from corn (Zea mays, L. cv. Pioneer 3747). The separated germinated pollen grains retained viability and continued tube growth when placed in culture medium.

  14. Urban Modification of Freezing-Rain Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changnon, Stanley A.

    2003-06-01

    A new national database for freezing-rain occurrences during the 1945-2000 period provided an opportunity for a study of the potential urban effects on freezing-rain events. Numerous past studies of snowfall events in urban areas have defined decreases of 10%-35% related to the urban heat island. The heat island, which acts to elevate near-surface temperatures, could also keep some freezing-rain situations from occurring in the city. The study involved four cities in the Midwest and Northeast for which the average annual number of days with freezing rain are three or more, for which data from in-city stations existed, and for which data for several surrounding rural stations existed. The two largest qualifying cities, New York City, New York, and Chicago, Illinois, had sizable reductions in average and maximum annual freezing-rain-day frequencies, ranging from 16% to 43% less than values of surrounding rural stations, and their freezing-rain `seasons' were 1-2 months shorter than those in surrounding rural areas. The ocean/lake influences at both cities, along with the heat island, also helped to reduce the local incidence of freezing-rain events. Two qualifying smaller urban areas, Washington, District of Columbia, and St. Louis, Missouri, had reductions in freezing-rain-day occurrences but had no shifts in the length of their freezing-rain seasons. Results suggest that freezing-rain occurrences in large cities are decreased between 10% and 30% by the heat island, which acts to keep rain from freezing to urban surfaces.

  15. Diversity gain for rain attenuation over Earth-space path at a tropical location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Arijit; Adhikari, Arpita; Maitra, Animesh

    2016-02-01

    The present study proposes a technique by which the diversity gain can be estimated for a site utilizing the propagation data obtained at a single station. The technique is crucial in estimating diversity parameters in the absence of multi-station data. The rain decay parameter, as defined in the Simple Attenuation Model (SAM), is used to derive the rain rate and consequently rain attenuation at different distances from the single receiving site. The tropical location has been found to experience a wide variability of rain features during different periods of the year causing strong seasonal variations in the diversity gain. A comparison of the diversity gain obtained from the present propagation data and the ITU-R model indicates the necessity of modifying the model parameters of the ITU-R model. The modified model incorporates the seasonal variation and exhibits better prediction capability than the ITU-R model as related to the tropical location.

  16. An experimental study of microwave scattering from rain- and wind-roughened seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, L. F.; Giovanangeli, J.-P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper investigates radar cross-section (RCS) characteristics of rain- and wind-roughened sea-surfaces. We conducted experiments in laboratory wind-wave tanks using artificial rain. The study includes light rain rates, light wind speeds, and combinations of these. A 36 Ghz scatterometer was operated at 30 deg incidence angle and with vertical polarization. RCS data were obtained not only with the scatterometer pointing up-wind but also as a function of azimuthal angle. We use a scatterometer rain and wind model SRWM-1, which relates the total average RCS in storms to the sum of the average RCS due to rain plus the average RCS due to wind. Implications of the study for operational monitoring of wind in rainy oceanic areas by satellite-borne instruments is discussed.

  17. Energy technology and emissions control for acid rain abatement in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    After more than ten years of research, acid rain is a sufficiently serious problem in North America to warrant control action. The acid rain problem has become a threat to the Asian continent as well. Emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are already high and announces plans for increases in coal use by countries in the region imply a major increase in emissions in the future. This will inevitably lead to greater incidence of acid rain and probably significant environmental damage in some locations. The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the issues relating to acid-rain-control technology in Asia and to suggest ways to include technology options in integrated simulation models of acid rain in Asia. 14 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs. (FL)

  18. Effects of rain attenuation on satellite EHF (Extremely High Frequency) communications in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattelman, Paul; Larson, Kevin P.

    1989-01-01

    One-minute rain rate data over a 10-year period-of-record at each of 41 locations in the contiguous U.S., and for a 6 1/2-year period-of-record at 1 location in Puerto Rico, were extracted from original weighing raingage recordings. The data were analyzed to determine monthly, seasonal, and annual rain-rate frequencies, durations, and probabilities at locations representing a large variety of climatic rainfall regimes. These analyses are particularly useful for estimating EHF (Extremely High Frequency) communication outages due to the increasing effects of attenuation caused by rain at frequencies above 10 GHz. An attenuation model was used to estimate the effects of rain attenuation at all 42 locations. Analyses of the 1-min rain rates, and outage estimates for various frequencies and propagation-path elevation angles are presented.

  19. Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, A.; Zhang, C.; Kollias, P.; Matrosov, S.; Szyrmer, W.

    2015-09-01

    The use of millimeter wavelength radars for probing precipitation has recently gained interest. However, estimation of precipitation variables is not straightforward due to strong signal attenuation, radar receiver saturation, antenna wet radome effects and natural microphysical variability. Here, an automated algorithm is developed for routinely retrieving rain rates from the profiling Ka-band (35-GHz) ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) zenith radars (KAZR). A 1-dimensional, simple, steady state microphysical model is used to estimate impacts of microphysical processes and attenuation on the profiles of radar observables at 35-GHz and thus provide criteria for identifying situations when attenuation or microphysical processes dominate KAZR observations. KAZR observations are also screened for signal saturation and wet radome effects. The algorithm is implemented in two steps: high rain rates are retrieved by using the amount of attenuation in rain layers, while low rain rates are retrieved from the reflectivity-rain rate (Ze-R) relation. Observations collected by the KAZR, rain gauge, disdrometer and scanning precipitating radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign at the Gan Island of the tropical Indian Ocean are used to validate the proposed approach. The differences in the rain accumulation from the proposed algorithm are quantified. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm has a potential for deriving continuous rain rate statistics in the tropics.

  20. The Study of Rain Specific Attenuation for the Prediction of Satellite Propagation in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeep, J. S.; Ng, Y. Y.; Abdullah, H.; Abdullah, M.

    2010-06-01

    Specific attenuation is the fundamental quantity in the calculation of rain attenuation for terrestrial path and slant paths representing as rain attenuation per unit distance (dB/km). Specific attenuation is an important element in developing the predicted rain attenuation model. This paper deals with the empirical determination of the power law coefficients which allow calculating the specific attenuation in dB/km from the knowledge of the rain rate in mm/h. The main purpose of the paper is to obtain the coefficients of k and α of power law relationship between specific attenuation. Three years (from 1st January 2006 until 31st December 2008) rain gauge and beacon data taken from USM, Nibong Tebal have been used to do the empirical procedure analysis of rain specific attenuation. The data presented are semi-empirical in nature. A year-to-year variation of the coefficients has been indicated and the empirical measured data was compared with ITU-R provided regression coefficient. The result indicated that the USM empirical measured data was significantly vary from ITU-R predicted value. Hence, ITU-R recommendation for regression coefficients of rain specific attenuation is not suitable for predicting rain attenuation at Malaysia.

  1. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  2. Acid Rain. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollmann, Pauline, Comp.

    The term "acid rain," also called "acid precipitation," generally refers to any precipitation having a pH value of less than 5.6. This guide to the literature on acid rain in the collections of the Library of Congress is not necessarily intended to be a comprehensive bibliography. It is designed to provide the reader with a set…

  3. Acid Rain Students Do Original Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outdoor Communicator, 1984

    1984-01-01

    At Park Senior High School (Cottage Grove, Minnesota), 46 juniors and seniors planted 384 red pine seedlings in connection with their original research on acid rain, with advice from Dr. Harriet Stubbs, director of the Acid Precipitation Awareness Program (West Saint Paul), which has been developing acid rain teaching materials. (MH)

  4. Acid rain and sugar maple decline

    Treesearch

    Paul G. Schaberg

    2017-01-01

    Through the increased combustion of fossil fuels, humans have dramatically increased pollutant additions of sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere where it conbines with water to form sulfuric and nitric acids, creating acid rain (Driscoll et al. 2001). Incoming acid rain has various impacts on human and natural systems, including the accelerated degradation of built...

  5. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  6. Human Ecology: Acid Rain and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1983-01-01

    A connection between science and society can be seen in the human and ecological dimensions of one contemporary problem: acid rain. Introduces a human ecological theme and relationships between acid rain and public policy, considering scientific understanding and public awareness, scientific research and public policy, and national politics and…

  7. Rain garden guidelines for southwest Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens are a unique and practical landscape feature that can enhance the beauty of home gardens. When properly installed, they are one method of limiting the negative effects of rainfall runoff in urban areas. Indeed, rain gardens turn a "negative" into a "positive" by capt...

  8. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  9. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  10. Acid Rain Students Do Original Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outdoor Communicator, 1984

    1984-01-01

    At Park Senior High School (Cottage Grove, Minnesota), 46 juniors and seniors planted 384 red pine seedlings in connection with their original research on acid rain, with advice from Dr. Harriet Stubbs, director of the Acid Precipitation Awareness Program (West Saint Paul), which has been developing acid rain teaching materials. (MH)

  11. Human Ecology: Acid Rain and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1983-01-01

    A connection between science and society can be seen in the human and ecological dimensions of one contemporary problem: acid rain. Introduces a human ecological theme and relationships between acid rain and public policy, considering scientific understanding and public awareness, scientific research and public policy, and national politics and…

  12. Environmental Education about the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkmuller, Klaus

    Designed to help in the development of an educational program about the value of rain forests, this handbook presents a condensation of issues, facts, and concepts. The handbook is divided into three parts. Part one introduces the rain forest ecosystem and provides conceptual background material needed in the determination of problems, the…

  13. Rain garden guidelines for southwest Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens are a unique and practical landscape feature that can enhance the beauty of home gardens. When properly installed, they are one method of limiting the negative effects of rainfall runoff in urban areas. Indeed, rain gardens turn a "negative" into a "positive" by capt...

  14. Rainy Day Fun: Rain-Inspired Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger, Annie Moretz

    1999-01-01

    Rainy days are opportunities to teach campers about weather and to plan activities around a rain theme. Indoor and outdoor science-based activities concerned with rain, water, or water conservation are suggested for specific age groups from ages 5-7 through 11-14. Campers can also develop ideas for activities using questions provided. (CDS)

  15. GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE RESEARCH PROGRAM: Rain Gardens

    EPA Science Inventory

    the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) rain garden evaluation is part of a larger collection of long-term research that evaluates a variety of stormwater management practices. The U.S. EPA recognizes the potential of rain gardens as a green infrastructure manag...

  16. Rain underscores need for injection

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1987, steam production totals at The Geysers Geothermal field have fallen and water injection totals have remained quite stable, except for the unusually dry winter months of 1994 when injection fell by a record amount. The heavy rainfall in the first half of 1995 altered the long-term production and injection patterns and underscored the need to increase injection in the field. From January to June 1995, steam production at The Geysers was reduced by 37 percent form the amount produced during the same period in 1994--because the rain increased availability of hydroelectric power. At the same time, water injection in the field rose by 25 percent because more rainwater was available for injection. Consequently, both reservoir pressure and available steam reserves grew, and most power plants that returned on line in the second half of the year produced more megawatts with less steam. This confirmed findings form several injection studies at The Geyser`s.

  17. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  18. Acid Rain: A Teaching Focus for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Renee B.; Adams, Neil D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of acid rain provides ample opportunities for active, interdisciplinary learning. This article describes 12 hands-on activities designed to expand students' understanding of acid rain. Background information on acid rain is included. (LB)

  19. What You Can Do to Soak Up the Rain

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Take steps around your home and community to reduce stormwater runoff. Use rain barrels, disconnect/redirect downspouts, plant trees and rain gardens, use drywells and permeable pavers, and plant green roofs. Take action to soak up the rain.

  20. Acid Rain: A Teaching Focus for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Renee B.; Adams, Neil D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of acid rain provides ample opportunities for active, interdisciplinary learning. This article describes 12 hands-on activities designed to expand students' understanding of acid rain. Background information on acid rain is included. (LB)