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Sample records for iii excitation functions

  1. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations for the excitation spectra of III-V ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhenhua; Liang, Ching-Tarng; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2017-08-01

    We adopted the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the linear augmented Slater-type orbitals basis and the cluster averaging method to compute the excitation spectra of III-V ternary alloys with arbitrary concentration x . The TDDFT was carried out with the use of adiabatic meta-generalized gradient approximation (mGGA), which contains the 1 /q2 singularity in the dynamical exchange-correlation kernel [fXC,00(q ) ] as q →0 . We found that, by using wave functions obtained in local density approximation while using mGGA to compute self-energy correction to the band structures, we can get good overall agreement between theoretical results and experimental data for the excitation spectra. Thus, our paper provides some insight into the theoretical calculation of optical spectra of semiconductor alloys.

  2. On the theory of the type III burst exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1976-01-01

    In situ satellite observations of type III burst exciters at 1 AU show that the beam does not evolve into a plateau in velocity space, contrary to the prediction of quasilinear theory. The observations can be explained by a theory that includes mode coupling effects due to excitation of the parametric oscillating two-stream instability and its saturation by anomalous resistivity. The time evolution of the beam velocity distribution is included in the analysis.

  3. Ligand enabling visible wavelength excitation of europium(III) for fluoroimmunoassays in aqueous micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Valta, Timo; Puputti, Eeva-Maija; Hyppänen, Iko; Kankare, Jouko; Takalo, Harri; Soukka, Tero

    2012-09-18

    Fluorescent reporters based on lanthanide ions, such as europium chelates, enable highly sensitive detection in immunoassays and other ligand binding assays. Unfortunately they normally require UV-excitation produced by a xenon flash or nitrogen laser light source. In order to use modern solid state excitation sources such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), these reporters need to be excited at wavelengths longer than 365 nm, where high-powered ultraviolet LEDs are available. A novel ligand, 9-ethyl-3,6-bis(5',5',5',4',4'-pentafluoro-1',3'-dioxopentyl)carbazole (bdc), was synthesized to efficiently excite europium(III) at wavelengths up to 450 nm in micellar solutions, and its performance was compared to a commercially available DELFIA enhancement solution. The detection limit of Eu(III) with the bdc-ligand using 365 nm excitation was determined to be 63 fM, which is 3 times lower than with the DELFIA solution. The bdc-ligand enabled sensitive detection of europium(III) ions in solution using 365 nm excitation and displayed similar sensitivity and functionality as commercially available DELFIA enhancement solution. Therefore, this novel enhancement solution might be a feasible alternative in producing time-resolved fluorescence under LED-excitation.

  4. TYPE III EXCITABILITY, SLOPE SENSITIVITY AND COINCIDENCE DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangying; Huguet, Gemma; Rinzel, John

    2013-01-01

    Some neurons in the nervous system do not show repetitive firing for steady currents. For time-varying inputs, they fire once if the input rise is fast enough. This property of phasic firing is known as Type III excitability. Type III excitability has been observed in neurons in the auditory brainstem (MSO), which show strong phase-locking and accurate coincidence detection. In this paper, we consider a Hodgkin-Huxley type model (RM03) that is widely-used for phasic MSO neurons and we compare it with a modification of it, showing tonic behavior. We provide insight into the temporal processing of these neuron models by means of developing and analyzing two reduced models that reproduce qualitatively the properties of the exemplar ones. The geometric and mathematical analysis of the reduced models allows us to detect and quantify relevant features for the temporal computation such as nearness to threshold and a temporal integration window. Our results underscore the importance of Type III excitability for precise coincidence detection. PMID:23667306

  5. Electron impact excitation of Astrophysically Important C III Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; KEENAN, FRANCIS P.

    2015-08-01

    Emission lines of many Be-like ions, including C~III, have been observed in the solar and stellar plasmas and are useful for density and temperature diagnostics. C~III is also important for studies of fusion plasmas. For modelling and diagnostics, atomic data for energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and excitation rates (equivalently effective collision strengths) are required. Therefore, we have adopted the GRASP code to calculate energy levels, A-values (for E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions) and lifetimes among 166 levels of the n <= 5 configurations. Energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1% for most levels, and A-values to better than 20% for most transitions. For A-values and lifetimes there are no large discrepancies between theory and measurement. For collision strengths DARC is adopted, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh and are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 800,000 K. Unfortunately, a comparison with the similar R-matrix calculations of Fernandez-Menchero et al [A&A 566 (2014) A104] shows differences up to over an order of magnitude for about 20% transitions (among the lowest 78 levels) over the complete temperature range of the results. In most cases their results are larger, up to a factor of 20, and the differences are similar and comparable to those already noted for other Be-like ions, namely Al~X, Cl~XIV, K~XVI, Ti~XIX and Ge~XXIX - see Aggarwal & Keenan [MNRAS 447 (2015) 3849]. Based on several comparisons and considering the wide range of partial waves included (up to 40.5) and the energy range adopted for collision strengths (up to 21 Ryd), our results are estimated to be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of transitions, allowed and forbidden. Detailed comparisons for all parameters for C~III and possible reasons for discrepancies will be presented during the conference and will also be soon available in MNRAS.

  6. Effective Collision Strengths for Electron Impact Excitation of Inelastic Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have calculated electron collisional excitation strengths for all electric dipole forbidden, semi-forbidden, and allowed transitions among the lowest 17 LS states 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 2) P-3, D-1, S-1, 3s3p(exp 3)S-5(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), S-3(exp 0), D-1(exp 0), 3S(exp 2)3p3d D-1(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), and 3S(exp 2)3p4S P-3(exp 0), P-l(exp 0) of S III using the R-matrix method. These S m states are represented by fairly extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that yield excited state energies in close agreement with recent laboratory measurements. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are explicitly included in the scattering calculation. The effective collision strengths are determined assuming Maxwellian distribution of electron energies. These are listed over a wide temperature range ([0.5-10] x 10(exp 4) K) and compared, where possible, with other available calculations. Subject headings: atomic data - atomic processes

  7. Excited heavy baryons and their symmetries III: Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccouche, Z. Aziza; Chow, Chi-Keung; Cohen, Thomas D.; Gelman, Boris A.

    2001-12-01

    Phenomenological applications of an effective theory of low-lying excited states of charm and bottom isoscalar baryons are discussed at leading and next-to-leading order in the combined heavy-quark and large- Nc expansion. The combined expansion is formulated in terms of the counting parameter λ˜1/ mQ,1/ Nc; the combined expansion is in powers of λ1/2. We work up to next-to-leading order. We obtain model-independent predictions for the excitation energies, the semileptonic form factors and electromagnetic decay rates. At leading order in the combined expansion these observables are given in terms of one phenomenological constant which can be determined from the excitation energy of the first excited state of Λc baryon. At next-to-leading order an additional phenomenological constant is required. The spin-averaged mass of the doublet of the first orbitally excited state of Λb is predicted to be approximately 5920 MeV. It is shown that in the combined limit at leading and next-to-leading order there is only one independent form factor describing Λ b→Λ cℓ ν¯; similarly, Λ b→Λ c∗ℓ ν¯ and Λ b→Λ c1ℓ ν¯ decays are described by a single independent form factor. These form factors are calculated at leading and next-to-leading order in the combined expansion. The value of the Λ b→Λ cℓ ν¯ form factor at zero recoil is predicted to be 0.998 at leading order which is very close to HQET value of unity. The electromagnetic decay rates of the first excited states of Λc and Λb are determined at leading and next-to-leading order. The ratio of radiative decay rates Γ(Λ c∗→Λ cγ)/Γ(Λ b1→Λ bγ) is predicted to be approximately 0.2, greatly different from the heavy-quark effective theory value of unity.

  8. Mechanisms of Sb(III) Photooxidation by the Excitation of Organic Fe(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2016-07-05

    Organic Fe(III) complexes are widely distributed in the aqueous environment, which can efficiently generate free radicals under light illumination, playing a significant role in heavy metal speciation. However, the potential importance of the photooxidation of Sb(III) by organic Fe(III) complexes remains unclear. Therefore, the photooxidation mechanisms of Sb(III) were comprehensively investigated in Fe(III)-oxalate, Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-fulvic acid (FA) solutions by kinetic measurements and modeling. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) was observed in an Fe(III)-oxalate solution over the pH range of 3 to 7. The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as an ·OH scavenger quenched the Sb(III) oxidation, suggesting that ·OH is an important oxidant for Sb(III). However, the incomplete quenching of Sb(III) oxidation indicated the existence of other oxidants, presumably an Fe(IV) species in irradiated Fe(III)-oxalate solution. In acidic solutions, ·OH may be formed by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4) with H2O2, but a hypothetical Fe(IV) species may be generated by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4)2(2-) with H2O2 at higher pH. Kinetic modeling provides a quantitative explanation of the results. Evidence for the existence of ·OH and hypothetical Fe(IV) was also observed in an irradiated Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-FA system. This study demonstrated an important pathway of Sb(III) oxidation in surface waters.

  9. Optical Properties of Iridium(III) Cyclometalates: Excited State Interaction with Small Molecules and Dynamics of Light-Harvesting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Kyle Robert

    The research presented in this thesis concerns the use and understanding of luminescent Ir(III) cyclometalates. Areas of research involve the design, synthesis, and characterization of novel luminescent Ir(III) cyclometalates, including photophysical investigation of their phosphorescent excited states using steady-state and time resolved absorption/luminescence spectroscopies. This broad research description may be further separated into two subareas: study of excited state interaction with small molecules and excited-state dynamics of metal-organic light harvesting dyads. Interaction of Ir(III) cyclometalates with the small molecule carbon dioxide (CO2) is the subject of Chapter One. Most optical detection schemes previously developed for CO2 use indirect detection methods, which rely upon measuring changes in pH brought about by hydrolysis of CO 2 on of CO2 were accomplished through development of a system where hydrazine, a simple amino ligand, when coupled into the coordination sphere of an Ir(III) cyclometalate reacts with CO2. The result of this reaction provides a shift in the luminescence wavelength, a previously unobserved optical response for CO2 detection. Chapter Two investigates phosphorescent excited states and their ability to function as triplet sensitizers for the generation of singlet oxygen ( 1O2) and luminescent probes for molecular oxygen (O 2) concentration. Interaction of phosphorescent excited states with O2 results in energy transfer from the luminescent probe to O 2, quenching the phosphorescent excited state. Energy transfer also generates the reactive oxygen species (ROS) 1O2. We have used this duality to develop an analytical methodology to follow the serendipitously discovered photoreactivity of 1O2 with common organic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) using the luminescence profile of Ir(III) and Ru(II) phosphors. In Chapter Three a detailed study involving the design, synthesis, and characterization of the electrochemical and

  10. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  11. LANTHANIDE ENHANCE LUMINESCENCE (LEL) WITH ONE AND TWO PHOTON EXCITATION OF QUANTUM DYES LANTHANIDE (III) - MACROCYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: Lanthanide Enhance Luminescence (LEL) with one and two photon excitation of Quantum Dyes? Lanthanide(III)-Macrocycles
    Principal Author:
    Robert C. Leif, Newport Instruments
    Secondary Authors:
    Margie C. Becker, Phoenix Flow Systems
    Al Bromm, Virginia Commonw...

  12. LANTHANIDE ENHANCE LUMINESCENCE (LEL) WITH ONE AND TWO PHOTON EXCITATION OF QUANTUM DYES LANTHANIDE (III) - MACROCYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: Lanthanide Enhance Luminescence (LEL) with one and two photon excitation of Quantum Dyes? Lanthanide(III)-Macrocycles
    Principal Author:
    Robert C. Leif, Newport Instruments
    Secondary Authors:
    Margie C. Becker, Phoenix Flow Systems
    Al Bromm, Virginia Commonw...

  13. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  14. Type III functional response in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Sarnelle, Orlando; Wilson, Alan E

    2008-06-01

    The functional response of Daphnia, a common pelagic herbivore in lakes, was assessed with a combination of secondary and meta-analyses of published data and new data from an experiment conducted using very low food levels. Secondary analyses of literature data (28 studies, n = 239-393) revealed a significant positive influence of food concentration on Daphnia clearance rate at low food levels, i.e., evidence of an overall Type III functional response. This result was not an artifact of including data from Daphnia that were exhausted from prolonged food deprivation (more than three hours at very low food). Meta-analysis of Daphnia clearance rate vs. food concentration across a range of low food concentrations (eight studies) showed a significantly positive slope across studies, which also supports the presence of a Type III response. Congruent with these analyses of published data, the feeding experiment showed clear evidence of a Type III functional response for D. pulicaria feeding on Ankistrodesmus falcatus. Food levels at which Daphnia clearance rate declined with decreasing food were near the minimum resource requirement for Daphnia population maintenance at steady state (R*). We suggest that Type III responses are more common than previously believed, perhaps because of the relative paucity of observations at low food levels, and that reduced prey mortality at low phytoplankton densities could be a stabilizing mechanism for Daphnia-phytoplankton systems under resource scarcity.

  15. Highly excited strings I: Generating function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skliros, Dimitri P.; Copeland, Edmund J.; Saffin, Paul M.

    2017-03-01

    This is the first of a series of detailed papers on string amplitudes with highly excited strings (HES). In the present paper we construct a generating function for string amplitudes with generic HES vertex operators using a fixed-loop momentum formalism. We generalise the proof of the chiral splitting theorem of D'Hoker and Phong to string amplitudes with arbitrary HES vertex operators (with generic KK and winding charges, polarisation tensors and oscillators) in general toroidal compactifications E =R D - 1 , 1 ×T Dcr - D (with generic constant Kähler and complex structure target space moduli, background Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge fields and torsion). We adopt a novel approach that does not rely on a ;reverse engineering; method to make explicit the loop momenta, thus avoiding a certain ambiguity pointed out in a recent paper by Sen, while also keeping the genus of the worldsheet generic. This approach will also be useful in discussions of quantum gravity and in particular in relation to black holes in string theory, non-locality and breakdown of local effective field theory, as well as in discussions of cosmic superstrings and their phenomenological relevance. We also discuss the manifestation of wave/particle (or rather wave/string) duality in string theory.

  16. Femtochemistry of Norrish type-I reactions: III. Highly excited ketones--theoretical.

    PubMed

    Diau, Eric W G; Kötting, Carsten; Sølling, Theis I; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2002-01-18

    Time-dependant density functional theory (TDDFT) and ab initio methods (CASSCF and CASMP2) are applied here for the investigation of the excited-state potential energy surfaces of ketones studied experimentally in the accompanying paper, number IV in the series. The aim is to provide a general and detailed physical picture of the Norrish type-I reaction from S0 and S1 potentials (papers I and II) and from higher-energy potentials (papers III and IV). Particular focus here is on reactions following excitation to the 3s, 3p, and 3d Rydberg state and to the (nz-->pi*) and (pi-->pi*) valence states. It is shown that the active orbitals in the CASSCF calculations can be chosen so that accurate results are obtained with a small active space. Dynamic corrections of the state-specific CASSCF energies at the multireference MP2 level do not improve the results for the Rydberg states but are significant for the valence states. The geometries of the Rydberg states are similar to the ground state; the S1 and other valence states are not. A common property of the valence states is the elongated CO bond and the pyramidalization of the carbonyl carbon atom. As a consequence, these valence states cross all Rydberg states along the CO stretching coordinate and provide an efficient pathway down to the 3s Rydberg states (S2) through a series of conical intersections (CIs). The nonadiabatic coupling vector of the CI between the (pi-->pi*) and the 3s Rydberg states guides energy channeling into the asymmetric CC-stretching mode. The energy demand for the CC bond breakage (Norrish type-I) on the S2 surface is lower than that of the CI leading to the S1 state. This CC bond breakage leads to a linear excited state acetyl radical (3s Rydberg). Crossing a small barrier the 3s acyl radical can access a CI leading either to a second CC bond breakage or to a hot ground-state acetyl radical. The barriers for the Norrish type-I reaction on the various excited-state surfaces can be rationalized

  17. Functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) III--modus operandi.

    PubMed

    Vardimon, A D; Graber, T M; Voss, L R; Muller, T P

    1990-02-01

    An intraoral intermaxillary appliance has been developed for the treatment of Class III malocclusions that exhibit midface sagittal deficiency with or without mandibular excess. The functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) III consists of upper and lower acrylic plates with a permanent magnet incorporated into each plate. The upper magnet is linked to a retraction screw. The upper magnet is retracted periodically (e.g., monthly) to stimulate maxillary advancement and mandibular retardation. The attractive mode neodymium magnets used in this study produced a horizontal force of 98 gm and a vertical force of 371 gm. Six female Macaca fascicularis monkeys were treated with FOMA IIIs. An additional three animals were treated with sham appliances. After 4 months of treatment, the following results were found: the growth pattern of the cranial base (saddle angle) was not altered; midfacial protraction did occur along a recumbent hyperbolic curve with a horizontal maxillary displacement and an anterosuperior premaxillary rotation; the cumulative protraction of the maxillary complex was initiated at the pterygomaxillary fissure with an additional contribution provided by other circummaxillary sutures (zygomaticomaxillary s., transverse s., premaxillary s.); and inhibition of mandibular length was minimal, but a tendency toward a vertical condylar growth pattern was observed. The interaction between sutural and condylar growth sites appeared biphasic, characterized by an immediate and rapid excitation of the circummaxillary sutures followed by a delayed and slow suppression of the condylar cartilage. Long-term animal and clinical FOMA III studies are recommended.

  18. C III spectra in WC Wolf-Rayet stars - Does collisional excitation dominate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1993-01-01

    A direct comparison of the spectra emitted by an improved collisionally excited C III atomic model, with observations of C III spectra in Wolf-Rayet WC stars, shows agreement for UV, visible, and near-infrared lines including lines usually considered to be recombination lines. The agreement implies high-density and temperature source conditions corresponding to log (Ne Te) is greater than 16 as a lower limit, whereas most current modeling assumes log (Ne Te) is less than 15.5. This raises questions concerning the photoionization/recombination assumptions on which most WR modeling is based. Recent models are discussed from this point of view.

  19. TRANSITION PROBABILITIES AND COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Cl III

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2012-10-15

    We report transition probabilities and effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of the astrophysically important Cl III ion. The collision strengths are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals is employed for an accurate description of the target wave functions. The 68 fine-structure levels belonging to the 32 LS states of 3s {sup 2}3p{sup 3}, 3s3p{sup 4}, 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}3d, 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}4s, and 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}4p configurations are included in the close-coupling expansion. The effective collision strengths are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities, and those are tabulated for all 2278 possible fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures in the range from 5000 to 1,000,000 K. Our results are compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Overall, we reached a good agreement with the 23 state calculation of Ramsbottom et al., but some discrepancies are seen for some transitions.

  20. Photofunctional triplet excited states of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes: beyond electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    You, Youngmin; Nam, Wonwoo

    2012-11-07

    The development of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes has enabled important breakthroughs in electroluminescence because such complexes permit the efficient population of triplet excited states that give rise to luminescent transitions. The triplet states of Ir(III) complexes are advantageous over those of other transition metal complexes in that their electronic transitions and charge-transfer characteristics are tunable over wide ranges. These favorable properties suggest that Ir(III) complexes have significant potential in a variety of photofunctions other than electroluminescence. In this critical review, we describe recent photonic applications of novel Ir(III) complexes. Ir(III) complexes have been shown to affect the exciton statistics in the active layers of organic photovoltaic cells, thereby improving the photon-to-current conversion efficiencies. Nonlinear optical applications that take advantage of the strong charge-transfer properties of triplet transitions are also discussed. The tunability of the electrochemical potentials facilitates the development of efficient photocatalysis in the context of water photolysis or organic syntheses. The photoredox reactivities of Ir(III) complexes have been employed in studies of charge migration along DNA chains. The photoinduced cytotoxicity of Ir(III) complexes on live cells suggests that the complexes may be useful in photodynamic therapy. Potential biological applications of the complexes include phosphorescence labeling and sensing. Intriguing platforms based on cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes potentially provide novel protein tagging and ratiometric detection. We envision that future research into the photofunctionality of Ir(III) complexes will provide important breakthroughs in a variety of photonic applications.

  1. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics in vitamin B12 and related cob(III)alamins.

    PubMed

    Shiang, Joseph J; Cole, Allwyn G; Sension, Roseanne J; Hang, Kun; Weng, Yuxiang; Trommel, Jenna S; Marzilli, Luigi G; Lian, Tianquan

    2006-01-25

    Femtosecond transient IR and visible absorption spectroscopies have been employed to investigate the excited-state photophysics of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin, CNCbl) and the related cob(III)alamins, azidocobalamin (N3Cbl), and aquocobalamin (H2OCbl). Excitation of CNCbl, H2OCbl, or N3Cbl results in rapid formation of a short-lived excited state followed by ground-state recovery on time scales ranging from a few picoseconds to a few tens of picoseconds. The lifetime of the intermediate state is influenced by the sigma-donating ability of the axial ligand, decreasing in the order CNCbl > N3Cbl > H2OCbl, and by the polarity of the solvent, decreasing with increasing solvent polarity. The peak of the excited-state visible absorption spectrum is shifted to ca. 490 nm, and the shape of the spectrum is characteristic of weak axial ligands, similar to those observed for cob(II)alamin, base-off cobalamins, or cobinamides. Transient IR spectra of the upper CN and N3 ligands are red-shifted 20-30 cm(-1) from the ground-state frequencies, consistent with a weakened Co-upper ligand bond. These results suggest that the transient intermediate state can be attributed to a corrin ring pi to Co 3d(z2) ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) state. In this state bonds between the cobalt and the axial ligands are weakened and lengthened with respect to the corresponding ground states.

  2. Electron impact excitation of the Ne II and Ne III fine structure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.; Cumbee, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of the low lying levels of the Ne II and Ne III ions are of great interest in cool molecular environments including young stellar objects, photodissociation regions, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray dominated regions. We have carried out details computations for cross sections and rate coefficients using the Dirac R-matrix codes (DARC), the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes (BP) and the Intermediate Coupling Frame Transformation (ICFT) codes, for both Ne II and Ne III. We also compare our results with previous calculations. We are primarily interested in rate coefficients in the temperature range below 1000 K, and the focus is on obtaining the most accurate rate coefficients for those temperatures. We present both a recommended set of effective collision strengths and an indication of the uncertainties on these values. Work at Auburn University and UGA partly supported by NASA Grant NNX15AE47G.

  3. The speeds of electrons that excite solar radio bursts of type III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Goldman, M. V.; Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented that solar type III radio bursts at kilometric wavelengths are excited by electrons with average speeds of 0.14 c; i.e., in good agreement with in situ measurements by Lin et al. (1981; 1986), but considerably lower than the generally accepted values of 0.3 to 0.5 c. A set of 28 bursts for which electrons and/or plasma waves were observed at ISEE-3 is examined, and it is found that the initial parts of all bursts were due to plasma radiation at the fundamental, and that the fastest electrons that produce radio emission range from 0.25 c down to 0.07 c (average 0.14 c). The slower electrons, those that produce fundamental radiation at approximately the time of burst peak, have an average speed of 0.06 c and a range from about 0.10 c down to 0.03 c.There is no evidence in the data for a systematic increase or decrease of exciting electron speed with distance from the sun.

  4. 32 CFR 2003.3 - Functions (Article III).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Functions (Article III). 2003.3 Section 2003.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.3 Functions (Article III). In carrying out its...

  5. 32 CFR 2003.3 - Functions (Article III).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Functions (Article III). 2003.3 Section 2003.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.3 Functions (Article III). In carrying out its...

  6. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A.; Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  7. Comment on elimination of polarization dependence from optical excitation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Maseberg, Jack W.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of optical excitation functions excited by electron impact is typically accomplished by recording atomic fluorescence emitted into a small solid angle perpendicular to the incident electron beam. This measured intensity is not proportional to the emission cross section because the fluorescence exhibits an angular distribution and polarization that varies with the energy of the exciting electrons. Typically, a polarizer is set at the ''magic angle'' (54.7 degree sign ) with respect to the electron beam axis to remove this polarization dependence. The literature for the derivation of the magic angle value assumes the polarizing element is perfect. An expression for the angle that accounts for the use of a partial polarizer is presented.

  8. Exceptional Oxygen Sensing Properties of New Blue Light-Excitable Highly Luminescent Europium(III) and Gadolinium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Sergey M.; Fischer, Roland; Saf, Robert; Klimant, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    New europium(III) and gadolinium(III) complexes bearing 8-hydroxyphenalenone antenna combine efficient absorption in the blue part of the spectrum and strong emission in polymers at room temperature. The Eu(III) complexes show characteristic red luminescence whereas the Gd(III) dyes are strongly phosphorescent. The luminescence quantum yields are about 20% for the Eu(III) complexes and 50% for the Gd(III) dyes. In contrast to most state-of-the-art Eu(III) complexes the new dyes are quenched very efficiently by molecular oxygen. The luminescence decay times of the Gd(III) complexes exceed 1 ms which ensures exceptional sensitivity even in polymers of moderate oxygen permeability. These sensors are particularly suitable for trace oxygen sensing and may be good substitutes for Pd(II) porphyrins. The photophysical and sensing properties can be tuned by varying the nature of the fourth ligand. The narrow-band emission of the Eu(III) allows efficient elimination of the background light and autofluorescence and is also very attractive for use e.g. in multi-analyte sensors. The highly photostable indicators incorporated in nanoparticles are promising for imaging applications. Due to the straightforward preparation and low cost of starting materials the new dyes represent a promising alternative to the state-of-the-art oxygen indicators particularly for such applications as e.g. food packaging. PMID:27158252

  9. Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering Excitation Functions at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bisplinghoff, J.; Daniel, R.; Diehl, O.; Engelhardt, H.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P.; Gro-Hardt, R.; Heider, S.; Heine, A.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Lahr, U.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mosel, F.; Rohdje, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Ro, U.; Scheid, H.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Schwarz, V.; Trelle, H.; Wiedmann, W.; Ziegler, R.; Albers, D.; Bollmann, R.; Bueer, K.; Dohrmann, F.; Gasthuber, M.; Greiff, J.; Gro, A.; Igelbrink, M.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Mueller, M.; Muenstermann, M.; Schirm, N.; Scobel, W.; Wellinghausen, A.; Woller, K.; Cloth, P.; Gebel, R.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; von Rossen, P.; Sterzenbach, G.

    1997-03-01

    Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic scattering cross sections have been measured in narrow steps for projectile momenta p{sub p} (energies T{sub p}) from 1100 to 3300MeV/c (500 to 2500MeV) in the angular range 35{degree}{le}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{le}90{degree} with a detector providing {Delta}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{approx}1.4{degree} resolution. Measurements have been performed continuously during projectile acceleration in the cooler synchrotron COSY with an internal CH{sub 2} fiber target, taking particular care to monitor luminosity as a function of T{sub p}. The advantages of this experimental technique are demonstrated, and the excitation functions obtained are compared to existing cross section data. No evidence for narrow structures was found. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-14

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites (III{sub V}{sup q}) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites (V{sub III}{sup q}) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III{sub V}{sup q} defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V{sub III}{sup q} under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  11. Electron-impact Excitation Collision Strengths and Theoretical Line Intensities for Transitions in S III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log Te (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s 23p 2, 3s3p 3, 3s 23p3d, 3s 23p4s, 3s 23p4p, and 3s 23p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  12. Reactions of the excited state of polypyridyl chromium(III) ion

    SciTech Connect

    Steffan, C.

    1990-09-21

    There has been much recent interest in the photochemistry and photophysics of transition metal polypyridine complexes due to the possibility of their use in solar energy conversion systems. The excited state of these compounds are known to undergo useful electron transfer and energy transfer reactions. This work attempts to elucidate the mechanism of the quenching of *CrL{sub 3}{sup 3+} (where L = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 5-chloro-1,10-phenanthroline, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline) by oxalate ions in neutral pH. Evidence suggests an ion-pairing pre-equilibrium followed by rate limiting electron transfer to produce CrL{sub 3}{sup 2+} and CO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} can then react with ground state chromium(III) species to produce another mole of the reduced product or it can produce a secondary transient as in the case of phenanthroline and substituted phenanthroline complexes. The secondary transient reacts to produce CrL{sub 3}{sup 2+} in a subsequent reaction. 85 refs., 24 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  14. Delta function excitation of waves in the earth's ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidmar, R. J.; Crawford, F. W.; Harker, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    Excitation of the earth's ionosphere by delta function current sheets is considered, and the temporal and spatial evolution of wave packets is analyzed for a two-component collisional F2 layer. Approximations of an inverse Fourier-Laplace transform via saddle point methods provide plots of typical wave packets. These illustrate cold plasma wave theory and may be used as a diagnostic tool since it is possible to relate specific features, e.g., the frequency of a modulation envelope, to plasma parameters such as the electron cyclotron frequency. It is also possible to deduce the propagation path length and orientation of a remote radio beacon.

  15. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, S.; Vasudevan, R. K.; Collins, L.; Strelcov, E.; Okatan, M. B.; Belianinov, A.; Baddorf, A. P.; Proksch, R.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope's tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations, such as polarization switching, ionic motion, and electrochemical reactions. The nanoscale size of the biased region, smaller or comparable to that of features such as grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this approach allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, responses measured as a function of frequency and bias can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging of inorganic and biological systems. This article reviews current progress in multidimensional scanning probe microscopy techniques based on band excitation time and voltage spectroscopies, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization, along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  16. Structure-function analyses of plant type III polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Noel, Joseph P

    2012-01-01

    Plant type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) form a superfamily of biosynthetic enzymes involved in the production of a plethora of polyketide-derived natural products important for ecological adaptations and the fitness of land plants. Moreover, tremendous interest in bioengineering of type III PKSs to produce high-value compounds is increasing. Compared to type I and type II PKSs, which form either large modular protein complexes or dissociable molecular assemblies, type III PKSs exist as smaller homodimeric proteins, technically more amenable for detailed quantitative biochemical and phylogenetic analyses. In this chapter, we summarize a collection of approaches, including bioinformatics, genetics, protein crystallography, in vitro biochemistry, and mutagenesis, together affording a comprehensive interrogation of the structure-function-evolutionary relationships in the plant type III PKS family.

  17. Leptin regulation of neuronal excitability and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jenni

    2007-12-01

    Leptin, a hormone produced by adipocytes, provides signals to specific regions of the hypothalamus to control energy homeostasis. However, the past decade of research has not only revealed that leptin receptors are widely expressed in the CNS, but has also identified numerous additional functions for this hormone in the brain. In particular, there is evidence that leptin influences neuronal excitability via the activation as well as trafficking of specific potassium channels in several brain regions. Leptin-induced alterations in neuronal excitability have been implicated in the regulation of food intake, reward behaviour and anti-convulsant effects. A number of studies have also identified a role for leptin in cognitive processes that involve activation of leptin receptors in limbic structures, such as the hippocampus. Indeed, leptin influences hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, and more recently leptin has been shown to have anti-depressant properties. Characterisation of these novel actions of leptin is providing valuable insights into the role of this hormone in the regulation of diverse neuronal functions in health and disease.

  18. Leptin regulation of neuronal excitability and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jenni

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, a hormone produced by adipocytes, provides signals to specific regions of the hypothalamus to control energy homeostasis. However, the past decade of research has not only revealed that leptin receptors are widely expressed in the CNS, but has also identified numerous additional functions for this hormone in the brain. In particular, there is evidence that leptin influences neuronal excitability via the activation as well as trafficking of specific potassium channels in several brain regions. Leptin-induced alterations in neuronal excitability have been implicated in the regulation of food intake, reward behaviour and anti-convulsant effects. A number of studies have also identified a role for leptin in cognitive processes that involve activation of leptin receptors in limbic structures, such as the hippocampus. Indeed, leptin influences hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, and more recently leptin has been shown to have anti-depressant properties. Characterisation of these novel actions of leptin is providing valuable insights into the role of this hormone in the regulation of diverse neuronal functions in health and disease. PMID:18024215

  19. Density functional computations for inner-shell excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ching-Han; Chong, Delano P.

    1996-11-01

    The 1 s → π ∗ inner-shell excitation spectra of seven molecules have been studied using density functional theory along with the unrestricted generalized transition state (uGTS) approach. The exchange-correlation potential is based on a combined functional of Becke's exchange (B88) and Perdew's correlation (P86). A scaling procedure based on Clementi and Raimondi's rules for atomic screening is applied to the cc-pVTZ basis set of atoms where a partial core-hole is created in the uGTS calculations. The average absolute deviation between our predicted 1 s → π ∗ excitations eneergies and experimental values is only 0.16 eV. Singlet-triplet splittings of C 1 s → π ∗ transitions of CO, C 2H 2, C 2H 4, and C 6H 6 also agree with experimental observations. The average absolute deviation of our predicted core-electron binding energies and term values is 0.23 and 0.29 eV, respectively.

  20. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Vasudevan, Dr. Rama; Collins, Liam; Strelcov, Evgheni; Okatan, Mahmut B; Belianinov, Alex; Baddorf, Arthur P; Proksch, Roger; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  1. Group III/IV locomotor muscle afferents alter motor cortical and corticospinal excitability and promote central fatigue during cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Simranjit K.; Weavil, Joshua C.; Mangum, Tyler S.; Jessop, Jacob E.; Richardson, Russell S.; Morgan, David E.; Amann, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of group III/IV muscle afferents on the development of central fatigue and corticospinal excitability during exercise. Methods Fourteen males performed cycling-exercise both under control-conditions (CTRL) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl (FENT) impairing feedback from leg muscle afferents. Transcranial magnetic- and cervicomedullary stimulation was used to monitor cortical versus spinal excitability. Results While fentanyl-blockade during non-fatiguing cycling had no effect on motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), cervicomedullary-evoked motor potentials (CMEPs) were 13 ± 3% higher (P < 0.05), resulting in a decrease in MEP/CMEP (P < 0.05). Although the pre- to post-exercise reduction in resting twitch was greater in FENT vs. CTRL (−53 ± 3% vs. −39 ± 3%; P < 0.01), the reduction in voluntary muscle activation was smaller (−2 ± 2% vs. −10 ± 2%; P < 0.05). Compared to the start of fatiguing exercise, MEPs and CMEPs were unchanged at exhaustion in CTRL. In contrast, MEPs and MEP/CMEP increased 13 ± 3% and 25 ± 6% in FENT (P < 0.05). Conclusion During non-fatiguing exercise, group III/IV muscle afferents disfacilitate, or inhibit, spinal motoneurons and facilitate motor cortical cells. In contrast, during exhaustive exercise, group III/IV muscle afferents disfacilitate/inhibit the motor cortex and promote central fatigue. Significance Group III/IV muscle afferents influence corticospinal excitability and central fatigue during whole-body exercise in humans. PMID:27866119

  2. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. III. Group and phase velocities of wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    2015-07-01

    The properties of whistler modes excited by single and multiple magnetic loop antennas have been investigated in a large laboratory plasma. A single loop excites a wavepacket, but an array of loops across the ambient magnetic field B0 excites approximate plane whistler modes. The single loop data are measured. The array patterns are obtained by linear superposition of experimental data shifted in space and time, which is valid in a uniform plasma and magnetic field for small amplitude waves. Phasing the array changes the angle of wave propagation. The antennas are excited by an rf tone burst whose propagating envelope and oscillations yield group and phase velocities. A single loop antenna with dipole moment across B0 excites wave packets whose topology resembles m = 1 helicon modes, but without radial boundaries. The phase surfaces are conical with propagation characteristics of Gendrin modes. The cones form near the antenna with comparable parallel and perpendicular phase velocities. A physical model for the wave excitation is given. When a wave burst is applied to a phased antenna array, the wave front propagates both along the array and into the plasma forming a "whistler wing" at the front. These laboratory observations may be relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  3. Excitation function calculations for α + 93Nb nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, M.; Tel, E.; Sarpün, İ. H.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the excitation functions of alpha-induced reactions on the 93Nb target nucleus were calculated by using ALICE-ASH code. The hybrid model, Weisskopf-Ewing model and geometry dependent hybrid model in this code were used to understand the alpha-niobium interaction. The contribution on the nuclear interaction of compound and pre-compound processes, with variation of the incident alpha particle energy, was presented. Furthermore, the reaction cross sections were calculated by using different level density models such as Superfluid nuclear model, Fermi gas model and Kataria-Ramamurthy Fermi gas model. Obtaining a good agreement between the calculated and the measured cross sections, the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models were varied. Finally, the proper choice of the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models was found to be quite important in order to obtain the more realistic cross section values.

  4. Coupled cluster Green function: Model involving single and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Kowalski, Karol; Shelton, William A.

    2016-04-14

    In this paper we report on the parallel implementation of the coupled-cluster (CC) Green function formulation (GF-CC) employing single and double excitations in the cluster operator (GF-CCSD). The detailed description of the underlying algorithm is provided, including the structure of ionization-potential- and electron-affinity-type intermediate tensors which enable to formulate GF-CC approach in a computationally feasible form. Several examples including calculations of ionization-potentials and electron a*ffinities for benchmark systems, which are juxtaposed against the experimental values, provide an illustration of the accuracies attainable in the GFCCSD simulations. We also discuss the structure of the CCSD self energies and discuss approximation that are geared to reduce the computational cost while maintaining the pole structure of the full GF-CCSD approach.

  5. [Ventricular pump function under ectopic excitation of the frog heart].

    PubMed

    Kibler, N A; Belogolova, A S; Vaĭkshnoraĭte, M A; Azarov, Ia E; Shmakov, D N

    2008-02-01

    The ventricular pump function under ectopic excitation of the heart was studied in decapitated and pithed adult frogs Rana temporaria (n = 21) at 18-19 degrees C. The intraventricular pressure was recorded with a catheter via ventricular wall. During pacing of the ventricular base and apex, the systolic pressure decreased (6.1 +/- 4.5 mm Hg and 8.9 +/- 5.0 mm Hg, respectively) as compared to the supraventricular rhythm (8.9 +/- 5.0 mm Hg, p < 0.05). The end-diastolic pressure decreased insignificantly both under basal and apical pacing. The systolic rate of pressure rise during dP/dtmax decreased under ventricular pacing, especially during pacing of the ventricular apex, as compared to the supraventricular rhythm (14.4 +/- 6/9 mm Hg/s and 22.1 +/- 11.2 mm Hg/s, respectively, p < 0.003). The isovolumetric relaxation (dP/dtmin) slowed during apical pacing as compared to the supraventricular rhythm (-25.1 +/- 13.6 and -35.6 +/- 18.3 mm Hg/s, respectively, p < 0.03). Ectopic excitation of the ventricular base and apex resulted in increase of the QRS duration (93 +/- 33 ms and 81 +/- 30 ms, respectively) as compared to the supraventricular rhythm (63 +/- 13 ms, p < 0.05). Thus, pacing of different ventricular areas ventricular myocardium with the ventricular pump function being reduced more obviously during the apical pacing compared to the pacing of ventricular base.

  6. Synthetic control of excited-state properties in cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes using ancillary ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Djurovich, Peter I; Alleyne, Bert D; Yousufuddin, Muhammed; Ho, Nam N; Thomas, J Christopher; Peters, Jonas C; Bau, Robert; Thompson, Mark E

    2005-03-21

    The synthesis and photophysical characterization of a series of (N,C(2')-(2-para-tolylpyridyl))2 Ir(LL') [(tpy)2 Ir(LL')] (LL' = 2,4-pentanedionato (acac), bis(pyrazolyl)borate ligands and their analogues, diphosphine chelates and tert-butylisocyanide (CN-t-Bu)) are reported. A smaller series of [(dfppy)2 Ir(LL')] (dfppy = N,C(2')-2-(4',6'-difluorophenyl)pyridyl) complexes were also examined along with two previously reported compounds, (ppy)2 Ir(CN)2- and (ppy)2 Ir(NCS)2- (ppy = N,C(2')-2-phenylpyridyl). The (tpy)2 Ir(PPh2CH2)2 BPh2 and [(tpy)2 Ir(CN-t-Bu)2](CF3SO3) complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The Ir-C(aryl) bond lengths in (tpy)2 Ir(CN-t-Bu)2+ (2.047(5) and 2.072(5) A) and (tpy)2 Ir(PPh2CH2)2 BPh2 (2.047(9) and 2.057(9) A) are longer than their counterparts in (tpy)2 Ir(acac) (1.982(6) and 1.985(7) A). Density functional theory calculations carried out on (ppy)2 Ir(CN-Me)2+ show that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) consists of a mixture of phenyl-pi and Ir-d orbitals, while the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital is localized primarily on the pyridyl-pi orbitals. Electrochemical analysis of the (tpy)2 Ir(LL') complexes shows that the reduction potentials are largely unaffected by variation in the ancillary ligand, whereas the oxidation potentials vary over a much wider range (as much as 400 mV between two different LL' ligands). Spectroscopic analysis of the cyclometalated Ir complexes reveals that the lowest energy excited state (T1) is a triplet ligand-centered state (3LC) on the cyclometalating ligand admixed with 1MLCT (MLCT = metal-to-ligand charge-transfer) character. The different ancillary ligands alter the 1MLCT state energy mainly by changing the HOMO energy. Destabilization of the 1MLCT state results in less 1MLCT character mixed into the T1 state, which in turn leads to an increase in the emission energy. The increase in emission energy leads to a linear decrease in ln(k(nr)) (k

  7. ESCRT-III on endosomes: new functions, new activation pathway.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Philip

    2016-01-15

    The multivesicular body (MVB) pathway sorts ubiquitinated membrane cargo to intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) within the endosome, en route to the lysosomal lumen. The pathway involves the sequential action of conserved protein complexes [endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs)], culminating in the activation by ESCRT-II of ESCRT-III, a membrane-sculpting complex. Although this linear pathway of ESCRT activation is widely accepted, a study by Luzio and colleagues in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal suggests that there is greater complexity in ESCRT-III activation, at least for some MVB cargoes. They show that ubiquitin-dependent sorting of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I to the MVB requires the central ESCRT-III complex but does not involve either ESCRT-II or functional links between ESCRT-II and ESCRT-III. Instead, they propose that MHC class I utilizes histidine-domain protein tyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP), a non-canonical ESCRT interactor, to promote ESCRT-III activation.

  8. Functional Assessment of Corticospinal System Excitability in Karate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Messina, Giovanni; Valenzano, Anna; Monda, Vincenzo; Viggiano, Andrea; Messina, Antonietta; Petito, Annamaria; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Ciliberti, Michela Anna Pia; Monda, Marcellino; Capranica, Laura; Cibelli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the involvement of the primary motor cortex (M1) in the coordination performance of karate athletes through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods Thirteen right-handed male karate athletes (25.0±5.0 years) and 13 matched non-athlete controls (26.7±6.2 years) were enrolled. A single-pulse TMS was applied using a figure-eight coil stimulator. Resting motor threshold (rMT) was determined. Surface electromyography was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Motor evoked potential (MEP) latencies and amplitudes at rMT, 110%, and 120% of rMT were considered. Functional assessment of the coordination performance was assessed by in-phase (IP) and anti-phase (AP) homolateral hand and foot coordination tasks performed at 80, 120, and 180 bpm. Results Compared to controls, athletes showed lower rMT (p<0.01), shorter MEP latency (p<0.01) and higher MEP amplitude (p<0.01), with a significant correlation (r = 0.50, p<0.01) between rMT and MEP latency. Coordination decreased with increasing velocity, and better IP performances emerged compared to AP ones (p<0.001). In general, a high correlation between rMT and coordination tasks was found for both IP and AP conditions. Conclusion With respect to controls, karate athletes present a higher corticospinal excitability indicating the presence of an activity-dependent alteration in the balance and interactions between inhibitory and facilitatory circuits determining the final output from the M1. Furthermore, the high correlation between corticospinal excitability and coordination performance could support sport-specific neurophysiological arrangements. PMID:27218465

  9. Evolutionary and functional analysis of mulberry type III polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Liang, Jiubo; Chen, Hu; Ding, Guangyu; Ma, Bi; He, Ningjia

    2016-08-04

    Type III polyketide synthases are important for the biosynthesis of flavonoids and various plant polyphenols. Mulberry plants have abundant polyphenols, but very little is known about the mulberry type III polyketide synthase genes. An analysis of these genes may provide new targets for genetic improvement to increase relevant secondary metabolites and enhance the plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Eighteen genes encoding type III polyketide synthases were identified, including six chalcone synthases (CHS), ten stilbene synthases (STS), and two polyketide synthases (PKS). Functional characterization of four genes representing most of the MnCHS and MnSTS genes by coexpression with 4-Coumaroyl-CoA ligase in Escherichia coli indicated that their products were able to catalyze p-coumaroyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA to generate naringenin and resveratrol, respectively. Microsynteny analysis within mulberry indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events contributed to the expansion of the MnCHS family, while tandem duplications were mainly responsible for the generation of the MnSTS genes. Combining the evolution and expression analysis results of the mulberry type III PKS genes indicated that MnCHS and MnSTS genes evolved mainly under purifying selection to maintain their original functions, but transcriptional subfunctionalization occurred during long-term species evolution. Moreover, mulberry leaves can rapidly accumulated oxyresveratrol after UV-C irradiation, suggesting that resveratrol was converted to oxyresveratrol. Characterizing the functions and evolution of mulberry type III PKS genes is crucial for advancing our understanding of these genes and providing the basis for further studies on the biosynthesis of relevant secondary metabolites in mulberry plants.

  10. Deactivation pathways of the electronic excitation of ions of lanthanide complexes in polymers with functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveshnikova, E. B.; Ermolaev, V. L.; Shablya, A. V.; Goĭkhman, M. Ya.; Yakimanskiĭ, A. V.; Podeshvo, I. V.; Kudryavtsev, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    Complexes Eu(TTA)3phen and Eu(MBTA)3phen, as well as complexes Tb(MBTA)3phen and Tb(TTA)3phen, which do not luminesce in solutions, are shown to luminesce in polymer films (TTA is thenoyltrifluoroacetone, MBTA is n-methoxybenzoyltrifluoroacetone, and phen is o-phenanthroline). Luminescence of complexes of Eu and Tb in films of a polymer, poly(methylene-bis-anthranilamide) 1,6-hexamethylenedicarboxylic acid (PAA-5), having a high concentration of functional anthranilate groups, is studied. From the behavior of the luminescence intensity (I lum), the luminescence decay time, and the luminescence spectra of complexes of these lanthanides in polymer films, the following regular features were revealed. (i) During the film preparation at 90°C, Ln complexes are attached to PAA-5 via anthranilate groups. (ii) Irradiation of these films in the range of the absorption band of ligands (TTA or MBTA) leads to deactivation of the electronic excitation of ions according to the diketone detachment mechanism and to further binding of complexes to polymers. In this case, I lum(Eu(III)) decreases because the introduction of anthranilate groups of the polymer into the first coordination sphere of Eu(III) complexes enhances the nonradiative deactivation of these ions, whereas I lum(Tb(III)) increases since the introduction of these groups suppresses the nonradiative deactivation of Tb complexes through triplet states of ligands (TTA and MBTA). (iii) Upon storage of films in the dark (20°C), complexes detach themselves from the polymer and return to their initial structure. In PAA-5 films into which Eu and Tb complexes were simultaneously introduced, the color of the emission from the irradiation spot changes from red to green.

  11. Some light-ion excitation-function measurements on titanium, yttrium, and europium, and associated results

    SciTech Connect

    West, H.I. Jr.; Lanier, R.G.; Mustafa, M.G.; Nuckolls, R.M.; Nagle, R.J.; O`Brien, H.; Frehaut, J.; Adam, A.; Philis, C.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses: Fabrication of Plastic-Matrix-Encapsulated Accelerator Targets and Their Use in Measuring Nuclear Excitation Functions; Correcting Excitation Function Data in the Low Energy Region for Finite Thickness of the Target Foils, Including Effects of Straggling; Excitation Functions for the Nuclear Reactions on Titanium Leading to the Production {sup 48}V, {sup 44}Sc and {sup 47}Sc by Proton, Deuteron and Triton Irradiations at 0--35 MeV; Some Excitation Functions of Proton and Deuteron Induced Reactions on {sup 89}Y; Measurements of the Excitation Functions of the Isobaric Chain {sup 87}Y, {sup 87}Y{sup m}, {sup 87}Y{sup g} and {sup 87}Sr{sup m}; Levels in {sup 87}Y Observed in the Decay of {sup 87}Zr; and Nuclear Reaction Excitation Functions from the Irradiation of {sup 151,153}Eu with Protons And deuterons up to 35 MeV.

  12. Nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics with hopping. III. Photoinduced excitation and relaxation of organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M.; Handt, J.; Schmidt, R.

    2014-07-01

    Photoinduced excitation and relaxation of organic molecules (C2H4 and CH2NH2+) are investigated by means of nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics with hopping (NA-QMD-H), developed recently [Fischer, Handt, and Schmidt, paper I of this series, Phys. Rev. A 90, 012525 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.012525]. This method is first applied to molecules assumed to be initially ad hoc excited to an electronic surface. Special attention is drawn to elaborate the role of electron-nuclear correlations, i.e., of quantum effects in the nuclear dynamics. It is found that they are essential for a realistic description of the long-time behavior of the electronic relaxation process, but only of minor importance to portray the short-time scenario of the nuclear dynamics. Migration of a hydrogen atom, however, is identified as a quantum effect in the nuclear motion. Results obtained with explicit inclusion of an fs-laser field are presented as well. It is shown that the laser-induced excitation process generally leads to qualitatively different gross features of the relaxation dynamics, as compared to the field-free case. Nevertheless, the nuclear wave packet contains all subtleties of the cis-trans isomerization mechanism as observed without a laser field.

  13. Anatomy and function of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in gastric vagal pathways.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard L; Cooper, Nicole J; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2008-05-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) are classified into groups I (excitatory), II and III (inhibitory) mGluR. Activation of peripheral group III mGluR (mGluR4, mGluR6, mGluR7, mGluR8), particularly mGluR8, inhibits vagal afferent mechanosensitivity in vitro which translates into reduced triggering of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations and gastroesophageal reflux in vivo. However, the expression and function of group III mGluR in central gastrointestinal vagal reflex pathways is not known. Here we assessed the expression of group III mGluR in identified gastric vagal afferents in the nodose ganglion (NG) and in the dorsal medulla. We also determined the central action of the mGluR8a agonist S-3,4-DCPG (DCPG) on nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons with gastric mechanosensory input in vivo. Labelling for mGluR4 and mGluR8 was abundant in gastric vagal afferents in the NG, at their termination site in the NTS (subnucleus gelatinosus) and in gastric vagal motorneurons, while labelling for mGluR6 and mGluR7 was weaker in these regions. DCPG (0.1 nmol or 0.001-10 nmol i.c.v.) inhibited or markedly attenuated responses of 8/10 NTS neurons excited by isobaric gastric distension with no effect on blood pressure or respiration; 2 NTS neurons were unaffected. The effects of DCPG were significantly reversed by the group III mGluR antagonist MAP4 (10 nmol, i.c.v.). In contrast, 4/4 NTS neurons inhibited by gastric distension were unaffected by DCPG. We conclude that group III mGluR are expressed in peripheral and central vagal pathways, and that mGluR8 within the NTS selectively reduce excitatory transmission along gastric vagal pathways.

  14. Structural and photophysical studies on gallium(III) 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonates. Does excited state decay involve ligand photolabilisation?

    PubMed

    Ramos, M Luísa; de Sousa, Andreia R E; Justino, Licínia L G; Fonseca, Sofia M; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Burrows, Hugh D

    2013-03-14

    Multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C and (71)Ga) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1D and 2D), DFT calculations and luminescence techniques have been used to study 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonate (8-HQS) and its complexes with Ga(III) in aqueous solutions. The study combines the high sensitivity of luminescence techniques and the selectivity of multinuclear NMR spectroscopy with the structural details accessible through DFT calculations, and aims to obtain a complete understanding of the complexation between the Ga(3+) ion and 8-HQS, and how this influences the luminescence behaviour. A full speciation study has been performed on this system and three complexes detected, with (metal : ligand) 1 : 1, 1 : 2 and 1 : 3 stoichiometries, the results being consistent with those previously found for the system Al(III)-8-HQS. Complexation in these systems is relevant to their potential biomedical, sensing and optoelectronic applications. On binding to Ga(III), a marked increase is seen in the intensity of the 8-HQS fluorescence band, which is accompanied by changes in the absorption spectra. These support the use of 8-HQS as a sensitive fluorescent sensor to detect Ga(3+) metal ions in surface waters, biological fluids, etc., and its metal complexes as an emitting or charge transport layer in light emitting devices. However, the fluorescence quantum yield of the Ga(III)-8-HQS 1 : 3 complex is about 35% of that of the corresponding system with Al(III). Although this may be due in part to a heavy atom effect favouring S(1)→ T(1) intersystem crossing with Ga(3+), this does not agree with transient absorption measurements on the triplet state yield, which is lower with the Ga(III) system than with Al(III). Instead, it is suggested that photolabilisation of ligand exchange plays a major role in nonradiative decay of the excited state and that this is more efficient with the Ga(3+) complex. Based on these results, suggestions are made of ways of enhancing fluorescence

  15. Equations describing coherent and partially coherent multilevel molecular excitation induced by pulsed Raman transitions: III

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Sacks, R.; Karr, T.

    1987-02-18

    This memo discusses the equations of motion used to describe multilevel molecular excitation induced by Raman transitions. These equations are based upon the time-dependent Schroedinger equation expressed in a basis of molecular energy states. A partition of these states is made into two sets, those that are far from resonance (and hence unpopulated) and those that are close to resonance, either by one-photon transition or two-photon (Raman) processes. By adiabatic elimination an effective Schroedinger equation is obtained for the resonance states alone. The effective Hamiltonian is expressible in terms of a polarizibility operator.

  16. The Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Systems.

    PubMed

    Notti, Ryan Q; Stebbins, C Erec

    2016-02-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) afford Gram-negative bacteria an intimate means of altering the biology of their eukaryotic hosts--the direct delivery of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to that of the eukaryote. This incredible biophysical feat is accomplished by nanosyringe "injectisomes," which form a conduit across the three plasma membranes, peptidoglycan layer, and extracellular space that form a barrier to the direct delivery of proteins from bacterium to host. The focus of this chapter is T3SS function at the structural level; we will summarize the core findings that have shaped our understanding of the structure and function of these systems and highlight recent developments in the field. In turn, we describe the T3SS secretory apparatus, consider its engagement with secretion substrates, and discuss the posttranslational regulation of secretory function. Lastly, we close with a discussion of the future prospects for the interrogation of structure-function relationships in the T3SS.

  17. Dissociative excitation of the N(+)(5S) state by electron impact on N2 - Excitation function and quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdman, P. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable N(+)(5S) ions were produced in the laboratory by dissociative excitation of N2 with energetic electrons. The resulting radiative decay of the N(+)(5S) state was observed with sufficient resolution to completely resolve the doublet from the nearby N2 molecular radiation. The excitation function was measured from threshold to 500 eV. The cross section peaks at a high electron energy and also exhibits a high threshold energy both of which are typical of dissociative excitation-ionization processes. This finding complicates the explanation of electron impact on N2 as the mechanism for the source of the 2145 A 'auroral mystery feature' by further increasing the required peak cross section. It is suggested that the apparent N(+)(5S) quenching in auroras may be an artifact due to the softening of the electron energy spectrum in the auroral E region.

  18. Is There a Linear Building Transfer Function for Small Excitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Heaton, T. H.

    2003-12-01

    In the absence of actual building accelerometer data, the linear response of a structure to strong ground motion is estimated by the convolution of the dynamic response of the structure with an input ground motion. The input motion is usually provided by a local `reference' station record. In this study, we look at whether actual recorded ground motion at two instrumented buildings with well studied dynamic properties can be satisfactorily modeled using a local ground station. All stations record continuous 24-bit data streams on the CISN network, so analysis of a variety of weak earthquake motions, as well as ambient noise, is possible. Our buildings are the 9-story reinforced concrete Millikan Library (CISN Station MIK) and the 3-story braced steel frame Broad Center (CBC), both on the Caltech Campus. Motions recorded on their upper floors are compared with motions from ground stations located in the basement of a lightweight wood-frame house (GSA), and in a subsurface vault (CRP). All stations are within 200m of each other. Recent work using the new continuous datastream indicates that the natural frequencies of these structures can vary by up to 5% during normal ambient conditions, due to such factors as changing building usage, diurnal temperature variation, and wind/rainfall events. These shifts can be sudden, and models of building motions are sensitive to these previously un-documented changes. Further, during stronger motions, such as forced vibration testing, and minor earthquake shaking, natural frequencies are shown to drop by up to 10% (2003 M5.4 Big Bear Earthquake, Δ = 119km), with near-instantaneous recovery once the excitation is over. Moderate earthquakes can temporarily reduce frequencies by up to 30% with no apparent structural damage (1971 M6.6 San Fernando Earthquake, Δ = 31km). Post-event permanent reductions of about 10% have been observed. The ability to monitor these evolving dynamic characteristics makes a re-evaluation of the

  19. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  20. Diverse functions and reactions of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Higher plants contain plant-specific peroxidases (class III peroxidase; Prxs) that exist as large multigene families. Reverse genetic studies to characterize the function of each Prx have revealed that Prxs are involved in lignification, cell elongation, stress defense and seed germination. However, the underlying mechanisms associated with plant phenotypes following genetic engineering of Prx genes are not fully understood. This is because Prxs can function as catalytic enzymes that oxidize phenolic compounds while consuming hydrogen peroxide and/or as generators of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, biochemical efforts to characterize Prxs responsible for lignin polymerization have revealed specialized activities of Prxs. In conclusion, not only spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and protein distribution, but also differentiated oxidation properties of each Prx define the function of this class of peroxidases.

  1. Luminescent Gold(III) Thiolates: Supramolecular Interactions Trigger and Control Switchable Photoemissions from Bimolecular Excited States

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Lucy; Rocchigiani, Luca; Bertrand, Benoît; Lancaster, Simon J.; Hughes, David L.; Duckworth, Helen; Jones, Saul T. E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new family of cyclometallated gold(III) thiolato complexes based on pyrazine‐centred pincer ligands has been prepared, (C^Npz^C)AuSR, where C^Npz^C=2,6‐bis(4‐ButC6H4)pyrazine dianion and R=Ph (1), C6H4 tBu‐4 (2), 2‐pyridyl (3), 1‐naphthyl (1‐Np, 4), 2‐Np (5), quinolinyl (Quin, 6), 4‐methylcoumarinyl (Coum, 7) and 1‐adamantyl (8). The complexes were isolated as yellow to red solids in high yields using mild synthetic conditions. The single‐crystal X‐ray structures revealed that the colour of the deep‐red solids is associated with the formation of a particular type of short (3.2–3.3 Å) intermolecular pyrazine⋅⋅⋅pyrazine π‐interactions. In some cases, yellow and red crystal polymorphs were formed; only the latter were emissive at room temperature. Combined NMR and UV/Vis techniques showed that the supramolecular π‐stacking interactions persist in solution and give rise to intense deep‐red photoluminescence. Monomeric molecules show vibronically structured green emissions at low temperature, assigned to ligand‐based 3IL(C^N^C) triplet emissions. By contrast, the unstructured red emissions correlate mainly with a 3LLCT(SR→{(C^Npz^C)2}) charge transfer transition from the thiolate ligand to the π⋅⋅⋅π dimerized pyrazine. Unusually, the π‐interactions can be influenced by sample treatment in solution, such that the emissions can switch reversibly from red to green. To our knowledge this is the first report of aggregation‐enhanced emission in gold(III) chemistry. PMID:27859790

  2. Addressing the electronic properties of III-V nanowires by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, M.

    2017-02-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been attracting an increasing interest in the scientific community. This is due to their peculiar filamentary shape and nanoscale diameter, which renders them versatile and cost-effective components of novel technological devices and also makes them an ideal platform for the investigation of a variety of fascinating physical effects. Absorption spectroscopy is a powerful and non-destructive technique able to provide information on the physical properties of the NWs. However, standard absorption spectroscopy is hard to perform in NWs, because of their small volume and the presence of opaque substrates. Here, we demonstrate that absorption can be successfully replaced by photoluminescence excitation (PLE). First, the use of polarization-resolved PLE to address the complex and highly-debated electronic band structure of wurtzite GaAs and InP NWs is shown. Then, PLE is used as a statistically-relevant method to localize the presence of separate wurtzite and zincblende NWs in the same InP sample. Finally, a variety of resonant exotic effects in the density of states of In x Ga1-x As/GaAs core/shell NWs are highlighted by high-resolution PLE. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. D. This project is part of the Journal of Physics’ series 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Marta De Luca was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. D as a Leader.

  3. Excited-state intermolecular proton transfer of firefly luciferin III. Proton transfer to a mild base.

    PubMed

    Presiado, Itay; Erez, Yuval; Huppert, Dan

    2010-12-30

    Steady-state and time-resolved techniques were employed to study the excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) from d-luciferin, the natural substrate of the firefly luciferase, to the mild acetate base in aqueous solutions. We found that in 1 M aqueous solutions of acetate or higher, a proton transfer (PT) process to the acetate takes place within 30 ps in both H(2)O and D(2)O solutions. The time-resolved emission signal is composed of three components. We found that the short-time component decay time is 300 and 600 fs in H(2)O and D(2)O, respectively. This component is attributed either to a PT process via the shortest water bridged complex available, ROH··H(2)O··Ac(-), or to PT taking place within a contact ion pair. The second time component of 2000 and 3000 fs for H(2)O and D(2)O, respectively, is attributed to ROH* acetate complex, whose proton wire is longer by one water molecule. The decay rate of the third, long-time component is proportional to the acetate concentration. We attribute it to the diffusion-assisted reaction as well as to PT process to the solvent.

  4. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in C III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2015-06-01

    We report energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes for the astrophysically important Be-like ion C III. For the calculations, 166 levels belonging to the n ≤ 5 configurations are considered and the GRASP (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) is adopted. Einstein A-coefficients are provided for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions, while lifetimes are compared with available measurements as well as theoretical results, and no large discrepancies noted. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1 per cent for a majority of levels, and A-values to better than 20 per cent for most transitions. Collision strengths are also calculated, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC) is used. A wide energy range, up to 21 Ryd, is considered and resonances resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. The collision strengths are subsequently averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 8.0 × 105 K, sufficient for most astrophysical applications. Our data are compared with the recent R-matrix calculations of Fernández-Menchero et al., and significant differences (up to over an order of magnitude) are noted for several transitions over the complete temperature range of the results.

  5. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.

    2017-09-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates (A-values) for four types of transitions (E1, E2, M1, and M2) are reported for an astrophysically important Mg-like ion Si III, whose emission lines have been observed in a variety of plasmas. For the calculations, well-known and widely-used GRASP code has been adopted, and results are listed for transitions among the 141 levels of the 3 ℓ 3ℓ‧ and 3 ℓ 4 ℓ configurations. Experimental energies are available for only the lowest 58 levels but there is no major discrepancy with theoretical results. Similarly, the A-values and lifetimes show a satisfactory agreement with other available results, particularly for strong E1 transitions. Collision strengths are also calculated, with the DARC code, and listed for resonance transitions over a wide energy range, up to 30 Ryd. No similar results are available in the literature for comparisons. However, comparisons are made with the more important parameter, effective collision strength (Υ), for which recent R-matrix results are available for a wide range of transitions, and over a large range of temperatures. To determine Υ, resonances have been resolved in a narrow energy mesh, although these are not observed to be as important as for other ions. Unfortunately, large discrepancies in Υ values are noted for about half the transitions. The differences increase with increasing temperature and worsen as the upper level J increases. In most cases the earlier results are overestimated, by up to (almost) two orders of magnitude, and this conclusion is consistent with the one observed earlier for Be-like ions.

  6. Investigation of Plasma Excitation. Volume III. Advanced Optical Diagnostics of Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    the delta function is zero except at, 0 (4C = n(HeNe) (14) and since the observed wavenumbers are in air, o can be written, 0 oo = n( oVac ) aVac (15...where n( oVac ) is the index of refraction of air at the vacuum wavenumber of the spectrum. From equations (14) and (15), the calculated wavenumbers, Gc

  7. Rational design of NIR-emitting iridium(iii) complexes for multimodal phosphorescence imaging of mitochondria under two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chengzhi; Guan, Ruilin; Wu, Jingheng; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Lili; Huang, Juanjuan; Wang, Hui; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2017-09-25

    A series of NIR-emitting iridium(iii) complexes were developed for multimodal phosphorescence imaging (NIR imaging, phosphorescence lifetime imaging and time-gated imaging) of mitochondria in living cells, 3D multicellular spheroids (MTCCs) and hippocampus slice under two-photon excitation.

  8. The Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Notti, Ryan Q.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2015-01-01

    ARTICLE SUMMARY Type III secretion systems (T3SS) afford gram-negative bacteria a most intimate means of altering the biology of their eukaryotic hosts — the direct delivery of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to that of the eukaryote. This incredible biophysical feat is accomplished by nanosyringe “injectisomes,” which form a conduit across the three plasma membranes, peptidoglycan layer and extracellular space that form a barrier to the direct delivery of proteins from bacterium to host. The focus of this chapter is T3SS function at the structural level; we will summarize the core findings that have shaped our understanding of the structure and function of these systems and highlight recent developments in the field. In turn, we describe the T3SS secretory apparatus, consider its engagement with secretion substrates, and discuss the post-translational regulation of secretory function. Lastly, we close with a discussion of the future prospects for the interrogation of structure-function relationships in the T3SS. PMID:26999392

  9. Enabling the Triplet of Tetraphenylethene to Sensitize the Excited State of Europium(III) for Protein Detection and Time‐Resolved Luminescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zece; Song, Bo; Yuan, Jingli

    2016-01-01

    A tetraphenylethene (TPE) group that exhibits aggregation‐induced emission is incorporated into the ligand of a Eu(III) complex (TPEEu) to sensitize the excited state of Eu(III). In steady‐state measurements, TPEEu exhibits weak luminescence when dissolved in aqueous solutions even at a high concentration level, but emits strong fluorescence of TPE and phosphorescence of Eu(III) upon binding with bovine serum albumin. With a delay time of 0.05 ms and a gate time of 1.0 ms in time‐resolved measurements, only phosphorescent emission of Eu(III) is observed with a high on/off ratio. Moreover, this probe is successfully used in time‐resolved luminescence imaging to eliminate the background signal from biological autofluorescence without a washing process. This work provides a general strategy in designing Ln(III) complexes for detecting a broad range of biological molecules. PMID:27981006

  10. Excitation function measurements and integral yields estimation for natZnp,x reactions at low energies.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, F S; Al Mugren, K S; Azzam, A

    2007-10-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for a number of proton-induced nuclear reactions on natural zinc in the energy range from 27.5 MeV down to their threshold energy, using the activation method on stacked foils. Excitation functions and thick target yield for the reactions leading to the formation of (67)Ga,(66)Ga,(68)Ga,(62)Zn and (65)Zn are presented and compared with earlier reported experimental data. The experimental cross-sections and the production yields are tabulated; the excitation functions and the thick target yield curves are plotted in graphs.

  11. Rome III functional dyspepsia symptoms classification: Severity vs frequency.

    PubMed

    Carbone, F; Holvoet, L; Vanuytsel, T; Tack, J

    2017-06-01

    The Rome III criteria subdivide functional dyspepsia (FD) in the epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) and the postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) based on the frequency of the symptoms to optimize the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. However, it is unclear to which extent the frequency of the symptoms is related to their severity. Our aim was to explore the frequency and severity of dyspeptic symptoms and their relationship in FD patients. Functional dyspepsia patients fulfilling the Rome III diagnostic completed a questionnaire that evaluated the frequency and severity of FD symptoms. The concordance between the severity and frequency categories was analyzed by means of spearman correlation and the concordance correlation coefficient (ρc ). In the entire patient cohort (n=421), the classification of symptoms severity and frequency showed good concordance for all symptoms. In the EPS subgroup (n=….), the symptom severity and frequency score of epigastric pain showed a poor correlation (r=.28; ρc =0.07). The PDS subgroup (n=…) showed a good correlation for most of the symptoms. Due to its limited occurrence in this group, the correlation of the severity and frequency scores for epigastric pain is of little relevance (r=.79; ρc =0.58). The overlap EPS-PDS group showed good correlation for most of the symptoms, except for epigastric pain (pain r=.24; ρc =0.09). We conclude that the information given by the assessment of frequency and severity of PDS symptoms is comparable and hence one of the scores sufficiently identifies symptom pattern in PDS patients. In EPS patients, both the symptom frequency and severity should be taken into account as two separate entities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Dimensionality of electronic excitations in organic semiconductors: A dielectric function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Nelson, Jenny; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Etchegoin, Pablo G.

    2007-12-01

    We present a detailed investigation on the effective dimensionality (associated with the degree of delocalization) of electronic excitations in thin organic films using the dielectric function as obtained from ellipsometry. To this end, we study first the best analytical representation of the optical dielectric function of these materials and compare different approaches found in the literature: (i) the harmonic oscillator approximation, (ii) the standard critical-point model (SCP), (iii) the model dielectric function (MDF), and (iv) the Forouhi-Bloomer model. We use these models to analyze variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry raw data for a thin poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) film deposited on quartz (taken as an archetypal sample). The superiority of the SCP model for PFO films and a wide range of other spin-coated conjugated polymers (and guest-molecules in polymers) is demonstrated. Moreover, we show how the SCP model can be used to gain physical information on the microscopic structure. As an example, we show that the delocalization of excitons decreases for nonconjugated polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and polyimide, while the conjugation length and exciton delocalization are, respectively, enhanced in cases where a planar conformation (e.g., β phase of PFO) or a high degree of crystallinity [e.g., poly(3-hexylthiophene)] is achieved. As an additional example, we employ the SCP excitonic model to investigate the temperature dependence of the dielectric function of crystalline and glassy PFO films. We propose that the SCP excitonic model should be adopted as the standard choice to model the optical properties of polymer thin films from ellipsometry data.

  13. Self-Consistent Optimization of Excited States within Density-Functional Tight-Binding.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Tim; Le, Khoa; Irle, Stephan

    2016-01-12

    We present an implementation of energies and gradients for the ΔDFTB method, an analogue of Δ-self-consistent-field density functional theory (ΔSCF) within density-functional tight-binding, for the lowest singlet excited state of closed-shell molecules. Benchmarks of ΔDFTB excitation energies, optimized geometries, Stokes shifts, and vibrational frequencies reveal that ΔDFTB provides a qualitatively correct description of changes in molecular geometries and vibrational frequencies due to excited-state relaxation. The accuracy of ΔDFTB Stokes shifts is comparable to that of ΔSCF-DFT, and ΔDFTB performs similarly to ΔSCF with the PBE functional for vertical excitation energies of larger chromophores where the need for efficient excited-state methods is most urgent. We provide some justification for the use of an excited-state reference density in the DFTB expansion of the electronic energy and demonstrate that ΔDFTB preserves many of the properties of its parent ΔSCF approach. This implementation fills an important gap in the extended framework of DFTB, where access to excited states has been limited to the time-dependent linear-response approach, and affords access to rapid exploration of a valuable class of excited-state potential energy surfaces.

  14. Dielectric function for a model of laser-excited GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, Lorin X.

    2001-02-15

    We consider a model for the ultrashort pulsed-laser excitation of GaAs in which electrons are excited from the top of the valence band to the bottom of the conduction band. The linear optical response of this excited system in the visible and near-UV is calculated by solving a statically screened Bethe-Salpeter equation. Single-particle electron energies and wave functions are taken from ab initio electronic structure calculations. The screened electron-hole interaction W is calculated with a model dielectric function which includes the excited carriers. Though band-gap renormalization is neglected, dramatic changes are observed in the shape of {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) due to Pauli blocking and the enhanced screening of W. We estimate the error incurred in the static screening approximation by performing static screening calculations with the assumption that the excited carriers respond too slowly to screen W.

  15. Excited state surfaces in density functional theory: a new twist on an old problem.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Paul; Williams, J A Gareth; Tozer, David J

    2009-09-07

    Excited state surfaces in density functional theory and the problem of charge transfer are considered from an orbital overlap perspective. For common density functional approximations, the accuracy of the surface will not be uniform if the spatial overlap between the occupied and virtual orbitals involved in the excitation has a strong conformational dependence; the excited state surface will collapse toward the ground state in regions where the overlap is very low. This characteristic is used to predict and to provide insight into the breakdown of excited state surfaces in the classic push-pull 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile molecule, as a function of twist angle. The breakdown is eliminated using a Coulomb-attenuated functional. Analogous situations will arise in many molecules.

  16. Core and valence excitations in resonant X-ray spectroscopy using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur K and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\textrm {L}_{2,3}$\\end{document}L2,3 edges. Comparison of the simulated XANES signals with experiment shows that the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory is more accurate and computationally less expensive than the static exchange method. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals give some insights into the correlation of different excitations in the molecule. PMID:23181305

  17. Core and valence excitations in resonant X-ray spectroscopy using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-11-01

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur K and {L}_{2,3} edges. Comparison of the simulated XANES signals with experiment shows that the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory is more accurate and computationally less expensive than the static exchange method. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals give some insights into the correlation of different excitations in the molecule.

  18. Assembly, structure, function and regulation of type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wanyin; Marshall, Natalie C; Rowland, Jennifer L; McCoy, James M; Worrall, Liam J; Santos, Andrew S; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Finlay, B Brett

    2017-04-10

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are protein transport nanomachines that are found in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and symbionts. Resembling molecular syringes, T3SSs form channels that cross the bacterial envelope and the host cell membrane, which enable bacteria to inject numerous effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm and establish trans-kingdom interactions with diverse hosts. Recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy and integrative imaging have provided unprecedented views of the architecture and structure of T3SSs. Furthermore, genetic and molecular analyses have elucidated the functions of many effectors and key regulators of T3SS assembly and secretion hierarchy, which is the sequential order by which the protein substrates are secreted. As essential virulence factors, T3SSs are attractive targets for vaccines and therapeutics. This Review summarizes our current knowledge of the structure and function of this important protein secretion machinery. A greater understanding of T3SSs should aid mechanism-based drug design and facilitate their manipulation for biotechnological applications.

  19. 77 FR 76426 - Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... organizations that are not functionally integrated. The withdrawal affects Type III supporting organizations... ``Type III Supporting Organizations''). Those regulations reflect changes to the law made by the Pension... Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 [REG 155929-06] RIN 1545-BL44 Payout Requirements for Type III...

  20. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew M.; Calvo, Rebecca A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize. PMID:26244495

  1. Excited State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-09-08

    The optical response of excited states is a key property used to probe photophysical and photochemical dynamics. Additionally, materials with a large nonlinear absorption cross-section caused by two-photon (TPA) and excited state absorption (ESA) are desirable for optical limiting applications. The ability to predict the optical response of excited states would help in the interpretation of transient absorption experiments and aid in the search for and design of optical limiting materials. We have developed an approach to obtain excited state absorption spectra by combining real-time (RT) and linear-response (LR) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Being based on RT-TDDFT, our method is aimed at tackling larger molecular complexes and materials systems where excited state absorption is predominantly seen and many time-resolved experimental efforts are focused. To demonstrate our method, we have calculated the ground and excited state spectra of H₂⁺ and H₂ due to the simplicity in the interpretation of the spectra. We have validated our new approach by comparing our results for butadiene with previously published results based on quadratic response (QR). We also present results for oligofluorenes, where we compare our results with both QR-TDDFT and experimental measurements. Because our method directly measures the response of an excited state, stimulated emission features are also captured; although, these features are underestimated in energy which could be attributed to a change of the reference from the ground to the excited state.

  2. Natural orbitals from single and double excitation configuration interaction wave functions: their use in second-order configuration interaction and wave functions incorporating limited triple and quadruple excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grev, Roger S.; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1992-05-01

    As an alternative to orbitals obtained from a molecular complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) wave function, we have investigated the use of natural orbitals (NOs) obtained from configuration interaction (CI) wave functions including all single and double excitations (CISD) for use in multireference CI (MRCI) studies. The specific MRCI methods investigated are (1) second-order CI (SOCI), which includes all single and double excitations with respect to a full CI in the valence space and (2) a wave function that includes all single and double excitations out of a valence space CISD reference function. The latter wave function can also be described as a single-double-triple-quadruple excitation CI in which only two electrons are allowed to simultaneously reside outside of the valence space, ``which we call CISD[TQ].'' Comparison is made with CASSCF-SOCI and full CI results for NH2 (2B1), CH3 (2A`2), and SiH2 (1B1) at equilibrium bond distances (Re) 1.5 and 2.0Re, and with full CI results for the dissociation energy of N2. The dissociation energies of N2 and C2 are also obtained using large atomic natural orbital basis sets and the results compared to CASSCF-SOCI and internally contracted MRCI results. In all, the MRCI results with CISD NOs are very similar to the CASSCF-MRCI results, and at geometries where the reference wave function is dominant, the relatively compact CISD[TQ] method yields results that are very close to SOCI. In addition to their ease of generation, the CISD NOs offer the added advantage of allowing for truncation of the CI configuration list on an orbital basis by simply deleting high-lying virtual orbitals. The errors introduced by this truncation are almost quantitatively obtained at the CISD level of theory.

  3. Global excitation of wave phenomena in a dissipative multiconstituent medium. III - Response characteristics for different sources in the earth's thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Varosi, F.; Herrero, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    A linear trasnfer function model of the earth's thermosphere which includes the electric field momentum source is used to study the differences in the response characteristics for Joule heating and momentum coupling in the thermosphere. It is found that, for Joule/particle heating, the temperature and density perturbations contain a relatively large trapped component which has the property of a low-pass filter, with slow decay after the source is turned off. The decay time is sensitive to the altitude of energy deposition and is significantly reduced as the source peak moves from 125 to 150 km. For electric field momentum coupling, the trapped components in the temperature and density perturbations are relatively small. In the curl field of the velocity, however, the trapped component dominates, but compared with the temperature and density its decay time is much shorter. Outside the source region the form of excitation is of secondary importance for the generation of the various propagating gravity wave modes.

  4. Testing excited-state energy-density functionals and potentials with the ionization potential theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbola, Manoj; Myneni, Hemanadhan; Shamim, Md.

    2014-03-01

    The modified local spin density functional and the related local potential for excited-states are tested by employing the ionization potential theorem. The functional is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding potential is given by analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital energy ɛmax accurately, the potential is corrected for its asymptotic behavior by employing the van Leeuwen-Barends correction to it. The highest occupied orbital energy ɛmax thus obtained is then compared with the ΔSCF ionization energy calculated using the excited-state functional. It is shown that the two match quite accurately, demonstrating thereby that our approach of constructing excited-state functional is on sound footing.

  5. Direct Extraction of Excitation Energies from Ensemble Density-Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zeng-hui; Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Ullrich, Carsten A.

    2017-07-01

    A very specific ensemble of ground and excited states is shown to yield an exact formula for any excitation energy as a simple correction to the energy difference between orbitals of the Kohn-Sham ground state. This alternative scheme avoids either the need to calculate many unoccupied levels as in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) or the need for many self-consistent ensemble calculations. The symmetry-eigenstate Hartree-exchange (SEHX) approximation yields results comparable to standard TDDFT for atoms. With this formalism, SEHX yields approximate double excitations, which are missed by adiabatic TDDFT.

  6. Modeling the doubly excited state with time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2008-11-01

    Multielectron excited states have become a hot topic in many cutting-edge research fields, such as the photophysics of polyenes and in the possibility of multiexciton generation in quantum dots for the purpose of increasing solar cell efficiency. However, obtaining multielectron excited states has been a major obstacle as it is often done with multiconfigurational methods, which involve formidable computational cost for large systems. Although they are computationally much cheaper than multiconfigurational wave function based methods, linear response adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density functional theory (TDDFT) are generally considered incapable of obtaining multielectron excited states. We have developed a real-time TDHF and adiabatic TDDFT approach that is beyond the perturbative regime. We show that TDHF/TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite two electrons from the ground state to the doubly excited state and that the real-time TDHF/TDDFT implicitly includes double excitation within a superposition state. We also present a multireference linear response theory to show that the real-time electron density response corresponds to a superposition of perturbative linear responses of the S0 and S2 states. As a result, the energy of the two-electron doubly excited state can be obtained with several different approaches. This is done within the adiabatic approximation of TDDFT, a realm in which the doubly excited state has been deemed missing. We report results on simple two-electron systems, including the energies and dipole moments for the two-electron excited states of H2 and HeH+. These results are compared to those obtained with the full configuration interaction method.

  7. Modeling the Excited States of Biological Chromophores within Many-Body Green's Function Theory.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuchen; Rohlfing, Michael; Molteni, Carla

    2010-01-12

    First-principle many-body Green's function theory (MBGFT) has been successfully used to describe electronic excitations in many materials, from bulk crystals to nanoparticles. Here we assess its performance for the calculations of the excited states of biological chromophores. MBGFT is based on a set of Green's function equations, whose key ingredients are the electron's self-energy Σ, which is obtained by Hedin's GW approach, and the electron-hole interaction, which is described by the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). The GW approach and the BSE predict orbital energies and excitation energies with high accuracy, respectively. We have calculated the low-lying excited states of a series of model biological chromophores, related to the photoactive yellow protein (PYP), rhodopsin, and the green fluorescent protein (GFP), obtaining a very good agreement with the available experimental and accurate theoretical data; the order of the excited states is also correctly predicted. MBGFT bridges the gap between time-dependent density functional theory and high-level quantum chemistry methods, combining the efficiency of the former with the accuracy of the latter: this makes MBGFT a promising method for studying excitations in complex biological systems.

  8. Balanced Description of Ground-State Properties, Valence Excitations, and Charge-Transfer Excitations with Long-Range Corrected Density Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrdanz, Mary A.; Herbert, John M.

    2009-06-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory's favorable scaling properties make it an attractive technique for the study of large, condensed-phase systems. However, in such systems conventional generalized gradient approximation functionals are plagued by spurious, low-energy charge transfer (CT) excitations. Long-range corrected (LRC) functionals, which asymptotically turn on full Hartree-Fock exchange at long range, push these CT states to higher energies. Until recently it has seemed impossible to find a long-range corrected functional that performed acceptably well for both ground- and excited-state properties. We have constructed an implemented a LRC hybrid functional that not only performs reasonably well in a battery of tests on ground-state properties and valence excitations, but also achieves reasonable accuracy for a small database of CT excitations.

  9. Assessing Accuracy of Exchange-Correlation Functionals for the Description of Atomic Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Marcin; Hanas, Martyna

    2016-09-01

    The performance of exchange-correlation functionals for the description of atomic excitations is investigated. A benchmark set of excited states is constructed and experimental data is compared to Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) calculations. The benchmark results show that for the selected group of functionals good accuracy may be achieved and the quality of predictions provided is competitive to computationally more demanding coupled-cluster approaches. Apart from testing the standard TDDFT approaches, also the role of self-interaction error plaguing DFT calculations and the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation kernels is given some insight.

  10. Insertion of alpha1S II-III loop and C terminal sequences into alpha1H fails to restore excitation-contraction coupling in dysgenic myotubes.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Christina M; Beam, Kurt G

    2003-01-01

    The L-type Ca2+ channel in skeletal muscle (alpha1S) is essential for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. Previous studies using chimeras composed of alpha1S together with alpha1C or alpha1M demonstrated the importance of the alpha1S II-III loop and of a smaller subdomain (residues 720-764; 'ECC') in skeletal EC coupling. However, these chimeras failed to test the significance of regions outside the II-III loop, which are highly conserved between alpha1S and alpha1C. Therefore, we have injected dysgenic (alpha1S-lacking) myotubes with cDNAs encoding chimeras between alpha1S and the highly divergent T-type Ca2+ channel, alpha1H. The chimeras consisted of GFP-tagged alpha1H with one or more of the following substitutions: alpha1S II-III loop residues 720-764 ('ECC'), a putative targeting domain of the alpha1S C terminus ('target'; residues 1543-1662) or the entire alpha1S C terminus ('Cterm'; residues 1382-1873). The presence of either target or Cterm affected the expression and/or kinetics of whole-cell currents recorded from both dysgenic muscle cells and tsa-201 cells. Importantly, substitution of ECC alone into GFP-alpha1H (GFP-alpha1H + ECC), or together with either target (GFP-alpha1H + ECC + target) or Cterm (GFP-alpha1H + ECC + Cterm), was insufficient to restore electrically evoked contractions. Depolarization-induced fluorescence transients for GFP-alpha1H + ECC, GFP-alpha1H + ECC + target or GFP-alpha1H + ECC + Cterm had a bell shaped dependence upon membrane voltage (inconsistent with skeletal EC coupling) and were also exceedingly small (unlike cardiac EC coupling). The absence of EC coupling for these chimeras raises the possibility that regions of alpha1S outside of ECC and target are necessary for providing the context that allows these two domains to function in EC coupling and targeting, respectively. Additionally, an inadequate membrane density of the chimeras may have contributed to the lack of coupling.

  11. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  12. On the Performances of the M06 Family of Density Functionals for Electronic Excitation Energies.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Perpète, Eric A; Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo; Valero, Rosendo; Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2010-07-13

    We assessed the accuracy of the four members of the M06 family of functionals (M06-L, M06, M06-2X, and M06-HF) for the prediction of electronic excitation energies of main-group compounds by time-dependent density functional theory. This is accomplished by comparing the predictions both to high-level theoretical benchmark calculations and some experimental data for gas-phase excitation energies of small molecules and to experimental data for midsize and large chromogens in liquid-phase solutions. The latter comparisons are carried out using implicit solvation models to include the electrostatic effects of solvation. We find that M06-L is one of the most accurate local functionals for evaluating electronic excitation energies, that M06-2X outperforms BHHLYP, and that M06-HF outperforms HF, although in each case, the compared functionals have the same or a similar amount of Hartree-Fock exchange. For the majority of investigated excited states, M06 emerges as the most accurate functional among the four tested, and it provides an accuracy similar to the best of the other global hybrids such as B3LYP, B98, and PBE0. For 190 valence excited states, 20 Rydberg states, and 16 charge transfer states, we try to provide an overall assessment by comparing the quality of the predictions to those of time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory and nine other density functionals. For the valence excited states, M06 yields a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 0.23 eV, whereas B3LYP, B98, and PBE0 have MADs in the range 0.19-0.22 eV. Of the functionals tested, M05-2X, M06-2X, and BMK are found to perform best for Rydberg states, and M06-HF performs best for charge transfer states, but no single functional performs satisfactorily for all three kinds of excitation. The performance of functionals with no Hartree-Fock exchange is of great practical interest because of their high computational efficiency, and we find that M06-L predicts more accurate excitation energies than other such functionals.

  13. Gravimetric excitation function of polar motion from the GRACE RL05 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Impact of land hydrosphere on polar motion excitation is still not as well known as the impact of the angular momentum of the atmosphere and ocean. Satellite mission Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) from 2002 provides additional information about mass distribution of the land hydrosphere. However, despite the use of similar computational procedures, the differences between GRACE data series made available by the various centers of computations are still considerable. In the paper we compare three series of gravimetric excitation functions of polar motion determined from Rl05 GRACE solution from the Center for Space Research (CSR), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ). These data are used to determine the gravimetric polar motion excitation function. Gravimetric signal is compared also with the geodetic residuals computed by subtracting atmospheric and oceanic signals from geodetic excitation functions of polar motion. Gravimetric excitation functions obtained on the basis of JPL data differ significantly from the geodetic residuals while and the series obtained from CSR and GFZ are more compatible.

  14. Generalized variational principle for excited states using nodes of trial functions.

    PubMed

    Bressanini, Dario; Reynolds, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    The familiar variational principle provides an upper bound to the ground-state energy of a given Hamiltonian. This allows one to optimize a trial wave function by minimizing the expectation value of the energy. This approach is also trivially generalized to excited states, so that given a trial wave function of a certain symmetry, one can compute an upper bound to the lowest-energy level of that symmetry. In order to generalize further and build an upper bound of an arbitrary excited state of the desired symmetry, a linear combination of basis functions is generally used to generate an orthogonal set of trial functions, all bounding their respective states. However, sometimes a compact wave-function form is sought, and a basis-set expansion is not desirable or possible. Here we present an alternative generalization of the variational principle to excited states that does not require explicit orthogonalization to lower-energy states. It is valid for one-dimensional systems and, with additional information, to at least some n-dimensional systems. This generalized variational principle exploits information about the nodal structure of the trial wave function, giving an upper bound to the exact energy without the need to build a linear combination of basis functions. To illustrate the theorem we apply it to a nontrivial example: the 1s2s (1)S excited state of the helium atom.

  15. Generalized variational principle for excited states using nodes of trial functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bressanini, Dario; Reynolds, Peter J.

    2011-10-15

    The familiar variational principle provides an upper bound to the ground-state energy of a given Hamiltonian. This allows one to optimize a trial wave function by minimizing the expectation value of the energy. This approach is also trivially generalized to excited states, so that given a trial wave function of a certain symmetry, one can compute an upper bound to the lowest-energy level of that symmetry. In order to generalize further and build an upper bound of an arbitrary excited state of the desired symmetry, a linear combination of basis functions is generally used to generate an orthogonal set of trial functions, all bounding their respective states. However, sometimes a compact wave-function form is sought, and a basis-set expansion is not desirable or possible. Here we present an alternative generalization of the variational principle to excited states that does not require explicit orthogonalization to lower-energy states. It is valid for one-dimensional systems and, with additional information, to at least some n-dimensional systems. This generalized variational principle exploits information about the nodal structure of the trial wave function, giving an upper bound to the exact energy without the need to build a linear combination of basis functions. To illustrate the theorem we apply it to a nontrivial example: the 1s2s {sup 1} S excited state of the helium atom.

  16. Motor cortex excitability and connectivity in chronic stroke: a multimodal model of functional reorganization.

    PubMed

    Volz, Lukas J; Sarfeld, Anna-Sophia; Diekhoff, Svenja; Rehme, Anne K; Pool, Eva-Maria; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers a cascade of cellular processes, which induce neuroprotection, inflammation, apoptosis and regeneration. At the neural network level, lesions concomitantly induce cerebral plasticity. Yet, many stroke survivors are left with a permanent motor deficit, and only little is known about the neurobiological factors that determine functional outcome after stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are non-invasive approaches that allow insights into the functional (re-) organization of the cortical motor system. We here combined neuronavigated TMS, MRI and analyses of connectivity to investigate to which degree recovery of hand function depends on corticospinal tract (CST) damage and biomarkers of cerebral plasticity like cortical excitability and motor network effective connectivity. As expected, individual motor performance of 12 stroke patients with persistent motor deficits was found to depend upon the degree of CST damage but also motor cortex excitability and interhemispheric connectivity. In addition, the data revealed a strong correlation between reduced ipsilesional motor cortex excitability and reduced interhemispheric inhibition in severely impaired patients. Interindividual differences in ipsilesional motor cortex excitability were stronger related to the motor deficit than abnormal interhemispheric connectivity or CST damage. Multivariate linear regression analysis combining the three factors accounted for more than 80 % of the variance in functional impairment. The inter-relation of cortical excitability and reduced interhemispheric inhibition provides direct multi-modal evidence for the disinhibition theory of the contralesional hemisphere following stroke. Finally, our data reveal a key mechanism (i.e., the excitability-related reduction in interhemispheric inhibition) accounting for the rehabilitative potential of novel therapeutic approaches which aim at modulating cortical

  17. Thick-target transmission method for excitation functions of interaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, M.; Ebata, S.; Imai, S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a method, called as thick-target transmission (T3) method, to obtain an excitation function of interaction cross sections. In an ordinal experiment to measure the excitation function of interaction cross sections by the transmission method, we need to change the beam energy for each cross section. In the T3 method, the excitation function is derived from the beam attenuations measured at the targets of different thicknesses without changing the beam energy. The advantage of the T3 method is the simplicity and availability for radioactive beams. To confirm the availability, we perform a simulation for the 12C + 27Al system with the PHITS code instead of actual experiments. Our results have large uncertainties but well reproduce the tendency of the experimental data.

  18. Experimental excitation functions of deuteron induced reactions on natural thallium up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam Rebeles, R.; Van den Winkel, P.; Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2012-10-01

    Excitation functions of deuteron induced reactions on natural thallium leading to the formation of 204m,203m2+m1+g,202m,201m+g,200Pb and 202,201m+g,200m+gTl isotopes were determined up to 50 MeV. The cross sections were measured by an activation technique using stacked foil irradiation. The excitation functions of the investigated reactions are compared with data reported in literature and also with the theoretical results of TALYS nuclear reaction code. From the measured cross section data, the thick target yield for the medical interesting 203Pb isotope is calculated.

  19. Quantal density-functional theory of excited states: The state arbitrariness of the model noninteracting system

    SciTech Connect

    Slamet, Marlina; Singh, Ranbir; Sahni, Viraht; Massa, Lou

    2003-10-01

    The quantal density-functional theory (Q-DFT) of nondegenerate excited-states maps the pure state of the Schroedinger equation to one of noninteracting fermions such that the equivalent excited state density, energy, and ionization potential are obtained. The state of the model S system is arbitrary in that it may be in a ground or excited state. The potential energy of the model fermions differs as a function of this state. The contribution of correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle and Coulomb repulsion to the potential and total energy of these fermions is independent of the state of the S system. The differences are solely a consequence of correlation-kinetic effects. Irrespective of the state of the S system, the highest occupied eigenvalue of the model fermions is the negative of the ionization potential. In this paper we demonstrate the state arbitrariness of the model system by application of Q-DFT to the first excited singlet state of the exactly solvable Hookean atom. We construct two model S systems: one in a singlet ground state (1s{sup 2}), and the other in a singlet first excited state (1s2s). In each case, the density and energy determined are equivalent to those of the excited state of the atom, with the highest occupied eigenvalues being the negative of the ionization potential. From these results we determine the corresponding Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) 'exchange-correlation' potential energy for the two S systems. Further, based on the results of the model calculations, suggestions for the KS-DFT of excited states are made.

  20. Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M.; Milin, M.

    2009-08-26

    Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

  1. Investigation of Multiconfigurational Short-Range Density Functional Theory for Electronic Excitations in Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Mickaël; Hedegård, Erik D; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2016-05-10

    Computational methods that can accurately and effectively predict all types of electronic excitations for any molecular system are missing in the toolbox of the computational chemist. Although various Kohn-Sham density-functional methods (KS-DFT) fulfill this aim in some cases, they become inadequate when the molecule has near-degeneracies and/or low-lying double-excited states. To address these issues we have recently proposed multiconfiguration short-range density-functional theory-MC-srDFT-as a new tool in the toolbox. While initial applications for systems with multireference character and double excitations have been promising, it is nevertheless important that the accuracy of MC-srDFT is at least comparable to the best KS-DFT methods also for organic molecules that are typically of single-reference character. In this paper we therefore systematically investigate the performance of MC-srDFT for a selected benchmark set of electronic excitations of organic molecules, covering the most common types of organic chromophores. This investigation confirms the expectation that the MC-srDFT method is accurate for a broad range of excitations and comparable to accurate wave function methods such as CASPT2, NEVPT2, and the coupled cluster based CC2 and CC3.

  2. Analysis of Real Ship Rolling Dynamics under Wave Excitement Force Composed of Sums of Cosine Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. S.; Cai, F.; Xu, W. M.

    2011-09-28

    The ship motion equation with a cosine wave excitement force describes the slip moments in regular waves. A new kind of wave excitement force model, with the form as sums of cosine functions was proposed to describe ship rolling in irregular waves. Ship rolling time series were obtained by solving the ship motion equation with the fourth-order-Runger-Kutta method. These rolling time series were synthetically analyzed with methods of phase-space track, power spectrum, primary component analysis, and the largest Lyapunove exponent. Simulation results show that ship rolling presents some chaotic characteristic when the wave excitement force was applied by sums of cosine functions. The result well explains the course of ship rolling's chaotic mechanism and is useful for ship hydrodynamic study.

  3. Excitation functions for actinides produced in the interactions of sup 31 P with sup 248 Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Leyba, J.D.; Henderson, R.A.; Hall, H.L.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Kadkhodayan, B.A.; Kreek, S.A.; Brady, E.K.; Gregorich, K.E.; Lee, D.M.; Nurmia, M.J.; Hoffman, D.C. Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California )

    1991-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of various isotopes of Bk, Cf, Es, and Fm from the interactions of 174- and 239-MeV {sup 31}P projectiles with {sup 248}Cm. The isotopic distributions were symmetric and displayed full widths at half maximum of 2.5, 2.5, and 2.25 mass units for Bk, Cf, and Fm, respectively. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur for those reaction channels which involve the exchange of the fewest number of nucleons between the target and projectile for which the calculated excitation energy is a positive quantity. The maxima of the excitation functions occur at those projectile energies which are consistent with the calculated reaction barriers based upon a binary reaction mechanism. The effects of the odd proton in the {sup 31}P projectile on the final isotopic distributions are discussed.

  4. Employment of sawtooth-shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling for improving resistance measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling; Li, Shujuan; Yan, Wenjuan; Li, Gang

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve higher measurement accuracy of routine resistance without increasing the complexity and cost of the system circuit of existing methods, this paper presents a novel method that exploits a shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling technology. The excitation signal source for resistance measurement is modulated by the sawtooth-shaped-function signal, and oversampling technology is employed to increase the resolution and the accuracy of the measurement system. Compared with the traditional method of using constant amplitude excitation signal, this method can effectively enhance the measuring accuracy by almost one order of magnitude and reduce the root mean square error by 3.75 times under the same measurement conditions. The results of experiments show that the novel method can attain the aim of significantly improve the measurement accuracy of resistance on the premise of not increasing the system cost and complexity of the circuit, which is significantly valuable for applying in electronic instruments.

  5. Employment of sawtooth-shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling for improving resistance measurement accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ling; Li, Shujuan; Yan, Wenjuan; Li, Gang

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve higher measurement accuracy of routine resistance without increasing the complexity and cost of the system circuit of existing methods, this paper presents a novel method that exploits a shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling technology. The excitation signal source for resistance measurement is modulated by the sawtooth-shaped-function signal, and oversampling technology is employed to increase the resolution and the accuracy of the measurement system. Compared with the traditional method of using constant amplitude excitation signal, this method can effectively enhance the measuring accuracy by almost one order of magnitude and reduce the root mean square error by 3.75 times under the same measurement conditions. The results of experiments show that the novel method can attain the aim of significantly improve the measurement accuracy of resistance on the premise of not increasing the system cost and complexity of the circuit, which is significantly valuable for applying in electronic instruments.

  6. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  7. Accurate excitation energies of molecules and oligomers from a semilocal density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Guocai; Mo, Yuxiang; Tao, Jianmin

    2017-06-01

    Excitation energy plays an important role in energy conversion, biological processes, and optical devices. In this work, we apply the Tao-Mo (TM) nonempirical meta-generalized gradient approximation and the combination TMTPSS (TMx + TPSSc), with TPSSc being the correlation part of the original TPSS (Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria) to study excitation energies of small molecules and oligomers. Our test set consists of 17 molecules with 134 total excited states, including singlet, triplet, valence, and Rydberg excited states. Our calculation shows that both the TMTPSS and TM functionals yield good overall performance, with mean absolute errors (MAEs) of 0.37 eV and 0.42 eV, respectively, outperforming commonly used semilocal functionals LSDA (MAE = 0.55 eV), PBE (MAE = 0.58 eV), and TPSS (MAE = 0.47 eV). In particular, TMTPSS can yield nearly the same accuracy of B3LYP (MAE = 0.36 eV), with lower computational cost. The accuracy for semilocal density functional theory continues to hold for conjugated oligomers, but they become less accurate than hybrid functionals, due to the insufficient nonlocality.

  8. N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide for detection of iron(III) by photoluminescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Javad; Manteghian, Mehrdad; Badiei, Alireza; Ueda, Hiroshi; Javanbakht, Mehran

    2016-02-01

    An N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide nanolayer was synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Detection of iron(III) based on photoluminescence spectroscopy was investigated. The N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide was shown to specifically interact with iron (III), compared with other cationic trace elements including potassium (I), sodium (I), calcium (II), chromium (III), zinc (II), cobalt (II), copper (II), magnesium (II), manganese (II), and molybdenum (VI). The quenching effect of iron (III) on the luminescence emission of N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide layer was used to detect iron (III). The limit of detection (2.8 × 10(-6)  M) and limit of quantitation (2.9 × 10(-5)  M) were obtained under optimal conditions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Luminescent lanthanide-binding peptides: sensitising the excited states of Eu(III) and Tb(III) with a 1,8-naphthalimide-based antenna.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Célia S; Devocelle, Marc; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2012-01-07

    The investigation into the luminescence properties of a lanthanide-binding peptide, derived from the Ca-binding loop of the parvalbumin, and modified by incorporating a 1,8-naphthalimide (Naph) chromophore at the N-terminus is described. Here, the Naph is used as a sensitising antenna, which can be excited at lower energy than classical aromatic amino acids, such as tryptophan (the dodecapeptide of which was also synthesised and studied herein). The syntheses of the Naph antenna, its solid phase incorporation into the dodecapeptide, and the NMR investigation into the formation of the corresponding lanthanide complexes in solution is presented. We also show that this Naph antenna can be successfully employed to sensitize the excited states of both europium and terbium ions, the results of which was used to determined the stability constants of their formation complexes, and we demonstrated that our peptide 'loop' can selectively bind these lanthanide ions over Ca(II).

  10. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shehryar; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef; Odelius, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H2O)-, Gd(III)DTPA(H2O)2-, and Gd(III)(H2O)83+ in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  11. 78 FR 9802 - Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... requirements to qualify as a Type III supporting organization that is operated in connection with one or more... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG31; 1545-BL38 Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS),...

  12. Ethyne-bridged (porphinato)zinc(II)-(porphinato)iron(III) complexes: phenomenological dependence of excited-state dynamics upon (porphinato)iron electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Timothy V; Wu, Sophia P; Therien, Michael J

    2006-08-16

    We report the synthesis, spectroscopy, potentiometric properties, and excited-state dynamical studies of 5-[(10,20-di-((4-ethyl ester)methylene-oxy)phenyl)porphinato]zinc(II)-[5'-[(10',20'- di-((4-ethyl ester)methylene-oxy)phenyl)porphinato]iron(III)-chloride]ethyne (PZn-PFe-Cl), along with a series of related supermolecules ([PZn-PFe-(L)1,2]+ species) that possess a range of metal axial ligation environments (L = pyridine, 4-cyanopyridine, 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine (collidine), and 2,6-dimethylpyridine (2,6-lutidine)). Relevant monomeric [(porphinato)iron-(ligand)1,2]+ ([PFe(L)1,2]+) benchmarks have also been synthesized and fully characterized. Ultrafast pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopic experiments that interrogate the initially prepared electronically excited states of [PFe(L)1,2]+ species bearing nonhindered axial ligands demonstrated subpicosecond-to-picosecond relaxation dynamics to the ground electronic state. Comparative pump-probe transient absorption experiments that interrogate the initially prepared excited states of PZn-PFe-Cl, [PZn-PFe-(py)2]+, [PZn-PFe-(4-CN-py)2]+, [PZn-PFe-(collidine)]+, and [PZn-PFe-(2,6-lutidine)]+ demonstrate that the spectra of all these species are dominated by a broad, intense NIR S1 --> Sn transient absorption manifold. While PZn-PFe-Cl, [PZn-PFe-(py)2]+, and [PZn-PFe-(4-CN-py)2]+ evince subpicosecond and picosecond time-scale relaxation of their respective initially prepared electronically excited states to the ground state, the excited-state dynamics observed for [PZn-PFe-(2,6-lutidine)]+ and [PZn-PFe-(collidine)]+ show fast relaxation to a [PZn+-PFe(II)] charge-separated state having a lifetime of nearly 1 ns. Potentiometric data indicate that while DeltaGCS for [PZn-PFe-(L)1,2]+ species is strongly influenced by the PFe+ ligation state [ligand (DeltaGCS): 4-cyanopyridine (-0.79 eV) < pyridine (-1.04 eV) < collidine (-1.35 eV) < chloride (-1.40 eV); solvent = CH2Cl2], the pump-probe transient absorption

  13. Prediction of Excitation Energies for Conjugated Oligomers and Polymers from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jianmin; Tretiak, Sergei; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2010-01-01

    With technological advances, light-emitting conjugated oligomers and polymers have become competitive candidates in the commercial market of light-emitting diodes for display and other technologies, due to the ultralow cost, light weight, and flexibility. Prediction of excitation energies of these systems plays a crucial role in the understanding of their optical properties and device design. In this review article, we discuss the calculation of excitation energies with time-dependent density functional theory, which is one of the most successful methods in the investigation of the dynamical response of molecular systems to external perturbation, owing to its high computational efficiency.

  14. Management of pseudo Class III malocclusion--synergistic approach with fixed and functional appliance.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gyan P

    2013-01-01

    Class III malocclusion has been divided into two subtypes: skeletal and pseudo-Class III. A pseudo Class III malocclusion should be treated as early as possible to reduce the functional shift of the mandible and increase maxillary arch length. A case of pseudo-Class III malocclusion was presented here. A 11-year-old boy came with an anterior cross bite, the treatment was done with Fixed appliance (Roth prescription) and Reverse Twin block therapy. This case demonstrated that an anterior cross bite was corrected after 10 months of treatment.

  15. Significant role of level-density parameters in probing nuclear dissipation with light-ion-induced fission excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of the ratio of level-density parameters at saddle to that at ground-state configuration (af/an) on the sensitivity of fission cross sections (σfiss) to presaddle dissipation effects by comparing fission excitation functions measured in the 3He + 197Au (208Pb) reactions with three distinct types of model calculations: the standard Bohr-Wheeler theory with af/an = 1 (i) and af/an ≠ 1 (ii) as well as the Langevin approach with af/an ≠ 1 (iii). It is shown that both cases (i) and (ii) cannot provide a reasonable, satisfactory description of the measured σfiss. A presaddle friction strength (β) of (4-4.5) × 1021 s-1 is extracted through reproducing data with Langevin simulations. We find from the comparison of the experimental and calculated σfiss in cases (ii) and (iii) that a precise determination of β depends sensitively on af/an. The finding indicates that level-density parameters play a significant role in accurately probing presaddle friction; that is, to stringently constrain β it is important to take into account a realistic and an elaborate evaluation of af/an in theoretical calculations. We further find that high energy increases the sensitivity of σfiss to β, suggesting that in experiments, to obtain precise information of presaddle dissipation by measuring σfiss, it is best to populate a compound nucleus with high energy.

  16. Direct measurement of excited-state intervalence transfer in [(tpy)Ru(III)(tppz(*-))Ru(II)(tpy)](4+) by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dattelbaum, Dana M; Hartshorn, Chris M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2002-05-08

    Extension of time-resolved infrared (TRIR) measurements into the near-infrared region has allowed the first direct measurement of a mixed-valence band in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state of a symmetrical ligand-bridged complex. Visible laser flash excitation of [(tpy)Ru(tppz)Ru(tpy)]4+ (tppz is 2,3,5,6-tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine; tpy is 2,2':6',6' '-terpyridine) produces the mixed-valence, MLCT excited state [(tpy)RuIII(tppz*-)RuII(tpy)]4+* with the excited electron localized on the bridging tppz ligand. A mixed-valence band appears at numax = 6300 cm-1 with a bandwidth-at-half- maximum, Deltanu1/2 = 1070 cm-1. In the analogous ground-state complex, [(tpy)Ru(tppz)Ru(tpy)]5+, a mixed-valence band appears at numax = 6550 cm-1 with Deltanu1/2 = 970 cm-1 which allows a comparison to be made of electronic coupling across tppz0 and tppz*- as bridging ligands.

  17. Excitation spectra and wave functions of quasiparticle bound states in bilayer Rashba superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Yoichi; Nagai, Yuki; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Kato, Masaru; Yanase, Youichi

    2015-11-01

    We study the excitation spectra and the wave functions of quasiparticle bound states at a vortex and an edge in bilayer Rashba superconductors under a magnetic field. In particular, we focus on the quasiparticle states at the zero energy in the pair-density wave state in a topologically non-trivial phase. We numerically demonstrate that the quasiparticle wave functions with zero energy are localized at both the edge and the vortex core if the magnetic field exceeds the critical value.

  18. Lanthanide Enhanced Luminescence (LEL) with One and Two Photon Excitation of Quantum Dyes(copyright) Lanthanide(III)-Macrocycles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Quagliano, and L. M. Vallarino, The Addition of a Second Lanthanide Ion to Increase the Luminescence of Europium(IIl) Macrocyclic Complexes ...Increasing the Luminescence of Lanthanide (III) Macrocyclic Complexes , 2002, and United States Patent Application 20020132992, September 19, 2002. 3. J...R. Quagliano, R. C. Leif, L. M. Vallarino, and S. A. Williams, Methods to Increase the Luminescence of Lanthanide (III) Macrocyclic Complexes , Optical

  19. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-12-28

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  20. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J.; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2016-12-01

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  1. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  2. Plasmon excitations in sodium atomic planes: a time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Ji; Xu, Yuehua; Ke, San-Huang

    2012-08-07

    The collective electronic excitation in planar sodium clusters is studied by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The formation and development of the resonances in photoabsorption spectra are investigated in terms of the shape and size of the two-dimensional (2D) systems. The nature of these resonances is revealed by the frequency-resolved induced charge densities present on a real-space grid. For long double chains, the excitation is similar to that in long single atomic chains, showing longitudinal modes, end and central transverse modes. However, for 2D planes consisting of (n × n) atoms with n being up to 16, new 2D characteristic modes emerge regardless of the symmetries considered. For in-plane excitations, besides the equivalent end mode, mixed modes with contrary polarity occur. The relation between the frequency of the primary modes and the system size is similar to the case of a 2D electron gas but with a correction due to the realistic atomic structure. For excitations perpendicular to the plane there are corner, side center, bulk center, and circuit modes. Our calculation reveals the importance of dimensionality for plasmon excitation and how it evolves from 1D to 2D.

  3. Measurement of fusion excitation functions in the system {sup 78}Kr + {sup 100}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Earlier measurements of fusion reactions involving {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo projectiles and Ni-targets showed surprisingly large fusion yields at low energies which could not be explained by coupled-channels calculations. The main difference to similar measurements involving the neighboring {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo isotopes was the different slope of the excitation functions at sub-barrier energies. An analysis of a variety of experiments showed a correlation between the nuclear structure and the slope of the excitation functions, with the {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} transitional nuclei ({sup 78}Kr, {sup 100}Mo) exhibiting shallower slopes than the {open_quotes}stiff{close_quotes} nuclei ({sup 86}Kr, {sup 92}Mo) measured at the same energies with respect to the barrier. In this experiment we studied the fusion excitation function involving two transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr + {sup 100}Mo. The measurements were performed with {sup 78}Kr beams from the ECR source at energies between 285-370 MeV. Separation of the evaporation nucleus from the elastically scattered particles was achieved by measuring time-of-flight and magnetic rigidity in the gas-filled spectrograph. The data were completely analyzed. A comparison of the cross sections with measurements for the system {sup 86}Kr + {sup 92}Mo populating the same compound nucleus {sup 178}Pt. It shows good agreement at the highest energies, but quite different falloffs of the excitation functions toward lower energies. Coupled-channels calculations, including multi-phonon excitation for the two systems, are being performed.

  4. Multiple hydrogen bonding in excited states of aminopyrazine in methanol solution: time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Chai, Shuo; Yu, Jie; Han, Yong-Chang; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Aminopyrazine (AP) and AP-methanol complexes have been theoretically studied by using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The excited-state hydrogen bonds are discussed in detail. In the ground state the intermolecular multiple hydrogen bonds can be formed between AP molecule and protic solvents. The AP monomer and hydrogen-bonded complex of AP with one methanol are photoexcited initially to the S2 state, and then transferred to the S1 state via internal conversion. However the complex of AP with two methanol molecules is directly excited to the S1 state. From the calculated electronic excited energies and simulated absorption spectra, we find that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are strengthened in the electronic excited states. The strengthening is confirmed by the optimized excited-state geometries. The photochemical processes in the electronic excited states are significantly influenced by the excited-state hydrogen bond strengthening.

  5. Synthesis and functionalization of monodisperse near-ultraviolet and visible excitable multifunctional Eu(3+), Bi(3+):REVO4 nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail V; Ashraf, Sumaira; Hartmann, Raimo; Núñez, Nuria O; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-06-16

    Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be tuned by adjusting the amount of PAA. The Eu- Bi-doped REVO4 based nanophosphors show the typical red luminescence of Eu(iii), which can be excited through an energy transfer process from the vanadate anions, resulting in a much higher luminescence intensity in comparison to the direct excitation of the europium cations. The incorporation of Bi into the REVO4 structure shifts the original absorption band of the vanadate anions towards longer wavelengths, giving rise to nanophosphors with an excitation maximum at 342 nm, which can also be excited in the visible range. The suitability of such nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications, as well as their colloidal stability in different buffer media of biological interest, their cytotoxicity, their degradability at low pH, and their uptake by HeLa cells have been evaluated. Their suitability for bioimaging and biosensing applications is also demonstrated.

  6. Impact of Reaction Cross Section on the Unified Description of Fusion Excitation Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basrak, Z.; Eudes, P.; de la Mota, V.; Sébille, F.; Royer, G.

    A systematics of over 300 complete and incomplete fusion cross section data points covering energies beyond the barrier for fusion is presented. Owing to a usual reduction of the fusion cross sections by the total reaction cross sections and an original scaling of energy, a fusion excitation function common to all the data points is established. A universal description of the fusion exci- tation function relying on basic nuclear concepts is proposed and its dependence on the reaction cross section used for the cross section normalization is discussed. The pioneering empirical model proposed by Bass in 1974 to describe the complete fusion cross sections is rather successful for the incomplete fusion too and provides cross section predictions in satisfactory agreement with the observed universality of the fusion excitation function. The sophisticated microscopic transport DYWAN model not only reproduces the data but also predicts that fusion reaction mechanism disappears due to weakened nuclear stopping power around the Fermi energy.

  7. Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scobel, W.; Dohrmann, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Hinterberger, F.; Scobel, W.; Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Büßer, K.; Cloth, P.; Danie, R.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H. P.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P. D.; Felden, O.; Flammer, J.; Gasthuber, M.; Gebel, R.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Hebbel, K.; Hinterberger, F.; Hüskes, T.; Jahn, R.; Koch, I.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjeß, H.; Rosendaal, D.; von Rossen, P.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Steinbeck, S.; Sterzenbach, G.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H. J.; Walker, M.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.; EDDA Collaboration at COSY; EDDA Collaboration

    1998-03-01

    Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic cross sections have been measured in narrow momentum steps Δp = 28 MeV/c in the kinetic energy range from 0.5 to 2.5 GeV and the angular range 35° ≤ Θcm ≤ 90° with a detector providing ΔΘcm ≈ 1.4° resolution and 82% solid angle coverage. Measurements have been performed continuously during projectile acceleration in the Cooler Synchrotron COSY with an internal CH 2 fiber target; background corrections were derived from measurements with a carbon fiber target and from Monte Carlo simulations of inelastic pp contributions. Particular care was taken to monitor the luminosity as a function of beam energy. The results provide excitation functions and angular distributions of unprecedented precision and internal consistency. The measured cross sections are compared to recent phase shift analyses, and their impact on the present solution SM97 [1] is discussed.

  8. Structural and functional analysis of the rat metallothionein III genomic locus.

    PubMed

    Chapman, G A; Kay, J; Kille, P

    1999-06-09

    Metallothionein III (MT III) has been reported to suppress neuronal growth in a rat in vitro model system. The protein and its specific mRNA are detected predominantly in the brain, differentiating MT III from the well-characterised archetypal metallothioneins. Isolation, sequencing and functional analysis of the rat MT III genomic locus indicated that, although the organisation of the gene was conserved between MT III and the more conventional metallothioneins, the 5' flanking region of the MT III gene was distinct. Within this region, a number of putative regulatory elements were identified, including the metal regulatory elements (MREs) characteristic of metallothionein promoters. However, despite their conservation in sequence with active elements, the MREs of MT III were unresponsive to zinc. A 'silencing element' was revealed within a 250 bp section of the MT III promoter which suppressed gene expression in two brain cell lines. The operation of this silencing region in conjunction with the inactive MREs may explain the distinct expression profile observed for MT III within the central nervous system and during neuronal development.

  9. Contributions to the study of optimal biphasic pulse shapes for functional electric stimulation: an analytical approach using the excitation functional.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Antola, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    An analytical approach to threshold problems in functional electric stimulation and pacing is proposed, framed in the concept of excitation functional. This functional can be applied to nerve, muscle and myocardium stimulation by external electrodes. An optimal shape for a biphasic pulse is found, using the criteria of minimum energy dissipated in biological tissues and total charge compensation between the excitatory cathodic and the compensatory anodic phases. The method can be further developed and applied to other threshold problems in functional electric stimulation and pacing.

  10. Deliberate synthetic control over the excited-state properties of cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes with materials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Michael Scott

    Luminescence color tuning is an area of great interest to materials research due to the expanding role of emissive complexes in a variety of optoelectronic and photocatalytic applications. This thesis contains an examination of structure-property relationships with luminescent iridium(III) complexes in order to synthetically control their photophysical and electrochemical properties and to optimize their performance in diverse fields, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photochemical water splitting, and chiroptical materials. A combinatorial approach was developed to accelerate the discovery of useful luminophores, and over 300 heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes have been prepared and characterized for their photophysical properties. Considerable attention has been placed on interpreting the effect of structural modifications at the ligand periphery and will be discussed in the context of tailoring the luminescent behavior of novel materials. An area that has seen tremendous growth throughout the tenure of this work is the field of OLED devices. Single-layer electroluminescent device constructed with an iridium(III) complexes were observed for the first time, and the color of these devices was tuned from yellow (lambdamax = 560 nm) to blue-green (lambdamax = 500 nm) by strategically modifying the iridium(III) luminophore. A computational method for predicting the emission energy of novel materials was also developed and will be discussed. A second field into which this work has endeavored is the area of photoinduced hydrogen production, specifically the design and optimization of iridium(III) photocatalysts for reducing protons to molecular hydrogen. Seven iridium(III) complexes were examined as photosensitizers, and a material expressing a nearly 100-fold increase in its ability to catalyze hydrogen production over Ru(bpy) 32+ is reported. A final extension of this work examined the chiroptical properties of enantiomerically pure iridium(III

  11. Long-range interactions of hydrogen atoms in excited states. III. n S -1 S interactions for n ≥3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, C. M.; Debierre, V.; Jentschura, U. D.

    2017-09-01

    The long-range interaction of excited neutral atoms has a number of interesting and surprising properties such as the prevalence of long-range oscillatory tails and the emergence of numerically large van der Waals C6 coefficients. Furthermore, the energetically quasidegenerate n P states require special attention and lead to mathematical subtleties. Here we analyze the interaction of excited hydrogen atoms in n S states (3 ≤n ≤12 ) with ground-state hydrogen atoms and find that the C6 coefficients roughly grow with the fourth power of the principal quantum number and can reach values in excess of 240 000 (in atomic units) for states with n =12 . The nonretarded van der Waals result is relevant to the distance range R ≪a0/α , where a0 is the Bohr radius and α is the fine-structure constant. The Casimir-Polder range encompasses the interatomic distance range a0/α ≪R ≪ℏ c /L , where L is the Lamb shift energy. In this range, the contribution of quasidegenerate excited n P states remains nonretarded and competes with the 1 /R2 and 1 /R4 tails of the pole terms, which are generated by lower-lying m P states with 2 ≤m ≤n -1 , due to virtual resonant emission. The dominant pole terms are also analyzed in the Lamb shift range R ≫ℏ c /L . The familiar 1 /R7 asymptotics from the usual Casimir-Polder theory is found to be completely irrelevant for the analysis of excited-state interactions. The calculations are carried out to high precision using computer algebra in order to handle a large number of terms in intermediate steps of the calculation for highly excited states.

  12. Intrinsic acidity of aluminum, chromium (III) and iron (III) μ 3-hydroxo functional groups from ab initio electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Dixon, David A.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2000-05-01

    Density functional calculations are performed on M 3(OH) 7(H 2O) 62+ and M 3O(OH) 6(H 2O) 6+ clusters for MAl, Cr(III), and Fe(III), allowing determination of the relative acidities of the μ 3-hydroxo and aquo functional groups. Contrary to previous predictions and rationalizations, Fe 3OH and Al 3OH groups have nearly the same intrinsic acidity, while Cr 3OH groups are significantly more acidic. The gas-phase acidity of the Fe 3OH site is in good agreement with the value predicted by the molecular mechanics model previously used to estimate the relative acidities of surface sites on iron oxides. [ J. R. Rustad et al. (1996)Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 1563]. Acidities of aquo functional groups were also computed for Al and Cr. The AlOH 2 site is more acidic than the Al 3OH site, whereas the Cr 3OH site is more acidic than the CrOH 2 site. These findings predict that the surface charging behavior of chromium oxides/oxyhydroxides should be distinguishable from their Fe, Al counterparts. The calculations also provide insight into why the lepidocrocite/boehmite polymorph is not observed for CrOOH.

  13. Optimal pulse shapes for magnetic stimulation of fibers: An analytical approach using the excitation functional.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Bagnasco, Diego; Armentano-Feijoo, R; Suarez-Antola, R

    2010-01-01

    An analytical approach to threshold problems in functional magnetic stimulation of nerve and skeletal muscle fibers was recently proposed, framed in the concept of excitation functional. Three generations of available equipments for magnetic stimulation are briefly considered, stressing the corresponding pulse shape in the stimulation coils. Using the criterion of minimum energy dissipated in biological tissues, an optimal shape for a current pulse in the coil that produces a just threshold depolarization in a nerve or skeletal muscle fiber is found. The method can be further developed and applied to other threshold problems in functional electric stimulation.

  14. Measurement of excitation functions in alpha induced reactions on natCu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun; Zaman, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2015-09-01

    The excitation functions of 66,67,68Ga, 62,63,65Zn, 61,64Cu, and 58,60Co radionuclides in the natCu(α, x) reaction were measured in the energy range from 15 to 42 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation method at the MC-50 cyclotron of the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The measured results were compared with the literature data as well as the theoretical values obtained from the TENDL-2013 and TENDL-2014 libraries based on the TALYS-1.6 code. The integral yields for thick targets of the produced radionuclides were also determined from the measured excitation functions and the stopping power of natural copper.

  15. The transfer function method for gear system dynamics applied to conventional and minimum excitation gearing designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A transfer function method for predicting the dynamic responses of gear systems with more than one gear mesh is developed and applied to the NASA Lewis four-square gear fatigue test apparatus. Methods for computing bearing-support force spectra and temporal histories of the total force transmitted by a gear mesh, the force transmitted by a single pair of teeth, and the maximum root stress in a single tooth are developed. Dynamic effects arising from other gear meshes in the system are included. A profile modification design method to minimize the vibration excitation arising from a pair of meshing gears is reviewed and extended. Families of tooth loading functions required for such designs are developed and examined for potential excitation of individual tooth vibrations. The profile modification design method is applied to a pair of test gears.

  16. Communication: Excited states, dynamic correlation functions and spectral properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Booth, George H; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2012-11-21

    In this communication, we propose a method for obtaining isolated excited states within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo framework. This method allows for stable sampling with respect to collapse to lower energy states and requires no uncontrolled approximations. In contrast with most previous methods to extract excited state information from quantum Monte Carlo methods, this results from a modification to the underlying propagator, and does not require explicit orthogonalization, analytic continuation, transient estimators, or restriction of the Hilbert space via a trial wavefunction. Furthermore, we show that the propagator can directly yield frequency-domain correlation functions and spectral functions such as the density of states which are difficult to obtain within a traditional quantum Monte Carlo framework. We demonstrate this approach with pilot applications to the neon atom and beryllium dimer.

  17. Measurement of the 208Pb(52Cr, n)259Sg Excitation Function

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C.M.; Dragojevic, I.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Eichler, R.; Garcia, M.A.; Gates, J.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K.E.; Hoffman, D.C.; Nitsche, H.

    2010-03-19

    The excitation function for the 208Pb(52Cr, n)259Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from 259Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the 208Pb(52Cr, 2n)258Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved 258Sg half-life of ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  18. Observation of the long-lived triplet excited state of perylenebisimide (PBI) in C^N cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes and application in photocatalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jifu; Zhong, Fangfang; Zhao, Jianzhang

    2013-07-14

    Perylenebisimide (PBI) was used to prepare C^N cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes that show strong absorption of visible light and it is the first time the long-lived triplet excited state of PBI chromophore was observed in a transition metal complex (τT = 22.3 μs). Previously, the lifetime of the triplet state of PBI in transition metal complexes was usually shorter than 1.0 μs. Long-lived triplet excited states are useful for applications in photocatalysis or other photophysical processes concerning triplet-triplet-energy-transfer. PBI and amino-PBI were used for preparation of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir-2 and Ir-3), in which the PBI chromophore was connected to the coordination center via C≡C π-conjugation bond. The new complexes show strong absorption in visible region (ε = 34,200 M(-1) cm(-1) at 541 nm for Ir-2, and ε = 19,000 at 669 nm for Ir-3), compared to the model complex Ir(ppy)(bpy)[PF6] Ir-1 (ε < 5000 M(-1) cm(-1) in the region beyond 400 nm). The nanosecond time-resolved transient absorption and DFT calculations indicated that PBI-localized long-lived (3)IL states were populated for Ir-2 and Ir-3 upon photoexcitation. The complexes were used as triplet photosensitizers for (1)O2-mediated photooxidation of 1,5-dihydronaphthalene to produce juglone, an important intermediate for preparation of anti-cancer compounds. (1)O2 quantum yields (Φ(Δ)) up to 91% were observed for the new Ir(III) complexes and the overall photosensitizing ability is much higher than the conventional Ir(III) complex Ir-1, which shows the typical weak visible light absorption in visible region. Our results are useful for preparation of transition metal complexes that show strong absorption of visible light and long-lived triplet excited state and for the application of these complexes in photocatalysis.

  19. Synthesis, one- and two-photon photophysical and excited-state properties, and sensing application of a new phosphorescent dinuclear cationic iridium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Juan; Liu, Shu-Juan; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hang; Liang, Hua; Zhao, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2013-01-07

    A new phosphorescent dinuclear cationic iridium(III) complex (Ir1) with a donor-acceptor-π-bridge-acceptor-donor (D-A-π-A-D)-conjugated oligomer (L1) as a N^N ligand and a triarylboron compound as a C^N ligand has been synthesized. The photophysical and excited-state properties of Ir1 and L1 were investigated by UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and molecular-orbital calculations, and they were compared with those of the mononuclear iridium(III) complex [Ir(Bpq)(2)(bpy)](+)PF(6)(-) (Ir0). Compared with Ir0, complex Ir1 shows a more-intense optical-absorption capability, especially in the visible-light region. For example, complex Ir1 shows an intense absorption band that is centered at λ=448 nm with a molar extinction coefficient (ε) of about 10(4) , which is rarely observed for iridium(III) complexes. Complex Ir1 displays highly efficient orange-red phosphorescent emission with an emission wavelength of 606 nm and a quantum efficiency of 0.13 at room temperature. We also investigated the two-photon-absorption properties of complexes Ir0, Ir1, and L1. The free ligand (L1) has a relatively small two-photon absorption cross-section (δ(max) =195 GM), but, when complexed with iridium(III) to afford dinuclear complex Ir1, it exhibits a higher two-photon-absorption cross-section than ligand L1 in the near-infrared region and an intense two-photon-excited phosphorescent emission. The maximum two-photon-absorption cross-section of Ir1 is 481 GM, which is also significantly larger than that of Ir0. In addition, because the strong B-F interaction between the dimesitylboryl groups and F(-) ions interrupts the extended π-conjugation, complex Ir1 can be used as an excellent one- and two-photon-excited "ON-OFF" phosphorescent probe for F(-) ions.

  20. On the calculation of Δ for electronic excitations in time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myneni, Hemanadhan; Casida, Mark E.

    2017-04-01

    Excited states are often treated within the context of time-dependent (TD) density-functional theory (DFT), making it important to be able to assign the excited spin-state symmetry. While there is universal agreement on how Δ , the difference between for ground and excited states, should be calculated in a wave-function-like formalism such as the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA), confusion persists as to how to determine the spin-state symmetry of excited states in TD-DFT. We try to clarify the origins of this confusion by examining various possibilities for the parameters (σ1 ,σ2) in the formula

  1. Two-photon excitation of porphyrin-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Secret, Emilie; Maynadier, Marie; Gallud, Audrey; Chaix, Arnaud; Bouffard, Elise; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Marcotte, Nathalie; Mongin, Olivier; El Cheikh, Khaled; Hugues, Vincent; Auffan, Mélanie; Frochot, Céline; Morère, Alain; Maillard, Philippe; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Sailor, Michael J; Garcia, Marcel; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Cunin, Frédérique

    2014-12-03

    Porous silicon nanoparticles (pSiNPs) act as a sensitizer for the 2-photon excitation of a pendant porphyrin using NIR laser light, for imaging and photodynamic therapy. Mannose-functionalized pSiNPs can be vectorized to MCF-7 human breast cancer cells through a mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism to provide a 3-fold enhancement of the 2-photon PDT effect.

  2. Gravimetric polar motion excitation functions from different series of gravimetric coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Jolanta; Książek, Elżbieta

    2014-05-01

    Since its lunch in February, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has been source of data of temporal changes in Earth's gravity field. These gravity fields can be used to determine the changing mass field of the Earth caused by redistribution of the geophysical fluids, and from that excitations of polar motion. The so-called Level 2 gravity field product are available, in the form of changes in the coefficients: Cnm Snm Since 2002 until the present time there are still attempts to better process these data. In this study we estimate gravimetric excitation of polar motion using a recent series of C21, S21 coefficient. In our calculations we use several series developed by nine centers. Firstly, we compare these gravimetric functions with each other. Then we examine the compatibility of these functions with hydrological signal in observed geodetic excitation function. We focus on seasonal and subseasonal time scales. The main purpose is to explore which from these several solutions are closed to observation.

  3. Influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function in low-pressure microwave argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Cotrino, J.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2005-07-01

    In this work the influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function has been determined for an argon microwave discharge at low pressure. A collisional-radiative model of argon has been developed taking into account the most recent experimental and theoretical values of argon-electron-impact excitation cross sections. The model has been solved along with the electron Boltzmann equation in order to study the influence of the inelastic collisions from the argon excited states on the electron-energy distribution function. Results show that under certain conditions the excited states can play an important role in determining the shape of the distribution function and the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, deplecting the high-energy tail due to inelastic processes from the excited states, especially from the 4s excited configuration. It has been found that from the populations of the excited states an excitation temperature can be defined. This excitation temperature, which can be experimentally determined by optical emission spectroscopy, is lower than the electron kinetic temperature obtained from the electron-energy distribution function.

  4. Two isoforms of human RNA polymerase III with specific functions in cell growth and transformation

    PubMed Central

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Da Silva, Daniel; Rey, Christophe; Prochazkova, Martina; Roeder, Robert G.; Besser, Daniel; Teichmann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic nuclei is carried out by DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Human RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribes small untranslated RNAs that include tRNAs, 5S RNA, U6 RNA, and some microRNAs. Increased Pol III transcription has been reported to accompany or cause cell transformation. Here we describe a Pol III subunit (RPC32β) that led to the demonstration of two human Pol III isoforms (Pol IIIα and Pol IIIβ). RPC32β-containing Pol IIIβ is ubiquitously expressed and essential for growth of human cells. RPC32α-containing Pol IIIα is dispensable for cell survival, with expression being restricted to undifferentiated ES cells and to tumor cells. In this regard, and most importantly, suppression of RPC32α expression impedes anchorage-independent growth of HeLa cells, whereas ectopic expression of RPC32α in IMR90 fibroblasts enhances cell transformation and dramatically changes the expression of several tumor-related mRNAs and that of a subset of Pol III RNAs. These results identify a human Pol III isoform and isoform-specific functions in the regulation of cell growth and transformation. PMID:20154270

  5. Obstruction of Photoinduced Electron Transfer from Excited Porphyrin to Graphene Oxide: A Fluorescence Turn-On Sensing Platform for Iron (III) Ions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong De; Zhao, Heng Xin; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2012-01-01

    A comparative reaserch of the assembly of different porphyrin molecules on graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was carried out, respectively. Despite the cationic porphyrin molecules can be assembled onto the surfaces of graphene sheets, including GO and RGO, to form complexes through electrostatic and π-π stacking interactions, the more obvious fluorescence quenching and the larger red-shift of the Soret band of porphyrin molecule in RGO-bound states were observed than those in GO-bound states, due to the differenc of molecular flattening in degree. Further, more interesting finding was that the complexes formed between cationic porphyrin and GO, rather than RGO sheets, can facilitate the incorporation of iron (III) ions into the porphyrin moieties, due to the presence of the oxygen-contained groups at the basal plane of GO sheets served as auxiliary coordination units, which can high-efficiently obstruct the electron transfer from excited porphyrin to GO sheets and result in the occurrence of fluorescence restoration. Thus, a fluorescence sensing platform has been developed for iron (III) ions detection in this contribution by using the porphyrin/GO nanohybrids as an optical probe, and our present one exhibited rapid and sensitive responses and high selectivity toward iron (III) ions. PMID:23251366

  6. α-synuclein and synapsin III cooperatively regulate synaptic function in dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Zaltieri, Michela; Grigoletto, Jessica; Longhena, Francesca; Navarria, Laura; Favero, Gaia; Castrezzati, Stefania; Colivicchi, Maria Alessandra; Della Corte, Laura; Rezzani, Rita; Pizzi, Marina; Benfenati, Fabio; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Missale, Cristina; Spano, PierFranco; Bellucci, Arianna

    2015-07-01

    The main neuropathological features of Parkinson's disease are dopaminergic nigrostriatal neuron degeneration, and intraneuronal and intraneuritic proteinaceous inclusions named Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, respectively, which mainly contain α-synuclein (α-syn, also known as SNCA). The neuronal phosphoprotein synapsin III (also known as SYN3), is a pivotal regulator of dopamine neuron synaptic function. Here, we show that α-syn interacts with and modulates synapsin III. The absence of α-syn causes a selective increase and redistribution of synapsin III, and changes the organization of synaptic vesicle pools in dopamine neurons. In α-syn-null mice, the alterations of synapsin III induce an increased locomotor response to the stimulation of synapsin-dependent dopamine overflow, despite this, these mice show decreased basal and depolarization-dependent striatal dopamine release. Of note, synapsin III seems to be involved in α-syn aggregation, which also coaxes its increase and redistribution. Furthermore, synapsin III accumulates in the caudate and putamen of individuals with Parkinson's disease. These findings support a reciprocal modulatory interaction of α-syn and synapsin III in the regulation of dopamine neuron synaptic function. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Dipolar Excitations at the L{sub III} X-Ray Absorption Edges of the Heavy Rare-Earth Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S. D.; Bouchenoire, L.; Thompson, P. B. J.; Mannix, D.; Strange, P.; Zarychta, B.; Stockton, S. J.; Horne, M.; Arola, E.; Ebert, H.; Fort, D.

    2007-12-14

    We report measured dipolar asymmetry ratios at the L{sub III} edges of the heavy rare-earth metals. The results are compared with a first-principles calculation and excellent agreement is found. A simple model of the scattering is developed, enabling us to reinterpret the resonant x-ray scattering in these materials and to identify the peaks in the asymmetry ratios with features in the spin and orbital moment densities.

  8. Functional repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increases motor cortex excitability in survivors of stroke.

    PubMed

    Massie, Crystal L; Tracy, Brian L; Malcolm, Matthew P

    2013-02-01

    To determine if repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the motor cortex with simultaneous voluntary muscle activation, termed functional-rTMS, will promote greater neuronal excitability changes and neural plasticity than passive-rTMS in survivors of stroke. Eighteen stroke survivors were randomized into functional-rTMS (EMG-triggered rTMS) or passive-rTMS (rTMS only; control) conditions. Measures of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF), force steadiness (coefficient of variation, CV) at 10% of maximum voluntary contraction, and pinch task muscle activity were assessed before and after rTMS. Functional-rTMS required subjects to exceed a muscle activation threshold to trigger each rTMS train; the passive-rTMS group received rTMS while relaxed. Significant interactions (time × condition) were observed in abductor pollicis brevis (APB) SICI, APB ICF, CV of force, and APB muscle activity. Functional-rTMS decreased APB SICI (p < 0.05) and increased ICF (p < 0.05) after stimulation, whereas passive-rTMS decreased APB muscle activity (p < 0.01) and decreased CV of force (p < 0.05). No changes were observed in FDI measures (EMG, ICF, SICI). Functional-rTMS increased motor cortex excitability, i.e., less SICI and more ICF for the APB muscle. Passive stimulation significantly reduced APB muscle activity and improved steadiness. Functional-rTMS promoted greater excitability changes and selectively modulated agonist muscle activity. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Excited-State N2 Dissociation Pathway on Fe-Functionalized Au.

    PubMed

    Martirez, John Mark P; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-20

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) offer the possibility of light-activated chemical catalysis on surfaces of strongly plasmonic metal nanoparticles. This technology relies on lower-barrier bond formation and/or dissociation routes made available through energy transfer following the eventual decay of LSPRs. The coupling between these decay processes and a chemical trajectory (nuclear motion, charge-transfer, intersystem crossing, etc.) dictates the availability of these alternative (possibly lower barrier) excited-state channels. The Haber-Bosch method of NH3 synthesis from N2 and H2 is notoriously energy intensive. This is due to the difficulty of N2 dissociation despite the overall reaction being thermodynamically favorable at ambient temperatures and pressures. LSPRs may provide means to improve the kinetics of N2 dissociation via induced resonance electronic excitation. In this work, we calculate, via embedded n-electron valence second-order perturbation theory within the density functional embedding theory, the excited-state potential energy surfaces for dissociation of N2 on an Fe-doped Au(111) surface. This metal alloy may take advantage simultaneously of the strong LSPR of Au and the catalytic activity of Fe toward N2 dissociation. We find the ground-state dissociation activation energy to be 4.74 eV/N2, with Fe as the active site on the surface. Consecutive resonance energy transfers (RETs) may be accessed due to the availability of many electronically excited states with intermediate energies arising from the metal surface that may couple to states induced by the Fe-dopant and the adsorbate molecule, and crossing between excited states may effectively lower the dissociation barrier to 1.33 eV. Our work illustrates that large energetic barriers, prohibitive toward chemical reaction, may be overcome through multiple RETs facilitating an otherwise difficult chemical process.

  10. Synthesis of oxindole from acetanilide via Ir(iii)-catalyzed C-H carbenoid functionalization.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pitambar; Borah, Gongutri

    2016-12-22

    Herein we disclose the first report on the synthesis of oxindole derivatives from acetanilide via Ir(iii)-catalyzed intermolecular C-H functionalization with diazotized Meldrum's acid. A broad range of substituted anilides were found to react smoothly under the Ir(iii)-catalytic system to afford the corresponding N-protected oxindoles. The N-protecting groups, such as Ac, Bz or Piv, can be easily removed to furnish the oxindole. Various synthetic applications of the synthesized oxindole were also demonstrated.

  11. Latent Class Analysis of Differential Item Functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Mi-young Lee; Cohen, Allan S.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of latent class analysis for the detection of differences in item functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third Edition (PPVT-III). A two-class solution for a latent class model appeared to be defined in part by ability because Class 1 was lower in ability than Class 2 on both the PPVT-III and the…

  12. An Amine‐Functionalized Iron(III) Metal–Organic Framework as Efficient Visible‐Light Photocatalyst for Cr(VI) Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Li; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Huabin; Chang, Kun; Meng, Xianguang; Liu, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    The photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) is investigated over iron(III)‐based metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) structured as MIL‐88B. It is found that MIL‐88B (Fe) MOFs, containing Fe3‐μ3‐oxo clusters, can be used as photocatalyst for the reduction of Cr(VI) under visible light irradiation, which is due to the direct excitation of Fe3‐μ3‐oxo clusters. The amine‐functionalized MIL‐88B (Fe) MOFs (denoted as NH2–MIL‐88B (Fe)) shows much higher efficiency for the photocatalytic Cr(VI) reduction under visible‐light irradiation compared with MIL‐88B (Fe). It is revealed that in addition to the direct excitation of Fe3‐μ3‐oxo clusters, the amine functionality in NH2–MIL‐88B (Fe) can also be excited and then transferred an electron to Fe3‐μ3‐oxo clusters, which is responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity for Cr(VI) reduction. The enhanced photocatalytic activity for Cr(VI) reduction is also achieved for other two amine‐functionalized iron(III)‐based MOFs (NH2–MIL‐53 (Fe) and NH2–MIL‐101 (Fe)). PMID:27980927

  13. Structural damage detection using auto correlation functions of vibration response under sinusoidal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger; Markert, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Structural damage detection using time domain vibration responses has attracted more and more researchers in recent years because of its simplicity in calculation and no requirement of a finite element model. This paper proposes a new approach to locate the damage using the auto correlation function of vibration response signals under sinusoidal excitation from different measurement points of the structure, based on which a vector named Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector (AMV) is formulated. A sensitivity analysis of the normalized AMV with respect to the local stiffness shows that under several specific frequency excitations, the normalized AMV has a sharp change around the local stiffness change location, which means that even when the damage is very small, the normalized AMV is a good indicator for the damage. In order to locate the damage, a damage index is defined as the relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage. Several example cases in stiffness reduction detection of a frame structure valid the results of the sensitivity analysis, demonstrate the efficiency of the normalized AMV in damage localization and the effect of the excitation frequency on its detectability.

  14. Measurement of the fusion excitation function for 19O + 12C at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Steinbach, T. K.; Vadas, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; Desouza, R. T.; Baby, L. T.; Tripathi, V.; Kuvin, S. A.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei in the outer crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as responsible for triggering X-ray super-bursts. The underlying hypothesis in this proposition is that the fusion of neutron-rich nuclei is enhanced as compared to stable nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis, an experiment has been performed to measure the fusion excitation function for 18O and 19O nuclei incident on a 12C target. A beam of 19O was produced by the 18O(d,p) reaction at Florida State University and separated using the RESOLUT mass spectrometer. The resulting 19O beam bombarded a 100 μg/cm2 12C target at an intensity of 2-4 × 103 p/s. Evaporation residues resulting from the de-excitation of the fusion product were distinguished by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. Using silicon detectors, micro-channel plate detectors, and an ionization chamber, evaporation residues were detected in the angular range θlab <= 23° with high efficiency. Initial experimental results including measurement of the fusion cross-section to approximately the 100 mb level will be presented. The measured excitation function will be compared to theoretical predictions. Supported by the US DOE under Grand No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  15. A closer look at the apparent correlation of structural and functional connectivity in excitable neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messé, Arnaud; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; König, Peter; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the structural connectivity (SC) and functional connectivity (FC) of neural systems is a central focus in brain network science. It is an open question, however, how strongly the SC-FC relationship depends on specific topological features of brain networks or the models used for describing excitable dynamics. Using a basic model of discrete excitable units that follow a susceptible - excited - refractory dynamic cycle (SER model), we here analyze how functional connectivity is shaped by the topological features of a neural network, in particular its modularity. We compared the results obtained by the SER model with corresponding simulations by another well established dynamic mechanism, the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, in order to explore general features of the SC-FC relationship. We showed that apparent discrepancies between the results produced by the two models can be resolved by adjusting the time window of integration of co-activations from which the FC is derived, providing a clearer distinction between co-activations and sequential activations. Thus, network modularity appears as an important factor shaping the FC-SC relationship across different dynamic models.

  16. Jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra and carbonyl wagging potential energy functions of several cyclic ketones in their S 1(n, π*) electronic excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chiang, W. Y.; Sagear, P.; Laane, J.

    1992-08-01

    The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra of the n→π* transitions of cyclopentanone, 3-cyclopenten-1-one, and cyclobutanone have been analyzed to determine the vibrational energy spacings in the S 1(n, π*) electronic excited states for the out-of-plane carbonyl wagging motions. A double-minimum potential energy function was determined for each and the barriers were found to be 680, 926, and 1940 cm -1, respectively. The carbonyl wagging angles were determined to be 22°, 26°, and 41°, respectively.

  17. Calibration of excitation function measurement based on corona cage test results.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Wen, Xishan; Li, Wei; Xiao, Guozhou

    2016-11-01

    Corona cage approaches are crucial for research on the corona characteristics of conductors. Calibration is an indispensable task for determining excitation functions, which are used to predict corona performance of long transmission lines through extrapolation from measurements of short lines in corona cages. In this paper, the amplification factor G is calculated through a frequently adopted method, propagation analysis of high-frequency corona current along a short line. Another convenient calibration method, based on distributed parameter equivalent circuits, is established. The results for G obtained through propagation analysis and equivalent circuits are compared. To verify the rationality of calculation parameters in propagation analysis and equivalent circuits, a calibration experiment based on the excitation caused by a simulated monopulse current was performed. The results of the proposed calibration method and the calibration experiment are in good agreement.

  18. Fusion excitation function measurement for 6Li+64Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin Shaikh, Md.; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Shrivastav, A.

    2015-01-01

    Total fusion excitation function has been measured for the reaction of weakly bound 6Li projectile on medium mass 64Ni target at energies near the Coulomb barrier of the system. Online characteristic γ-ray detection method has been used to identify and determine the cross sections of the residues. No suppression of total fusion cross section (σTF) is observed at above barrier energies. But enhancement of measured cross section with respect to the one-dimensional barrier penetration model (1-DBPM) calculation is observed at below barrier energies. The enhancement can not be explained by coupled channels calculation with dominant projectile and target excitations as well as one-neutron stripping reaction.

  19. Measurement of fusion excitation function for 7Li+64Ni near the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin Shaikh, Md.; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Shrivastava, A.; Saha, S.; Pillay, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    Total fusion (TF) excitation function has been measured for the system 7Li + 64Ni at the energies near the Coulomb barrier of the system. The evaporation residue (ER) cross sections have been estimated through the online detection of characteristic γ-rays of the ERs. The summed ER cross sections yielding the experimental TF cross section have been compared with the theoretical one dimensional barrier penetration model (1DBPM) prediction. The measured and the model cross sections are very close to each other at above barrier energies. However, an enhancement of the experimental TF cross section with respect to the 1DBPM prediction is observed at below barrier energies. Coupled channels (CC) calculation with inelastic excitations alone could not explain the enhancement. The origin of the enhancement is identified as due to the enhanced population of the αxn channels.

  20. Excited states of boron isoelectronic series from explicitly correlated wave functions.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, F J; Buendía, E; Sarsa, A

    2005-04-15

    The ground state and some low-lying excited states arising from the 1s2 2s2p2 configuration of the boron isoelectronic series are studied starting from explicitly correlated multideterminant wave functions. One- and two-body densities in position space have been calculated and different expectation values such as , , , , , and , where r, r12, and R stand for the electron-nucleus, interelectronic, and two electron center of mass coordinates, respectively, have been obtained. The energetic ordering of the excited states and the fulfillment of the Hund's rules is analyzed systematically along the isoelectronic series in terms of the electron-electron and electron-nucleus potential energies. The effects of electronic correlations have been systematically studied by comparing the correlated results with the corresponding noncorrelated ones. All the calculations have been done by using the variational Monte Carlo method.

  1. Charge-Transfer Excited States in Aqueous DNA: Insights from Many-Body Green's Function Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Huabing; Ma, Yuchen; Mu, Jinglin; Liu, Chengbu; Rohlfing, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) excited states play an important role in the excited-state dynamics of DNA in aqueous solution. However, there is still much controversy on their energies. By ab initio many-body Green's function theory, together with classical molecular dynamics simulations, we confirm the existence of CT states at the lower energy side of the optical absorption maximum in aqueous DNA as observed in experiments. We find that the hydration shell can exert strong effects (˜1 eV) on both the electronic structure and CT states of DNA molecules through dipole electric fields. In this case, the solvent cannot be simply regarded as a macroscopic screening medium as usual. The influence of base stacking and base pairing on the CT states is also discussed.

  2. Excitation energy-transfer in functionalized nanoparticles: Going beyond the Förster approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, G.; Corni, S.; Delgado, A.; Bertoni, A.; Goldoni, G.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a novel approach to treat excitation energy transfer in hybrid nanosystems composed by an organic molecule attached to a semiconductor nanoparticle. Our approach extends the customary Förster theory by considering interaction between transition multipole moments of the nanoparticle at all orders and a point-like transition dipole moment representing the molecule. Optical excitations of the nanoparticle are described through an envelope-function configuration interaction method for a single electron-hole pair. We applied the method to the prototypical case of a core/shell CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dot which shows a complete suppression of the energy transfer for specific transitions which could not be captured by Förster theory.

  3. Excitability of spinal neural function during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Bunno, Yoshibumi; Onigata, Chieko; Tani, Makiko; Uragami, Sayuri; Yoshida, Sohei

    2014-01-01

    the median nerve at the wrist in subjects during two motor imagery conditions: holding and not holding the sensor of a pinch meter between the thumb and index finger. Our aim was to determine whether mental simulation without the muscle contraction associated with motion can increase the excitability of spinal neural function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). F-waves of the left thenar muscles were examined in 10 patients with PD under resting, holding and motor imagery conditions. For the holding condition, the subjects held the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger. For the motor imagery conditions, the subjects were asked to imagine a 50% maximal voluntary isometric contraction holding and not holding the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger (motor imagery "with"/"without sensor"). Persistence during motor imagery under the "with sensor" condition increased significantly compared with persistence during resting (n=10, z=2.2509, p=0.0244, Wilcoxon test). The F/M amplitude ratio during motor imagery under the "with sensor" condition increased significantly compared with that during resting (n=10, z=2.1915, p=0.0284, Wilcoxon test). Excitability of spinal neural function during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease Motor imagery under the "with the sensor" condition increased excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles. Because excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles during motor imagery "with the sensor" was significantly higher than that during resting, we suggest that movement preparation for a motor imagery task is important in patients with PD.

  4. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Kullie, Ossama E-mail: ossama.kullie@unistra.fr

    2014-01-14

    In previous works on Zn{sub 2} and Cd{sub 2} dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s{sup 2} + 6s6p), (6s{sup 2} + 6s7s), and (6s{sup 2} + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg{sub 2}. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg{sub 2} including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd{sub 2}, and Zn{sub 2}, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg{sub 2}.

  5. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  6. Semiclassical and quantum mechanical analysis of the excitation function for the 130Te(p,n)130I reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musthafa, M. M.; Singh, B. P.; Sankaracharyulu, M. G. V.; Bhardwaj, H. D.; Prasad, R.

    1995-12-01

    We report excitation function for the reaction 130Te(p,n)130I in the energy range ~=4-18 MeV. The measurements were done employing stacked foil activation technique and enriched isotope. To the best of our knowledge this excitation function has been reported for the first time. The theoretical analysis of the excitation function has been done employing both the semiclassical as well as quantum mechanical descriptions of the preequilibrium emission. In general, theoretical calculations agree well with the experimental data.

  7. Beyond Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Using Only Single Excitations: Methods for Computational Studies of Excited States in Complex Systems.

    PubMed

    Herbert, John M; Zhang, Xing; Morrison, Adrian F; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-17

    Single-excitation methods, namely, configuration interaction singles and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), along with semiempirical versions thereof, represent the most computationally affordable electronic structure methods for describing electronically excited states, scaling as [Formula: see text] absent further approximations. This relatively low cost, combined with a treatment of electron correlation, has made TDDFT the most widely used excited-state quantum chemistry method over the past 20+ years. Nevertheless, certain inherent problems (beyond just the accuracy of this or that exchange-correlation functional) limit the utility of traditional TDDFT. For one, it affords potential energy surfaces whose topology is incorrect in the vicinity of any conical intersection (CI) that involves the ground state. Since CIs are the conduits for transitions between electronic states, the TDDFT description of photochemistry (internal conversion and intersystem crossing) is therefore suspect. Second, the [Formula: see text] cost can become prohibitive in large systems, especially those that involve multiple electronically coupled chromophores, for example, the antennae structures of light-harvesting complexes or the conjugated polymers used in organic photovoltaics. In such cases, the smallest realistic mimics might already be quite large from the standpoint of ab initio quantum chemistry. This Account describes several new computational methods that address these problems. Topology around a CI can be rigorously corrected using a "spin-flip" version of TDDFT, which involves an α → β spin-flipping transition in addition to occupied → virtual excitation of one electron. Within this formalism, singlet states are generated via excitation from a high-spin triplet reference state, doublets from a quartet, etc. This provides a more balanced treatment of electron correlation between ground and excited states. Spin contamination is problematic away from the

  8. Fully first-principles sX-LDA calculations of excited states and optical properties of III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyon Rhim, Sung; Kim, Miyoung; Freeman, A. J.

    2004-03-01

    III-V semiconductors are important for their extensive applications as optical devices such as laser diodes and infrared sensors. Optical properties, [ɛ_2(ω), n, k, R, and α], of III-V semiconductors (InAs, InSb, GaSb, and AlSb), are investigated using our highly precise full-potential linearized augmented plane wave(E.Wimmer,H.Krakauer, M.Weinert, A.J.Freeman, PRB,24), 864 (1981)(FLAPW) method with the screened-exchange local density approximation( R.Asahi,W.Mannstadt, A.J.Freeman,PRB,59), 7486 (1999)(sX-LDA) solved self-consistently and with spin-orbit coupling included. The imaginary part of the dielectric constant, ɛ_2(ω) is calculated using the longitudinal expression with full e^iqotr matrix elements, due to the nonlocality of the potential in the sX-LDA method(R.Del Sole, R.Girlanda, PRB 48), 11789 (1993). The structure of the ɛ_2(ω)'s are analyzed with band structures and consideration of interband transitions. The result shows good agreement of the peak positions in ɛ_2(ω) with experiment( D.E.Aspnes,A.A.Studna, PRB 27), 985 (1983) .

  9. The unique regulation and functions of type III interferons in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Odendall, Charlotte; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2015-06-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) were long considered to be the sole IFN species produced by virus-infected cells until the discovery of type III IFNs (IFNλs), decades later. Like type I IFNs, type III IFNs are induced by and protect against viral infections, leading to the initial conclusion that the two IFN species are identical in regulation and biological functions. However, the two systems differ in the tissue expression of their receptor, resulting in different roles in vivo. The unique nature of IFNλs has been further demonstrated by recent studies revealing differences in the regulation of type I and III IFN expression, and how these proteins elicit specific cellular responses. This review focuses on the distinctive features of type III IFNs in antiviral innate immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Enantioselective excited-state quenching of racemic Tb (III) and Eu (III) Tris (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate) by vitamin B 12 derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Dekkers, Harry P. J. M.

    1999-08-01

    Enantioselectivity in the dynamic quenching of the luminescence of the Δ and Λ enantiomers of racemic Tb(III)(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate=DPA) 33- and Eu(DPA) 33- by a series of corrinoids is demonstrated by time resolved luminescence and circular-polarization-of-luminescence (CPL) spectroscopy. Studied are cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12), aquacobalamin (B 12a) and its conjugated base hydroxocobalamin (HOCbl), dicyanocobinamide ((CN) 2Cbi) and the heptamethyl ester of dicyanocobyrinic acid ((CN) 2Cby(OMe) 7). For this set of quenchers (Q), the diastereomeric quenching rate constants ( kqΔ and kqΛ) are reported together with the degree of enantioselectivity Eq=( kqΔ- kqΛ)/( kqΔ+ kqΛ). In the systems with Tb, values of the average rate constant kqavg(=( kqΔ+ kqΛ)/2) are 1.0, 2.9 and 0.53 10 8 M -1 s -1 for CNCbl, (CN) 2Cbi, (CN) 2Cby(OMe) 7 with Eq=-0.24, -0.20, +0.01 (standard error of Eq is 0.01). The quenching by B 12a is strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength ( I); when I=12 mM we find kqavg=5.3, Eq=-0.23 at pH 6.7 and kqavg=1.3, Eq=-0.27 at pH 8.9. Corresponding rates for Eu are 0.41, 27, 3.4 10 7 M -1 s -1 and for B 12a, 7.3 and 1.2 10 7 M -1 s -1, corresponding values for Eq -0.27, -0.29, +0.02, -0.21 and -0.29. The quenching reaction is modeled as a pre-equilibrium involving the formation of an encounter complex (association constant K) followed by the actual electronic energy transfer step (rate ket). By relating the quenching data with molecular structure it is argued that the binding in the encounter complex involves two hydrogen bonds between the uncoordinated carboxylate oxygen atom of two DPA ligands of Ln(DPA) 33- and two amide groups of the corrinoid, presumably involving the a and g, the a and b, or the b and g side chains. For some corrinoid/Ln(DPA) 33- complexes the association constants and enantioselectivities in the ground state are known (Spectrochimica Acta 55A (1999) 1837-1855), which allows for an estimate of the average rate of

  11. Cat hindlimb motoneurons during locomotion. III. Functional segregation in sartorius.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, J A; Loeb, G E; Sugano, N; Marks, W B; O'Donovan, M J; Pratt, C A

    1987-02-01

    Cat sartorius has two distinct anatomical portions, anterior (SA-a) and medial (SA-m). SA-a acts to extend the knee and also to flex the hip. SA-m acts to flex both the knee and the hip. The objective of this study was to investigate how a "single motoneuron pool" is used to control at least three separate functions mediated by the two anatomical portions of one muscle. Discharge patterns of single motoneurons projecting to the sartorius muscle were recorded using floating microelectrodes implanted in the L5 ventral root of cats. The electromyographic activity generated by the anterior and medial portions of sartorius was recorded with chronically implanted electrodes. The muscle portion innervated by each motoneuron was determined by spike-triggered averaging of the EMGs during walking on a motorized treadmill. During normal locomotion, SA-a exhibited two bursts of EMG activity per step cycle, one during the stance phase and one during the late swing phase. In contrast, every recorded motoneuron projecting to SA-a discharged a single burst of action potentials per step cycle. Some SA-a motoneurons discharged only during the stance phase, whereas other motoneurons discharged only during the late swing phase. In all cases, the instantaneous frequencygram of the motoneuron was well fit by the rectified smoothed EMG envelope generated by SA-a during the appropriate phase of the step cycle. During normal locomotion, SA-m exhibited a single burst of EMG activity per step cycle, during the swing phase. The temporal characteristics of the EMG bursts recorded from SA-m differed from the swing-phase EMG bursts generated by SA-a.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Charge asymmetry in rovibrationally excited HD{sup +} determined using explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kirnosov, Nikita; Sharkey, Keeper L.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-11-28

    Very accurate non-Born-Oppenheimer quantum-mechanical calculations are performed to determine the average values of the interparticle distances and the proton-deuteron density function for the rovibrationally excited HD{sup +} ion. The states corresponding to excitations to all bound vibrational states (v = 0, …, 22) and simultaneously excited to the first excited rotational state (N = 1) are considered. To describe each state up to 8000 explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions are used. The nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians are variationally optimized using a procedure that employs the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The results show an increasing asymmetry in the electron distribution with the vibrational excitation as the electron density shifts towards deuteron and away from the proton.

  13. Excitation Functions and Yields for RE-186G Production by Proton Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, E.; Bonardi, M. L.; Groppi, F.; Zona, C.; Canella, L.; Manenti, S.; Marchetti, M.; Abbas, K.; Holzwarth, U.; Simonelli, F.

    2008-06-01

    Excitation functions and yields for the 181-186Re radionuclides were measured by the activation method on natural tungsten foils for the proton energies up to 17 MeV. A new data sets have been given for the investigated radionuclides. These results are compared both with the experimental literature values and the ones calculated by EMPIRE II code (version 2.19). In particular, the attention is focused on Re-186g due to its remarkable applications in Nuclear Medicine for metabolic radiotherapy of tumours.

  14. Excitation Function for the 74Se(18O,p3n) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Jacklyn; Dragojevic, Irena; Dvorak, Jan; Ellison, Paul; Gregorich, Kenneth; Stavsetra, Liv; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-02-02

    The 74Se(18O,p3n)88gNb excitation function was measured and a maximum cross section of 495+-5 mb was observed at and 18O energy of 74.0 MeV. Experimental cross sections were compared to theoretical calculations using the computer code ALICE-91 and the values were found to be in good agreement. The half life of 88gNb was determined to be around 14.56+-0.11 min.

  15. Finding Limit Cycles in self-excited oscillators with infinite-series damping functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debapriya; Banerjee, Dhruba; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a simple method for finding the location of limit cycles of self excited oscillators whose damping functions can be represented by some infinite convergent series. We have used standard results of first-order perturbation theory to arrive at amplitude equations. The approach has been kept pedagogic by first working out the cases of finite polynomials using elementary algebra. Then the method has been extended to various infinite polynomials, where the fixed points of the corresponding amplitude equations cannot be found out. Hopf bifurcations for systems with nonlinear powers in velocities have also been discussed.

  16. A search for parameters of universal sub-barrier fusion excitation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Wolski, R.

    2016-11-01

    Many fusion experimental data have been analyzed in terms of a simple universal function which could be used for predictions of fusion cross section below the barrier for arbitrary systems. Sub-barrier fusions based on the concept of Q -fusion value dependence were studied. It is attempted to parameterize the energy-reduced fusion excitation functions around the Coulomb barriers by an analytical phenomenological function. It was found that the speed of driving nuclei towards fusion is faster with the increase of mass asymmetry of colliding systems and those systems with a large difference of the ratio of neutrons to protons. However, a general trend with respect to total mass has not been observed. An exposition of more qualitative conclusions is hindered by apparent inconsistencies of measured fusion cross sections.

  17. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-05-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance.

  18. Neuropeptides Function in a Homeostatic Manner to Modulate Excitation-Inhibition Imbalance in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance. PMID:23658528

  19. Synthesis and functionalization of monodisperse near-ultraviolet and visible excitable multifunctional Eu3+, Bi3+:REVO4 nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail V.; Ashraf, Sumaira; Hartmann, Raimo; Núñez, Nuria O.; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2016-06-01

    Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be tuned by adjusting the amount of PAA. The Eu- Bi-doped REVO4 based nanophosphors show the typical red luminescence of Eu(iii), which can be excited through an energy transfer process from the vanadate anions, resulting in a much higher luminescence intensity in comparison to the direct excitation of the europium cations. The incorporation of Bi into the REVO4 structure shifts the original absorption band of the vanadate anions towards longer wavelengths, giving rise to nanophosphors with an excitation maximum at 342 nm, which can also be excited in the visible range. The suitability of such nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications, as well as their colloidal stability in different buffer media of biological interest, their cytotoxicity, their degradability at low pH, and their uptake by HeLa cells have been evaluated. Their suitability for bioimaging and biosensing applications is also demonstrated.Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be

  20. Isomeric yield ratios and excitation functions in α-induced reactions on 107,109Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, R.; Saha, S. K.; Prakash, Satya; Uhl, M.

    1992-07-01

    Isomeric yield ratios for the reactions 107Ag(α,3n)108In, 107Ag(α,α3n)104Ag, 109Ag(α,2n)111In, and 109Ag(α,3n)110In are determined in the energy range of 20-63 MeV α particles. Excitation functions for the above reactions as well as for the 107Ag(α,2n)109In, 107Ag(α,α2n)105Ag, 109Ag(α,4n)109In, 109Ag(α,5n)108In, and 109Ag(α,α4n)105Ag reactions are also presented. Experimental excitation functions are compared with statistical model calculations taking into account precompound particle emission. Isomeric yield ratios are found to depend strongly on the root mean square orbital angular momentum in the entrance channel. A semiempirical method for the prediction of isomeric yield ratios failed to reproduce experimental data even for compoundlike reactions. Isomeric yield ratios were also calculated in the frame of a statistical model under consideration of angular momentum effects in the preequilibrium and the equilibrium stage. Overall agreement between the theory and the experiment for isomeric yield ratios was found to be satisfactory especially at low bombarding energy when compound nucleus reaction channel is dominant. The discrepancy observed at higher bombarding energies needs to be theoretically investigated in greater detail.

  1. Excitation functions of the {sup 20}Ne+{sup 20}Ne system

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, S.P.; Zurmuehle, R.; Murgatroyd, J.T.; Wimer, N.G.; Miao, Y.; Pohl, K.R.; Wuosmaa, A.H.; Betts, R.R.; Freer, M.; Glagola, B.

    1995-04-01

    A differentially pumped windowless {sup 20}Ne gas target and a {sup 20}Ne beam produced with the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory were used to measure angle-averaged excitation functions for binary decay of {sup 20}Ne+{sup 20}Ne into low-lying states of {sup 20}Ne+{sup 20}Ne and {sup 24}Mg+{sup 16}O, in the region of excitation energy in {sup 40}Ca from 51.4 to 58.2 MeV ({sup 20}Ne beam energies from 61.8 to 75.4 MeV). The {sup 20}Ne+{sup 20}Ne mass partition displays little correlated structure and there exists no evidence of intermediate width resonances in these channels with branching ratios comparable to those seen in the {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg system. Angular distributions for the elastic channel are consistent with those obtained using optical-model calculations. The exictation functions for the low-lying channels in {sup 24}Mg+{sup 16}O do contain some structures, with widths varying from 400 to 800 keV in the c.m. system.

  2. Evaluation of thallium-201 production in INER's compact cyclotron based on excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, R. J.; Jiang, S. H.; Duh, T. S.

    2003-12-01

    The production of Thallium-201 via the 203Tl(p,3n) 201Pb→ 201Tl process in the compact cyclotron TR30/15 of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) was evaluated based on excitation functions. This study involves a selection of a series of parameters including proton energy, target thickness, and irradiation time that will maximize the yield of the product and minimize the radioactive impurities. The excitation functions of the 203Tl(p, xn)Pb reactions have been calculated by using the ALICE-91 and FLUKA codes, respectively. Their results were compared with that recommended in the IAEA-TECDOC-1211 report. The discrepancies among them were identified and the resulting effects on the integral yields were discussed. Based on the recommended nuclear data, a user-friendly program has been developed to estimate the activities of the product and impurities during the production process of 201Tl in INER's compact cyclotron (INERCC). This helps in understanding the effects of various parameters selected in the production process. The results reveal that the current status of the production process of 201Tl in INERCC appears to be quite optimal and the production yield is close to its theoretical prediction.

  3. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-24

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  4. The EXCITE Trial: analysis of "noncompleted" Wolf Motor Function Test items.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steven L; Thompson, Paul A; Estes, Emily; Lonergan, Timothy; Merchant, Rozina; Richardson, Natasha

    2012-02-01

    This is the first study to examine Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) tasks among EXCITE Trial participants that could not be completed at baseline or 2 weeks later. Data were collected from participants who received constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) immediately at the time of randomization (CIMT-I, n = 106) and from those for whom there was a delay of 1 year in receiving this intervention (CIMT-D, n = 116). Data were collected at baseline and at a 2-week time point, during which the CIMT-I group received the CIMT intervention and the CIMT-D group did not. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses were used to examine repeated binary data and count values. Group and visit interactions were assessed, adjusting for functional level, affected side, dominant side, age, and gender covariates. In CIMT-I participants, there was an increase in the proportion of completed tasks at posttest compared with CIMT-D participants, particularly with respect to those tasks requiring dexterity with small objects and total incompletes (P < .0033). Compared with baseline, 120 tasks governing distal limb use for CIMT-I and 58 tasks dispersed across the WMFT for CIMT-D could be completed after 2 weeks. Common movement components that may have contributed to incomplete tasks include shoulder stabilization and flexion, elbow flexion and extension, wrist pronation, supination and ulnar deviation, and pincer grip. CIMT training should emphasize therapy for those specific movement components in patients who meet the EXCITE criteria for baseline motor control.

  5. Evidence for a Nonendosomal Function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ESCRT-III-Like Protein Chm7.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Iva; Brune, Thomas; Preiss, Richard; Kölling, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) proteins are involved in a number of cellular processes, such as endosomal protein sorting, HIV budding, cytokinesis, plasma membrane repair, and resealing of the nuclear envelope during mitosis. Here we explored the function of a noncanonical member of the ESCRT-III protein family, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of human CHMP7. Very little is known about this protein. In silico analysis predicted that Chm7 (yeast ORF YJL049w) is a fusion of an ESCRT-II and ESCRT-III-like domain, which would suggest a role in endosomal protein sorting. However, our data argue against a role of Chm7 in endosomal protein sorting. The turnover of the endocytic cargo protein Ste6 and the vacuolar protein sorting of carboxypeptidase S (CPS) were not affected by CHM7 deletion, and Chm7 also responded very differently to a loss in Vps4 function compared to a canonical ESCRT-III protein. Our data indicate that the Chm7 function could be connected to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In line with a function at the ER, we observed a strong negative genetic interaction between the deletion of a gene function (APQ12) implicated in nuclear pore complex assembly and messenger RNA (mRNA) export and the CHM7 deletion. The patterns of genetic interactions between the APQ12 deletion and deletions of ESCRT-III genes, two-hybrid interactions, and the specific localization of mCherry fusion proteins are consistent with the notion that Chm7 performs a novel function at the ER as part of an alternative ESCRT-III complex.

  6. Scaling up the predator functional response in heterogeneous environment: when Holling type III can emerge?

    PubMed

    Cordoleani, Flora; Nerini, David; Morozov, Andrey; Gauduchon, Mathias; Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    2013-11-07

    Accurate parametrization of functional terms in model equations is of great importance for reproducing the dynamics of real food webs. Constructing models over large spatial and temporal scales using mathematical expressions obtained based on microcosm experiments can be erroneous. Here, using a generic spatial predator-prey model, we show that scaling up the microscale functional response of a predator can result in qualitative alterations of functional response on macroscales. In particular, a global functional response of sigmoid type (Holling type III) can emerge as a result of non-linear averaging of non-sigmoid local responses (Holling type I or II). We demonstrate that alteration between the local and the global response in the model is a result of the interplay between density-dependent dispersal of the predator across the habitat and heterogeneity of the environment. Using the method of aggregation of variables, we analytically derive the mathematical formulation of the global functional response as a function of the total amount of prey in the system, and reveal the key parameters which control the emergence of a Holling type III global response. We argue that this mechanism by which a global Holling type III emerges from a local Holling type II response has not been reported in the literature yet: in particular, Holling type III can emerge in the case of a fixed gradient of resource distribution across the habitat, which would be impossible in priorly suggested mechanisms. As a case study, we consider the interaction between phytoplankton and zooplankton grazers in the water column; and we show that the emergence of a Holling type III global response can allow for the efficient top-down regulation of primary producers and stabilization of planktonic ecosystems under eutrophic conditions.

  7. Sex Differences in WISC-III Profiles of Children with High-Functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyama, Tomonori; Kamio, Yoko; Inada, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Using the Japanese version of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III), 26 girls with high-functioning (IQ greater than or equal to 70) pervasive developmental disorders (HFPDD) (mean age, 8.2 years) were compared with 116 boys with HFPDD (mean age, 9.0 years). Compared with the boys, the girls scored significantly…

  8. Sex Differences in WISC-III Profiles of Children with High-Functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyama, Tomonori; Kamio, Yoko; Inada, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Using the Japanese version of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III), 26 girls with high-functioning (IQ greater than or equal to 70) pervasive developmental disorders (HFPDD) (mean age, 8.2 years) were compared with 116 boys with HFPDD (mean age, 9.0 years). Compared with the boys, the girls scored significantly…

  9. Slar SI III line ratios from the high-resolution telescope and spectrograph on board Spacelab 2 - The effects of non-Maxellian electron distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Dufton, P. L.; Kingston, A. E.; Cook, J. W.

    1989-05-01

    Electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si III, incorporating the effects of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions (EVDFs), are presented for a range of electron temperatures appropriate to the solar transition region. A comparison of theoretical line ratios with observational data for a quiet solar region, a sunspot, and an active region obtained with the high-resolution telescope and spectrograph (HRTS) on board Spacelab 2 indicates that non-Maxwellian EVDFs may exist in the transition region. Non-Maxwellian effects appear to be larger for the sunspot than for the quiet sun, implying that the temperature gradient may be greater in the former.

  10. SLEEPLESS is a bi-functional regulator of excitability and cholinergic synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meilin; Robinson, James E.; Joiner, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Although sleep is conserved throughout evolution, the molecular basis of its control is still largely a mystery. We previously showed that the quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene encodes a membrane-tethered protein that is required for normal sleep in Drosophila. SLEEPLESS (SSS) protein functions, at least in part, by upregulating the levels and open probability of Shaker (Sh) potassium channels to suppress neuronal excitability and enable sleep. Consistent with this proposed mechanism, loss-of-function mutations in Sh phenocopy qvr/sss null mutants. However, sleep is more genetically modifiable in Sh than in qvr/sss mutants, suggesting that sss may regulate additional molecules to influence sleep. Results Here we show that SSS also antagonizes nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to reduce synaptic transmission and promote sleep. Mimicking this antagonism with the nAChR inhibitor mecamylamine or by RNAi knockdown of specific nAChR subunits is sufficient to restore sleep to qvr/sss mutants. Regulation of nAChR activity by SSS occurs post-transcriptionally since the levels of nAChR mRNAs are unchanged in qvr/sss mutants. Regulation of nAChR activity by SSS may in fact be direct, since SSS forms a stable complex with and antagonizes fly nAChR function in transfected cells. Intriguingly, lynx1, a mammalian homolog of SSS, can partially restore normal sleep to qvr/sss mutants, and lynx1 can form stable complexes with Shaker-type channels and nAChRs. Conclusions Together, our data point to an evolutionarily conserved, bi-functional role for SSS and its homologs in controlling excitability and synaptic transmission in fundamental processes of the nervous system such as sleep. PMID:24613312

  11. MULTIDIMENSIONAL CHEMICAL MODELING OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS. III. THE INFLUENCE OF GEOMETRY ON THE ABUNDANCE AND EXCITATION OF DIATOMIC HYDRIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Bruderer, S.; Benz, A. O.; Staeuber, P.; Doty, S. D.

    2010-09-10

    The Herschel Space Observatory enables observations in the far-infrared at high spectral and spatial resolution. A particular class of molecules will be directly observable: light diatomic hydrides and their ions (CH, OH, SH, NH, CH{sup +}, OH{sup +}, SH{sup +}, NH{sup +}). These simple constituents are important both for the chemical evolution of the region and as tracers of high-energy radiation. If outflows of a forming star erode cavities in the envelope, protostellar far-UV (FUV; 6 < E{sub {gamma}} < 13.6 eV) radiation may escape through such low-density regions. Depending on the shape of the cavity, the FUV radiation then irradiates the quiescent envelope in the walls along the outflow. The chemical composition in these outflow walls is altered by photoreactions and heating via FUV photons in a manner similar to photo-dominated regions. In this work, we study the effect of cavity shapes, outflow density, and of a disk with the two-dimensional chemical model of a high-mass young stellar object introduced in the second paper in this series. The model has been extended with a self-consistent calculation of the dust temperature and a multi-zone escape probability method for the calculation of the molecular excitation and the prediction of line fluxes. We find that the shape of the cavity is particularly important in the innermost part of the envelope, where the dust temperatures are high enough ({approx}>100 K) for water ice to evaporate. If the cavity shape allows FUV radiation to penetrate this hot-core region, the abundance of FUV-destroyed species (e.g., water) is decreased. On larger scales, the shape of the cavity is less important for the chemistry in the outflow wall. In particular, diatomic hydrides and their ions CH{sup +}, OH{sup +}, and NH{sup +} are enhanced by many orders of magnitude in the outflow walls due to the combination of high gas temperatures and rapid photodissociation of more saturated species. The enhancement of these diatomic hydrides

  12. Chirp excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaneja, Navin

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes the design of broadband chirp excitation pulses. We first develop a three stage model for understanding chirp excitation in NMR. We then show how a chirp π pulse can be used to refocus the phase of the chirp excitation pulse. The resulting magnetization still has some phase dispersion in it. We show how a combination of two chirp π pulses instead of one can be used to eliminate this dispersion, leaving behind a small residual phase dispersion. The excitation pulse sequence presented here allows exciting arbitrary large bandwidths without increasing the peak rf-amplitude. Experimental excitation profiles for the residual HDO signal in a sample of 99.5 % D2O are displayed as a function of resonance offset. Although methods presented in this paper have appeared elsewhere, we present complete analytical treatment that elucidates the working of these methods.

  13. Phylogeny, topology, structure and functions of membrane-bound class III peroxidases in vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Lüthje, Sabine; Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Hopff, David; Möller, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are key player in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. Membrane-bound isoenzymes have been described for peroxidase superfamilies in plants and animals. Recent studies demonstrated a location of peroxidases of the secretory pathway (class III peroxidases) at the tonoplast and the plasma membrane. Proteomic approaches using highly enriched plasma membrane preparations suggest organisation of these peroxidases in microdomains, a developmentally regulation and an induction of isoenzymes by oxidative stress. Phylogenetic relations, topology, putative structures, and physiological function of membrane-bound class III peroxidases will be discussed.

  14. Excitability of spinal neural function during motor imagery in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Bunno, Yoshibumi; Onigata, Chieko; Tani, Makiko; Uragami, Sayuri; Yoshida, Sohei

    2014-01-01

    Summary We analyzed thenar muscle F-waves after stimulating the median nerve at the wrist in subjects during two motor imagery conditions: holding and not holding the sensor of a pinch meter between the thumb and index finger. Our aim was to determine whether mental simulation without the muscle contraction associated with motion can increase the excitability of spinal neural function in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). F-waves of the left thenar muscles were examined in 10 patients with PD under resting, holding and motor imagery conditions. For the holding condition, the subjects held the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger. For the motor imagery conditions, the subjects were asked to imagine a 50% maximal voluntary isometric contraction holding and not holding the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger (motor imagery “with”/“without sensor”). Persistence during motor imagery under the “with sensor” condition increased significantly compared with persistence during resting (n=10, z=2.2509, p=0.0244, Wilcoxon test). The F/M amplitude ratio during motor imagery under the “with sensor” condition increased significantly compared with that during resting (n=10, z=2.1915, p=0.0284, Wilcoxon test). Motor imagery under the “with the sensor” condition increased excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles. Because excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles during motor imagery “with the sensor” was significantly higher than that during resting, we suggest that movement preparation for a motor imagery task is important in patients with PD. PMID:25764256

  15. Benchmarking DFT and TD-DFT Functionals for the Ground and Excited States of Hydrogen-Rich Peptide Radicals.

    PubMed

    Riffet, Vanessa; Jacquemin, Denis; Cauët, Emilie; Frison, Gilles

    2014-08-12

    We assess the pros and cons of a large panel of DFT exchange-correlation functionals for the prediction of the electronic structure of hydrogen-rich peptide radicals formed after electron attachment on a protonated peptide. Indeed, despite its importance in the understanding of the chemical changes associated with the reduction step, the question of the attachment site of an electron and, more generally, of the reduced species formed in the gas phase through electron-induced dissociation (ExD) processes in mass spectrometry is still a matter of debate. For hydrogen-rich peptide radicals in which several positive groups and low-lying π* orbitals can capture the incoming electron in ExD, inclusion of full Hartree-Fock exchange at long-range interelectronic distance is a prerequisite for an accurate description of the electronic states, thereby excluding several popular exchange-correlation functionals, e.g., B3LYP, M06-2X, or CAM-B3LYP. However, we show that this condition is not sufficient by comparing the results obtained with asymptotically correct range-separated hybrids (M11, LC-BLYP, LC-BPW91, ωB97, ωB97X, and ωB97X-D) and with reference CASSCF-MRCI and EOM-CCSD calculations. The attenuation parameter ω significantly tunes the spin density distribution and the excited states vertical energies. The investigated model structures, ranging from methylammonium to hexapeptide, allow us to obtain a description of the nature and energy of the electronic states, depending on (i) the presence of hydrogen bond(s) around the cationic site(s), (ii) the presence of π* molecular orbitals (MOs), and (iii) the selected DFT approach. It turns out that, in the present framework, LC-BLYP and ωB97 yields the most accurate results.

  16. The Function of Vascular Smooth Muscle Phosphodiesterase III is Preserved in Healthy Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Elvebak, Rachel L.; Eisenach, John H.; Joyner, Michael J.; Nicholson, Wayne T.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase (PDE) III is an enzyme in vascular smooth muscle that metabolizes cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Milrinone inhibits PDE III, increasing the availability of cAMP. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which is regulated by nitric oxide (NO), also inhibits PDE III. The endothelial NO component of prostacyclin (PGI2)‐mediated vasodilation is reduced in aging. This study investigated if PGI2‐mediated vasodilation during concomitant inhibition of endothelial NO and smooth muscle PDE III is affected by healthy aging. PDE III was inhibited with milrinone in 10 older subjects and 10 young matched controls while simultaneously infusing NG‐monomethyl‐l‐arginine acetate (l‐NMMA) to remove the confounding inhibitory effects of cGMP on PDE III. Incremental doses of PGI2 and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were administered to the brachial artery during separate trials. l‐NMMA decreased baseline blood flow similarly, and the addition of milrinone increased baseline blood flow similarly in both groups. The forearm blood flow responses to PGI2 were similar between groups (younger: 7.62 ± 0.72; older: 6.88 ± 0.81 mL•dL−1 FAV•min−1 at the highest dose of PGI2). SNP responses were also similar. This study suggests that the vasodilator pathway associated with PDE III function, the bioavailability of cAMP, and the interaction with cGMP may be preserved in healthy aging. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 239–242. PMID:21500398

  17. A density functional theory study of arsenic immobilization by the Al(III)-modified zeolite clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Awuah, Joel B; Dzade, Nelson Y; Tia, Richard; Adei, Evans; Kwakye-Awuah, Bright; Richard A Catlow, C; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2016-04-28

    We present density functional theory calculations of the adsorption of arsenic acid (AsO(OH)3) and arsenous acid (As(OH)3) on the Al(III)-modified natural zeolite clinoptilolite under anhydrous and hydrated conditions. From our calculated adsorption energies, we show that adsorption of both arsenic species is favorable (associative and exothermic) under anhydrous conditions. When the zeolite is hydrated, adsorption is less favourable, with the water molecules causing dissociation of the arsenic complexes, although exothermic adsorption is still observed for some sites. The strength of interaction of the arsenic complexes is shown to depend sensitively on the Si/Al ratio in the Al(III)-modified clinoptilolite, which decreases as the Si/Al ratio increases. The calculated large adsorption energies indicate the potential of Al(iii)-modified clinoptilolite for arsenic immobilization.

  18. Development and Validation of the Korean Rome III Questionnaire for Diagnosis of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyung Ho; Min, Byung-Hoon; Youn, Young Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Keum, Bo Ra; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims A self-report questionnaire is frequently used to measure symptoms reliably and to distinguish patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) from those with other conditions. We produced and validated a cross-cultural adaptation of the Rome III questionnaire for diagnosis of FGIDs in Korea. Methods The Korean version of the Rome III (Rome III-K) questionnaire was developed through structural translational processes. Subsequently, reliability was measured by a test-retest procedure. Convergent validity was evaluated by comparing self-reported questionnaire data with the subsequent completion of the questionnaire by the physician based on an interview and with the clinical diagnosis. Concurrent validation using the validated Korean version of the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) was adopted to demonstrate discriminant validity. Results A total of 306 subjects were studied. Test-retest reliability was good, with a median Cronbach's α value of 0.83 (range, 0.71-0.97). The degree of agreement between patient-administered and physician-administered questionnaires to diagnose FGIDs was excellent; the κ index was 0.949 for irritable bowel syndrome, 0.883 for functional dyspepsia and 0.927 for functional heartburn. The physician's clinical diagnosis of functional dyspepsia showed the most marked discrepancy with that based on the self-administered questionnaire. Almost all SF-36 domains were impaired in participants diagnosed with one of these FGIDs according to the Rome III-K. Conclusions We developed the Rome III-K questionnaire though structural translational processes, and it revealed good test-retest reliability and satisfactory construct validity. These results suggest that this instrument will be useful for clinical and research assessments in the Korean population. PMID:24199012

  19. Calculation of electronic excitations using wave-function in wave-function frozen-density embedding.

    PubMed

    Höfener, Sebastian; Visscher, Lucas

    2012-11-28

    Recently, a general framework suitable for general frozen-density embedding (FDE) methods was published [S. Höfener, A. S. P. Gomes, and L. Visscher, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044104 (2012)]. In the present article, we report the fragmentation of a supermolecule while treating all subsystems with coupled-cluster theory and the interaction of the subsystems with density-functional theory. This variant is denoted wave-function theory in wave-function theory FDE, or coupled-cluster theory in coupled-cluster theory FDE. Main target of this approach is not the embedding of a single molecule in large solvation shells, but rather the possibility to divide a complex system consisting of several molecules when all subsystems are to be treated with, e.g., coupled-cluster methods to provide a balanced and unbiased description. We present numerical results for hydrogen-bonded complexes which exhibit rather strong interactions. Cases with weakly interacting subsystems are expected to exhibit even higher accuracy. This facilitates the study of properties of larger complexes such as DNA base pairs with coupled-cluster methods.

  20. Calculation of electronic excitations using wave-function in wave-function frozen-density embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfener, Sebastian; Visscher, Lucas

    2012-11-01

    Recently, a general framework suitable for general frozen-density embedding (FDE) methods was published [S. Höfener, A. S. P. Gomes, and L. Visscher, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044104 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3675845. In the present article, we report the fragmentation of a supermolecule while treating all subsystems with coupled-cluster theory and the interaction of the subsystems with density-functional theory. This variant is denoted wave-function theory in wave-function theory FDE, or coupled-cluster theory in coupled-cluster theory FDE. Main target of this approach is not the embedding of a single molecule in large solvation shells, but rather the possibility to divide a complex system consisting of several molecules when all subsystems are to be treated with, e.g., coupled-cluster methods to provide a balanced and unbiased description. We present numerical results for hydrogen-bonded complexes which exhibit rather strong interactions. Cases with weakly interacting subsystems are expected to exhibit even higher accuracy. This facilitates the study of properties of larger complexes such as DNA base pairs with coupled-cluster methods.

  1. Expression and functional properties of the Streptococcus intermedius surface protein antigen I/II.

    PubMed

    Petersen, F C; Pasco, S; Ogier, J; Klein, J P; Assev, S; Scheie, A A

    2001-07-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is associated with deep-seated purulent infections. In this study, we investigated expression and functional activities of antigen I/II in S. intermedius. The S. intermedius antigen I/II appeared to be cell surface associated, with a molecular mass of approximately 160 kDa. Northern blotting indicated that the S. intermedius NCTC 11324 antigen I/II gene was transcribed as a monocistronic message. Maximum expression was seen during the early exponential phase. Insertional inactivation of the antigen I/II gene resulted in reduced hydrophobicity during early exponential phase, whereas no effect was detected during mid- and late exponential phases. Binding to human fibronectin and laminin was reduced in the isogenic mutant, whereas binding to human collagen types I and IV and to rat collagen type I was not significant for either the wild type or the mutant. Compared to the wild type, the capacity of the isogenic mutant to induce interleukin 8 (IL-8) release by THP-1 monocytic cells was significantly reduced. The results indicate that the S. intermedius antigen I/II is involved in adhesion to human receptors and in IL-8 induction.

  2. Influence of surgical orthodontic treatment on masticatory function in skeletal Class III patients.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Yagi, T; Tomonari, H; Ikemori, T; Miyawaki, S

    2015-10-01

    Skeletal Class III patients exhibit malocclusion characterised by Angle Class III and anterior crossbite, and their occlusion shows total or partially lateral crossbite of the posterior teeth. Most patients exhibit lower bite force and muscle activity than non-affected subjects. While orthognathic surgery may help improve masticatory function in these patients, its effects have not been fully elucidated. The aims of the study were to evaluate jaw movement and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of masticatory muscles before and after orthognathic treatment in skeletal Class III patients in comparison with control subjects with normal occlusion. Jaw movement variables and EMG data were recorded in 14 female patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion and 15 female controls with good occlusion. Significant changes in jaw movement, from a chopping to a grinding pattern, were observed after orthognathic treatment (closing angle P < 0.01; cycle width P < 0.01), rendering jaw movement in the patient group similar to that of the control group. However, the grinding pattern in the patient group was not as broad as that of controls. The activity indexes, indicating the relative contributions of the masseter and temporalis muscles (where a negative value corresponds to relatively more temporalis activity and vice versa) changed from negative to positive after treatment (P < 0.05), becoming similar to those of control subjects. Our findings suggest that orthognathic treatment in skeletal Class III patients improves the masticatory chewing pattern and muscle activity. However, the chewing pattern remains incomplete compared with controls.

  3. Spin contamination-free N-electron wave functions in the excitation-based configuration interaction treatment.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego R; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Oña, Ofelia B; Capuzzi, Pablo

    2016-07-07

    This work deals with the spin contamination in N-electron wave functions provided by the excitation-based configuration interaction methods. We propose a procedure to ensure a suitable selection of excited N-electron Slater determinants with respect to a given reference determinant, required in these schemes. The procedure guarantees the construction of N-electron wave functions which are eigenfunctions of the spin-squared operator Sˆ(2), avoiding any spin contamination. Our treatment is based on the evaluation of the excitation level of the determinants by means of the expectation value of an excitation operator formulated in terms of spin-free replacement operators. We report numerical determinations of energies and 〈Sˆ(2)〉 expectation values, arising from our proposal as well as from traditional configuration interaction methods, in selected open-shell systems, in order to compare the behavior of these procedures and their computational costs.

  4. Single-particle spectroscopy of I-III-VI semiconductor nanocrystals: spectral diffusion and suppression of blinking by two-color excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Hirata, Shuzo; Bujak, Lukasz; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Kameyama, Tatsuya; Kishi, Marino; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Vacha, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Ternary I-III-VI semiconductor nanocrystals have been explored as non-toxic alternatives to II-VI semiconductors for optoelectronic and sensing applications, but large photoluminescence spectral width and moderate brightness restrict their practical use. Here, using single-particle photoluminescence spectroscopy on nanocrystals of (AgIn)xZn2(1-x)S2 we show that the photoluminescence band is inhomogeneously broadened and that size distribution is the dominant factor in the broadening. The residual homogeneous linewidth of individual nanocrystals reaches up to 75% of the ensemble spectral width. Single nanocrystals undergo spectral diffusion which also contributes to the inhomogeneous band. Excitation with two lasers with energies above and below the bandgap reveals coexistence of two emitting donor states within one particle. Spectral diffusion in such particles is due to temporal activation and deactivation of one such state. Filling of a trap state with a lower-energy laser enables optical modulation of photoluminescence intermittency (blinking) and leads to an almost two-fold increase in brightness.Ternary I-III-VI semiconductor nanocrystals have been explored as non-toxic alternatives to II-VI semiconductors for optoelectronic and sensing applications, but large photoluminescence spectral width and moderate brightness restrict their practical use. Here, using single-particle photoluminescence spectroscopy on nanocrystals of (AgIn)xZn2(1-x)S2 we show that the photoluminescence band is inhomogeneously broadened and that size distribution is the dominant factor in the broadening. The residual homogeneous linewidth of individual nanocrystals reaches up to 75% of the ensemble spectral width. Single nanocrystals undergo spectral diffusion which also contributes to the inhomogeneous band. Excitation with two lasers with energies above and below the bandgap reveals coexistence of two emitting donor states within one particle. Spectral diffusion in such particles is due

  5. Subversion of plant cellular functions by bacterial type-III effectors: beyond suppression of immunity.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P

    2016-04-01

    Most bacterial plant pathogens employ a type-III secretion system to inject type-III effector (T3E) proteins directly inside plant cells. These T3Es manipulate host cellular processes in order to create a permissive niche for bacterial proliferation, allowing development of the disease. An important role of T3Es in plant pathogenic bacteria is the suppression of plant immune responses. However, in recent years, research has uncovered T3E functions different from direct immune suppression, including the modulation of plant hormone signaling, metabolism or organelle function. This insight article discusses T3E functions other than suppression of immunity, which may contribute to the modulation of plant cells in order to promote bacterial survival, nutrient release, and bacterial replication and dissemination.

  6. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  7. Proton and deuteron induced reactions on natGa: Experimental and calculated excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam-Rebeles, R.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2015-09-01

    Cross-sections for reactions on natGa, induced by protons (up to 65 MeV) and deuterons (up to 50 MeV), producing γ-emitting radionuclides with half-lives longer than 1 h were measured in a stacked-foil irradiation using thin Ga-Ni alloy (70-30%) targets electroplated on Cu or Au backings. Excitation functions for generation of 68,69Ge, 66,67,68,72Ga and 65,69mZn on natGa are discussed, relative to the monitor reactions natAl(d,x)24,22Na, natAl(p,x)24,22Na, natCu(p,x)62Zn and natNi(p,x)57Ni. The results are compared to our earlier measurements, the scarce literature values and to the results of the code TALYS 1.6 (online database TENDL-2014).

  8. The use of coherence functions to determine dynamic excitation sources on launch vehicle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, S.; Halvorson, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of determining the relative contribution of simultaneous acoustic and mechanical inputs to the response of structures under combined dynamic loads was studied. An analytical technique developed by Bendat for calculating ordinary, partial, and multiple coherence functions, using an iterative nonmatrix approach was applied to data obtained from laboratory tests on a complex structural assembly. Testing was performed in an acoustically 'live' room. Up to three random inputs, having similar spectral content and varying degrees of mutual coherence, and a single output were used. Stationary and nonstationary inputs were used. It was concluded that the technique provided an effective method of identifying sources of dynamic excitation and evaluating their relative contributions to the measured output at structural resonances, for stationary random inputs. An attempt to apply the technique to nonstationary inputs did not yield consistent results.

  9. Activity of psoralen-functionalized nanoscintillators against cancer cells upon X-ray excitation.

    PubMed

    Scaffidi, Jonathan P; Gregas, Molly K; Lauly, Benoit; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2011-06-28

    We report development of a nanoparticle-based, X-ray-activated anticancer "nanodrug" composed of yttrium oxide (Y(2)O(3)) nanoscintillators, a fragment of the HIV-1 TAT peptide, and psoralen. In this formulation, X-ray radiation is absorbed by the Y(2)O(3) nanoscintillators, which then emit UVA light. Absorption of UVA photons by nanoparticle-tethered psoralen has the potential to cross-link adenine and thymine residues in DNA. UVA-induced cross-linking by free psoralen upon activation with UVA light has previously been shown to cause apoptosis in vitro and an immunogenic response in vivo. Studies using the PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line demonstrate that X-ray excitation of these psoralen-functionalized Y(2)O(3) nanoscintillators yields concentration-dependent reductions in cell number when compared to control cultures containing psoralen-free Y(2)O(3) nanoscintillators.

  10. Functional relatedness in the Inv/Mxi-Spa type III secretion system family.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jessica A; Dave, Biren M; Raphenya, Amogelang R; McArthur, Andrew G; Knodler, Leigh A

    2017-03-01

    Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs) are structurally conserved nanomachines that span the inner and outer bacterial membranes, and via a protruding needle complex contact host cell membranes and deliver type III effector proteins. T3SS are phylogenetically divided into several families based on structural basal body components. Here we have studied the evolutionary and functional conservation of four T3SS proteins from the Inv/Mxi-Spa family: a cytosolic chaperone, two hydrophobic translocators that form a plasma membrane-integral pore, and the hydrophilic 'tip complex' translocator that connects the T3SS needle to the translocon pore. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), a common cause of food-borne gastroenteritis, possesses two T3SSs, one belonging to the Inv/Mxi-Spa family. We used invasion-deficient S. Typhimurium mutants as surrogates for expression of translocator orthologs identified from an extensive phylogenetic analysis, and type III effector translocation and host cell invasion as a readout for complementation efficiency, and identified several Inv/Mxi-Spa orthologs that can functionally substitute for the S. Typhimurium chaperone and translocator proteins. Functional complementation correlates with amino acid sequence identity between orthologs, but varies considerably between the four proteins. This is the first in-depth survey of the functional interchangeability of Inv/Mxi-Spa T3SS proteins acting directly at the host-pathogen interface. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Development of an optical imaging platform for functional imaging of small animals using wide-field excitation

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek; Chen, Jin; Intes, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The design and characterization of a time-resolved functional imager using a wide-field excitation scheme for small animal imaging is described. The optimal operation parameters are established based on phantom studies. The performance of the platform for functional imaging and the simultaneous 3D reconstruction of absorption and scattering coefficients is investigated in vitro. PMID:21258454

  12. A cyclometallated fluorenyl Ir(iii) complex as a potential sensitiser for two-photon excited photodynamic therapy (2PE-PDT).

    PubMed

    Boreham, Elizabeth M; Jones, Lucy; Swinburne, Adam N; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Hugues, Vincent; Terryn, Christine; Miomandre, Fabien; Lemercier, Gilles; Natrajan, Louise S

    2015-09-28

    A new Ir(iii) cyclometallated complex bearing a fluorenyl 5-substituted-1,10-phenanthroline ligand ([Ir(ppy)2()][PF6], ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) is presented which exhibits enhanced triplet oxygen sensing properties. The efficacy of this complex to act as a photosensitiser for altering the morphology of C6 Glioma cells that represent malignant nervous tumours has been evaluated. The increased heavy metal effect and related spin-orbit coupling parameters on the photophysical properties of this complex are evidenced by comparison with Ru(ii) analogues. The complex [Ir(ppy)2()][PF6] is shown to exhibit relatively high two-photon absorption efficiencies for the lowest energy MLCT electronic transitions with two-photon absorption cross sections that range from 50 to 80 Goeppert-Mayer units between 750 to 800 nm. Quantum yields for the complex were measured up to 23% and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant, KSV was determined to be 40 bar(-1) in acetonitrile solution, confirming the high efficiency of the complex as a triplet oxygen sensitiser. Preliminary in vitro experiments with C6 Glioma cells treated with [Ir(ppy)2()][PF6], show that the complex is an efficient sensitizer for triplet oxygen, producing cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O2) by two-photon excitation at 740 nm resulting in photodynamic effects that lead to localised cell damage and death.

  13. Bäcklund transformation of Painlevé III(D 8) τ function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershtein, M. A.; Shchechkin, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    We study the explicit formula (suggested by Gamayun, Iorgov and Lisovyy) for the Painlevé III(D 8) τ function in terms of Virasoro conformal blocks with a central charge of 1. The Painlevé equation has two types of bilinear forms, which we call Toda-like and Okamoto-like. We obtain these equations from the representation theory using an embedding of the direct sum of two Virasoro algebras in a certain superalgebra. These two types of bilinear forms correspond to the Neveu–Schwarz sector and the Ramond sector of this algebra. We also obtain the τ functions of the algebraic solutions of the Painlevé III(D 8) from the special representations of the Virasoro algebra of the highest weight (n  +  1/4)2.

  14. Simultaneous functional MRI acquisition of distributed brain regions with high temporal resolution using a 2D-selective radiofrequency excitation.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    To perform simultaneous functional MRI of multiple, distributed brain regions at high temporal resolution using a 2D-selective radiofrequency (2DRF) excitation. A tailored 2DRF excitation is used to excite several, small regions-of-interest distributed in the brain. They are acquired in a single projection image with an appropriately chosen orientation such that the different regions-of-interest can be discriminated by their position in the projection plane. Thus, they are excited and acquired simultaneously with a temporal resolution comparable to that of a single-slice measurement. The feasibility of this approach for functional neuroimaging (in-plane resolution 2 × 2 mm(2) ) at high temporal resolution (80 ms) is demonstrated in healthy volunteers for regions-of-interest in the visual and motor system using checkerboard and finger tapping block-design paradigms. Task-related brain activation could be observed in both the visual and the motor system simultaneously with a high temporal resolution. For an onset shift of 240 ms for half of the checkerboard, a delay of the hemodynamic response in the corresponding hemisphere of the visual cortex could be detected. Limiting the excited magnetization to the desired target regions with a 2DRF excitation reduces the imaging sampling requirements which can improve the temporal resolution significantly. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Calculation of atomic excitation energies by time-dependent density functional theory within a modified linear response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunping; Sugino, Osamu; Tateyama, Yoshitaka

    2009-02-11

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become a standard tool for investigation of electronic excited states. However, for certain types of electronic excitations, TDDFT is known to give systematically inaccurate results, which has been attributed to the insufficiency of conventional exchange-correlation functionals, such as the local density approximation (LDA). To improve TDDFT performance within LDA, a modified linear response (MLR) scheme was recently proposed, in which the responses from not only the ground state, but also the intermediate excited states are taken into account. This scheme was shown to greatly improve TDDFT performance on the prediction of Rydberg and charge-transfer excitation energies of molecules. Yet, for a validation of this TDDFT-MLR scheme for excitation energies, there remain issues to be resolved regarding Rydberg transitions of single atoms before going to larger systems. In the present work, we show an adapted algorithm to construct the intermediate excited states for rare-gas atoms. With the technique, Rydberg transition energies can be well decoded from LDA, as will also be shown in the application of the TDDFT-MLR scheme to other types of atoms.

  16. Obtaining Hartree-Fock and density functional theory doubly excited states with Car-Parrinello density matrix search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenkel; Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2009-11-01

    The calculation of doubly excited states is one of the major problems plaguing the modern day excited state workhorse methodology of linear response time dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density function theory (TDDFT). We have previously shown that the use of a resonantly tuned field within real-time TDHF and TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite both the α and β electrons to achieve the two-electron excited states of minimal basis H2 and HeH+ [C. M. Isborn and X. Li, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 204107 (2008)]. We now extend this method to many electron systems with the use of our Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) with a first-principles fictitious mass method for wave function optimization [X. Li, C. L. Moss, W. Liang, and Y. Feng, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234115 (2009)]. Real-time TDHF/TDDFT is used during the application of the laser field perturbation, driving the electron density toward the doubly excited state. The CP-DMS method then converges the density to the nearest stationary state. We present these stationary state doubly excited state energies and properties at the HF and DFT levels for H2, HeH+, lithium hydride, ethylene, and butadiene.

  17. Functional variation of the antigen I/II surface protein in Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Petersen, F C; Assev, S; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; Scheie, A A

    2002-01-01

    Although Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus mutans are regarded as members of the commensal microflora of the body, S. intermedius is often associated with deep-seated purulent infections, whereas S. mutans is frequently associated with dental caries. In this study, we investigated the roles of the S. mutans and S. intermedius antigen I/II proteins in adhesion and modulation of cell surface characteristics. By using isogenic mutants, we show that the antigen I/II in S. mutans, but not in S. intermedius, was involved in adhesion to a salivary film under flowing conditions, as well as in binding to rat collagen type I. Binding to human fibronectin was a common function associated with the S. mutans and S. intermedius antigen I/II. Adhesion of S. mutans or S. intermedius to human collagen types I or IV was negligible. Hydrophobicity, as measured by water contact angles, and zeta potentials were unaltered in the S. intermedius mutant. The S. mutans isogenic mutants, on the other hand, exhibited more positive zeta potentials at physiological pH values than did the wild type. The results indicate common and species-specific roles for the antigen I/II in mediating the attachment of S. mutans and S. intermedius to host components and in determining cell surface properties.

  18. Decoherence in Optically Excited Semiconductors: a perspective from non-equilibrium Green functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Kuljit Singh

    Decoherence is central to our understanding of the transition from the quantum to the classical world. It is also a way of probing the dynamics of interacting many-body systems. Photoexcited semiconductors are such systems in which the transient dynamics can be studied in considerable detail experimentally. Recent advances in spectroscopy of semiconductors provide powerful tools to explore many-body physics in new regimes. An appropriate theoretical framework is necessary to describe new physical effects now accessible for observation. We present a possible approach in this thesis, and discuss results of its application to an experimentally relevant scenario. The major portion of this thesis is devoted to a formalism for the multi-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy of semiconductors. A perturbative treatment of the electromagnetic field is used to derive a closed set of differential equations for the multi-particle correlation functions, which take into account the many-body effects up to third order in the field. A diagrammatic method is developed, in which we retain all features of the double-sided Feynman diagrams for bookkeeping the excitation scenario, and complement them by allowing for the description of interactions. We apply the formalism to study decoherence between the states of optically excited excitons embedded in an electron gas, and compare it with the decoherence between these states and the ground state. We derive a dynamical equation for the two-time correlation functions of excitons, and compare it with the corresponding equation for the interband polarization. It is argued, and verified by numerical calculation, that the decay of Raman coherence depends sensitively on how differently the superimposed exciton states interact with the electron gas, and that it can be much slower than the decay of interband polarization. We also present a new numerical approach based on the length gauge for modeling the time-dependent laser-semiconductor interaction

  19. Identification and functional prediction of mitochondrial complex III and IV mutations associated with glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Rhiannon E.; Keatley, Kathleen; Littlewood, D. Timothy J.; Meunier, Brigitte; Holt, William V.; An, Qian; Higgins, Samantha C.; Polyzoidis, Stavros; Stephenson, Katie F.; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Fillmore, Helen L.; Pilkington, Geoffrey J.; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults, with a dismal prognosis. Treatment is hampered by GBM's unique biology, including differential cell response to therapy. Although several mitochondrial abnormalities have been identified, how mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contribute to GBM biology and therapeutic response remains poorly described. We sought to determine the spectrum of functional complex III and IV mtDNA mutations in GBM. Methods The complete mitochondrial genomes of 10 GBM cell lines were obtained using next-generation sequencing and combined with another set obtained from 32 GBM tissues. Three-dimensional structural mapping and analysis of all the nonsynonymous mutations identified in complex III and IV proteins was then performed to investigate functional importance. Results Over 200 mutations were identified in the mtDNAs, including a significant proportion with very low mutational loads. Twenty-five were nonsynonymous mutations in complex III and IV, 9 of which were predicted to be functional and affect mitochondrial respiratory chain activity. Most of the functional candidates were GBM specific and not found in the general population, and 2 were present in the germ-line. Patient-specific maps reveal that 43% of tumors carry at least one functional candidate. Conclusions We reveal that the spectrum of GBM-associated mtDNA mutations is wider than previously thought, as well as novel structural-functional links between specific mtDNA mutations, abnormal mitochondria, and the biology of GBM. These results could provide tangible new prognostic indicators as well as targets with which to guide the development of patient-specific mitochondrially mediated chemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:25731774

  20. Excited states of DNA base pairs using long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lasse; Govind, Niranjan

    2009-09-10

    In this work, we present a study of the excitation energies of adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine, and the adenine-thymine (AT) and guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs using long-range corrected (LC) density functional theory. We compare three recent LC functionals, BNL, CAM-B3LYP, and LC-PBE0, with B3LYP and coupled cluster results from the literature. We find that the best overall performance is for the BNL functional based on LDA. However, in order to achieve this good agreement, a smaller attenuation parameter is needed, which leads to nonoptimum performance for ground-state properties. B3LYP, on the other hand, severely underestimates the charge-transfer (CT) transitions in the base pairs. Surprisingly, we also find that the CAM-B3LYP functional also underestimates the CT excitation energy for the GC base pair but correctly describes the AT base pair. This illustrates the importance of retaining the full long-range exact exchange even at distances as short as that of the DNA base pairs. The worst overall performance is obtained with the LC-PBE0 functional, which overestimates the excitations for the individual bases as well as the base pairs. It is therefore crucial to strike a good balance between the amount of local and long-range exact exchange. Thus, this work highlights the difficulties in obtained LC functionals, which provides a good description of both ground- and excited-state properties.

  1. Excited States of DNA Base Pairs Using Long-Range Corrected Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Lasse; Govind, Niranjan

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we present a study of the excitation energies of adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine, and the adenine-thymine (AT) and guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs using long-range corrected (LC) density functional theory. We compare three recent LC functionals, BNL, CAM-B3LYP, and LC-PBE0, with B3LYP and coupled cluster results from the literature. We find that the best overall performance is for the BNL functional based on LDA. However, in order to achieve this good agreement, a smaller attenuation parameter is needed, which leads to nonoptimum performance for ground-state properties. B3LYP, on the other hand, severely underestimates the charge-transfer (CT) transitions in the base pairs. Surprisingly, we also find that the CAM-B3LYP functional also underestimates the CT excitation energy for the GC base pair but correctly describes the AT base pair. This illustrates the importance of retaining the full long-range exact exchange even at distances as short as that of the DNA base pairs. The worst overall performance is obtained with the LC-PBE0 functional, which overestimates the excitations for the individual bases as well as the base pairs. It is therefore crucial to strike a good balance between the amount of local and long-range exact exchange. Thus, this work highlights the difficulties in obtained LC functionals, which provides a good description of both ground- and excited-state properties.

  2. Response functions and spectrum of collective excitations of fractional-quantum-Hall-effect systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ana; Fradkin, Eduardo

    1993-03-01

    We calculate the electromagnetic response functions of a fractional-quantum-Hall-effect (FQHE) system within the framework of the fermion Chern-Simons theory for the FQHE, which we developed before. Our results are valid in a semiclassical expansion around the average-field approximation (AFA). We reexamine the AFA and the role of fluctuations. We argue that, order-by-order in the semiclassical expansion, the response functions obey the correct symmetry properties required by Galilean and gauge invariance and by the incompressibility of the fluid. In particular, we find that the low-momentum limit of the semiclassical approximation to the response functions is exact and that it saturates the f-sum rule. We obtain the spectrum of collective excitations of FQHE systems in the low-momentum limit. We find a rich spectrum of modes which includes a host of quasiparticle-quasihole bound states and, in general, two collective modes coalescing at the cyclotron frequency. The Hall conductance is obtained from the current-density correlation function, and it has the correct value already at the semiclassical level. We applied these results to the problem of the screening of external charges and fluxes by the electron fluid, and obtained asymptotic expressions of the charge and current-density profiles, for different types of interactions. Finally, we reconsider the anyon superfluid within our scheme and derive the spectrum of collective modes for interacting hard-core bosons and semions. In addition to the gapless phase mode, we find a set of gapped collective modes.

  3. Using Brain Oscillations and Corticospinal Excitability to Understand and Predict Post-Stroke Motor Function.

    PubMed

    Thibaut, Aurore; Simis, Marcel; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo; Fanciullacci, Chiara; Bertolucci, Federica; Huerta-Gutierrez, Rodrigo; Chisari, Carmelo; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    What determines motor recovery in stroke is still unknown and finding markers that could predict and improve stroke recovery is a challenge. In this study, we aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms of motor function recovery after stroke using neurophysiological markers by means of cortical excitability (transcranial magnetic stimulation-TMS) and brain oscillations (electroencephalography-EEG). In this cross-sectional study, 55 subjects with chronic stroke (62 ± 14 yo, 17 women, 32 ± 42 months post-stroke) were recruited in two sites. We analyzed TMS measures (i.e., motor threshold-MT-of the affected and unaffected sides) and EEG variables (i.e., power spectrum in different frequency bands and different brain regions of the affected and unaffected hemispheres) and their correlation with motor impairment as measured by Fugl-Meyer. Multiple univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to identify the predictors of good motor function. A significant interaction effect of MT in the affected hemisphere and power in beta bandwidth over the central region for both affected and unaffected hemispheres was found. We identified that motor function positively correlates with beta rhythm over the central region of the unaffected hemisphere, while it negatively correlates with beta rhythm in the affected hemisphere. Our results suggest that cortical activity in the affected and unaffected hemisphere measured by EEG provides new insights on the association between high-frequency rhythms and motor impairment, highlighting the role of an excess of beta in the affected central cortical region in poor motor function in stroke recovery.

  4. Using Brain Oscillations and Corticospinal Excitability to Understand and Predict Post-Stroke Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Thibaut, Aurore; Simis, Marcel; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo; Fanciullacci, Chiara; Bertolucci, Federica; Huerta-Gutierrez, Rodrigo; Chisari, Carmelo; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    What determines motor recovery in stroke is still unknown and finding markers that could predict and improve stroke recovery is a challenge. In this study, we aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms of motor function recovery after stroke using neurophysiological markers by means of cortical excitability (transcranial magnetic stimulation—TMS) and brain oscillations (electroencephalography—EEG). In this cross-sectional study, 55 subjects with chronic stroke (62 ± 14 yo, 17 women, 32 ± 42 months post-stroke) were recruited in two sites. We analyzed TMS measures (i.e., motor threshold—MT—of the affected and unaffected sides) and EEG variables (i.e., power spectrum in different frequency bands and different brain regions of the affected and unaffected hemispheres) and their correlation with motor impairment as measured by Fugl-Meyer. Multiple univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to identify the predictors of good motor function. A significant interaction effect of MT in the affected hemisphere and power in beta bandwidth over the central region for both affected and unaffected hemispheres was found. We identified that motor function positively correlates with beta rhythm over the central region of the unaffected hemisphere, while it negatively correlates with beta rhythm in the affected hemisphere. Our results suggest that cortical activity in the affected and unaffected hemisphere measured by EEG provides new insights on the association between high-frequency rhythms and motor impairment, highlighting the role of an excess of beta in the affected central cortical region in poor motor function in stroke recovery. PMID:28539912

  5. A simple and rapid method for direct determination of Al(III) based on the enhanced resonance Rayleigh scattering of hemin-functionalized graphene-Al(III) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yu; Chen, Ling Xiao; Dong, Jiang Xue; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-03-01

    A novel method for direct determination of Al(III) by using hemin-functionalized graphene (H-GO) has been established based on the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensity. The characteristics of RRS spectra, the optimum reaction conditions, and the reaction mechanism have been investigated. In this experiment, the Al(III) would exist in sol-gel Al(OH)3 species under the condition of pH 5.9 in aqueous solutions. When H-GO existed in the solution, the sol-gel Al(OH)3 would react with H-GO and result in enhancement of RRS intensity, owing to the enhanced hydrophobicity of H-GO surface. Therefore, a simple and rapid sensor for Al(III) was developed. The increased intensity of RRS is directly proportional to the concentration of Al(III) in the range of 10 nM-6 μM, along with a detection limit of 0.87 nM. Moreover, the sensor has been applied to determination of Al(III) concentration in real water and aspirin tablet samples with satisfactory results. Therefore, the proposed method is promising as an effective means for selective and sensitive determination of Al(III).

  6. The joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure: development and cross-validation of a six-factor model of cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, David S; Price, Larry R

    2003-06-01

    During the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (3rd ed.; WMS-III) the participants in the normative study completed both scales. This "co-norming" methodology set the stage for full integration of the 2 tests and the development of an expanded structure of cognitive functioning. Until now, however, the WAIS-III and WMS-III had not been examined together in a factor analytic study. This article presents a series of confirmatory factor analyses to determine the joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure. Using a structural equation modeling approach, a 6-factor model that included verbal, perceptual, processing speed, working memory, auditory memory, and visual memory constructs provided the best model fit to the data. Allowing select subtests to load simultaneously on 2 factors improved model fit and indicated that some subtests are multifaceted. The results were then replicated in a large cross-validation sample (N = 858).

  7. Density functional theory studies of actinide(III) motexafins (An-Motex2+, An = Ac, Cm, Lr). Structure, stability, and comparison with lanthanide(III) motexafins.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Li, Quansong; Moritz, Anna; Xie, Zhizhong; Dolg, Michael; Chen, Xuebo; Fang, Weihai

    2006-04-17

    Newly developed relativistic energy-consistent 5f-in-core actinide pseudopotentials and corresponding (7s6p5d1f)/[5s4p3d1f] basis sets in the segmented contraction scheme, combined with density functional theory methods, have been used to study the molecular structure and chemical properties of selected actinide(III) motexafins (An-Motex2+, An = Ac, Cm, Lr). Structure and stability are discussed, and a comparison to the lanthanide(III) motexafins (Ln-Motex2+, Ln = La, Gd, Lu) is made. The actinide element is found to reside above the mean N5 motexafin plane, and the larger the cation, the greater the observed out-of-plane displacement. It is concluded that the actinium(III), curium(III), and lawrencium(III) cations are tightly bound to the macrocyclic skeleton, yielding stable structures. However, the calculated metal-ligand gas-phase binding energy for An-Motex2+ is about 1-2 eV lower than that of Ln-Motex2+, implying a lower stability of An-Motex2+ compared to Ln-Motex2+. Results including solvent effects imply that Ac-Motex2+ is the most stable complex in aqueous solution and should be the best candidate for experimentalists to get stable actinide(III) motexafin complexes.

  8. Excited state geometry optimizations by analytical energy gradient of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Mahito; Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2006-04-14

    An analytical excitation energy gradient of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory (LC-TDDFT) is presented. This is based on a previous analytical TDDFT gradient formalism, which avoids solving the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham equation for each nuclear degree of freedom. In LC-TDDFT, exchange interactions are evaluated by combining the short-range part of a DFT exchange functional with the long-range part of the Hartree-Fock exchange integral. This LC-TDDFT gradient was first examined by calculating the excited state geometries and adiabatic excitation energies of small typical molecules and a small protonated Schiff base. As a result, we found that long-range interactions play a significant role even in valence excited states of small systems. This analytical LC-TDDFT gradient was also applied to the investigations of small twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) systems. By comparing with calculated ab initio multireference perturbation theory and experimental results, we found that LC-TDDFT gave much more accurate absorption and fluorescence energies of these systems than those of conventional TDDFTs using pure and hybrid functionals. For optimized excited state geometries, LC-TDDFT provided fairly different twisting and wagging angles of these small TICT systems in comparison with conventional TDDFT results.

  9. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ≤SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (≤SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  10. Structural characterization, tissue distribution, and functional expression of murine aminoacylase III.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Alexander; Carpenito, Gerardo; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Tsuprun, Vladimir; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Motemoturu, Srilakshmi; Sassani, Pakan; Solovieva, Nadezhda; Dukkipati, Ramnath; Kurtz, Ira

    2004-04-01

    Many xenobiotics are detoxified through the mercapturate metabolic pathway. The final product of the pathway, mercapturic acids (N-acetylcysteine S-conjugates), are secreted predominantly by renal proximal tubules. Mercapturic acids may undergo a transformation mediated by aminoacylases and cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyases that leads to nephrotoxic reactive thiol formation. The deacetylation of cysteine S-conjugates of N-acyl aromatic amino acids is thought to be mediated by an aminoacylase whose molecular identity has not been determined. In the present study, we cloned aminoacylase III, which likely mediates this process in vivo, and characterized its function and structure. The enzyme consists of 318 amino acids and has a molecular mass (determined by SDS-PAGE) of approximately 35 kDa. Under nondenaturing conditions, the molecular mass of the enzyme is approximately 140 kDa as determined by size-exclusion chromatography, which suggests that it is a tetramer. In agreement with this hypothesis, transmission electron microscopy and image analysis of aminoacylase III showed that the monomers of the enzyme are arranged with a fourfold rotational symmetry. Northern analysis demonstrated an approximately 1.4-kb transcript that was expressed predominantly in kidney and showed less expression in liver, heart, small intestine, brain, lung, testis, and stomach. In kidney, aminoacylase III was immunolocalized predominantly to the apical domain of S1 proximal tubules and the cytoplasm of S2 and S3 proximal tubules. The data suggest that in kidney proximal tubules, aminoacylase III plays an important role in deacetylating mercapturic acids. The predominant cytoplasmic localization of aminoacylase III may explain the greater sensitivity of the proximal straight tubule to the nephrotoxicity of mercapturic acids.

  11. Evaluation of the auto-refraction function of the Nidek OPD-Scan III.

    PubMed

    McGinnigle, Samantha; Naroo, Shehzad A; Eperjesi, Frank

    2014-03-01

    The aim was to evaluate the validity and repeatability of the auto-refraction function of the Nidek OPD-Scan III (Nidek Technologies, Gamagori, Japan) compared with non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. The Nidek OPD-Scan III is a new aberrometer/corneal topographer workstation based on the skiascopy principle. It combines a wavefront aberrometer, topographer, autorefractor, auto keratometer and pupillometer/pupillographer. Objective refraction results obtained using the Nidek OPD-Scan III were compared with non-cycloplegic subjective refraction for 108 eyes of 54 participants (29 female) with a mean age of 23.7 ± 9.5 years. Intra-session and inter-session variability were assessed on 14 subjects (28 eyes). The Nidek OPD-Scan III gave slightly more negative readings than results obtained by subjective refraction (Nidek mean difference -0.19 ± 0.36 DS, p < 0.01 for sphere; -0.19 ± 0.35 DS, p < 0.01 for mean spherical equivalent; -0.002 ± 0.23 DC, p = 0.91 for cylinder; -0.06 ± 0.38 DC, p = 0.30 for J0 and -0.36 ± 0.31 DC for J45, p = 0.29). Auto-refractor results for 74 per cent of spherical readings and 60 per cent of cylindrical powers were within ± 0.25 of subjective refraction. There was high intra-session and inter-session repeatability for all parameters; 90 per cent of inter-session repeatability results were within 0.25 D. The Nidek OPD-Scan III gives valid and repeatable measures of objective refraction when compared with non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2013 Optometrists Association Australia.

  12. The optical luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts deduced from ROTSE-III observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, X. H.; Wu, X. F.; Wei, J. J.; Yuan, F.; Zheng, W. K.; Liang, E. W.; Akerlof, C. W.; McKay, T. A.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Flewelling, H. A.; Göǧüş, E.; Güver, T.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; Pandey, S. B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rujopakarn, W.; Schaefer, B. E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Yost, S. A. E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: fang.yuan@anu.edu.au E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn

    2014-11-10

    We present the optical luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) estimated from a uniform sample of 58 GRBs from observations with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment III (ROTSE-III). Our GRB sample is divided into two sub-samples: detected afterglows (18 GRBs) and those with upper limits (40 GRBs). We derive R-band fluxes for these two sub-samples 100 s after the onset of the burst. The optical LFs at 100 s are fitted by assuming that the co-moving GRB rate traces the star formation rate. While fitting the optical LFs using Monte Carlo simulations, we take into account the detection function of ROTSE-III. We find that the cumulative distribution of optical emission at 100 s is well described by an exponential rise and power-law decay, a broken power law,and Schechter LFs. A single power-law (SPL) LF, on the other hand, is ruled out with high confidence.

  13. Application of new WAIS-III/WMS-III discrepancy scores for evaluating memory functioning: relationship between intellectual and memory ability.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between memory and intellectual ability has received some support as a means for evaluating memory impairment. Recently, comprehensive base rate tables for General Ability Index (GAI) minus memory discrepancy scores (i.e., GAI-memory) were developed using the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (Lange, Chelune, & Tulsky, in press). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to identify memory impairment in 34 patients with Alzheimer's type dementia (DAT) versus a sample of 34 demographically matched healthy participants. On average, patients with DAT obtained significantly lower scores on all WAIS-III and WMS-III indexes and had larger GAI-memory discrepancy scores. Clinical outcome analyses revealed that GAI-memory scores were useful at identifying memory impairment in patients with DAT versus matched healthy participants. However, GAI-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from the memory indexes alone. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  14. An accurate density functional theory calculation for electronic excitation energies: the least-squares support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ting; Sun, Shi-Ling; Shi, Li-Li; Li, Hui; Li, Hong-Zhi; Su, Zhong-Min; Lu, Ying-Hua

    2009-05-14

    Support vector machines (SVMs), as a novel type of learning machine, has been very successful in pattern recognition and function estimation problems. In this paper we introduce least-squares (LS) SVMs to improve the calculation accuracy of density functional theory. As a demonstration, this combined quantum mechanical calculation with LS-SVM correction approach has been applied to evaluate the electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules. The newly introduced LS-SVM approach reduces the root-mean-square deviation of the calculated electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules from 0.32 to 0.11 eV for the B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculation. Thus, the LS-SVM correction on top of B3LYP/6-31G(d) is a better method to correct electronic excitation energies and can be used as the approximation of experimental results which are impossible to obtain experimentally.

  15. Understanding lanthanoid(III) hydration structure and kinetics by insights from energies and wave functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Heinz, Norah; Dolg, Michael

    2014-07-21

    The hydration of all trivalent lanthanoid (Ln) ions is studied theoretically from two aspects: energy and wave function. With the help of the incremental scheme, for the first time the lanthanoid(III) aqua complexes are computed at the CCSD(T) level using large basis sets. These computations prove that SCS-MP2 is nearly as accurate as CCSD, thus enabling us to give the most accurate first principle hydration Gibbs free energies and reliable preferred coordination numbers (CNs) of lanthanoid(III) aqua complexes: 9, 8, and both, for light, heavy, and intermediate lanthanoids, respectively. Then a series of wave function analyses were performed to explore the deeper reasons for the preference of specific CNs. An unexpected observation is that as Ln goes from samarium to lutetium, the capping Ln-O bonds in nona-aqua lanthanoid complexes become weaker while they get shorter. Therefore, as the capping Ln-O bonds are getting easier to disrupt, heavier lanthanoids will prefer a low CN, i.e., 8. On the basis of this and previous work of other groups, a model for the water exchange kinetics of lanthanoid(III) ions is proposed. This model suggests that the capping Ln-O bonds of moderate strength, which occur for intermediate lanthanoids, are advantageous for the formation of a bicapped trigonal prism intermediate during water exchange. This explains some NMR experiments and, more importantly, an observation which puzzled investigators for a long time, i.e., that the exchange rate reaches a maximum for the middle region but is low at the beginning and end of the lanthanoid series. This nontrivial behavior of capping Ln-O bonds is interpreted and is believed to determine the hydration behavior of lanthanoid(III) ions.

  16. Regulation of postsynaptic function by the dementia-related ESCRT-III subunit CHMP2B.

    PubMed

    Chassefeyre, Romain; Martínez-Hernández, José; Bertaso, Federica; Bouquier, Nathalie; Blot, Béatrice; Laporte, Marine; Fraboulet, Sandrine; Couté, Yohann; Devoy, Anny; Isaacs, Adrian M; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Sadoul, Rémy; Fagni, Laurent; Goldberg, Yves

    2015-02-18

    The charged multivesicular body proteins (Chmp1-7) are an evolutionarily conserved family of cytosolic proteins that transiently assembles into helical polymers that change the curvature of cellular membrane domains. Mutations in human CHMP2B cause frontotemporal dementia, suggesting that this protein may normally control some neuron-specific process. Here, we examined the function, localization, and interactions of neuronal Chmp2b. The protein was highly expressed in mouse brain and could be readily detected in neuronal dendrites and spines. Depletion of endogenous Chmp2b reduced dendritic branching of cultured hippocampal neurons, decreased excitatory synapse density in vitro and in vivo, and abolished activity-induced spine enlargement and synaptic potentiation. To understand the synaptic effects of Chmp2b, we determined its ultrastructural distribution by quantitative immuno-electron microscopy and its biochemical interactions by coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. In the hippocampus in situ, a subset of neuronal Chmp2b was shown to concentrate beneath the perisynaptic membrane of dendritic spines. In synaptoneurosome lysates, Chmp2b was stably bound to a large complex containing other members of the Chmp family, as well as postsynaptic scaffolds. The supramolecular Chmp assembly detected here corresponds to a stable form of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III), a ubiquitous cytoplasmic protein complex known to play a central role in remodeling of lipid membranes. We conclude that Chmp2b-containing ESCRT-III complexes are also present at dendritic spines, where they regulate synaptic plasticity. We propose that synaptic ESCRT-III filaments may function as a novel element of the submembrane cytoskeleton of spines.

  17. Regulation of Postsynaptic Function by the Dementia-Related ESCRT-III Subunit CHMP2B

    PubMed Central

    Chassefeyre, Romain; Martínez-Hernández, José; Bertaso, Federica; Bouquier, Nathalie; Blot, Béatrice; Laporte, Marine; Fraboulet, Sandrine; Couté, Yohann; Devoy, Anny; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Fagni, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The charged multivesicular body proteins (Chmp1–7) are an evolutionarily conserved family of cytosolic proteins that transiently assembles into helical polymers that change the curvature of cellular membrane domains. Mutations in human CHMP2B cause frontotemporal dementia, suggesting that this protein may normally control some neuron-specific process. Here, we examined the function, localization, and interactions of neuronal Chmp2b. The protein was highly expressed in mouse brain and could be readily detected in neuronal dendrites and spines. Depletion of endogenous Chmp2b reduced dendritic branching of cultured hippocampal neurons, decreased excitatory synapse density in vitro and in vivo, and abolished activity-induced spine enlargement and synaptic potentiation. To understand the synaptic effects of Chmp2b, we determined its ultrastructural distribution by quantitative immuno-electron microscopy and its biochemical interactions by coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. In the hippocampus in situ, a subset of neuronal Chmp2b was shown to concentrate beneath the perisynaptic membrane of dendritic spines. In synaptoneurosome lysates, Chmp2b was stably bound to a large complex containing other members of the Chmp family, as well as postsynaptic scaffolds. The supramolecular Chmp assembly detected here corresponds to a stable form of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III), a ubiquitous cytoplasmic protein complex known to play a central role in remodeling of lipid membranes. We conclude that Chmp2b-containing ESCRT-III complexes are also present at dendritic spines, where they regulate synaptic plasticity. We propose that synaptic ESCRT-III filaments may function as a novel element of the submembrane cytoskeleton of spines. PMID:25698751

  18. Bi-exponential decay of Eu(III) complexed by Suwannee River humic substances: spectroscopic evidence of two different excited species.

    PubMed

    Reiller, Pascal E; Brevet, Julien

    2010-02-01

    The bi-exponential luminescence decay of europium (III) complexed by Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and humic acid (SRHA), is studied in time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy using two different gratings at varying delay after the laser pulse, increasing accumulation time in order to obtain comparable signals. The two hypotheses found in the literature to interpret this bi-exponential decay are (i) a back transfer from the metal to the triplet state of the organic ligand and (ii) the radiative decay of two different excited species. It is shown that evolutions of the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(0) and (5)D(0)-->(7)F(2) luminescent transitions are occurring between 10 and 300 micros delay. First, the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(0) transition is decreasing relative to the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(1) showing a slightly greater symmetry of the 'slow' component, and is also slightly red shifted. Second, a slight modification of the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(2) transition is also evidencing a slightly different ligand field splitting. No significant modification of the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(1) magnetic dipole, which is less susceptible to symmetry changes, is noted in line with expectations. The (5)D(0)-->(7)F(0) transitions are adjusted with either one or two components. The use of a simple component fit seems to be well adapted for representing an average comportment of these heterogeneous compounds, and a two-component fit constrained by the bi-exponential decay parameters and accumulation times yields in the proposition of the spectra for the fast and slow components.

  19. Functional capacity as a significant independent predictor of postoperative mortality for octogenarian ASA-III patients.

    PubMed

    Visnjevac, Ognjen; Lee, Jun; Pourafkari, Leili; Dosluoglu, Hasan H; Nader, Nader D

    2014-10-01

    The American Society of Anesthesiology's (ASA) 6-point physical status classification remains one of the most significant predictors of perioperative morbidity and mortality and is the most widely used risk stratification tool worldwide. Its utility is significantly limited for octogenarians, however, as the majority of these patients are classified as ASA-III. Thus, for patients aged 80 or older, we hypothesized that incorporating patients' functional status, defined by the ability to perform activities of daily living independently, would improve perioperative risk stratification. All data were extracted from the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program, a perioperative prospectively maintained computerized database. ASA-III patients were reclassified into subgroups IIIA or IIIB, with IIIA representing functionally independent patients and IIIB representing partially or fully dependent patients. Functional status was self-reported during preoperative assessments. In this database, mortality data (primary outcome) was reliably available for all patients for the duration of the 96-month follow-up period, as were other perioperative patient data. Seven hundred and fifty-nine (72.4%) patients were classified as ASA-IIIA, and 290 (27.6%) patients were ASA-IIIB. Thirty-day and long-term survival was significantly better in the ASA-IIIA group, irrespective of type of surgery (hazard ratio 1.87, confidence interval 1.55-2.25, p < .001). ASA-IIIB hazard ratios for mortality were greatest for orthopedic and vascular surgery patients, but a significant divergence in survival between ASA-IIIA and IIIB patients was observed in all surgical specialties. As evidenced by Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analyses, functional capacity was a significant independent predictor of mortality for ASA-III patients older than 80 years of age. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2014.

  20. Narrow structure in the excitation function of η photoproduction off the neutron.

    PubMed

    Werthmüller, D; Witthauer, L; Keshelashvili, I; Aguar-Bartolomé, P; Ahrens, J; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Braghieri, A; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Glazier, D I; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Huber, G M; Jaegle, I; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Käser, A; Kashevarov, V L; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kruglov, S P; Krusche, B; Kulbardis, A; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Maghrbi, Y; Mancell, J; Manley, D M; Marinides, Z; Martinez, M; McGeorge, J C; McNicoll, E F; Metag, V; Middleton, D G; Mushkarenkov, A; Nefkens, B M K; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ostrick, M; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Pheron, F; Polonski, A; Prakhov, S N; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Sober, D; Starostin, A; Supek, I; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P

    2013-12-06

    The photoproduction of η mesons off nucleons bound in 2H and 3He has been measured in coincidence with recoil protons and recoil neutrons for incident photon energies from threshold up to 1.4 GeV. The experiments were performed at the Mainz MAMI accelerator, using the Glasgow tagged photon facility. Decay photons from the η→2γ and η→3π0 decays and the recoil nucleons were detected with an almost 4π electromagnetic calorimeter combining the Crystal Ball and TAPS detectors. The data from both targets are of excellent statistical quality and show a narrow structure in the excitation function of γn→nη. The results from the two measurements are consistent, taking into account the expected effects from nuclear Fermi motion. The best estimates for position and intrinsic width of the structure are W=(1670±5)  MeV and Γ=(30±15)  MeV. For the first time precise results for the angular dependence of this structure have been extracted.

  1. Measuring excitation functions needed to interpret cosmogenic nuclide production in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K.; Beverding, A.; Englert, P. A. J.; Caffee, M. W.; Vincent, J.; Castaneda, C.; Reedy, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides produced in lunar rocks by cosmic ray interactions are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry or gamma-ray spectroscopy. From these measurements, estimates of the solar proton flux over time periods characterized by the half-life of the isotope under study can be made, if all the cross sections for all the reactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are known. Proton production cross sections are very important because (approximately) 98% of solar cosmic rays and (approximately) 87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons in the lunar environment. Many of the needed cross sections have never been measured. Targets of C, Al, Si, SiO2, mg, K, Ca, Fe and Ni have been irradiated using three accelerators to cover a proton energy range of 25-500 MeV. Excitation functions for Be-7, Be-10, Na-22, and Al-26 production from Mg and Al will be reported, and the consequences of using these new cross section values to estimate solar proton fluxes discussed.

  2. Optical properties and dynamics excitation relaxation in reduced graphene oxide functionalized with nanostructured porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khenfouch, M.; Bajjou, O.; Baïtoul, M.; Mongwaketsi, N.; Maaza, M.; Wery Venturini, J.

    2015-04-01

    Few layers of reduced graphene oxide (FRGO) were functionalized with porphyrins self assembled nanostructure. These new hybrid nanocomposites were investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), UV-visible, Raman scattering, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and photoluminescence. The structural and morphological results show strong interactions between these hybrids components. Moreover, steady state photoluminescence (PL) of both porphyrin nanorods (PN) and (PN)/FRGO composite show clearly the PL quenching confirming a charge transfer from porphyrin molecules to graphene sheets. In addition, the relaxation kinetics of the PN and (PN)/FRGO were studied by means of time resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) and the excitation density in the sample was of 1017 cm3/pulse. The major change of the carrier dynamics in porphyrin nanorods after their interaction with FRGO was in the increase in the fast time constants, which found to be slower at 650 nm, τ1 = 196 ps and τ2 = 1171 ps. This has been explained by the change in their energy band gap due to the role of FRGO as doping related to the size of the nanometer-scale sp2 clusters, which leads to a slower interband carrier recombination.

  3. Functional imaging of living Paramecium by means of confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Fronte, Paola; Raimondo, Marco; Fato, Marco; DeLeo, Gianluca; Beltrame, Francesco; Cannone, Fabio; Chirico, Giberto; Ramoino, Paola

    2002-05-01

    Confocal and Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy allow gathering three-dimensional and temporal information from biological systems exploiting fluorescence labeling and autofluorescence properties. In this work we study biological events linked to functionality in Paramecium primaurelia. The internalization of material in ciliated one-celled organisms (protozoa) occurs via different mechanisms, even if most of nutrients, particulate or not, is taken up by food vacuoles formed at the bottom of the oral cavity. The endocytosis of small-sized molecules occurs at the parasomal sacs, located next the ciliar basal bodies. Vital fluorescent dyes (BSA-FITC, WGA-FITC, dextran-Texas Red, cholesteryl-Bodipy) and autofluorescence were used to study formation, movement, and fusion of vesicles during endocytosis and phagocytosis of Paramecium primaurelia. By immobilizing living cells pulsed with food vacuole and endosome markers at successive times after chasing in unlabeled medium, the intracellular movement and fusion of food vacuoles and of endosomes were visualized. A temporal analysis of fluorescence images and the false-color technique were used. Starting from time series or 3D data sets composite images were generated by associating with each originally acquired image a different color corresponding to each sampling point in time and along the z-axis. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging attempts are also outlined.

  4. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  5. Measuring excitation functions needed to interpret cosmogenic nuclide production in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K.; Beverding, A.; Englert, P. A. J.; Caffee, M. W.; Vincent, J.; Castaneda, C.; Reedy, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides produced in lunar rocks by cosmic ray interactions are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry or gamma-ray spectroscopy. From these measurements, estimates of the solar proton flux over time periods characterized by the half-life of the isotope under study can be made, if all the cross sections for all the reactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are known. Proton production cross sections are very important because (approximately) 98% of solar cosmic rays and (approximately) 87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons in the lunar environment. Many of the needed cross sections have never been measured. Targets of C, Al, Si, SiO2, mg, K, Ca, Fe and Ni have been irradiated using three accelerators to cover a proton energy range of 25-500 MeV. Excitation functions for Be-7, Be-10, Na-22, and Al-26 production from Mg and Al will be reported, and the consequences of using these new cross section values to estimate solar proton fluxes discussed.

  6. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  7. Excitation Functions and Production Rates of Radionuclides Produced in the Proton Bombardment of natPr and natLa

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, C.; Steyn, G.F.; Walt, T.N. van der; Nortier, F.M.; Szelecsenyi, F.; Kovacs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Excitation functions and production rates are presented for various radionuclides formed in the bombardment of natPr and natLa with protons. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions based on the geometry dependent hybrid model. Alternative production routes for 139Pr and 139Ce are investigated.

  8. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  9. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  10. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  11. Examining the relationship between WAIS-III premorbid intellectual functioning and WMS-III memory ability to evaluate memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous research by Lange and Chelune (2006) by evaluating the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to detect memory impairment using estimated premorbid GAI scores (i.e., GAI-E) rather than obtained GAI scores. Participants were 34 patients with Alzheimer's-type dementia and a sub-sample of 34 demographically matched participants from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. GAI-memory discrepancy scores were more effective at differentiating Alzheimer's patients versus healthy controls when using estimated premorbid GAI scores than obtained GAI scores. However, GAI(E)-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from interpretation of the memory index scores alone. This was most likely due to the prevalence of obvious memory impairment in this patient population. Future research directions are discussed.

  12. A Polybasic Plasma Membrane Binding Motif in the I-II Linker Stabilizes Voltage-gated CaV1.2 Calcium Channel Function.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurjot; Pinggera, Alexandra; Ortner, Nadine J; Lieb, Andreas; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Obermair, Gerald J; Flucher, Bernhard E; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-08-21

    L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) regulate many physiological functions like muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression, and neuronal excitability. Their activity is strictly controlled by various molecular mechanisms. The pore-forming α1-subunit comprises four repeated domains (I-IV), each connected via an intracellular linker. Here we identified a polybasic plasma membrane binding motif, consisting of four arginines, within the I-II linker of all LTCCs. The primary structure of this motif is similar to polybasic clusters known to interact with polyphosphoinositides identified in other ion channels. We used de novo molecular modeling to predict the conformation of this polybasic motif, immunofluorescence microscopy and live cell imaging to investigate the interaction with the plasma membrane, and electrophysiology to study its role for Cav1.2 channel function. According to our models, this polybasic motif of the I-II linker forms a straight α-helix, with the positive charges facing the lipid phosphates of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Membrane binding of the I-II linker could be reversed after phospholipase C activation, causing polyphosphoinositide breakdown, and was accelerated by elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels. This indicates the involvement of negatively charged phospholipids in the plasma membrane targeting of the linker. Neutralization of four arginine residues eliminated plasma membrane binding. Patch clamp recordings revealed facilitated opening of Cav1.2 channels containing these mutations, weaker inhibition by phospholipase C activation, and reduced expression of channels (as quantified by ON-gating charge) at the plasma membrane. Our data provide new evidence for a membrane binding motif within the I-II linker of LTCC α1-subunits essential for stabilizing normal Ca(2+) channel function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Natural excitation orbitals from linear response theories: Time-dependent density functional theory, time-dependent Hartree-Fock, and time-dependent natural orbital functional theory.

    PubMed

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2017-01-28

    Straightforward interpretation of excitations is possible if they can be described as simple single orbital-to-orbital (or double, etc.) transitions. In linear response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT), the (ground state) Kohn-Sham orbitals prove to be such an orbital basis. In contrast, in a basis of natural orbitals (NOs) or Hartree-Fock orbitals, excitations often employ many orbitals and are accordingly hard to characterize. We demonstrate that it is possible in these cases to transform to natural excitation orbitals (NEOs) which resemble very closely the KS orbitals and afford the same simple description of excitations. The desired transformation has been obtained by diagonalization of a submatrix in the equations of linear response time-dependent 1-particle reduced density matrix functional theory (LR-TDDMFT) for the NO transformation, and that of a submatrix in the linear response time-dependent Hartree-Fock (LR-TDHF) equations for the transformation of HF orbitals. The corresponding submatrix is already diagonal in the KS basis in the LR-TDDFT equations. While the orbital shapes of the NEOs afford the characterization of the excitations as (mostly) simple orbital-to-orbital transitions, the orbital energies provide a fair estimate of excitation energies.

  14. Effects of cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation on motor cortex excitability and motor function.

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Bramanti, Alessia; Leo, Antonino; Manuli, Alfredo; Sciarrone, Francesca; Russo, Margherita; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-01-07

    The cerebellum regulates several motor functions through two main mechanisms, the cerebellum-brain inhibition (CBI) and the motor surround inhibition (MSI). Although the exact cerebellar structures and functions involved in such processes are partially known, Purkinje cells (PC) and their surrounding interneuronal networks may play a pivotal role concerning CBI and MSI. Cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been proven to shape specific cerebellar components in a feasible, safe, effective, and non-invasive manner. The aim of our study was to characterize the cerebellar structures and functions subtending CBI and MSI using a tACS approach. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent a cerebellar tACS protocol at 10, 50, and 300 Hz, or a sham-tACS over the right cerebellar hemisphere. We measured the tACS aftereffects on motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, CBI induced by tACS (tiCBI) at different frequencies, MSI, and hand motor task performance. None of the participants had any side effect related to tACS. After 50-Hz tACS, we observed a clear tiCBI-50Hz weakening (about +30%, p < 0.001) paralleled by a MEP amplitude increase (about +30%, p = 0.001) and a reduction of the time required to complete some motor task (about -20%, p = 0.01), lasting up to 30 min. The 300-Hz tACS induced a selective, specific tiCBI-300Hz and tiCBI-50Hz modulation in surrounding muscles (about -15%, p = 0.01) and MSI potentiation (about +40%, p < 0.001). The 10-Hz tACS and the sham-tACS were ineffective (p > 0.6). Our preliminary data suggest that PC may represent the last mediator of tiCBI and that the surrounding interneuronal network may have an important role in updating MSI, tiCBI, and M1 excitability during tonic muscle contraction, by acting onto the PC. The knowledge of these neurophysiological issues offers new cues to design innovative, non-invasive neuromodulation protocols to shape cerebellar-cerebral functions.

  15. Testing an excited-state energy density functional and the associated potential with the ionization potential theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemanadhan, M.; Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K.

    2014-06-01

    The modified local spin density (MLSD) functional and the related local potential for excited states is tested by employing the ionization potential theorem. The exchange functional for an excited state is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding exchange potential is given by an analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital energy ɛmax accurately, the potential is corrected for its asymptotic behaviour by employing the van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB) correction to it. ɛmax so obtained is then compared with the ΔSCF ionization energy calculated using the MLSD functional with self-interaction correction for the orbitals involved in the transition. It is shown that the two match quite accurately. The match becomes even better by tuning the LB correction with respect to a parameter in it.

  16. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Cloning and characterization of a functional human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Aspinwall, Richard; Rothwell, Dominic G.; Roldan-Arjona, Teresa; Anselmino, Catherine; Ward, Christopher J.; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Sampson, Julian R.; Lindahl, Tomas; Harris, Peter C.; Hickson, Ian D.

    1997-01-01

    Repair of oxidative damage to DNA bases is essential to prevent mutations and cell death. Endonuclease III is the major DNA glycosylase activity in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the excision of pyrimidines damaged by ring opening or ring saturation, and it also possesses an associated lyase activity that incises the DNA backbone adjacent to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. During analysis of the area adjacent to the human tuberous sclerosis gene (TSC2) in chromosome region 16p13.3, we identified a gene, OCTS3, that encodes a 1-kb transcript. Analysis of OCTS3 cDNA clones revealed an open reading frame encoding a predicted protein of 34.3 kDa that shares extensive sequence similarity with E. coli endonuclease III and a related enzyme from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, including a conserved active site region and an iron/sulfur domain. The product of the OCTS3 gene was therefore designated hNTH1 (human endonuclease III homolog 1). The hNTH1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. The recombinant protein had spectral properties indicative of the presence of an iron/sulfur cluster, and exhibited DNA glycosylase activity on double-stranded polydeoxyribonucleotides containing urea and thymine glycol residues, as well as an apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase activity. Our data indicate that hNTH1 is a structural and functional homolog of E. coli endonuclease III, and that this class of enzymes, for repair of oxidatively damaged pyrimidines in DNA, is highly conserved in evolution from microorganisms to human cells. PMID:8990169

  18. LcrV Mutants That Abolish Yersinia Type III Injectisome Function

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, Katherine Given; Miller, Nathan C.; Mitchell, Anthony; Plano, Gregory V.

    2013-01-01

    LcrV, the type III needle cap protein of pathogenic Yersinia, has been proposed to function as a tether between YscF, the needle protein, and YopB-YopD to constitute the injectisome, a conduit for the translocation of effector proteins into host cells. Further, insertion of LcrV-capped needles from a calcium-rich environment into host cells may trigger the low-calcium signal for effector translocation. Here, we used a genetic approach to test the hypothesis that the needle cap responds to the low-calcium signal by promoting injectisome assembly. Growth restriction of Yersinia pestis in the absence of calcium (low-calcium response [LCR+] phenotype) was exploited to isolate dominant negative lcrV alleles with missense mutations in its amber stop codon (lcrV*327). The addition of at least four amino acids or the eight-residue Strep tag to the C terminus was sufficient to generate an LCR− phenotype, with variant LcrV capping type III needles that cannot assemble the YopD injectisome component. The C-terminal Strep tag appears buried within the cap structure, blocking effector transport even in Y. pestis yscF variants that are otherwise calcium blind, a constitutive type III secretion phenotype. Thus, LcrV*327 mutants arrest the needle cap in a state in which it cannot respond to the low-calcium signal with either injectisome assembly or the activation of type III secretion. Insertion of the Strep tag at other positions of LcrV produced variants with wild-type LCR+, LCR−, or dominant negative LCR− phenotypes, thereby allowing us to identify discrete sites within LcrV as essential for its attributes as a secretion substrate, needle cap, and injectisome assembly factor. PMID:23222719

  19. Stone tool function at the paleolithic sites of Starosele and Buran Kaya III, Crimea: behavioral implications.

    PubMed

    Hardy, B L; Kay, M; Marks, A E; Monigal, K

    2001-09-11

    Stone tools are often the most abundant type of cultural remains at Paleolithic sites, yet their function is often poorly understood. Investigations of stone tool function, including microscopic use-wear and residue analyses, were performed on a sample of artifacts from the Paleolithic sites of Starosele (40,000-80,000 years BP) and Buran Kaya III (32,000-37,000 years BP). The Middle Paleolithic levels at Starosele exhibit a typical variant of the local Micoquian Industry. The artifacts from Buran Kaya III most closely resemble an Early Streletskayan Industry associated with the early Upper Paleolithic. The results of the functional analyses suggest that hominids at both sites were exploiting woody and starchy plant material as well as birds and mammals. Both sites show evidence of hafting of a wide variety of tools and the possible use of projectile or thrusting spears. These analyses were performed by using two different techniques conducted by independent researchers. Combined residue and use-wear analyses suggest that both the Upper Paleolithic and Middle Paleolithic hominids at these sites were broad-based foragers capable of exploiting a wide range of resources.

  20. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed indazole synthesis by C-H bond functionalization and cyclative capture.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yajing; Bergman, Robert G; Lavis, Luke D; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2013-05-15

    An efficient, one-step, and highly functional group-compatible synthesis of substituted N-aryl-2H-indazoles is reported via the rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H bond addition of azobenzenes to aldehydes. The regioselective coupling of unsymmetrical azobenzenes was further demonstrated and led to the development of a new removable aryl group that allows for the preparation of indazoles without N-substitution. The 2-aryl-2H-indazole products also represent a new class of readily prepared fluorophores for which initial spectroscopic characterization has been performed.

  1. Excited state property of hardly photodissociable heme-CO adduct studied by time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Takehiro; Pal, Biswajit; Kitagawa, Teizo

    2005-11-10

    While most of CO-bound hemes are easily photodissociated with a quantum yield of nearly unity, we occasionally encounter a CO-heme which appears hardly photodissociable under the ordinary measurement conditions of resonance Raman spectra using CW laser excitation and a spinning cell. This study aims to understand such hemes theoretically, that is, the excited-state properties of the five-coordinate heme-CO adduct (5cH) as well as the 6c heme-CO adduct (6cH) with a weak axial ligand. Using a hybrid density functional theory, we scrutinized the properties of the ground and excited spin states of the computational models of a 5cH and a water-ligated 6cH (6cH-H(2)O) and compared these properties with those of a photodissociable imidazole-ligated 6cH (6cH-Im). Jahn-Teller softening for the Fe-C-O bending potential in the a(1)-e excited state was suggested. The excited-state properties of 6cH-Im and 5cH were further studied with time-dependent DFT theory. The reaction products of 6cH-Im and 5cH were assumed to be quintet and triplet states, respectively. According to the time-dependent DFT calculations, the Q excited state of 6cH-Im, which is initially a pure pi-pi state, crosses the Fe-CO dissociative state (2A') without large elongation of the Fe-CO bond. In contrast, the Q state of the 5cH does not cross the Fe-CO dissociative state but results in the formation of the excited spin state with a bent Fe-C-O. Consequently, photoisomerization from linear to bent Fe-C-O in the 5cH is a likely mechanism for apparent nonphotodissociation.

  2. Lack of in vivo functional compensation between Pax family groups II and III in rodents.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shinichiro; Rocancourt, Didier; Buckingham, Margaret; Relaix, Frederic

    2011-10-01

    Pax genes encode evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that play critical roles in embryonic development and organogenesis. Pax proteins are subdivided into four subfamilies: group I (Pax1and 9), II (Pax2, 5, and 8), III (Pax3 and 7), and IV (Pax4 and 6), based on the presence of a paired domain, an octapeptide motif and part or all of the homeodomain. Studies of the evolution of this gene family are incomplete. Nevertheless, it is known that each family evolved via duplication from four corresponding ancestral genes. Pax gene functions have been shown to be conserved within subgroups. It remains unclear, however, whether any (early) conserved function is shared between subgroups. To investigate conserved functions between subfamily II and III, we replaced an allele of Pax3 with a Pax8-coding sequence via gene targeting in the mouse. Homozygote Pax3(Pax8/Pax8) embryos display phenotypes indistinguishable from Pax3-deficient mutant embryos, with neural tube closure defects, a deficit in neural crest cells in the trunk, and skeletal muscle defects including absence of long-range migratory myogenic progenitors and impaired somite development. Interestingly, despite Pax8 expression in the neural tube in a domain ventral to that of Pax3, Pax8 cannot replace Pax3 function in the dorsal neural tube. Altogether, our results demonstrate that expression of Pax8 fails to compensate for Pax3 deficiency, demonstrating the absence of functional compensation between one subfamily of Pax genes and another in the mouse embryo. Our result suggests that Pax3/7 and Pax2/5/8 functions evolved independently after duplication of the ancestral progenitor Pax genes.

  3. Excited-State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Optical Limiting in Zinc Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-04-07

    Optical-limiting materials are capable of attenuating light to protect delicate equipment from high-intensity light sources. Phthalocyanines have attracted a lot of attention for optical-limiting applications due to their versatility and large nonlinear absorption. With excited-state absorption (ESA) being the primary mechanism for optical limiting behavior in phthalocyanines, the ability to tune the optical absorption of ground and excited states in phthalocyanines would allow for the development of advanced optical limiters. We recently developed a method for the calculation of ESA based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory propagation of an excited-state density. In this work, we apply the approach to zinc phthalocyanine, demonstrating the ability of our method to efficiently identify the optical limiting potential of a molecular complex.

  4. Density Functional Theory Modeling of Low-Loss Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy in Wurtzite III-Nitride Ternary Alloys.

    PubMed

    Eljarrat, Alberto; Sastre, Xavier; Peiró, Francesca; Estradé, Sónia

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the dielectric response of III-nitride semiconductors is studied using density functional theory (DFT) band structure calculations. The aim of this study is to improve our understanding of the features in the low-loss electron energy-loss spectra of ternary alloys, but the results are also relevant to optical and UV spectroscopy results. In addition, the dependence of the most remarkable features with composition is tested, i.e. applying Vegard's law to band gap and plasmon energy. For this purpose, three wurtzite ternary alloys, from the combination of binaries AlN, GaN, and InN, were simulated through a wide compositional range (i.e., Al x Ga1-x N, In x Al1-x N, and In x Ga1-x N, with x=[0,1]). For this DFT calculations, the standard tools found in Wien2k software were used. In order to improve the band structure description of these semiconductor compounds, the modified Becke-Johnson exchange-correlation potential was also used. Results from these calculations are presented, including band structure, density of states, and complex dielectric function for the whole compositional range. Larger, closer to experimental values, band gap energies are predicted using the novel potential, when compared with standard generalized gradient approximation. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the collective excitation features in the dielectric response reveals their compositional dependence, which sometimes departs from a linear behavior (bowing). Finally, an advantageous method for measuring the plasmon energy dependence from these calculations is explained.

  5. Aromatic Lateral Substituents Influence the Excitation Energies of Hexaaza Lanthanide Macrocyclic Complexes: A Wave Function Theory and Density Functional Study.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2015-09-24

    The high interest in lanthanide chemistry, and particularly in their luminescence, has been encouraged by the need of understanding the lanthanide chemical coordination and how the design of new luminescent materials can be affected by this. This work is focused on the understanding of the electronic structure, bonding nature, and optical properties of a set of lanthanide hexaaza macrocyclic complexes, which can lead to potential optical applications. Here we found that the DFT ground state of the open-shell complexes are mainly characterized by the manifold of low lying f states, having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps. The results obtained from the wave function theory calculations (SO-RASSI) put on evidence the multiconfigurational character of their ground state and it is observed that the large spin-orbit coupling and the weak crystal field produce a strong mix of the ground and the excited states. The electron localization function (ELF) and the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) support the idea of a dative interaction between the macrocyclic ligand and the lanthanide center for all the studied systems; noting that, this interaction has a covalent character, where the d-orbital participation is evidenced from NBO analysis, leaving the f shell completely noninteracting in the chemical bonding. From the optical part we observed in all cases the characteristic intraligand (IL) (π-π*) and ligand to metal charge-transfer (LMCT) bands that are present in the ultraviolet and visible regions, and for the open-shell complexes we found the inherent f-f electronic transitions on the visible and near-infrared region.

  6. Analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in time-dependent density functional theory: Formalism, implementation, and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the formalism, implementation, and performance of the analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) that extends our previous work [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011)] on the analytical Hessian in TDDFT within Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to full TDDFT. In contrast to TDA-TDDFT, an appreciable advantage of full TDDFT is that it maintains the oscillator strength sum rule, and therefore yields more precise results for the oscillator strength and other related physical quantities. For the excited-state harmonic vibrational frequency calculation, however, full TDDFT does not seem to be advantageous since the numerical tests demonstrate that the accuracy of TDDFT with and without TDA are comparable to each other. As a common practice, the computed harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled by a suitable scale factor to yield good agreement with the experimental fundamental frequencies. Here we apply both the optimized ground-state and excited-state scale factors to scale the calculated excited-state harmonic frequencies and find that the scaling decreases the root-mean-square errors. The optimized scale factors derived from the excited-state calculations are slightly smaller than those from the ground-state calculations.

  7. Analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in time-dependent density functional theory: formalism, implementation, and performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2011-11-14

    The paper presents the formalism, implementation, and performance of the analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) that extends our previous work [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011)] on the analytical Hessian in TDDFT within Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to full TDDFT. In contrast to TDA-TDDFT, an appreciable advantage of full TDDFT is that it maintains the oscillator strength sum rule, and therefore yields more precise results for the oscillator strength and other related physical quantities. For the excited-state harmonic vibrational frequency calculation, however, full TDDFT does not seem to be advantageous since the numerical tests demonstrate that the accuracy of TDDFT with and without TDA are comparable to each other. As a common practice, the computed harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled by a suitable scale factor to yield good agreement with the experimental fundamental frequencies. Here we apply both the optimized ground-state and excited-state scale factors to scale the calculated excited-state harmonic frequencies and find that the scaling decreases the root-mean-square errors. The optimized scale factors derived from the excited-state calculations are slightly smaller than those from the ground-state calculations.

  8. exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G0W0. Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more.

  9. Exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-10

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G(0)W(0). Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Cardiovascular Function by Influencing the Excitability of Subfornical Organ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kuksis, Markus; Smith, Pauline M.; Ferguson, Alastair V.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter endogenously found in the central nervous system, has recently been suggested to act as a signalling molecule in the brain having beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. This study was thus undertaken to investigate the effect of NaHS (an H2S donor) in the subfornical organ (SFO), a central nervous system site important to blood pressure regulation. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats for both in vivo and in vitro experiments. We first used RT-PCR to confirm our previous microarray analyses showing that mRNAs for the enzymes required to produce H2S are expressed in the SFO. We then used microinjection techniques to investigate the physiological effects of NaHS in SFO, and found that NaHS microinjection (5 nmol) significantly increased blood pressure (mean AUC = 853.5±105.7 mmHg*s, n = 5). Further, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology and found that 97.8% (88 of 90) of neurons depolarized in response to NaHS. This response was found to be concentration dependent with an EC50 of 35.6 µM. Coupled with the depolarized membrane potential, we observed an overall increase in neuronal excitability using an analysis of rheobase and action potential firing patterns. This study has provided the first evidence of NaHS and thus H2S actions and their cellular correlates in SFO, implicating this brain area as a site where H2S may act to control blood pressure. PMID:25144759

  11. Evaporation residue excitation function and spin distribution for 31P + 170Er

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanto, G.; Madhavan, N.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Mukul, Ish; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Roy, A.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Mazumdar, I.; Gothe, D. A.; Chavan, P. B.; Sadhukhan, J.; Pal, S.; Kaur, Maninder; Singh, Varinderjit; Sinha, A. K.; Ramamurthy, V. S.

    2013-09-01

    Background: Synthesis of a doubly magic spherical nucleus beyond 82208Pb126 is a key question in contemporary nuclear physics. Such nuclei can exist solely because of shell stabilization. As the formation cross section of super heavy elements is prohibitively low, attempts have been made to understand stabilizing effects of closed proton (Z) and neutron (N) shells in the vicinity of 82208Pb126.Purpose: The present work attempts to elucidate the stabilizing effect of shell closure, in general, and the same of Z=82, in particular.Methods: The evaporation residue (ER) excitation function and ER-gated γ-multiplicity distribution have been measured for the reaction 31P + 170Er at a laboratory energy range of 134-172 MeV. The measurements have been carried out using the HYbrid Recoil mass Analyzer (HYRA) in gas-filled mode and a 4π spin spectrometer consisting of 29 NaI(Tl) detectors. Results of the present reaction have been compared with those of the reaction 30Si + 170Er. Statistical model calculation has been performed for both the systems.Results: The two reactions, induced by 30Si and 31P projectiles, resulted in compound nuclei (CN) 200Pb (Z=82) and 201Bi (Z=83), respectively. To reproduce experimental ER cross sections, the liquid drop fission barrier (Bf) had to be scaled in the statistical model calculation. The scaling factor (Kf) varies from 0.75 to 1.05 and 0.90 to 1.05 for 30Si and 31P induced reactions, respectively. No significant differences have been found between γ-multiplicity distribution and the distribution moments of the two systems.Conclusions: No clear signature has been observed in favor of extra stability of the ERs with closed proton shell (Z=82) as Kf values of the two systems match within errors. More exclusive measurements and comparison between more systems forming CN/ER around Z=82 are desirable.

  12. Altered neuronal excitability underlies impaired hippocampal function in an animal model of psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Grüter, Thomas; Wiescholleck, Valentina; Dubovyk, Valentyna; Aliane, Verena; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Psychosis is accompanied by severe attentional deficits, and impairments in associational-memory processing and sensory information processing that are ascribed to dysfunctions in prefrontal and hippocampal function. Disruptions of glutamatergic signaling may underlie these alterations: Antagonism of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) results in similar molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral changes in rodents and/or humans as those that occur in psychosis, raising the question as to whether changes in glutamatergic transmission may be intrinsic to the pathophysiology of the disease. In an animal model of psychosis that comprises treatment with the irreversible NMDAR-antagonist, MK801, we explored the cellular mechanisms that may underlie hippocampal dysfunction in psychosis. MK801-treatment resulted in a profound loss of hippocampal LTP that was evident 4 weeks after treatment. Whereas neuronal expression of the immediate early gene, Arc, was enhanced in the hippocampus by spatial learning in controls, MK801-treated animals failed to show activity-dependent increases in Arc expression. By contrast, a significant increase in basal Arc expression in the absence of learning was evident compared to controls. Paired-pulse (PP) facilitation was increased at the 40 ms interval indicating that NMDAR and/or fast GABAergic-mediated neurotransmission was disrupted. In line with this, MK801-treatment resulted in a significant decrease in GABA(A), and increase in GABA(B)-receptor-expression in PFC, along with a significant increase of GABA(B)- and NMDAR-GluN2B expression in the dentate gyrus. NMDAR-GluN1 or GluN2A subunit expression was unchanged. These data suggest that in psychosis, deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory may be caused by a loss of hippocampal LTP that arises through enhanced hippocampal neuronal excitability, altered GluN2B and GABA receptor expression and an uncoupling of the hippocampus-prefrontal cortex circuitry. PMID:26042007

  13. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Bailey, Stephen; McGreer, Ian D.; Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yeche, Christophe; Strauss, Michael A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Shen, Yue; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Aubourg, Eric; Bovy, Jo; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; and others

    2013-08-10

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i {approx}< 21.8 quasars are selected over an area of 2236 deg{sup 2}, with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 < z < 3.5, filling in a key part of the luminosity-redshift plane for optical quasar studies. The completeness of the survey is derived through simulated quasar photometry, and this completeness estimate is checked using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar K-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M{sub i} (z = 2.2) Almost-Equal-To -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log {Phi}* - M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of {approx}2.6 while {Phi}* declines by a factor of {approx}8. At z {approx}< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities.

  14. Electronic Excitations in Pyrrole: A Test Case for Determination of Chromophores in the Chromogenic Effects of Neurotoxic Hydrocarbons by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and Single-Excitation Configuration Interaction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo; Dixon, David A.

    2002-11-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) calculations on the electronic excitations in pyrrole have been performed to examine the reliability of these first-principles electronic structure methods in predicting electronic excitation spectraof pyrrole-containing compounds. Both the TD-DFT and CIS calculations led to satisfactory results when compared to available experimental data, particularly for low-lying excited states. The TD-DFT and CIS calculations provide lower and upper limits of the excitation energies, respectively, for low-lying singlet excited states. These results suggest that these methods can be used for the prediction of the excitation spectra, particularly the excitation energies for low-lying excited states, of chromophores responsible for the chromogenic effects of neurotoxic hydrocarbons, which are believed to be substituted pyrroles and their adducts with proteins. As an example of a practical application, the spectrum of the widely used 2,5-dimethylpyrrole has been calculated. It is shown that the 2,5-dimethylpyrrole molecule does not have an absorption in the region of the visible spectrum (400-700 nm), suggesting that the absorption observed at 530 nm and the color of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole is due to another species, probably a product of possible 2,5-dimethylpyrrole autoxidation. This suggests that the conclusions from previously reported experimental studies of biochemical reactions of neurotoxic γ-diketones need to be reexamined in terms of the relationship of chromogenicity to neurotoxicity.

  15. Gravitational fragmentation in turbulent primordial gas and the initial mass function of Population III stars

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Paul C.; Glover, Simon C.O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Bromm, Volker; /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2010-08-25

    We report results from numerical simulations of star formation in the early universe that focus on the dynamical behavior of metal-free gas under different initial and environmental conditions. In particular we investigate the role of turbulence, which is thought to ubiquitously accompany the collapse of high-redshift halos. We distinguish between two main cases: the birth of Population III.1 stars - those which form in the pristine halos unaffected by prior star formation - and the formation of Population III.2 stars - those forming in halos where the gas is still metal free but has an increased ionization fraction. This latter case can arise either from exposure to the intense UV radiation of stellar sources in neighboring halos, or from the high virial temperatures associated with the formation of massive halos, that is, those with masses greater than {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}}. We find that turbulent primordial gas is highly susceptible to fragmentation in both cases, even for turbulence in the subsonic regime, i.e. for rms velocity dispersions as low as 20 % of the sound speed. Contrary to our original expectations, fragmentation is more vigorous and more widespread in pristine halos compared to pre-ionized ones. We therefore predict Pop III.1 stars to be on average of somewhat lower mass, and form in larger groups, than Pop III.2 stars. We find that fragment masses cover over two orders of magnitude, indicating that the resulting Population III initial mass function was significantly extended in mass as well. Our results suggest that the details of the fragmentation process depend on the local properties of the turbulent velocity field and hence we expect considerable variations in the resulting stellar mass spectrum in different halos. In particular, the lowest-mass objects in our sample should have survived to the present day and could potentially provide a unique record of the physical conditions of stellar birth in the primordial universe

  16. Excited States of DNA Base Pairs Using Long-Range Corrected Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Lasse; Govind, Niranjan

    2009-09-10

    In this work we present a study of the excitation energies of adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine and the adenine-thymine (AT) and guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs using long-range corrected (LC) density functional theory. We compare three recent LC-functionals, BNL, CAM-B3LYP and LC-PBE0 with B3LYP and coupled cluster results from the literature. We find that the best overall performance is for the BNL functional based on LDA. However, in order to achieve this good agreement a smaller attenuation parameter was needed which leads to non-optimum performance for ground state properties. B3LYP, on the other hand, severely underestimates the charge transfer (CT) transitions in the base pairs. Surprisingly we also find that the CAM-B3LYP functional also underestimates the CT excitation energy for the GC base pair, but correctly describes the AT base pair. This illustrates the importance of retaining the full long-range exact exchange even at distances as short as that of the DNA base pairs. The worst overall performance was obtained with the LC-PBE0 functional which overestimates the excitations for the individual bases as well as the base pairs. It is therefore crucial to strike a good balance between the amount of local and long-range exact exchange.

  17. A simplified Tamm-Dancoff density functional approach for the electronic excitation spectra of very large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimme, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Two approximations in the Tamm-Dancoff density functional theory approach (TDA-DFT) to electronically excited states are proposed which allow routine computations for electronic ultraviolet (UV)- or circular dichroism (CD) spectra of molecules with 500-1000 atoms. Speed-ups compared to conventional time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) treatments of about two to three orders of magnitude in the excited state part at only minor loss of accuracy are obtained. The method termed sTDA ("s" for simplified) employs atom-centered Löwdin-monopole based two-electron repulsion integrals with the asymptotically correct 1/R behavior and perturbative single excitation configuration selection. It is formulated generally for any standard global hybrid density functional with given Fock-exchange mixing parameter ax. The method performs well for two standard benchmark sets of vertical singlet-singlet excitations for values of ax in the range 0.2-0.6. The mean absolute deviations from reference data are only 0.2-0.3 eV and similar to those from standard TD-DFT. In three cases (two dyes and one polypeptide), good mutual agreement between the electronic spectra (up to 10-11 eV excitation energy) from the sTDA method and those from TD(A)-DFT is obtained. The computed UV- and CD-spectra of a few typical systems (e.g., C60, two transition metal complexes, [7]helicene, polyalanine, a supramolecular aggregate with 483 atoms and about 7000 basis functions) compare well with corresponding experimental data. The method is proposed together with medium-sized double- or triple-zeta type atomic-orbital basis sets as a quantum chemical tool to investigate the spectra of huge molecular systems at a reliable DFT level.

  18. Photoluminescence changes of III-Nitride lateral polarity structures after chemical functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Nora G.; Franke, Alexander; Kirste, Ronny; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2016-12-01

    The photoluminescence changes of a III-Nitride semiconductor with various surface topographies were studied after chemical functionalization. Al x Ga1-x N with a composition of 70% aluminum was used and the surfaces were functionalized with a fluorophore dye-terminated peptide using a linker molecule. The stability of the wafers in water was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry prior to modifying the material. The leaching data demonstrated that the AlGaN material in highly stable in biological conditions over 7 d. The attachment of the dye to the wafer was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The PL spectrum showed a clear signature of the dye with a pronounced emission peak at approximately 260 nm, indicating a successful attachment to the surface.

  19. Description of ground and excited electronic states by ensemble density functional method with extended active space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Martínez, Todd J.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2017-08-01

    An extended variant of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, the REKS(4,4) method, designed to describe the ground electronic states of strongly multireference systems is modified to enable calculation of excited states within the time-independent variational formalism. The new method, the state-interaction state-averaged REKS(4,4), i.e., SI-SA-REKS(4,4), is capable of describing several excited states of a molecule involving double bond cleavage, polyradical character, or multiple chromophoric units. We demonstrate that the new method correctly describes the ground and the lowest singlet excited states of a molecule (ethylene) undergoing double bond cleavage. The applicability of the new method for excitonic states is illustrated with π stacked ethylene and tetracene dimers. We conclude that the new method can describe a wide range of multireference phenomena.

  20. Quantal Density Functional Theory(Q-DFT) of Degenerate Ground and Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Viraht; Pan, Xiaoyin

    2002-03-01

    We present here Q-DFT (V.Sahni et al, PRL 87), 113002 (2001), and references therein. of degenerate states with degeneracy g. We describe : (a) The transformation from a degenerate ground or excited pure state of the interacting system to an S (single Slater determinant) system of noninteracting Fermions with equivalent density, total energy, and ionization potential; (b) The construction of g S systems to reproduce a subspace ensemble density and energy. The density and energy are defined via the ensemble density matrix formed from the degenerate ground or excited pure states of the interacting system; (c) The construction of an S system with a g-fold degenerate highest occupied level, (which leads to g Slater determinants (C.A. Ullrich and W. Kohn, PRL 87), 093001(2001).), to reproduce the ground or excited state ensemble density and energy.

  1. LOWER EXTREMITY FUNCTIONAL TESTS AND RISK OF INJURY IN DIVISION III COLLEGIATE ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Heiderscheit, Bryan C.; Manske, Robert C.; Niemuth, Paul E.; Rauh, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Functional tests have been used primarily to assess an athlete's fitness or readiness to return to sport. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine the ability of the standing long jump (SLJ) test, the single‐leg hop (SLH) for distance test, and the lower extremity functional test (LEFT) as preseason screening tools to identify collegiate athletes who may be at increased risk for a time‐loss sports‐related low back or lower extremity injury. Methods: A total of 193 Division III athletes from 15 university teams (110 females, age 19.1 ± 1.1 y; 83 males, age 19.5 ± 1.3 y) were tested prior to their sports seasons. Athletes performed the functional tests in the following sequence: SLJ, SLH, LEFT. The athletes were then prospectively followed during their sports season for occurrence of low back or LE injury. Results: Female athletes who completed the LEFT in $118 s were 6 times more likely (OR=6.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 31.7) to sustain a thigh or knee injury. Male athletes who completed the LEFT in #100 s were more likely to experience a time‐loss injury to the low back or LE (OR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 9.5) or a foot or ankle injury (OR=6.7, 95% CI: 1.5, 29.7) than male athletes who completed the LEFT in 101 s or more. Female athletes with a greater than 10% side‐to‐side asymmetry between SLH distances had a 4‐fold increase in foot or ankle injury (cut point: >10%; OR=4.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 15.4). Male athletes with SLH distances (either leg) at least 75% of their height had at least a 3‐fold increase (OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for the right LE; OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for left LE) in low back or LE injury. Conclusions: The LEFT and the SLH tests appear useful in identifying Division III athletes at risk for a low back or lower extremity sports injury. Thus, these tests warrant further consideration as preparticipatory screening examination tools for sport injury in this population. Clinical Relevance: The single‐leg hop for

  2. Lower extremity functional tests and risk of injury in division iii collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Brumitt, Jason; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Manske, Robert C; Niemuth, Paul E; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2013-06-01

    Functional tests have been used primarily to assess an athlete's fitness or readiness to return to sport. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine the ability of the standing long jump (SLJ) test, the single-leg hop (SLH) for distance test, and the lower extremity functional test (LEFT) as preseason screening tools to identify collegiate athletes who may be at increased risk for a time-loss sports-related low back or lower extremity injury. A total of 193 Division III athletes from 15 university teams (110 females, age 19.1 ± 1.1 y; 83 males, age 19.5 ± 1.3 y) were tested prior to their sports seasons. Athletes performed the functional tests in the following sequence: SLJ, SLH, LEFT. The athletes were then prospectively followed during their sports season for occurrence of low back or LE injury. Female athletes who completed the LEFT in $118 s were 6 times more likely (OR=6.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 31.7) to sustain a thigh or knee injury. Male athletes who completed the LEFT in #100 s were more likely to experience a time-loss injury to the low back or LE (OR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 9.5) or a foot or ankle injury (OR=6.7, 95% CI: 1.5, 29.7) than male athletes who completed the LEFT in 101 s or more. Female athletes with a greater than 10% side-to-side asymmetry between SLH distances had a 4-fold increase in foot or ankle injury (cut point: >10%; OR=4.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 15.4). Male athletes with SLH distances (either leg) at least 75% of their height had at least a 3-fold increase (OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for the right LE; OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for left LE) in low back or LE injury. The LEFT and the SLH tests appear useful in identifying Division III athletes at risk for a low back or lower extremity sports injury. Thus, these tests warrant further consideration as preparticipatory screening examination tools for sport injury in this population. The single-leg hop for distance and the lower extremity functional test, when administered to Division III

  3. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shunsuke A; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  4. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  5. Extension of the excitation functions of deuteron induced reactions on natSn up to 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.

    2017-01-01

    Using the stacked-foil activation technique, cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions on natural Sn targets were determined up to 50 MeV. Excitation functions are reported for the product nuclides 116mSb, 117Sb, 118mSb, 120mSb 122m+gSb, 124m+gSb, 110Sn(cum), 113m+gSn(cum), 117mSn, 110mIn(cum), 110gIn, 111m+gIn(cum), 113mIn, 114mIn 115mIn. Comparison with earlier published data at lower energy is discussed. For all excitation functions a theoretical calculation using the TALYS 1.6 (on-line TENDL-2015 library) code is shown.

  6. Excitation functions for complete-fusion and transfer reactions in {sup 4}He interaction with {sup 197}Au nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kulko, A. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Muzychka, Yu. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Rassadov, D. N.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D. A.

    2007-04-15

    Excitation functions are measured for the fusion reactions {sup 197}Au({sup 4}He, xn){sup 201-xn}Tl that are induced by alpha-particle interaction with gold nuclei in the energy range 14-36 MeV and in which x neutrons (0 {<=} x {<=} 3) are evaporated. The stack-activation technique was used to record and separate reaction products. Experimental data on the fusion reactions followed by evaporation of one to three neutrons agree with results of previous studies. For the radiative-capture reaction {sup 197}Au({sup 4}He,{gamma}){sup 201}Tl, the upper limit on the cross section proved to be much lower. The excitation functions for the reactions subjected to measurements are compared with the results of calculations based on the statistical model and with the results of an experiment performed previously in a {sup 6}He beam.

  7. Excitation Functions for Complete Fusion and Transfer Reactions in the Interaction of 4He Nuclei with 197Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulko, A. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Muzychka, Yu. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Rassadov, D. N.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D. A.

    2007-05-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the fusion reaction 197Au(αxn)201-xnTl with the evaporation of x neutrons (0⩽x⩽3) in the energy range 14-36 MeV. The induced-activation method was used for registration and identification of the reaction products. The experimental cross sections for the (1-3)-neutron evaporation residues are in good agreement with the results known from literature. For the radiation capture reaction 197Au(α,γ)201Tl, the upper limit was obtained essentially lower. The excitation functions for the measured reactions are compared with calculations in the frame of the statistical model, as well as with formerly measured similar data with a 6He beam.

  8. Excitation Functions for Complete Fusion and Transfer Reactions in the Interaction of 4He Nuclei with 197Au

    SciTech Connect

    Kulko, A. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Muzychka, Yu. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Rassadov, D. N.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D. A.

    2007-05-22

    Excitation functions have been measured for the fusion reaction 197Au({alpha}xn)201-xnTl with the evaporation of x neutrons (0{<=}x{<=}3) in the energy range 14-36 MeV. The induced-activation method was used for registration and identification of the reaction products. The experimental cross sections for the (1-3)-neutron evaporation residues are in good agreement with the results known from literature. For the radiation capture reaction 197Au({alpha},{gamma})201Tl, the upper limit was obtained essentially lower. The excitation functions for the measured reactions are compared with calculations in the frame of the statistical model, as well as with formerly measured similar data with a 6He beam.

  9. Excitation functions for complete-fusion and transfer reactions in 4He interaction with 197Au nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulko, A. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Muzychka, Yu. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Rassadov, D. N.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D. A.

    2007-04-01

    Excitation functions are measured for the fusion reactions 197Au(4He, xn)201-xn Tl that are induced by alpha-particle interaction with gold nuclei in the energy range 14 36 MeV and in which x neutrons (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) are evaporated. The stack-activation technique was used to record and separate reaction products. Experimental data on the fusion reactions followed by evaporation of one to three neutrons agree with results of previous studies. For the radiative-capture reaction 197Au(4He,γ)201Tl, the upper limit on the cross section proved to be much lower. The excitation functions for the reactions subjected to measurements are compared with the results of calculations based on the statistical model and with the results of an experiment performed previously in a 6He beam.

  10. Excitation Functions of Helion-Induced Nuclear Reactions for the Production of the Medical Radioisotope 103Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, Ye.; Qaim, S. M.

    2005-05-01

    Excitation functions were measured by the stacked-foil technique for the reactions 100Ru(α,n)103Pd, 101Ru(α,2n)103Pd, 101Ru(3He,n)103Pd, and 102Ru(3He,2n)103Pd for incident energies up to 25 and 34 MeV for α-particles and 3He ions, respectively. The integral thick target yields of the product radionuclide 103Pd calculated from the excitation functions of the above-named four reactions amount to 960, 1050, 50, and 725 KBq/μAh, respectively, at the maximum energy of the incident particle. The data are compared with the results of statistical model calculations and other charged particle induced reaction investigations.

  11. Measurement of the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg excitation function

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C. M.; Dragojevic, I.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nelson, S. L.; Hoffman, D. C.; Nitsche, H.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K. E.; Eichler, R.

    2009-02-15

    The excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of 320{sub -100}{sup +110} pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from {sup 259}Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,2n){sup 258}Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved {sup 258}Sg half-life of 2.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.6} ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  12. Structural and functional characterization of two unusual endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Hall, David R; Smalås, Arne O; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna; Moe, Elin

    2015-08-01

    While most bacteria possess a single gene encoding the bifunctional DNA glycosylase Endonuclease III (EndoIII) in their genomes, Deinococcus radiodurans possesses three: DR2438 (DrEndoIII1), DR0289 (DrEndoIII2) and DR0982 (DrEndoIII3). Here we have determined the crystal structures of DrEndoIII1 and an N-terminally truncated form of DrEndoIII3 (DrEndoIII3Δ76). We have also generated a homology model of DrEndoIII2 and measured activity of the three enzymes. All three structures consist of two all α-helical domains, one of which exhibits a [4Fe-4S] cluster and the other a HhH-motif, separated by a DNA binding cleft, similar to previously determined structures of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, both DrEndoIII1 and DrEndoIII3 possess an extended HhH motif with extra helical features and an altered electrostatic surface potential. In addition, the DNA binding cleft of DrEndoIII3 seems to be less accessible for DNA interactions, while in DrEndoIII1 it seems to be more open. Analysis of the enzyme activities shows that DrEndoIII2 is most similar to the previously studied enzymes, while DrEndoIII1 seems to be more distant with a weaker activity towards substrate DNA containing either thymine glycol or an abasic site. DrEndoIII3 is the most distantly related enzyme and displays no detectable activity towards these substrates even though the suggested catalytic residues are conserved. Based on a comparative structural analysis, we suggest that the altered surface potential, shape of the substrate-binding pockets and specific amino acid substitutions close to the active site and in the DNA interacting loops may underlie the unexpected differences in activity.

  13. A Functional Threshold for Long-Term Use of Hand and Arm Function Can Be Determined: Predictions From a Computational Model and Supporting Data From the Extremity Constraint-Induced Therapy Evaluation (EXCITE) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cheol E.; Wolf, Steven L.; Arbib, Michael A.; Winstein, Carolee J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although spontaneous use of the more-affected arm and hand after stroke is an important determinant of participation and quality of life, a number of patients exhibit decreases in use following rehabilitative therapy. A previous neurocomputational model predicted that if the dose of therapy is sufficient to bring performance above a certain threshold, training can be stopped. Objective The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that there exists a threshold for function of the paretic arm and hand after therapy. If function is above this threshold, spontaneous use will increase in the months following therapy. In contrast, if function is below this threshold, spontaneous use will decrease. Methods New computer simulations are presented showing that changes in arm use following therapy depend on a performance threshold. This prediction was tested by reanalyzing the data from the Extremity Constraint-Induced Therapy Evaluation (EXCITE) trial, a phase III randomized controlled trial in which participants received constraint-induced movement therapy for 2 weeks and were tested both 1 week and 1 year after therapy. Results The results demonstrate that arm and hand function measured immediately after therapy predicts, on average, the long-term change of arm use. Above a functional threshold, use improves. Below this threshold, use decreases. Limitations The reanalysis of the EXCITE trial data provides a “group” threshold above which a majority of patients, but not all, improve spontaneously. A goal of future research is to provide the means to assess when patients reach their individual threshold. Conclusion Understanding of the causal and nonlinear relationship between limb function and daily use is important for the future development of cost-effective interventions and prevention of “rehabilitation in vain.” PMID:19797304

  14. [STT arthrodesis for treatment of stage III semilunar bone necrosis: functional outcome].

    PubMed

    Tränkle, M; Sauerbier, M; Linsner, G; Bickert, B; Germann, G

    2000-11-01

    Scapho-trapezio-trapezoid arthrodesis for the treatment of Kienböck's disease is recommended as a salvage procedure for Stage III A and B in the Lichtman classification. This study reviews the results of 26 patients with stage III of Kienböck's disease treated by STT-arthrodesis. 26 patients (16 male, 10 female) were treated by STT-arthrodesis between 1993 and 1998. Fusion was established after seven weeks average. All patients were examined, the mean follow-up time was 35 (10 to 72) months. Active range of motion showed 63% of extension/flexion and 51% of radial/ulnar deviation on average, compared to the uninjured hand. Mean preoperative and postoperative pain scores were 58.4 (non-stress) vs. 82.5 (stress) and 16.4 (non-stress) vs. 33.7 (stress), eight patients claimed complete pain relief. Grip strength improved to 71% of the opposite side. Total DASH score reached 24.8. 20 of the 26 patients were satisfied with the final result and would undergo the operation again. We found a significant reduction of pain, a slightly reduced grip strength and a satisfying functional wrist mobility after STT-arthrodesis. Carpal height was unchanged and the carpal collapse did not progress. The mid-term data support that STT-arthrodesis will stand the test of time.

  15. Cytochrome oxidase subunit III from Arbacia lixula: detection of functional constraints by comparison with homologous sequences.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, C; Martiradonna, A; Saccone, C

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we report the comparison of the sequences of the cytochrome oxidase subunit III from three different sea urchin species. Both nucleotide and amino acid sequences have been analyzed. The nucleotide sequence analysis reveals that the sea urchin sequences obey some rules already found in mammals. The base substitution analysis carried out on the sequences of the three species pairs, shows that the evolutionary dynamics of the first and the second codon positions are so slow that do not allow a quantitative measurement of their genetic distances, thus demonstrating that also in these species the COIII gene is strongly conserved during evolution. Changes occurring at the third codon positions indicate that the three species evolved from a common ancestor under different directional mutational pressure. The multi-alignment of the sea urchin proteins indicates the existence of the amino acid sequence motif N R T that represents a possible glycosylation site. Another glycosylation site has been detected in the mammalian cytochrome oxidase subunit III, in a position slightly different. Such an analysis revealed, for the first time, a new functional aspect of this sequence.

  16. Imaging of rotational wave-function in photodissociation of rovibrationally excited HCl molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygoryeva, K.; Rakovský, J.; Votava, O.; Fárník, M.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a visualization of quantum mechanical phenomena with the velocity map imaging (VMI) technique, combining vibrationally mediated photodissociation (VMP) of a simple diatomic HCl with the VMI of its H-photofragments. Free HCl molecules were excited by a pump infrared (IR) laser pulse to particular rotational J levels of the v = 2 vibrational state, and subsequently a probe ultraviolet laser photodissociated the molecule at a fixed wavelength of 243.07 nm where also the H-fragments were ionized. The molecule was aligned by the IR excitation with respect to the IR laser polarization, and this alignment was reflected in the angular distribution of the H-photofragments. In particular, the highest degree of molecular alignment was achieved for the J =1 ←0 transition, which exclusively led to the population of a single rotational state with M = 0. The obtained images were analyzed for further details of the VMP dynamics, and different J states were studied as well. Additionally, we investigated the dynamic evolution of the excited states by changing the pump-probe laser pulse delay; the corresponding images reflected dephasing due to a coupling between the molecular angular momentum and nuclear spin. Our measurements confirmed previous observation using the time-of-flight technique by Sofikitis et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 144307 (2007)]. We observed a partial recovery of the originally excited state after 60 ns in agreement with the previous observation.

  17. Excitation functions for {sup 208-211}Fr produced in the {sup 18}O+{sup 197}Au fusion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Corradi, L.; Behera, B.R.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Stefanini, A.M.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Wu, Y.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Sagaidak, R.N.; Atutov, S.N.; Mai, B.; Stancari, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Mariotti, E.; Khanbekyan, A.; Veronesi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Excitation functions for {sup 208-211}Fr isotopes produced in the {sup 18}O+{sup 197}Au fusion-evaporation reaction have been measured at E{sub lab}=75-130 MeV via characteristic {alpha} decays by means of an electrostatic deflector and a semiconductor detector. Data have been compared with calculations giving barrier-passing (capture) cross sections and probabilities of the compound nucleus decay into different channels according to the standard statistical model.

  18. Evaluation of the Interactions between Water Extractable Soil Organic Matter and Metal Cations (Cu(II), Eu(III)) Using Excitation-Emission Matrix Combined with Parallel Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jing; Han, Lu; Song, Jing; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the binding behavior of Cu(II) and Eu(III) with water extractable organic matter (WEOM) in soil, and assess the competitive effect of the cations. Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectrometry was used in combination with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) to obtain four WEOM components: fulvic-like, humic-like, microbial degraded humic-like, and protein-like substances. Fluorescence titration experiments were performed to obtain the binding parameters of PARAFAC-derived components with Cu(II) and Eu(III). The conditional complexation stability constants (logKM) of Cu(II) with the four components ranged from 5.49 to 5.94, and the Eu(III) logKM values were between 5.26 to 5.81. The component-specific binding parameters obtained from competitive binding experiments revealed that Cu(II) and Eu(III) competed for the same binding sites on the WEOM components. These results would help understand the molecular binding mechanisms of Cu(II) and Eu(III) with WEOM in soil environment. PMID:26121300

  19. Functional Effects of Schizophrenia-Linked Genetic Variants on Intrinsic Single-Neuron Excitability: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Halnes, Geir; Devor, Anna; Witoelar, Aree; Bettella, Francesco; Djurovic, Srdjan; Wang, Yunpeng; Einevoll, Gaute T.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies have identified a large number of genetic risk factors for schizophrenia (SCZ) featuring ion channels and calcium transporters. For some of these risk factors, independent prior investigations have examined the effects of genetic alterations on the cellular electrical excitability and calcium homeostasis. In the present proof-of-concept study, we harnessed these experimental results for modeling of computational properties on layer V cortical pyramidal cells and identified possible common alterations in behavior across SCZ-related genes. Methods We applied a biophysically detailed multicompartmental model to study the excitability of a layer V pyramidal cell. We reviewed the literature on functional genomics for variants of genes associated with SCZ and used changes in neuron model parameters to represent the effects of these variants. Results We present and apply a framework for examining the effects of subtle single nucleotide polymorphisms in ion channel and calcium transporter-encoding genes on neuron excitability. Our analysis indicates that most of the considered SCZ-related genetic variants affect the spiking behavior and intracellular calcium dynamics resulting from summation of inputs across the dendritic tree. Conclusions Our results suggest that alteration in the ability of a single neuron to integrate the inputs and scale its excitability may constitute a fundamental mechanistic contributor to mental disease, alongside the previously proposed deficits in synaptic communication and network behavior. PMID:26949748

  20. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C 60 fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Larson, Bryon W.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-01-01

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1--T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (..phi..ISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1--S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ..phi..ISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (..tau..avg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (..tau..avg approx. 17 us and 54 us for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas ..tau..avg approx. 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited- state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  1. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C60 fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J; Clikeman, Tyler T; Larson, Bryon W; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-08-17

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1 → T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (ΦISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1 → S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ΦISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (τavg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (τavg ≈ 17 μs and 54 μs for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas τavg ≈ 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited-state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  2. Double excitations and state-to-state transition dipoles in π-π∗ excited singlet states of linear polyenes: Time-dependent density-functional theory versus multiconfigurational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Ivan A.; Tafur, Sergio; Masunov, Artëm E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of static and dynamic electron correlation on the nature of excited states and state-to-state transition dipole moments is studied with a multideterminant wave function approach on the example of all-trans linear polyenes ( C4H6 , C6H8 , and C8H10 ). Symmetry-forbidden singlet nAg states were found to separate into three groups: purely single, mostly single, and mostly double excitations. The excited-state absorption spectrum is dominated by two bright transitions: 1Bu-2Ag and 1Bu-mAg , where mAg is the state, corresponding to two-electron excitation from the highest occupied to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The richness of the excited-state absorption spectra and strong mixing of the doubly excited determinants into lower- nAg states, reported previously at the complete active space self-consistent field level of theory, were found to be an artifact of the smaller active space, limited to π orbitals. When dynamic σ-π correlation is taken into account, single- and double-excited states become relatively well separated at least at the equilibrium geometry of the ground state. This electronic structure is closely reproduced within time-dependent density-functional theory (TD DFT), where double excitations appear in a second-order coupled electronic oscillator formalism and do not mix with the single excitations obtained within the linear response. An extension of TD DFT is proposed, where the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) is invoked after the linear response equations are solved (a posteriori TDA). The numerical performance of this extension is validated against multideterminant-wave-function and quadratic-response TD DFT results. It is recommended for use with a sum-over-states approach to predict the nonlinear optical properties of conjugated molecules.

  3. Menopausal Characteristics and Physical Functioning in Older Adulthood in the NHANES III

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Sarah E.; Cooper, Rachel; Patel, Kushang V.; Guralnik, Jack M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that natural menopause would be related to better physical functioning compared to surgical menopause and that later age at menopause would be related to better physical functioning. Methods Our sample comprised 1765 women aged ≥ 60 years who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, a cross-sectional study representative of the United States population. Women recalled age at final menstrual period and age at removal of the uterus and ovaries and reported age, race and ethnicity, height, weight, educational attainment, smoking status, number of children, and use of estrogen therapy. Respondents completed a walk trial and chair rises and reported functional limitations. Results Women with a surgical menopause had chair rise times that were an average of 4.4% slower than those of women with natural menopause (95% CI 0.56, 8.27). Women with natural menopause at age ≥ 55 years had an average walking speed 0.05 meters/second (95% CI 0.01, 0.10) faster than women with natural menopause at age < 45 years. Later ages at natural and surgical menopause were also related to lower self-reported functional limitation. Women with surgical menopause at age ≥ 55 years had odds of functional limitation 0.52 times (95% CI 0.29, 0.95) those of women with surgical menopause at age < 40 years, with similar patterns for natural menopause. Conclusions Women with surgical menopause and earlier age at menopause had worse physical function in older adulthood. These groups of women may benefit from interventions to prevent functional decline. PMID:21993081

  4. Voiced Excitations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    for purposes of vocoding in high noise environments: Task 1: Estimation of voiced excitation functions using skin surface vibration...High Noise Environments. The work on “ Voiced Excitations” shows that the surface vibrations of neck skin, during voicing , carry a great deal of...5 in this report). For field use, it may be better to obtain data from another location on the neck or face. A pressure function of voiced speech is

  5. Cancer Cell Mitochondria Targeting by Pancratistatin Analogs is Dependent on Functional Complex II and III

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dennis; Pignanelli, Christopher; Tarade, Daniel; Gilbert, Tyler; Noel, Megan; Mansour, Fadi; Adams, Scott; Dowhayko, Alexander; Stokes, Kyle; Vshyvenko, Sergey; Hudlicky, Tomas; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced mitochondrial stability and decreased dependence on oxidative phosphorylation confer an acquired resistance to apoptosis in cancer cells, but may present opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The compound pancratistatin (PST) has been shown to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, its low availability in nature has hindered its clinical advancement. We synthesized PST analogs and a medium-throughput screen was completed. Analogs SVTH-7, -6, and -5 demonstrated potent anti-cancer activity greater than PST and several standard chemotherapeutics. They disrupted mitochondrial function, activated the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and reduced growth of tumor xenografts in vivo. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effects of SVTH-7 on cancer cells and mitochondria were abrogated with the inhibition of mitochondrial complex II and III, suggesting mitochondrial or metabolic vulnerabilities may be exploited by this analog. This work provides a scaffold for characterizing distinct mitochondrial and metabolic features of cancer cells and reveals several lead compounds with high therapeutic potential. PMID:28220885

  6. Cancer Cell Mitochondria Targeting by Pancratistatin Analogs is Dependent on Functional Complex II and III.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dennis; Pignanelli, Christopher; Tarade, Daniel; Gilbert, Tyler; Noel, Megan; Mansour, Fadi; Adams, Scott; Dowhayko, Alexander; Stokes, Kyle; Vshyvenko, Sergey; Hudlicky, Tomas; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2017-02-21

    Enhanced mitochondrial stability and decreased dependence on oxidative phosphorylation confer an acquired resistance to apoptosis in cancer cells, but may present opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The compound pancratistatin (PST) has been shown to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, its low availability in nature has hindered its clinical advancement. We synthesized PST analogs and a medium-throughput screen was completed. Analogs SVTH-7, -6, and -5 demonstrated potent anti-cancer activity greater than PST and several standard chemotherapeutics. They disrupted mitochondrial function, activated the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and reduced growth of tumor xenografts in vivo. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effects of SVTH-7 on cancer cells and mitochondria were abrogated with the inhibition of mitochondrial complex II and III, suggesting mitochondrial or metabolic vulnerabilities may be exploited by this analog. This work provides a scaffold for characterizing distinct mitochondrial and metabolic features of cancer cells and reveals several lead compounds with high therapeutic potential.

  7. Structure and Function of the Type III Secretion System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Galle, Marlies; Carpentier, Isabelle; Beyaert, Rudi

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a dangerous pathogen particularly because it harbors multiple virulence factors. It causes several types of infection, including dermatitis, endocarditis, and infections of the urinary tract, eye, ear, bone, joints and, of particular interest, the respiratory tract. Patients with cystic fibrosis, who are extremely susceptible to Pseudomonas infections, have a bad prognosis and high mortality. An important virulence factor of P. aeruginosa, shared with many other gram-negative bacteria, is the type III secretion system, a hollow molecular needle that transfers effector toxins directly from the bacterium into the host cell cytosol. This complex macromolecular machine works in a highly regulated manner and can manipulate the host cell in many different ways. Here we review the current knowledge of the structure of the P. aeruginosa T3SS, as well as its function and recognition by the immune system. Furthermore, we describe recent progress in the development and use of therapeutic agents targeting the T3SS. PMID:23305368

  8. Density-functional calculations of carbon doping in III-V compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, C. D.; Jones, R.; Öberg, S.; Briddon, P. R.

    2001-04-01

    This article reports the results of investigations based on local-density-functional theory into the relative formation energies for single substitutional carbon atoms in nine III-V compound semiconductors. The calculations are performed using a supercell formalism derived from the AIMPRO real-space cluster method. Only a very slight trend is discernible down the periodic table. When a metal atom is replaced with carbon, it is energetically least favorable in the phosphides, very marginally lower energy in the arsenides, and ~0.5-0.7 eV lower in the antimonides. The situation is approximately reversed when a P, As, or Sb atom is substituted by a C atom: for the In compounds the energy is ~0.4-0.8 eV higher than for the Al and Ga compounds.

  9. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for H + N2 yields HN2. III - Calculations for the excited state surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1991-01-01

    Additional calculations which characterize potential energy sources (PESs) for the excited 3A-double-prime state, for a bound 2(2A-prime) state, for HN2(+), and for the Rydberg states associated with HN2(+). It is anticipated that these excited state PESs will be important in interpreting and designing experiments to characterize the ground state HN2 species via neutralized ion beam techniques.

  10. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for H + N2 yields HN2. III - Calculations for the excited state surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1991-01-01

    Additional calculations which characterize potential energy sources (PESs) for the excited 3A-double-prime state, for a bound 2(2A-prime) state, for HN2(+), and for the Rydberg states associated with HN2(+). It is anticipated that these excited state PESs will be important in interpreting and designing experiments to characterize the ground state HN2 species via neutralized ion beam techniques.

  11. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating... ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 11 Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations....

  12. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  13. Chiral Cyclopentadienyls: Enabling Ligands for Asymmetric Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Functionalizations.

    PubMed

    Ye, Baihua; Cramer, Nicolai

    2015-05-19

    Transition-metal catalyzed C-H functionalizations became a complementary and efficient bond-forming strategy over the past decade. In this respect, Cp*Rh(III) complexes have emerged as powerful catalysts for a broad spectrum of reactions giving access to synthetically versatile building blocks. Despite their high potential, the corresponding catalytic enantioselective transformations largely lag behind. The targeted transformations require all the remaining three coordination sites of the central rhodium atom of the catalyst. In consequence, the chiral information on a competent catalyst can only by stored in the cyclopentadienyl unit. The lack of suitable enabling chiral cyclopentadienyl (Cp(x)) ligands is the key hurdle preventing the development of such asymmetric versions. In this respect, an efficient set of chiral Cp(x) ligands useable with a broad variety of different transition-metals can unlock substantial application potential. This Account provides a description of our developments of two complementary classes of C2-symmetric Cp(x) derivatives. We have introduced a side- and back-wall concept to enforce chirality transfer onto the central metal atom. The first generation consists of a fused cyclohexane unit having pseudo axial methyl groups as chiral selectors and a rigidifying acetal moiety. The second ligand generation derives from an atrop-chiral biaryl-backbone and which possesses adjustable substituents at its 3,3'-positions. Both ligand families can be modulated in their respective steric bulk to adjust for the specific needs of the targeted application. The cyclopentadienes can be metalated under standard conditions. The corresponding chiral rhodium(I) ethylene complexes are relatively air and moisture and represent storable stable precatalysts for the targeted asymmetric Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H functionalizations. These complexes are then conveniently oxidized in situ by dibenzoyl peroxide to give the reactive Cp(x)Rh(III)(OBz)2 species. For

  14. Immunotoxic effects of the color additive caramel color III: immune function studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Penninks, A H; Seinen, W; Vos, J G; Van Loveren, H

    1993-01-01

    Administration of the color additive caramel color III (AC) may cause a reduction in total white blood cell counts in rats due to reduced lymphocyte counts. Beside lymphopenia, several other effects in rat have been described. The effects are caused by the imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) and occur in rats fed a diet low in vitamin B6. In the present paper, immune function studies on AC and THI with rats fed a diet low, but not deficient in vitamin B6 are presented and discussed. Rats were exposed to 0.4 or 4% AC or to 5.72 ppm THI in drinking water during and for 28 days prior to the start of immune function assays. Resistance to Trichinella spiralis was examined in an oral infection model and clearance of Listeria monocytogenes upon an intravenous infection was studied. In addition, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity of splenic and nonadherent peritoneal cells and the antibody response to sheep red blood cells were studied. From the results it is concluded that exposure of rats to AC or THI influenced various immune function parameters. Thymus-dependent immunity was suppressed, while parameters of the nonspecific resistance were also affected, as shown by a decreased natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the spleen and an enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes.

  15. A preliminary transcranial magnetic stimulation study of cortical inhibition and excitability in high-functioning autism and Asperger disorder.

    PubMed

    Enticott, Peter G; Rinehart, Nicole J; Tonge, Bruce J; Bradshaw, John L; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2010-08-01

    Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Participants were diagnosed by experienced clinicians strictly according to DSM-IV criteria. Participants with HFA (nine males, two females; mean age 16y 8mo, SD 4y 5mo) or Asperger disorder (11 males, three females; mean age 19y 1mo, SD 4y 2mo) and neurotypical participants (eight males, three females; mean age 19y 0mo, SD 3y 1mo) were administered a paired-pulse TMS paradigm intended to assess motor cortical inhibition and excitability. Responses to TMS were recorded by electromyography. Cortical inhibition was significantly reduced in the HFA group compared with both the Asperger disorder (p<0.001) and neurotypical (p<0.001) groups, suggesting disruption of activity at gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors. There was no group difference in cortical excitability. Cortical inhibition deficits may underlie motor dysfunction in autism, and perhaps even relate to specific clinical symptoms (e.g. repetitive behaviours). These findings provide novel evidence for a possible neurobiological dissociation between HFA and Asperger disorder based on GABAergic function.

  16. Crossed-beams and theoretical studies of the O((3)P) + H(2)O --> HO(2) + H reaction excitation function.

    PubMed

    Brunsvold, Amy L; Zhang, Jianming; Upadhyaya, Hari P; Minton, Timothy K; Camden, Jon P; Paci, Jeffrey T; Schatz, George C

    2007-11-01

    Hyperthermal collisions of ground-state atomic oxygen with H2O have been investigated, with special attention paid to the H-atom elimination reaction, O((3)P) + H(2)O(X (1)A(1)) --> HO(2)((2)A') + H((2)S). This reaction was observed in a crossed-beams experiment, and the relative excitation function in the region around its energy threshold (50-80 kcal mol(-1)) was measured. Direct dynamics calculations were also performed at two levels of theory, B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and MP2/6-31G(d,p). The shape of the B3LYP excitation function closely matches that of the experiment. The calculations provided a detailed description of the dynamics and revealed a striking dependence of the reaction mechanism on collision energy, where the cross section rises from a threshold near 60 kcal mol(-1) to a peak at approximately 115 kcal mol(-1) and then decreases at higher energies as secondary dissociation of the internally excited HO(2) product becomes dominant. The calculations show that the cross section for H-atom elimination (O + H(2)O --> HO(2) + H) is about 10-25% that of the H-atom abstraction (O + H(2)O --> OH + OH) cross section for collision energies in the 70-160 kcal mol(-1) range.

  17. Evaporation residue excitation function measurements in 50Ti- and 54Cr-induced reactions with lanthanide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Alfonso, M. C.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Bennett, M. E.; Frey, M. M.; Folden, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Cross sections for the production of shell-stabilized evaporation residues in the 50Ti+Gd160 , 159Tb, 162Dy , and 54Cr+Dy162 reactions are reported. The compound nucleus excitation energy range considered principally covers the 4 n evaporation channel with segments of the 3 n and 5 n channels also measured. The resultant production cross sections are for nuclides with Z =86 -90 . From an analysis based on a statistical model, it is concluded that a larger fission probability than that predicted by the Bohr-Wheeler transition-state theory is needed to describe the data. This outcome is attributed to the influence of collective nuclear excitations. Subsequently, the expected stability enhancement against fission due to the influence of the magic N =126 shell is not evident. The x n excitation functions measured in previous experiments in the reactions 48Ca+Gd154 , 159Tb,Dy162 , and 165Ho are combined with the present data for Z >20 projectiles to illustrate systematic behavior of measured cross sections as a function of the difference in fission barrier and neutron separation energy.

  18. Selective removal of cesium from aqueous solutions with nickel (II) hexacyanoferrate (III) functionalized agricultural residue-walnut shell.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dahu; Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Zhenya

    2014-04-15

    A novel nickel (II) hexacyanoferrate (III) functionalized agricultural residue-walnut shell (Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS) was developed to selectively remove cesium ion (Cs(+)) from aqueous solutions. This paper showed the first integral study on Cs(+) removal behavior and waste reduction analysis by using biomass adsorption material. The results indicated that the removal process was rapid and reached saturation within 2h. As a special characteristic of Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS, acidic condition was preferred for Cs(+) removal, which was useful for extending the application scope of the prepared biomass material in treating acidic radioactive liquid waste. The newly developed Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS could selectively remove Cs(+) though the coexisting ions (Na(+) and K(+) in this study) exhibited negative effects. In addition, approximately 99.8% (in volume) of the liquid waste was reduced by using Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS and furthermore 91.9% (in volume) of the spent biomass material (Cs-Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS) was reduced after incineration (at 500°C for 2h). Due to its relatively high distribution coefficient and significant volume reduction, Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS is expected to be a promising material for Cs(+) removal in practice.

  19. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl− ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2016-01-01

    Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane permeability for Cl− ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl− ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl− transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl− lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions—high membrane conductance and passive distribution—enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1 gene. However, given that ClC-1 must be drastically inhibited (∼80%) before myotonia develops, more recent studies have explored whether acute and more subtle ClC-1 regulation contributes to controlling the excitability of working muscle. Methods were developed to measure ClC-1 function with subsecond temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate ions. This inhibition is important for preserving excitability of working muscle in the face of activity-induced elevation of extracellular K+ and accumulating inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Furthermore, during prolonged activity, a marked ClC-1 activation can develop that compromises muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and

  20. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2016-04-01

    Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane permeability for Cl(-) ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl(-) ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl(-) transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl(-) lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions-high membrane conductance and passive distribution-enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1 gene. However, given that ClC-1 must be drastically inhibited (∼80%) before myotonia develops, more recent studies have explored whether acute and more subtle ClC-1 regulation contributes to controlling the excitability of working muscle. Methods were developed to measure ClC-1 function with subsecond temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate ions. This inhibition is important for preserving excitability of working muscle in the face of activity-induced elevation of extracellular K(+) and accumulating inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Furthermore, during prolonged activity, a marked ClC-1 activation can develop that compromises muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and

  1. Spin-adapted open-shell time-dependent density functional theory. III. An even better and simpler formulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2011-11-21

    The recently proposed spin-adapted time-dependent density functional theory (S-TD-DFT) [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 064106 (2010)] resolves the spin-contamination problem in describing singly excited states of high spin open-shell systems. It is an extension of the standard restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham-based TD-DFT which can only access those excited states due to singlet-coupled single excitations. It is also far superior over the unrestricted Kohn-Sham-based TD-DFT (U-TD-DFT) which suffers from severe spin contamination for those excited states due to triplet-coupled single excitations. Nonetheless, the accuracy of S-TD-DFT for high spin open-shell systems is still inferior to TD-DFT for well-behaved closed-shell systems. The reason can be traced back to the violation of the spin degeneracy conditions (SDC) by approximate exchange-correlation (XC) functionals. Noticing that spin-adapted random phase approximation (S-RPA) can indeed maintain the SDC by virtue of the Wigner-Eckart theorem, a hybrid ansatz combining the good of S-TD-DFT and S-RPA can immediately be envisaged. The resulting formalism, dubbed as X-TD-DFT, is free of spin contamination and can also be viewed as a S-RPA correction to the XC kernel of U-TD-DFT. Compared with S-TD-DFT, X-TD-DFT leads to much improved results for the low-lying excited states of, e.g., N(2)(+), yet with much reduced computational cost. Therefore, X-TD-DFT can be recommended for routine calculations of excited states of high spin open-shell systems.

  2. Preparation of amino-Fe(III) functionalized mesoporous silica for synergistic adsorption of tetracycline and copper.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyang; Liu, Huijuan; Wu, Liyuan; Lan, Huachun; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-11-01

    Finding effective methods for simultaneous removal of antibiotics and heavy metals has attracted increasing concern since both of them are frequently detected in aquatic environments. In this study, a novel mesoporous silica adsorbent (Fe-N,N-SBA15) contained dual-functional groups was synthesized by first grafting di-amino groups on SBA15, and then coordinating Fe(III) onto the adsorbent. The adsorbent was then used in the synchronous elimination of tetracycline (TC) and Cu(II) from water, which was deeply studied by solution pH, kinetics, equilibriums in sole and binary systems. It was found that the adsorbent had high affinity for both TC and Cu(II) and synergistic effects on the adsorption were found. The solution pH remarkably affected the adsorption due to pH-dependent speciation of TC, Cu(II), TC-Cu(II) complex and the surface properties of the adsorbent. Increasing adsorption amount of TC and Cu(II) on the adsorbent could be attributed to the formation of complex TC-Cu(II) bridging or the stronger affinity of the adsorbent for the TC-Cu(II) complex than that for TC or Cu(II) separately. FT-IR and XPS studies revealed that Fe(III) and amino groups on the adsorbent were complexed with the amide of TC and Cu(II), respectively. The recyclabilities of the adsorbent were also evaluated and the Fe-N,N-SBA15 exhibited good reusability for TC and Cu(II) removal. This study shows guidelines and offers an innovative, effective method for the synergistic removal of antibiotics and heavy metals from aquatic environments.

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses two functional homologues of Escherichia coli endonuclease III.

    PubMed

    You, H J; Swanson, R L; Doetsch, P W

    1998-04-28

    We previously identified two distinct genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae redoxyendonuclease (SCR1 and SCR2) which possess a high degree of sequence similarity to Escherichia coli endonuclease III [Augeri, L., Lee, Y. M., Barton, A. B., and Doetsch, P. W. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 721-729]. The proteins encoded by SCR1 and SCR2 were overexpressed in E. coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. Both proteins recognized and cleaved DNA substrates containing dihydrouracil, 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5N-methylformamidopyrimidine (FaPy-7-MeGua), and abasic sites but not DNA substrates containing uracil or 8-oxoguanine. Purified Scr2, but not Scr1, possesses spectral properties which indicate the presence of an iron-sulfur center. Kinetic parameters for Scr1 and Scr2 were determined by using an oligonucleotide containing a single dihydrouracil. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of Scr1 and Scr2 suggests that Scr2 bears an iron-sulfur motif, while Scr1 does not have this motif. However, Scr1 has a long, positively charged N-terminus that could be a mitochondrial transit sequence. Targeted gene disruption of SCR1 and SCR2 produced a double mutant that had no detectable enzymatic activity against the dihydrouracil-containing substrate. Northern blot analysis showed that SCR1 was induced by menadione, but SCR2 was not. These results indicate that although Scr1 and Scr2 are both functional homologues of E. coli endonuclease III, they differ from each other with respect to their amino acid sequences and inducibility by DNA damaging agents, suggesting that their precise biological roles may be different.

  4. Cross-sectional retrospective study of muscle function in patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Decostre, Valérie; Laforêt, Pascal; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; De Antonio, Marie; Leveugle, Sylvain; Ollivier, Gwenn; Canal, Aurélie; Kachetel, Kahina; Petit, François; Eymard, Bruno; Behin, Anthony; Wahbi, Karim; Labrune, Philippe; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by liver and muscle impairment. This study aimed to identify promising muscle function measures for future studies on natural disease progression and therapeutic trials. The age-effect on the manual muscle testing (MMT), the hand-held dynamometry (HHD), the motor function measure (MFM) and the Purdue pegboard test was evaluated by regression analysis in a cross-sectional retrospective single site study. In patients aged between 13 and 56 years old, the Purdue pegboard test and dynamometry of key pinch and knee extension strength were age-sensitive with annual losses of 1.49, 1.10 and 0.70% of the predicted values (%pred), respectively. The MFM score and handgrip strength were also age-sensitive but only in patients older than 29 and 37 years old with annual losses of 1.42 and 1.84%pred, respectively. Muscle strength assessed by MMT and elbow extension measured by HHD demonstrated an annual loss of less than 0.50%pred and are thus unlikely to be promising outcome measures for future clinical trials. In conclusion, our results identified age-sensitive outcomes from retrospective data and may serve for future longitudinal studies in which an estimation of the minimal number of subjects is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Steps for Shigella Gatekeeper Protein MxiC Function in Hierarchical Type III Secretion Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Roehrich, A. Dorothea; Bordignon, Enrica; Mode, Selma; Shen, Da-Kang; Liu, Xia; Pain, Maria; Murillo, Isabel; Martinez-Argudo, Isabel; Sessions, Richard B.

    2017-01-01

    Type III secretion systems are complex nanomachines used for injection of proteins from Gram-negative bacteria into eukaryotic cells. Although they are assembled when the environmental conditions are appropriate, they only start secreting upon contact with a host cell. Secretion is hierarchical. First, the pore-forming translocators are released. Second, effector proteins are injected. Hierarchy between these protein classes is mediated by a conserved gatekeeper protein, MxiC, in Shigella. As its molecular mechanism of action is still poorly understood, we used its structure to guide site-directed mutagenesis and to dissect its function. We identified mutants predominantly affecting all known features of MxiC regulation as follows: secretion of translocators, MxiC and/or effectors. Using molecular genetics, we then mapped at which point in the regulatory cascade the mutants were affected. Analysis of some of these mutants led us to a set of electron paramagnetic resonance experiments that provide evidence that MxiC interacts directly with IpaD. We suggest how this interaction regulates a switch in its conformation that is key to its functions. PMID:27974466

  6. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-08-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses.

  7. Apelin acts in the subfornical organ to influence neuronal excitability and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li; Smith, Pauline M; Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2013-01-01

    Apelin is an adipocyte-derived hormone involved in the regulation of water balance, food intake and the cardiovascular system partially through actions in the CNS. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ with identified roles in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular control and energy balance. The SFO lacks a normal blood–brain barrier, and is thus able to detect circulating signalling molecules such as angiotensin II and leptin. In this study, we investigated actions of apelin-13, the predominant apelin isoform in brain and circulatory system, on the excitability of dissociated SFO neurons using electrophysiological approaches, and determined the cardiovascular consequences of direct administration into the SFO of anaesthetized rats. Whole cell current clamp recording revealed that bath-applied 100 nm apelin-13 directly influences the excitability of the majority of SFO neurons by eliciting either depolarizing (31.8%, mean 7.0 ± 0.8 mV) or hyperpolarizing (28.6%, mean −10.4 ± 1.8 mV) responses. Using voltage-clamp techniques, we also identified modulatory actions of apelin-13 on specific ion channels, demonstrating that apelin-13 activates a non-selective cationic conductance to depolarize SFO neurons while activation of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance underlies hyperpolarizing effects. In anaesthetized rats, microinjection of apelin into SFO decreased both blood pressure (BP) (mean area under the curve −1492.3 ± 357.1 mmHg.s, n= 5) and heart rate (HR) (−32.4 ± 10.39 beats, n= 5). Our data suggest that circulating apelin can directly affect BP and HR as a consequence of the ability of this peptide to modulate the excitability of SFO neurons. PMID:23629509

  8. Apelin acts in the subfornical organ to influence neuronal excitability and cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Smith, Pauline M; Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2013-07-01

    Apelin is an adipocyte-derived hormone involved in the regulation of water balance, food intake and the cardiovascular system partially through actions in the CNS. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ with identified roles in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular control and energy balance. The SFO lacks a normal blood-brain barrier, and is thus able to detect circulating signalling molecules such as angiotensin II and leptin. In this study, we investigated actions of apelin-13, the predominant apelin isoform in brain and circulatory system, on the excitability of dissociated SFO neurons using electrophysiological approaches, and determined the cardiovascular consequences of direct administration into the SFO of anaesthetized rats. Whole cell current clamp recording revealed that bath-applied 100 nm apelin-13 directly influences the excitability of the majority of SFO neurons by eliciting either depolarizing (31.8%, mean 7.0 ± 0.8 mV) or hyperpolarizing (28.6%, mean -10.4 ± 1.8 mV) responses. Using voltage-clamp techniques, we also identified modulatory actions of apelin-13 on specific ion channels, demonstrating that apelin-13 activates a non-selective cationic conductance to depolarize SFO neurons while activation of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance underlies hyperpolarizing effects. In anaesthetized rats, microinjection of apelin into SFO decreased both blood pressure (BP) (mean area under the curve -1492.3 ± 357.1 mmHg.s, n = 5) and heart rate (HR) (-32.4 ± 10.39 beats, n = 5). Our data suggest that circulating apelin can directly affect BP and HR as a consequence of the ability of this peptide to modulate the excitability of SFO neurons.

  9. Understanding the effects of packing and chemical terminations on the optical excitations of azobenzene-functionalized self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, Caterina; Draxl, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    In a first-principles study based on many-body perturbation theory, we analyze the optical excitations of azobenzene-functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with increasing packing density and different terminations, considering for comparison the corresponding gas-phase molecules and dimers. Intermolecular coupling increases with the density of the chromophores independently of the functional groups. The intense π → π* resonance that triggers photo-isomerization is present in the spectra of isolated dimers and diluted SAMs, but it is almost completely washed out in tightly packed architectures. Intermolecular coupling is partially inhibited by mixing differently functionalized azobenzene derivatives, in particular when large groups are involved. In this way, the excitation band inducing the photo-isomerization process is partially preserved and the effects of dense packing partly counterbalanced. Our results suggest that a tailored design of azobenzene-functionalized SAMs which optimizes the interplay between the packing density of the chromophores and their termination can lead to significant improvements in the photo-switching efficiency of these systems.

  10. Management of Grade III Mobile Anterior Tooth in Function Using Endostabilizer – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Swapnil N

    2014-01-01

    Impact of implant dentistry is such that today very few dentists think about saving grade III mobile anterior teeth. A patient with grade III mobility of central incisor due to apical root resorption was treated by using 80 no.stainless steel ‘H’ file as endostabiliser and one year follow up was done. Endostabiliser reduced the mobility of grade III mobile teeth drastically, immediately after its placement. Tooth was absolutely asymptomatic throughout one year follow up. PMID:25654043

  11. Central chemoreflex activation induces sympatho-excitation without altering static or dynamic baroreflex function in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Saku, Keita; Tohyama, Takeshi; Shinoda, Masako; Kishi, Takuya; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Nishikawa, Takuya; Oga, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    Central chemoreflex activation induces sympatho-excitation. However, how central chemoreflex interacts with baroreflex function remains unknown. This study aimed to examine the impact of central chemoreflex on the dynamic as well as static baroreflex functions under open-loop conditions. In 15 anesthetized, vagotomized Sprague-Dawley rats, we isolated bilateral carotid sinuses and controlled intra-sinus pressure (CSP). We then recorded sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) at the celiac ganglia, and activated central chemoreflex by a gas mixture containing various concentrations of CO2 Under the baroreflex open-loop condition (CSP = 100 mmHg), central chemoreflex activation linearly increased SNA and arterial pressure (AP). To examine the static baroreflex function, we increased CSP stepwise from 60 to 170 mmHg and measured steady-state SNA responses to CSP (mechanoneural arc), and AP responses to SNA (neuromechanical arc). Central chemoreflex activation by inhaling 3% CO2 significantly increased SNA irrespective of CSP, indicating resetting of the mechanoneural arc, but did not change the neuromechanical arc. As a result, central chemoreflex activation did not change baroreflex maximum total loop gain significantly (-1.29 ± 0.27 vs. -1.68 ± 0.74, N.S.). To examine the dynamic baroreflex function, we randomly perturbed CSP and estimated transfer functions from 0.01 to 1.0 Hz. The transfer function of the mechanoneural arc approximated a high-pass filter, while those of the neuromechanical arc and total (CSP-AP relationship) arcs approximated a low-pass filter. In conclusion, central chemoreflex activation did not alter the transfer function of the mechanoneural, neuromechanical, or total arcs. Central chemoreflex modifies hemodynamics via sympatho-excitation without compromising dynamic or static baroreflex AP buffering function. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the

  12. Many-body Green's function GW and Bethe-Salpeter study of the optical excitations in a paradigmatic model dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Faber, C; Boulanger, P; Duchemin, I; Attaccalite, C; Blase, X

    2013-11-21

    We study within the many-body Green's function GW and Bethe-Salpeter formalisms the excitation energies of a paradigmatic model dipeptide, focusing on the four lowest-lying local and charge-transfer excitations. Our GW calculations are performed at the self-consistent level, updating first the quasiparticle energies, and further the single-particle wavefunctions within the static Coulomb-hole plus screened-exchange approximation to the GW self-energy operator. Important level crossings, as compared to the starting Kohn-Sham LDA spectrum, are identified. Our final Bethe-Salpeter singlet excitation energies are found to agree, within 0.07 eV, with CASPT2 reference data, except for one charge-transfer state where the discrepancy can be as large as 0.5 eV. Our results agree best with LC-BLYP and CAM-B3LYP calculations with enhanced long-range exchange, with a 0.1 eV mean absolute error. This has been achieved employing a parameter-free formalism applicable to metallic or insulating extended or finite systems.

  13. Resveratrol Attenuates Aβ-Induced Early Hippocampal Neuron Excitability Impairment via Recovery of Function of Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongqiang; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Hui; Gao, Na; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2017-03-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) is not only the morphological hallmark but also the initiator of the pathology process of AD. As a natural compound found in grapes, resveratrol shows a protective effect on the pathophysiology of AD, but the underlying mechanism is not very clear. This study was to investigate whether resveratrol could attenuate Aβ-induced early impairment in hippocampal neuron excitability and the underlying mechanism. The excitability and voltage-gated potassium currents were examined in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. It was found that Aβ25-35 increased the excitability of neurons. Resveratrol could reverse the Aβ25-35-induced increase in the frequency of repetitive firing and the spike half-width of action potential (AP). Moreover, resveratrol can attenuate Aβ25-35-induced decreases in transient potassium channel (I A ) and delay rectifier potassium channel (I K(DR)) of neurons. It was also found that resveratrol could decline the increase of protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibit the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway induced by Aβ25-35. The results suggest that resveratrol alleviates Aβ25-35-induced dysfunction in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons via recovery of the function of I A and I K(DR) by inhibiting the increase of PKA and the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  14. Nanoscale visualization of functional adhesion/excitability nodes at the intercalated disc.

    PubMed

    Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Agullo-Pascual, Esperanza; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Keegan, Sarah; Lin, Xianming; Arcos, Tatiana; Feng-Xia-Liang; Korchev, Yuri E; Gorelik, Julia; Fenyö, David; Rothenberg, Eli; Rothenberg, Eli; Delmar, Mario

    2016-01-20

    Intercellular adhesion and electrical excitability are considered separate cellular properties. Studies of myelinated fibres, however, show that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) aggregate with cell adhesion molecules at discrete subcellular locations, such as the nodes of Ranvier. Demonstration of similar macromolecular organization in cardiac muscle is missing. Here we combine nanoscale-imaging (single-molecule localization microscopy; electron microscopy; and 'angle view' scanning patch clamp) with mathematical simulations to demonstrate distinct hubs at the cardiac intercalated disc, populated by clusters of the adhesion molecule N-cadherin and the VGSC NaV1.5. We show that the N-cadherin-NaV1.5 association is not random, that NaV1.5 molecules in these clusters are major contributors to cardiac sodium current, and that loss of NaV1.5 expression reduces intercellular adhesion strength. We speculate that adhesion/excitability nodes are key sites for crosstalk of the contractile and electrical molecular apparatus and may represent the structural substrate of cardiomyopathies in patients with mutations in molecules of the VGSC complex.

  15. Nanoscale visualization of functional adhesion/excitability nodes at the intercalated disc

    PubMed Central

    Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Agullo-Pascual, Esperanza; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L.; Keegan, Sarah; Lin, Xianming; Arcos, Tatiana; Feng-Xia-Liang; Korchev, Yuri E.; Gorelik, Julia; Fenyö, David; Rothenberg, Eli; Delmar, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion and electrical excitability are considered separate cellular properties. Studies of myelinated fibres, however, show that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) aggregate with cell adhesion molecules at discrete subcellular locations, such as the nodes of Ranvier. Demonstration of similar macromolecular organization in cardiac muscle is missing. Here we combine nanoscale-imaging (single-molecule localization microscopy; electron microscopy; and ‘angle view' scanning patch clamp) with mathematical simulations to demonstrate distinct hubs at the cardiac intercalated disc, populated by clusters of the adhesion molecule N-cadherin and the VGSC NaV1.5. We show that the N-cadherin-NaV1.5 association is not random, that NaV1.5 molecules in these clusters are major contributors to cardiac sodium current, and that loss of NaV1.5 expression reduces intercellular adhesion strength. We speculate that adhesion/excitability nodes are key sites for crosstalk of the contractile and electrical molecular apparatus and may represent the structural substrate of cardiomyopathies in patients with mutations in molecules of the VGSC complex. PMID:26787348

  16. Diabatic-At-Construction Method for Diabatic and Adiabatic Ground and Excited States Based on Multistate Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Grofe, Adam; Qu, Zexing; Truhlar, Donald G; Li, Hui; Gao, Jiali

    2017-03-14

    We describe a diabatic-at-construction (DAC) strategy for defining diabatic states to determine the adiabatic ground and excited electronic states and their potential energy surfaces using the multistate density functional theory (MSDFT). The DAC approach differs in two fundamental ways from the adiabatic-to-diabatic (ATD) procedures that transform a set of preselected adiabatic electronic states to a new representation. (1) The DAC states are defined in the first computation step to form an active space, whose configuration interaction produces the adiabatic ground and excited states in the second step of MSDFT. Thus, they do not result from a similarity transformation of the adiabatic states as in the ATD procedure; they are the basis for producing the adiabatic states. The appropriateness and completeness of the DAC active space can be validated by comparison with experimental observables of the ground and excited states. (2) The DAC diabatic states are defined using the valence bond characters of the asymptotic dissociation limits of the adiabatic states of interest, and they are strictly maintained at all molecular geometries. Consequently, DAC diabatic states have specific and well-defined physical and chemical meanings that can be used for understanding the nature of the adiabatic states and their energetic components. Here we present results for the four lowest singlet states of LiH and compare them to a well-tested ATD diabatization method, namely the 3-fold way; the comparison reveals both similarities and differences between the ATD diabatic states and the orthogonalized DAC diabatic states. Furthermore, MSDFT can provide a quantitative description of the ground and excited states for LiH with multiple strongly and weakly avoided curve crossings spanning over 10 Å of interatomic separation.

  17. Combined effects of gas pressure and exciting frequency on electron energy distribution functions in hydrogen capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, E.; Sugai, H.

    2013-02-15

    The combined effects of the variation of hydrogen pressure (40-400 mTorr) and exciting frequency (13.56-50 MHz) on the electron energy probability function (EEPF) and other plasma parameters in capacitively coupled hydrogen H{sub 2} discharge at fixed discharge voltage were investigated using rf-compensated Langmuir probe. At a fixed exciting frequency of 13.56 MHz, the EEPF evolved from Maxwellian-like distribution to a bi-Maxwellian distribution when the H{sub 2} pressure increased, possibly due to efficient vibrational excitation. The electron density largely increased to a peak value and then decreased with the increase of H{sub 2} pressure. Meanwhile, the electron temperature and plasma potential significantly decrease and reaching a minimum at 120 mTorr beyond, which saturated or slightly increases. On the other hand, the dissipated power and electron density markedly increased with increasing the exciting frequency at fixed H{sub 2} pressure and voltage. The electron temperatures negligibly dependent on the driving frequency. The EEPFs at low pressure 60 mTorr resemble Maxwellian-like distribution and evolve into a bi-Maxwellian type as frequency increased, due to a collisonless (stochastic) sheath-heating in the very high frequency regime, while the EEPF at hydrogen pressure {>=}120 mTorr retained a bi-Maxwellian-type distribution irrespective of the driving frequency. Such evolution of the EEPFs shape with the driving frequency and hydrogen pressure has been discussed on the basis of electron diffusion processes and low threshold-energy inelastic collision processes taking place in the discharge. The ratio of stochastic power to bulk power heating ratio is dependent on the hydrogen pressure while it is independent on the driving frequency.

  18. Functional Characterization of Two Type III Secretion Systems of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwon-Sam; Ono, Takahiro; Rokuda, Mitsuhiro; Jang, Myoung-Ho; Okada, Kazuhisa; Iida, Tetsuya; Honda, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a gram-negative marine bacterium, is a worldwide cause of food-borne gastroenteritis. Recent genome sequencing of the clinical V. parahaemolyticus strain RIMD2210633 identified two sets of genes for the type III secretion system (TTSS), TTSS1 and TTSS2. Here, we constructed a series of mutant strains from RIMD2210633 to determine whether the two putative TTSS apparatus are functional. The cytotoxic activity of mutant strains having a deletion in one of the TTSS1 genes was significantly decreased compared with that of the parent and TTSS2-related mutant strains. In an enterotoxicity assay with the rabbit ileal loop test, intestinal fluid accumulation was diminished by deletion of the TTSS2-related genes while TTSS1-related mutants caused a level of fluid accumulation similar to that of the parent. VopD, a protein encoded in the proximity of the TTSS1 region and a homologue of the Yersinia YopD, was secreted in a TTSS1-dependent manner. In contrast, VopP, which is encoded by a pathogenicity island on chromosome 2 and is homologous to the Yersinia YopP, was secreted via the TTSS2 pathway. These results provide evidence that V. parahaemolyticus TTSSs function as secretion systems and may have a role in the pathogenicity of the organism. This is the first report of functional TTSSs in Vibrio species. The presence of TTSS apparatus gene homologues was demonstrated in other vibrios, such as Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio tubiashii, suggesting that some other vibrios also contain TTSS and that the TTSS has a role in protein secretion in those organisms during interaction with eukaryotic cells. PMID:15501799

  19. Exact ensemble density functional theory for excited states in a model system: Investigating the weight dependence of the correlation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Killian; Mazouin, Laurent; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (eDFT) is an exact time-independent alternative to time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) for the calculation of excitation energies. Despite its formal simplicity and advantages in contrast to TD-DFT (multiple excitations, for example, can be easily taken into account in an ensemble), eDFT is not standard, which is essentially due to the lack of reliable approximate exchange-correlation (x c ) functionals for ensembles. Following Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. B 93, 245131 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.245131], we propose in this work to construct an exact eDFT for the nontrivial asymmetric Hubbard dimer, thus providing more insight into the weight dependence of the ensemble x c energy in various correlation regimes. For that purpose, an exact analytical expression for the weight-dependent ensemble exchange energy has been derived. The complementary exact ensemble correlation energy has been computed by means of Legendre-Fenchel transforms. Interesting features like discontinuities in the ensemble x c potential in the strongly correlated limit have been rationalized by means of a generalized adiabatic connection formalism. Finally, functional-driven errors induced by ground-state density-functional approximations have been studied. In the strictly symmetric case or in the weakly correlated regime, combining ensemble exact exchange with ground-state correlation functionals gives better ensemble energies than when calculated with the ground-state exchange-correlation functional. However, when approaching the asymmetric equiensemble in the strongly correlated regime, the former approximation leads to highly curved ensemble energies with negative slope which is unphysical. Using both ground-state exchange and correlation functionals gives much better results in that case. In fact, exact ensemble energies are almost recovered in some density domains. The analysis of density-driven errors is left for future work.

  20. Multiphoton excitation microscopy of in vivo human skin. Functional and morphological optical biopsy based on three-dimensional imaging, lifetime measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Masters, B R; So, P T; Gratton, E

    1998-02-09

    Two-photon excitation microscopy has the potential as an effective, noninvasive, diagnostic tool for in vivo examination of human deep tissue structure at the subcellular level. By using infrared photons as the excitation source in two-photon microscopy, a significant improvement in penetration depth can be achieved because of the much lower tissue scattering and absorption coefficients in the infrared wavelengths. Two-photon absorption occurs primarily at the focal point and provides the physical basis for optical sectioning. Multiphoton excitation microscopy at 730 nm was used to image in vivo human skin autofluorescence from the surface to a depth of about 200 microns. The spectroscopic data suggest that reduced pyridine nucleotides, NAD(P)H, are the primary source of the skin autofluorescence using 730 nm excitation. This study demonstrates the use of multiphoton excitation microscopy for functional imaging of the metabolic states of in vivo human skin cells and provides a functional and morphological optical biopsy.

  1. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. III. Probability distribution functions of molecular lines in Cygnus X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Ossenkopf, V.; Klessen, R. S.; Simon, R.; Fechtenbaum, S.; Herpin, F.; Tremblin, P.; Csengeri, T.; Myers, P. C.; Hill, T.; Cunningham, M.; Federrath, C.

    2016-03-01

    The probability distribution function of column density (N-PDF) serves as a powerful tool to characterise the various physical processes that influence the structure of molecular clouds. Studies that use extinction maps or H2 column-density maps (N) that are derived from dust show that star-forming clouds can best be characterised by lognormal PDFs for the lower N range and a power-law tail for higher N, which is commonly attributed to turbulence and self-gravity and/or pressure, respectively. While PDFs from dust cover a large dynamic range (typically N ~ 1020-24 cm-2 or Av~ 0.1-1000), PDFs obtained from molecular lines - converted into H2 column density - potentially trace more selectively different regimes of (column) densities and temperatures. They also enable us to distinguish different clouds along the line of sight through using the velocity information. We report here on PDFs that were obtained from observations of 12CO, 13CO, C18O, CS, and N2H+ in the Cygnus X North region, and make a comparison to a PDF that was derived from dust observations with the Herschel satellite. The PDF of 12CO is lognormal for Av ~ 1-30, but is cut for higher Av because of optical depth effects. The PDFs of C18O and 13CO are mostly lognormal up to Av ~ 1-15, followed by excess up to Av ~ 40. Above that value, all CO PDFs drop, which is most likely due to depletion. The high density tracers CS and N2H+ exhibit only a power law distribution between Av ~ 15 and 400, respectively. The PDF from dust is lognormal for Av ~ 3-15 and has a power-law tail up to Av ~ 500. Absolute values for the molecular line column densities are, however, rather uncertain because of abundance and excitation temperature variations. If we take the dust PDF at face value, we "calibrate" the molecular line PDF of CS to that of the dust and determine an abundance [CS]/[H2] of 10-9. The slopes of the power-law tails of the CS, N2H+, and dust PDFs are -1.6, -1.4, and -2.3, respectively, and are thus consistent

  2. Conceptual Tools: Functional System, List of Functions, Operational Definitions of Functions. Method for Determining Language Objectives and Criteria, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setzler, Hubert H., Jr.; And Others

    The conceptual tools used in the communication/language objectives-based system (C/LOBS), which supports the front-end analysis efforts of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, are examined. The C/LOBS project, which is described in 13 volumes and an executive summary, functions as a subsystem of the instructional systems…

  3. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 16/O with /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Chasteler, R.M.; Henderson, R.A.; Lee, D.; Gregorich, K.E.; Nurmia, M.J.; Welch, R.B.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 249/Cf with 90- to 150-MeV /sup 16/O ions. A comparison of the maxima of the mass-yield curves measured in this experiment with those for the reactions of /sup 18/O ions with /sup 249/Cf shows different shifts from those that have been measured for reactions of the /sup 16,18/O and /sup 20,22/Ne ion pairs with /sup 248/Cm. However, the shifts appear similar to those recently measured for reactions of these ion pairs with /sup 254/Es.

  4. Relaxation Models of the (110) Zinc-Blende III-V Semiconductor Surfaces: Density Functional Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, H.; Chen, G.; Wu, Y.; Zhu, Y.; Wei, S. H.

    2008-11-01

    Clean III-V zinc-blende (110) surfaces are the most extensively studied semiconductor surface. For conventional III-V compounds such as GaAs and InP, the surface relaxation follows a bond rotation relaxation model. However, for III-nitrides recent study indicates that they follow a bond-constricting relaxation model. First-principles atom relaxation calculations are performed to explore the origin of the difference between the two groups of materials. By analyzing the individual shift trends and ionic properties of the top layer anions and cations, we attribute the difference between the conventional and nitride III-V compounds to the strong electronegativity of N, which leads to the s{sup 2}p{sup 3} pyramid bond angle to be larger than the ideal one in bulk (109.5{sup o}). The general trends of the atomic relaxation at the III-nitrides (110) surfaces are explained.

  5. Time-dependent density functional study of the electronic potential energy curves and excitation spectrum of the oxygen molecule.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jingang; Wang, Fan; Ziegler, Tom; Cox, Hazel

    2006-07-28

    Orbital energies, ionization potentials, molecular constants, potential energy curves, and the excitation spectrum of O(2) are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The calculated negative highest occupied molecular orbital energy (-epsilon(HOMO)) is compared with the energy difference ionization potential for five exchange correlation functionals consisting of the local density approximation (LDAxc), gradient corrected Becke exchange plus Perdew correlation (B(88X)+P(86C)), gradient regulated asymptotic correction (GRAC), statistical average of orbital potentials (SAOP), and van Leeuwen and Baerends asymptotically correct potential (LB94). The potential energy curves calculated using TDDFT with the TDA at internuclear distances from 1.0 to 1.8 A are divided into three groups according to the electron configurations. The 1pi(u) (4)1pi(g) (2) electron configuration gives rise to the X (3)Sigma(g) (-), a (1)Delta(g), and b (1)Sigma(g) (+) states; the 1pi(u) (3)1pi(g) (3) electron configuration gives rise to the c (1)Sigma(u) (-), C (3)Delta(u), and A (3)Sigma(u) (+) states; and the B (3)Sigma(u) (-), A (1)Delta(u), and f (1)Sigma(u) (+) states are determined by the mixing of two or more electron configurations. The excitation spectrum of the oxygen molecule, calculated with the aforementioned exchange correlation functionals, shows that the results are quite sensitive to the choice of functional. The LDAxc and the B(88X)+P(86C) functionals produce similar spectroscopic patterns with a single strongly absorbing band positioned at 19.82 and 19.72 eV, respectively, while the asymptotically corrected exchange correlation functionals of the SAOP and the LB94 varieties yield similar excitation spectra where the computed strongly absorbing band is located at 16.09 and 16.42 eV, respectively. However, all of the exchange correlation functionals yield only one strongly absorbing band (oscillator strength

  6. Excitation functions for the production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Smolanczuk, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Excitation energy dependence of the cross sections of the reactions {sup 208}Pb{sub 126}({sup 50}Ti{sub 28},1n){sup 257}Rf{sub 153} and {sup 208}Pb{sub 126}({sup 58}Fe{sub 32},1n){sup 265}Hs{sub 157} is calculated and compared with the experimental data measured at GSI-Darmstadt. Such a dependence is also calculated for the reaction {sup 208}Pb{sub 126}({sup 86}Kr{sub 50},1n){sup 293}118{sub 175} reported recently by the Berkeley group, and for reactions which may lead to the synthesis of element 119 and production of its odd-Z descendants. Recommendations for future experiments based on the present study are presented. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  7. Equilibrium structure and anharmonic potential function of phosgene: Microwave spectra of vibrationally excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nakata, Munetaka; Sugie, Masaaki; Takeo, Harutoshi; Matsumura, Chi; Kuchitsu, Kozo

    1984-06-01

    The vibrational satellites in the microwave spectra of 35Cl 2CO were measured and analyzed for the ν2, ν3, 2 ν3, ν4, ν5, ν6, and ν2 + ν3 states. The rotational constants for the ν5 state were first estimated by an analysis of anharmonic potential constants derived from the available rotational constants for the other excited states and other isotopic species and the electron diffraction intensity, and used for the assignment of its weak satellites. The Coriolis resonance between ν2 and ν4 was analyzed, and the difference in their wavenumbers, ν˜4 - ν˜2 = 9.553(3) cm-1, was obtained. The sign of the perturbation (positive) was determined using the infrared band envelope.

  8. Doa4 function in ILV budding is restricted through its interaction with the Vps20 subunit of ESCRT-III

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Caleb M.; West, Matthew; Odorizzi, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III executes the formation of intralumenal vesicles (ILVs) at endosomes. Repeated cycles of ESCRT-III function requires disassembly of the complex by Vps4, an ATPase with a microtubule interaction and trafficking (MIT) domain that binds MIT-interacting motifs (MIM1 or MIM2) in ESCRT-III subunits. We identified a putative MIT domain at the N-terminus of Doa4, which is the ubiquitin (Ub) hydrolase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that deubiquitinates ILV cargo proteins. The Doa4 N-terminus is predicted to have the α-helical structure common to MIT domains, and it binds directly to a MIM1-like sequence in the Vps20 subunit of ESCRT-III. Disrupting this interaction does not prevent endosomal localization of Doa4 but enhances the defect in ILV cargo protein deubiquitination observed in cells lacking Bro1, which is an ESCRT-III effector protein that stimulates Doa4 catalytic activity. Deletion of the BRO1 gene (bro1Δ) blocks ILV budding, but ILV budding was rescued upon disrupting the interaction between Vps20 and Doa4. This rescue in ILV biogenesis requires Doa4 expression but is independent of its Ub hydrolase activity. Thus, binding of Vps20 to the Doa4 N-terminus inhibits a non-catalytic function of Doa4 that promotes ILV formation. PMID:23444383

  9. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish antithrombin III triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombosis, revealing insight into function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kretz, Colin A.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Richter, Catherine E.; Tsao, Philip; Vo, Andy H.; Huarng, Michael C.; Rode, Thomas; Hu, Zhilian; Mehra, Rohit; Olson, Steven T.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic blood clotting is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, underlying deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Genetic predisposition to thrombosis is still poorly understood, and we hypothesize that there are many additional risk alleles and modifying factors remaining to be discovered. Mammalian models have contributed to our understanding of thrombosis, but are low throughput and costly. We have turned to the zebrafish, a tool for high-throughput genetic analysis. Using zinc finger nucleases, we show that disruption of the zebrafish antithrombin III (at3) locus results in spontaneous venous thrombosis in larvae. Although homozygous mutants survive into early adulthood, they eventually succumb to massive intracardiac thrombosis. Characterization of null fish revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation in larvae secondary to unopposed thrombin activity and fibrinogen consumption, which could be rescued by both human and zebrafish at3 complementary DNAs. Mutation of the human AT3-reactive center loop abolished the ability to rescue, but the heparin-binding site was dispensable. These results demonstrate overall conservation of AT3 function in zebrafish, but reveal developmental variances in the ability to tolerate excessive clot formation. The accessibility of early zebrafish development will provide unique methods for dissection of the underlying mechanisms of thrombosis. PMID:24782510

  10. Type III phosphatidylinositol 4 kinases: structure, function, regulation, signalling and involvement in disease.

    PubMed

    Dornan, Gillian L; McPhail, Jacob A; Burke, John E

    2016-02-01

    Many important cellular functions are regulated by the selective recruitment of proteins to intracellular membranes mediated by specific interactions with lipid phosphoinositides. The enzymes that generate lipid phosphoinositides therefore must be properly positioned and regulated at their correct cellular locations. Phosphatidylinositol 4 kinases (PI4Ks) are key lipid signalling enzymes, and they generate the lipid species phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), which plays important roles in regulating physiological processes including membrane trafficking, cytokinesis and organelle identity. PI4P also acts as the substrate for the generation of the signalling phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). PI4Ks also play critical roles in a number of pathological processes including mediating replication of a number of pathogenic RNA viruses, and in the development of the parasite responsible for malaria. Key to the regulation of PI4Ks is their regulation by a variety of both host and viral protein-binding partners. We review herein our current understanding of the structure, regulatory interactions and role in disease of the type III PI4Ks.

  11. Structural and Functional Characterization of the Bacterial Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Matthias J.; Yan, Jun; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Schärfe, Charlotta; Grin, Iwan; Galán, Jorge E.; Macek, Boris; Marlovits, Thomas C.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type III protein secretion systems inject effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells in order to promote survival and colonization of Gram-negative pathogens and symbionts. Secretion across the bacterial cell envelope and injection into host cells is facilitated by a so-called injectisome. Its small hydrophobic export apparatus components SpaP and SpaR were shown to nucleate assembly of the needle complex and to form the central “cup” substructure of a Salmonella Typhimurium secretion system. However, the in vivo placement of these components in the needle complex and their function during the secretion process remained poorly defined. Here we present evidence that a SpaP pentamer forms a 15 Å wide pore and provide a detailed map of SpaP interactions with the export apparatus components SpaQ, SpaR, and SpaS. We further refine the current view of export apparatus assembly, consolidate transmembrane topology models for SpaP and SpaR, and present intimate interactions of the periplasmic domains of SpaP and SpaR with the inner rod protein PrgJ, indicating how export apparatus and needle filament are connected to create a continuous conduit for substrate translocation. PMID:27977800

  12. [Cloning, expression and functional identification of a type III polyketide synthase gene from Huperzia serrata].

    PubMed

    Ye, Jin-cui; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Jie-yin; Guo, Chao-tan; Chen, Guo-shen; Abe, Ikuro; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    A cDNA encoding novel type III polyketide synthase (PKS) was cloned and sequenced from young leaves of Chinese club moss Huperzia serrata (Thunb.) Trev. by RT-PCR using degenerated primers based on the conserved sequences of known CHSs, and named as H. serrata PKS2. The terminal sequences of cDNA were obtained by the 3'- and 5'-RACE method. The full-length cDNA of H. serrata PKS2 contained a 1212 bp open reading frame encoding a 46.4 kDa protein with 404 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of H. serrata PKS2 showed 50%-66% identities to those of other chalcone synthase super family enzymes of plant origin. The recombinant H. serrata PKS2 was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus and showed unusually versatile catalytic potency to produce various aromatic tetraketides, including chalcones, benzophenones, phloroglucinols, and acridones. In particular, the enzyme accepted bulky starter substrates N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA, and carried out three condensations with malonyl-CoA to produce 1, 3-dihydroxy-N-methylacridone. Interestingly, H. serrata PKS2 lacks most of the consensus active site sequences with acridone synthase from Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae).

  13. A simplified relativistic time-dependent density-functional theory formalism for the calculations of excitation energies including spin-orbit coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Ziegler, Tom

    2005-10-15

    In the present work we have proposed an approximate time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) formalism to deal with the influence of spin-orbit coupling effect on the excitation energies for closed-shell systems. In this formalism scalar relativistic TDDFT calculations are first performed to determine the lowest single-group excited states and the spin-orbit coupling operator is applied to these single-group excited states to obtain the excitation energies with spin-orbit coupling effects included. The computational effort of the present method is much smaller than that of the two-component TDDFT formalism and this method can be applied to medium-size systems containing heavy elements. The compositions of the double-group excited states in terms of single-group singlet and triplet excited states are obtained automatically from the calculations. The calculated excitation energies based on the present formalism show that this formalism affords reasonable excitation energies for transitions not involving 5p and 6p orbitals. For transitions involving 5p orbitals, one can still obtain acceptable results for excitations with a small truncation error, while the formalism will fail for transitions involving 6p orbitals, especially 6p1/2 spinors.

  14. Functional Promiscuity of Two Divergent Paralogs of Type III Plant Polyketide Synthases1

    PubMed Central

    Pandith, Shahzad A.; Dhar, Niha; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Kushwaha, Manoj; Gupta, Ajai P.; Shah, Manzoor A.; Vishwakarma, Ram

    2016-01-01

    Plants effectively defend themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses by synthesizing diverse secondary metabolites, including health-protective flavonoids. These display incredible chemical diversity and ubiquitous occurrence and confer impeccable biological and agricultural applications. Chalcone synthase (CHS), a type III plant polyketide synthase, is critical for flavonoid biosynthesis. It catalyzes acyl-coenzyme A thioesters to synthesize naringenin chalcone through a polyketidic intermediate. The functional divergence among the evolutionarily generated members of a gene family is pivotal in driving the chemical diversity. Against this backdrop, this study was aimed to functionally characterize members of the CHS gene family from Rheum emodi, an endangered and endemic high-altitude medicinal herb of northwestern Himalayas. Two full-length cDNAs (1,179 bp each), ReCHS1 and ReCHS2, encoding unique paralogs were isolated and characterized. Heterologous expression and purification in Escherichia coli, bottom-up proteomic characterization, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and enzyme kinetic studies using five different substrates confirmed their catalytic potential. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of higher synonymous mutations in the intronless divergents of ReCHS. ReCHS2 displayed significant enzymatic efficiency (Vmax/Km) with different substrates. There were significant spatial and altitudinal variations in messenger RNA transcript levels of ReCHSs correlating positively with metabolite accumulation. Furthermore, the elicitations in the form of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, ultraviolet B light, and wounding, chosen on the basis of identified cis-regulatory promoter elements, presented considerable differences in the transcript profiles of ReCHSs. Taken together, our results demonstrate differential propensities of CHS paralogs in terms of the accumulation of flavonoids and

  15. Formation and Function of the Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase†

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Yun, Danny; Saleh, Lana; Bollinger, J. Martin; Krebs, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The β2 subunit of a class Ia or Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is activated when its carboxylate-bridged Fe2II/II cluster reacts with O2 to oxidize a nearby tyrosine (Y) residue to a stable radical (Y•). During turnover, the Y• in β2 is thought to reversibly oxidize a cysteine (C) in the α2 subunit to a thiyl radical (C•) by a long-distance (~35 Å) proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step. The C• in α2 then initiates reduction of the 2' position of the ribonucleoside-5'-diphosphate substrate by abstracting the hydrogen atom from C3'. The class I RNR from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the prototype of a newly recognized subclass (Ic), which is characterized by the presence of a phenylalanine (F) residue at the site of β2 where the essential radical-harboring Y is normally found. We recently demonstrated that Ct RNR employs a heterobinuclear MnIV/FeIII cluster for radical initiation. In essence, the MnIV ion of the cluster functionally replaces the Y• of the conventional class I RNR. The Ct β2 protein also auto-activates by reaction of its reduced (MnII/FeII) metal cluster with O2. In this reaction, an unprecedented MnIV/FeIV intermediate accumulates almost stoichiometrically and decays by one-electron reduction of the FeIV site. This reduction is mediated by the near-surface residue, Y222, a residue with no functional counterpart in the well-studied conventional class I RNRs. In this review, we recount the discovery of the novel Mn/Fe redox cofactor in Ct RNR and summarize our current understanding of how it assembles and initiates nucleotide reduction. PMID:19061340

  16. Pathophysiology of functional heartburn based on Rome III criteria in Japanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yasuhiro; Funaki, Yasushi; Izawa, Shinya; Iida, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Yoshiharu; Adachi, Kazunori; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Sasaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kasugai, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathophysiology of functional heartburn (FH) in Japanese patients. METHODS: A total of 111 patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease underwent intraesophageal pressure testing and 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (24MII-pH) testing. The patients also completed several questionnaires while they were receiving the PPI treatment, including the questionnaire for the diagnosis of reflux disease (QUEST), the frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG), the gastrointestinal symptoms rating scale (GSRS), SF-36, and the Cornell Medical Index (CMI). The subjects were classified into FH and endoscopy-negative reflux disease (ENRD) groups based on the Rome III criteria. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients with esophageal motility disorder were excluded from this study, while 22 patients with abnormal esophageal acid exposure time (pH-POS) and 34 with hypersensitive esophagus (HE) were included in the ENRD group. The FH group included 22 patients with no reflux involvement. Sex, age, and body mass index did not differ significantly between the groups. The mean SF-36 values were < 50 (normal) for all scales in these groups, with no significant differences. The GSRS scores in these groups were not different and showed overlap with other gastrointestinal symptoms. The QUEST and the FSSG scores did not differ significantly between the groups. Neuroticism was diagnosed using the CMI questionnaire in 17 of the 78 included subjects within the pH-POS (n = 4), HE (n = 8), and FH (n = 5) groups, with no significant differences. CONCLUSION: Clinical characteristics of the FH and PPI-refractory ENRD groups were similar. Therefore, esophageal function should be examined via manometry and 24MII-pH testing to differentiate between them. PMID:25945016

  17. Pathophysiology of functional heartburn based on Rome III criteria in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yasuhiro; Funaki, Yasushi; Izawa, Shinya; Iida, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Yoshiharu; Adachi, Kazunori; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Sasaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kasugai, Kunio

    2015-04-28

    To investigate the pathophysiology of functional heartburn (FH) in Japanese patients. A total of 111 patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease underwent intraesophageal pressure testing and 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (24MII-pH) testing. The patients also completed several questionnaires while they were receiving the PPI treatment, including the questionnaire for the diagnosis of reflux disease (QUEST), the frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG), the gastrointestinal symptoms rating scale (GSRS), SF-36, and the Cornell Medical Index (CMI). The subjects were classified into FH and endoscopy-negative reflux disease (ENRD) groups based on the Rome III criteria. Thirty-three patients with esophageal motility disorder were excluded from this study, while 22 patients with abnormal esophageal acid exposure time (pH-POS) and 34 with hypersensitive esophagus (HE) were included in the ENRD group. The FH group included 22 patients with no reflux involvement. Sex, age, and body mass index did not differ significantly between the groups. The mean SF-36 values were < 50 (normal) for all scales in these groups, with no significant differences. The GSRS scores in these groups were not different and showed overlap with other gastrointestinal symptoms. The QUEST and the FSSG scores did not differ significantly between the groups. Neuroticism was diagnosed using the CMI questionnaire in 17 of the 78 included subjects within the pH-POS (n = 4), HE (n = 8), and FH (n = 5) groups, with no significant differences. Clinical characteristics of the FH and PPI-refractory ENRD groups were similar. Therefore, esophageal function should be examined via manometry and 24MII-pH testing to differentiate between them.

  18. III-V semiconductor waveguides for photonic functionality at 780 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Jessica O.; Greenaway, Mark T.; Campion, Richard P.; Pyragius, Tadas; Fromhold, T. Mark; Kent, Anthony J.; Mellor, Christopher J.

    2014-03-01

    Photonic integrated circuits based on III-V semiconductor polarization-maintaining waveguides were designed and fabricated for the first time for application in a compact cold-atom gravimeter1,2 at an operational wavelength of 780 nm. Compared with optical fiber-based components, semiconductor waveguides achieve very compact guiding of optical signals for both passive functions, such as splitting and recombining, and for active functions, such as switching or modulation. Quantum sensors, which have enhanced sensitivity to a physical parameter as a result of their quantum nature, can be made from quantum gases of ultra-cold atoms. A cloud of ultra-cold atoms may start to exhibit quantum-mechanical properties when it is trapped and cooled using laser cooling in a magneto-optical trap, to reach milli-Kelvin temperatures. The work presented here focuses on the design and fabrication of optical devices for a quantum sensor to measure the acceleration of gravity precisely and accurately. In this case the cloud of ultra-cold atoms consists of rubidium (87Rb) atoms and the sensor exploits the hyperfine structure of the D1 transition, from an outer electronic state of 5 2S ½ to 5 2P3/2 which has an energy of 1.589 eV or 780.241 nm. The short wavelength of operation of the devices dictated stringent requirements on the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and device fabrication in terms of anisotropy and smoothness of plasma etch processes, cross-wafer uniformities and alignment tolerances. Initial measurements of the optical loss of the polarization-maintaining waveguide, assuming Fresnel reflection losses only at the facets, suggested a loss of 8 dB cm-1, a loss coefficient, α, of 1.9 (+/-0.3) cm-1.

  19. Longest-Wavelength Electronic Excitations of Linear Cyanines: The Role of Electron Delocalization and of Approximations in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Ii, Barry Moore; Autschbach, Jochen

    2013-11-12

    The lowest-energy/longest-wavelength electronic singlet excitation energies of linear cyanine dyes are examined, using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and selected wave function methods in comparison with literature data. Variations of the bond-length alternation obtained with different optimized structures produce small differences of the excitation energy in the limit of an infinite chain. Hybrid functionals with range-separated exchange are optimally 'tuned', which is shown to minimize the delocalization error (DE) in the cyanine π systems. Much unlike the case of charge-transfer excitations, small DEs are not strongly correlated with better performance. A representative cyanine is analyzed in detail. Compared with accurate benchmark data, TDDFT with 'pure' local functionals gives too high singlet excitation energies for all systems, but DFT-based ΔSCF calculations with a local functional severely underestimates the energies. TDDFT strongly overestimates the difference between singlet and triplet excitation energies. An analysis points to systematically much too small magnitudes of integrals from the DFT components of the exchange-correlation response kernel as the likely culprit. The findings support previous suggestions that the differential correlation energy between the ground and excited state is not correctly produced by TDDFT with most functionals.

  20. Assembly and Function of the RNA Editing Complex in Trypanosoma brucei Requires Band III Protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Catherine E.; O'Hearn, Sean F.; Sollner-Webb, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Trypanosome RNA editing, the posttranscriptional insertion and deletion of U residues in mitochondrial transcripts, is catalyzed by a protein complex containing seven distinct proteins. In this study, we cloned the gene for band III, a 555-amino-acid protein with two separate zinc finger motifs. We prepared antibodies that showed band III protein cofractionates with the previously characterized band IV protein throughout the purification of the editing complex and is not found free or in other protein associations; therefore, it is a true constituent of the editing complex. Double-stranded RNA interference efficiently depleted band III protein and demonstrated that band III expression is essential for growth of procyclic trypanosomes and for RNA editing. These depleted cell extracts were deficient specifically in guide RNA-directed endonuclease cleavage at both U deletion and U insertion sites and in the activity of the band IV ligase, but they retained the 3′-U-exonuclease and terminal-U-transferase activities as well as band V ligase of the editing complex. Loss of band III protein also resulted in almost complete loss of the band IV ligase protein and altered sedimentation of the band V ligase. These data indicate that band III is either the RNA editing endonuclease or a factor critical for cleavage activity in the editing complex. They also demonstrate that band III is required for proper assembly of the editing complex. PMID:11940676

  1. Functional testing of space flight induced changes in tonic motor control by using limb-attached excitation and load devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallasch, Eugen; Kozlovskaya, Inessa

    2007-02-01

    Long term space flights induce atrophy and contractile changes on postural muscles such effecting tonic motor control. Functional testing of tonic motor control structures is a challenge because of the difficulties to deliver appropriate test forces on crew members. In this paper we propose two approaches for functional testing by using limb attached loading devices. The first approach is based on a frequency and amplitude controllable moving magnet exciter to deliver sinusoidal test forces during limb postures. The responding limb deflection is recorded by an embedded accelerometer to obtain limb impedance. The second approach is based on elastic limb loading to evoke self-excited oscillations during arm extensions. Here the contraction force at the oscillation onset provides information about limb stiffness. The rationale for both testing approaches is based on Feldman's λ-model. An arm expander based on the second approach was probed in a 6-month MIR space flight. The results obtained from the load oscillations, confirmed that this device is well suited to capture space flight induced neuromuscular changes.

  2. Genetic Inhibition of CaMKII in Dorsal Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Reduces Functional Excitatory Synapses and Enhances Intrinsic Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Klug, Jason R.; Mathur, Brian N.; Kash, Thomas L.; Wang, Hui-Dong; Matthews, Robert T.; Robison, A. J.; Anderson, Mark E.; Deutch, Ariel Y.; Lovinger, David M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Winder, Danny G.

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). CaMKII is dynamically regulated by changes in dopamine signaling, as occurs in Parkinson's disease as well as addiction. Although CaMKII has been extensively studied in the hippocampus where it regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, relatively little is known about how it modulates neuronal function in the striatum. Therefore, we examined the impact of selectively overexpressing an EGFP-fused CaMKII inhibitory peptide (EAC3I) in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) using a novel transgenic mouse model. EAC3I-expressing cells exhibited markedly decreased excitatory transmission, indicated by a decrease in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). This decrease was not accompanied by changes in the probability of release, levels of glutamate at the synapse, or changes in dendritic spine density. CaMKII regulation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a major means by which the kinase regulates neuronal function in the hippocampus. We found that the decrease in striatal excitatory transmission seen in the EAC3I mice is mimicked by deletion of GluA1. Further, while CaMKII inhibition decreased excitatory transmission onto MSNs, it increased their intrinsic excitability. These data suggest that CaMKII plays a critical role in setting the excitability rheostat of striatal MSNs by coordinating excitatory synaptic drive and the resulting depolarization response. PMID:23028932

  3. Genetic inhibition of CaMKII in dorsal striatal medium spiny neurons reduces functional excitatory synapses and enhances intrinsic excitability.

    PubMed

    Klug, Jason R; Mathur, Brian N; Kash, Thomas L; Wang, Hui-Dong; Matthews, Robert T; Robison, A J; Anderson, Mark E; Deutch, Ariel Y; Lovinger, David M; Colbran, Roger J; Winder, Danny G

    2012-01-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). CaMKII is dynamically regulated by changes in dopamine signaling, as occurs in Parkinson's disease as well as addiction. Although CaMKII has been extensively studied in the hippocampus where it regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, relatively little is known about how it modulates neuronal function in the striatum. Therefore, we examined the impact of selectively overexpressing an EGFP-fused CaMKII inhibitory peptide (EAC3I) in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) using a novel transgenic mouse model. EAC3I-expressing cells exhibited markedly decreased excitatory transmission, indicated by a decrease in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). This decrease was not accompanied by changes in the probability of release, levels of glutamate at the synapse, or changes in dendritic spine density. CaMKII regulation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a major means by which the kinase regulates neuronal function in the hippocampus. We found that the decrease in striatal excitatory transmission seen in the EAC3I mice is mimicked by deletion of GluA1. Further, while CaMKII inhibition decreased excitatory transmission onto MSNs, it increased their intrinsic excitability. These data suggest that CaMKII plays a critical role in setting the excitability rheostat of striatal MSNs by coordinating excitatory synaptic drive and the resulting depolarization response.

  4. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  5. Sodium channel function and the excitability of human cutaneous afferents during ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cindy S-Y; Grosskreutz, Julian; Burke, David

    2002-01-01

    The changes in excitability of cutaneous afferents in the median nerve of healthy subjects were compared during 13 min of ischaemia and during 13 min continuous depolarizing DC. In addition, intermittent polarizing currents were used to compensate for or to accentuate the threshold change produced by ischaemia. Measurements were made alternately of the ischaemic (or current-induced) changes in threshold, refractoriness and, in some experiments, supernormality. The strength-duration time constant (τSD) was calculated from the thresholds to test stimuli of different duration. During ischaemia for 13 min, the threshold decreased steadily by 34 % over the initial 8 min, reached a plateau and increased slightly over the final few minutes. However, with continuous depolarizing DC, the threshold decreased linearly with the applied current, by 55 % with strong current ramps. Intermittent injection of hyperpolarizing DC was used to compensate for the ischaemic threshold change, but the compensating current increased progressively and did not reach a plateau as had occurred with the ischaemic threshold change. During ischaemia, τSD increased to a plateau, following the threshold more closely than the current required to compensate for threshold. Refractoriness, on the other hand, increased more steeply than the applied compensating current. There were similar discrepancies in the relationships of τSD and refractoriness to supernormality. The smaller-than-expected threshold change during ischaemia could result from limitations on the change in excitability produced by ischaemic metabolites acting on the gating and/or permeability of Na+ channels. Intermittent depolarizing DC was applied during the ischaemic depolarization to determine whether it would reduce or accentuate the discrepancies noted during ischaemia alone. The extent of the threshold change was greater than with ischaemia alone, and there was a greater change in τSD and a proportionately smaller change in

  6. Correlated wave functions for the ground and some excited states of the iron atom.

    PubMed

    Buendía, E; Gálvez, F J; Sarsa, A

    2006-04-21

    We study the states arising from the [Ar]4s(2)3d6 and [Ar]4s(1)3d7 configurations of iron atom with explicitly correlated wave functions. The variational wave function is the product of the Jastrow correlation factor times a model function obtained within the parametrized optimized effective potential framework. A systematic analysis of the dependence of both the effective potential and the correlation factor on the configuration and on the term is carried out. The ground state of both, the cation, Fe+, and anion, Fe-, are calculated with correlated wave functions and the ionization potential and the electron affinity are obtained.

  7. Hydration effects on the barrier function of stratum corneum lipids: Raman analysis of ceramides 2, III and 5.

    PubMed

    Tfayli, Ali; Jamal, Dima; Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Manfait, Michel; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2013-11-07

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of the skin; its barrier function is highly dependent on the composition and the structure as well as the organization of lipids in its extracellular matrix. Ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol represent the major lipid classes present in this matrix. They play an important role in maintaining the normal hydration levels required for the normal physiological function. Despite the advancement in the understanding of the structure, composition and the function of the stratum corneum (SC), the concern of "dry skin" remains important in dermatology and care research. Most studies focus on the quantification of water in the skin using different techniques including Raman spectroscopy, while the studies that investigate the effect of hydration on the quality of the barrier function of the skin are limited. Raman spectroscopy provides structural, conformational and organizational information that could help elucidate the effect of hydration on the barrier function of the skin. In order to assess the effect of relative humidity on the lipid barrier function; we used Raman spectroscopy to follow-up the evolution of the conformation and the organization of three synthetic ceramides (CER) differing from each other by the nature of their polar heads (sphingosine, phytosphingosine and α hydroxyl sphingosine), CER 2, III and 5 respectively. CER III and 5 showed a more compact and ordered organization with stronger polar interactions at intermediate relative humidity values, while CER 2 showed opposite tendencies to those observed with CER III and 5.

  8. Light-harvesting ytterbium(III)-porphyrinate-BODIPY conjugates: synthesis, excitation-energy transfer, and two-photon-induced near-infrared-emission studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Xunjin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Tam, Hoi-Lam; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2013-01-07

    Based on a donor-acceptor framework, several conjugates have been designed and prepared in which an electron-donor moiety, ytterbium(III) porphyrinate (YbPor), was linked through an ethynyl bridge to an electron-acceptor moiety, boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY). Photoluminescence studies demonstrated efficient energy transfer from the BODIPY moiety to the YbPor counterpart. When conjugated with the YbPor moiety, the BODIPY moiety served as an antenna to harvest the lower-energy visible light, subsequently transferring its energy to the YbPor counterpart, and, consequently, sensitizing the Yb(III) emission in the near-infrared (NIR) region with a quantum efficiency of up to 0.73% and a lifetime of around 40 μs. Moreover, these conjugates exhibited large two-photon-absorption cross-sections that ranged from 1048-2226 GM and strong two-photon-induced NIR emission.

  9. Channels active in the excitability of nerves and skeletal muscles across the neuromuscular junction: basic function and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Barbara E

    2008-06-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the activation of motoneurons and their corresponding muscle cells is essential for interpreting basic neurophysiology in nerves, the heart, and skeletal and smooth muscle. This review article is intended to clarify how channels work in nerves, neuromuscular junctions, and muscle function and what happens when these channels are defective. Highlighting the human diseases that result from defective ion channels is likely to be interesting to students in helping them choose to learn about channel physiology.

  10. A Convenient Approach To Synthesize o-Carborane-Functionalized Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complexes for Endocellular Hypoxia Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Tong, Xiao; Yan, Hong; Lu, Changsheng; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-21

    The structure-property relationship of carborane-modified iridium(III) complexes was investigated. Firstly, an efficient approach for the synthesis of o-carborane-containing pyridine ligands a-f in high yields was developed by utilizing stable and cheap B10 H10 (Et4 N)2 as the starting material. By using these ligands, iridium(III) complexes I-VII were efficiently prepared. In combination with DFT calculations, the photophysical and electrochemical properties of these complexes were studied. The hydrophilic nido-o-carborane-based iridium(III) complex VII showed the highest phosphorescence efficiency (abs. ϕP =0.48) among known water-soluble homoleptic cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes and long emission lifetime (τ=1.24 μs) in aqueous solution. Both of them are sensitive to O2 , and thus endocellular hypoxia imaging of complex VII was realized by time-resolved luminescence imaging (TRLI). This is the first example of applying TRLI in endocellular oxygen detection with a water-soluble nido-carborane functionalized iridium(III) complex.

  11. GBM heterogeneity as a function of variable epidermal growth factor receptor variant III activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Olle R.; McKinney, Andrew; Engler, Jane R.; Koshkakaryan, Gayane; Gong, Henry; Robinson, Aaron E.; Ewald, Andrew J.; Huillard, Emmanuelle; James, C. David; Molinaro, Annette M.; Shieh, Joseph T.; Phillips, Joanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) due to a deletion of exons 2-7 of EGFR (EGFRvIII) is a common alteration in glioblastoma (GBM). While this alteration can drive gliomagenesis, tumors harboring EGFRvIII are heterogeneous. To investigate the role for EGFRvIII activation in tumor phenotype we used a neural progenitor cell-based murine model of GBM driven by EGFR signaling and generated tumor progenitor cells with high and low EGFRvIII activation, pEGFRHi and pEGFRLo. In vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies suggested a direct association between EGFRvIII activity and increased tumor cell proliferation, decreased tumor cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and altered progenitor cell phenotype. Time-lapse confocal imaging of tumor cells in brain slice cultures demonstrated blood vessel co-option by tumor cells and highlighted differences in invasive pattern. Inhibition of EGFR signaling in pEGFRHi promoted cell differentiation and increased cell-matrix adhesion. Conversely, increased EGFRvIII activation in pEGFRLo reduced cell-matrix adhesion. Our study using a murine model for GBM driven by a single genetic driver, suggests differences in EGFR activation contribute to tumor heterogeneity and aggressiveness. PMID:27738329

  12. Polymer Dots of Peryleneimide-Functionalized Polyethyleneimine: Facile Synthesis and Effective Fluorescent Sensing of Iron (III) Ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wu, Bo; Zhong, Dan; Zhan, Xiaowei; Wang, Guojie

    2016-12-01

    A simple and low-cost method is reported here for synthesizing polymer dots (PDs) using branched polyethyleneimine and peryleneimide derivatives as precursors heated in dimethylacetamide. The as-prepared PDs can be well-dispersed in water and show excitation-dependent fluorescence, stable fluorescence over a wide range (pH = 5.0 - 9.0), and high photostability. It is demonstrated that the prepared PDs can be used as a novel fluorescent sensing platform for sensitive and selective detection of Fe (III) ions. The fluorescent PDs may be applied to promising applications in chemical sensors for metal ions, as well as biological imaging or biological labeling for their excellent fluorescence properties. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The Initial Mass Function of the Inner Galaxy Measured from OGLE-III Microlensing Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2017-07-01

    We use the timescale distribution of ˜3000 microlensing events measured by the OGLE-III survey, together with accurate new made-to-measure dynamical models of the Galactic bulge/bar region, to measure the IMF in the inner Milky Way. The timescale of each event depends on the mass of the lensing object, together with the relative distances and velocities of the lens and source. The dynamical model statistically provides these distances and velocities, allowing us to constrain the lens mass function, and thereby infer the IMF. Parameterizing the IMF as a broken power-law, we find slopes in the main-sequence {α }{ms}=1.31+/- 0.10{| }{stat}+/- 0.10{| }{sys}, and brown dwarf region {α }{bd}=-0.7+/- 0.9{| }{stat}+/- 0.8{| }{sys}, where we use a fiducial 50% binary fraction, and the systematic uncertainty covers the range of binary fractions 0%-100%. Similarly, for a log-normal IMF we conclude {M}c=(0.17+/- 0.02{| }{stat}+/- 0.01{| }{sys}) {\\text{}}{M}⊙ and {σ }m=0.49+/- 0.07{| }{stat}+/- 0.06{| }{sys}. These values are very similar to a Kroupa or Chabrier IMF, respectively, showing that the IMF in the bulge is indistinguishable from that measured locally, despite the lenses lying in the inner Milky Way where the stars are mostly ˜10 Gyr old and formed on a fast α-element enhanced timescale. This therefore constrains models of IMF variation that depend on the properties of the collapsing gas cloud.

  14. Parallel transmit excitation at 1.5 T based on the minimization of a driving function for device heating

    PubMed Central

    Gudino, N.; Sonmez, M.; Yao, Z.; Baig, T.; Nielles-Vallespin, S.; Faranesh, A. Z.; Lederman, R. J.; Martens, M.; Balaban, R. S.; Hansen, M. S.; Griswold, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a rapid method to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) E-field coupling and consequent heating in long conductors in an interventional MRI (iMRI) setup. Methods: A driving function for device heating (W) was defined as the integration of the E-field along the direction of the wire and calculated through a quasistatic approximation. Based on this function, the phases of four independently controlled transmit channels were dynamically changed in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. During the different excitation configurations, the RF induced heating in a nitinol wire immersed in a saline phantom was measured by fiber-optic temperature sensing. Additionally, a minimization of W as a function of phase and amplitude values of the different channels and constrained by the homogeneity of the RF excitation field (B1) over a region of interest was proposed and its results tested on the benchtop. To analyze the validity of the proposed method, using a model of the array and phantom setup tested in the scanner, RF fields and SAR maps were calculated through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. In addition to phantom experiments, RF induced heating of an active guidewire inserted in a swine was also evaluated. Results: In the phantom experiment, heating at the tip of the device was reduced by 92% when replacing the body coil by an optimized parallel transmit excitation with same nominal flip angle. In the benchtop, up to 90% heating reduction was measured when implementing the constrained minimization algorithm with the additional degree of freedom given by independent amplitude control. The computation of the optimum phase and amplitude values was executed in just 12 s using a standard CPU. The results of the FDTD simulations showed similar trend of the local SAR at the tip of the wire and measured temperature as well as to a quadratic function of W, confirming the validity of the quasistatic approach for the presented problem at 64 MHz. Imaging and heating

  15. Parallel transmit excitation at 1.5 T based on the minimization of a driving function for device heating

    SciTech Connect

    Gudino, N.; Sonmez, M.; Nielles-Vallespin, S.; Faranesh, A. Z.; Lederman, R. J.; Balaban, R. S.; Hansen, M. S.; Yao, Z.; Baig, T.; Martens, M.; Griswold, M. A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To provide a rapid method to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) E-field coupling and consequent heating in long conductors in an interventional MRI (iMRI) setup. Methods: A driving function for device heating (W) was defined as the integration of the E-field along the direction of the wire and calculated through a quasistatic approximation. Based on this function, the phases of four independently controlled transmit channels were dynamically changed in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. During the different excitation configurations, the RF induced heating in a nitinol wire immersed in a saline phantom was measured by fiber-optic temperature sensing. Additionally, a minimization of W as a function of phase and amplitude values of the different channels and constrained by the homogeneity of the RF excitation field (B{sub 1}) over a region of interest was proposed and its results tested on the benchtop. To analyze the validity of the proposed method, using a model of the array and phantom setup tested in the scanner, RF fields and SAR maps were calculated through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. In addition to phantom experiments, RF induced heating of an active guidewire inserted in a swine was also evaluated. Results: In the phantom experiment, heating at the tip of the device was reduced by 92% when replacing the body coil by an optimized parallel transmit excitation with same nominal flip angle. In the benchtop, up to 90% heating reduction was measured when implementing the constrained minimization algorithm with the additional degree of freedom given by independent amplitude control. The computation of the optimum phase and amplitude values was executed in just 12 s using a standard CPU. The results of the FDTD simulations showed similar trend of the local SAR at the tip of the wire and measured temperature as well as to a quadratic function of W, confirming the validity of the quasistatic approach for the presented problem at 64 MHz. Imaging and heating

  16. Can we Predict Quantum Yields Using Excited State Density Functional Theory for New Families of Fluorescent Dyes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Alexander W.; Lin, Zhou; Shepherd, James J.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-06-01

    For a fluorescent dye, the quantum yield characterizes the efficiency of energy transfer from the absorbed light to the emitted fluorescence. In the screening among potential families of dyes, those with higher quantum yields are expected to have more advantages. From the perspective of theoreticians, an efficient prediction of the quantum yield using a universal excited state electronic structure theory is in demand but still challenging. The most representative examples for such excited state theory include time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS). In the present study, we explore the possibility of predicting the quantum yields for conventional and new families of organic dyes using a combination of TDDFT and ROKS. We focus on radiative (kr) and nonradiative (knr) rates for the decay of the first singlet excited state (S_1) into the ground state (S_0) in accordance with Kasha's rule. M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950). For each dye compound, kr is calculated with the S_1-S_0 energy gap and transition dipole moment obtained using ROKS and TDDFT respectively at the relaxed S_1 geometry. Our predicted kr agrees well with the experimental value, so long as the order of energy levels is correctly predicted. Evaluation of knr is less straightforward as multiple processes are involved. Our study focuses on the S_1-T_1 intersystem crossing (ISC) and the S_1-S_0 internal conversion (IC): we investigate the properties that allow us to model the knr value using a Marcus-like expression, such as the Stokes shift, the reorganization energy, and the S_1-T_1 and S_1-S_0 energy gaps. Taking these factors into consideration, we compare our results with those obtained using the actual Marcus theory and provide explanation for discrepancy. T. Kowalczyk, T. Tsuchimochi, L. Top, P.-T. Chen, and T. Van Voorhis, J. Chem. Phys., 138, 164101 (2013). M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950).

  17. SERS Activity of Silver Nanoparticles Functionalized with A Desferrioxamine B Derived Ligand for FE(III) Binding and Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinetto, P.; Taglietti, A.; Pasotti, L.; Pallavicini, P.; Dacarro, G.; Giulotto, E.; Grandi, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the SERS activity of colloidal silver nanoparticles functionalized with a ligand, derived from the siderophore desferrioxamine B (desferal, DFO), an iron chelator widely used in biological and medical applications. The ligand was equipped with a sulfur-containing moiety to ensure optimal binding with silver surfaces. By means of Raman and SERS effects we monitored the route of material preparation from the modified DFO-S molecule to the colloidal aggregates. The results indicate that the functionalization of the chelating agent does not affect its binding ability towards Fe(III). The resulting functionalized silver nanoparticles are a promising SERS tag for operation in biological environments. The Fe-O stretching signature, arising when DFO-S grafted to silver nanoparticles binds Fe(III), could provide a tool for cation sensing in solution.

  18. Type III restriction is alleviated by bacteriophage (RecE) homologous recombination function but enhanced by bacterial (RecBCD) function.

    PubMed

    Handa, Naofumi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2005-11-01

    Previous works have demonstrated that DNA breaks generated by restriction enzymes stimulate, and are repaired by, homologous recombination with an intact, homologous DNA region through the function of lambdoid bacteriophages lambda and Rac. In the present work, we examined the effect of bacteriophage functions, expressed in bacterial cells, on restriction of an infecting tester phage in a simple plaque formation assay. The efficiency of plaque formation on an Escherichia coli host carrying EcoRI, a type II restriction system, is not increased by the presence of Rac prophage-presumably because, under the single-infection conditions of the plaque assay, a broken phage DNA cannot find a homologue with which to recombine. To our surprise, however, we found that the efficiency of plaque formation in the presence of a type III restriction system, EcoP1 or EcoP15, is increased by the bacteriophage-mediated homologous recombination functions recE and recT of Rac prophage. This type III restriction alleviation does not depend on lar on Rac, unlike type I restriction alleviation. On the other hand, bacterial RecBCD-homologous recombination function enhances type III restriction. These results led us to hypothesize that the action of type III restriction enzymes takes place on replicated or replicating DNA in vivo and leaves daughter DNAs with breaks at nonallelic sites, that bacteriophage-mediated homologous recombination reconstitutes an intact DNA from them, and that RecBCD exonuclease blocks this repair by degradation from the restriction breaks.

  19. Identification and functional study of type III-A CRISPR-Cas systems in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Linyan; Gao, Chun-Hui; Zhu, Jiade; Zhao, Liping; Wu, Qingfa; Li, Min; Sun, Baolin

    2016-12-01

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats [CRISPR]-CRISPR associated proteins [Cas]) system can provide prokaryote with immunity against invading mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as phages and plasmids, which are the main sources of staphylococcal accessory genes. To date, only a few Staphylococcus aureus strains containing CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified, but no functional study in these strains has been reported. In this study, 6 clinical isolates of S. aureus with type III-A CRISPR-Cas systems were identified, and whole-genome sequencing and functional study were conducted subsequently. Genome sequence analysis revealed a close linkage between the CRISPR-Cas system and the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element in five strains. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the type III-A repeats are conserved within staphylococci, despite of the decreased conservation in trailer-end repeats. Highly homologous sequences of some spacers were identified in staphylococcal MGEs, and partially complementary sequences of spacers were mostly found in the coding strand of lytic regions in staphylococcal phages. Transformation experiments showed that S. aureus type III-A CRISPR-Cas system can specifically prevent plasmid transfer in a transcription-dependent manner. Base paring between crRNA and target sequence, the endoribonuclease, and the Csm complex were proved to be necessary for type III-A CRISPR-Cas immunity.

  20. Cobalt(III)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Indazoles and Furans by C–H Bond Functionalization/Addition/Cyclization Cascades

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of operationally straightforward and cost-effective routes for the assembly of heterocycles from simple inputs is important for many scientific endeavors, including pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and materials research. In this article we describe the development of a new air-stable cationic Co(III) catalyst for convergent, one-step benchtop syntheses of N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans by C–H bond additions to aldehydes followed by in situ cyclization and aromatization. Only a substoichiometric amount of AcOH is required as an additive that is both low-cost and convenient to handle. The syntheses of these heterocycles are the first examples of Co(III)-catalyzed additions to aldehydes, and reactions are demonstrated for a variety of aromatic, heteroaromatic, and aliphatic derivatives. The syntheses of both N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans have been performed on 20 mmol scales and should be readily applicable to larger scales. The reported heterocycle syntheses also demonstrate the use of directing groups that have not previously been applied to Co(III)-catalyzed C–H bond functionalizations. Additionally, the synthesis of furans demonstrates the first example of Co(III)-catalyzed functionalization of alkenyl C–H bonds. PMID:25494296

  1. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the G-III Swept-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    In support of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge [ACTE] project at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, displacement transfer functions were applied to the swept wing of a Gulfstream G-III airplane (Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, Georgia) to obtain deformed shape predictions. Four strainsensing lines (two on the lower surface, two on the upper surface) were used to calculate the deformed shape of the G III wing under bending and torsion. There being an insufficient number of surface strain sensors, the existing G III wing box finite element model was used to generate simulated surface strains for input to the displacement transfer functions. The resulting predicted deflections have good correlation with the finite-element generated deflections as well as the measured deflections from the ground load calibration test. The convergence study showed that the displacement prediction error at the G III wing tip can be reduced by increasing the number of strain stations (for each strain-sensing line) down to a minimum error of l.6 percent at 17 strain stations; using more than 17 strain stations yielded no benefit because the error slightly increased to 1.9% when 32 strain stations were used.

  2. Cobalt(III)-catalyzed synthesis of indazoles and furans by C-H bond functionalization/addition/cyclization cascades.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Joshua R; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2015-01-14

    The development of operationally straightforward and cost-effective routes for the assembly of heterocycles from simple inputs is important for many scientific endeavors, including pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and materials research. In this article we describe the development of a new air-stable cationic Co(III) catalyst for convergent, one-step benchtop syntheses of N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans by C-H bond additions to aldehydes followed by in situ cyclization and aromatization. Only a substoichiometric amount of AcOH is required as an additive that is both low-cost and convenient to handle. The syntheses of these heterocycles are the first examples of Co(III)-catalyzed additions to aldehydes, and reactions are demonstrated for a variety of aromatic, heteroaromatic, and aliphatic derivatives. The syntheses of both N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans have been performed on 20 mmol scales and should be readily applicable to larger scales. The reported heterocycle syntheses also demonstrate the use of directing groups that have not previously been applied to Co(III)-catalyzed C-H bond functionalizations. Additionally, the synthesis of furans demonstrates the first example of Co(III)-catalyzed functionalization of alkenyl C-H bonds.

  3. Electronic Excitations in Pyrrole: A Test Case for Determination of Chromophores in the Chromogenic Effects of Neurotoxic Hydrocarbons by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and Single-Excitation Configuration Interaction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Chang-Guo N.; Dixon, David A. )

    2002-11-01

    Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and single excitation configuration interaction (CIS) calculations on the electronic excitations in pyrrole have been performed to examine the reliability of these first-principles electronic structure methods in predicting electronic excitation spectra of pyrrole-containing compounds. Both the TD-DFT and CIS calculations led to satisfactory results when compared to available experimental data. The TD-DFT and CIS calculations provide lower and upper limits of the excitations energies, respectively. These results suggest that these methods can be used for the prediction of the excitation spectra of chromophores responsible for the chromogenic effects of neurotoxic hydrocarbons which are believed to be substituted pyrroles and their adducts with proteins. As an example of practical application, the spectrum of the widely used 2,5-dimethylpyrrole has been calculated. It is shown that the 2,5-dimethylpyrrole molecule does not have an absorption in the region of the visible spectrum (400-700 nm), suggesting that the absorption observed at 530 nm and the color of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole is due to another species, probably a product of possible 2,5-dimethylpyrrole autoxidation. This suggests that the conclusions from previously reported experimental studies of biochemical reactions of neurotoxic y-diketones need to be re-examined in terms of the relationship of chromogenicity to neurotoxicity.

  4. Complex Function for SicA, a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Type III Secretion-Associated Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Stephanie C.; Galán, Jorge E.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica encodes a type III secretion system within a pathogenicity island located at centisome 63 that is essential for virulence. All type III secretion systems require the function of a family of low-molecular-weight proteins that aid the secretion process by acting as partitioning factors and/or secretion pilots. One such protein is SicA, which is encoded immediately upstream of the type III secreted proteins SipB and SipC. We found that the absence of SicA results in the degradation of both SipB and SipC. Interestingly, in the absence of SipC, SipB was not only stable but also secreted at wild-type levels in a sicA mutant background, indicating that SicA is not required for SipB secretion. We also found that SicA is capable of binding both SipB and SipC. These results are consistent with a SicA role as a partitioning factor for SipB and SipC, thereby preventing their premature association and degradation. We also found that introduction of a sicA null mutation results in the lack of expression of SopE, another type III-secreted protein. Such an effect was shown to be transcriptional. Introduction of a loss-of-function sipC mutation into the sicA mutant background rescued sopE expression. These results indicate that the effect of sicA on sopE expression is indirect and most likely exerted through a regulatory factor(s) partitioned by SicA from SipC. These studies therefore describe a surprisingly complex function for the Salmonella enterica type III secretion-associated chaperone SicA. PMID:10735870

  5. Tailoring the optimal control cost function to a desired output: application to minimizing phase errors in short broadband excitation pulses.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Thomas E; Reiss, Timo O; Luy, Burkhard; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

    2005-01-01

    The de facto standard cost function has been used heretofore to characterize the performance of pulses designed using optimal control theory. The freedom to choose new, creative quality factors designed for specific purposes is demonstrated. While the methodology has more general applicability, its utility is illustrated by comparison to a consistently chosen example--broadband excitation. The resulting pulses are limited to the same maximum RF amplitude used previously and tolerate the same variation in RF homogeneity deemed relevant for standard high-resolution NMR probes. Design criteria are unchanged: transformation of I(z)--> I(x) over resonance offsets of +/-20 kHz and RF variability of +/-5%, with a peak RF amplitude equal to 17.5 kHz. However, the new cost effectively trades a small increase in residual z magnetization for improved phase in the transverse plane. Compared to previous broadband excitation by optimized pulses (BEBOP), significantly shorter pulses are achievable, with only marginally reduced performance. Simulations transform I(z) to greater than 0.98 I(x), with phase deviations of the final magnetization less than 2 degrees, over the targeted ranges of resonance offset and RF variability. Experimental performance is in excellent agreement with the simulations.

  6. Tailoring the optimal control cost function to a desired output: application to minimizing phase errors in short broadband excitation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Thomas E.; Reiss, Timo O.; Luy, Burkhard; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2005-01-01

    The de facto standard cost function has been used heretofore to characterize the performance of pulses designed using optimal control theory. The freedom to choose new, creative quality factors designed for specific purposes is demonstrated. While the methodology has more general applicability, its utility is illustrated by comparison to a consistently chosen example—broadband excitation. The resulting pulses are limited to the same maximum RF amplitude used previously and tolerate the same variation in RF homogeneity deemed relevant for standard high-resolution NMR probes. Design criteria are unchanged: transformation of Iz → Ix over resonance offsets of ±20 kHz and RF variability of ±5%, with a peak RF amplitude equal to 17.5 kHz. However, the new cost effectively trades a small increase in residual z magnetization for improved phase in the transverse plane. Compared to previous broadband excitation by optimized pulses (BEBOP), significantly shorter pulses are achievable, with only marginally reduced performance. Simulations transform Iz to greater than 0.98 Ix, with phase deviations of the final magnetization less than 2°, over the targeted ranges of resonance offset and RF variability. Experimental performance is in excellent agreement with the simulations.

  7. Unrestricted density functional theory based on the fragment molecular orbital method for the ground and excited state calculations of large systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Sakurai, Minoru; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2014-04-14

    We extended the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method interfaced with density functional theory (DFT) into spin unrestricted formalism (UDFT) and developed energy gradients for the ground state and single point excited state energies based on time-dependent DFT. The accuracy of FMO is evaluated in comparison to the full calculations without fragmentation. Electronic excitations in solvated organic radicals and in the blue copper protein, plastocyanin (PDB code: 1BXV), are reported. The contributions of solvent molecules to the electronic excitations are analyzed in terms of the fragment polarization and quantum effects such as interfragment charge transfer.

  8. A crucial role of fractional occupation numbers of natural orbitals (NOs) in the description of double excitations in response time-dependent NO functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a crucial role of fractional occupation numbers (FONs) of natural orbitals (NOs) in the description of double excitations in time-dependent NO functional theory (TDNOFT). An analytical dependence of the double excitation energy ωα on the ratio of the FONs is derived in a model from the matrix diagonalization problem. In the large ratio Heitler-London limit the derived formula reproduces the correct asymptotics of ωα of the ionic state of double excitation character. In the small ratio Møller-Plesset, MP limit the reverse relation of static MP perturbation theory emerges in the dynamical response theory to provide ωα .

  9. Cognitive Profiles of Adults with Asperger's Disorder, High-Functioning Autism, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified Based on the WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanai, Chieko; Tani, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Yamada, Takashi; Ota, Haruhisa; Watanabe, Hiromi; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the cognitive profiles of high-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) in adults based on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale III (WAIS-III). We examined cognitive profiles of adults with no intellectual disability (IQ greater than 70), and in adults with Asperger's disorder (AS; n = 47), high-functioning autism (HFA;…

  10. Cognitive Profiles of Adults with Asperger's Disorder, High-Functioning Autism, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified Based on the WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanai, Chieko; Tani, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Yamada, Takashi; Ota, Haruhisa; Watanabe, Hiromi; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the cognitive profiles of high-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) in adults based on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale III (WAIS-III). We examined cognitive profiles of adults with no intellectual disability (IQ greater than 70), and in adults with Asperger's disorder (AS; n = 47), high-functioning autism (HFA;…

  11. [Study of the "stimulus--excitation" function in the peripheral portion of the frog taste analyzer].

    PubMed

    Shmarov, D A; Samoĭlov, V O

    1979-04-01

    The intensity of glossopharyngeal nerve afferent discharges in the frog was studied during stimulation of gustatory receptors by caffeine, acetic acid, saccharose and sodium chloride ranging widely in the concentration changes. It was shown, that the function "stimulus-exitation" for the summary discharges in response on the coffeine and acetic acid was being logaryphmic. The character of off-effects dependence on the concentration of bitter and sour stimuli. Was proved to be the same. The curve "stimulus-exitation" for the saccharose was "S" shaped, but for the sodium chloride it might be described by the power function with the exponent equal 0,8.

  12. Enantioselective epoxidation of non-functionalized alkenes using carbohydrate based salen-Mn(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanshan; Zhao, Jiquan; Zhao, Dongmin

    2007-02-05

    Three new salen ligands with carbohydrate moieties were prepared from a salicylaldehyde derivative obtained by reaction of 1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-glucofuranose with 3-tert-butyl-5-(chloro-methyl)-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde. These ligands were coordinated with Mn(III) to give three chiral salen-Mn(III) complexes. The complexes were characterized and employed in the asymmetric epoxidation of unfunctionalized alkenes. Catalytic results showed that although there are no chiral groups on the diimine bridge, these complexes had some enantioselectivity, which indicates the carbohydrate moiety has an asymmetric inducing effect in the epoxidation reaction.

  13. Corticospinal excitability as a predictor of functional gains at the affected upper limb following robotic training in chronic stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Milot, Marie-Hélène; Spencer, Steven J; Chan, Vicky; Allington, James P; Klein, Julius; Chou, Cathy; Pearson-Fuhrhop, Kristin; Bobrow, James E; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Cramer, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Robotic training can help improve function of a paretic limb following a stroke, but individuals respond differently to the training. A predictor of functional gains might improve the ability to select those individuals more likely to benefit from robot-based therapy. Studies evaluating predictors of functional improvement after a robotic training are scarce. One study has found that white matter tract integrity predicts functional gains following a robotic training of the hand and wrist. Objective. To determine the predictive ability of behavioral and brain measures in order to improve selection of individuals for robotic training. Twenty subjects with chronic stroke participated in an 8-week course of robotic exoskeletal training for the arm. Before training, a clinical evaluation, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were each measured as predictors. Final functional gain was defined as change in the Box and Block Test (BBT). Measures significant in bivariate analysis were fed into a multivariate linear regression model. Training was associated with an average gain of 6 ± 5 blocks on the BBT (P < .0001). Bivariate analysis revealed that lower baseline motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude on TMS, and lower laterality M1 index on fMRI each significantly correlated with greater BBT change. In the multivariate linear regression analysis, baseline MEP magnitude was the only measure that remained significant. Subjects with lower baseline MEP magnitude benefited the most from robotic training of the affected arm. These subjects might have reserve remaining for the training to boost corticospinal excitability, translating into functional gains. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Converging genetic and functional brain imaging evidence links neuronal excitability to working memory, psychiatric disease, and brain activity.

    PubMed

    Heck, Angela; Fastenrath, Matthias; Ackermann, Sandra; Auschra, Bianca; Bickel, Horst; Coynel, David; Gschwind, Leo; Jessen, Frank; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Maier, Wolfgang; Milnik, Annette; Pentzek, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Ripke, Stephan; Spalek, Klara; Sullivan, Patrick; Vogler, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2014-03-05

    Working memory, the capacity of actively maintaining task-relevant information during a cognitive task, is a heritable trait. Working memory deficits are characteristic for many psychiatric disorders. We performed genome-wide gene set enrichment analyses in multiple independent data sets of young and aged cognitively healthy subjects (n = 2,824) and in a large schizophrenia case-control sample (n = 32,143). The voltage-gated cation channel activity gene set, consisting of genes related to neuronal excitability, was robustly linked to performance in working memory-related tasks across ages and to schizophrenia. Functional brain imaging in 707 healthy participants linked this gene set also to working memory-related activity in the parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Gene set analyses may help to dissect the molecular underpinnings of cognitive dimensions, brain activity, and psychopathology.

  15. Near and Above Ionization Electronic Excitations with Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Kenneth; Govind, Niranjan

    2013-11-12

    We present a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) prescription for capturing near and post-ionization excitations based on non-Hermitian von Neumann density matrix propagation with atom-centered basis sets, tuned range-separated DFT, and a phenomenological imaginary molecular orbital-based absorbing potential to mimic coupling to the continuum. The computed extreme ultraviolet absorption spectra for acetylene (C2H2), water (H2O), and Freon 12 (CF2Cl2) agree well with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data over the range of 0-50 eV. The absorbing potential removes spurious high-energy finite basis artifacts, yielding correct bound-to-bound transitions, metastable (autoionizing) resonance states, and consistent overall absorption shapes.

  16. Near and Above Ionization Electronic Excitations with Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, Kenneth A.; Govind, Niranjan

    2013-11-12

    We present a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) prescription for capturing near and post-ionization excitations based on non-Hermitian von Neumann density matrix propagation with atom-centered basis sets, tuned range-separated DFT, and a phenomenological imaginary molecular orbital-based absorbing potential to mimic coupling to the continuum. The computed extreme ultraviolet absorption spectra for acetylene (C2H2), water (H2O), and Freon 12 (CF2Cl2) agree well with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data over the range 0 to 50 eV. The absorbing potential removes spurious high energy finite basis artifacts, yielding correct bound to bound transitions, metastable (autoionizing) resonance states, and consistent overall absorption shapes.

  17. Study of excitation functions of alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions on holmium for 167Tm production.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Király, B; Takács, S; Ignatyuk, A V

    2010-03-01

    (167)Tm is a candidate radioisotope for both nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy due to its emitted Auger-electrons, low energy X- and gamma-rays. In the frame of a systematic study of excitation functions for production of medically relevant radioisotopes by charged particle induced reactions on rare earths, the (165)Ho(alpha,2n)(167)Tm reaction and the (165)Ho(alpha,n)(168)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,3n)(166)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,4n)(165)Tm side reactions were measured up to 40 MeV by the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured results were compared to the ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-II theoretical curves. Thick target yields, impurity levels and specific activities were deduced and compared with the same parameters for other charged particle production routes of (167)Tm. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of excitation functions of alpha induced reactions on natXe: Production of the therapeutic radioisotope 131Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Hermanne, A.; Király, B.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Sonck, M.; Kovalev, S. F.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2009-03-01

    Excitation functions were measured for alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions on natural xenon leading to the formation of the radionuclides 129m(rel),129g,131m,131mg,133m,135m,137m,139cumBa and 129cum,130mg,132,134m,135m,136mg,138mgCs from the respective thresholds up to 40 MeV. No earlier experimental cross section data were found in the literature. The experimental data were compared to and analyzed with the results of the theoretical model code ALICE-IPPE. The feasibility of the production of the therapeutic radioisotope 131Cs by using gas target technology was investigated. Comparison of reactor and cyclotron production routes of 131Cs was given.

  19. Comparative assessment of density functional methods for evaluating essential parameters to simulate SERS spectra within the excited state energy gradient approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Mozhdeh; Jamshidi, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    The prospect of challenges in reproducing and interpretation of resonance Raman properties of molecules interacting with metal clusters has prompted the present research initiative. Resonance Raman spectra based on the time-dependent gradient approximation are examined in the framework of density functional theory using different methods for representing the exchange-correlation functional. In this work the performance of different XC functionals in the prediction of ground state properties, excitation state energies, and gradients are compared and discussed. Resonance Raman properties based on time-dependent gradient approximation for the strongly low-lying charge transfer states are calculated and compared for different methods. We draw the following conclusions: (1) for calculating the binding energy and ground state geometry, dispersion-corrected functionals give the best performance in comparison to ab initio calculations, (2) GGA and meta GGA functionals give good accuracy in calculating vibrational frequencies, (3) excited state energies determined by hybrid and range-separated hybrid functionals are in good agreement with EOM-CCSD calculations, and (4) in calculating resonance Raman properties GGA functionals give good and reasonable performance in comparison to the experiment; however, calculating the excited state gradient by using the hybrid functional on the hessian of GGA improves the results of the hybrid functional significantly. Finally, we conclude that the agreement of charge-transfer surface enhanced resonance Raman spectra with experiment is improved significantly by using the excited state gradient approximation.

  20. Emission sensitization and mechanisms of electron-excitation migration in structures based on III-nitrides doped with rare-earth elements (Eu, Er, Sm)

    SciTech Connect

    Mezdrogina, M. M. Danilovsky, E. Yu.; Kuzmin, R. V.

    2010-03-15

    The effect of doping with Eu, Er, and Sm rare-earth ions on the shape of the luminescence spectrum for heterostructures with GaN/In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (0.1 < x < 0.4) quantum wells and from p-GaN/n-GaN and p-AlGaN/n-GaN junctions is investigated. The results of measurements of the electroluminescence of these structures correlate with the previous data on photoluminescence and Moessbauer spectroscopy. It is shown that it is the GaN 'yellow' (5000-6000 A) band that plays the important role in the excitation of intracenter states in the structures with several GaN/InGaN quantum wells doped with Eu and Sm. In this case, Eu is most likely the sensitizer for Sm. Additional introduction of 3d metal (Fe{sup 57}) in p-GaN/n-GaN:Eu results in the realization of intracenter transitions in Eu{sup 3+}: {sup 5}D{sub 0} {sup {yields} 7}F{sub 1} (6006 A), {sup 5}D{sub 0} {sup {yields} 7}F{sub 2} (6195 A), {sup 5}D{sub 0} {sup {yields} 7}F{sub 3} (6627 A), and {sup 5}D{sub 1} {sup {yields} 7}F{sub 4} (6327 A) due to the occurrence of new, efficient channels of excitation transfer to intracenter states and in the effect of Fe on the local environment of rare-earth ions including due to the f-d hybridization enhancement.

  1. Determination of excitation profile and dielectric function spatial nonuniformity in porous silicon by using WKB approach.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Yurkevich, Igor V; Canham, Leigh T; Loni, Armando; Kaplan, Andrey

    2014-11-03

    We develop an analytical model based on the WKB approach to evaluate the experimental results of the femtosecond pump-probe measurements of the transmittance and reflectance obtained on thin membranes of porous silicon. The model allows us to retrieve a pump-induced nonuniform complex dielectric function change along the membrane depth. We show that the model fitting to the experimental data requires a minimal number of fitting parameters while still complying with the restriction imposed by the Kramers-Kronig relation. The developed model has a broad range of applications for experimental data analysis and practical implementation in the design of devices involving a spatially nonuniform dielectric function, such as in biosensing, wave-guiding, solar energy harvesting, photonics and electro-optical devices.

  2. Density-functional theory study of vibrational relaxation of CO stretching excitation on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakong, Sung; Kratzer, Peter; Han, Xu; Laß, Kristian; Weingart, Oliver; Hasselbrink, Eckart

    2008-11-01

    A first-principles theory is presented for calculating the lifetime of adsorbate vibrations on semiconductor or insulator surfaces, where dissipation of the vibrational energy to substrate phonons is the dominant relaxation mechanism. As an example, we study the stretching vibration of CO/Si(100), where a lifetime of 2.3 ns has been measured recently [K. Laß, X. Han, and E. Hasselbrink, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 051102 (2005)]. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for the local modes of the adsorbate, including their anharmonic coupling, are combined with force field calculations for the substrate phonons. Using the DFT-Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional, we have determined the most stable adsorption site for CO on top of the lower Si atom of the Si surface dimer, the local normal modes of CO, and the multidimensional potential energy surface for the CO vibrations. The anharmonic stretching frequency of adsorbed CO obtained in DFT-PBE is 5% lower than the experimental value, while the B3LYP functional reproduces the CO stretching frequency with only 1.4% error. The coupling between the anharmonic vibrational modes and the phonon continuum is evaluated within first-order perturbation theory, and transition rates for the CO vibrational relaxation are calculated using Fermi's golden rule. The lifetime of 0.5 ns obtained with DFT-PBE is in qualitative agreement with experiment, while using vibrational frequencies from the B3LYP functional gives a much too long lifetime as compared to experiment. We find that the numerical value of the lifetime is very sensitive to the harmonic frequencies used as input to the calculation of the transition rate. An empirical adjustment of these frequencies yields excellent agreement between our theory and experiment. From these calculations we conclude that the most probable microscopic decay channel of the CO stretching mode is into four lateral shift/bending quanta and one phonon.

  3. Ionisation potential theorem in the presence of the electric field: Assessment of range-separated functional in the reproduction of orbital and excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borpuzari, Manash Protim; Boruah, Abhijit; Kar, Rahul

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the range-separated density functionals have been reported to reproduce gas phase orbital and excitation energies with good accuracy. In this article, we have revisited the ionisation potential theorem in the presence of external electric field. Numerical results on six linear molecules are presented and the performance of the range-separated density functionals in reproducing highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies, LUMO energies, HOMO-LUMO gaps in the presence of the external electric field is assessed. In addition, valence and Rydberg excitation energies in the presence of the external electric field are presented. It is found that the range-separated density functionals reproduce orbital and excitation energies accurately in the presence of the electric field. Moreover, we have performed fractional occupation calculation using cubic spline equation and tried to explain the performance of the functional.

  4. Calculations of Excitation Functions of Some Structural Fusion Materials for ( n, t) Reactions up to 50 MeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Durgu, C.; Aktı, N. N.; Okuducu, Ş.

    2010-06-01

    Fusion serves an inexhaustible energy for humankind. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, the working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross sections is of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n, t) reactions for some structural fusion materials such as 27Al, 51V, 52Cr, 55Mn, and 56Fe have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27Al( n, t)25Mg, 51V( n, t)49Ti, 52Cr( n, t)50V, 55Mn( n, t)53Cr and 56Fe( n, t)54Mn reactions have been carried out up to 50 MeV incident neutron energy. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the new evaluated the geometry dependent hybrid model, hybrid model and the cascade exciton model. Equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, we have calculated ( n, t) reaction cross-sections by using new evaluated semi-empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  5. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-15

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency {omega} on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (={omega}/2{pi}) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f {<=} 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent ''hot tail'' is observed at f{>=} 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the ''hot tail'' is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of {omega}, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower {omega} may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency {nu}{sub en}; the transition being dictated by {omega} {approx} 2{pi}{nu}{sub en}.

  6. Investigations of the potential functions of weakly bound diatomic molecules and laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Three variations on the Dunham series expansion function of the potential of a diatomic molecule are compared. The differences among these expansions lie in the choice of the expansion variable, lambda. The functional form of these variables are lambda/sub s/ = l-r/sub e//r for the Simon-Parr-Finlan version, lambda/sub T/ - 1-(r/sub e//r)/sup p/ for that of Thakkar, and lambda/sub H/ = 1-exp(-rho(r/r/sub e/-1) for that of Huffaker. A wide selection of molecular systems are examined. It is found that, for potentials in excess of thirty kcal/mole, the Huffaker expansion provides the best description of the three, extrapolating at large internuclear separation to a value within 10% of the true dissociation energy. For potentials that result from the interaction of excited states, all series expansions show poor behavior away from the equilibrium internuclear separation of the molecule. The series representation of the potentials of weakly bound molecules are examined in more detail. The ground states of BeAr/sup +/, HeNe/sup +/, NaAr, and Ar/sub 2/ and the excited states of HeNe+, NaNe, and NaAr are best described by the Thakkar expansion. Finally, the observation of laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization in a flowing afterglow is reported. The reaction Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca + h nu ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(5p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ occurs when the photon energy, h nu, is approximately equal to the energy difference between the metastable argon and one of the fine structure levels of the ion's doublet. By monitoring the cascade fluorescence of the above reaction and comparing it to the flourescence from the field-free process Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(4p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ a surprisingly large cross section of 6.7 x 10/sup 3/ A/sup 2/ is estimated.

  7. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Excitable Cells: Modulators of Mitochondrial and Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrion is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide (O2•−) is generated under specific bioenergetic conditions at several sites within the electron-transport system; most is converted to H2O2 inside and outside the mitochondrial matrix by superoxide dismutases. H2O2 is a major chemical messenger that, in low amounts and with its products, physiologically modulates cell function. The redox state and ROS scavengers largely control the emission (generation scavenging) of O2•−. Cell ischemia, hypoxia, or toxins can result in excess O2•− production when the redox state is altered and the ROS scavenger systems are overwhelmed. Too much H2O2 can combine with Fe2+ complexes to form reactive ferryl species (e.g., Fe(IV) = O•). In the presence of nitric oxide (NO•), O2•− forms the reactant peroxynitrite (ONOO−), and ONOOH-induced nitrosylation of proteins, DNA, and lipids can modify their structure and function. An initial increase in ROS can cause an even greater increase in ROS and allow excess mitochondrial Ca2+ entry, both of which are factors that induce cell apoptosis and necrosis. Approaches to reduce excess O2•− emission include selectively boosting the antioxidant capacity, uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation to reduce generation of O2•− by inducing proton leak, and reversibly inhibiting electron transport. Mitochondrial cation channels and exchangers function to maintain matrix homeostasis and likely play a role in modulating mitochondrial function, in part by regulating O2•− generation. Cell-signaling pathways induced physiologically by ROS include effects on thiol groups and disulfide linkages to modify posttranslationally protein structure to activate/inactivate specific kinase/phosphatase pathways. Hypoxia-inducible factors that stimulate a cascade of gene transcription may be mediated physiologically by ROS. Our knowledge of the role played by ROS and their scavenging systems in

  8. Heterologous gene expression and functional analysis of a type III polyketide synthase from Aspergillus niger NRRL 328

    SciTech Connect

    Kirimura, Kohtaro Watanabe, Shotaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi

    2016-05-13

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the formation of pyrone- and resorcinol-types aromatic polyketides. The genomic analysis of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger NRRL 328 revealed that this strain has a putative gene (chr-8-2: 2978617–2979847) encoding a type III PKS, although its functions are unknown. In this study, for functional analysis of this putative type III PKS designated as An-CsyA, cloning and heterologous expression of the An-CsyA gene (An-csyA) in Escherichia coli were performed. Recombinant His-tagged An-CsyA was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3), purified by Ni{sup 2+}-affinity chromatography, and used for in vitro assay. Tests on the substrate specificity of the His-tagged An-CsyA with myriad acyl-CoAs as starter substrates and malonyl-CoA as extender substrate showed that His-tagged An-CsyA accepted fatty acyl-CoAs (C2-C14) and produced triketide pyrones (C2-C14), tetraketide pyrones (C2-C10), and pentaketide resorcinols (C10-C14). Furthermore, acetoacetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, isobutyryl-CoA, and benzoyl-CoA were also accepted as starter substrates, and both of triketide pyrones and tetraketide pyrones were produced. It is noteworthy that the His-tagged An-CsyA produced polyketides from malonyl-CoA as starter and extender substrates and produced tetraketide pyrones from short-chain fatty acyl-CoAs as starter substrates. Therefore, this is the first report showing the functional properties of An-CsyA different from those of other fungal type III PKSs. -- Highlights: •Type III PKS from Aspergillus niger NRRL 328, An-CsyA, was cloned and characterized. •An-CsyA produced triketide pyrones, tetraketide pyrones and pentaketide resorcinols. •Functional properties of An-CsyA differs from those of other fungal type III PKSs.

  9. Cardiac function in types II and III spinal muscular atrophy: should we change standards of care?

    PubMed

    Bianco, Flaviana; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Messina, Sonia; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana; Soraru, Gianni; Pera, Maria Carmela; Mongini, Tiziana; Politano, Luisa; Baranello, Giovanni; Vita, Gianluca; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Morandi, Lucia; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    In the last years, there has been increasing evidence of cardiac involvement in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Autonomic dysfunction has been reported in animal models and in several patients with types I and III SMA, these findings raising the question whether heart rate should be routinely investigated in all SMA patients. The aim of our study was to detect possible signs of autonomic dysfunction and, more generally, of cardiac involvement in types II and III SMA. We retrospectively reviewed 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) in 157 types II and III SMA patients (age range, 2-74 years). Of them, 82 also had echocardiography. None of the patients had signs of bradycardia, atrial fibrillation, or the other previously reported rhythm disturbances regardless of the age at examination or the type of SMA. Echocardiography was also normal. There were no signs of congenital cardiac defects with the exception of one patient with a history of ventricular septal defects. Our results suggest that cardiac abnormalities are not common in type II and type III SMA. These findings provide no evidence to support a more accurate cardiac surveillance or changes in the existing standards of care. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Structure, Evolution, and Functions of Bacterial Type III Toxin-Antitoxin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goeders, Nathalie; Chai, Ray; Chen, Bihe; Day, Andrew; Salmond, George P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that encode a toxin (that targets an essential cellular process) and an antitoxin that neutralises or suppresses the deleterious effect of the toxin. Based on the molecular nature of the toxin and antitoxin components, TA systems are categorised into different types. Type III TA systems, the focus of this review, are composed of a toxic endoribonuclease neutralised by a non-coding RNA antitoxin in a pseudoknotted configuration. Bioinformatic analysis shows that the Type III systems can be classified into subtypes. These TA systems were originally discovered through a phage resistance phenotype arising due to a process akin to an altruistic suicide; the phenomenon of abortive infection. Some Type III TA systems are bifunctional and can stabilise plasmids during vegetative growth and sporulation. Features particular to Type III systems are explored here, emphasising some of the characteristics of the RNA antitoxin and how these may affect the co-evolutionary relationship between toxins and cognate antitoxins in their quaternary structures. Finally, an updated analysis of the distribution and diversity of these systems are presented and discussed. PMID:27690100

  11. Corticospinal excitability as a predictor of functional gains at the affected upper limb following robotic training in chronic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Milot, Marie-Hélène; Spencer, Steven J.; Chan, Vicky; Allington, James P.; Klein, Julius; Chou, Cathy; Pearson-Fuhrhop, Kristin; Bobrow, James E.; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Robotic training can help improve function of a paretic limb following a stroke, but individuals respond differently to the training. A predictor of functional gains might improve the ability to select those individuals more likely to benefit from robot based therapy. Studies evaluating predictors of functional improvement after a robotic training are scarce. One study has found that white matter tract integrity predicts functional gains following a robotic training of the hand and wrist. Objective Determine the predictive ability of behavioral and brain measures to improve selection of individuals for robotic training. Methods Twenty subjects with chronic stroke participated in an 8-week course of robotic exoskeletal training for the arm. Before training, a clinical evaluation, fMRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were each measured as predictors. Final functional gain was defined as change in the Box and Block Test (BBT). Measures significant in bivariate analysis were fed into a multivariate linear regression model. Results Training was associated with an average gain of 6±5 blocks on the BBT (p<0.0001). Bivariate analysis revealed that lower baseline motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude on TMS, and lower laterality M1 index on fMRI each significantly correlated with greater BBT change. In the multivariate linear regression analysis, baseline MEP magnitude was the only measure that remained significant. Conclusion Subjects with lower baseline MEP magnitude benefited the most from robotic training of the affected arm. These subjects might have reserve remaining for the training to boost corticospinal excitability, translating into functional gains. PMID:24642382

  12. Density functional investigation of the electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of a multichromophoric antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2016-05-01

    We report an electronic structure study of a multichromophoric molecular complex containing two of each borondipyrromethane dye, Zn-tetraphenyl-porphyrin, bisphenyl anthracene and a fullerene. The snowflake shaped molecule behaves like an antenna capturing photon at different frequencies and transferring the photon energy to the porphyrin where electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin to the fullerene. The study is performed within density functional formalism using large polarized Guassian basis sets (12,478 basis functions in total). The energies of the HOMO and LUMO states in the complex, as adjudged by the ionization potential and the electron affinity values, show significant differences with respect to their values in participating subunits in isolation. These differences are also larger than the variations of the ionization potential and electron affinity values observed in non-bonded C60-ZnTPP complexes in co-facial arrangement or end-on orientations. An understanding of the origin of these differences is obtained by a systematic study of the effect of structural strain, the presence of ligands, the effect of orbital delocalization on the ionization energy and the electron affinity. Finally, a few lowest charge transfer energies involving electronic transitions from the porphyrin component to the fullerene subunit of the complex are predicted.

  13. Speed-Up of the Excited-State Benchmarking: Double-Hybrid Density Functionals as Test Cases.

    PubMed

    Bremond, Eric; Savarese, Marika; Pérez-Jiménez, Ángel José; Sancho-García, Juan Carlos; Adamo, Carlo

    2017-10-04

    The EX6-0, EX7-0 and EX7-1 representative benchmark sets are developed for the fast evaluation of the performance of a density functional, or more generally of a computational protocol, in modeling low-lying valence singlet-singlet excitation energies of organic dyes within the range of 1.5 to 4.5 eV. All sets share the advantage of being small (a maximum of 7 molecules), but providing statistical errors representative of larger and extended databases. To that extent, the EX7-1 benchmark set goes a step further and is composed by systems as small as possible in order to alleviate the associated computational cost. The reliability of all the sets is assessed through the benchmarking of 15 modern double-hybrid density functionals. The investigation shows not only that the 3 benchmark sets provide close error metrics for each density functional, but also that when taking advantage of the Resolution-of-the-Identity and a balanced triple-\\zeta basis set (e.g., def2-TZVP), double hybrids overperform the `popular' hybrids in modeling vertical absorption, emission, and adiabatic energies.

  14. Functional outcomes of Gartland III supracondylar humerus fractures with early neurovascular complications in children: A retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sung Il; Kwon, Tae Young; Hwang, Hong Pil; Kim, Jung Ryul

    2017-06-01

    This was a retrospective observational study. The aim of this study was to evaluate functional outcomes in children treated for Gartland III supracondylar humerus (SCH) fracture with neurovascular (NV) injuries using validated outcome measures. A secondary goal was to determine whether clinical parameters such as age at injury, sex, weight, fracture site, and/or direction of displacement could predict NV injury at the time of fracture or long-term functional outcomes in these patients.One hundred fifty-four patients of Gartland III SCH fractures between March 2004 and May 2013 were studied retrospectively. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence of NV injury. Medical records and radiographs were reviewed to assess several parameters, including age, sex, weight, treatment intervention, the extremity involved, direction of fracture displacement, and NV injury. Functional outcome was assessed on final follow-up using the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick DASH) outcome measures. Statistical analysis was used to determine the relationship between NV injury and functional outcomes.There were 33 cases with Gartland III SCH fracture associated with NV injuries (10 cases of vascular compromise, 14 cases of neural injury, and 9 cases involving both vascular compromise and neural injury). There were significant differences between the 2 groups in age (P  =  .048), weight (P  =  .009), and direction of displacement (P  =  .004). Vascular compromise and median nerve injury were most common in fractures with posterolateral displacement, and radial nerve injuries were common in fractures with posteromedial displacement. The mean global function score in the PODCI was 91.4 points, and the mean Quick DASH score was 11.7 points, with excellent functional outcomes. No differences in outcomes were identified based upon age, fracture site, sex, weight, direction of

  15. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  16. Assessment of the Global and Regional Land Hydrosphere and Its Impact on the Balance of the Geophysical Excitation Function of Polar Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wińska, Małgorzata; Nastula, Jolanta; Kołaczek, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The impact of continental hydrological loading from land water, snow and ice on polar motion excitation, calculated as hydrological angular momentum (HAM), is difficult to estimate, and not as much is known about it as about atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and oceanic angular momentum (OAM). In this paper, regional hydrological excitations to polar motion are investigated using monthly terrestrial water storage data derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission and from the five models of land hydrology. The results show that the areas where the variance shows large variability are similar for the different models of land hydrology and for the GRACE data. Areas which have a small amplitude on the maps make an important contribution to the global hydrological excitation function of polar motion. The comparison of geodetic residuals and global hydrological excitation functions of polar motion shows that none of the hydrological excitation has enough energy to significantly improve the agreement between the observed geodetic excitation and geophysical ones.

  17. Rapid development of Purkinje cell excitability, functional cerebellar circuit, and afferent sensory input to cerebellum in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Yi; Ulrich, Brittany; Issa, Fadi A; Wan, Jijun; Papazian, Diane M

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish has significant advantages for studying the morphological development of the brain. However, little is known about the functional development of the zebrafish brain. We used patch clamp electrophysiology in live animals to investigate the emergence of excitability in cerebellar Purkinje cells, functional maturation of the cerebellar circuit, and establishment of sensory input to the cerebellum. Purkinje cells are born at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf). By 4 dpf, Purkinje cells spontaneously fired action potentials in an irregular pattern. By 5 dpf, the frequency and regularity of tonic firing had increased significantly and most cells fired complex spikes in response to climbing fiber activation. Our data suggest that, as in mammals, Purkinje cells are initially innervated by multiple climbing fibers that are winnowed to a single input. To probe the development of functional sensory input to the cerebellum, we investigated the response of Purkinje cells to a visual stimulus consisting of a rapid change in light intensity. At 4 dpf, sudden darkness increased the rate of tonic firing, suggesting that afferent pathways carrying visual information are already active by this stage. By 5 dpf, visual stimuli also activated climbing fibers, increasing the frequency of complex spiking. Our results indicate that the electrical properties of zebrafish and mammalian Purkinje cells are highly conserved and suggest that the same ion channels, Nav1.6 and Kv3.3, underlie spontaneous pacemaking activity. Interestingly, functional development of the cerebellum is temporally correlated with the emergence of complex, visually-guided behaviors such as prey capture. Because of the rapid formation of an electrically-active cerebellum, optical transparency, and ease of genetic manipulation, the zebrafish has great potential for functionally mapping cerebellar afferent and efferent pathways and for investigating cerebellar control of motor behavior.

  18. Clinical and functional outcomes after operative management of Salter-Harris III and IV fractures of the proximal tibial epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brian W; Rizkala, Amir R; Li, Mengnai

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric proximal tibial epiphysis fractures are uncommon and have subsequently received little attention in terms of treatment and outcomes. We studied the clinical and functional outcomes of 13 patients with Salter-Harris III and IV fractures of the proximal tibial epiphysis after operative fixation. Associated meniscus, ligamentous, or neurovascular injury was present in 100% of this cohort. Provisional external fixation and locked plating spanning the open physis were used in the majority of cases. The mean clinical follow-up was 15.69 months, where all fractures progressed to union. Good functional outcomes with a low complication rate are possible after operative fixation of these infrequent injuries.

  19. A Series of Supramolecular Complexes for Solar Energy Conversion via Water Reduction to Produce Hydrogen: An Excited State Kinetic Analysis of Ru(II),Rh(III),Ru(II) Photoinitiated Electron Collectors.

    PubMed

    White, Travis A; Knoll, Jessica D; Arachchige, Shamindri M; Brewer, Karen J

    2011-12-27

    Mixed-metal supramolecular complexes have been designed that photochemically absorb solar light, undergo photoinitiated electron collection and reduce water to produce hydrogen fuel using low energy visible light. This manuscript describes these systems with an analysis of the photophysics of a series of six supramolecular complexes, [{(TL)₂Ru(dpp)}₂RhX₂](PF₆)₅ with TL = bpy, phen or Ph₂phen with X = Cl or Br. The process of light conversion to a fuel requires a system to perform a number of complicated steps including the absorption of light, the generation of charge separation on a molecular level, the reduction by one and then two electrons and the interaction with the water substrate to produce hydrogen. The manuscript explores the rate of intramolecular electron transfer, rate of quenching of the supramolecules by the DMA electron donor, rate of reduction of the complex by DMA from the ³MLCT excited state, as well as overall rate of reduction of the complex via visible light excitation. Probing a series of complexes in detail exploring the variation of rates of important reactions as a function of sub-unit modification provides insight into the role of each process in the overall efficiency of water reduction to produce hydrogen. The kinetic analysis shows that the complexes display different rates of excited state reactions that vary with TL and halide. The role of the MLCT excited state is elucidated by this kinetic study which shows that the ³MLCT state and not the ³MMCT is likely that key contributor to the photoreduction of these complexes. The kinetic analysis of the excited state dynamics and reactions of the complexes are important as this class of supramolecules behaves as photoinitiated electron collectors and photocatalysts for the reduction of water to hydrogen.

  20. OFF-ON-OFF Dual Emission at Visible and UV Wavelengths from Carbazole Functionalized β-Diketonate Europium(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yuki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Yuasa, Junpei

    2016-06-23

    This work demonstrates dual emission "OFF-ON-OFF" switching at visible and UV wavelengths of a carbazole functionalized β-diketone (LH) by a simple change of a europium(III) ion (Eu(3+)) concentration in the submicromolar concentration range. In the presence of 0.25 equiv of Eu(3+) (5 μM), LH forms a luminescent 4:1 complex ([Eu(3+)(L(-))4](-)) exhibiting dual emission at 357 and 613 nm resulting from the local excitation of the carbazole ring and ligand-sensitized luminescence from the Eu(3+)-β-diketonate unit, respectively. The 4:1 complex begins to convert into a 2:1 complex ([Eu(3+)(L(-))2](+)) via a 3:1 complex [Eu(3+)(L(-))3] above a molar ratio ([Eu(3+)]/[LH]) of 0.25, which provides the opportunity for binding of solvent methanol molecules to the vacant site of the Eu(3+) ion in the complex ([Eu(3+)(L(-))2(MeOH)n](+)). The OH oscillators of coordinated methanol molecules facilitate the nonradiative pathway of the Eu(3+) emission; hence the emission at 613 nm almost disappears above the 0.50 equivalent of Eu(3+) (11 μM), while the UV emission at 357 nm remains mostly constant over the whole concentration range.

  1. New Approaches to Exciting Exergame-Experiences for People with Motor Function Impairments.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Martina; Gómez-Martinho, Ignacio; Meneses, Juan; Martínez, José-Fernán

    2017-02-12

    The work presented here suggests new ways to tackle exergames for physical rehabilitation and to improve the players' immersion and involvement. The primary (but not exclusive) purpose is to increase the motivation of children and adolescents with severe physical impairments, for doing their required exercises while playing. The proposed gaming environment is based on the Kinect sensor and the Blender Game Engine. A middleware has been implemented that efficiently transmits the data from the sensor to the game. Inside the game, different newly proposed mechanisms have been developed to distinguish pure exercise-gestures from other movements used to control the game (e.g., opening a menu). The main contribution is the amplification of weak movements, which allows the physically impaired to have similar gaming experiences as the average population. To test the feasibility of the proposed methods, four mini-games were implemented and tested by a group of 11 volunteers with different disabilities, most of them bound to a wheelchair. Their performance has also been compared to that of a healthy control group. Results are generally positive and motivating, although there is much to do to improve the functionalities. There is a major demand for applications that help to include disabled people in society and to improve their life conditions. This work will contribute towards providing them with more fun during exercise.

  2. New Approaches to Exciting Exergame-Experiences for People with Motor Function Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Martina; Gómez-Martinho, Ignacio; Meneses, Juan; Martínez, José-Fernán

    2017-01-01

    The work presented here suggests new ways to tackle exergames for physical rehabilitation and to improve the players’ immersion and involvement. The primary (but not exclusive) purpose is to increase the motivation of children and adolescents with severe physical impairments, for doing their required exercises while playing. The proposed gaming environment is based on the Kinect sensor and the Blender Game Engine. A middleware has been implemented that efficiently transmits the data from the sensor to the game. Inside the game, different newly proposed mechanisms have been developed to distinguish pure exercise-gestures from other movements used to control the game (e.g., opening a menu). The main contribution is the amplification of weak movements, which allows the physically impaired to have similar gaming experiences as the average population. To test the feasibility of the proposed methods, four mini-games were implemented and tested by a group of 11 volunteers with different disabilities, most of them bound to a wheelchair. Their performance has also been compared to that of a healthy control group. Results are generally positive and motivating, although there is much to do to improve the functionalities. There is a major demand for applications that help to include disabled people in society and to improve their life conditions. This work will contribute towards providing them with more fun during exercise. PMID:28208682

  3. Cryogenic exciter

    DOEpatents

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  4. Fluorescence Excitation Function Produced Through Photoexcitation of the Rydberg States b, cn, and o3 of N2 in the 80-100 nm Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R. C.; Judge, D. L.; Singh, T. S.; Mu, X. L.; Nee, J. B.; Chiang, S. Y.; Fung, H. S.

    2006-12-01

    Fluorescence excitation functions produced through photoexcitation of N2 using synchrotron radiation in the spectral region between 80 and 100 nm have been studied. Two broadband detectors were employed to simultaneously monitor fluorescence in the 115-320 nm and 300-700 nm region, respectively. The peaks in the VUV Fluorescence excitation functions are found to correspond to excitation of absorption transitions from the ground electronic state to the Rydberg states of b, cn (with n= 4-9), and o3 of N2. The relative fluorescence production cross sections for the observed peaks are determined. No fluorescence has been produced through excitation of the most dominating absorption features of the b-X transition except the (1,0), (5,0), and (6,0) bands, in excellent agreement with the recent lifetime measurements [1] and theoretical calculations [2]. In addition, fluorescence peaks correlate with the long vibrational progression of the c4 (v = 0-7) has also been observed. Weak fluorescence excitation peaks are also found to correlate with the excitation of the (1,0), (2,0), and (3,0) bands of the o3 VX transition. The present results provide important information for further unraveling of complicated and intriguing interactions among the excited electronic states of N2. Furthermore, solar photon excitation of N2 leading to the production of c4(0) may provide useful data required for evaluation and analysis of dayglow models of the c4(0) issue of the Earth's atmosphere [3]. Detailed results will be presented. This research is based on work supported by NSF grant ATM-0096761. [1] Sprengers, J. P., W. Ubachs, and K. G. H. Baldwin, J. Chem. Phys., 122, 144301 (2005). [2] Lewis, B. R., S. T. Gibson, W. Zhang, H. Lefebvre-Brion, and J.-M. Robbe, J. Chem. Phys., 122, 144302 (2005). [3] e.g., Meier, R. R., Space Sci. Rev., 58, 1 (1991).

  5. Density functional theory calculations of III-N based semiconductors with mBJLDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan; Akıncı, Özden; Ünlü, Hilmi

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present first principles calculations based on a full potential linear augmented plane-wave method (FP-LAPW) to calculate structural and electronic properties of III-V based nitrides such as GaN, AlN, InN in a zinc-blende cubic structure. First principles calculation using the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) underestimate the band gap. We proposed a new potential called modified Becke-Johnson local density approximation (MBJLDA) that combines modified Becke-Johnson exchange potential and the LDA correlation potential to get better band gap results compared to experiment. We compared various exchange-correlation potentials (LSDA, GGA, HSE, and MBJLDA) to determine band gaps and structural properties of semiconductors. We show that using MBJLDA density potential gives a better agreement with experimental data for band gaps III-V nitrides based semiconductors.

  6. Functional initiators for both ATRP and ROP catalyzed by iron(III) catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Yang, C.; Cheng, C. J.

    2016-07-01

    α-Trichloromethyl benzyl alcohol was successfully used as initiators for both AGET ATRP and ROP reactions, which was catalyzed by only one non-toxic and very cheap catalyst iron(III) chloride. The corresponding polymers PMMA and PCL were characterized by 1H NMR, and their molecular mass were calculated as 7.53 kDa and 10.08 kDa, respectively.

  7. ALIX and ESCRT-I/II function as parallel ESCRT-III recruiters in cytokinetic abscission

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Liliane; Wenzel, Eva M.; Liestøl, Knut; Raiborg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinetic abscission, the final stage of cell division where the two daughter cells are separated, is mediated by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. The ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B is a key effector in abscission, whereas its paralogue, CHMP4C, is a component in the abscission checkpoint that delays abscission until chromatin is cleared from the intercellular bridge. How recruitment of these components is mediated during cytokinesis remains poorly understood, although the ESCRT-binding protein ALIX has been implicated. Here, we show that ESCRT-II and the ESCRT-II–binding ESCRT-III subunit CHMP6 cooperate with ESCRT-I to recruit CHMP4B, with ALIX providing a parallel recruitment arm. In contrast to CHMP4B, we find that recruitment of CHMP4C relies predominantly on ALIX. Accordingly, ALIX depletion leads to furrow regression in cells with chromosome bridges, a phenotype associated with abscission checkpoint signaling failure. Collectively, our work reveals a two-pronged recruitment of ESCRT-III to the cytokinetic bridge and implicates ALIX in abscission checkpoint signaling. PMID:26929449

  8. ALIX and ESCRT-I/II function as parallel ESCRT-III recruiters in cytokinetic abscission.

    PubMed

    Christ, Liliane; Wenzel, Eva M; Liestøl, Knut; Raiborg, Camilla; Campsteijn, Coen; Stenmark, Harald

    2016-02-29

    Cytokinetic abscission, the final stage of cell division where the two daughter cells are separated, is mediated by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. The ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B is a key effector in abscission, whereas its paralogue, CHMP4C, is a component in the abscission checkpoint that delays abscission until chromatin is cleared from the intercellular bridge. How recruitment of these components is mediated during cytokinesis remains poorly understood, although the ESCRT-binding protein ALIX has been implicated. Here, we show that ESCRT-II and the ESCRT-II-binding ESCRT-III subunit CHMP6 cooperate with ESCRT-I to recruit CHMP4B, with ALIX providing a parallel recruitment arm. In contrast to CHMP4B, we find that recruitment of CHMP4C relies predominantly on ALIX. Accordingly, ALIX depletion leads to furrow regression in cells with chromosome bridges, a phenotype associated with abscission checkpoint signaling failure. Collectively, our work reveals a two-pronged recruitment of ESCRT-III to the cytokinetic bridge and implicates ALIX in abscission checkpoint signaling.

  9. Structure and function of the ESCRT II-III interface in multivesicular body biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Im, Young Jun; Wollert, Thomas; Boura, Evzen; Hurley, James H.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The ESCRT-II-ESCRT-III interaction coordinates the sorting of ubiquitinated cargo with the budding and scission of intralumenal vesicles into multivesicular bodies. The interacting regions of these complexes were mapped to the second winged-helix domain of human ESCRT-II subunit VPS25 and the first helix of ESCRT-III subunit VPS20. The crystal structure of this complex was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. Residues involved in structural interactions explain the specificity of ESCRT-II for Vps20, and are critical for cargo sorting in vivo. ESCRT-II directly activates ESCRT-III driven vesicle budding and scission in vitro via these structural interactions. VPS20 and ESCRT-II bind membranes with nanomolar affinity, explaining why binding to ESCRT-II is dispensable for the recruitment of Vps20 to membranes. Docking of the ESCRT-II -VPS202 supercomplex reveals a convex membrane-binding surface, suggesting a hypothesis for negative membrane curvature induction in the nascent intralumenal vesicle. PMID:19686684

  10. Structure and function of the ESCRT-II-III interface in multivesicular body biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Young Jun; Wollert, Thomas; Boura, Evzen; Hurley, James H.

    2009-09-08

    The ESCRT-II-ESCRT-III interaction coordinates the sorting of ubiquitinated cargo with the budding and scission of intralumenal vesicles into multivesicular bodies. The interacting regions of these complexes were mapped to the second winged helix domain of human ESCRT-II subunit VPS25 and the first helix of ESCRT-III subunit VPS20. The crystal structure of this complex was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. Residues involved in structural interactions explain the specificity of ESCRT-II for Vps20, and are critical for cargo sorting in vivo. ESCRT-II directly activates ESCRT-III-driven vesicle budding and scission in vitro via these structural interactions. VPS20 and ESCRT-II bind membranes with nanomolar affinity, explaining why binding to ESCRT-II is dispensable for the recruitment of Vps20 to membranes. Docking of the ESCRT-II-VPS202 supercomplex reveals a convex membrane-binding surface, suggesting a hypothesis for negative membrane curvature induction in the nascent intralumenal vesicle.

  11. Off-season training habits and preseason functional test measures of division iii collegiate athletes: a descriptive report.

    PubMed

    Brumitt, Jason; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Manske, Robert C; Niemuth, Paul E; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2014-08-01

    Division III (D III) collegiate coaches are challenged to assess athletic readiness and condition their athletes during the preseason. However, there are few reports on off-season training habits and normative data of functional assessment tests among D III athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine off-season training habits of D III athletes and their relationships to the standing long jump (SLJ) and single-leg hop (SLH) tests. One-hundred and ninety-three athletes (110 females, age 19.1 ± 1.1 y; 83 males, age 19.5 ± 1.3 y) were tested prior to the start of their sports seasons. Athletes reported their off-season training habits (weightlifting, cardiovascular exercise, plyometric exercise, and scrimmage) during the six weeks prior to the preseason. Athletes also performed three maximal effort SLJs and three SLHs. Male athletes reported training more hours per exercise category than their female counterparts. Mean SLJ distances (normalized to height) were 0.79 ± 0.10 for females and 0.94 ± 0.12 for males. Mean SLH distances for female athletes' right and left limbs were 0.66 (± 0.10) and 0.65 (± 0.10), respectively. Mean SLH distances for male athletes' right and left limbs were 0.75 (± 0.13) and 0.75 (± 0.12), respectively. Several significant differences between off-season training habits and functional test measures were found for both sexes: males [SLJ and weightlifting (p = 0.04); SLH and weightlifting (p = 0.04), plyometrics (p = 0.05)]; females [SLJ and plyometrics (p = 0.04); SLH and scrimmage (p = 0.02)]. This study provides normative data for off-season training habits and preseason functional test measures in a D III athlete population. Greater SLJ and SLH measures were associated with increased time during off-season training. The findings between functional tests and off-season training activities may be useful for sports medicine professionals and strength coaches when designing their preseason training programs. 4.

  12. Genetic analysis of the Salmonella enterica type III secretion-associated ATPase InvC defines discrete functional domains.

    PubMed

    Akeda, Yukihiro; Galán, Jorge E

    2004-04-01

    An essential component of all type III secretion systems is a highly conserved ATPase that shares significant amino acid sequence similarity to the beta subunit of the F(0)F(1) ATPases and is thought to provide the energy for the secretion process. We have performed a genetic and functional analysis of InvC, the ATPase associated with the Salmonella enterica type III secretion system encoded within its pathogenicity island 1. Through a mutagenesis analysis, we have identified amino acid residues that are essential for specific activities of InvC, such as nucleotide hydrolysis and membrane binding. This has allowed us to define discrete domains of InvC that are specifically associated with different essential activities of this protein.

  13. Damage detection of metro tunnel structure through transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis using local excitation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Yi, Xiaohua; Zhu, Dapeng; Xie, Xiongyao; Wang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    In a modern metropolis, metro rail systems have become a dominant mode for mass transportation. The structural health of a metro tunnel is closely related to public safety. Many vibration-based techniques for detecting and locating structural damage have been developed in the past several decades. However, most damage detection techniques and validation tests are focused on bridge and building structures; very few studies have been reported on tunnel structures. Among these techniques, transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are two well-known diagnostic approaches. The former operates in frequency domain and the latter in time domain. Both approaches can be applied to detect and locate damage through acceleration data obtained from sensor arrays. Furthermore, the two approaches can directly utilize structural response data without requiring excitation measurement, which offers advantages in field testing on a large structure. In this research, a numerical finite element model of a metro tunnel is built and different types of structural defects are introduced at multiple locations of the tunnel. Transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are applied to perform structural damage detection and localization, based on simulated structural vibration data. Numerical results demonstrate that the introduced defects can be successfully identified and located. The sensitivity and feasibility of the two approaches have been verified when sufficient distribution of measurement locations is available. Damage detection results of the two different approaches are compared and discussed.

  14. Implications of cortical balanced excitation and inhibition, functional heterogeneity, and sparseness of neuronal activity in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong

    2015-01-01

    Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies often report inconsistent findings, probably due to brain properties such as balanced excitation and inhibition and functional heterogeneity. These properties indicate that different neurons in the same voxels may show variable activities including concurrent activation and deactivation, that the relationships between BOLD signal and neural activity (i.e., neurovascular coupling) are complex, and that increased BOLD signal may reflect reduced deactivation, increased activation, or both. The traditional general-linear-model-based-analysis (GLM-BA) is a univariate approach, cannot separate different components of BOLD signal mixtures from the same voxels, and may contribute to inconsistent findings of fMRI. Spatial independent component analysis (sICA) is a multivariate approach, can separate the BOLD signal mixture from each voxel into different source signals and measure each separately, and thus may reconcile previous conflicting findings generated by GLM-BA. We propose that methods capable of separating mixed signals such as sICA should be regularly used for more accurately and completely extracting information embedded in fMRI datasets. PMID:26341939

  15. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  16. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theory via linear response.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I; Beylkin, Gregory; Harrison, Robert J

    2015-12-21

    A fully numerical method for the time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm-Dancoff (TD) approximation is presented in a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. The integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using a numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. We introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.

  17. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory via linear response

    DOE PAGES

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I.; Beylkin, Gregory; ...

    2015-02-25

    Using the fully numerical method for time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm–Dancoff (TD) approximation we use a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach to present our findings. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. Moreover, the integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using amore » numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. Finally, we introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.« less

  18. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory via linear response

    SciTech Connect

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I.; Beylkin, Gregory; Harrison, Robert J.

    2015-02-25

    Using the fully numerical method for time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm–Dancoff (TD) approximation we use a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach to present our findings. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. Moreover, the integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using a numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. Finally, we introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.

  19. S1 and S2 excited states of gas-phase Schiff-base retinal chromophores: a time-dependent density functional theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengtao; Ding, Yong; Cui, Ganglong; Liu, Yajun

    2007-04-19

    In concert with the recent photoabsorption experiments of gas-phase Schiff-base retinal chromophores (Nielsen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 96, 018304), quantum chemical calculations using time-dependent density functional theory coupled with different functionals and under the Tamm-Dancoff approximation were made on the first two excited states (S1 and S2) of two retinal chromophores: 11-cis and all-trans protonated Schiff bases. The calculated vertical excitation energies (Tv) and oscillator strengths (f) are consistent with the experimental absorption bands. The experimentally observed phenomenon that the transition dipole moment (mu) of S2 is much smaller that of S1 was interpreted by 3D representation of transition densities. The different optical behaviors (linear and nonlinear optical responds) of the excited states were investigated by considering different strengths of external electric fields.

  20. Modification of humic acid by ether functional group as biosorbent to Au(III) adsorption in the presence of Sn(II) and Ni(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanti, Ika; Winata, Wahyu Fajar; Sudiono, Sri; Triyono

    2017-03-01

    Modification of humic acid on the phenolic functional group with dimethylsulfate (DMS) for adsorption Au(III) in the presence of Sn(II) and Ni(II) have been conducted. Ash content was analyzed and characterized by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR). Determination of Au(III) adsorption in the presence of Sn(II) and Ni(II) was conducted by Atomic Adsorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The isolated humic acid has 19.8% ash content and after purification has 0.6% ash content, etherified humic acid (EHAs) has 1.4% ash content. Adsorption percentage of Au(III) in the presence of Sn(II) and Ni(II) by EHAs decreased until 4.936% and 41.782% respectively. The addition of Sn(II) and Ni(II) as competitors of Au(III) in the Au(III) adsorption by using EHAs, were affect the percentage of Au(III) adsorption.

  1. Imaging performance of annular apertures. III - Apodization and modulation transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschunko, H. F. A.

    1979-01-01

    Apodization functions with decreasing transmission and their opposite, functions with increasing transmission, are investigated for various central obstruction ratios. The resultant modulation transfer functions are presented for various transmission functions and central obstruction ratios. Conclusions applicable to the improvement of imaging performance are discussed.

  2. Long-term outcome of surgical Class III correction as a function of age at surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, L'Tanya J.; Phillips, Ceib; Proffit, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we assessed whether the likelihood of a positive overjet 5 to 10 years after Class III surgery was affected by age at the surgery or the type of surgery and evaluated the amount and pattern of postsurgical growth. Methods Cephalometric measurements including overjet were evaluated from immediately postsurgery and long-term recall cephalograms of 104 patients who had had surgical Class III correction and at least 5-year recalls. The patients were classified as younger (III surgery in younger patients. PMID:18331934

  3. Identification and functional characterization of three type III polyketide synthases from Aquilaria sinensis calli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhongxiu; Dong, Xianjuan; Feng, Yingying; Liu, Xiao; Gao, Bowen; Wang, Jinling; Zhang, Le; Wang, Juan; Shi, Shepo; Tu, Pengfei

    2017-03-30

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) play an important role in biosynthesis of various plant secondary metabolites and plant adaptation to environmental stresses. Aquilaria sinensis is the main plant species for production of agarwood, little is known about the PKS family. In this study, AsCHS1 and two new type III PKSs, AsPKS1 and AsPKS2, were isolated and characterized in Aquilaria sinensis calli. The comparative sequence and phylogenetic analysis indicated that AsPKS1 and AsPKS2 belong to non-CHS group different from AsCHS1. The recombinant AsPKS1 and AsPKS2 produced the lactone-type products, suggesting different enzyme activities with AsCHS1. Three PKS genes had a tissues-specific pattern in A. sinensis. Moreover, we examined the expression profiles of three PKS genes in calli under different abiotic stresses and hormone treatments. AsCHS1 transcript was significantly induced by salt stress, AsPKS1 abundance was most remarkably enhanced by CdCl2 treatment, while AsPKS2 expression was most significantly induced by mannitol treatment. Furthermore, AsCHS1, AsPKS1 and AsPKS2 transcript were enhanced upon gibberellins (GA3), methyl jasmonate (MeJA), salicylic acid (SA) treatments, while three PKS genes displayed low transcript levels at the early stage under abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. In addition, three GFP:PKSs fusion proteins were localized in the cytoplasm and cell wall in Nicotiana benthamiana cells. These results indicated the multifunctional role of three type III PKSs in polyketide biosynthesis, plant resistance in abiotic stresses and signal transduction.

  4. Vibrational properties of III-V semiconductor in wurtzite phase: A comparative density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajaria, Trupti K.; Dabhi, Shweta D.; Baraiya, Bhumi A.; Mankad, Venu; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2017-05-01

    A First principles study of structural, vibrational and thermal properties of III-V semiconductor compounds viz. Indium Arsenide (InAs) and Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) are investigated in their wurtzite phase which is normally observed in the case of nanosystems. Phonon dispersion curve, Debye temperature and specific heat behavior for both the compounds are compared and discussed. The present work will have its implication for making devices with tunable properties using InAs and GaAs based heterojuction solar cells.

  5. Electronic and Chemical State of Aluminum from the Single- (K) and Double-Electron Excitation (KLII&III, KLI) X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectra of α-Alumina, Sodium Aluminate, Aqueous Al(3+)·(H2O)6, and Aqueous Al(OH)4(-).

    PubMed

    Fulton, John L; Govind, Niranjan; Huthwelker, Thomas; Bylaska, Eric J; Vjunov, Aleksei; Pin, Sonia; Smurthwaite, Tricia D

    2015-07-02

    We probe, at high energy resolution, the double electron excitation (KLII&II) X-ray absorption region that lies approximately 115 eV above the main Al K-edge (1566 eV) of α-alumina and sodium aluminate. The two solid standards, α-alumina (octahedral) and sodium aluminate (tetrahedral), are compared to aqueous species that have the same Al coordination symmetries, Al(3+)·6H2O (octahedral) and Al(OH)4(-) (tetrahedral). For the octahedral species, the edge height of the KLII&III-edge is approximately 10% of the main K-edge; however, the edge height is much weaker (3% of K-edge height) for Al species with tetrahedral symmetry. For the α-alumina and aqueous Al(3+)·6H2O the KLII&III spectra contain white line features and extended absorption fine structure (EXAFS) that mimics the K-edge spectra. The KLII&III-edge feature interferes with an important region in the EXAFS spectra of the crystalline and aqueous standards. The K-edge spectra and K-edge energy positions are predicted using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The TDDFT calculations for the K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectra (XANES) reproduce the observed transitions in the experimental spectra of the four Al species. The KLII&II and KLI onsets and their corresponding chemical shifts for the four standards are estimated using the delta self-consistent field (ΔSCF) method.

  6. Interaction of Eu(III) with mammalian cells: Cytotoxicity, uptake, and speciation as a function of Eu(III) concentration and nutrient composition.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Susanne; Heller, Anne; Weiss, Stephan; Bok, Frank; Bernhard, Gert

    2015-10-01

    In case of the release of lanthanides and actinides into the environment, knowledge about their behavior in biological systems is necessary to assess and prevent adverse health effects for humans. We investigated the interaction of europium with FaDu cells (human squamous cell carcinoma cell line) combining analytical methods, spectroscopy, and thermodynamic modeling with in-vitro cell experiments under defined conditions. Both the cytotoxicity of Eu(III) onto FaDu cells and its cellular uptake are mainly concentration-dependent. Moreover, they are governed by its chemical speciation in the nutrient medium. In complete cell culture medium, i.e., in the presence of fetal bovine serum, Eu(III) is stabilized in solution in a wide concentration range by complexation with serum proteins resulting in low cytotoxicity and cellular Eu(III) uptake. In serum-free medium, Eu(III) precipitates as hardly soluble phosphate species, exhibiting a significantly higher cytotoxicity and slightly higher cellular uptake. The presence of a tenfold excess of citrate in serum-free medium causes the formation of Eu(HCit)2(3-) complexes in addition to the dominating Eu(III) phosphate species, resulting in a decreased Eu(III) cytotoxicity and cellular uptake. The results of this study underline the crucial role of a metal ion's speciation for its toxicity and bioavailability.

  7. An alternative splicing event which occurs in mouse pachytene spermatocytes generates a form of DNA ligase III with distinct biochemical properties that may function in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Z B; Ramos, W; Levin, D S; Walter, C A; McCarrey, J R; Tomkinson, A E

    1997-01-01

    Three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases have been identified. However, the role of each of these enzymes in mammalian DNA metabolism has not been established. In this study, we show that two forms of mammalian DNA ligase III, alpha and beta, are produced by a conserved tissue-specific alternative splicing mechanism involving exons encoding the C termini of the polypeptides. DNA ligase III-alpha cDNA, which encodes a 103-kDa polypeptide, is expressed in all tissues and cells, whereas DNA ligase III-beta cDNA, which encodes a 96-kDa polypeptide, is expressed only in the testis. During male germ cell differentiation, elevated expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA is restricted, beginning only in the latter stages of meiotic prophase and ending in the round spermatid stage. In 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta, the C-terminal 77 amino acids of DNA ligase III-alpha are replaced by a different 17- to 18-amino acid sequence. As reported previously, the 103-kDa DNA ligase III-alpha interacts with the DNA strand break repair protein encoded by the human XRCC1 gene. In contrast, the 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta does not interact with XRCC1, indicating that DNA ligase III-beta may play a role in cellular functions distinct from the DNA repair pathways involving the DNA ligase III-alpha x XRCC1 complex. The distinct biochemical properties of DNA ligase III-beta, in combination with the tissue- and cell-type-specific expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA, suggest that this form of DNA ligase III is specifically involved in the completion of homologous recombination events that occur during meiotic prophase. PMID:9001252

  8. Identification and functional analysis of type III effector proteins in Mesorhizobium loti.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Shin; Okabe, Saori; Higashi, Miku; Shimoda, Yoshikazu; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Hashiguchi, Masatsugu; Akashi, Ryo; Göttfert, Michael; Saeki, Kazuhiko

    2010-02-01

    Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099, a microsymbiont of the model legume Lotus japonicus, possesses a cluster of genes (tts) that encode a type III secretion system (T3SS). In the presence of heterologous nodD from Rhizobium leguminosarum and a flavonoid naringenin, we observed elevated expression of the tts genes and secretion of several proteins into the culture medium. Inoculation experiments with wild-type and T3SS mutant strains revealed that the presence of the T3SS affected nodulation at a species level within the Lotus genus either positively (L. corniculatus subsp. frondosus and L. filicaulis) or negatively (L. halophilus and two other species). By inoculating L. halophilus with mutants of various type III effector candidate genes, we identified open reading frame mlr6361 as a major determinant of the nodulation restriction observed for L. halophilus. The predicted gene product of mlr6361 is a protein of 3,056 amino acids containing 15 repetitions of a sequence motif of 40 to 45 residues and a shikimate kinase-like domain at its carboxyl terminus. Homologues with similar repeat sequences are present in the hypersensitive-response and pathogenicity regions of several plant pathogens, including strains of Pseudomonas syringae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Xanthomonas species. These results suggest that L. halophilus recognizes Mlr6361 as potentially pathogen derived and subsequently halts the infection process.

  9. Green Phosphorescence and Electroluminescence of Sulfur Pentafluoride-Functionalized Cationic Iridium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Shavaleev, Nail M; Xie, Guohua; Varghese, Shinto; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Momblona, Cristina; Ortí, Enrique; Bolink, Henk J; Samuel, Ifor D W; Zysman-Colman, Eli

    2015-06-15

    We report on four cationic iridium(III) complexes [Ir(C^N)2(dtBubpy)](PF6) that have sulfur pentafluoride-modified 1-phenylpyrazole and 2-phenylpyridine cyclometalating (C^N) ligands (dtBubpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridyl). Three of the complexes were characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. In cyclic voltammetry, the complexes undergo reversible oxidation of iridium(III) and irreversible reduction of the SF5 group. They emit bright green phosphorescence in acetonitrile solution and in thin films at room temperature, with emission maxima in the range of 482-519 nm and photoluminescence quantum yields of up to 79%. The electron-withdrawing sulfur pentafluoride group on the cyclometalating ligands increases the oxidation potential and the redox gap and blue-shifts the phosphorescence of the iridium complexes more so than the commonly employed fluoro and trifluoromethyl groups. The irreversible reduction of the SF5 group may be a problem in organic electronics; for example, the complexes do not exhibit electroluminescence in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEECs). Nevertheless, the complexes exhibit green to yellow-green electroluminescence in doped multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with emission maxima ranging from 501 nm to 520 nm and with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of up to 1.7% in solution-processed devices.

  10. Excitation function shape and neutron spectrum of the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Hernández, Guido; Mastinu, Pierfrancesco; Maggiore, Mario; Pranovi, Lorenzo; Prete, Gianfranco; Praena, Javier; Capote-Noy, Roberto; Gramegna, Fabiana; Lombardi, Augusto; Maran, Luca; Scian, Carlo; Munaron, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The forward-emitted low energy tail of the neutron spectrum generated by the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction on a thick target at a proton energy of 1893.6 keV was measured by time-of-flight spectroscopy. The measurement was performed at BELINA (Beam Line for Nuclear Astrophysics) of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. Using the reaction kinematics and the proton on lithium stopping power the shape of the excitation function is calculated from the measured neutron spectrum. Good agreement with two reported measurements was found. Our data, along with the previous measurements, are well reproduced by the Breit-Wigner single-resonance formula for s -wave particles. The differential yield of the reaction is calculated and the widely used neutron spectrum at a proton energy of 1912 keV was reproduced. Possible causes regarding part of the 6.5% discrepancy between the 197Au(n ,γ ) cross section measured at this energy by Ratynski and Kappeler [Phys. Rev. C 37, 595 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevC.37.595] and the one obtained using the Evaluated Nuclear Data File version B-VII.1 are given.

  11. Reaction Mechanisms in 12C+93Nb System:. Excitation Functions and Recoil Range Distributions Below 7 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tauseef; Rizvi, I. A.; Agarwal, Avinash; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K. S.; Chaubey, A. K.

    The experiments were performed to study excitation functions (EFs) of evaporation residues (ERs), i.e. 103,102,101Ag, 101,100,99Pd, 101,100Rh, 97Ru, 96Tc, 95Tc, 94Tc, 93Mom, 92Nbm populated in the reactions induced by 12C on 93Nb for exploring the reaction dynamics involved at energies ≈ 47-75 MeV. The activation technique followed by offline γ-ray spectrometry has been employed to measure EFs. These measurements were simulated with other reported values available in literature as well as with theoretical predictions based on computer code PACE-2. The effect of variation of level density parameter involved in this code has also been studied. An excellent agreement was found between theoretical and experimental values in some of the fusion evaporation channels. However, significant enhancement of cross-section as observed in α-emission channels may be due to incomplete fusion (ICF) process and/or direct reaction process. To confirm the aforesaid reaction mechanism, Recoil Range Distributions (RRDs) of various ERs have been measured at ≈ 80 MeV. Moreover, an attempt is made to separate the percentage relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion components from the analysis of the measured RRDs data. Further, the relative percentage ICF fraction, also estimated from EFs data, was found to be sensitive with the projectile energy.

  12. The EORTC emotional functioning computerized adaptive test: phases I–III of a cross-cultural item bank development

    PubMed Central

    Gamper, Eva-Maria; Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aa; Young, Teresa; Costantini, Anna; Aaronson, Neil; Giesinger, Johannes M; Meraner, Verena; Kemmler, Georg; Holzner, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Background The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is currently developing computerized adaptive testing measures for the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) scales. The work presented here describes the development of an EORTC item bank for emotional functioning (EF), which is one of the core domains of the QLQ-C30. Methods According to the EORTC guidelines on module development, the development of the EF item bank comprised four phases, of which the phases I–III are reported in the present paper. Phase I involved defining the theoretical framework for the EF item bank and a literature search. Phase II included pre-defined item selection steps and a multi-stage expert review process. In phase III, feedback from cancer patients from different countries was obtained. Results On the basis of literature search in phase I, a list of 1750 items was generated. These were reviewed and further developed in phase II with a focus on relevance, redundancy, clarity, and difficulty. The development and selection steps led to a preliminary list of 41 items. In phase III, patient interviews (N = 41; Austria, Denmark, Italy, and the UK) were conducted with the preliminary item list, resulting in some minor changes to item wording. The final list comprised 38 items. Discussion The phases I–III of the developmental process have resulted in an EF item list that was well accepted by patients in several countries. The items will be subjected to larger-scale field testing in order to establish their psychometric characteristics and their fit to an item response theory model. PMID:24217943

  13. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priolisi, Ornella; Fabrizi, Alberto; Deon, Giovanna; Bonollo, Franco; Cattini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  14. Mechanochemical Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C-H Bond Functionalization of Acetanilides under Solventless Conditions in a Ball Mill.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gary N; Becker, Peter; Bolm, Carsten

    2015-06-15

    In a proof-of-principle study, a planetary ball mill was applied to rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization. Under solventless conditions and in the presence of a minute amount of Cu(OAc)2, the mechanochemical activation led to the formation of an active rhodium species, thus enabling an oxidative Heck-type cross-coupling reaction with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant. The absence of an organic solvent, the avoidance of a high reaction temperature, the possibility of minimizing the amount of the metallic mediator, and the simplicity of the protocol result in a powerful and environmentally benign alternative to the common solution-based standard protocol.

  15. A new insight into the chemistry of iridium(III) complexes bearing phenyl phenylphosphonite cyclometalate and chelating pyridyl triazolate: the excited-state proton transfer tautomerism via an inter-ligand PO-H···N hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Huei; Liao, Jia-Ling; Wu, Yu-Sin; Liao, Kuan-Yu; Chi, Yun; Chen, Chi-Lin; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2015-05-14

    Treatment of [IrCl3(tht)3], where tht = tetrahydrothiophene, with two equiv. of phenyl diphenylphosphinite (pdpitH) gave [Ir(pdpitH)(pdpit)(tht)Cl2] (1), which on further reaction with 3-t-butyl-5-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazole (bptzH) and NaOAc using a one-pot reaction afforded [Ir(pdpit)2(bptz)] (2). In sharp contrast, the reaction of [IrCl3(tht)3], pdpitH, and bptzH in the presence of a stronger base, Na2CO3, afforded a phenyl phenylphosphonite (pppo)-containing Ir(III) complex [Ir(pdpit)(pppo)(bptz)] (3) that reveals a strong PO-H-N inter-ligand hydrogen bond (H-bond), as evidenced by the single crystal X-ray structural analysis. For confirmation, addition of diazomethane to a diethylether solution of 3 led to the isolation of two methylated Ir(III) isomeric complexes, i.e. [Ir(pdpit)(pppoMe)(bptz)] (4) and [Ir(pdpit)(pppo)(bptzMe)] (5), possessing either a PO-Me or N-Me bonding fragment, respectively. The absorption spectrum of 3 in CH2Cl2 resembles that of 4, implying the dominant PO-H character in solution. Despite the prevailing PO-H character both in the solid crystal and in solution, its corresponding emission resembles that of 5, leading us to propose a mechanism incorporating the excited-state inter-ligand proton transfer (ESILPT) from PO-H to N-H isomeric form via the pre-existing PO···H···N hydrogen bond. The thermodynamics of proton transfer tautomerism are discussed on the basis of absorption/emission spectroscopy in combination with computational approaches; additional support is given by the relationship between emission pattern versus the position of protons and methyl substituents. The results demonstrate for the first time a paradigm of excited-state proton transfer for the transition metal complexes in the triplet manifold.

  16. Benchmarking Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Excited State Geometries of Organic Molecules in Gas-Phase and in Solution.

    PubMed

    Guido, Ciro A; Knecht, Stefan; Kongsted, Jacob; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2013-05-14

    We analyze potentials and limits of the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) approach for the determination of excited-state geometries of organic molecules in gas-phase and in solution. Three very popular DFT exchange-correlation functionals, two hybrids (B3LYP and PBE0) and one long-range corrected (CAM-B3LYP), are here investigated, and the results are compared to the correlated RI-CC2 wave function approach. Solvent effects are further analyzed by means of a polarizable continuum model. A total of 15 organic chromophores (including both small molecules and larger push-pull systems) are considered as prototypes of n → π* and π → π* singlet excitations. Our analysis allows to point out specific correlations between the accuracy of the various functionals and the type of excitation and/or the type of chemical bonds involved. We find that while the best ground-state geometries are obtained with PBE0 and B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP yields the most accurate description of electronic and geometrical characteristics of excited states, both in gas-phase and in solution.

  17. The 181Ta(7Li,5n)183Os reaction: Measurement and analysis of the excitation function and isomeric cross-section ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Sharma, R. P.; Rashid, M. H.

    1998-03-01

    Excitation function and isomeric cross-section ratios for the production of 183Osm,g by 7Li-induced reactions on 181Ta are obtained from the measurements of the residual activities by the conventional stacked-foils technique from threshold to 50 MeV. The excitation function and isomeric cross-section ratios for nuclear reaction 181Ta(7Li,5n)183Osm,g are compared with the theoretical statistical model calculation by using the ALICE/91, STAPRE, and CASCADE codes. In the energy range of the present measurement the excitation functions are fitted fairly well by both the geometry dependent hybrid (GDH) model and the hybrid model of Blann with initial exciton number n0=7 (nn=4, np=3, nh=0) using the ALICE/91 code. The experimental isomeric cross-section ratios are also reproduced fairly well by the calculation using the STAPRE code. However, the CASCADE code calculations slightly underpredict the cross section but reproduce the shape. In general, the statistical model under a suitable set of global assumptions, can reproduce the excitation function as well as isomeric cross-section ratios.

  18. A comprehensive study of sensorimotor cortex excitability in chronic cocaine users: Integrating TMS and functional MRI data☆

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Colleen A.; DeVries, William; Dowdle, Logan T.; West, Julia A.; Siekman, Bradley; Li, Xingbao; George, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disruptions in motor control are often overlooked features of chronic cocaine users. During a simple sensorimotor integration task, for example, cocaine users activate a larger area of cortex than controls but have lower functional connectivity between the cortex and dorsal striatum, which is further correlated with poor performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether abnormal cortical excitability in cocaine users was related to disrupted inhibitory or excitatory mechanisms, as measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods A battery of TMS measures were acquired from 87 individuals (50 cocaine dependent, 37 controls). Functional MRI data were acquired from a subset of 28 individuals who performed a block-design finger tapping task. Results TMS measures revealed that cocaine users had significantly higher resting motor thresholds and higher intracortical cortical facilitation (ICF) than controls. There was no between-group difference in either measure of cortical inhibition. Task-evoked BOLD signal in the motor cortex was significantly correlated with ICF in the cocaine users. There was no significant difference in brain-skull distance between groups. Conclusion These data demonstrated that cocaine users have disrupted cortical facilitation (as measured with TMS), which is related to elevated BOLD signal. Cortical inhibition, however, is largely intact. Given the relationship between ICF and glutamatergic agents, this may be a potentially fruitful and treatable target in addiction. Finally, among controls the distance from the scalp to the cortex was correlated with the motor threshold which may be a useful parameter to integrate into therapeutic TMS protocols in the future. PMID:26541870

  19. Functional characterization of the 19q12 amplicon in grade III breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The 19q12 locus is amplified in a subgroup of oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative grade III breast cancers. This amplicon comprises nine genes, including cyclin E1 (CCNE1), which has been proposed as its 'driver'. The aim of this study was to identify the genes within the 19q12 amplicon whose expression is required for the survival of cancer cells harbouring their amplification. Methods We investigated the presence of 19q12 amplification in a series of 313 frozen primary breast cancers and 56 breast cancer cell lines using microarray comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH). The nine genes mapping to the smallest region of amplification on 19q12 were silenced using RNA interference in phenotypically matched breast cancer cell lines with (MDA-MB-157 and HCC1569) and without (Hs578T, MCF7, MDA-MB-231, ZR75.1, JIMT1 and BT474) amplification of this locus. Genes whose silencing was selectively lethal in amplified cells were taken forward for further validation. The effects of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) silencing and chemical inhibition were tested in cancer cells with and without CCNE1 amplification. Results 19q12 amplification was identified in 7.8% of ER-negative grade III breast cancer. Of the nine genes mapping to this amplicon, UQCRFS1, POP4, PLEKHF1, C19ORF12, CCNE1 and C19ORF2 were significantly over-expressed when amplified in primary breast cancers and/or breast cancer cell lines. Silencing of POP4, PLEKHF1, CCNE1 and TSZH3 selectively reduced cell viability in cancer cells harbouring their amplification. Cancer cells with CCNE1 amplification were shown to be dependent on CDK2 expression and kinase activity for their survival. Conclusions The 19q12 amplicon may harbour more than a single 'driver', given that expression of POP4, PLEKHF1, CCNE1 and TSZH3 is required for the survival of cancer cells displaying their amplification. The observation that cancer cells harbouring CCNE1 gene amplification are sensitive to CDK2 inhibitors provides a

  20. Cobalt preconcentration on a nitroso-R salt functional resin and elution with titanium(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Stella, R.; Valentini, M.T.G.; Maggi, L.

    1985-08-01

    The anion exchange resin Dowex 1X8, converted to the nitroso-R salt form, was used for adsorbing cobalt from large freshwater samples. Strongly acid titanium(III) chloride 10/sup -2/ M solution was found very effective at 60/sup 0/C as a new eluant and yielded complete recovery with a preconcentration factor of 100. Subsequent atomic absorption spectrometry determination of cobalt in the eluate was possible with no interference from titanium, reduced organics, and iron, copper, and nickel which partially might be fixed onto the resin. The suggested procedure allows a reproducibility of 5-10% for samples with cobalt concentrations in the range of 0.01-1 ..mu..g L/sup -1/. 15 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Eu(III) Complexes of Functionalized Octadentate 1-Hydroxypyridin-2-ones: Stability, Bioconjugation and LRET Studies

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Jocher, Christoph J.; Corneillie, Todd M.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis, stability, and photophysical properties of several Eu(III) complexes featuring the 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one (1,2-HOPO) chelate group in tetradentate and octadentate ligands are reported. These complexes pair highly efficient emission with exceptional stabilities (pEu ~ 20.7 – 21.8) in aqueous solution at pH 7.4. Further analysis of their solution behavior has shown the observed luminescence intensity is significantly diminished below ca. pH ~ 6 due to an apparent quenching mechanism involving protonation of the amine backbones. Nonetheless, under biologically relevant conditions, these complexes are promising candidates for applications in Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence (HTRF) assays and synthetic methodology to prepare derivatives with either a terminal amine or carboxylate group suitable for bioconjugation has been developed. Lastly, we have demonstrated the use of these compounds as the energy donor in a Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (LRET) biological assay format. PMID:20873782

  2. Long-lived room-temperature deep-red-emissive intraligand triplet excited state of naphthalimide in cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes and its application in triplet-triplet annihilation-based upconversion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jifu; Wu, Wanhua; Zhao, Jianzhang

    2012-06-25

    Cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes with acetylide ppy and bpy ligands were prepared (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) in which naphthal (Ir-2) and naphthalimide (NI) were attached onto the ppy (Ir-3) and bpy ligands (Ir-4) through acetylide bonds. [Ir(ppy)(3)] (Ir-1) was also prepared as a model complex. Room-temperature phosphorescence was observed for the complexes; both neutral and cationic complexes Ir-3 and Ir-4 showed strong absorption in the visible range (ε=39,600  M(-1)  cm(-1) at 402 nm and ε=25,100  M(-1)  cm(-1) at 404 nm, respectively), long-lived triplet excited states (τ(T)=9.30 μs and 16.45 μs) and room-temperature red emission (λ(em)=640 nm, Φ(p)=1.4 % and λ(em)=627 nm, Φ(p)=0.3 %; cf. Ir-1: ε=16,600  M(-1)  cm(-1) at 382 nm, τ(em)=1.16 μs, Φ(p)=72.6 %). Ir-3 was strongly phosphorescent in non-polar solvent (i.e., toluene), but the emission was completely quenched in polar solvents (MeCN). Ir-4 gave an opposite response to the solvent polarity, that is, stronger phosphorescence in polar solvents than in non-polar solvents. Emission of Ir-1 and Ir-2 was not solvent-polarity-dependent. The T(1) excited states of Ir-2, Ir-3, and Ir-4 were identified as mainly intraligand triplet excited states ((3)IL) by their small thermally induced Stokes shifts (ΔE(s)), nanosecond time-resolved transient difference absorption spectroscopy, and spin-density analysis. The complexes were used as triplet photosensitizers for triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) upconversion and quantum yields of 7.1 % and 14.4 % were observed for Ir-2 and Ir-3, respectively, whereas the upconversion was negligible for Ir-1 and Ir-4. These results will be useful for designing visible-light-harvesting transition-metal complexes and for their applications as triplet photosensitizers for photocatalysis, photovoltaics, TTA upconversion, etc. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Asymptotic correction approach to improving approximate exchange-correlation potentials: Time-dependent density-functional theory calculations of molecular excitation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casida, Mark E.; Salahub, Dennis R.

    2000-11-01

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculation of excitation spectra places certain demands on the DFT exchange-correlation potential, vxc, that are not met by the functionals normally used in molecular calculations. In particular, for high-lying excitations, it is crucial that the asymptotic behavior of vxc be correct. In a previous paper, we introduced a novel asymptotic-correction approach which we used with the local density approximation (LDA) to yield an asymptotically corrected LDA (AC-LDA) potential [Casida, Casida, and Salahub, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 70, 933 (1998)]. The present paper details the theory underlying this asymptotic correction approach, which involves a constant shift to incorporate the effect of the derivative discontinuity (DD) in the bulk region of finite systems, and a spliced asymptotic correction in the large r region. This is done without introducing any adjustable parameters. We emphasize that correcting the asymptotic behavior of vxc is not by itself sufficient to improve the overall form of the potential unless the effect of the derivative discontinuity is taken into account. The approach could be used to correct vxc from any of the commonly used gradient-corrected functionals. It is here applied to the LDA, using the asymptotically correct potential of van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB94) in the large r region. The performance of our AC-LDA vxc is assessed for the calculation of TD-DFT excitation energies for a large number of excitations, including both valence and Rydberg states, for each of four small molecules: N2, CO, CH2O, and C2H4. The results show a significant improvement over those from either the LB94 or the LDA functionals. This confirms that the DD is indeed an important element in the design of functionals. The quality of TDLDA/LB94 and TDLDA/AC-LDA oscillator strengths were also assessed in what we believe to be the first rigorous assessment of TD-DFT molecular oscillator strengths in comparison with

  4. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-03

    provide interpretation of absorption spectra with respect to molecular structure for excitation by electromagnetic waves at frequencies within the...IR and UV-visible ranges. The absorption spectrum corresponding to excitation states of As-H2O complexes consisting of relatively small numbers of...As emphasized previously [17], the absorption spectrum of H2O clusters should be of significance for interpretation of absorption spectra

  5. Structures and properties of electronically excited chromophores in solution from the polarizable continuum model coupled to the time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Mennucci, Benedetta; Cappelli, Chiara; Guido, Ciro Achille; Cammi, Roberto; Tomasi, Jacopo

    2009-04-02

    This paper provides an overview of recent research activities concerning the quantum-mechanical description of structures and properties of electronically excited chromophores in solution. The focus of the paper is on a specific approach to include solvent effects, namely the polarizable continuum model (PCM). Such a method represents an efficient strategy if coupled to proper quantum-mechanical descriptions such as the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). As a result, the description of molecules in the condensed phase can be extended to excited states still maintaining the computational efficiency and the physical reliability of the ground-state calculations. The most important theoretical and computational aspects of the coupling between PCM and TDDFT are presented and discussed together with an example of application to the study of the low-lying electronic excited states of push-pull chromophores in different solvents.

  6. Translation and validation of the Farsi version of Rome III diagnostic questionnaire for the adult functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Toghiani, Ali; Maleki, Iradj; Afshar, Hamid; Kazemian, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to validate the Farsi version of Rome III modular questionnaire which contains all functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Materials and Methods: We used Rome foundation guidelines for translation of English version into Farsi, and all the steps were performed. In the first step, 2 forward translations into Farsi were completed by two authors separately, and then translators, who participated in Step 1, together with our monitor, compared the two target-language versions and made some changes. The product of Phase 2 was translated back into English by an American-Iranian physician. The final step was comparison of the two English versions and validation of the translation. In this step, we compared the final version item by item, and also we used focus groups of patients after pretesting. Results: Our results showed that FGIDs questionnaire diagnosed 153 patients among 169 patients who were diagnosed to have different types of FGIDs. The sensitivity of this questionnaire was 90.5%. It was determined that the odd questions' values of Cronbach’s alpha was 0.77 (very reliable), and it was 0.71 (very reliable) in other sections. The split-half test reliability of whole items value was 0.72, which is statistically significant. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the Farsi version of Rome III diagnostic questionnaire for the adult functional gastrointestinal disorders demonstrated good validity and reliability and could be used in clinical studies. PMID:28250780

  7. Myofibroblast differentiation and its functional properties are inhibited by nicotine and e-cigarette via mitochondrial OXPHOS complex III

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wei; Lerner, Chad; Sundar, Isaac K.; Rahman, Irfan

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco products including e-cigarettes. Fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation is a key process during wound healing and is dysregulated in lung diseases. The role of nicotine and e-cigarette derived nicotine on cellular functions including profibrotic response and other functional aspects is not known. We hypothesized that nicotine and e-cigarettes affect myofibroblast differentiation, gel contraction, and wound healing via mitochondria stress through nicotinic receptor-dependent mechanisms. To test the hypothesis, we exposed human lung fibroblasts with various doses of nicotine and e-cigarette condensate and determined myofibroblast differentiation, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), wound healing, and gel contraction at different time points. We found that both nicotine and e-cigarette inhibit myofibroblast differentiation as shown by smooth muscle actin and collagen type I, alpha 1 abundance. Nicotine and e-cigarette inhibited OXPHOS complex III accompanied by increased MitoROS, and this effect was augmented by complex III inhibitor antimycin A. These mitochondrial associated effects by nicotine resulted in inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation. These effects were associated with inhibition of wound healing and gel contraction suggesting that nicotine is responsible for dysregulated repair during injurious responses. Thus, our data suggest that nicotine causes dysregulated repair by inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation via OXPHOS pathway. PMID:28256533

  8. Role of autocleavage in the function of a type III secretion specificity switch protein in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Monjarás Feria, Julia V; Lefebre, Matthew D; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Galán, Jorge E; Wagner, Samuel

    2015-10-13

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein machines employed by many Gram-negative bacteria to inject bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to promote bacterial survival and colonization. The core unit of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins through the bacterial envelope. A distinct feature of the T3SS is that protein export occurs in a strictly hierarchical manner in which proteins destined to form the needle complex filament and associated structures are secreted first, followed by the secretion of effectors and the proteins that will facilitate their translocation through the target host cell membrane. The secretion hierarchy is established by complex mechanisms that involve several T3SS-associated components, including the "switch protein," a highly conserved, inner membrane protease that undergoes autocatalytic cleavage. It has been proposed that the autocleavage of the switch protein is the trigger for substrate switching. We show here that autocleavage of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium switch protein SpaS is an unregulated process that occurs after its folding and before its incorporation into the needle complex. Needle complexes assembled with a precleaved form of SpaS function in a manner indistinguishable from that of the wild-type form. Furthermore, an engineered mutant of SpaS that is processed by an external protease also displays wild-type function. These results demonstrate that the cleavage event per se does not provide a signal for substrate switching but support the hypothesis that cleavage allows the proper conformation of SpaS to render it competent for its switching function. Bacterial interaction with eukaryotic hosts often involves complex molecular machines for targeted delivery of bacterial effector proteins. One such machine, the type III secretion system of some Gram-negative bacteria, serves to inject a multitude of structurally

  9. Positive and negative functional interactions between promoter elements from different classes of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes.

    PubMed Central

    Parry, H D; Mattaj, I W

    1990-01-01

    Consensus tRNA gene promoter elements, A and B boxes, were introduced into the coding sequence of a Xenopus U6 gene. Combinations in which A and B boxes were coupled to wild-type or mutant U6 promoters were made. In this way information about both the functions of individual promoter elements and functional relationships between different classes of RNA polymerase III promoter element were obtained. Mutants in which the U6 PSE was non-functional were rescued by the presence of a B box, indicating a degree of functional relationship between these two elements. Moreover, the B box acted to increase the transcriptional activity and competitive strength of the wild-type U6 promoter. In contrast, no evidence was obtained to suggest that a tRNA A box can interact productively with U6 promoter elements in the absence of a B box. Data obtained suggest that the U6 PSE functions as an 'adaptor', being necessary to enable the basal U6 promoter to respond to upstream enhancement. Certain combinations of U6 and tRNA promoter elements are shown to be mutually antagonistic by a mechanism which is likely to involve blockage of transcription initiation. In summary, the U6 and tRNA promoters are shown to consist of functionally related, but distinct, promoter elements whose interactions shed new light on their normal roles in transcription. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2323333

  10. Jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectrum, carbonyl wagging, and ring-puckering potential energy functions of 3-cyclopenten-1-one in its S1(n,π*) electronic excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagear, Paul; Laane, Jaan

    1995-05-01

    The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectrum of 3-cyclopenten-1-one has been recorded in the 308-330 nm region, and the electronic origin for the S1(n,π*) state of A2 symmetry was observed at 30 229 cm-1. The observed spectrum consists of more than 80 bands involving primarily ν3 (carbonyl stretch), ν29 (carbonyl out-of-plane wagging), and ν30 (ring puckering). Bands were also assigned to combinations with seven other vibrational modes. The energies for the v=0 to 11 quantum states of ν29 were measured and used to determine a one-dimensional potential energy function. This function has energy minima at wagging angles of ±24° and a barrier to inversion of 939 cm-1. Four bands associated with ν30 were observed and were used to determine an asymmetric single-minimum one-dimensional ring-puckering potential energy function for the S1(n,π*) state. The ring-puckering energy levels in the ν29 vibrational excited states are little changed from the v=0 state indicating that there is little interaction between the carbonyl wagging and the ring-puckering motions.

  11. Why are time-dependent density functional theory excitations in solids equal to band structure energy gaps for semilocal functionals, and how does nonlocal Hartree-Fock-type exchange introduce excitonic effects?

    PubMed

    Izmaylov, Artur F; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2008-07-21

    We examine the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) equations for calculating excitation energies in solids with Gaussian orbitals and analytically show that for semilocal functionals, their lowest eigenvalue collapses to the minimum band orbital energy difference. With the introduction of nonlocal Hartree-Fock-type exchange (as in hybrid functionals), this result is no longer valid, and the lowest TD-DFT eigenvalue reflects the appearance of excitonic effects. Previously reported "charge-transfer" problems with semilocal TD-DFT excitations in molecules can be deduced from our analysis by taking the limit to infinite lattice constant.

  12. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics: Optical Excitation Function of H(1s-2p) Produced by electron Impact from Threshold to 1.8 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Slevin, J. A.; Shemansky, D. E.; McConkey, J. W.; Bray, I.; Dziczek, D.; Kanik, I.; Ajello, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The optical excitation function of prompt Lyman-Alpha radiation, produced by electron impact on atomic hydrogen, has been measured over the extended energy range from threshold to 1.8 keV. Measurements were obtained in a crossed-beams experiment using both magnetically confined and electrostatically focused electrons in collision with atomic hydrogen produced by an intense discharge source. A vacuum-ultraviolet mono- chromator system was used to measure the emitted Lyman-Alpha radiation. The absolute H(1s-2p) electron impact excitation cross section was obtained from the experimental optical excitation function by normalizing to the accepted optical oscillator strength, with corrections for polarization and cascade. Statistical and known systematic uncertainties in our data range from +/- 4% near threshold to +/- 2% at 1.8 keV. Multistate coupling affecting the shape of the excitation function up to 1 keV impact energy is apparent in both the present experimental data and present theoretical results obtained with convergent close- coupling (CCC) theory. This shape function effect leads to an uncertainty in absolute cross sections at the 10% level in the analysis of the experimental data. The derived optimized absolute cross sections are within 7% of the CCC calculations over the 14 eV-1.8 keV range. The present CCC calculations converge on the Bethe- Fano profile for H(1s-2p) excitation at high energy. For this reason agreement with the CCC values to within 3% is achieved in a nonoptimal normalization of the experimental data to the Bethe-Fano profile. The fundamental H(1s-2p) electron impact cross section is thereby determined to an unprecedented accuracy over the 14 eV - 1.8 keV energy range.

  13. Derivation of the RPA (Random Phase Approximation) Equation of ATDDFT (Adiabatic Time Dependent Density Functional Ground State Response Theory) from an Excited State Variational Approach Based on the Ground State Functional.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Tom; Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-09-09

    The random phase approximation (RPA) equation of adiabatic time dependent density functional ground state response theory (ATDDFT) has been used extensively in studies of excited states. It extracts information about excited states from frequency dependent ground state response properties and avoids, thus, in an elegant way, direct Kohn-Sham calculations on excited states in accordance with the status of DFT as a ground state theory. Thus, excitation energies can be found as resonance poles of frequency dependent ground state polarizability from the eigenvalues of the RPA equation. ATDDFT is approximate in that it makes use of a frequency independent energy kernel derived from the ground state functional. It is shown in this study that one can derive the RPA equation of ATDDFT from a purely variational approach in which stationary states above the ground state are located using our constricted variational DFT (CV-DFT) method and the ground state functional. Thus, locating stationary states above the ground state due to one-electron excitations with a ground state functional is completely equivalent to solving the RPA equation of TDDFT employing the same functional. The present study is an extension of a previous work in which we demonstrated the equivalence between ATDDFT and CV-DFT within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation.

  14. Functional assignment to positively selected sites in the core type III effector RipG7 from Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Keke; Remigi, Philippe; Anisimova, Maria; Lonjon, Fabien; Kars, Ilona; Kajava, Andrey; Li, Chien-Hui; Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Vailleau, Fabienne; Genin, Stéphane; Peeters, Nemo

    2016-05-01

    The soil-borne pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum causes bacterial wilt in a broad range of plants. The main virulence determinants of R. solanacearum are the type III secretion system (T3SS) and its associated type III effectors (T3Es), translocated into the host cells. Of the conserved T3Es among R. solanacearum strains, the Fbox protein RipG7 is required for R. solanacearum pathogenesis on Medicago truncatula. In this work, we describe the natural ripG7 variability existing in the R. solanacearum species complex. We show that eight representative ripG7 orthologues have different contributions to pathogenicity on M. truncatula: only ripG7 from Asian or African strains can complement the absence of ripG7 in GMI1000 (Asian reference strain). Nonetheless, RipG7 proteins from American and Indonesian strains can still interact with M. truncatula SKP1-like/MSKa protein, essential for the function of RipG7 in virulence. This indicates that the absence of complementation is most likely a result of the variability in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of RipG7. We identified 11 sites under positive selection in the LRR domains of RipG7. By studying the functional impact of these 11 sites, we show the contribution of five positively selected sites for the function of RipG7CMR15 in M. truncatula colonization. This work reveals the genetic and functional variation of the essential core T3E RipG7 from R. solanacearum. This analysis is the first of its kind on an essential disease-controlling T3E, and sheds light on the co-evolutionary arms race between the bacterium and its hosts. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  15. Leptin Enhances NMDA-Induced Spinal Excitation in Rats: A Functional Link between Adipocytokine and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yinghong; Wang, Shuxing; Ma, Yuxin; Lim, Grewo; Kim, Hyangin; Mao, Jianren

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that leptin (an adipocytokine) played an important role in nociceptive behavior induced by nerve injury, but the cellular mechanism of this action remains unclear. Using the whole cell patch-clamp recording from rat’s spinal cord slices, we showed that superfusion of leptin onto spinal cord slices dose-dependently enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated currents in spinal cord lamina II neurons. At the cellular level, the effect of leptin on spinal NMDA-induced currents was mediated through the leptin receptor and the JAK2/STAT3 (but not PI3K or MAPK) pathway, as the leptin effect was abolished in leptin receptor deficient (db/db) mice and inhibited by a JAK/STAT inhibitor. Moreover, we demonstrated in naïve rats that a single intrathecal administration of leptin enhanced spontaneous biting, scratching and licking behavior induced by intrathecal NMDA and that repeated intrathecal administration of leptin elicited thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which was attenuated by the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. Intrathecal leptin also upregulated the expression of NMDA receptors and pSTAT3 within the rat’s spinal cord dorsal horn and intrathecal MK-801 attenuated this leptin effect as well. Our data demonstrate a relationship between leptin and NMDA receptor-mediated spinal neuronal excitation and its functional role in nociceptive behavior. Since leptin contributes to nociceptive behavior induced by nerve injury, the present findings suggest an important cellular link between the leptin’s spinal effect and the NMDA receptor-mediated cellular mechanism of neuropathic pain. PMID:21376468

  16. ASKtheta, a group-III Arabidopsis GSK3, functions in the brassinosteroid signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rozhon, Wilfried; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Petutschnig, Elena; Fujioka, Shozo; Jonak, Claudia

    2010-04-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant hormones that regulate many processes including cell elongation, leaf development, pollen tube growth and xylem differentiation. GSK3/shaggy-like kinases (GSK) are critical regulators of intracellular signalling initiated by the binding of BR to the BRI1 receptor complex. Three GSKs have already been shown to relay BR responses, including phosphorylation of the transcriptional regulator BES1. However, recent studies indicate that one or more yet unidentified protein kinases are involved in BR signalling. Here, we show that the in vivo protein kinase activity of the group-III GSK, ASKtheta, was negatively regulated by BRI1. Arabidopsis thaliana plants with enhanced ASKtheta activity displayed a bri1-like phenotype. ASKtheta overexpressors accumulated high levels of brassinolide, castasterone and typhasterol, and were insensitive to BR. ASKtheta localized to the nucleus and directly phosphorylated BES1 and BZR1. Moreover, the BES1/BZR1-like transcription factor BEH2 was isolated as an ASKtheta interaction partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen. ASKtheta phosphorylated BEH2 both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, these data provide strong evidence that ASKtheta is a novel component of the BR signalling cascade, targeting the transcription factors BES1, BZR1 and BEH2.

  17. Masticatory muscle function three years after surgical correction of class III dentofacial deformity.

    PubMed

    Trawitzki, L V V; Dantas, R O; Mello-Filho, F V; Marques, W

    2010-09-01

    Individuals with dentofacial deformities have masticatory muscle changes. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of interdisciplinary treatment in patients with dentofacial deformities regarding electromyographic activity (EMG) of masticatory muscles three years after surgical correction. Thirteen patients with class III dentofacial deformities were studied, considered as group P1 (before surgery) and group P3 (3 years to 3 years and 8 months after surgery). Fifteen individuals with no changes in facial morphology or dental occlusion were studied as controls. The participants underwent EMG examination of the temporal and masseter muscles during mastication and biting. Evaluation of the amplitude interval of EMG activity revealed a difference between P1 and P3 and no difference between P3 and the control group. In contrast, evaluation of root mean square revealed that, in general, P3 values were higher only when compared with P1 and differed from the control group. There was an improvement in the EMG activity of the masticatory muscles, mainly observed in the masseter muscle, with values close to those of the control group in one of the analyses.

  18. The nearby Abell clusters. III. Luminosity functions for eight rich clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Oegerle, W.R.; Hoessel, J.G. Washburn Observatory, Madison, WI )

    1989-11-01

    Red photographic data on eight rich Abell clusters are combined with previous results on four other Abell clusters to study the luminosity functions of the clusters. The results produce a mean value of the characteristic galaxy magnitude (M asterisk) that is consistent with previous results. No relation is found between the magnitude of the first-ranked cluster galaxy and M asterisk, suggesting that the value of M asterisk is not changed by dynamical evolution. The faint ends of the luminosity functions for many of the clusters are quite flat, validating the nonuniversality in the parametrization of Schechter (1976) functions for rich clusters of galaxies. 40 refs.

  19. The nearby Abell clusters. III - Luminosity functions for eight rich clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Hoessel, John G.

    1989-01-01

    Red photographic data on eight rich Abell clusters are combined with previous results on four other Abell clusters to study the luminosity functions of the clusters. The results produce a mean value of the characteristic galaxy magnitude (M asterisk) that is consistent with previous results. No relation is found between the magnitude of the first-ranked cluster galaxy and M asterisk, suggesting that the value of M asterisk is not changed by dynamical evolution. The faint ends of the luminosity functions for many of the clusters are quite flat, validating the nonuniversality in the parametrization of Schechter (1976) functions for rich clusters of galaxies.

  20. Functional Anthology of Intrinsic Disorder. III. Ligands, Postranslational Modifications and Diseases Associated with Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongbo; Vucetic, Slobodan; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Dunker, A. Keith; Obradovic, Zoran; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the understanding of the relationships between function, amino acid sequence and protein structure continues to represent one of the major challenges of the modern protein science. As much as 50% of eukaryotic proteins are likely to contain functionally important long disordered regions. Many proteins are wholly disordered but still possess numerous biologically important functions. However, the number of experimentally confirmed disordered proteins with known biological