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Sample records for iii excitation functions

  1. Electronic bands and excited states of III-V semiconductor polytypes with screened-exchange density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2014-03-31

    The electronic band structures and excited states of III-V semiconductors such as GaP, AlP, AlAs, and AlSb for various polytypes are determined employing the screened-exchange density functional calculations implemented in the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave methods. We demonstrate that GaP and AlSb in the wurtzite (WZ) structure have direct gap while III-V semiconductors in the zinc blende, 4H, and 6H structures considered in this study exhibit an indirect gap. Furthermore, we find that inclusion of Al atoms less than 17% and 83% in the hexagonal Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}P and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As alloys, respectively, leads to a direct transition with a gap energy of ∼2.3 eV. The feasibility of III-V semiconductors with a direct gap in WZ structure offers a possible crystal structure engineering to tune the optical properties of semiconductor materials.

  2. Doubly Excited States in Be III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T.; Bentzen, S. M.; Poulsen, O.

    1980-01-01

    The triplet spectrum of doubly excited Be III has been studied in the wavelength region of 75-5000 Å in order to test the validity of the theoretical term values reported by Lipsky et al. The beam-foil excitation technique was applied to effectively populate the doubly excited states. The identified lower-lying, doubly excited states 2p2 3P, 2pnp 3P, or 3D, and 2pnd 3P, or 3D (n = 3, 4) show that the theoretical term values should be slightly modified.

  3. TYPE III EXCITABILITY, SLOPE SENSITIVITY AND COINCIDENCE DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangying; Huguet, Gemma; Rinzel, John

    2013-01-01

    Some neurons in the nervous system do not show repetitive firing for steady currents. For time-varying inputs, they fire once if the input rise is fast enough. This property of phasic firing is known as Type III excitability. Type III excitability has been observed in neurons in the auditory brainstem (MSO), which show strong phase-locking and accurate coincidence detection. In this paper, we consider a Hodgkin-Huxley type model (RM03) that is widely-used for phasic MSO neurons and we compare it with a modification of it, showing tonic behavior. We provide insight into the temporal processing of these neuron models by means of developing and analyzing two reduced models that reproduce qualitatively the properties of the exemplar ones. The geometric and mathematical analysis of the reduced models allows us to detect and quantify relevant features for the temporal computation such as nearness to threshold and a temporal integration window. Our results underscore the importance of Type III excitability for precise coincidence detection. PMID:23667306

  4. Electron impact excitation of Astrophysically Important C III Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; KEENAN, FRANCIS P.

    2015-08-01

    Emission lines of many Be-like ions, including C~III, have been observed in the solar and stellar plasmas and are useful for density and temperature diagnostics. C~III is also important for studies of fusion plasmas. For modelling and diagnostics, atomic data for energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and excitation rates (equivalently effective collision strengths) are required. Therefore, we have adopted the GRASP code to calculate energy levels, A-values (for E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions) and lifetimes among 166 levels of the n <= 5 configurations. Energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1% for most levels, and A-values to better than 20% for most transitions. For A-values and lifetimes there are no large discrepancies between theory and measurement. For collision strengths DARC is adopted, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh and are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 800,000 K. Unfortunately, a comparison with the similar R-matrix calculations of Fernandez-Menchero et al [A&A 566 (2014) A104] shows differences up to over an order of magnitude for about 20% transitions (among the lowest 78 levels) over the complete temperature range of the results. In most cases their results are larger, up to a factor of 20, and the differences are similar and comparable to those already noted for other Be-like ions, namely Al~X, Cl~XIV, K~XVI, Ti~XIX and Ge~XXIX - see Aggarwal & Keenan [MNRAS 447 (2015) 3849]. Based on several comparisons and considering the wide range of partial waves included (up to 40.5) and the energy range adopted for collision strengths (up to 21 Ryd), our results are estimated to be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of transitions, allowed and forbidden. Detailed comparisons for all parameters for C~III and possible reasons for discrepancies will be presented during the conference and will also be soon available in MNRAS.

  5. Hot carrier relaxation in highly excited III V compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, H.; Kuett, W.; Seibert, K.; Strahnen, M.

    1988-04-01

    The transition from nonthermal to thermalized carrier distributions and their subsequent cooling via phonon emission is investigated in III-V compounds by time resolved optical measurements with femtosecond laser pulses.

  6. On the correlation between exciter duration and decay constant of solar decameter Type III radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, K. R.; Krishan, V.; Sastry, Ch. V.

    1981-04-01

    It is observed that while there exists a strong correlation between the decay constant and the exciter duration for isolated Type III radio bursts, it is absent for those Type III radio bursts which are preceded by Type IIIb radio bursts. A possible theoretical explanation for the presence of correlation in one case and lack of it in the other is proposed.

  7. Effect of the medium and the formation of nanostructures on deexcitation of electronic excitation of Eu(III) and Tb(III) chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveshnikova, E. B.; Dudar, S. S.; Shablya, A. V.; Ermolaev, V. L.

    2006-10-01

    The intensity I lum and lifetime τlum of the luminescence of complexes of Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions with β-diketones and o-phenanthroline in water-ethanol solutions of these ligands have been analyzed as functions of the concentrations of ligand, luminescing lanthanide ions, and added ions causing columinescence and of the solvent deuteration. It is shown that the formation of nanostructures from Ln complexes and their coarsening leads to an increase in τlum of Eu(III) and Tb(III) and that this increase is due to the suppression of both photochemical deexcitation of these ions and transfer of their electronic excitation energy to OH vibrations of water molecules. The disappearance of the dependence of I lum of Eu(III) on deuteration of water-ethanol solutions of n-methoxybenzoyltrifluoracetone + o-phenanthroline caused by adding Gd(III) ions is explained by the shift of the equilibrium of formation of complexes of Ln chelates to neutral hydrophoblic forms corresponding to the formation of nanostructures of these chelates in the solution. The differences in effect of La(III) and Gd(III) ions on I lum and τlum of Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes are explained. It is shown that the widely discussed effect of columinescence not only results from the energy migration in mixed structures of Eu or Tb complexes and Gd complexes but is also due to a large extent to the decrease in τlum of Eu(III) or Tb(III) caused by their incorporation into nanostructures.

  8. Electron Exciter Speeds Associated with Interplanetary Type III Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    This article provides a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the kinematics of the electron exciters associated with interplanetary type III solar radio bursts. Detailed multispacecraft analyses of the radio and plasma wave data from the widely separated Wind and STEREO spacecraft are provided for five interplanetary type III bursts that illustrate different aspects of the problems involved in establishing the electron exciter speeds. The exciter kinematics are determined from the observed frequency drift and in-situ radiation characteristics for each type III burst. The analysis assumes propagation of the electron exciters along a Parker spiral, with origin at the associated solar active region, and curvature determined by the measured solar wind speed. The analyses take fully into account the appropriate light-propagation-time corrections from the radio source to the observing spacecraft as the exciters propagate along the Parker spiral path. For the five in-situ type III bursts analyzed in detail here, we found that their initial exciter speeds, near the Sun, ranged from 0.2c to 0.38c, where c is the speed of light. This is significantly higher than the exciter speeds derived from other recent analyses. The results presented here further suggest that the type III electron exciters normally decelerate as they propagate through the interplanetary medium. We argue based on the observations by the widely separated spacecraft that the initial part of the type III radiation usually occurs at the fundamental of the plasma frequency. Finally, we compare the results for the exciter speeds to all previous determinations and provide quantitative arguments to explain the differences.

  9. Mechanisms of Sb(III) Photooxidation by the Excitation of Organic Fe(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2016-07-01

    Organic Fe(III) complexes are widely distributed in the aqueous environment, which can efficiently generate free radicals under light illumination, playing a significant role in heavy metal speciation. However, the potential importance of the photooxidation of Sb(III) by organic Fe(III) complexes remains unclear. Therefore, the photooxidation mechanisms of Sb(III) were comprehensively investigated in Fe(III)-oxalate, Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-fulvic acid (FA) solutions by kinetic measurements and modeling. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) was observed in an Fe(III)-oxalate solution over the pH range of 3 to 7. The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as an ·OH scavenger quenched the Sb(III) oxidation, suggesting that ·OH is an important oxidant for Sb(III). However, the incomplete quenching of Sb(III) oxidation indicated the existence of other oxidants, presumably an Fe(IV) species in irradiated Fe(III)-oxalate solution. In acidic solutions, ·OH may be formed by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4) with H2O2, but a hypothetical Fe(IV) species may be generated by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4)2(2-) with H2O2 at higher pH. Kinetic modeling provides a quantitative explanation of the results. Evidence for the existence of ·OH and hypothetical Fe(IV) was also observed in an irradiated Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-FA system. This study demonstrated an important pathway of Sb(III) oxidation in surface waters. PMID:27267512

  10. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  11. Cyclometalated gold(III) trioxadiborrin complexes: studies of the bonding and excited states.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Nicholas A; Browne, Amberle R; Anderson, Bryce L; Gray, Thomas G

    2016-03-01

    Trioxadiborrins are chelating ligands that assemble in dehydration reactions of boronic acids. They are structurally related to β-diketonate ligands, but have a 2-charge. Little is known of the bonding properties of trioxadiborrin ligands. Presented here are density-functional theory (DFT) studies of cyclometalated gold(III) trioxadiborrins. Substituent effects are evaluated, and comparison is made to the cyclometalating 2-(4-tolyl)pyridine (tpy) ligand on gold. The tpy ligand binds more strongly than any trioxadiborrin ligand considered here, and the two ligands bind competitively to gold. The 1,3-diphenyl trioxadiborrin ligand of 1 has a larger absolute binding enthalpy to gold than its β-diketonate analogue. Conjugation between boron and aryl substituents delocalizes charge and attenuates the trioxadiborrin's binding capacity. Steric effects that disrupt conjugation between boron and aryl substituents cause the trioxadiborrin to chelate more tightly. Fragment bond orders are divided into in-plane and out-of-plane contributions for square planar 1. In-plane bonding accounts for 88% of bond order between (tpy)Au2+ and the trioxadiborrin ligand. Cyclometalated gold(III) trioxadiborrin complexes were previously shown to be phosphorescent. Spin-unrestricted triplet-state geometry optimizations find that the ten largest excited-state distortions all occur on the tpy ligand. A plot of spin density in triplet 1 shows spin to reside predominantly on tpy. The 77 K luminescence spectrum of 1 is reported here. Time-dependent DFT and configuration interaction singles calculations (corrected for doubles excitations) overestimate the emission energy by ∼ 0.12 eV. PMID:26821088

  12. Cyclometalated gold(III) trioxadiborrin complexes: studies of the bonding and excited states.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Nicholas A; Browne, Amberle R; Anderson, Bryce L; Gray, Thomas G

    2016-03-01

    Trioxadiborrins are chelating ligands that assemble in dehydration reactions of boronic acids. They are structurally related to β-diketonate ligands, but have a 2-charge. Little is known of the bonding properties of trioxadiborrin ligands. Presented here are density-functional theory (DFT) studies of cyclometalated gold(III) trioxadiborrins. Substituent effects are evaluated, and comparison is made to the cyclometalating 2-(4-tolyl)pyridine (tpy) ligand on gold. The tpy ligand binds more strongly than any trioxadiborrin ligand considered here, and the two ligands bind competitively to gold. The 1,3-diphenyl trioxadiborrin ligand of 1 has a larger absolute binding enthalpy to gold than its β-diketonate analogue. Conjugation between boron and aryl substituents delocalizes charge and attenuates the trioxadiborrin's binding capacity. Steric effects that disrupt conjugation between boron and aryl substituents cause the trioxadiborrin to chelate more tightly. Fragment bond orders are divided into in-plane and out-of-plane contributions for square planar 1. In-plane bonding accounts for 88% of bond order between (tpy)Au2+ and the trioxadiborrin ligand. Cyclometalated gold(III) trioxadiborrin complexes were previously shown to be phosphorescent. Spin-unrestricted triplet-state geometry optimizations find that the ten largest excited-state distortions all occur on the tpy ligand. A plot of spin density in triplet 1 shows spin to reside predominantly on tpy. The 77 K luminescence spectrum of 1 is reported here. Time-dependent DFT and configuration interaction singles calculations (corrected for doubles excitations) overestimate the emission energy by ∼ 0.12 eV.

  13. LANTHANIDE ENHANCE LUMINESCENCE (LEL) WITH ONE AND TWO PHOTON EXCITATION OF QUANTUM DYES LANTHANIDE (III) - MACROCYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: Lanthanide Enhance Luminescence (LEL) with one and two photon excitation of Quantum Dyes? Lanthanide(III)-Macrocycles
    Principal Author:
    Robert C. Leif, Newport Instruments
    Secondary Authors:
    Margie C. Becker, Phoenix Flow Systems
    Al Bromm, Virginia Commonw...

  14. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  15. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor-acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene-perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  16. The luminescence response of Eu(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate complexes upon preresonant excitation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjichristov, Georgi B.; Stefanov, Ivan L.; Stanimirov, Stanislav S.; Petkov, Ivan K.

    2010-01-01

    The luminescence of thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (TTA) coordination complexes of trivalent europium ion (Eu(III)) in aqueous solutions and in solid-state polymeric films is probed upon single- and two-photon preresonant excitation with Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser. Particularly, diamine-liganded Eu(III)(TTA) 3 and poly(oxyethylene phosphate)tris(β-diketonate)Eu(III) complexes are examined aiming their possible applications as luminescent labels for sensing and imaging of biological molecules. Even at a pre-resonance, the excitation of these compounds with high-intensity, broadband light of frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser centered around 400 nm results in a luminescence response suitable for fluorometric applications.

  17. Energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and photochemistry in cob(III)alamins and ferric porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Rury, Aaron S; Wiley, Theodore E; Sension, Roseanne J

    2015-03-17

    Porphyrins and the related chlorins and corrins contain a cyclic tetrapyrrole with the ability to coordinate an active metal center and to perform a variety of functions exploiting the oxidation state, reactivity, and axial ligation of the metal center. These compounds are used in optically activated applications ranging from light harvesting and energy conversion to medical therapeutics and photodynamic therapy to molecular electronics, spintronics, optoelectronic thin films, and optomagnetics. Cobalt containing corrin rings extend the range of applications through photolytic cleavage of a unique axial carbon-cobalt bond, permitting spatiotemporal control of drug delivery. The photochemistry and photophysics of cyclic tetrapyrroles are controlled by electronic relaxation dynamics including internal conversion and intersystem crossing. Typically the electronic excitation cascades through ring centered ππ* states, ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) states, metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states, and metal centered states. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the electronic state dynamics in metal containing tetrapyrroles. The UV-visible spectrum is sensitive to the oxidation state, electronic configuration, spin state, and axial ligation of the central metal atom. Ultrashort broadband white light probes spanning the range from 270 to 800 nm, combined with tunable excitation pulses, permit the detailed unravelling of the time scales involved in the electronic energy cascade. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations provide additional insight required for precise assignment of the states. In this Account, we focus on recent ultrafast transient absorption studies of ferric porphyrins and corrin containing cob(III)alamins elucidating the electronic states responsible for ultrafast energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and the resulting photoreactivity or photostability of these compounds. Iron

  18. On Speeds of Exciter Beams of Interplanetary Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupar, V.; Kontar, E.; Soucek, J.; Santolik, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Kruparova, O.

    2014-12-01

    Type III radio bursts are intense radio emissions triggered by beams of energetic electrons often associated with solar flares. These exciter beams propagate outward the Sun along an open magnetic field line in the corona and the interplanetary medium at large distances beyond 1 AU, where energetic electrons can be detected in situ by spacecraft. We performed a statistical survey of 20 simple and isolated interplanetary Type III radio bursts observed by STEREO/Waves between January 2013 and June 2014. We investigated time - frequency profiles to derive speeds of exciter electron beams. We present evidence that these beams decelerate in the solar wind. Obtained beam speeds range from 0.05c up to 0.55c depending on initial assumptions. It corresponds to electron energies between tens of eV and hundreds of keV.

  19. Are type III radio aurorae directly excited by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    McDiarmid, D.R.; Watermann, J.; McNamara, A.G. ); Koehler, J.A.; Sofko, G.J. )

    1989-10-01

    In 1981, a network of three 50-MHz radar transmitters and two receivers were operated in the CW mode on the Canadian prairies. The echoes obtained from coherent ionospheric backscatter were divided into segments of 205 ms such that their FFT spectra yielded frequency resolution of 4.9 Hz. The spectra were subsequently averaged over 10 s. Type III spectra (narrow spectra with sub ion-acoustic Doppler shifts) were observed (often simultaneously) on radar links whose wave vector components perpendicular to the geomagnetic field were almost identical while their components parallel to the field were significantly different. From a statistical analysis of more than 300 type III spectra it is inferred that these are in general unlikely to arise from electrostatic ion cyclotron waves directly excited by an essentially linear process. Doppler shifts around 55 Hz were much more frequently observed than around 30 Hz, the occurrence of type III spectra increased with increasing magnetic aspect angle (deviation of the scatter wave vector from perpendicular to the geomagnetic field), and the mean Doppler shifts of type III spectra simultaneously on different radar links went through a minimum for aspect angles between 4{degree} and 7{degree} (depending on the assumed backscatter height). These three results disagree with theoretical expectations. The spectral width the type III echoes decreased linearly with magnetic aspect by about 2 Hz/deg.

  20. Excitability of motor cortices as a function of emotional sounds.

    PubMed

    Komeilipoor, Naeem; Pizzolato, Fabio; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Cesari, Paola

    2013-01-01

    We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST). While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally), single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right primary motor cortex (M1), and electromyographic activities were recorded from the contralateral abductor pollicis brevis muscle. We found a significant increase in CST excitability in response to unpleasant as compared to neutral sounds. The increased excitability was lateralized as a function of stimulus valence: Unpleasant stimuli resulted in a significantly higher facilitation of motor potentials evoked in the left hemisphere, while pleasant stimuli yielded a greater CST excitability in the right one. Furthermore, TMS induced higher motor evoked potentials when listening to unpleasant sounds with the left than with the right ear. Taken together, our findings provide compelling evidence for an asymmetric modulation of CST excitability as a function of emotional sounds along with ear laterality.

  1. Electron impact excitation of the Ne II and Ne III fine structure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.; Cumbee, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of the low lying levels of the Ne II and Ne III ions are of great interest in cool molecular environments including young stellar objects, photodissociation regions, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray dominated regions. We have carried out details computations for cross sections and rate coefficients using the Dirac R-matrix codes (DARC), the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes (BP) and the Intermediate Coupling Frame Transformation (ICFT) codes, for both Ne II and Ne III. We also compare our results with previous calculations. We are primarily interested in rate coefficients in the temperature range below 1000 K, and the focus is on obtaining the most accurate rate coefficients for those temperatures. We present both a recommended set of effective collision strengths and an indication of the uncertainties on these values. Work at Auburn University and UGA partly supported by NASA Grant NNX15AE47G.

  2. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-01

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites ( III V q) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites ( V I I I q) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III V q defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V I I I q under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  3. 32 CFR 2003.3 - Functions (Article III).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Functions (Article III). 2003.3 Section 2003.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.3 Functions (Article III). In carrying out its...

  4. 32 CFR 2003.3 - Functions (Article III).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Functions (Article III). 2003.3 Section 2003.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE...) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.3 Functions (Article III). In carrying out its...

  5. Excitation Spectra of Nucleobases with Multiconfigurational Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Mickaël; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Hedegård, Erik D

    2016-01-14

    Range-separated hybrid methods between wave function theory and density functional theory (DFT) can provide high-accuracy results, while correcting some of the inherent flaws of both the underlying wave function theory and DFT. We here assess the accuracy for excitation energies of the nucleobases thymine, uracil, cytosine, and adenine, using a hybrid between complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and DFT methods. The method is based on range separation, thereby avoiding all double-counting of electron correlation and is denoted long-range CASSCF short-range DFT (CAS-srDFT). Using a linear response extension of CAS-srDFT, we compare the first 7-8 excited states of the nucleobases with perturbative multireference approaches as well as coupled cluster based methods. Our results show that the CAS-srDFT method can provide accurate excitation energies in good correspondence with the computationally more expensive methods. PMID:26669578

  6. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A.; Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  7. The speeds of electrons that excite solar radio bursts of type III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Goldman, M. V.; Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented that solar type III radio bursts at kilometric wavelengths are excited by electrons with average speeds of 0.14 c; i.e., in good agreement with in situ measurements by Lin et al. (1981; 1986), but considerably lower than the generally accepted values of 0.3 to 0.5 c. A set of 28 bursts for which electrons and/or plasma waves were observed at ISEE-3 is examined, and it is found that the initial parts of all bursts were due to plasma radiation at the fundamental, and that the fastest electrons that produce radio emission range from 0.25 c down to 0.07 c (average 0.14 c). The slower electrons, those that produce fundamental radiation at approximately the time of burst peak, have an average speed of 0.06 c and a range from about 0.10 c down to 0.03 c.There is no evidence in the data for a systematic increase or decrease of exciting electron speed with distance from the sun.

  8. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-14

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites (III{sub V}{sup q}) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites (V{sub III}{sup q}) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III{sub V}{sup q} defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V{sub III}{sup q} under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  9. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  10. Reactions of the excited state of polypyridyl chromium(III) ion

    SciTech Connect

    Steffan, C.

    1990-09-21

    There has been much recent interest in the photochemistry and photophysics of transition metal polypyridine complexes due to the possibility of their use in solar energy conversion systems. The excited state of these compounds are known to undergo useful electron transfer and energy transfer reactions. This work attempts to elucidate the mechanism of the quenching of *CrL{sub 3}{sup 3+} (where L = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 5-chloro-1,10-phenanthroline, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline) by oxalate ions in neutral pH. Evidence suggests an ion-pairing pre-equilibrium followed by rate limiting electron transfer to produce CrL{sub 3}{sup 2+} and CO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} can then react with ground state chromium(III) species to produce another mole of the reduced product or it can produce a secondary transient as in the case of phenanthroline and substituted phenanthroline complexes. The secondary transient reacts to produce CrL{sub 3}{sup 2+} in a subsequent reaction. 85 refs., 24 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. 19-Tungstodiarsenate(III) Functionalized by Organoantimony(III) Groups: Tuning the Structure-Bioactivity Relationship.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Lin, Zhengguo; Alfaro-Espinoza, Gabriela; Ullrich, Matthias S; Raţ, Ciprian I; Silvestru, Cristian; Kortz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A family of three discrete organoantimony(III)-functionalized heteropolyanions-[Na{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}As(III)2W19O67(H2O)](10-) (1), [{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}2As(III)2W19O67(H2O)](8-) (2), and [{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}{WO2(H2O)}{WO(H2O)}2(B-β-As(III)W8O30)(B-α-As(III)W9O33)2](14-) (3)-have been prepared by one-pot reactions of the 19-tungstodiarsenate(III) precursor [As(III)2W19O67(H2O)](14-) with 2-(Me2NCH2)C6H4SbCl2. The three novel polyanions crystallized as the hydrated mixed-alkali salts Cs3KNa6[Na{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}As(III)2W19O67(H2O)]·43H2O (CsKNa-1), Rb2.5K5.5[{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}2As(III)2W19O67(H2O)]·18H2O·Me2NCH2C6H5 (RbK-2), and Rb2.5K11.5[{2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)}{WO2(H2O)}{WO(H2O)}2(B-β-As(III)W8O30)(B-α-As(III)W9O33)2]·52H2O (RbK-3), respectively. The number of incorporated {2-(Me2HN(+)CH2)C6H4Sb(III)} units could be tuned by careful control of the experimental parameters. Polyanions 1 and 2 possess a dimeric sandwich-type topology, whereas 3 features a trimeric, wheel-shaped structure, representing the largest organoantimony-containing polyanion. All three compounds were fully characterized in the solid state via single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, and their aqueous solution stability was validated by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C, and (183)W) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective inhibition against six different types of bacteria was observed for 1 and 2, and we could extract a structure-bioactivity relationship for these polyanions.

  12. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Vasudevan, Dr. Rama; Collins, Liam; Strelcov, Evgheni; Okatan, Mahmut B; Belianinov, Alex; Baddorf, Arthur P; Proksch, Roger; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  13. Effective collision strengths for excitation and de-excitation of nebular [O III] optical and infrared lines with κ distributed electron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2015-05-01

    We present effective collision strengths for electron excitation and de-excitation of the 10 forbidden transitions between the five lowest energy levels of the astronomically abundant doubly ionized oxygen ion, O2+. The raw collision strength data were obtained from an R-matrix intermediate coupling calculation using the Breit-Pauli relativistic approximation published previously by the authors. The effective collision strengths were calculated with κ-distributed electron energies and are tabulated as a function of the electron temperature and κ.

  14. Excitation function calculations for α + 93Nb nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, M.; Tel, E.; Sarpün, İ. H.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the excitation functions of alpha-induced reactions on the 93Nb target nucleus were calculated by using ALICE-ASH code. The hybrid model, Weisskopf-Ewing model and geometry dependent hybrid model in this code were used to understand the alpha-niobium interaction. The contribution on the nuclear interaction of compound and pre-compound processes, with variation of the incident alpha particle energy, was presented. Furthermore, the reaction cross sections were calculated by using different level density models such as Superfluid nuclear model, Fermi gas model and Kataria-Ramamurthy Fermi gas model. Obtaining a good agreement between the calculated and the measured cross sections, the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models were varied. Finally, the proper choice of the exciton numbers and the nuclear level density models was found to be quite important in order to obtain the more realistic cross section values.

  15. Stratification in the electron beams exciting type III solar radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, A.B.; Zaitsev, V.V.

    1982-07-01

    The opportunities for stratifying the fast-electron beams that generate type III solar radio bursts are discussed. Stratification can result from the growth of electromagnetic instability in a direction normal to the beam velocity, and it will cause the plasma-wave energy density to develop an oscillating space distribution. Analysis of the problem furnishes an explanation of the direct measurements of plasma waves in type III burst sources.

  16. Functional Assessment of Corticospinal System Excitability in Karate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Messina, Giovanni; Valenzano, Anna; Monda, Vincenzo; Viggiano, Andrea; Messina, Antonietta; Petito, Annamaria; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Ciliberti, Michela Anna Pia; Monda, Marcellino; Capranica, Laura; Cibelli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the involvement of the primary motor cortex (M1) in the coordination performance of karate athletes through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods Thirteen right-handed male karate athletes (25.0±5.0 years) and 13 matched non-athlete controls (26.7±6.2 years) were enrolled. A single-pulse TMS was applied using a figure-eight coil stimulator. Resting motor threshold (rMT) was determined. Surface electromyography was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Motor evoked potential (MEP) latencies and amplitudes at rMT, 110%, and 120% of rMT were considered. Functional assessment of the coordination performance was assessed by in-phase (IP) and anti-phase (AP) homolateral hand and foot coordination tasks performed at 80, 120, and 180 bpm. Results Compared to controls, athletes showed lower rMT (p<0.01), shorter MEP latency (p<0.01) and higher MEP amplitude (p<0.01), with a significant correlation (r = 0.50, p<0.01) between rMT and MEP latency. Coordination decreased with increasing velocity, and better IP performances emerged compared to AP ones (p<0.001). In general, a high correlation between rMT and coordination tasks was found for both IP and AP conditions. Conclusion With respect to controls, karate athletes present a higher corticospinal excitability indicating the presence of an activity-dependent alteration in the balance and interactions between inhibitory and facilitatory circuits determining the final output from the M1. Furthermore, the high correlation between corticospinal excitability and coordination performance could support sport-specific neurophysiological arrangements. PMID:27218465

  17. Excited-state properties of a triply ortho-metalated iridium(III) complex

    SciTech Connect

    King, K.A.; Spellane, P.J.; Watts, R.J.

    1985-03-06

    The characterization of the ground and luminescent excited states of a triply ortho-metalated complex of ppy, fac-Ir(ppy)/sub 3/ (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) is effected. This complex, which is the first triply ortho-metalated ppy species to be characterized, is one of the strongest transition-metal photoreductants thus far reported. 20 references, 2 figures.

  18. Some light-ion excitation-function measurements on titanium, yttrium, and europium, and associated results

    SciTech Connect

    West, H.I. Jr.; Lanier, R.G.; Mustafa, M.G.; Nuckolls, R.M.; Nagle, R.J.; O`Brien, H.; Frehaut, J.; Adam, A.; Philis, C.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses: Fabrication of Plastic-Matrix-Encapsulated Accelerator Targets and Their Use in Measuring Nuclear Excitation Functions; Correcting Excitation Function Data in the Low Energy Region for Finite Thickness of the Target Foils, Including Effects of Straggling; Excitation Functions for the Nuclear Reactions on Titanium Leading to the Production {sup 48}V, {sup 44}Sc and {sup 47}Sc by Proton, Deuteron and Triton Irradiations at 0--35 MeV; Some Excitation Functions of Proton and Deuteron Induced Reactions on {sup 89}Y; Measurements of the Excitation Functions of the Isobaric Chain {sup 87}Y, {sup 87}Y{sup m}, {sup 87}Y{sup g} and {sup 87}Sr{sup m}; Levels in {sup 87}Y Observed in the Decay of {sup 87}Zr; and Nuclear Reaction Excitation Functions from the Irradiation of {sup 151,153}Eu with Protons And deuterons up to 35 MeV.

  19. Structural and photophysical studies on gallium(III) 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonates. Does excited state decay involve ligand photolabilisation?

    PubMed

    Ramos, M Luísa; de Sousa, Andreia R E; Justino, Licínia L G; Fonseca, Sofia M; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Burrows, Hugh D

    2013-03-14

    Multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C and (71)Ga) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1D and 2D), DFT calculations and luminescence techniques have been used to study 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonate (8-HQS) and its complexes with Ga(III) in aqueous solutions. The study combines the high sensitivity of luminescence techniques and the selectivity of multinuclear NMR spectroscopy with the structural details accessible through DFT calculations, and aims to obtain a complete understanding of the complexation between the Ga(3+) ion and 8-HQS, and how this influences the luminescence behaviour. A full speciation study has been performed on this system and three complexes detected, with (metal : ligand) 1 : 1, 1 : 2 and 1 : 3 stoichiometries, the results being consistent with those previously found for the system Al(III)-8-HQS. Complexation in these systems is relevant to their potential biomedical, sensing and optoelectronic applications. On binding to Ga(III), a marked increase is seen in the intensity of the 8-HQS fluorescence band, which is accompanied by changes in the absorption spectra. These support the use of 8-HQS as a sensitive fluorescent sensor to detect Ga(3+) metal ions in surface waters, biological fluids, etc., and its metal complexes as an emitting or charge transport layer in light emitting devices. However, the fluorescence quantum yield of the Ga(III)-8-HQS 1 : 3 complex is about 35% of that of the corresponding system with Al(III). Although this may be due in part to a heavy atom effect favouring S(1)→ T(1) intersystem crossing with Ga(3+), this does not agree with transient absorption measurements on the triplet state yield, which is lower with the Ga(III) system than with Al(III). Instead, it is suggested that photolabilisation of ligand exchange plays a major role in nonradiative decay of the excited state and that this is more efficient with the Ga(3+) complex. Based on these results, suggestions are made of ways of enhancing fluorescence

  20. Structural and photophysical studies on gallium(III) 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonates. Does excited state decay involve ligand photolabilisation?

    PubMed

    Ramos, M Luísa; de Sousa, Andreia R E; Justino, Licínia L G; Fonseca, Sofia M; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Burrows, Hugh D

    2013-03-14

    Multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C and (71)Ga) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1D and 2D), DFT calculations and luminescence techniques have been used to study 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonate (8-HQS) and its complexes with Ga(III) in aqueous solutions. The study combines the high sensitivity of luminescence techniques and the selectivity of multinuclear NMR spectroscopy with the structural details accessible through DFT calculations, and aims to obtain a complete understanding of the complexation between the Ga(3+) ion and 8-HQS, and how this influences the luminescence behaviour. A full speciation study has been performed on this system and three complexes detected, with (metal : ligand) 1 : 1, 1 : 2 and 1 : 3 stoichiometries, the results being consistent with those previously found for the system Al(III)-8-HQS. Complexation in these systems is relevant to their potential biomedical, sensing and optoelectronic applications. On binding to Ga(III), a marked increase is seen in the intensity of the 8-HQS fluorescence band, which is accompanied by changes in the absorption spectra. These support the use of 8-HQS as a sensitive fluorescent sensor to detect Ga(3+) metal ions in surface waters, biological fluids, etc., and its metal complexes as an emitting or charge transport layer in light emitting devices. However, the fluorescence quantum yield of the Ga(III)-8-HQS 1 : 3 complex is about 35% of that of the corresponding system with Al(III). Although this may be due in part to a heavy atom effect favouring S(1)→ T(1) intersystem crossing with Ga(3+), this does not agree with transient absorption measurements on the triplet state yield, which is lower with the Ga(III) system than with Al(III). Instead, it is suggested that photolabilisation of ligand exchange plays a major role in nonradiative decay of the excited state and that this is more efficient with the Ga(3+) complex. Based on these results, suggestions are made of ways of enhancing fluorescence

  1. Excitation Control: Balancing PSD-95 Function at the Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Dove; El-Husseini, Alaa

    2008-01-01

    Excitability of individual neurons dictates the overall excitation in specific brain circuits. This process is thought to be regulated by molecules that regulate synapse number, morphology and strength. Neuronal excitation is also influenced by the amounts of neurotransmitter receptors and signaling molecules retained at particular synaptic sites. Recent studies revealed a key role for PSD-95, a scaffolding molecule enriched at glutamatergic synapses, in modulation of clustering of several neurotransmitter receptors, adhesion molecules, ion channels, cytoskeletal elements and signaling molecules at postsynaptic sites. In this review we will highlight mechanisms that control targeting of PSD-95 at the synapse, and discuss how this molecule influences the retention and clustering of diverse synaptic proteins to regulate synaptic structure and strength. We will also discuss how PSD-95 may maintain a balance between excitation and inhibition in the brain and how alterations in this balance may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:18946537

  2. Is There a Linear Building Transfer Function for Small Excitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Heaton, T. H.

    2003-12-01

    In the absence of actual building accelerometer data, the linear response of a structure to strong ground motion is estimated by the convolution of the dynamic response of the structure with an input ground motion. The input motion is usually provided by a local `reference' station record. In this study, we look at whether actual recorded ground motion at two instrumented buildings with well studied dynamic properties can be satisfactorily modeled using a local ground station. All stations record continuous 24-bit data streams on the CISN network, so analysis of a variety of weak earthquake motions, as well as ambient noise, is possible. Our buildings are the 9-story reinforced concrete Millikan Library (CISN Station MIK) and the 3-story braced steel frame Broad Center (CBC), both on the Caltech Campus. Motions recorded on their upper floors are compared with motions from ground stations located in the basement of a lightweight wood-frame house (GSA), and in a subsurface vault (CRP). All stations are within 200m of each other. Recent work using the new continuous datastream indicates that the natural frequencies of these structures can vary by up to 5% during normal ambient conditions, due to such factors as changing building usage, diurnal temperature variation, and wind/rainfall events. These shifts can be sudden, and models of building motions are sensitive to these previously un-documented changes. Further, during stronger motions, such as forced vibration testing, and minor earthquake shaking, natural frequencies are shown to drop by up to 10% (2003 M5.4 Big Bear Earthquake, Δ = 119km), with near-instantaneous recovery once the excitation is over. Moderate earthquakes can temporarily reduce frequencies by up to 30% with no apparent structural damage (1971 M6.6 San Fernando Earthquake, Δ = 31km). Post-event permanent reductions of about 10% have been observed. The ability to monitor these evolving dynamic characteristics makes a re-evaluation of the

  3. Dissociative excitation of the N(+)(5S) state by electron impact on N2 - Excitation function and quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdman, P. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable N(+)(5S) ions were produced in the laboratory by dissociative excitation of N2 with energetic electrons. The resulting radiative decay of the N(+)(5S) state was observed with sufficient resolution to completely resolve the doublet from the nearby N2 molecular radiation. The excitation function was measured from threshold to 500 eV. The cross section peaks at a high electron energy and also exhibits a high threshold energy both of which are typical of dissociative excitation-ionization processes. This finding complicates the explanation of electron impact on N2 as the mechanism for the source of the 2145 A 'auroral mystery feature' by further increasing the required peak cross section. It is suggested that the apparent N(+)(5S) quenching in auroras may be an artifact due to the softening of the electron energy spectrum in the auroral E region.

  4. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  5. One-electron and multi-electron transitions observed in the excitation function of the dissociative photoionization excitation of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Masashi; Ukai, Masatoshi; Machida, Shuntaro; Kameta, Kosei; Ehresmann, Arno; Kouchi, Noriyuki; Hatano, Yoshihiko; Hayaishi, Tatsuji; Shigemasa, Eiji; Ito, Kenji

    1996-05-01

    The excitation function of the dissociative photoionization excitation ( DIE) of 0953-4075/29/9/017/img14 has been measured with the detection technique of coincidence between photoion 0953-4075/29/9/017/img15 and a fluorescence photon emitted from an excited atom N* using extreme- UV synchrotron radiation ( SR) as an excitation source in the energy region of 35 - 65 eV. The axis of the detection system was set at two angles, parallel or perpendicular with respect to the major axis of the elliptically polarized SR, in the present measurement. The coincidence spectra obtained in this energy region show at least two qualitatively different structures originating from two different DIE processes. The major components of the DIE in the present energy region are ascribed to the dissociation of the 0953-4075/29/9/017/img16 state which is strongly coupled with correlation states in the 0953-4075/29/9/017/img17 symmetry. In addition, DIE from other precursor states in the 0953-4075/29/9/017/img18 symmetry or dissociative photo-double ionization excitation ( DDIE) was also observed.

  6. The Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Notti, Ryan Q.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2015-01-01

    ARTICLE SUMMARY Type III secretion systems (T3SS) afford gram-negative bacteria a most intimate means of altering the biology of their eukaryotic hosts — the direct delivery of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to that of the eukaryote. This incredible biophysical feat is accomplished by nanosyringe “injectisomes,” which form a conduit across the three plasma membranes, peptidoglycan layer and extracellular space that form a barrier to the direct delivery of proteins from bacterium to host. The focus of this chapter is T3SS function at the structural level; we will summarize the core findings that have shaped our understanding of the structure and function of these systems and highlight recent developments in the field. In turn, we describe the T3SS secretory apparatus, consider its engagement with secretion substrates, and discuss the post-translational regulation of secretory function. Lastly, we close with a discussion of the future prospects for the interrogation of structure-function relationships in the T3SS. PMID:26999392

  7. Characterization of a potentially axially symmetric europium(III) complex of a tetraacetate,tetraaza, macrocyclic ligand by luminescence excitation, emission and lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Michael; de, William; Horrocks, W., Jr.; Liotta, Frank J.

    1982-01-01

    The Eu(III) complex of the octadentate macrocyclic ligand, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N''' -tetraacetate, DOTA, has been examined by luminescence excitation, emission, and lifetime spectroscopy using pulsed dye laser techniques. The results confirm the expected axially symmetric nature of the major component in solution and reveal that 1.2 ± 0.4 water molecules arc coordinatcd to the Eu(III) ion in the complex.

  8. Self-Consistent Optimization of Excited States within Density-Functional Tight-Binding.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Tim; Le, Khoa; Irle, Stephan

    2016-01-12

    We present an implementation of energies and gradients for the ΔDFTB method, an analogue of Δ-self-consistent-field density functional theory (ΔSCF) within density-functional tight-binding, for the lowest singlet excited state of closed-shell molecules. Benchmarks of ΔDFTB excitation energies, optimized geometries, Stokes shifts, and vibrational frequencies reveal that ΔDFTB provides a qualitatively correct description of changes in molecular geometries and vibrational frequencies due to excited-state relaxation. The accuracy of ΔDFTB Stokes shifts is comparable to that of ΔSCF-DFT, and ΔDFTB performs similarly to ΔSCF with the PBE functional for vertical excitation energies of larger chromophores where the need for efficient excited-state methods is most urgent. We provide some justification for the use of an excited-state reference density in the DFTB expansion of the electronic energy and demonstrate that ΔDFTB preserves many of the properties of its parent ΔSCF approach. This implementation fills an important gap in the extended framework of DFTB, where access to excited states has been limited to the time-dependent linear-response approach, and affords access to rapid exploration of a valuable class of excited-state potential energy surfaces.

  9. Functional patterned multiphoton excitation deep inside scattering tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Bègue, Aurélien; Leshem, Ben; Schwartz, Osip; Stell, Brandon M.; Bradley, Jonathan; Oron, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina

    2013-04-01

    Stochastic distortion of light beams in scattering samples makes in-depth photoexcitation in brain tissue a major challenge. A common solution for overcoming scattering involves adaptive pre-compensation of the unknown distortion. However, this requires long iterative searches for sample-specific optimized corrections, which is a problem when applied to optical neurostimulation where typical timescales in the system are in the millisecond range. Thus, photoexcitation in scattering media that is independent of the properties of a specific sample would be an ideal solution. Here, we show that temporally focused two-photon excitation with generalized phase contrast enables photoexcitation of arbitrary spatial patterns within turbid tissues with remarkable robustness to scattering. We demonstrate three-dimensional confinement of tailored photoexcitation patterns >200 µm in depth, both in numerical simulations and through brain slices combined with patch-clamp recording of photoactivated channelrhodopsin-2.

  10. Multiple-Resonance Local Wave Functions for Accurate Excited States in Quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zulfikri, Habiburrahman; Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a novel class of local multideterminant Jastrow-Slater wave functions for the efficient and accurate treatment of excited states in quantum Monte Carlo. The wave function is expanded as a linear combination of excitations built from multiple sets of localized orbitals that correspond to the bonding patterns of the different Lewis resonance structures of the molecule. We capitalize on the concept of orbital domains of local coupled-cluster methods, which is here applied to the active space to select the orbitals to correlate and construct the important transitions. The excitations are further grouped into classes, which are ordered in importance and can be systematically included in the Jastrow-Slater wave function to ensure a balanced description of all states of interest. We assess the performance of the proposed wave function in the calculation of vertical excitation energies and excited-state geometry optimization of retinal models whose π → π* state has a strong intramolecular charge-transfer character. We find that our multiresonance wave functions recover the reference values of the total energies of the ground and excited states with only a small number of excitations and that the same expansion can be flexibly used at very different geometries. Furthermore, significant computational saving can also be gained in the orbital optimization step by selectively mixing occupied and virtual orbitals based on spatial considerations without loss of accuracy on the excitation energy. Our multiresonance wave functions are therefore compact, accurate, and very promising for the calculation of multiple excited states of different character in large molecules.

  11. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew M.; Calvo, Rebecca A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize. PMID:26244495

  12. Core and valence excitations in resonant X-ray spectroscopy using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur K and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\textrm {L}_{2,3}$\\end{document}L2,3 edges. Comparison of the simulated XANES signals with experiment shows that the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory is more accurate and computationally less expensive than the static exchange method. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals give some insights into the correlation of different excitations in the molecule. PMID:23181305

  13. Core and Valence Excitations in Resonant X-ray Spectroscopy using Restricted Excitation Window Time-dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-11-21

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur K and L2,3 edges. The simulated XANES signals from the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory (REW-TDDFT) and the static exchange (STEX) method are compared with experiments, showing that REW-TDDFT is more accurate and computationally less expensive than STEX. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals from REW-TDDFT give some insights on the correlation of different excitations in the molecule.

  14. Comparison of the hydrological excitation functions HAM of polar motion for the period 1980.0-2007.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, J.; Pasnicka, M.; Kolaczek, B.

    2011-10-01

    In this study we compared contributions of polar motion excitation determined from hydrological models and harmonic coefficients of the Earth gravity field obtained from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). Hydrological excitation function (hydrological angular momentum - HAM) has been estimated from models of global hydrology, based on the observed distribution of surface water, snow, ice and soil moisture. All of them were compared with observed Geodetic Angular Momentum (GAM), excitations of polar motion. The spectra of these excitation functions of polar motion and residual geodetic excitation function G-A-O obtained from GAM by elimination of atmospheric and oceanic excitation functions were computed too. Phasor diagrams of the seasonal components of the polar motion excitation functions of all HAM excitation functions as well as of two GRACE solutions: CSR, CNES were determined and discussed.

  15. Linearity condition for orbital energies in density functional theory (V): Extension to excited state calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Kensei; Iizuka, Takeshi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A new scheme is proposed for constructing an orbital-specific (OS) exchange-correlation functional that satisfies multiple linearity conditions for orbital energies (LCOEs). The Hartree-Fock exchange portions in the OS exchange-correlation functional, based on a multiply range-separated functional, are set so as to satisfy the multiple LCOEs. The current scheme has also been extended to calculations of core, valence, and Rydberg excitations. Numerical assessments on ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies have confirmed accurate descriptions of core, valence, and Rydberg orbitals by the OS hybrid functional.

  16. Fragment-based configuration interaction wave function to calculate environmental effect on excited states in proteins and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Jun-ya

    2013-05-01

    Solvatochromic effect in proteins and solutions was described by a configuration interaction singles (CIS) wave function with fragment-localized molecular orbitals. Coarse-grained analysis indicated that the CI wave function can be described by local excitations and charge-transfer (CT) excitations between the chromophore and the environment. We developed an atomic-orbital direct runcated CIS code and applied the excited states of retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin and MeOH environments, and those of s-trans-acrolein in water. Number of excitation operators was significantly reduced by eliminating the CT excitations between the environmental fragments. The truncated CIS wave functions reproduced the original excitation energies very well.

  17. Analysis of the magnetic coupling in binuclear systems. III. The role of the ligand to metal charge transfer excitations revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzado, Carmen J.; Angeli, Celestino; Taratiel, David; Caballol, Rosa; Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2009-07-01

    In magnetic coordination compounds and solids the magnetic orbitals are essentially located on metallic centers but present some delocalization tails on adjacent ligands. Mean field variational calculations optimize this mixing and validate a single band modelization of the intersite magnetic exchange. In this approach, due to the Brillouin's theorem, the ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) excitations play a minor role. On the other hand the extensive configuration interaction calculations show that the determinants obtained by a single excitation on the top of the LMCT configurations bring an important antiferromagnetic contribution to the magnetic coupling. Perturbative and truncated variational calculations show that contrary to the interpretation given in a previous article [C. J. Calzado et al., J. Chem. Phys. 116, 2728 (2002)] the contribution of these determinants to the magnetic coupling constant is not a second-order one. An analytic development enables one to establish that they contribute at higher order as a correlation induced increase in the LMCT components of the wave function, i.e., of the mixing between the ligand and the magnetic orbitals. This larger delocalization of the magnetic orbitals results in an increase in both the ferro- and antiferromagnetic contributions to the coupling constant.

  18. Analysis of the magnetic coupling in binuclear systems. III. The role of the ligand to metal charge transfer excitations revisited.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Carmen J; Angeli, Celestino; Taratiel, David; Caballol, Rosa; Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2009-07-28

    In magnetic coordination compounds and solids the magnetic orbitals are essentially located on metallic centers but present some delocalization tails on adjacent ligands. Mean field variational calculations optimize this mixing and validate a single band modelization of the intersite magnetic exchange. In this approach, due to the Brillouin's theorem, the ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) excitations play a minor role. On the other hand the extensive configuration interaction calculations show that the determinants obtained by a single excitation on the top of the LMCT configurations bring an important antiferromagnetic contribution to the magnetic coupling. Perturbative and truncated variational calculations show that contrary to the interpretation given in a previous article [C. J. Calzado et al., J. Chem. Phys. 116, 2728 (2002)] the contribution of these determinants to the magnetic coupling constant is not a second-order one. An analytic development enables one to establish that they contribute at higher order as a correlation induced increase in the LMCT components of the wave function, i.e., of the mixing between the ligand and the magnetic orbitals. This larger delocalization of the magnetic orbitals results in an increase in both the ferro- and antiferromagnetic contributions to the coupling constant.

  19. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Is as Accurate as CASPT2 for Electronic Excitation.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Chad E; Ghosh, Soumen; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-02-01

    A correct description of electronically excited states is critical to the interpretation of visible-ultraviolet spectra, photochemical reactions, and excited-state charge-transfer processes in chemical systems. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory and a new kind of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here, we show that MC-PDFT with a first-generation on-top density functional performs as well as CASPT2 for an organic chemistry database including valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer excitations. The results are very encouraging for practical applications. PMID:26794241

  20. Excited State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-09-01

    The optical response of excited states is a key property used to probe photophysical and photochemical dynamics. Additionally, materials with a large nonlinear absorption cross-section caused by two-photon (TPA) and excited state absorption (ESA) are desirable for optical limiting applications. The ability to predict the optical response of excited states would help in the interpretation of transient absorption experiments and aid in the search for and design of optical limiting materials. We have developed an approach to obtain excited state absorption spectra by combining real-time (RT) and linear-response (LR) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Being based on RT-TDDFT, our method is aimed at tackling larger molecular complexes and materials systems where excited state absorption is predominantly seen and many time-resolved experimental efforts are focused. To demonstrate our method, we have calculated the ground and excited state spectra of H₂⁺ and H₂ due to the simplicity in the interpretation of the spectra. We have validated our new approach by comparing our results for butadiene with previously published results based on quadratic response (QR). We also present results for oligofluorenes, where we compare our results with both QR-TDDFT and experimental measurements. Because our method directly measures the response of an excited state, stimulated emission features are also captured; although, these features are underestimated in energy which could be attributed to a change of the reference from the ground to the excited state.

  1. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  2. Assessing Accuracy of Exchange-Correlation Functionals for the Description of Atomic Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Marcin; Hanas, Martyna

    2016-09-01

    The performance of exchange-correlation functionals for the description of atomic excitations is investigated. A benchmark set of excited states is constructed and experimental data is compared to Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) calculations. The benchmark results show that for the selected group of functionals good accuracy may be achieved and the quality of predictions provided is competitive to computationally more demanding coupled-cluster approaches. Apart from testing the standard TDDFT approaches, also the role of self-interaction error plaguing DFT calculations and the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation kernels is given some insight.

  3. Communication: Exciton analysis in time-dependent density functional theory: How functionals shape excited-state characters.

    PubMed

    Mewes, Stefanie A; Plasser, Felix; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Excited-state descriptors based on the one-particle transition density matrix referring to the exciton picture have been implemented for time-dependent density functional theory. State characters such as local, extended ππ(∗), Rydberg, or charge transfer can be intuitively classified by simple comparison of these descriptors. Strong effects of the choice of the exchange-correlation kernel on the physical nature of excited states can be found and decomposed in detail leading to a new perspective on functional performance and the design of new functionals.

  4. Communication: Exciton analysis in time-dependent density functional theory: How functionals shape excited-state characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Stefanie A.; Plasser, Felix; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Excited-state descriptors based on the one-particle transition density matrix referring to the exciton picture have been implemented for time-dependent density functional theory. State characters such as local, extended ππ∗, Rydberg, or charge transfer can be intuitively classified by simple comparison of these descriptors. Strong effects of the choice of the exchange-correlation kernel on the physical nature of excited states can be found and decomposed in detail leading to a new perspective on functional performance and the design of new functionals.

  5. Gravimetric excitation function of polar motion from the GRACE RL05 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Impact of land hydrosphere on polar motion excitation is still not as well known as the impact of the angular momentum of the atmosphere and ocean. Satellite mission Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) from 2002 provides additional information about mass distribution of the land hydrosphere. However, despite the use of similar computational procedures, the differences between GRACE data series made available by the various centers of computations are still considerable. In the paper we compare three series of gravimetric excitation functions of polar motion determined from Rl05 GRACE solution from the Center for Space Research (CSR), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ). These data are used to determine the gravimetric polar motion excitation function. Gravimetric signal is compared also with the geodetic residuals computed by subtracting atmospheric and oceanic signals from geodetic excitation functions of polar motion. Gravimetric excitation functions obtained on the basis of JPL data differ significantly from the geodetic residuals while and the series obtained from CSR and GFZ are more compatible.

  6. Thick-target transmission method for excitation functions of interaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, M.; Ebata, S.; Imai, S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a method, called as thick-target transmission (T3) method, to obtain an excitation function of interaction cross sections. In an ordinal experiment to measure the excitation function of interaction cross sections by the transmission method, we need to change the beam energy for each cross section. In the T3 method, the excitation function is derived from the beam attenuations measured at the targets of different thicknesses without changing the beam energy. The advantage of the T3 method is the simplicity and availability for radioactive beams. To confirm the availability, we perform a simulation for the 12C + 27Al system with the PHITS code instead of actual experiments. Our results have large uncertainties but well reproduce the tendency of the experimental data.

  7. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shehryar; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef; Odelius, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H2O)-, Gd(III)DTPA(H2O)2-, and Gd(III)(H2O)83+ in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  8. Assembly and function of type III secretory systems.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, G R; Van Gijsegem, F

    2000-01-01

    Type III secretion systems allow Yersinia spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Bordetella spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli adhering at the surface of a eukaryotic cell to inject bacterial proteins across the two bacterial membranes and the eukaryotic cell membrane to destroy or subvert the target cell. These systems consist of a secretion apparatus, made of approximately 25 proteins, and an array of proteins released by this apparatus. Some of these released proteins are "effectors," which are delivered into the cytosol of the target cell, whereas the others are "translocators," which help the effectors to cross the membrane of the eukaryotic cell. Most of the effectors act on the cytoskeleton or on intracellular-signaling cascades. A protein injected by the enteropathogenic E. coli serves as a membrane receptor for the docking of the bacterium itself at the surface of the cell. Type III secretion systems also occur in plant pathogens where they are involved both in causing disease in susceptible hosts and in eliciting the so-called hypersensitive response in resistant or nonhost plants. They consist of 15-20 Hrp proteins building a secretion apparatus and two groups of effectors: harpins and avirulence proteins. Harpins are presumably secreted in the extracellular compartment, whereas avirulence proteins are thought to be targeted into plant cells. Although a coherent picture is clearly emerging, basic questions remain to be answered. In particular, little is known about how the type III apparatus fits together to deliver proteins in animal cells. It is even more mysterious for plant cells where a thick wall has to be crossed. In spite of these haunting questions, type III secretion appears as a fascinating trans-kingdom communication device. PMID:11018143

  9. N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide for detection of iron(III) by photoluminescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Javad; Manteghian, Mehrdad; Badiei, Alireza; Ueda, Hiroshi; Javanbakht, Mehran

    2016-02-01

    An N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide nanolayer was synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Detection of iron(III) based on photoluminescence spectroscopy was investigated. The N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide was shown to specifically interact with iron (III), compared with other cationic trace elements including potassium (I), sodium (I), calcium (II), chromium (III), zinc (II), cobalt (II), copper (II), magnesium (II), manganese (II), and molybdenum (VI). The quenching effect of iron (III) on the luminescence emission of N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide layer was used to detect iron (III). The limit of detection (2.8 × 10(-6)  M) and limit of quantitation (2.9 × 10(-5)  M) were obtained under optimal conditions.

  10. N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide for detection of iron(III) by photoluminescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Javad; Manteghian, Mehrdad; Badiei, Alireza; Ueda, Hiroshi; Javanbakht, Mehran

    2016-02-01

    An N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide nanolayer was synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Detection of iron(III) based on photoluminescence spectroscopy was investigated. The N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide was shown to specifically interact with iron (III), compared with other cationic trace elements including potassium (I), sodium (I), calcium (II), chromium (III), zinc (II), cobalt (II), copper (II), magnesium (II), manganese (II), and molybdenum (VI). The quenching effect of iron (III) on the luminescence emission of N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide layer was used to detect iron (III). The limit of detection (2.8 × 10(-6)  M) and limit of quantitation (2.9 × 10(-5)  M) were obtained under optimal conditions. PMID:26016610

  11. Detection of time-frequency relations between geodetic and geophysical excitation functions of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeszotko, A.; Kosek, W.; Popinski, W.

    2009-09-01

    The redistribution of mass in the atmosphere, oceans and hydrology and the changes of the wind and ocean currents velocities are important sources of polar motion excitation. Relations between the geodetic excitation function and the effective angular momentum functions of the atmosphere, oceans and hydrology are examined in the time-frequency domain by means of coherence and phase synchronization. Coherence may be interpreted as a correlation coefficient between oscillations with the same frequencies present in two time series whereas phase synchronization allow to investigate the phase agreement between these oscillations.

  12. Assessment of the ΔSCF density functional theory approach for electronic excitations in organic dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalczyk, T.; Yost, S. R.; Van Voorhis, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the accuracy of the ΔSCF method for computing low-lying HOMO→LUMO transitions in organic dye molecules. For a test set of vertical excitation energies of 16 chromophores, surprisingly similar accuracy is observed for time-dependent density functional theory and for ΔSCF density functional theory. In light of this performance, we reconsider the ad hoc ΔSCF prescription and demonstrate that it formally obtains the exact stationary density within the adiabatic approximation, partially justifying its use. The relative merits and future prospects of ΔSCF for simulating individual excited states are discussed.

  13. RNase III autoregulation: structure and function of rncO, the posttranscriptional "operator".

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, J; Simons, E L; Simons, R W

    1996-12-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli rnc-era-recO operon is regulated posttranscriptionally by ribonuclease III (RNase III), encoded in the rnc gene. RNase III initiates rapid decay of the rnc operon mRNA by cleaving a double-stranded region of the rnc leader. This region, termed rncO, is portable, conferring stability and RNase III regulation to heterologous RNAs. Here, we report the detailed analysis of rncO structure and function. The first 215 nt of the rnc leader are sufficient for its function. Dimethylsulfate (DMS) modification in vivo revealed distinct structural elements in this region: a 13-nt single-stranded 5' leader, followed by a 6-bp stem-loop structure (I), a larger stem-loop structure (II) containing the RNase III site, a single-stranded region containing the rnc translation initiation site, and a small stem-loop structure (III) at the 3' terminus of rncO, wholly within the rnc coding region. Genetic analysis revealed the function of these structural elements. The single-stranded leader is not required for stability or RNase III control, stem-loop II is required only for RNase III control, and both stem-loops I and III are required for stability. Stem-loop II effectively serves only as the site at which RNase III cleaves to remove stem-loop I and thereby initiates decay, after which RNase III plays no role. Mutations at the cleavage site underscore the importance of base pairing for efficient RNase III attack. When stem-loops I and II were replaced with an artificial hairpin structure, stability was restored only partially, but was restored almost fully when a single-stranded leader was also added. PMID:8972772

  14. Excitation functions for actinides produced in the interactions of sup 31 P with sup 248 Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Leyba, J.D.; Henderson, R.A.; Hall, H.L.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Kadkhodayan, B.A.; Kreek, S.A.; Brady, E.K.; Gregorich, K.E.; Lee, D.M.; Nurmia, M.J.; Hoffman, D.C. Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California )

    1991-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of various isotopes of Bk, Cf, Es, and Fm from the interactions of 174- and 239-MeV {sup 31}P projectiles with {sup 248}Cm. The isotopic distributions were symmetric and displayed full widths at half maximum of 2.5, 2.5, and 2.25 mass units for Bk, Cf, and Fm, respectively. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur for those reaction channels which involve the exchange of the fewest number of nucleons between the target and projectile for which the calculated excitation energy is a positive quantity. The maxima of the excitation functions occur at those projectile energies which are consistent with the calculated reaction barriers based upon a binary reaction mechanism. The effects of the odd proton in the {sup 31}P projectile on the final isotopic distributions are discussed.

  15. Employment of sawtooth-shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling for improving resistance measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling; Li, Shujuan; Yan, Wenjuan; Li, Gang

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve higher measurement accuracy of routine resistance without increasing the complexity and cost of the system circuit of existing methods, this paper presents a novel method that exploits a shaped-function excitation signal and oversampling technology. The excitation signal source for resistance measurement is modulated by the sawtooth-shaped-function signal, and oversampling technology is employed to increase the resolution and the accuracy of the measurement system. Compared with the traditional method of using constant amplitude excitation signal, this method can effectively enhance the measuring accuracy by almost one order of magnitude and reduce the root mean square error by 3.75 times under the same measurement conditions. The results of experiments show that the novel method can attain the aim of significantly improve the measurement accuracy of resistance on the premise of not increasing the system cost and complexity of the circuit, which is significantly valuable for applying in electronic instruments.

  16. Analysis of Real Ship Rolling Dynamics under Wave Excitement Force Composed of Sums of Cosine Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. S.; Cai, F.; Xu, W. M.

    2011-09-28

    The ship motion equation with a cosine wave excitement force describes the slip moments in regular waves. A new kind of wave excitement force model, with the form as sums of cosine functions was proposed to describe ship rolling in irregular waves. Ship rolling time series were obtained by solving the ship motion equation with the fourth-order-Runger-Kutta method. These rolling time series were synthetically analyzed with methods of phase-space track, power spectrum, primary component analysis, and the largest Lyapunove exponent. Simulation results show that ship rolling presents some chaotic characteristic when the wave excitement force was applied by sums of cosine functions. The result well explains the course of ship rolling's chaotic mechanism and is useful for ship hydrodynamic study.

  17. Impact of Substituents on Excited-State and Photosensitizing Properties in Cationic Iridium(III) Complexes with Ligands of Coumarin 6.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Shin-Ya; Ikuta, Naoya; Zeng, Fanyang; Komaru, Shohei; Sebata, Shinogu; Murata, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    A series of bis-cyclometalated cationic iridium (Ir) complexes were synthesized employing two coumarin 6 ligands and a 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) with various substituents as new sensitizers, realizing both features of strong visible-light absorption and long-lived excited state. Complexes 2-4, with electron-donating methyl and methoxy groups, absorbed visible light strongly (ε: 126 000-132 000 M(-1) cm(-1)) and exhibited room-temperature phosphorescence with remarkably long lifetimes (21-23 μs) in dichloromethane. In contrast, the excited state of prototype complex 1 without any substituents was short-lived, particularly in highly polar acetonitrile. Phosphorescence of complex 5 with the strong electron-withdrawing CF3 groups was too weak to be detected at room temperature even in less polar dichloromethane. The triplet energies of their coumarin ligand-centered ((3)LC) phosphorescent states were almost invariable, demonstrating that selective tuning of the excited-state lifetime is possible through this "simple chemical modification of the bpy ligand" (we name it the "SCMB" method). The spectroscopic and computational investigations in this study suggest that a potential source of the nonradiative deactivation is a triplet ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer state ((3)LLCT state, coumarin 6 → bpy) and lead us to conclude that the energy level of this dark (3)LLCT state, as well as its thermal population, is largely dependent on the substituents and solvent polarity. In addition, the significant difference in excited-state lifetime was reflected in the photosensitizing ability of complexes 1-5 in visible-light-driven hydrogen generation using sodium ascorbate and a cobalt(III) diglyoxime complex as an electron donor and a water-reduction catalyst, respectively. This study suggests that the SCMB method should be generally effective in controlling the excited state of other bis-cyclometalated cationic Ir(III) complexes. PMID:27548036

  18. Impact of Substituents on Excited-State and Photosensitizing Properties in Cationic Iridium(III) Complexes with Ligands of Coumarin 6.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Shin-Ya; Ikuta, Naoya; Zeng, Fanyang; Komaru, Shohei; Sebata, Shinogu; Murata, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    A series of bis-cyclometalated cationic iridium (Ir) complexes were synthesized employing two coumarin 6 ligands and a 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) with various substituents as new sensitizers, realizing both features of strong visible-light absorption and long-lived excited state. Complexes 2-4, with electron-donating methyl and methoxy groups, absorbed visible light strongly (ε: 126 000-132 000 M(-1) cm(-1)) and exhibited room-temperature phosphorescence with remarkably long lifetimes (21-23 μs) in dichloromethane. In contrast, the excited state of prototype complex 1 without any substituents was short-lived, particularly in highly polar acetonitrile. Phosphorescence of complex 5 with the strong electron-withdrawing CF3 groups was too weak to be detected at room temperature even in less polar dichloromethane. The triplet energies of their coumarin ligand-centered ((3)LC) phosphorescent states were almost invariable, demonstrating that selective tuning of the excited-state lifetime is possible through this "simple chemical modification of the bpy ligand" (we name it the "SCMB" method). The spectroscopic and computational investigations in this study suggest that a potential source of the nonradiative deactivation is a triplet ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer state ((3)LLCT state, coumarin 6 → bpy) and lead us to conclude that the energy level of this dark (3)LLCT state, as well as its thermal population, is largely dependent on the substituents and solvent polarity. In addition, the significant difference in excited-state lifetime was reflected in the photosensitizing ability of complexes 1-5 in visible-light-driven hydrogen generation using sodium ascorbate and a cobalt(III) diglyoxime complex as an electron donor and a water-reduction catalyst, respectively. This study suggests that the SCMB method should be generally effective in controlling the excited state of other bis-cyclometalated cationic Ir(III) complexes.

  19. Quantification of functional abilities in Rett syndrome: a comparison between stages III and IV

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Carlos BM; Savelsbergh, Geert JP; Smorenburg, Ana RP; Graciani, Zodja; Torriani-Pasin, Camila; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E; Kok, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the functional abilities of persons with Rett syndrome (RTT) in stages III and IV. The group consisted of 60 females who had been diagnosed with RTT: 38 in stage III, mean age (years) of 9.14, with a standard deviation of 5.84 (minimum 2.2/maximum 26.4); and 22 in stage IV, mean age of 12.45, with a standard deviation of 6.17 (minimum 5.3/maximum 26.9). The evaluation was made using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, which has 197 items in the areas of self-care, mobility, and social function. The results showed that in the area of self-care, stage III and stage IV RTT persons had a level of 24.12 and 18.36 (P=0.002), respectively. In the area of mobility, stage III had 37.22 and stage IV had 14.64 (P<0.001), while in the area of social function, stage III had 17.72 and stage IV had 12.14 (P=0.016). In conclusion, although persons with stage III RTT have better functional abilities when compared with stage IV, the areas of mobility, self-care, and social function are quite affected, which shows a great functional dependency and need for help in basic activities of daily life. PMID:25061307

  20. Plasmon excitations in sodium atomic planes: a time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Ji; Xu, Yuehua; Ke, San-Huang

    2012-08-01

    The collective electronic excitation in planar sodium clusters is studied by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The formation and development of the resonances in photoabsorption spectra are investigated in terms of the shape and size of the two-dimensional (2D) systems. The nature of these resonances is revealed by the frequency-resolved induced charge densities present on a real-space grid. For long double chains, the excitation is similar to that in long single atomic chains, showing longitudinal modes, end and central transverse modes. However, for 2D planes consisting of (n × n) atoms with n being up to 16, new 2D characteristic modes emerge regardless of the symmetries considered. For in-plane excitations, besides the equivalent end mode, mixed modes with contrary polarity occur. The relation between the frequency of the primary modes and the system size is similar to the case of a 2D electron gas but with a correction due to the realistic atomic structure. For excitations perpendicular to the plane there are corner, side center, bulk center, and circuit modes. Our calculation reveals the importance of dimensionality for plasmon excitation and how it evolves from 1D to 2D.

  1. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  2. Measurement of fusion excitation functions in the system {sup 78}Kr + {sup 100}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Earlier measurements of fusion reactions involving {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo projectiles and Ni-targets showed surprisingly large fusion yields at low energies which could not be explained by coupled-channels calculations. The main difference to similar measurements involving the neighboring {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo isotopes was the different slope of the excitation functions at sub-barrier energies. An analysis of a variety of experiments showed a correlation between the nuclear structure and the slope of the excitation functions, with the {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} transitional nuclei ({sup 78}Kr, {sup 100}Mo) exhibiting shallower slopes than the {open_quotes}stiff{close_quotes} nuclei ({sup 86}Kr, {sup 92}Mo) measured at the same energies with respect to the barrier. In this experiment we studied the fusion excitation function involving two transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr + {sup 100}Mo. The measurements were performed with {sup 78}Kr beams from the ECR source at energies between 285-370 MeV. Separation of the evaporation nucleus from the elastically scattered particles was achieved by measuring time-of-flight and magnetic rigidity in the gas-filled spectrograph. The data were completely analyzed. A comparison of the cross sections with measurements for the system {sup 86}Kr + {sup 92}Mo populating the same compound nucleus {sup 178}Pt. It shows good agreement at the highest energies, but quite different falloffs of the excitation functions toward lower energies. Coupled-channels calculations, including multi-phonon excitation for the two systems, are being performed.

  3. Intrinsic acidity of aluminum, chromium (III) and iron (III) μ 3-hydroxo functional groups from ab initio electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Dixon, David A.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2000-05-01

    Density functional calculations are performed on M 3(OH) 7(H 2O) 62+ and M 3O(OH) 6(H 2O) 6+ clusters for MAl, Cr(III), and Fe(III), allowing determination of the relative acidities of the μ 3-hydroxo and aquo functional groups. Contrary to previous predictions and rationalizations, Fe 3OH and Al 3OH groups have nearly the same intrinsic acidity, while Cr 3OH groups are significantly more acidic. The gas-phase acidity of the Fe 3OH site is in good agreement with the value predicted by the molecular mechanics model previously used to estimate the relative acidities of surface sites on iron oxides. [ J. R. Rustad et al. (1996)Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 1563]. Acidities of aquo functional groups were also computed for Al and Cr. The AlOH 2 site is more acidic than the Al 3OH site, whereas the Cr 3OH site is more acidic than the CrOH 2 site. These findings predict that the surface charging behavior of chromium oxides/oxyhydroxides should be distinguishable from their Fe, Al counterparts. The calculations also provide insight into why the lepidocrocite/boehmite polymorph is not observed for CrOOH.

  4. Loss of PCLO function underlies pontocerebellar hypoplasia type III

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mustafa Y.; Chioza, Barry A.; Rajab, Anna; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Al-Khayat, Aisha; Al-Turki, Saeed; Baple, Emma L.; Patton, Michael A.; Al-Memar, Ali Y.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Hill, R. Sean; Evrony, Gilad D.; Servattalab, Sarah; Markianos, Kyriacos; Walsh, Christopher A.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause of pontocerebellar hypoplasia type III (PCH3). Methods: We studied the original reported pedigree of PCH3 and performed genetic analysis including genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. Human fetal brain RNA sequencing data were then analyzed for the identified candidate gene. Results: The affected individuals presented with severe global developmental delay and seizures starting in the first year of life. Brain MRI of an affected individual showed diffuse atrophy of the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analysis confirmed the linkage to chromosome 7q we previously reported, and showed no other genomic areas of linkage. Whole-exome sequencing of 2 affected individuals identified a shared homozygous, nonsense variant in the PCLO (piccolo) gene. This variant segregated with the disease phenotype in the pedigree was rare in the population and was predicted to eliminate the PDZ and C2 domains in the C-terminus of the protein. RNA sequencing data of human fetal brain showed that PCLO was moderately expressed in the developing cerebral cortex. Conclusions: Here, we show that a homozygous, nonsense PCLO mutation underlies the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, PCH3. PCLO is a component of the presynaptic cytoskeletal matrix, and is thought to be involved in regulation of presynaptic proteins and synaptic vesicles. Our findings suggest that PCLO is crucial for the development and survival of a wide range of neuronal types in the human brain. PMID:25832664

  5. Synthesis and functionalization of monodisperse near-ultraviolet and visible excitable multifunctional Eu(3+), Bi(3+):REVO4 nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail V; Ashraf, Sumaira; Hartmann, Raimo; Núñez, Nuria O; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-06-16

    Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be tuned by adjusting the amount of PAA. The Eu- Bi-doped REVO4 based nanophosphors show the typical red luminescence of Eu(iii), which can be excited through an energy transfer process from the vanadate anions, resulting in a much higher luminescence intensity in comparison to the direct excitation of the europium cations. The incorporation of Bi into the REVO4 structure shifts the original absorption band of the vanadate anions towards longer wavelengths, giving rise to nanophosphors with an excitation maximum at 342 nm, which can also be excited in the visible range. The suitability of such nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications, as well as their colloidal stability in different buffer media of biological interest, their cytotoxicity, their degradability at low pH, and their uptake by HeLa cells have been evaluated. Their suitability for bioimaging and biosensing applications is also demonstrated. PMID:27253384

  6. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer.

    PubMed

    Kullie, Ossama

    2014-01-14

    In previous works on Zn2 and Cd2 dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s(2) + 6s6p), (6s(2) + 6s7s), and (6s(2) + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg2. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg2 including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd2, and Zn2, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg2.

  7. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullie, Ossama

    2014-01-01

    In previous works on Zn2 and Cd2 dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s2 + 6s6p), (6s2 + 6s7s), and (6s2 + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg2. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg2 including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd2, and Zn2, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg2.

  8. Functional redundancy between DNA ligases I and III in DNA replication in vertebrate cells

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Bednar, Theresa; Wang, Minli; Paul, Katja; Mladenov, Emil; Bencsik-Theilen, Alena A.; Iliakis, George

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the three families of ATP-dependent DNA ligases are associated with specific functions in DNA metabolism. DNA ligase I (LigI) catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the replication fork and nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA ligase IV (LigIV) mediates repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) via the canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The evolutionary younger DNA ligase III (LigIII) is restricted to higher eukaryotes and has been associated with base excision (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR). Here, using conditional knockout strategies for LIG3 and concomitant inactivation of the LIG1 and LIG4 genes, we show that in DT40 cells LigIII efficiently supports semi-conservative DNA replication. Our observations demonstrate a high functional versatility for the evolutionary new LigIII in DNA replication and mitochondrial metabolism, and suggest the presence of an alternative pathway for Okazaki fragment ligation. PMID:22127868

  9. Latent Class Analysis of Differential Item Functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Mi-young Lee; Cohen, Allan S.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of latent class analysis for the detection of differences in item functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third Edition (PPVT-III). A two-class solution for a latent class model appeared to be defined in part by ability because Class 1 was lower in ability than Class 2 on both the PPVT-III and the…

  10. Measurement of excitation functions in alpha induced reactions on natCu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun; Zaman, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2015-09-01

    The excitation functions of 66,67,68Ga, 62,63,65Zn, 61,64Cu, and 58,60Co radionuclides in the natCu(α, x) reaction were measured in the energy range from 15 to 42 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation method at the MC-50 cyclotron of the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The measured results were compared with the literature data as well as the theoretical values obtained from the TENDL-2013 and TENDL-2014 libraries based on the TALYS-1.6 code. The integral yields for thick targets of the produced radionuclides were also determined from the measured excitation functions and the stopping power of natural copper.

  11. Measurement of the 208Pb(52Cr, n)259Sg Excitation Function

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C.M.; Dragojevic, I.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Eichler, R.; Garcia, M.A.; Gates, J.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K.E.; Hoffman, D.C.; Nitsche, H.

    2010-03-19

    The excitation function for the 208Pb(52Cr, n)259Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from 259Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the 208Pb(52Cr, 2n)258Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved 258Sg half-life of ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  12. Generating functions and stability study of multivariate self-excited epidemic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saichev, A. I.; Sornette, D.

    2011-09-01

    We present a stability study of the class of multivariate self-excited Hawkes point processes, that can model natural and social systems, including earthquakes, epileptic seizures and the dynamics of neuron assemblies, bursts of exchanges in social communities, interactions between Internet bloggers, bank network fragility and cascading of failures, national sovereign default contagion, and so on. We present the general theory of multivariate generating functions to derive the number of events over all generations of various types that are triggered by a mother event of a given type. We obtain the stability domains of various systems, as a function of the topological structure of the mutual excitations across different event types. We find that mutual triggering tends to provide a significant extension of the stability (or subcritical) domain compared with the case where event types are decoupled, that is, when an event of a given type can only trigger events of the same type.

  13. Communication: Excited states, dynamic correlation functions and spectral properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Booth, George H; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2012-11-21

    In this communication, we propose a method for obtaining isolated excited states within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo framework. This method allows for stable sampling with respect to collapse to lower energy states and requires no uncontrolled approximations. In contrast with most previous methods to extract excited state information from quantum Monte Carlo methods, this results from a modification to the underlying propagator, and does not require explicit orthogonalization, analytic continuation, transient estimators, or restriction of the Hilbert space via a trial wavefunction. Furthermore, we show that the propagator can directly yield frequency-domain correlation functions and spectral functions such as the density of states which are difficult to obtain within a traditional quantum Monte Carlo framework. We demonstrate this approach with pilot applications to the neon atom and beryllium dimer.

  14. The transfer function method for gear system dynamics applied to conventional and minimum excitation gearing designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A transfer function method for predicting the dynamic responses of gear systems with more than one gear mesh is developed and applied to the NASA Lewis four-square gear fatigue test apparatus. Methods for computing bearing-support force spectra and temporal histories of the total force transmitted by a gear mesh, the force transmitted by a single pair of teeth, and the maximum root stress in a single tooth are developed. Dynamic effects arising from other gear meshes in the system are included. A profile modification design method to minimize the vibration excitation arising from a pair of meshing gears is reviewed and extended. Families of tooth loading functions required for such designs are developed and examined for potential excitation of individual tooth vibrations. The profile modification design method is applied to a pair of test gears.

  15. Two-photon excitation of porphyrin-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Secret, Emilie; Maynadier, Marie; Gallud, Audrey; Chaix, Arnaud; Bouffard, Elise; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Marcotte, Nathalie; Mongin, Olivier; El Cheikh, Khaled; Hugues, Vincent; Auffan, Mélanie; Frochot, Céline; Morère, Alain; Maillard, Philippe; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Sailor, Michael J; Garcia, Marcel; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Cunin, Frédérique

    2014-12-01

    Porous silicon nanoparticles (pSiNPs) act as a sensitizer for the 2-photon excitation of a pendant porphyrin using NIR laser light, for imaging and photodynamic therapy. Mannose-functionalized pSiNPs can be vectorized to MCF-7 human breast cancer cells through a mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism to provide a 3-fold enhancement of the 2-photon PDT effect.

  16. Comparison of polar motion excitation functions computed from different sets of gravimetric coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, J.; Winska, M.; Birylo, M.

    2015-08-01

    Since its launch in February, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has been source of data of temporal changes in Earth's gravity field. These gravity fields can be used to determine the changing mass field of the Earth caused by redistribution of the geophysical fluids, and from that excitations of polar motion. The so-called Level 2 gravity field product are available, in the form of changes in the coefficients: C_{nm}, S_{nm}. Since 2002 until the present time there are still attempts to better process these data. In this study we estimate gravimetric excitation of polar motion using a recent series of C_{21}, S_{21} coefficients. In our calculations we use several series developed by different centers. Firstly, we compare these gravimetric functions with each other. Then we examine the compatibility of these functions with hydrological signal in observed geodetic excitation function. We focus on seasonal and subseasonal time scales. The main purpose is to explore which from these several solutions are closed.

  17. Representations of affine superalgebras and mock theta functions. III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kac, V. G.; Wakimoto, M.

    2016-08-01

    We study modular invariance of normalized supercharacters of tame integrable modules over an affine Lie superalgebra, associated to an arbitrary basic Lie superalgebra g. For this we develop a several step modification process of multivariable mock theta functions, where at each step a Zwegers' type 'modifier' is used. We show that the span of the resulting modified normalized supercharacters is \\operatorname{SL}_2( Z)-invariant, with the transformation matrix equal, in the case the Killing form on g is non-degenerate, to that for the basic defect 0 subalgebra g^! of g, orthogonal to a maximal isotropic set of roots of g.

  18. Influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function in low-pressure microwave argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Cotrino, J.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2005-07-01

    In this work the influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function has been determined for an argon microwave discharge at low pressure. A collisional-radiative model of argon has been developed taking into account the most recent experimental and theoretical values of argon-electron-impact excitation cross sections. The model has been solved along with the electron Boltzmann equation in order to study the influence of the inelastic collisions from the argon excited states on the electron-energy distribution function. Results show that under certain conditions the excited states can play an important role in determining the shape of the distribution function and the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, deplecting the high-energy tail due to inelastic processes from the excited states, especially from the 4s excited configuration. It has been found that from the populations of the excited states an excitation temperature can be defined. This excitation temperature, which can be experimentally determined by optical emission spectroscopy, is lower than the electron kinetic temperature obtained from the electron-energy distribution function.

  19. Theoretical study of H2/+/ spectroscopic properties. II, III. [2p and 3d excited electronic states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckel, C. L.; Shafi, M.; Peek, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the theoretical spectroscopic properties of the 2p pi/sub u/ and 3d sigma/sub g/ excited states of the H2/+/ hydrogen molecular ion. Numerical integration of the Schrodinger equation is used to determine vibration-rotation eigenvalues. Dunham power series expansions are used to determine the equilibrium separation, potential coefficients, and spectroscopic constants. The eigenvalues are used to determine delta-G, Bv, Dv, and Hv.

  20. A highly-efficient blue-light excitable red phosphor: intramolecular π-stacking interactions in one dinuclear europium(iii) complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengliang; Yang, Hui; He, Pei; He, Yonghui; Zhao, Jishou; Tang, Huaijun

    2016-02-21

    A series of ternary dinuclear europium(iii) complexes [Eu2(2,7-BTFDBC)3-n(DBM)2n(Phen)2] (n = 0, 1, or 2) were synthesized by using 2,7-bis(4'4'4'-trifluoro-1,3-dioxobutyl)-(9-ethyl-9H-carbazole) (2,7-BTFDBC), dibenzoylmethane (DBM), 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) and europium(iii) ions. All these complexes display a broad excitation band in the blue region and high intensity emission with high colour purity. The intensity of emission significantly increases with the increase of DBM in [Eu2(2,7-BTFDBC)3-n(DBM)2n(Phen)2] (n = 0, 1, or 2). The theoretical predictions of the molecular geometry and electronic absorption spectrum of [Eu2(2,7-BTFDBC)(DBM)4(Phen)2] confirm that the pendant phenyl domains engage in multiple T-shaped and parallel-displaced π-stacking interactions with the coordination sphere of two europium(iii) centers. Using [Eu2(2,7-BTFDBC)(DBM)4(Phen)2] as a red phosphor, a single red LED has been obtained with a ∼460 nm-emitting GaN chip. PMID:26673545

  1. Obstruction of photoinduced electron transfer from excited porphyrin to graphene oxide: a fluorescence turn-on sensing platform for iron (III) ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong De; Zhao, Heng Xin; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2012-01-01

    A comparative research of the assembly of different porphyrin molecules on graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was carried out, respectively. Despite the cationic porphyrin molecules can be assembled onto the surfaces of graphene sheets, including GO and RGO, to form complexes through electrostatic and π-π stacking interactions, the more obvious fluorescence quenching and the larger red-shift of the Soret band of porphyrin molecule in RGO-bound states were observed than those in GO-bound states, due to the difference of molecular flattening in degree. Further, more interesting finding was that the complexes formed between cationic porphyrin and GO, rather than RGO sheets, can facilitate the incorporation of iron (III) ions into the porphyrin moieties, due to the presence of the oxygen-contained groups at the basal plane of GO sheets served as auxiliary coordination units, which can high-efficiently obstruct the electron transfer from excited porphyrin to GO sheets and result in the occurrence of fluorescence restoration. Thus, a fluorescence sensing platform has been developed for iron (III) ions detection in this contribution by using the porphyrin/GO nanohybrids as an optical probe, and our present one exhibited rapid and sensitive responses and high selectivity toward iron (III) ions.

  2. The unique regulation and functions of type III interferons in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Odendall, Charlotte; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2015-06-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) were long considered to be the sole IFN species produced by virus-infected cells until the discovery of type III IFNs (IFNλs), decades later. Like type I IFNs, type III IFNs are induced by and protect against viral infections, leading to the initial conclusion that the two IFN species are identical in regulation and biological functions. However, the two systems differ in the tissue expression of their receptor, resulting in different roles in vivo. The unique nature of IFNλs has been further demonstrated by recent studies revealing differences in the regulation of type I and III IFN expression, and how these proteins elicit specific cellular responses. This review focuses on the distinctive features of type III IFNs in antiviral innate immunity.

  3. Alkane functionalization at ([mu]-Oxo)diiron(III) centers

    SciTech Connect

    Leising, R.A.; Kim, J.; Perez, M.A.; Que, L. Jr. )

    1993-10-20

    The reactivity of ([mu]-oxo)diferric complexes with [sup t]BuOOH (TBHP) for the functionalization of alkanes in CH[sub 3]CN has been investigated as part of our efforts to model dinuclear sites in nonheme iron enzymes. [Fe[sub 2](TPA)[sub 2]O(OAc)](CIO[sub 4])[sub 3] (1) (TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, OAc = acetate) is an efficient catalyst for cyclohexane oxidation, affording cyclohexanol (A, 9 equiv), cyclohexanone (K, 11 equiv), and (tert-butylperoxy)cyclohexane (P, 16 equiv) in 0.25 h at ambient temperature and pressure under an argon atmosphere. The catalyst is remarkably robust, as indicated by the [sup 1]H NMR and UV-vis spectra of the reaction mixture during the catalytic reaction and by its ability to maintain its turnover efficiency with subsequent additions of oxidant. The catalytic mechanism for TBHP utilization was explored by observing the effects of varying the tripodal ligands on the ([mu]-oxo)([mu]-carboxylato)diferric catalysts and varying the bridge on Fe[sub 2]O(TPA)[sub 2] catalysts. The (A + K)/P ratio increased as the ligands became more electron donating. Solvent also played an important role in determining the partitioning of products between A + K and P, with benzonitrile favoring hydroxylated products at the expense of P and pyridine having the opposite effect. 49 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Complex I Function and Supercomplex Formation Are Preserved in Liver Mitochondria Despite Progressive Complex III Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Mina; Kotarsky, Heike; Hansson, Eva; Fellman, Vineta

    2014-01-01

    Functional oxidative phosphorylation requires appropriately assembled mitochondrial respiratory complexes and their supercomplexes formed mainly of complexes I, III and IV. BCS1L is the chaperone needed to incorporate the catalytic subunit, Rieske iron-sulfur protein, into complex III at the final stage of its assembly. In cell culture studies, this subunit has been considered necessary for supercomplex formation and for maintaining the stability of complex I. Our aim was to assess the importance of fully assembled complex III for supercomplex formation in intact liver tissue. We used our transgenic mouse model with a homozygous c.232A>G mutation in Bcs1l leading to decreased expression of BCS1L and progressive decrease of Rieske iron-sulfur protein in complex III, resulting in hepatopathy. We studied supercomplex formation at different ages using blue native gel electrophoresis and complex activity using high-resolution respirometry. In isolated liver mitochondria of young and healthy homozygous mutant mice, we found similar supercomplexes as in wild type. In homozygotes aged 27–29 days with liver disorder, complex III was predominantly a pre-complex lacking Rieske iron-sulfur protein. However, the main supercomplex was clearly detected and contained complex III mainly in the pre-complex form. Oxygen consumption of complex IV was similar and that of complex I was twofold compared with controls. These complexes in free form were more abundant in homozygotes than in controls, and the mRNA of complex I subunits were upregulated. In conclusion, when complex III assembly is deficient, the pre-complex without Rieske iron-sulfur protein can participate with available fully assembled complex III in supercomplex formation, complex I function is preserved, and respiratory chain stability is maintained. PMID:24466228

  5. Measurement of the fusion excitation function for 19O + 12C at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Steinbach, T. K.; Vadas, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; Desouza, R. T.; Baby, L. T.; Tripathi, V.; Kuvin, S. A.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei in the outer crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as responsible for triggering X-ray super-bursts. The underlying hypothesis in this proposition is that the fusion of neutron-rich nuclei is enhanced as compared to stable nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis, an experiment has been performed to measure the fusion excitation function for 18O and 19O nuclei incident on a 12C target. A beam of 19O was produced by the 18O(d,p) reaction at Florida State University and separated using the RESOLUT mass spectrometer. The resulting 19O beam bombarded a 100 μg/cm2 12C target at an intensity of 2-4 × 103 p/s. Evaporation residues resulting from the de-excitation of the fusion product were distinguished by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. Using silicon detectors, micro-channel plate detectors, and an ionization chamber, evaporation residues were detected in the angular range θlab <= 23° with high efficiency. Initial experimental results including measurement of the fusion cross-section to approximately the 100 mb level will be presented. The measured excitation function will be compared to theoretical predictions. Supported by the US DOE under Grand No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  6. A closer look at the apparent correlation of structural and functional connectivity in excitable neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messé, Arnaud; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; König, Peter; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the structural connectivity (SC) and functional connectivity (FC) of neural systems is a central focus in brain network science. It is an open question, however, how strongly the SC-FC relationship depends on specific topological features of brain networks or the models used for describing excitable dynamics. Using a basic model of discrete excitable units that follow a susceptible - excited - refractory dynamic cycle (SER model), we here analyze how functional connectivity is shaped by the topological features of a neural network, in particular its modularity. We compared the results obtained by the SER model with corresponding simulations by another well established dynamic mechanism, the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, in order to explore general features of the SC-FC relationship. We showed that apparent discrepancies between the results produced by the two models can be resolved by adjusting the time window of integration of co-activations from which the FC is derived, providing a clearer distinction between co-activations and sequential activations. Thus, network modularity appears as an important factor shaping the FC-SC relationship across different dynamic models.

  7. Measurement of fusion excitation function for 7Li+64Ni near the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin Shaikh, Md.; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Shrivastava, A.; Saha, S.; Pillay, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    Total fusion (TF) excitation function has been measured for the system 7Li + 64Ni at the energies near the Coulomb barrier of the system. The evaporation residue (ER) cross sections have been estimated through the online detection of characteristic γ-rays of the ERs. The summed ER cross sections yielding the experimental TF cross section have been compared with the theoretical one dimensional barrier penetration model (1DBPM) prediction. The measured and the model cross sections are very close to each other at above barrier energies. However, an enhancement of the experimental TF cross section with respect to the 1DBPM prediction is observed at below barrier energies. Coupled channels (CC) calculation with inelastic excitations alone could not explain the enhancement. The origin of the enhancement is identified as due to the enhanced population of the αxn channels.

  8. A developmental switch in the excitability and function of the starburst network in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Jian; Lee, Seunghoon; Zhou, Z Jimmy

    2004-12-01

    Dual patch-clamp recording and Ca2+ uncaging revealed Ca2+-dependent corelease of ACh and GABA from, and the presence of reciprocal nicotinic and GABAergic synapses between, starburst cells in the perinatal rabbit retina. With maturation, the nicotinic synapses between starburst cells dramatically diminished, whereas the GABAergic synapses remained and changed from excitatory to inhibitory, indicating a coordinated conversion of the starburst network excitability from an early hyperexcitatory to a mature nonepileptic state. We show that this transition allows the starburst cells to use their neurotransmitters for two completely different functions. During early development, the starburst network mediates recurrent excitation and spontaneous retinal waves, which are important for visual system development. After vision begins, starburst cells release GABA in a prolonged and Ca2+-dependent manner and inhibit each other laterally via direct GABAergic synapses, which may be important for visual integration, such as the detection of motion direction.

  9. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shehryar Odelius, Michael; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef

    2015-01-21

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H{sub 2}O){sup −}, Gd(III)DTPA(H{sub 2}O){sup 2−}, and Gd(III)(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}{sup 3+} in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  10. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Kullie, Ossama E-mail: ossama.kullie@unistra.fr

    2014-01-14

    In previous works on Zn{sub 2} and Cd{sub 2} dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s{sup 2} + 6s6p), (6s{sup 2} + 6s7s), and (6s{sup 2} + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg{sub 2}. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg{sub 2} including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd{sub 2}, and Zn{sub 2}, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg{sub 2}.

  11. Preparation and functionalization of a visible-light-excited europium complex-modified luminescent protein for cell imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lu; Dai, Zhichao; Ye, Zhiqiang; Song, Bo; Yuan, Jingli

    2014-03-01

    Lanthanide complex-based luminescent bioprobes have shown great utility in a variety of time-resolved luminescence bioassays, but these bioprobes often require UV excitation and suffer from problems related to bioaffinity and biocompatibility for in vivo applications. In this work, a new visible-light-excited europium(III) complex with the maximum excitation wavelength over 400 nm, BHHBB-Eu(3+)-BPT {BHHBB: 1,2-bis[4'-(1'',1'',1'',2'',2'',3'',3''-heptafluoro-4'',6''-hexanedion-6''-yl)-benzyl]-benzene; BPT: 2-(N,N-diethylanilin-4-yl)-4,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine}, has been synthesized for the preparation of an artificial luminescent protein that can be used as a visible-light-excited luminescent bioprobe for cell imaging. By encapsulating BHHBB-Eu(3+)-BPT into apoferritin with a simple dissociation-reassembly method, the luminescent protein, Eu@AFt, with a maximum excitation peak at 420 nm and a long luminescence lifetime of 365 μs was fabricated and successfully used for visible-light-excited time-resolved luminescence cell imaging. Moreover, by conjugating a mitochondria-targeting molecule, (5-N-succinimidoxy-5-oxopentyl)-triphenylphosphonium bromide (SPTPP), onto the surface of Eu@AFt, a mitochondria-specifically-tracking luminescent probe, Eu@AFt-SPTPP, was further prepared and used for visible-light-excited confocal luminescence microscopy imaging to visualize the mitochondria of living cells.

  12. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  13. Beyond Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Using Only Single Excitations: Methods for Computational Studies of Excited States in Complex Systems.

    PubMed

    Herbert, John M; Zhang, Xing; Morrison, Adrian F; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-17

    Single-excitation methods, namely, configuration interaction singles and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), along with semiempirical versions thereof, represent the most computationally affordable electronic structure methods for describing electronically excited states, scaling as [Formula: see text] absent further approximations. This relatively low cost, combined with a treatment of electron correlation, has made TDDFT the most widely used excited-state quantum chemistry method over the past 20+ years. Nevertheless, certain inherent problems (beyond just the accuracy of this or that exchange-correlation functional) limit the utility of traditional TDDFT. For one, it affords potential energy surfaces whose topology is incorrect in the vicinity of any conical intersection (CI) that involves the ground state. Since CIs are the conduits for transitions between electronic states, the TDDFT description of photochemistry (internal conversion and intersystem crossing) is therefore suspect. Second, the [Formula: see text] cost can become prohibitive in large systems, especially those that involve multiple electronically coupled chromophores, for example, the antennae structures of light-harvesting complexes or the conjugated polymers used in organic photovoltaics. In such cases, the smallest realistic mimics might already be quite large from the standpoint of ab initio quantum chemistry. This Account describes several new computational methods that address these problems. Topology around a CI can be rigorously corrected using a "spin-flip" version of TDDFT, which involves an α → β spin-flipping transition in addition to occupied → virtual excitation of one electron. Within this formalism, singlet states are generated via excitation from a high-spin triplet reference state, doublets from a quartet, etc. This provides a more balanced treatment of electron correlation between ground and excited states. Spin contamination is problematic away from the

  14. Evidence for a Nonendosomal Function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ESCRT-III-Like Protein Chm7.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Iva; Brune, Thomas; Preiss, Richard; Kölling, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) proteins are involved in a number of cellular processes, such as endosomal protein sorting, HIV budding, cytokinesis, plasma membrane repair, and resealing of the nuclear envelope during mitosis. Here we explored the function of a noncanonical member of the ESCRT-III protein family, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of human CHMP7. Very little is known about this protein. In silico analysis predicted that Chm7 (yeast ORF YJL049w) is a fusion of an ESCRT-II and ESCRT-III-like domain, which would suggest a role in endosomal protein sorting. However, our data argue against a role of Chm7 in endosomal protein sorting. The turnover of the endocytic cargo protein Ste6 and the vacuolar protein sorting of carboxypeptidase S (CPS) were not affected by CHM7 deletion, and Chm7 also responded very differently to a loss in Vps4 function compared to a canonical ESCRT-III protein. Our data indicate that the Chm7 function could be connected to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In line with a function at the ER, we observed a strong negative genetic interaction between the deletion of a gene function (APQ12) implicated in nuclear pore complex assembly and messenger RNA (mRNA) export and the CHM7 deletion. The patterns of genetic interactions between the APQ12 deletion and deletions of ESCRT-III genes, two-hybrid interactions, and the specific localization of mCherry fusion proteins are consistent with the notion that Chm7 performs a novel function at the ER as part of an alternative ESCRT-III complex.

  15. Enantioselective excited-state quenching of racemic Tb (III) and Eu (III) Tris (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate) by vitamin B 12 derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Dekkers, Harry P. J. M.

    1999-08-01

    Enantioselectivity in the dynamic quenching of the luminescence of the Δ and Λ enantiomers of racemic Tb(III)(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate=DPA) 33- and Eu(DPA) 33- by a series of corrinoids is demonstrated by time resolved luminescence and circular-polarization-of-luminescence (CPL) spectroscopy. Studied are cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12), aquacobalamin (B 12a) and its conjugated base hydroxocobalamin (HOCbl), dicyanocobinamide ((CN) 2Cbi) and the heptamethyl ester of dicyanocobyrinic acid ((CN) 2Cby(OMe) 7). For this set of quenchers (Q), the diastereomeric quenching rate constants ( kqΔ and kqΛ) are reported together with the degree of enantioselectivity Eq=( kqΔ- kqΛ)/( kqΔ+ kqΛ). In the systems with Tb, values of the average rate constant kqavg(=( kqΔ+ kqΛ)/2) are 1.0, 2.9 and 0.53 10 8 M -1 s -1 for CNCbl, (CN) 2Cbi, (CN) 2Cby(OMe) 7 with Eq=-0.24, -0.20, +0.01 (standard error of Eq is 0.01). The quenching by B 12a is strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength ( I); when I=12 mM we find kqavg=5.3, Eq=-0.23 at pH 6.7 and kqavg=1.3, Eq=-0.27 at pH 8.9. Corresponding rates for Eu are 0.41, 27, 3.4 10 7 M -1 s -1 and for B 12a, 7.3 and 1.2 10 7 M -1 s -1, corresponding values for Eq -0.27, -0.29, +0.02, -0.21 and -0.29. The quenching reaction is modeled as a pre-equilibrium involving the formation of an encounter complex (association constant K) followed by the actual electronic energy transfer step (rate ket). By relating the quenching data with molecular structure it is argued that the binding in the encounter complex involves two hydrogen bonds between the uncoordinated carboxylate oxygen atom of two DPA ligands of Ln(DPA) 33- and two amide groups of the corrinoid, presumably involving the a and g, the a and b, or the b and g side chains. For some corrinoid/Ln(DPA) 33- complexes the association constants and enantioselectivities in the ground state are known (Spectrochimica Acta 55A (1999) 1837-1855), which allows for an estimate of the average rate of

  16. Sex Differences in WISC-III Profiles of Children with High-Functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyama, Tomonori; Kamio, Yoko; Inada, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Using the Japanese version of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III), 26 girls with high-functioning (IQ greater than or equal to 70) pervasive developmental disorders (HFPDD) (mean age, 8.2 years) were compared with 116 boys with HFPDD (mean age, 9.0 years). Compared with the boys, the girls scored significantly…

  17. Electronic excitation spectra from time-dependent density functional response theory using plane-wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Sprik, Michiel

    2000-11-01

    The time-dependent density functional response theory method for the computation of electronic excitation spectra has been implemented in a plane-wave basis set/pseudo-potential formalism. We compare our test results for N2 and H2CO to literature atomic basis set calculations and find good agreement. We also discuss some of the technical complications specific to the use of plane-wave basis sets. As an application, the thermally broadened photoabsorption spectrum of formamide at room temperature is computed by averaging over a number of vibrational configurations sampled from an ab initio molecular dynamics run and compared to experiment.

  18. Finding Limit Cycles in self-excited oscillators with infinite-series damping functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debapriya; Banerjee, Dhruba; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a simple method for finding the location of limit cycles of self excited oscillators whose damping functions can be represented by some infinite convergent series. We have used standard results of first-order perturbation theory to arrive at amplitude equations. The approach has been kept pedagogic by first working out the cases of finite polynomials using elementary algebra. Then the method has been extended to various infinite polynomials, where the fixed points of the corresponding amplitude equations cannot be found out. Hopf bifurcations for systems with nonlinear powers in velocities have also been discussed.

  19. Green's functions for analysis of dynamic response of wheel/rail to vertical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Traian

    2007-09-01

    An analytical model to simulate wheel/rail interaction using the Green's functions method is proposed in this paper. The model consists of a moving wheel on a discretely supported rail. Particularly for this model of rail, the bending and the longitudinal displacement are coupled due to the rail pad and a complex model of the rail pad is adopted. An efficient method for solving a time-domain analysis for wheel/rail interaction is presented. The method is based on the properties of the rail's Green functions and starting to these functions, a track's Green matrix is assembled for the numerical simulations of wheel/rail response due to three kinds of vertical excitations: the steady-state interaction, the rail corrugation and the wheel flat. The study points to influence of the worn rail—rigid contact—on variation in the wheel/rail contact force. The concept of pinned-pinned inhibitive rail pad is also presented.

  20. Charge asymmetry in rovibrationally excited HD{sup +} determined using explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kirnosov, Nikita; Sharkey, Keeper L.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-11-28

    Very accurate non-Born-Oppenheimer quantum-mechanical calculations are performed to determine the average values of the interparticle distances and the proton-deuteron density function for the rovibrationally excited HD{sup +} ion. The states corresponding to excitations to all bound vibrational states (v = 0, …, 22) and simultaneously excited to the first excited rotational state (N = 1) are considered. To describe each state up to 8000 explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions are used. The nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians are variationally optimized using a procedure that employs the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The results show an increasing asymmetry in the electron distribution with the vibrational excitation as the electron density shifts towards deuteron and away from the proton.

  1. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-05-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance.

  2. Development and Validation of the Korean Rome III Questionnaire for Diagnosis of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyung Ho; Min, Byung-Hoon; Youn, Young Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Keum, Bo Ra; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims A self-report questionnaire is frequently used to measure symptoms reliably and to distinguish patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) from those with other conditions. We produced and validated a cross-cultural adaptation of the Rome III questionnaire for diagnosis of FGIDs in Korea. Methods The Korean version of the Rome III (Rome III-K) questionnaire was developed through structural translational processes. Subsequently, reliability was measured by a test-retest procedure. Convergent validity was evaluated by comparing self-reported questionnaire data with the subsequent completion of the questionnaire by the physician based on an interview and with the clinical diagnosis. Concurrent validation using the validated Korean version of the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) was adopted to demonstrate discriminant validity. Results A total of 306 subjects were studied. Test-retest reliability was good, with a median Cronbach's α value of 0.83 (range, 0.71-0.97). The degree of agreement between patient-administered and physician-administered questionnaires to diagnose FGIDs was excellent; the κ index was 0.949 for irritable bowel syndrome, 0.883 for functional dyspepsia and 0.927 for functional heartburn. The physician's clinical diagnosis of functional dyspepsia showed the most marked discrepancy with that based on the self-administered questionnaire. Almost all SF-36 domains were impaired in participants diagnosed with one of these FGIDs according to the Rome III-K. Conclusions We developed the Rome III-K questionnaire though structural translational processes, and it revealed good test-retest reliability and satisfactory construct validity. These results suggest that this instrument will be useful for clinical and research assessments in the Korean population. PMID:24199012

  3. Can we improve the calculation of some excitation functions for deuteron-induced reactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Chau, Huu-Tai

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose to use the CDCC* approach to calculate (d,p) excitation functions. Starting from the CDCC* results, we derive some (d,p) differential and integrated cross sections, then using a simple semi-phenomenological model, we calculate the excitation functions for this process. We compare our calculations with the experimental cross sections for the 27Al (d, p)28Al, 58Fe(d, p)59Fe, 59Co(d, p)60Co, 75As(d, p)76As, 81Br(d, p)82Br, 84Kr(d, p)85Kr, 86Kr(d, p)87Kr, 108Pd (d, p)109Pd, 140Ce(d, p)141Ce, 142Ce(d, p)143Ce, 141Pr(d, p)142Pr, 165Ho(d, p)166Ho, and 180Hf (d, p)181Hf reactions. We plan to include these cross sections into evaluations of d-induced reactions and this could be a first step for improving of the quality of the next decade cross sections libraries.

  4. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-24

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  5. Synthesis and functionalization of monodisperse near-ultraviolet and visible excitable multifunctional Eu3+, Bi3+:REVO4 nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail V.; Ashraf, Sumaira; Hartmann, Raimo; Núñez, Nuria O.; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2016-06-01

    Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be tuned by adjusting the amount of PAA. The Eu- Bi-doped REVO4 based nanophosphors show the typical red luminescence of Eu(iii), which can be excited through an energy transfer process from the vanadate anions, resulting in a much higher luminescence intensity in comparison to the direct excitation of the europium cations. The incorporation of Bi into the REVO4 structure shifts the original absorption band of the vanadate anions towards longer wavelengths, giving rise to nanophosphors with an excitation maximum at 342 nm, which can also be excited in the visible range. The suitability of such nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications, as well as their colloidal stability in different buffer media of biological interest, their cytotoxicity, their degradability at low pH, and their uptake by HeLa cells have been evaluated. Their suitability for bioimaging and biosensing applications is also demonstrated.Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be

  6. Visualization of molecular fluorescence point spread functions via remote excitation switching fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Liang; Lu, Gang; Kenens, Bart; Rocha, Susana; Fron, Eduard; Yuan, Haifeng; Chen, Chang; Van Dorpe, Pol; Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; Mizuno, Hideaki; Hofkens, Johan; Hutchison, James A.; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The enhancement of molecular absorption, emission and scattering processes by coupling to surface plasmon polaritons on metallic nanoparticles is a key issue in plasmonics for applications in (bio)chemical sensing, light harvesting and photocatalysis. Nevertheless, the point spread functions for single-molecule emission near metallic nanoparticles remain difficult to characterize due to fluorophore photodegradation, background emission and scattering from the plasmonic structure. Here we overcome this problem by exciting fluorophores remotely using plasmons propagating along metallic nanowires. The experiments reveal a complex array of single-molecule fluorescence point spread functions that depend not only on nanowire dimensions but also on the position and orientation of the molecular transition dipole. This work has consequences for both single-molecule regime-sensing and super-resolution imaging involving metallic nanoparticles and opens the possibilities for fast size sorting of metallic nanoparticles, and for predicting molecular orientation and binding position on metallic nanoparticles via far-field optical imaging. PMID:25687887

  7. Visualization of molecular fluorescence point spread functions via remote excitation switching fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Liang; Lu, Gang; Kenens, Bart; Rocha, Susana; Fron, Eduard; Yuan, Haifeng; Chen, Chang; Van Dorpe, Pol; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Mizuno, Hideaki; Hofkens, Johan; Hutchison, James A; Uji-I, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The enhancement of molecular absorption, emission and scattering processes by coupling to surface plasmon polaritons on metallic nanoparticles is a key issue in plasmonics for applications in (bio)chemical sensing, light harvesting and photocatalysis. Nevertheless, the point spread functions for single-molecule emission near metallic nanoparticles remain difficult to characterize due to fluorophore photodegradation, background emission and scattering from the plasmonic structure. Here we overcome this problem by exciting fluorophores remotely using plasmons propagating along metallic nanowires. The experiments reveal a complex array of single-molecule fluorescence point spread functions that depend not only on nanowire dimensions but also on the position and orientation of the molecular transition dipole. This work has consequences for both single-molecule regime-sensing and super-resolution imaging involving metallic nanoparticles and opens the possibilities for fast size sorting of metallic nanoparticles, and for predicting molecular orientation and binding position on metallic nanoparticles via far-field optical imaging. PMID:25687887

  8. SLEEPLESS is a bi-functional regulator of excitability and cholinergic synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meilin; Robinson, James E.; Joiner, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Although sleep is conserved throughout evolution, the molecular basis of its control is still largely a mystery. We previously showed that the quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene encodes a membrane-tethered protein that is required for normal sleep in Drosophila. SLEEPLESS (SSS) protein functions, at least in part, by upregulating the levels and open probability of Shaker (Sh) potassium channels to suppress neuronal excitability and enable sleep. Consistent with this proposed mechanism, loss-of-function mutations in Sh phenocopy qvr/sss null mutants. However, sleep is more genetically modifiable in Sh than in qvr/sss mutants, suggesting that sss may regulate additional molecules to influence sleep. Results Here we show that SSS also antagonizes nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to reduce synaptic transmission and promote sleep. Mimicking this antagonism with the nAChR inhibitor mecamylamine or by RNAi knockdown of specific nAChR subunits is sufficient to restore sleep to qvr/sss mutants. Regulation of nAChR activity by SSS occurs post-transcriptionally since the levels of nAChR mRNAs are unchanged in qvr/sss mutants. Regulation of nAChR activity by SSS may in fact be direct, since SSS forms a stable complex with and antagonizes fly nAChR function in transfected cells. Intriguingly, lynx1, a mammalian homolog of SSS, can partially restore normal sleep to qvr/sss mutants, and lynx1 can form stable complexes with Shaker-type channels and nAChRs. Conclusions Together, our data point to an evolutionarily conserved, bi-functional role for SSS and its homologs in controlling excitability and synaptic transmission in fundamental processes of the nervous system such as sleep. PMID:24613312

  9. Chemical functionalization of diatom silica microparticles for adsorption of gold (III) ions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Addai-Mensah, Jonas; Losic, Dusan

    2011-12-01

    Diatom silica microparticles from natural diatomaceous earth (DE) silica have been functionalized with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and their application for adsorption of gold (III) ions from aqueous solutions is demonstrated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of the MPTMS modified diatom microparticles revealed that the silane layer with functional group (-SH) was successfully introduced to the diatom surface. The adsorption study of Au(III) ions using MPTMS-DE indicated that the process depends on initial gold (III) concentration and pH showing maximum adsorption capacity at pH = 3. The Au(III) adsorption kinetics results showed that the adsorption was very fast and followed a pseudo-second-order reaction model. The Langmuir model was used to provide a sound mechanistic basis for the theoretical of the adsorption equilibrium data. Gold recovery from MPTMS-DE structures was also investigated by using acidified thiourea solution and found to be high (> 95%). These results show that chemically modified DE microparticles can be used as a new, cost effective and environmentally benign adsorbent suitable for adsorption of gold metal ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:22408909

  10. Benchmarking DFT and TD-DFT Functionals for the Ground and Excited States of Hydrogen-Rich Peptide Radicals.

    PubMed

    Riffet, Vanessa; Jacquemin, Denis; Cauët, Emilie; Frison, Gilles

    2014-08-12

    We assess the pros and cons of a large panel of DFT exchange-correlation functionals for the prediction of the electronic structure of hydrogen-rich peptide radicals formed after electron attachment on a protonated peptide. Indeed, despite its importance in the understanding of the chemical changes associated with the reduction step, the question of the attachment site of an electron and, more generally, of the reduced species formed in the gas phase through electron-induced dissociation (ExD) processes in mass spectrometry is still a matter of debate. For hydrogen-rich peptide radicals in which several positive groups and low-lying π* orbitals can capture the incoming electron in ExD, inclusion of full Hartree-Fock exchange at long-range interelectronic distance is a prerequisite for an accurate description of the electronic states, thereby excluding several popular exchange-correlation functionals, e.g., B3LYP, M06-2X, or CAM-B3LYP. However, we show that this condition is not sufficient by comparing the results obtained with asymptotically correct range-separated hybrids (M11, LC-BLYP, LC-BPW91, ωB97, ωB97X, and ωB97X-D) and with reference CASSCF-MRCI and EOM-CCSD calculations. The attenuation parameter ω significantly tunes the spin density distribution and the excited states vertical energies. The investigated model structures, ranging from methylammonium to hexapeptide, allow us to obtain a description of the nature and energy of the electronic states, depending on (i) the presence of hydrogen bond(s) around the cationic site(s), (ii) the presence of π* molecular orbitals (MOs), and (iii) the selected DFT approach. It turns out that, in the present framework, LC-BLYP and ωB97 yields the most accurate results.

  11. Excitation spectra and correlation functions of quantum Su-Schrieffer-Heeger models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Manuel; Assaad, Fakher F.; Hohenadler, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We study one-dimensional Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) models with quantum phonons using a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. Within statistical errors, we obtain identical results for the SSH model with acoustic phonons, and a related model with a coupling to an optical bond phonon mode. Based on this agreement, we first study the Peierls metal-insulator transition of the spinless SSH model, and relate it to the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition of a spinless Luttinger liquid. In the Peierls phase, the spectral functions reveal the single-particle and charge gap, and a central peak related to long-range order. For the spinful SSH model, which has a dimerized ground state for any nonzero coupling, we reveal a symmetry-related degeneracy of spin and charge excitations, and the expected spin and charge gaps as well as a central peak. Finally, we study the SSH-U V model with electron-phonon and electron-electron interaction. We observe a Mott phase with critical spin and bond correlations at weak electron-phonon coupling, and a Peierls phase with gapped spin excitations at strong coupling. We relate our findings to the extended Hubbard model, and discuss the physical origin of the agreement between optical and acoustic phonons.

  12. Complexation behavior of Eu(III), Tb(III), Tm(III), and Am(III) with three 1,10-phenanthroline-type ligands: insights from density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqiu; Fang, Yu; Liu, Jun; Hu, Shiyuan; Hu, Sheng; Yang, Liang; Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Huabei; Luo, Shunzhong

    2015-07-01

    Extraction complexes of Eu(III), Tb(III), Tm(III), and Am(III) with three 1,10-phenanthroline-type ligands have been studied, primarily using density functional theory (DFT). The same accuracies and optimized structural geometries were obtained whether optimization of the [ML2(NO3)](2+) complexes was performed at the B3LYP/6-31G(d)/RECP or the MP2/6-31G(d)/RECP level of theory. Calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311G(d, p)/RECP level of theory indicated that solvation does not favor the formation of these complexes. Moreover, the ΔGg and ΔGsolv values for the reactions leading to the formation of [LnL2(NO3)](2+) complexes were seen to decrease with increasing atomic number of the lanthanide (from Eu to Tb to Tm). In addition, when a strongly hydrophobic benzo[e][1,2,4]triazine group was created in each ligand, ligand selectivity for actinides/lanthanides in acidic media improved. Even greater ligand selectivity for actinides/lanthanides in acidic media was obtained when a 5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine group was created in each ligand instead of a benzo[e][1,2,4]triazine group. Vibrational analysis and NMR spectroscopic analysis were also performed on all of the studied ligands and the metal complexes that included them. Further in-depth investigations should be undertaken in this field. PMID:26141789

  13. Spin contamination-free N-electron wave functions in the excitation-based configuration interaction treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E.; Oña, Ofelia B.; Capuzzi, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the spin contamination in N-electron wave functions provided by the excitation-based configuration interaction methods. We propose a procedure to ensure a suitable selection of excited N-electron Slater determinants with respect to a given reference determinant, required in these schemes. The procedure guarantees the construction of N-electron wave functions which are eigenfunctions of the spin-squared operator S ˆ 2 , avoiding any spin contamination. Our treatment is based on the evaluation of the excitation level of the determinants by means of the expectation value of an excitation operator formulated in terms of spin-free replacement operators. We report numerical determinations of energies and < S ˆ 2 > expectation values, arising from our proposal as well as from traditional configuration interaction methods, in selected open-shell systems, in order to compare the behavior of these procedures and their computational costs.

  14. Calculation of vibrational and electronic excited state absorption spectra of arsenic-water complexes using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Lambrakos, S. G.; Shabaev, A.; Massa, L.

    2016-05-01

    Calculations are presented of vibrational and electronic excited-state absorption spectra for As-H2O complexes using density function theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). DFT and TD-DFT can provide interpretation of absorption spectra with respect to molecular structure for excitation by electromagnetic waves at frequencies within the IR and UV-visible ranges. The absorption spectrum corresponding to excitation states of As-H2O complexes consisting of relatively small numbers of water molecules should be associated with response features that are intermediate between that of isolated molecules and that of a bulk system. DFT and TD-DFT calculated absorption spectra represent quantitative estimates that can be correlated with additional information obtained from laboratory measurements and other types of theory based calculations. The DFT software GAUSSIAN was used for the calculations of excitation states presented here.

  15. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  16. Efficient evaluation of dielectric response functions and calculations of ground and excited state properties beyond local Density Functional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Deyu; Li, Yan; Rocca, Dario; Viet Nguyen, H.; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2010-03-01

    A recently developed technique to diagonalize iteratively dielectric matrices [1], is used to carry out efficient, ab-initio calculations of dispersion interactions, and excited state properties of nanostructures. In particular, we present results for the binding energies of weakly bonded molecular crystals [2], obtained at the EXX/RPA level of theory, and for absorption spectra of semiconducting clusters, obtained by an iterative solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equations [3]. We show that the ability to obtain the eigenmodes of dielectric matrices from Density Functional perturbation theory, without computing single particle excited states, greatly improves the efficiency of both EXX/RPA and many body perturbation theory [3,4] calculations and opens the way to large scale computations. [1] H. Wilson, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B , 78, 113303, 2008; and H. Wilson, D. Lu, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B, 79, 245106, 2009. [2] D. Lu, Y. Li, D. Rocca and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett, 102, 206411, 2009; and Y. Li, D. Lu, V. Nguyen and G. Galli, J. Phys. Chem. C (submitted) [3] D. Rocca, D. Lu and G. Galli, submitted. [4] D. Lu, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 147601, 2008. Work was funded by DOE/Scidac DE-FC02-06ER25794 and DOE/BES DE-FG02-06ER46262.

  17. The use of coherence functions to determine dynamic excitation sources on launch vehicle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, S.; Halvorson, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of determining the relative contribution of simultaneous acoustic and mechanical inputs to the response of structures under combined dynamic loads was studied. An analytical technique developed by Bendat for calculating ordinary, partial, and multiple coherence functions, using an iterative nonmatrix approach was applied to data obtained from laboratory tests on a complex structural assembly. Testing was performed in an acoustically 'live' room. Up to three random inputs, having similar spectral content and varying degrees of mutual coherence, and a single output were used. Stationary and nonstationary inputs were used. It was concluded that the technique provided an effective method of identifying sources of dynamic excitation and evaluating their relative contributions to the measured output at structural resonances, for stationary random inputs. An attempt to apply the technique to nonstationary inputs did not yield consistent results.

  18. Single-particle spectroscopy of I-III-VI semiconductor nanocrystals: spectral diffusion and suppression of blinking by two-color excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Hirata, Shuzo; Bujak, Lukasz; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Kameyama, Tatsuya; Kishi, Marino; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Vacha, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Ternary I-III-VI semiconductor nanocrystals have been explored as non-toxic alternatives to II-VI semiconductors for optoelectronic and sensing applications, but large photoluminescence spectral width and moderate brightness restrict their practical use. Here, using single-particle photoluminescence spectroscopy on nanocrystals of (AgIn)xZn2(1-x)S2 we show that the photoluminescence band is inhomogeneously broadened and that size distribution is the dominant factor in the broadening. The residual homogeneous linewidth of individual nanocrystals reaches up to 75% of the ensemble spectral width. Single nanocrystals undergo spectral diffusion which also contributes to the inhomogeneous band. Excitation with two lasers with energies above and below the bandgap reveals coexistence of two emitting donor states within one particle. Spectral diffusion in such particles is due to temporal activation and deactivation of one such state. Filling of a trap state with a lower-energy laser enables optical modulation of photoluminescence intermittency (blinking) and leads to an almost two-fold increase in brightness.Ternary I-III-VI semiconductor nanocrystals have been explored as non-toxic alternatives to II-VI semiconductors for optoelectronic and sensing applications, but large photoluminescence spectral width and moderate brightness restrict their practical use. Here, using single-particle photoluminescence spectroscopy on nanocrystals of (AgIn)xZn2(1-x)S2 we show that the photoluminescence band is inhomogeneously broadened and that size distribution is the dominant factor in the broadening. The residual homogeneous linewidth of individual nanocrystals reaches up to 75% of the ensemble spectral width. Single nanocrystals undergo spectral diffusion which also contributes to the inhomogeneous band. Excitation with two lasers with energies above and below the bandgap reveals coexistence of two emitting donor states within one particle. Spectral diffusion in such particles is due

  19. Density functional theory studies of actinide(III) motexafins (An-Motex2+, An = Ac, Cm, Lr). Structure, stability, and comparison with lanthanide(III) motexafins.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Li, Quansong; Moritz, Anna; Xie, Zhizhong; Dolg, Michael; Chen, Xuebo; Fang, Weihai

    2006-04-17

    Newly developed relativistic energy-consistent 5f-in-core actinide pseudopotentials and corresponding (7s6p5d1f)/[5s4p3d1f] basis sets in the segmented contraction scheme, combined with density functional theory methods, have been used to study the molecular structure and chemical properties of selected actinide(III) motexafins (An-Motex2+, An = Ac, Cm, Lr). Structure and stability are discussed, and a comparison to the lanthanide(III) motexafins (Ln-Motex2+, Ln = La, Gd, Lu) is made. The actinide element is found to reside above the mean N5 motexafin plane, and the larger the cation, the greater the observed out-of-plane displacement. It is concluded that the actinium(III), curium(III), and lawrencium(III) cations are tightly bound to the macrocyclic skeleton, yielding stable structures. However, the calculated metal-ligand gas-phase binding energy for An-Motex2+ is about 1-2 eV lower than that of Ln-Motex2+, implying a lower stability of An-Motex2+ compared to Ln-Motex2+. Results including solvent effects imply that Ac-Motex2+ is the most stable complex in aqueous solution and should be the best candidate for experimentalists to get stable actinide(III) motexafin complexes. PMID:16602805

  20. Reactions of pyridyl-functionalized, chelating λ3-phosphinines in the coordination environment of Rh(III) and Ir(III).

    PubMed

    de Krom, Iris; Pidko, Evgeny A; Lutz, Martin; Müller, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Rh(III) and Ir(III) complexes based on the λ(3)-P,N hybrid ligand 2-(2'-pyridyl)-4,6-diphenylphosphinine (1) react selectively at the P=C double bond to chiral coordination compounds of the type [(1H⋅OH)Cp*MCl]Cl (2,3), which can be deprotonated with triethylamine to eliminate HCl. By using different bases, the pKa value of the P-OH group could be estimated. Whereas [(1H⋅O)Cp*IrCl] (4) is formed quantitatively upon treatment with NEt3, the corresponding rhodium compound [(1H⋅O)Cp*RhCl] (5) undergoes tautomerization upon formation of the λ(5)σ(4)-phosphinine rhodium(III) complex [(1⋅OH)Cp*RhCl] (6) as confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Blocking the acidic P-OH functionality in 3 by introducing a P-OCH3 substituent leads directly to the λ(5)σ(4)-phosphinine iridium(III) complex (8) upon elimination of HCl. These new transformations in the coordination environment of Rh(III) and Ir(III) provide an easy and general access to new transition-metal complexes containing λ(5)σ(4)-phosphinine ligands.

  1. The joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure: development and cross-validation of a six-factor model of cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, David S; Price, Larry R

    2003-06-01

    During the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (3rd ed.; WMS-III) the participants in the normative study completed both scales. This "co-norming" methodology set the stage for full integration of the 2 tests and the development of an expanded structure of cognitive functioning. Until now, however, the WAIS-III and WMS-III had not been examined together in a factor analytic study. This article presents a series of confirmatory factor analyses to determine the joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure. Using a structural equation modeling approach, a 6-factor model that included verbal, perceptual, processing speed, working memory, auditory memory, and visual memory constructs provided the best model fit to the data. Allowing select subtests to load simultaneously on 2 factors improved model fit and indicated that some subtests are multifaceted. The results were then replicated in a large cross-validation sample (N = 858).

  2. A simple and rapid method for direct determination of Al(III) based on the enhanced resonance Rayleigh scattering of hemin-functionalized graphene-Al(III) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yu; Chen, Ling Xiao; Dong, Jiang Xue; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-03-01

    A novel method for direct determination of Al(III) by using hemin-functionalized graphene (H-GO) has been established based on the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensity. The characteristics of RRS spectra, the optimum reaction conditions, and the reaction mechanism have been investigated. In this experiment, the Al(III) would exist in sol-gel Al(OH)3 species under the condition of pH 5.9 in aqueous solutions. When H-GO existed in the solution, the sol-gel Al(OH)3 would react with H-GO and result in enhancement of RRS intensity, owing to the enhanced hydrophobicity of H-GO surface. Therefore, a simple and rapid sensor for Al(III) was developed. The increased intensity of RRS is directly proportional to the concentration of Al(III) in the range of 10 nM-6 μM, along with a detection limit of 0.87 nM. Moreover, the sensor has been applied to determination of Al(III) concentration in real water and aspirin tablet samples with satisfactory results. Therefore, the proposed method is promising as an effective means for selective and sensitive determination of Al(III).

  3. The optical luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts deduced from ROTSE-III observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, X. H.; Wu, X. F.; Wei, J. J.; Yuan, F.; Zheng, W. K.; Liang, E. W.; Akerlof, C. W.; McKay, T. A.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Flewelling, H. A.; Göǧüş, E.; Güver, T.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; Pandey, S. B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rujopakarn, W.; Schaefer, B. E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Yost, S. A. E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: fang.yuan@anu.edu.au E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn

    2014-11-10

    We present the optical luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) estimated from a uniform sample of 58 GRBs from observations with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment III (ROTSE-III). Our GRB sample is divided into two sub-samples: detected afterglows (18 GRBs) and those with upper limits (40 GRBs). We derive R-band fluxes for these two sub-samples 100 s after the onset of the burst. The optical LFs at 100 s are fitted by assuming that the co-moving GRB rate traces the star formation rate. While fitting the optical LFs using Monte Carlo simulations, we take into account the detection function of ROTSE-III. We find that the cumulative distribution of optical emission at 100 s is well described by an exponential rise and power-law decay, a broken power law,and Schechter LFs. A single power-law (SPL) LF, on the other hand, is ruled out with high confidence.

  4. A multireference density functional approach to the calculation of the excited states of uranium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Eric V.

    An accurate and efficient hybrid Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Multireference Configuration Interaction (MRCI) model for computing electronic excitation energies in atoms and molecules was developed. The utility of a hybrid method becomes apparent when ground and excited states of large molecules, clusters of molecules, or even moderately sized molecules containing heavy element atoms are desired. In the case of large systems of lighter elements, the hybrid method brings to bear the numerical efficiency of the DFT method in computing the electron-electron dynamic correlation, while including non-dynamical electronic correlation via the Configuration Interaction (CI) calculation. Substantial reductions in the size of the CI expansion necessary to obtain accurate spectroscopic results are possible in the hybrid method. Where heavy element compounds are of interest, fully relativistic calculations based upon the Dirac Hamiltonian rapidly become computationally prohibitive, as the basis set requirements in four-component calculations increase by a factor of two or more in order to satisfy kinetic balance between the large electronic components and small positronic components, while the size of the MRCI Hamiltonian quadruples with respect to a non-relativistic calculation. In this hybrid method, applications to heavy element compounds such as bromine and uranium were accomplished through the use of relativistic effective core potentials, allowing for the first time both scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effect treatment necessary for the accurate calculation of electronic excitation energies in heavy elements in a Density Functional Theory Multireference Configuration Interaction Hybrid Model (DFT/MRCI) method. This implementation of the original hybrid method, developed by Grimme and Waletzke, was modified to remove inherent spin-multiplicity limitations, as well as reduce the number of free parameters used in the method from five to three. The DFT portion of

  5. A cyclometallated fluorenyl Ir(iii) complex as a potential sensitiser for two-photon excited photodynamic therapy (2PE-PDT).

    PubMed

    Boreham, Elizabeth M; Jones, Lucy; Swinburne, Adam N; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Hugues, Vincent; Terryn, Christine; Miomandre, Fabien; Lemercier, Gilles; Natrajan, Louise S

    2015-09-28

    A new Ir(iii) cyclometallated complex bearing a fluorenyl 5-substituted-1,10-phenanthroline ligand ([Ir(ppy)2()][PF6], ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) is presented which exhibits enhanced triplet oxygen sensing properties. The efficacy of this complex to act as a photosensitiser for altering the morphology of C6 Glioma cells that represent malignant nervous tumours has been evaluated. The increased heavy metal effect and related spin-orbit coupling parameters on the photophysical properties of this complex are evidenced by comparison with Ru(ii) analogues. The complex [Ir(ppy)2()][PF6] is shown to exhibit relatively high two-photon absorption efficiencies for the lowest energy MLCT electronic transitions with two-photon absorption cross sections that range from 50 to 80 Goeppert-Mayer units between 750 to 800 nm. Quantum yields for the complex were measured up to 23% and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant, KSV was determined to be 40 bar(-1) in acetonitrile solution, confirming the high efficiency of the complex as a triplet oxygen sensitiser. Preliminary in vitro experiments with C6 Glioma cells treated with [Ir(ppy)2()][PF6], show that the complex is an efficient sensitizer for triplet oxygen, producing cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O2) by two-photon excitation at 740 nm resulting in photodynamic effects that lead to localised cell damage and death.

  6. A cyclometallated fluorenyl Ir(iii) complex as a potential sensitiser for two-photon excited photodynamic therapy (2PE-PDT).

    PubMed

    Boreham, Elizabeth M; Jones, Lucy; Swinburne, Adam N; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Hugues, Vincent; Terryn, Christine; Miomandre, Fabien; Lemercier, Gilles; Natrajan, Louise S

    2015-09-28

    A new Ir(iii) cyclometallated complex bearing a fluorenyl 5-substituted-1,10-phenanthroline ligand ([Ir(ppy)2()][PF6], ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) is presented which exhibits enhanced triplet oxygen sensing properties. The efficacy of this complex to act as a photosensitiser for altering the morphology of C6 Glioma cells that represent malignant nervous tumours has been evaluated. The increased heavy metal effect and related spin-orbit coupling parameters on the photophysical properties of this complex are evidenced by comparison with Ru(ii) analogues. The complex [Ir(ppy)2()][PF6] is shown to exhibit relatively high two-photon absorption efficiencies for the lowest energy MLCT electronic transitions with two-photon absorption cross sections that range from 50 to 80 Goeppert-Mayer units between 750 to 800 nm. Quantum yields for the complex were measured up to 23% and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant, KSV was determined to be 40 bar(-1) in acetonitrile solution, confirming the high efficiency of the complex as a triplet oxygen sensitiser. Preliminary in vitro experiments with C6 Glioma cells treated with [Ir(ppy)2()][PF6], show that the complex is an efficient sensitizer for triplet oxygen, producing cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O2) by two-photon excitation at 740 nm resulting in photodynamic effects that lead to localised cell damage and death. PMID:26289593

  7. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ≤SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (≤SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  8. Comparison of hydrological and GRACE-based excitation functions of polar motion in the seasonal spectral band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, J.; Kolaczek, B.; Salstein, D. A.

    2008-04-01

    Understanding changes in the global balance of the Earths angular momentum due to the mass redistribution of geophysical fluids is needed to explain the observed polar motion. The impact of continental hydrologic signals, from land water, snow, and ice, on polar motion excitation (hydrological angular momentum-HAM), is still inadequately known. Although estimates of HAM have been made from several models of global hydrology based upon the observed distribution of surface water, snow, and soil moisture, the relatively sparse observation network and the presence of errors in the data and the geophysical fluid models preclude a full understanding of the HAM influence on polar motion variations. Recently the GRACE mission monitoring Earths time variable gravity field has allowed us to determine the mass term of polar motion excitation functions and compare them with the mass term derivable as a residual from the geodetic excitation functions and geophysical fluid motion terms on seasonal time scales. Differences between these mass terms in the years 2004 - 2005.5 are still on the order of 20 mas. Besides the overall mass excitation of polar motion comparisons with GRACE (RL04-release), we also intercompare the non-atmospheric, non-oceanic signals in the mass term of geodetic polar motion excitation with hydrological excitation of polar motion.

  9. Obtaining Hartree-Fock and density functional theory doubly excited states with Car-Parrinello density matrix search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenkel; Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2009-11-01

    The calculation of doubly excited states is one of the major problems plaguing the modern day excited state workhorse methodology of linear response time dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density function theory (TDDFT). We have previously shown that the use of a resonantly tuned field within real-time TDHF and TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite both the α and β electrons to achieve the two-electron excited states of minimal basis H2 and HeH+ [C. M. Isborn and X. Li, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 204107 (2008)]. We now extend this method to many electron systems with the use of our Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) with a first-principles fictitious mass method for wave function optimization [X. Li, C. L. Moss, W. Liang, and Y. Feng, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234115 (2009)]. Real-time TDHF/TDDFT is used during the application of the laser field perturbation, driving the electron density toward the doubly excited state. The CP-DMS method then converges the density to the nearest stationary state. We present these stationary state doubly excited state energies and properties at the HF and DFT levels for H2, HeH+, lithium hydride, ethylene, and butadiene.

  10. A New Method To Evaluate Excited States Lifetimes Based on Green's Function: Application to Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Sulzer, David; Iuchi, Satoru; Yasuda, Koji

    2016-07-12

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSCs) are the promising device for electricity generation. However, the initial stage in which an electron is injected from a dye to the semiconductor has not been precisely understood. Standard quantum chemistry methods cannot handle infinite number of orbitals coming from the band structure of the semiconductor, whereas solid state calculations cannot handle many excited states at a reasonable computational cost. In this regard, we propose a new method to evaluate lifetimes of many excited states of a molecule on a semi-infinite surface. On the basis of the theory of resonance state, the effect of the semi-infinite semiconductor is encoded into the complex self-energy from surface Green's function. The lifetimes of excited states are evaluated through the imaginary part of the self-energy, and the self-energy correction is included into excitation energies obtained from time-dependent density functional theory calculations. This new method is applied to a DSSC system composed of black dye attached to the TiO2 semiconductor, and the computed lifetimes are linked to the natures of excited states and to the surface properties. The present method provides the firm ground for analysis of interplay between many excited states of the dye and band structure of the semiconductor. PMID:27310524

  11. A New Method To Evaluate Excited States Lifetimes Based on Green's Function: Application to Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Sulzer, David; Iuchi, Satoru; Yasuda, Koji

    2016-07-12

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSCs) are the promising device for electricity generation. However, the initial stage in which an electron is injected from a dye to the semiconductor has not been precisely understood. Standard quantum chemistry methods cannot handle infinite number of orbitals coming from the band structure of the semiconductor, whereas solid state calculations cannot handle many excited states at a reasonable computational cost. In this regard, we propose a new method to evaluate lifetimes of many excited states of a molecule on a semi-infinite surface. On the basis of the theory of resonance state, the effect of the semi-infinite semiconductor is encoded into the complex self-energy from surface Green's function. The lifetimes of excited states are evaluated through the imaginary part of the self-energy, and the self-energy correction is included into excitation energies obtained from time-dependent density functional theory calculations. This new method is applied to a DSSC system composed of black dye attached to the TiO2 semiconductor, and the computed lifetimes are linked to the natures of excited states and to the surface properties. The present method provides the firm ground for analysis of interplay between many excited states of the dye and band structure of the semiconductor.

  12. Application of new WAIS-III/WMS-III discrepancy scores for evaluating memory functioning: relationship between intellectual and memory ability.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between memory and intellectual ability has received some support as a means for evaluating memory impairment. Recently, comprehensive base rate tables for General Ability Index (GAI) minus memory discrepancy scores (i.e., GAI-memory) were developed using the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (Lange, Chelune, & Tulsky, in press). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to identify memory impairment in 34 patients with Alzheimer's type dementia (DAT) versus a sample of 34 demographically matched healthy participants. On average, patients with DAT obtained significantly lower scores on all WAIS-III and WMS-III indexes and had larger GAI-memory discrepancy scores. Clinical outcome analyses revealed that GAI-memory scores were useful at identifying memory impairment in patients with DAT versus matched healthy participants. However, GAI-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from the memory indexes alone. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  13. Application of new WAIS-III/WMS-III discrepancy scores for evaluating memory functioning: relationship between intellectual and memory ability.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between memory and intellectual ability has received some support as a means for evaluating memory impairment. Recently, comprehensive base rate tables for General Ability Index (GAI) minus memory discrepancy scores (i.e., GAI-memory) were developed using the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (Lange, Chelune, & Tulsky, in press). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to identify memory impairment in 34 patients with Alzheimer's type dementia (DAT) versus a sample of 34 demographically matched healthy participants. On average, patients with DAT obtained significantly lower scores on all WAIS-III and WMS-III indexes and had larger GAI-memory discrepancy scores. Clinical outcome analyses revealed that GAI-memory scores were useful at identifying memory impairment in patients with DAT versus matched healthy participants. However, GAI-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from the memory indexes alone. Implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:16624786

  14. Regulation of Postsynaptic Function by the Dementia-Related ESCRT-III Subunit CHMP2B

    PubMed Central

    Chassefeyre, Romain; Martínez-Hernández, José; Bertaso, Federica; Bouquier, Nathalie; Blot, Béatrice; Laporte, Marine; Fraboulet, Sandrine; Couté, Yohann; Devoy, Anny; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Fagni, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The charged multivesicular body proteins (Chmp1–7) are an evolutionarily conserved family of cytosolic proteins that transiently assembles into helical polymers that change the curvature of cellular membrane domains. Mutations in human CHMP2B cause frontotemporal dementia, suggesting that this protein may normally control some neuron-specific process. Here, we examined the function, localization, and interactions of neuronal Chmp2b. The protein was highly expressed in mouse brain and could be readily detected in neuronal dendrites and spines. Depletion of endogenous Chmp2b reduced dendritic branching of cultured hippocampal neurons, decreased excitatory synapse density in vitro and in vivo, and abolished activity-induced spine enlargement and synaptic potentiation. To understand the synaptic effects of Chmp2b, we determined its ultrastructural distribution by quantitative immuno-electron microscopy and its biochemical interactions by coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. In the hippocampus in situ, a subset of neuronal Chmp2b was shown to concentrate beneath the perisynaptic membrane of dendritic spines. In synaptoneurosome lysates, Chmp2b was stably bound to a large complex containing other members of the Chmp family, as well as postsynaptic scaffolds. The supramolecular Chmp assembly detected here corresponds to a stable form of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III), a ubiquitous cytoplasmic protein complex known to play a central role in remodeling of lipid membranes. We conclude that Chmp2b-containing ESCRT-III complexes are also present at dendritic spines, where they regulate synaptic plasticity. We propose that synaptic ESCRT-III filaments may function as a novel element of the submembrane cytoskeleton of spines. PMID:25698751

  15. The discrepant kinematics of recombination and collisionally excited lines in NGC 7009 as a function of ionization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Peimbert, S.; Richer, M. R.; Georgiev, L.; Arrieta, A.

    2014-10-01

    We have analyzed the kinematics of emission of the planetary nebula NGC 7009 from long slit spectroscopy from the UVES spectrograph at the VLT of ESO. In particular we are interested in comparing lines excited by recombination and collisions with electrons to determine whether similarities or differences could be useful in elucidating the well-known abundance discrepancy derived from them. We construct position-velocity maps for recombination, fluorescence, charge transfer, and collisionally excited lines.We find a plasma component emitting in the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II recombination lines whose kinematics are discrepant: they are incompatible with the ionization structure derived from all other evidence and the kinematics derived from all of these lines are unexpectedly very similar. We found direct evidence for a recombination contribution to [N II] λ5755. Once taken into account, the electron temperatures from [N II], [O III], and [Ne III] agree at a given position and velocity. The electron densities derived from [O II] and [Ar IV] are consistent with direct imaging and the distribution of hydrogen emission. The kinematics of the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II lines does not coincide with the kinematics of the [O III] and [Ne III] forbidden emission, indicating that there is an additional plasma component to the recombination emission that arises from a different volume from that giving rise to the forbidden emission from the parent ions within NGC 7009. Thus, the chemical abundances derived from either type of line are correct only for the plasma component from which they arise. Apart from [N II] λ5755, we find no anomaly with the forbidden lines usually used to determine chemical abundances in ionized nebulae, so the abundances derived from them should be reliable for the medium from which they arise.

  16. Calculation of excitation functions of proton, alpha and deuteron induced reactions for production of medical radioisotopes 122-125I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artun, Ozan; Aytekin, Hüseyin

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the excitation functions for production of medical radioisotopes 122-125I with proton, alpha, and deuteron induced reactions were calculated by two different level density models. For the nuclear model calculations, the Talys 1.6 code were used, which is the latest version of Talys code series. Calculations of excitation functions for production of the 122-125I isotopes were carried out by using the generalized superfluid model (GSM) and Fermi-gas model (FGM). The results have shown that generalized superfluid model is more successful than Fermi-gas model in explaining the experimental results.

  17. Examining the relationship between WAIS-III premorbid intellectual functioning and WMS-III memory ability to evaluate memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous research by Lange and Chelune (2006) by evaluating the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to detect memory impairment using estimated premorbid GAI scores (i.e., GAI-E) rather than obtained GAI scores. Participants were 34 patients with Alzheimer's-type dementia and a sub-sample of 34 demographically matched participants from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. GAI-memory discrepancy scores were more effective at differentiating Alzheimer's patients versus healthy controls when using estimated premorbid GAI scores than obtained GAI scores. However, GAI(E)-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from interpretation of the memory index scores alone. This was most likely due to the prevalence of obvious memory impairment in this patient population. Future research directions are discussed.

  18. Examining the relationship between WAIS-III premorbid intellectual functioning and WMS-III memory ability to evaluate memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous research by Lange and Chelune (2006) by evaluating the clinical utility of GAI-memory discrepancy scores to detect memory impairment using estimated premorbid GAI scores (i.e., GAI-E) rather than obtained GAI scores. Participants were 34 patients with Alzheimer's-type dementia and a sub-sample of 34 demographically matched participants from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. GAI-memory discrepancy scores were more effective at differentiating Alzheimer's patients versus healthy controls when using estimated premorbid GAI scores than obtained GAI scores. However, GAI(E)-memory discrepancy scores failed to provide unique interpretive information beyond that which is gained from interpretation of the memory index scores alone. This was most likely due to the prevalence of obvious memory impairment in this patient population. Future research directions are discussed. PMID:17848127

  19. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180341

  20. Stone tool function at the paleolithic sites of Starosele and Buran Kaya III, Crimea: Behavioral implications

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Bruce L.; Kay, Marvin; Marks, Anthony E.; Monigal, Katherine

    2001-01-01

    Stone tools are often the most abundant type of cultural remains at Paleolithic sites, yet their function is often poorly understood. Investigations of stone tool function, including microscopic use-wear and residue analyses, were performed on a sample of artifacts from the Paleolithic sites of Starosele (40,000–80,000 years BP) and Buran Kaya III (32,000–37,000 years BP). The Middle Paleolithic levels at Starosele exhibit a typical variant of the local Micoquian Industry. The artifacts from Buran Kaya III most closely resemble an Early Streletskayan Industry associated with the early Upper Paleolithic. The results of the functional analyses suggest that hominids at both sites were exploiting woody and starchy plant material as well as birds and mammals. Both sites show evidence of hafting of a wide variety of tools and the possible use of projectile or thrusting spears. These analyses were performed by using two different techniques conducted by independent researchers. Combined residue and use-wear analyses suggest that both the Upper Paleolithic and Middle Paleolithic hominids at these sites were broad-based foragers capable of exploiting a wide range of resources. PMID:11535837

  1. Selective functionalization of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with ibuprofen and Gd(III) chelates: a new probe for potential theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Carniato, Fabio; Muñoz-Úbeda, Mónica; Tei, Lorenzo; Botta, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Organo-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles, loaded with ibuprofen into the pores and functionalized on the external surface with a stable Gd(iii)-DOTA-monoamide chelate, were prepared and explored as potential theranostic probes.

  2. An Efficient Visible and Near-Infrared (NIR) Emitting Sm(III) Metal-Organic Framework (Sm-MOF) Sensitized by Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) Ligand.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Mei; Wei, Zhang-Wen; Wang, Hai-Ping; Fan, Ya-Nan; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2016-06-21

    We report herein an unprecedented example of a luminescent Sm(III) metal-organic framework (Sm-MOF), in which both the visible and near-infrared (NIR) emissions of Sm(3+) ions are able to be sensitized by an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) ligand. Due to the solvent-mediated interchange between enol and keto excited states of the ligand and subsequent energy transfer rate to Sm(3+) ions, the luminescent decay lifetime of the Sm-MOF can be tuned in different solvent-grinding systems.

  3. Functional imaging of living Paramecium by means of confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Fronte, Paola; Raimondo, Marco; Fato, Marco; DeLeo, Gianluca; Beltrame, Francesco; Cannone, Fabio; Chirico, Giberto; Ramoino, Paola

    2002-05-01

    Confocal and Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy allow gathering three-dimensional and temporal information from biological systems exploiting fluorescence labeling and autofluorescence properties. In this work we study biological events linked to functionality in Paramecium primaurelia. The internalization of material in ciliated one-celled organisms (protozoa) occurs via different mechanisms, even if most of nutrients, particulate or not, is taken up by food vacuoles formed at the bottom of the oral cavity. The endocytosis of small-sized molecules occurs at the parasomal sacs, located next the ciliar basal bodies. Vital fluorescent dyes (BSA-FITC, WGA-FITC, dextran-Texas Red, cholesteryl-Bodipy) and autofluorescence were used to study formation, movement, and fusion of vesicles during endocytosis and phagocytosis of Paramecium primaurelia. By immobilizing living cells pulsed with food vacuole and endosome markers at successive times after chasing in unlabeled medium, the intracellular movement and fusion of food vacuoles and of endosomes were visualized. A temporal analysis of fluorescence images and the false-color technique were used. Starting from time series or 3D data sets composite images were generated by associating with each originally acquired image a different color corresponding to each sampling point in time and along the z-axis. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging attempts are also outlined.

  4. Measuring excitation functions needed to interpret cosmogenic nuclide production in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K.; Beverding, A.; Englert, P. A. J.; Caffee, M. W.; Vincent, J.; Castaneda, C.; Reedy, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides produced in lunar rocks by cosmic ray interactions are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry or gamma-ray spectroscopy. From these measurements, estimates of the solar proton flux over time periods characterized by the half-life of the isotope under study can be made, if all the cross sections for all the reactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are known. Proton production cross sections are very important because (approximately) 98% of solar cosmic rays and (approximately) 87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons in the lunar environment. Many of the needed cross sections have never been measured. Targets of C, Al, Si, SiO2, mg, K, Ca, Fe and Ni have been irradiated using three accelerators to cover a proton energy range of 25-500 MeV. Excitation functions for Be-7, Be-10, Na-22, and Al-26 production from Mg and Al will be reported, and the consequences of using these new cross section values to estimate solar proton fluxes discussed.

  5. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  6. Design and optimization for variable rate selective excitation using an analytic RF scaling function.

    PubMed

    Gai, Neville D; Zur, Yuval

    2007-11-01

    At higher B(0) fields, specific absorption rate (SAR) deposition increases. Due to maximum SAR limitation, slice coverage decreases and/or scan time increases. Conventional selective RF pulses are played out in conjunction with a time independent field gradient. Variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) is a technique that modifies the original RF and gradient waveforms such that slice profile is unchanged. The drawback is that the slice profile for off-resonance spins is distorted. A new VERSE algorithm based on modeling the scaled waveforms as a Fermi function is introduced. It ensures that system related constraints of maximum gradient amplitude and slew rate are not exceeded. The algorithm can be used to preserve the original RF pulse duration while minimizing SAR and peak b1 or to minimize the RF pulse duration. The design is general and can be applied to any symmetrical or asymmetrical RF waveform. The algorithm is demonstrated by using it to (a) minimize the SAR of a linear phase RF pulse, (b) minimize SAR of a hyperbolic secant RF pulse, and (c) minimize the duration of a linear phase RF pulse. Images with a T1-FLAIR (T1 FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) sequence using a conventional and VERSE adiabatic inversion RF pulse are presented. Comparison of images and scan parameters for different anatomies and coils shows increased scan coverage and decreased SAR with the VERSE inversion RF pulse, while image quality is preserved.

  7. The excitation functions of 187Re(n,2n) 186m,gRe reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Long; Kang, Meng-Xiao; Liu, Li-Le; Wang, Ji-Min; Chen, Xiong-Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new value for the emission probability of 137.144 keV γ-rays from 186gRe decay is recommended to be (9.47±0.03)/%. Using this value the measured cross sections for 187Re(n,2n)186mRe and 187Re(n,2n)186gRe reactions around 14 MeV are analyzed, and the cross section for 187Re(n,2n)186m+gRe reaction at 14.8 MeV is (2213±116) mb. The UNF code was adopted to calculate the cross sections for the 187Re(n,2n)186m+gRe reaction below 20 MeV, fitting to the value (2213±116) mb at 14.8 MeV using a set of optimum neutron optical potential parameters which were obtained based on the relevant experimental data of rhenium. The isomeric cross section ratio for the 187Re(n,2n)186m,gRe reaction was analyzed using the V-H method based on nuclear statistical theory. Combining these calculated results, the excitation functions for the 187Re(n,2n)186mRe and 187Re(n,2n)186gRe reactions were obtained. The obtained results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  8. The discrepant kinematics of recombination and collisionally-excited in NGC7009 as a function of ionization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, A.; Richer, M.; Georgiev, L. N.; Torres-Peimbert, S.

    2014-04-01

    We present spatially- and velocity-resolved echelle spectroscopy for NGC 7009 obtained with the UVES spectrograph at the ESO VLT. We construct position-velocity maps for recombination, fluorescence, charge transfer, and collisionally excited lines. We find a plasma component emitting in the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II recombination lines whose kinematics are discrepant: They are incompatible with the ionization structure derived from all other evidence and the kinematics derived from all of these lines are unexpectedly very similar. We find direct evidence for a recombination contribution to [N II] 5755. Once taken into account, the electron temperatures from [N II], [O III], and [Ne III] agree at a given position and velocity, even though both the [N II] and [O III] temperatures clearly vary. The electron densities derived from [O II] and [Ar IV] are consistent with direct imaging and the distribution of hydrogen emission. The kinematics of the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II lines does not coincide with the kinematics of the [O III] and [Ne III] forbidden emission, indicating that there is an additional plasma component to the recombination emission that arises from a different volume from that giving rise to the forbidden emission from the parent ions within NGC 7009. Thus, the chemical abundances derived from either type of line are correct only for the plasma component from which they arise. Apart from [N II] 5755, we find no anomaly with the forbidden lines usually used to determine chemical abundances in ionized nebulae, so the abundances derived from them should be reliable for the medium from which they arise.

  9. [Functional dyspepsia: the past, the present and the Rome III classification].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2007-08-19

    The author summarizes the historical development of our knowledge about functional dyspepsia and overviews the so-called "road to Rome" process. Between 1988 and 2006, expert committees developed using the Delphi method subsequent classifications of functional gastrointestinal disorders (Rome I-III). The Rome III classification reassessed the diagnostic criteria for functional dyspepsia and distinguished new subgroups as the postprandial distress and epigastric pain syndrome. The rationale for the proposed new classification was based on the inadequacy of prior approaches such as the predominant symptom, the results of factor analyses in tertiary care and in the general population, clinical experience and new observations in the peer-reviewed literature. Epidemiologic data suggest that dyspeptic symptoms date back to the 1730s and their prevalence increased markedly subsequently, remaining the commonest diagnosis even in the endoscopic era. The current worldwide prevalence of functional dyspepsia is 7-45%, with large geographic variations. The role of Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella infection as etiologic factors is discussed. Amongst the pathophysiological features, the recent data on the role of phenotypic changes of acid secretion, alterations of fundic accommodation and antro-duodenal motility and gastric emptying, gastric hypersensitivity and hormonal disturbances are presented, but all these abnormalities are present only in a small part of the patients. The possible role of the polymorphism of alpha-adrenoceptor gene was also raised. The treatment of functional dyspepsia led to equivocal results and the high rate of placebo response makes difficult any interpretation. According to the recent meta-analyses, proton pump inhibitors and H 2 -histamine receptor blockers are superior to placebo. In spite of good results, cisapride was withdrawn in 2004. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori can induce sustained remission in a small but significant minority of

  10. Density Functional Theory Modeling of Low-Loss Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy in Wurtzite III-Nitride Ternary Alloys.

    PubMed

    Eljarrat, Alberto; Sastre, Xavier; Peiró, Francesca; Estradé, Sónia

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the dielectric response of III-nitride semiconductors is studied using density functional theory (DFT) band structure calculations. The aim of this study is to improve our understanding of the features in the low-loss electron energy-loss spectra of ternary alloys, but the results are also relevant to optical and UV spectroscopy results. In addition, the dependence of the most remarkable features with composition is tested, i.e. applying Vegard's law to band gap and plasmon energy. For this purpose, three wurtzite ternary alloys, from the combination of binaries AlN, GaN, and InN, were simulated through a wide compositional range (i.e., Al x Ga1-x N, In x Al1-x N, and In x Ga1-x N, with x=[0,1]). For this DFT calculations, the standard tools found in Wien2k software were used. In order to improve the band structure description of these semiconductor compounds, the modified Becke-Johnson exchange-correlation potential was also used. Results from these calculations are presented, including band structure, density of states, and complex dielectric function for the whole compositional range. Larger, closer to experimental values, band gap energies are predicted using the novel potential, when compared with standard generalized gradient approximation. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the collective excitation features in the dielectric response reveals their compositional dependence, which sometimes departs from a linear behavior (bowing). Finally, an advantageous method for measuring the plasmon energy dependence from these calculations is explained. PMID:26868876

  11. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  12. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  13. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Bailey, Stephen; McGreer, Ian D.; Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yeche, Christophe; Strauss, Michael A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Shen, Yue; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Aubourg, Eric; Bovy, Jo; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; and others

    2013-08-10

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i {approx}< 21.8 quasars are selected over an area of 2236 deg{sup 2}, with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 < z < 3.5, filling in a key part of the luminosity-redshift plane for optical quasar studies. The completeness of the survey is derived through simulated quasar photometry, and this completeness estimate is checked using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar K-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M{sub i} (z = 2.2) Almost-Equal-To -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log {Phi}* - M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of {approx}2.6 while {Phi}* declines by a factor of {approx}8. At z {approx}< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities.

  14. Gravitational fragmentation in turbulent primordial gas and the initial mass function of Population III stars

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Paul C.; Glover, Simon C.O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Bromm, Volker; /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2010-08-25

    We report results from numerical simulations of star formation in the early universe that focus on the dynamical behavior of metal-free gas under different initial and environmental conditions. In particular we investigate the role of turbulence, which is thought to ubiquitously accompany the collapse of high-redshift halos. We distinguish between two main cases: the birth of Population III.1 stars - those which form in the pristine halos unaffected by prior star formation - and the formation of Population III.2 stars - those forming in halos where the gas is still metal free but has an increased ionization fraction. This latter case can arise either from exposure to the intense UV radiation of stellar sources in neighboring halos, or from the high virial temperatures associated with the formation of massive halos, that is, those with masses greater than {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}}. We find that turbulent primordial gas is highly susceptible to fragmentation in both cases, even for turbulence in the subsonic regime, i.e. for rms velocity dispersions as low as 20 % of the sound speed. Contrary to our original expectations, fragmentation is more vigorous and more widespread in pristine halos compared to pre-ionized ones. We therefore predict Pop III.1 stars to be on average of somewhat lower mass, and form in larger groups, than Pop III.2 stars. We find that fragment masses cover over two orders of magnitude, indicating that the resulting Population III initial mass function was significantly extended in mass as well. Our results suggest that the details of the fragmentation process depend on the local properties of the turbulent velocity field and hence we expect considerable variations in the resulting stellar mass spectrum in different halos. In particular, the lowest-mass objects in our sample should have survived to the present day and could potentially provide a unique record of the physical conditions of stellar birth in the primordial universe

  15. Aromatic Lateral Substituents Influence the Excitation Energies of Hexaaza Lanthanide Macrocyclic Complexes: A Wave Function Theory and Density Functional Study.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2015-09-24

    The high interest in lanthanide chemistry, and particularly in their luminescence, has been encouraged by the need of understanding the lanthanide chemical coordination and how the design of new luminescent materials can be affected by this. This work is focused on the understanding of the electronic structure, bonding nature, and optical properties of a set of lanthanide hexaaza macrocyclic complexes, which can lead to potential optical applications. Here we found that the DFT ground state of the open-shell complexes are mainly characterized by the manifold of low lying f states, having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps. The results obtained from the wave function theory calculations (SO-RASSI) put on evidence the multiconfigurational character of their ground state and it is observed that the large spin-orbit coupling and the weak crystal field produce a strong mix of the ground and the excited states. The electron localization function (ELF) and the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) support the idea of a dative interaction between the macrocyclic ligand and the lanthanide center for all the studied systems; noting that, this interaction has a covalent character, where the d-orbital participation is evidenced from NBO analysis, leaving the f shell completely noninteracting in the chemical bonding. From the optical part we observed in all cases the characteristic intraligand (IL) (π-π*) and ligand to metal charge-transfer (LMCT) bands that are present in the ultraviolet and visible regions, and for the open-shell complexes we found the inherent f-f electronic transitions on the visible and near-infrared region. PMID:26325624

  16. Excitation function of the 60Ni(p ,γ )61Cu reaction from threshold to 16 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. S.; Sudár, S.; Spahn, I.; Shariff, M. A.; Qaim, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    Excitation function of the reaction 60Ni(p ,γ )61Cu was measured via the activation technique in the energy range of 1.3-16.0 MeV using a low-energy accelerator and a small cyclotron. The results are comparable to those previously obtained via prompt γ counting. In addition excitation functions of the more common competing 60Ni(p ,n )60Cu and 60Ni(p ,α )57Co reactions were also measured. Theoretical calculations on proton-induced reactions on 60Ni were performed using the nuclear model code talys. The results suggest that near the threshold of the reaction the compound nucleus mechanism dominates. Thereafter the contribution of direct interactions becomes rather strong, especially between 4 and 6 MeV, i.e., just below the threshold of the 60Ni(p ,n )60Cu reaction. The cross section at the maximum of the excitation function of each of the three reactions, namely, 60Ni(p ,γ )61Cu,60Ni(p ,n )60Cu , and 60Ni(p ,α )57Co , amounts to 2, 320, and 85 mb, respectively. The (p ,n ) reaction is thus the most commonly occurring process, and the (p ,γ ) reaction is the weakest, possibly due to higher probability of particle emission than γ-ray emission from the highly excited intermediate nucleus 61Cu formed in the interaction of a proton with the target nucleus 60Ni.

  17. Yeast as a Heterologous Model System to Uncover Type III Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina; Coll, Núria S.; Valls, Marc; Sessa, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Type III effectors (T3E) are key virulence proteins that are injected by bacterial pathogens inside the cells of their host to subvert cellular processes and contribute to disease. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an important heterologous system for the functional characterisation of T3E proteins in a eukaryotic environment. Importantly, yeast contains eukaryotic processes with low redundancy and are devoid of immunity mechanisms that counteract T3Es and mask their function. Expression in yeast of effectors from both plant and animal pathogens that perturb conserved cellular processes often resulted in robust phenotypes that were exploited to elucidate effector functions, biochemical properties, and host targets. The genetic tractability of yeast and its amenability for high-throughput functional studies contributed to the success of this system that, in recent years, has been used to study over 100 effectors. Here, we provide a critical view on this body of work and describe advantages and limitations inherent to the use of yeast in T3E research. “Favourite” targets of T3Es in yeast are cytoskeleton components and small GTPases of the Rho family. We describe how mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling, vesicle trafficking, membrane structures, and programmed cell death are also often altered by T3Es in yeast and how this reflects their function in the natural host. We describe how effector structure–function studies and analysis of candidate targeted processes or pathways can be carried out in yeast. We critically analyse technologies that have been used in yeast to assign biochemical functions to T3Es, including transcriptomics and proteomics, as well as suppressor, gain-of-function, or synthetic lethality screens. We also describe how yeast can be used to select for molecules that block T3E function in search of new antibacterial drugs with medical applications. Finally, we provide our opinion on the limitations of S

  18. Excited-State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Optical Limiting in Zinc Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-04-01

    Optical-limiting materials are capable of attenuating light to protect delicate equipment from high-intensity light sources. Phthalocyanines have attracted a lot of attention for optical-limiting applications due to their versatility and large nonlinear absorption. With excited-state absorption (ESA) being the primary mechanism for optical limiting behavior in phthalocyanines, the ability to tune the optical absorption of ground and excited states in phthalocyanines would allow for the development of advanced optical limiters. We recently developed a method for the calculation of ESA based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory propagation of an excited-state density. In this work, we apply the approach to zinc phthalocyanine, demonstrating the ability of our method to efficiently identify the optical limiting potential of a molecular complex.

  19. LOWER EXTREMITY FUNCTIONAL TESTS AND RISK OF INJURY IN DIVISION III COLLEGIATE ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Heiderscheit, Bryan C.; Manske, Robert C.; Niemuth, Paul E.; Rauh, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Functional tests have been used primarily to assess an athlete's fitness or readiness to return to sport. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine the ability of the standing long jump (SLJ) test, the single‐leg hop (SLH) for distance test, and the lower extremity functional test (LEFT) as preseason screening tools to identify collegiate athletes who may be at increased risk for a time‐loss sports‐related low back or lower extremity injury. Methods: A total of 193 Division III athletes from 15 university teams (110 females, age 19.1 ± 1.1 y; 83 males, age 19.5 ± 1.3 y) were tested prior to their sports seasons. Athletes performed the functional tests in the following sequence: SLJ, SLH, LEFT. The athletes were then prospectively followed during their sports season for occurrence of low back or LE injury. Results: Female athletes who completed the LEFT in $118 s were 6 times more likely (OR=6.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 31.7) to sustain a thigh or knee injury. Male athletes who completed the LEFT in #100 s were more likely to experience a time‐loss injury to the low back or LE (OR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 9.5) or a foot or ankle injury (OR=6.7, 95% CI: 1.5, 29.7) than male athletes who completed the LEFT in 101 s or more. Female athletes with a greater than 10% side‐to‐side asymmetry between SLH distances had a 4‐fold increase in foot or ankle injury (cut point: >10%; OR=4.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 15.4). Male athletes with SLH distances (either leg) at least 75% of their height had at least a 3‐fold increase (OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for the right LE; OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for left LE) in low back or LE injury. Conclusions: The LEFT and the SLH tests appear useful in identifying Division III athletes at risk for a low back or lower extremity sports injury. Thus, these tests warrant further consideration as preparticipatory screening examination tools for sport injury in this population. Clinical Relevance: The single‐leg hop for

  20. Hydrogen sulfide regulates cardiovascular function by influencing the excitability of subfornical organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Kuksis, Markus; Smith, Pauline M; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter endogenously found in the central nervous system, has recently been suggested to act as a signalling molecule in the brain having beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. This study was thus undertaken to investigate the effect of NaHS (an H2S donor) in the subfornical organ (SFO), a central nervous system site important to blood pressure regulation. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats for both in vivo and in vitro experiments. We first used RT-PCR to confirm our previous microarray analyses showing that mRNAs for the enzymes required to produce H2S are expressed in the SFO. We then used microinjection techniques to investigate the physiological effects of NaHS in SFO, and found that NaHS microinjection (5 nmol) significantly increased blood pressure (mean AUC = 853.5±105.7 mmHg*s, n = 5). Further, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology and found that 97.8% (88 of 90) of neurons depolarized in response to NaHS. This response was found to be concentration dependent with an EC50 of 35.6 µM. Coupled with the depolarized membrane potential, we observed an overall increase in neuronal excitability using an analysis of rheobase and action potential firing patterns. This study has provided the first evidence of NaHS and thus H2S actions and their cellular correlates in SFO, implicating this brain area as a site where H2S may act to control blood pressure.

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Cardiovascular Function by Influencing the Excitability of Subfornical Organ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kuksis, Markus; Smith, Pauline M.; Ferguson, Alastair V.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter endogenously found in the central nervous system, has recently been suggested to act as a signalling molecule in the brain having beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. This study was thus undertaken to investigate the effect of NaHS (an H2S donor) in the subfornical organ (SFO), a central nervous system site important to blood pressure regulation. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats for both in vivo and in vitro experiments. We first used RT-PCR to confirm our previous microarray analyses showing that mRNAs for the enzymes required to produce H2S are expressed in the SFO. We then used microinjection techniques to investigate the physiological effects of NaHS in SFO, and found that NaHS microinjection (5 nmol) significantly increased blood pressure (mean AUC = 853.5±105.7 mmHg*s, n = 5). Further, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology and found that 97.8% (88 of 90) of neurons depolarized in response to NaHS. This response was found to be concentration dependent with an EC50 of 35.6 µM. Coupled with the depolarized membrane potential, we observed an overall increase in neuronal excitability using an analysis of rheobase and action potential firing patterns. This study has provided the first evidence of NaHS and thus H2S actions and their cellular correlates in SFO, implicating this brain area as a site where H2S may act to control blood pressure. PMID:25144759

  2. Functional equivalence of WAIS-III/WMS-III digit and spatial span under forward and backward recall conditions.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Nancy; Strauss, Esther

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the performance characteristics of the Wechsler Spatial Span subtest in a mixed clinical sample. Contrary to expectation, differential patterns of performance were obtained on the Digit and Spatial Span tasks. Forward Digit Span scores were significantly higher than backward recall scores, but this was not the case for Spatial Span. There were no differences between forward and backward raw Spatial Span scores at the mean level. Further, about one third of the sample showed better performance on backward compared to forward Spatial Span. In addition, performance on the Spatial Span backward task correlated unexpectedly with that of the WMS-III Immediate and Delayed Auditory Index scores. Overall, the findings suggest that clinicians should be hesitant when interpreting the Spatial Span task, and the backward condition in particular, as a measure of working memory. Finally, methodological concerns with the Spatial Span task are noted, raising additional concerns regarding the meaning of this task.

  3. Analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in time-dependent density functional theory: Formalism, implementation, and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the formalism, implementation, and performance of the analytical approach for the excited-state Hessian in the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) that extends our previous work [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011)] on the analytical Hessian in TDDFT within Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to full TDDFT. In contrast to TDA-TDDFT, an appreciable advantage of full TDDFT is that it maintains the oscillator strength sum rule, and therefore yields more precise results for the oscillator strength and other related physical quantities. For the excited-state harmonic vibrational frequency calculation, however, full TDDFT does not seem to be advantageous since the numerical tests demonstrate that the accuracy of TDDFT with and without TDA are comparable to each other. As a common practice, the computed harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled by a suitable scale factor to yield good agreement with the experimental fundamental frequencies. Here we apply both the optimized ground-state and excited-state scale factors to scale the calculated excited-state harmonic frequencies and find that the scaling decreases the root-mean-square errors. The optimized scale factors derived from the excited-state calculations are slightly smaller than those from the ground-state calculations.

  4. Building up the Population III initial mass function from cosmological initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker; Lee, Aaron T.

    2016-10-01

    We simulate the growth of a Population III stellar system, starting from cosmological initial conditions at z = 100. We follow the formation of a minihalo and the subsequent collapse of its central gas to high densities, resolving scales as small as ˜ 1 au. Using sink particles to represent the growing protostars, we model the growth of the photodissociating and ionizing region around the first sink, continuing the simulation for ˜5000 yr after initial protostar formation. Along with the first-forming sink, several tens of secondary sinks form before an ionization front develops around the most massive star. The resulting cluster has high rates of sink formation, ejections from the stellar disc, and sink mergers during the first ˜ 2000 yr, before the onset of radiative feedback. By this time, a warm ˜5000 K phase of neutral gas has expanded to roughly the disc radius of 2000 au, slowing mass flow on to the disc and sinks. By 5000 yr the most massive star grows to 20 M⊙, while the total stellar mass approaches 75 M⊙. Out of the ˜ 40 sinks, approximately 30 are low mass (M* < 1 M⊙), and if the simulation had resolved smaller scales an even greater number of sinks might have formed. Thus, protostellar radiative feedback is insufficient to prevent rapid disc fragmentation and the formation of a high-member Pop III cluster before an ionization front emerges. Throughout the simulation, the majority of stellar mass is contained within the most massive stars, further implying that the Pop III initial mass function is top-heavy.

  5. exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G0W0. Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more.

  6. Exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-10

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G(0)W(0). Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more. PMID:25135665

  7. Evidence for Moonlighting Functions of the θ Subunit of Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, M.; Pedró, L.; García, J.; Pons, M.; Hüttener, M.; Paytubi, S.; Madrid, C.

    2014-01-01

    The holE gene is an enterobacterial ORFan gene (open reading frame [ORF] with no detectable homology to other ORFs in a database). It encodes the θ subunit of the DNA polymerase III core complex. The precise function of the θ subunit within this complex is not well established, and loss of holE does not result in a noticeable phenotype. Paralogs of holE are also present on many conjugative plasmids and on phage P1 (hot gene). In this study, we provide evidence indicating that θ (HolE) exhibits structural and functional similarities to a family of nucleoid-associated regulatory proteins, the Hha/YdgT-like proteins that are also encoded by enterobacterial ORFan genes. Microarray studies comparing the transcriptional profiles of Escherichia coli holE, hha, and ydgT mutants revealed highly similar expression patterns for strains harboring holE and ydgT alleles. Among the genes differentially regulated in both mutants were genes of the tryptophanase (tna) operon. The tna operon consists of a transcribed leader region, tnaL, and two structural genes, tnaA and tnaB. Further experiments with transcriptional lacZ fusions (tnaL::lacZ and tnaA::lacZ) indicate that HolE and YdgT downregulate expression of the tna operon by possibly increasing the level of Rho-dependent transcription termination at the tna operon's leader region. Thus, for the first time, a regulatory function can be attributed to HolE, in addition to its role as structural component of the DNA polymerase III complex. PMID:24375106

  8. Structural and functional characterization of two unusual endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Hall, David R; Smalås, Arne O; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna; Moe, Elin

    2015-08-01

    While most bacteria possess a single gene encoding the bifunctional DNA glycosylase Endonuclease III (EndoIII) in their genomes, Deinococcus radiodurans possesses three: DR2438 (DrEndoIII1), DR0289 (DrEndoIII2) and DR0982 (DrEndoIII3). Here we have determined the crystal structures of DrEndoIII1 and an N-terminally truncated form of DrEndoIII3 (DrEndoIII3Δ76). We have also generated a homology model of DrEndoIII2 and measured activity of the three enzymes. All three structures consist of two all α-helical domains, one of which exhibits a [4Fe-4S] cluster and the other a HhH-motif, separated by a DNA binding cleft, similar to previously determined structures of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, both DrEndoIII1 and DrEndoIII3 possess an extended HhH motif with extra helical features and an altered electrostatic surface potential. In addition, the DNA binding cleft of DrEndoIII3 seems to be less accessible for DNA interactions, while in DrEndoIII1 it seems to be more open. Analysis of the enzyme activities shows that DrEndoIII2 is most similar to the previously studied enzymes, while DrEndoIII1 seems to be more distant with a weaker activity towards substrate DNA containing either thymine glycol or an abasic site. DrEndoIII3 is the most distantly related enzyme and displays no detectable activity towards these substrates even though the suggested catalytic residues are conserved. Based on a comparative structural analysis, we suggest that the altered surface potential, shape of the substrate-binding pockets and specific amino acid substitutions close to the active site and in the DNA interacting loops may underlie the unexpected differences in activity. PMID:26172070

  9. Structural and functional characterization of two unusual endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Hall, David R; Smalås, Arne O; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna; Moe, Elin

    2015-08-01

    While most bacteria possess a single gene encoding the bifunctional DNA glycosylase Endonuclease III (EndoIII) in their genomes, Deinococcus radiodurans possesses three: DR2438 (DrEndoIII1), DR0289 (DrEndoIII2) and DR0982 (DrEndoIII3). Here we have determined the crystal structures of DrEndoIII1 and an N-terminally truncated form of DrEndoIII3 (DrEndoIII3Δ76). We have also generated a homology model of DrEndoIII2 and measured activity of the three enzymes. All three structures consist of two all α-helical domains, one of which exhibits a [4Fe-4S] cluster and the other a HhH-motif, separated by a DNA binding cleft, similar to previously determined structures of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, both DrEndoIII1 and DrEndoIII3 possess an extended HhH motif with extra helical features and an altered electrostatic surface potential. In addition, the DNA binding cleft of DrEndoIII3 seems to be less accessible for DNA interactions, while in DrEndoIII1 it seems to be more open. Analysis of the enzyme activities shows that DrEndoIII2 is most similar to the previously studied enzymes, while DrEndoIII1 seems to be more distant with a weaker activity towards substrate DNA containing either thymine glycol or an abasic site. DrEndoIII3 is the most distantly related enzyme and displays no detectable activity towards these substrates even though the suggested catalytic residues are conserved. Based on a comparative structural analysis, we suggest that the altered surface potential, shape of the substrate-binding pockets and specific amino acid substitutions close to the active site and in the DNA interacting loops may underlie the unexpected differences in activity.

  10. Ghost-interaction correction in ensemble density-functional theory for excited states with and without range separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Mehboob; Knecht, Stefan; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    Ensemble density-functional theory (eDFT) suffers from the so-called "ghost-interaction" error when approximate exchange-correlation functionals are used. In this work, we present a rigorous ghost-interaction correction (GIC) scheme in the context of range-separated eDFT. The method relies on an exact decomposition of the ensemble short-range exchange-correlation energy into a multideterminantal exact exchange term, which involves the long-range interacting ensemble density matrix, instead of the Kohn-Sham (KS) one, and a complementary density-functional correlation energy. A generalized adiabatic connection formula is derived for the latter. In order to perform practical calculations, the complementary correlation functional is simply modeled by its ground-state local density approximation (LDA), while long-range interacting ground- and excited-state wave functions are obtained self-consistently by combining a long-range configuration-interaction calculation with a short-range LDA potential. We show that the GIC reduces the curvature of approximate range-separated ensemble energies drastically while providing considerably more accurate excitation energies, even for charge-transfer and double excitations. Interestingly, the method performs well also in the context of standard KS-eDFT, which is recovered when the range-separation parameter is set to 0.

  11. 77 FR 76426 - Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... affect Type III supporting organizations and their supported organizations. The text of those temporary...), which are known as supporting organizations. The final and temporary regulations provide requirements to... Type III supporting organizations and their supported organizations. The text of those...

  12. Evidence for strong mixing between the LC and MLCT excited states in Bis(2-phenylpyridinato-C[sup 2], N')(2, 2'-bipyridine)iridium(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, M.G.; Hauser, A.; Guedel, H.U. )

    1993-07-07

    The well-resolved absorption, excitation, and luminescence spectra of [Ir(ppy)[sub 2]bpy][sup +] (ppyH = 2-phenylpyridine, bpy = 2, 2'-bipyridine) in different media at cryogenic temperatures are presented. In solutions and glasses at ambient temperature the lowest energy excited state corresponds to an Ir [yields] bpy charge-transfer excitation whereas in the crystalline host lattice [Rh(ppy)[sub 2]bpy]PF[sub 6] the lowest excited state at 21,450 cm[sup [minus]1] is assigned to a [sup 3][pi]-[pi]* excitation localized on the cyclometalating ppy[minus] ligands. The next higher excited Ir [yields] bpy charge-transfer state has shifted to 21,820 cm[sup [minus]1], only 300 cm[sup [minus]1] above the [sup 3]LC excited state. The close proximity of the [sup 3]LC and [sup 3]MLCT excited states and the large spin-orbit coupling constant of Ir[sup 3+] induce a strong mixing of charge-transfer character into the [sup 3]LC lowest excited states, resulting in increased oscillator strengths, reduced lifetimes, short axis polarized transitions, and a large zero-field splitting of 10-15 cm[sup [minus]1].

  13. A simplified Tamm-Dancoff density functional approach for the electronic excitation spectra of very large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimme, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Two approximations in the Tamm-Dancoff density functional theory approach (TDA-DFT) to electronically excited states are proposed which allow routine computations for electronic ultraviolet (UV)- or circular dichroism (CD) spectra of molecules with 500-1000 atoms. Speed-ups compared to conventional time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) treatments of about two to three orders of magnitude in the excited state part at only minor loss of accuracy are obtained. The method termed sTDA ("s" for simplified) employs atom-centered Löwdin-monopole based two-electron repulsion integrals with the asymptotically correct 1/R behavior and perturbative single excitation configuration selection. It is formulated generally for any standard global hybrid density functional with given Fock-exchange mixing parameter ax. The method performs well for two standard benchmark sets of vertical singlet-singlet excitations for values of ax in the range 0.2-0.6. The mean absolute deviations from reference data are only 0.2-0.3 eV and similar to those from standard TD-DFT. In three cases (two dyes and one polypeptide), good mutual agreement between the electronic spectra (up to 10-11 eV excitation energy) from the sTDA method and those from TD(A)-DFT is obtained. The computed UV- and CD-spectra of a few typical systems (e.g., C60, two transition metal complexes, [7]helicene, polyalanine, a supramolecular aggregate with 483 atoms and about 7000 basis functions) compare well with corresponding experimental data. The method is proposed together with medium-sized double- or triple-zeta type atomic-orbital basis sets as a quantum chemical tool to investigate the spectra of huge molecular systems at a reliable DFT level.

  14. Radial and angular correlations of two excited electrons. IV. Comparison of configuration-interaction wave functions with the group-theoretical basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. D.; Macek, J. H.

    1984-05-01

    Doubly-excited-state basis (DESB) functions of Herrick and Sinanoǧlu are compared with the large-scale configuration-interaction (CI) wave functions of Lipsky et al., and with the adiabatic channel functions in hyperspherical coordinates. It is shown that DESB functions will represent those states where the mean value of θ12 is large. Owing to the absence of intershell correlations, and a consequent underestimation of radial correlations, the DESB functions give excessive concentrations near θ12=0 for other, less sharply correlated in angle, states.

  15. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shunsuke A; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases. PMID:26671367

  16. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  17. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  18. Measurement of the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg excitation function

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C. M.; Dragojevic, I.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nelson, S. L.; Hoffman, D. C.; Nitsche, H.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K. E.; Eichler, R.

    2009-02-15

    The excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of 320{sub -100}{sup +110} pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from {sup 259}Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,2n){sup 258}Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved {sup 258}Sg half-life of 2.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.6} ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  19. Excitation functions of (nat)Zn(p,x) nuclear reactions with proton beam energy below 18 MeV.

    PubMed

    Asad, Ali H; Chan, Sun; Morandeau, Laurence; Cryer, David; Smith, Suzanne V; Price, Roger I

    2014-12-01

    We measured the excitation functions of (nat)Zn (p,x) reactions up to 17.6MeV, using the stacked-foils activation technique. High-purity natural zinc (and copper) foils were irradiated with proton beams generated by an 18MeV isochronous cyclotron. Activated foils were measured using high-purity Ge gamma spectroscopy to quantify the radionuclides (61)Cu, (66)Ga, (67)Ga, and (65)Zn produced from the reactions. Thick-target integral yields were also deduced from the measured excitation functions of the produced radioisotopes. These results were compared with the published literature and were found to be in good agreement with most reports, particularly those most recently compiled.

  20. Excitation functions for (d,x) reactions on (133)Cs up to Ed=40MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M; Ignatyuk, A V

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of excitation functions of deuteron induced reactions the excitation functions of the (133)Cs(d,x)(133m,133mg,131mg)Ba,(134,)(132)Cs and (12)(9m)Xe nuclear reactions were measured up to 40MeV deuteron energies by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-ray spectroscopy of activated samples. The results were compared with calculations performed with the theoretical nuclear reaction codes ALICE-IPPE-D, EMPIRE II-D and TALYS calculation listed in the TENDL-2014 library. A moderate agreement was obtained. Based on the integral yields deduced from our measured cross sections, production of (131)Cs via the (133)Cs(d,4n)(131)Ba→(131)Cs reaction and (133)Ba via (133)Cs(d,2n) reactions is discussed in comparison with other charged particle production routes. PMID:26773822

  1. Selective removal of cesium from aqueous solutions with nickel (II) hexacyanoferrate (III) functionalized agricultural residue-walnut shell.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dahu; Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Zhenya

    2014-04-15

    A novel nickel (II) hexacyanoferrate (III) functionalized agricultural residue-walnut shell (Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS) was developed to selectively remove cesium ion (Cs(+)) from aqueous solutions. This paper showed the first integral study on Cs(+) removal behavior and waste reduction analysis by using biomass adsorption material. The results indicated that the removal process was rapid and reached saturation within 2h. As a special characteristic of Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS, acidic condition was preferred for Cs(+) removal, which was useful for extending the application scope of the prepared biomass material in treating acidic radioactive liquid waste. The newly developed Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS could selectively remove Cs(+) though the coexisting ions (Na(+) and K(+) in this study) exhibited negative effects. In addition, approximately 99.8% (in volume) of the liquid waste was reduced by using Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS and furthermore 91.9% (in volume) of the spent biomass material (Cs-Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS) was reduced after incineration (at 500°C for 2h). Due to its relatively high distribution coefficient and significant volume reduction, Ni(II)HCF(III)-WS is expected to be a promising material for Cs(+) removal in practice.

  2. Excitation functions for {sup 208-211}Fr produced in the {sup 18}O+{sup 197}Au fusion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Corradi, L.; Behera, B.R.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Stefanini, A.M.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Wu, Y.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Sagaidak, R.N.; Atutov, S.N.; Mai, B.; Stancari, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Mariotti, E.; Khanbekyan, A.; Veronesi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Excitation functions for {sup 208-211}Fr isotopes produced in the {sup 18}O+{sup 197}Au fusion-evaporation reaction have been measured at E{sub lab}=75-130 MeV via characteristic {alpha} decays by means of an electrostatic deflector and a semiconductor detector. Data have been compared with calculations giving barrier-passing (capture) cross sections and probabilities of the compound nucleus decay into different channels according to the standard statistical model.

  3. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C60 fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J; Clikeman, Tyler T; Larson, Bryon W; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-08-17

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1 → T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (ΦISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1 → S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ΦISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (τavg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (τavg ≈ 17 μs and 54 μs for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas τavg ≈ 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited-state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene. PMID:27485768

  4. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C60 fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J; Clikeman, Tyler T; Larson, Bryon W; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-08-17

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1 → T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (ΦISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1 → S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ΦISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (τavg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (τavg ≈ 17 μs and 54 μs for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas τavg ≈ 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited-state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  5. Development of Two Animal Models To Study the Function of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type III Secretion Systems▿

    PubMed Central

    Piñeyro, Pablo; Zhou, Xiaohui; Orfe, Lisa H.; Friel, Patrick J.; Lahmers, Kevin; Call, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an emerging food- and waterborne pathogen that encodes two type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Previous studies have linked type III secretion system 1 (T3SS1) to cytotoxicity and T3SS2 to intestinal fluid accumulation, but animal challenge models needed to study these phenomena are limited. In this study we evaluated the roles of the T3SSs during infection using two novel animal models: a model in which piglets were inoculated orogastrically and a model in which mice were inoculated in their lungs (intrapulmonarily). The bacterial strains employed in this study had equivalent growth rates and beta-hemolytic activity based on in vitro assays. Inoculation of 48-h-old conventional piglets with 1011 CFU of the wild-type strain (NY-4) or T3SS1 deletion mutant strains resulted in acute, self-limiting diarrhea, whereas inoculation with a T3SS2 deletion mutant strain failed to produce any clinical symptoms. Intrapulmonary inoculation of C57BL/6 mice with the wild-type strain and T3SS2 deletion mutant strains (5 × 105 CFU) induced mortality or a moribund state within 12 h (80 to 100% mortality), whereas inoculation with a T3SS1 deletion mutant or a T3SS1 T3SS2 double deletion mutant produced no mortality. Bacteria were recovered from multiple organs regardless of the strain used in the mouse model, indicating that the mice were capable of clearing the lung infection in the absence of a functional T3SS1. Because all strains had a similar beta-hemolysin phenotype, we surmise that thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) plays a limited role in these models. The two models introduced herein produce robust results and provide a means to determine how different T3SS1 and T3SS2 effector proteins contribute to pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus infection. PMID:20823199

  6. Preparation of amino-Fe(III) functionalized mesoporous silica for synergistic adsorption of tetracycline and copper.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyang; Liu, Huijuan; Wu, Liyuan; Lan, Huachun; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-11-01

    Finding effective methods for simultaneous removal of antibiotics and heavy metals has attracted increasing concern since both of them are frequently detected in aquatic environments. In this study, a novel mesoporous silica adsorbent (Fe-N,N-SBA15) contained dual-functional groups was synthesized by first grafting di-amino groups on SBA15, and then coordinating Fe(III) onto the adsorbent. The adsorbent was then used in the synchronous elimination of tetracycline (TC) and Cu(II) from water, which was deeply studied by solution pH, kinetics, equilibriums in sole and binary systems. It was found that the adsorbent had high affinity for both TC and Cu(II) and synergistic effects on the adsorption were found. The solution pH remarkably affected the adsorption due to pH-dependent speciation of TC, Cu(II), TC-Cu(II) complex and the surface properties of the adsorbent. Increasing adsorption amount of TC and Cu(II) on the adsorbent could be attributed to the formation of complex TC-Cu(II) bridging or the stronger affinity of the adsorbent for the TC-Cu(II) complex than that for TC or Cu(II) separately. FT-IR and XPS studies revealed that Fe(III) and amino groups on the adsorbent were complexed with the amide of TC and Cu(II), respectively. The recyclabilities of the adsorbent were also evaluated and the Fe-N,N-SBA15 exhibited good reusability for TC and Cu(II) removal. This study shows guidelines and offers an innovative, effective method for the synergistic removal of antibiotics and heavy metals from aquatic environments.

  7. Direct excitation luminescence spectroscopy of Eu(III) complexes of 1,4,7-tris(carbamoylmethyl)-1,4,7,10- tetraazacyclododecane derivatives and kinetic studies of their catalytic cleavage of an RNA analog.

    PubMed

    Nwe, Kido; Richard, John P; Morrow, Janet R

    2007-11-28

    The macrocycles 1,4,7-tris(carbamoylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetrazacyclododecane (1), 1,4,7-tris[(N-ethyl)carbamoylmethyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (2), 1,4,7-tris[(N,N-diethyl)carbamoylmethyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (3) and their Eu(III) complexes are prepared. Studies using direct Eu(III) excitation luminescence spectroscopy show that all three Eu(III) complexes exhibit only one predominant isomer with two bound waters under neutral to mildly basic conditions (Eu(X)(H(2)O)(2) for X = 1-3). There are no detectable ligand ionizations over the pH range 5.0-8.0 for Eu(3), 5.0-8.5 for Eu(2) or 5.0-9.5 for Eu(1). The three Eu(III) complexes show a linear dependence of second-order rate constants for the cleavage of 4-nitrophenyl-2-hydroxyethylphosphate (HpPNP) on pH in the range 6.5-8.0 for Eu(3), 7.0-8.5 for Eu(2) and 7.0-9.0 for Eu(1). This pH-rate profile is consistent with the Eu(III) complex-substrate complex being converted to the active form by loss of a proton and with Eu(III) water pK(a) values that are higher than 8.0 for Eu(3), 8.5 for Eu(2) and 9.0 for Eu(1). Inhibition studies show that Eu() binds strongly to the dianionic ligand methylphosphate (K(d) = 0.28 mM), and more weakly to diethylphosphate (K(d) = 7.5 mM), consistent with a catalytic role of the Eu(III) complexes in stabilizing the developing negative charge on the phosphorane transition state.

  8. Double excitations and state-to-state transition dipoles in π-π∗ excited singlet states of linear polyenes: Time-dependent density-functional theory versus multiconfigurational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Ivan A.; Tafur, Sergio; Masunov, Artëm E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of static and dynamic electron correlation on the nature of excited states and state-to-state transition dipole moments is studied with a multideterminant wave function approach on the example of all-trans linear polyenes ( C4H6 , C6H8 , and C8H10 ). Symmetry-forbidden singlet nAg states were found to separate into three groups: purely single, mostly single, and mostly double excitations. The excited-state absorption spectrum is dominated by two bright transitions: 1Bu-2Ag and 1Bu-mAg , where mAg is the state, corresponding to two-electron excitation from the highest occupied to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The richness of the excited-state absorption spectra and strong mixing of the doubly excited determinants into lower- nAg states, reported previously at the complete active space self-consistent field level of theory, were found to be an artifact of the smaller active space, limited to π orbitals. When dynamic σ-π correlation is taken into account, single- and double-excited states become relatively well separated at least at the equilibrium geometry of the ground state. This electronic structure is closely reproduced within time-dependent density-functional theory (TD DFT), where double excitations appear in a second-order coupled electronic oscillator formalism and do not mix with the single excitations obtained within the linear response. An extension of TD DFT is proposed, where the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) is invoked after the linear response equations are solved (a posteriori TDA). The numerical performance of this extension is validated against multideterminant-wave-function and quadratic-response TD DFT results. It is recommended for use with a sum-over-states approach to predict the nonlinear optical properties of conjugated molecules.

  9. Cross-sectional retrospective study of muscle function in patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Decostre, Valérie; Laforêt, Pascal; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; De Antonio, Marie; Leveugle, Sylvain; Ollivier, Gwenn; Canal, Aurélie; Kachetel, Kahina; Petit, François; Eymard, Bruno; Behin, Anthony; Wahbi, Karim; Labrune, Philippe; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by liver and muscle impairment. This study aimed to identify promising muscle function measures for future studies on natural disease progression and therapeutic trials. The age-effect on the manual muscle testing (MMT), the hand-held dynamometry (HHD), the motor function measure (MFM) and the Purdue pegboard test was evaluated by regression analysis in a cross-sectional retrospective single site study. In patients aged between 13 and 56 years old, the Purdue pegboard test and dynamometry of key pinch and knee extension strength were age-sensitive with annual losses of 1.49, 1.10 and 0.70% of the predicted values (%pred), respectively. The MFM score and handgrip strength were also age-sensitive but only in patients older than 29 and 37 years old with annual losses of 1.42 and 1.84%pred, respectively. Muscle strength assessed by MMT and elbow extension measured by HHD demonstrated an annual loss of less than 0.50%pred and are thus unlikely to be promising outcome measures for future clinical trials. In conclusion, our results identified age-sensitive outcomes from retrospective data and may serve for future longitudinal studies in which an estimation of the minimal number of subjects is provided.

  10. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for H + N2 yields HN2. III - Calculations for the excited state surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1991-01-01

    Additional calculations which characterize potential energy sources (PESs) for the excited 3A-double-prime state, for a bound 2(2A-prime) state, for HN2(+), and for the Rydberg states associated with HN2(+). It is anticipated that these excited state PESs will be important in interpreting and designing experiments to characterize the ground state HN2 species via neutralized ion beam techniques.

  11. Evaporation residue excitation function measurements in 50Ti- and 54Cr-induced reactions with lanthanide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Alfonso, M. C.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Bennett, M. E.; Frey, M. M.; Folden, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Cross sections for the production of shell-stabilized evaporation residues in the 50Ti+Gd160 , 159Tb, 162Dy , and 54Cr+Dy162 reactions are reported. The compound nucleus excitation energy range considered principally covers the 4 n evaporation channel with segments of the 3 n and 5 n channels also measured. The resultant production cross sections are for nuclides with Z =86 -90 . From an analysis based on a statistical model, it is concluded that a larger fission probability than that predicted by the Bohr-Wheeler transition-state theory is needed to describe the data. This outcome is attributed to the influence of collective nuclear excitations. Subsequently, the expected stability enhancement against fission due to the influence of the magic N =126 shell is not evident. The x n excitation functions measured in previous experiments in the reactions 48Ca+Gd154 , 159Tb,Dy162 , and 165Ho are combined with the present data for Z >20 projectiles to illustrate systematic behavior of measured cross sections as a function of the difference in fission barrier and neutron separation energy.

  12. Photosensitized Singlet Oxygen Production upon Two-Photon Excitation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Functionalized Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gandra, Naveen; Chiu, Pui Lam; Li, Wenbing; Anderson, Yolanda R.; Mitra, Somenath; He, Huixin; Gao, Ruomei

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with -COOH (along with some sulphonation and nitration), and/or modified with chitosan were prepared and tested for their singlet oxygen (1O2) production. The emission from 1O2 observed upon SWNT irradiation at 532 nm was due to a two-photon process, while 1O2 production via excitation at 355 nm occurred through a conventional one-photon pathway. The relative quantum yield of 1O2 production at excitation wavelength of 532 nm was found to be 0.00, 0.07-0.13 and 0.24-0.54 for highly-functionalized, partially-functionalized and non-functionalized SWNT samples respectively. The nanotube-mediated generation of 1O2 may find applications in both targeted destruction of tumor cells and selective degradation of drug molecules. Our research provides a practical approach to modulate the production of reactive oxygen species from SWNTs via surface functionalization/modification. PMID:20046942

  13. Motor cortex maturation is associated with reductions in recurrent connectivity among functional subpopulations and increases in intrinsic excitability.

    PubMed

    Biane, Jeremy S; Scanziani, Massimo; Tuszynski, Mark H; Conner, James M

    2015-03-18

    Behavior is derived from the configuration of synaptic connectivity among functionally diverse neurons. Fine motor behavior is absent at birth in most mammals but gradually emerges during subsequent postnatal corticospinal system maturation; the nature of circuit development and reorganization during this period has been largely unexplored. We investigated connectivity and synaptic signaling among functionally distinct corticospinal populations in Fischer 344 rats from postnatal day 18 through 75 using retrograde tracer injections into specific spinal cord segments associated with distinct aspects of forelimb function. Primary motor cortex slices were prepared enabling simultaneous patch-clamp recordings of up to four labeled corticospinal neurons and testing of 3489 potential synaptic connections. We find that, in immature animals, local connectivity is biased toward corticospinal neurons projecting to the same spinal cord segment; this within-population connectivity significantly decreases through maturation until connection frequency is similar between neurons projecting to the same (within-population) or different (across-population) spinal segments. Concomitantly, postnatal maturation is associated with a significant reduction in synaptic efficacy over time and an increase in intrinsic neuronal excitability, altering how excitation is effectively transmitted across recurrent corticospinal networks. Collectively, the postnatal emergence of fine motor control is associated with a relative broadening of connectivity between functionally diverse cortical motor neurons and changes in synaptic properties that could enable the emergence of smaller independent networks, enabling fine motor movement. These changes in synaptic patterning and physiological function provide a basis for the increased capabilities of the mature versus developing brain.

  14. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl− ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2016-01-01

    Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane permeability for Cl− ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl− ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl− transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl− lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions—high membrane conductance and passive distribution—enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1 gene. However, given that ClC-1 must be drastically inhibited (∼80%) before myotonia develops, more recent studies have explored whether acute and more subtle ClC-1 regulation contributes to controlling the excitability of working muscle. Methods were developed to measure ClC-1 function with subsecond temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate ions. This inhibition is important for preserving excitability of working muscle in the face of activity-induced elevation of extracellular K+ and accumulating inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Furthermore, during prolonged activity, a marked ClC-1 activation can develop that compromises muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and

  15. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2016-04-01

    Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane permeability for Cl(-) ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl(-) ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl(-) transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl(-) lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions-high membrane conductance and passive distribution-enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1 gene. However, given that ClC-1 must be drastically inhibited (∼80%) before myotonia develops, more recent studies have explored whether acute and more subtle ClC-1 regulation contributes to controlling the excitability of working muscle. Methods were developed to measure ClC-1 function with subsecond temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate ions. This inhibition is important for preserving excitability of working muscle in the face of activity-induced elevation of extracellular K(+) and accumulating inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Furthermore, during prolonged activity, a marked ClC-1 activation can develop that compromises muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and

  16. Structure-function analysis of hRPC62 provides insights into RNA polymerase III transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Stéphane; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; El-Ayoubi, Leyla; Budd, Aidan; Legrand, Pierre; Pinaud, Noël; Teichmann, Martin; Fribourg, Sébastien

    2011-03-01

    The 17-subunit human RNA polymerase III (hPol III) transcribes small, untranslated RNA genes that are involved in the regulation of transcription, splicing and translation. hPol III subunits hRPC62, hRPC39 and hRPC32 form a stable ternary subcomplex required for promoter-specific transcription initiation by hPol III. Here, we report the crystal structure of hRPC62. This subunit folds as a four-tandem extended winged helix (eWH) protein that is structurally related to the transcription factor TFIIEα N terminus. Through biochemical analyses, we mapped the protein-protein interactions of hRPC62, hRPC32 and hRPC39. In addition, we demonstrated that hRPC62 and hRPC39 bind single-stranded and duplex DNA, respectively, in a sequence-independent manner. Overall, we shed light on structural similarities between the hPol III-specific subunit hRPC62 and TFIIEα and propose specific functions for hRPC39 and hRPC62 in transcription initiation by hPol III. PMID:21358628

  17. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses. PMID:27491409

  18. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-08-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses.

  19. Apelin acts in the subfornical organ to influence neuronal excitability and cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Smith, Pauline M; Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2013-07-01

    Apelin is an adipocyte-derived hormone involved in the regulation of water balance, food intake and the cardiovascular system partially through actions in the CNS. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ with identified roles in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular control and energy balance. The SFO lacks a normal blood-brain barrier, and is thus able to detect circulating signalling molecules such as angiotensin II and leptin. In this study, we investigated actions of apelin-13, the predominant apelin isoform in brain and circulatory system, on the excitability of dissociated SFO neurons using electrophysiological approaches, and determined the cardiovascular consequences of direct administration into the SFO of anaesthetized rats. Whole cell current clamp recording revealed that bath-applied 100 nm apelin-13 directly influences the excitability of the majority of SFO neurons by eliciting either depolarizing (31.8%, mean 7.0 ± 0.8 mV) or hyperpolarizing (28.6%, mean -10.4 ± 1.8 mV) responses. Using voltage-clamp techniques, we also identified modulatory actions of apelin-13 on specific ion channels, demonstrating that apelin-13 activates a non-selective cationic conductance to depolarize SFO neurons while activation of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance underlies hyperpolarizing effects. In anaesthetized rats, microinjection of apelin into SFO decreased both blood pressure (BP) (mean area under the curve -1492.3 ± 357.1 mmHg.s, n = 5) and heart rate (HR) (-32.4 ± 10.39 beats, n = 5). Our data suggest that circulating apelin can directly affect BP and HR as a consequence of the ability of this peptide to modulate the excitability of SFO neurons.

  20. Apelin acts in the subfornical organ to influence neuronal excitability and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li; Smith, Pauline M; Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2013-01-01

    Apelin is an adipocyte-derived hormone involved in the regulation of water balance, food intake and the cardiovascular system partially through actions in the CNS. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ with identified roles in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular control and energy balance. The SFO lacks a normal blood–brain barrier, and is thus able to detect circulating signalling molecules such as angiotensin II and leptin. In this study, we investigated actions of apelin-13, the predominant apelin isoform in brain and circulatory system, on the excitability of dissociated SFO neurons using electrophysiological approaches, and determined the cardiovascular consequences of direct administration into the SFO of anaesthetized rats. Whole cell current clamp recording revealed that bath-applied 100 nm apelin-13 directly influences the excitability of the majority of SFO neurons by eliciting either depolarizing (31.8%, mean 7.0 ± 0.8 mV) or hyperpolarizing (28.6%, mean −10.4 ± 1.8 mV) responses. Using voltage-clamp techniques, we also identified modulatory actions of apelin-13 on specific ion channels, demonstrating that apelin-13 activates a non-selective cationic conductance to depolarize SFO neurons while activation of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance underlies hyperpolarizing effects. In anaesthetized rats, microinjection of apelin into SFO decreased both blood pressure (BP) (mean area under the curve −1492.3 ± 357.1 mmHg.s, n= 5) and heart rate (HR) (−32.4 ± 10.39 beats, n= 5). Our data suggest that circulating apelin can directly affect BP and HR as a consequence of the ability of this peptide to modulate the excitability of SFO neurons. PMID:23629509

  1. A [4 + 1] Cyclative Capture Access to Indolizines via Cobalt(III)-Catalyzed Csp(2)-H Bond Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xun; Hu, Xinwei; Deng, Yuanfu; Jiang, Huanfeng; Zeng, Wei

    2016-09-16

    A Co(III)-catalyzed [4 + 1] cycloaddition of 2-arylpyridines or 2-alkenylpyridines with aldehydes through Csp(2)-H bond activation has been developed. This protocol provides a facile approach to structurally diverse indolizines including benzoindolizines with a broad range of functional group tolerance. PMID:27584706

  2. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. III. Probability distribution functions of molecular lines in Cygnus X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Ossenkopf, V.; Klessen, R. S.; Simon, R.; Fechtenbaum, S.; Herpin, F.; Tremblin, P.; Csengeri, T.; Myers, P. C.; Hill, T.; Cunningham, M.; Federrath, C.

    2016-03-01

    The probability distribution function of column density (N-PDF) serves as a powerful tool to characterise the various physical processes that influence the structure of molecular clouds. Studies that use extinction maps or H2 column-density maps (N) that are derived from dust show that star-forming clouds can best be characterised by lognormal PDFs for the lower N range and a power-law tail for higher N, which is commonly attributed to turbulence and self-gravity and/or pressure, respectively. While PDFs from dust cover a large dynamic range (typically N ~ 1020-24 cm-2 or Av~ 0.1-1000), PDFs obtained from molecular lines - converted into H2 column density - potentially trace more selectively different regimes of (column) densities and temperatures. They also enable us to distinguish different clouds along the line of sight through using the velocity information. We report here on PDFs that were obtained from observations of 12CO, 13CO, C18O, CS, and N2H+ in the Cygnus X North region, and make a comparison to a PDF that was derived from dust observations with the Herschel satellite. The PDF of 12CO is lognormal for Av ~ 1-30, but is cut for higher Av because of optical depth effects. The PDFs of C18O and 13CO are mostly lognormal up to Av ~ 1-15, followed by excess up to Av ~ 40. Above that value, all CO PDFs drop, which is most likely due to depletion. The high density tracers CS and N2H+ exhibit only a power law distribution between Av ~ 15 and 400, respectively. The PDF from dust is lognormal for Av ~ 3-15 and has a power-law tail up to Av ~ 500. Absolute values for the molecular line column densities are, however, rather uncertain because of abundance and excitation temperature variations. If we take the dust PDF at face value, we "calibrate" the molecular line PDF of CS to that of the dust and determine an abundance [CS]/[H2] of 10-9. The slopes of the power-law tails of the CS, N2H+, and dust PDFs are -1.6, -1.4, and -2.3, respectively, and are thus consistent

  3. Rational design of stable and functional hirudin III mutants with lower antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Saeme; Mirzahoseini, Hasan; Karimipour, Morteza; Rahimi, Hamze; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2015-11-01

    Hirudin is an inhibitor of thrombin and used as an effective anticoagulant, but has a potential to develop unacceptable immune responses. In this study, two computational tools were used to predict T-cell epitopes within Hirudin variant III (HVIII) sequence, and design mutations that would lessen its antigenicity. Homology models of native and mutant HVIII proteins (T4K, S9G, V21G, and V21K) were generated, and further used to assess their interactions with thrombin. The docking experiment showed that all mutants had a suitable pattern of interactions, with similar or lower interaction energies compared with the native protein. These complexes were subsequently subjected to molecular dynamics simulation. All mutants complexes had overall stable structures over simulation time, with RMSD, gyration radius, hydrogen bonds numbers, and accessible surface areas patterns that were comparable with the native HVIII over time. Interestingly, in all mutants, a shorter length was observed for the two salt bridges Arg73-Asp55 and Arg77-Glu57, which are suggested to be important in Hirudin-thrombin complex formation. Best selected mutants expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), subsequently SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis confirmed the successful same expression of Hirudin and mutants. In conclusion, we believe that this computational approach could identify potentially safer proteins with preserved or even improved functionality. PMID:26321653

  4. Distinct aetiopathogenesis in subgroups of functional dyspepsia according to the Rome III criteria

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu-Jen; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Chen, Chieh-Chang; Lee, Ji-Yuh; Hsu, Yao-Chun; Chen, Mei-Jyh; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Yang, Tsung-Hua; Chang, Wen-Hsiung; Wu, Jeng-Yi; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Lin, Jaw-Town; Shun, Chia-Tung; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Whether there is distinct pathogenesis in subgroups of functional dyspepsia (FD), the postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) remains controversial. We aimed to identify the risk factors of FD and its subgroups in the Chinese population. Methods Patients with dyspepsia and healthy subjects who underwent gastric cancer screening were enrolled in this multicentre study from 2010 to 2012. All patients were evaluated by questionnaire, oesophagoduodenoscopy, histological examination and Helicobacter pylori tests. Subgroups of FD were classified according to the Rome III criteria. Psychiatric stress was assessed by the short form Brief Symptom Rating Scale. CagA and VacA genotypes were determined by PCR. Results Of 2378 patients screened for eligibility, 771 and 491 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of uninvestigated dyspepsia and FD, respectively. 298 (60.7%) and 353 (71.9%) individuals were diagnosed with EPS and PDS, respectively, whereas 169 (34.4%) had the overlap syndrome. As compared with 1031 healthy controls, PDS and EPS shared some common risk factors, including younger age (OR 0.95; 99.5% CI 0.93 to 0.98), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (OR 6.60; 99.5% CI 3.13 to 13.90), anxiety (OR 3.41; 99.5% CI 2.01 to 5.77) and concomitant IBS (OR 6.89; 99.5% CI 3.41 to 13.94). By contrast, H. pylori (OR 1.86; 99.5% CI 1.01 to 3.45), unmarried status (OR 4.22; 99.5% CI 2.02 to 8.81), sleep disturbance (OR 2.56; 99.5% CI 1.29 to 5.07) and depression (OR 2.34; 99.5% CI 1.04 to 5.36) were associated with PDS. Moderate to severe antral atrophy and CagA positive strains were also more prevalent in PDS. Conclusions Different risk factors exist among FD subgroups based on the Rome III criteria, indicating distinct aetiopathogenesis of the subdivisions that may necessitate different therapeutic strategies. PMID:25406127

  5. Nanoscale visualization of functional adhesion/excitability nodes at the intercalated disc

    PubMed Central

    Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Agullo-Pascual, Esperanza; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L.; Keegan, Sarah; Lin, Xianming; Arcos, Tatiana; Feng-Xia-Liang; Korchev, Yuri E.; Gorelik, Julia; Fenyö, David; Rothenberg, Eli; Delmar, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion and electrical excitability are considered separate cellular properties. Studies of myelinated fibres, however, show that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) aggregate with cell adhesion molecules at discrete subcellular locations, such as the nodes of Ranvier. Demonstration of similar macromolecular organization in cardiac muscle is missing. Here we combine nanoscale-imaging (single-molecule localization microscopy; electron microscopy; and ‘angle view' scanning patch clamp) with mathematical simulations to demonstrate distinct hubs at the cardiac intercalated disc, populated by clusters of the adhesion molecule N-cadherin and the VGSC NaV1.5. We show that the N-cadherin-NaV1.5 association is not random, that NaV1.5 molecules in these clusters are major contributors to cardiac sodium current, and that loss of NaV1.5 expression reduces intercellular adhesion strength. We speculate that adhesion/excitability nodes are key sites for crosstalk of the contractile and electrical molecular apparatus and may represent the structural substrate of cardiomyopathies in patients with mutations in molecules of the VGSC complex. PMID:26787348

  6. Modeling Spin Fluctuations and Magnetic Excitations from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorni, Tommaso; Timrov, Iurii; Dal Corso, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano

    Harnessing spin fluctuations and magnetic excitations in materials is key in many fields of technology, spanning from memory devices to information transfer and processing, to name but a few. A proper understanding of the interplay between collective and single-particle spin excitations is still lacking, and it is expected that first-principle simulations based on TDDFT may shed light on this interplay, as well as on the role of important effects such as relativistic ones and related magnetic anisotropies. All the numerical approaches proposed so far to tackle this problem are based on the computationally demanding solution of the Sternheimer equations for the response orbitals or the even more demanding solution of coupled Dyson equations for the spin and charge susceptibilities. The Liouville-Lanczos approach to TDDFT has already proven to be a valuable alternative, the most striking of its features being the avoidance of sums over unoccupied single-particle states and the frequency-independence of the main numerical bottleneck. In this work we present an extension of this methodology to magnetic systems and its implementation in the Quantum ESPRESSO distribution, together with a few preliminary results on the magnon dispersions in bulk Fe.

  7. Imaging spectrophotometry of ionized gas in NGC 1068. III - Anisotropic excitation of the large-scale disk by scattering of nuclear continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolowski, J.; Bland-hawthorn, J.; Cecil, G. North Carolina, University, Chapel Hill )

    1991-07-01

    Photoionization of the solar abundance diffuse ionized media (DIM) in NGC 1068 by anisotropic nuclear emission is studied. It is shown that the emission characteristics can be understood in the light of the developing picture of the galaxy in which its intrinsic type 1 Seyfert nucleus, concealed by an obscuring medium, is visible only through scattered, polarized light. The gas excitation is anisotropic, the high-excitation gas along the jet axis being photoionized by direct nuclear continuum, while the lower excitation gas away from the axis sees only indirect nuclear emission scattered into it. A model of low optical depth, near-nuclear Thomson scattering is considered in detail, and it is shown that, even with moderate dust extinction, this mechanism is sufficient to energize the DIM. 56 refs.

  8. Analysis and Control of Vibrational Power Transmission to Machinery Supporting Structures Subjected to a Multi-Excitation System, Part Iii: Vibrational Power Cancellation and Control Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Y. K.; White, R. G.

    1996-10-01

    The study of time-averaged vibrational power input to flexible beams and rectangular plates subjected to co-located simultaneously sinusoidal force and moment excitations has resulted in various potential vibration control schemes, both active and passive approaches, based on minimization of the resultant vibrational power input to the structures. The theory and analytical results have been presented in the two companion papers. In this paper the experimental arrangements for verification of the theoretical predictions are described. The optimal moment arm concept for the vibration levels by using combined force and moment excitations is validated on beams and rectangular plates experimentally. It is also demonstrated that by using a set of force and moment seating devices with predetermined moment arms, the vibrational response around the fundamental resonance frequency of a supporting rectangular plate caused by unbalance motor excitations can be reduced.

  9. π*-σ* hyperconjugation mechanism on the rotational barrier of the methyl group (III): Methyl-azabenzenes in the ground, excited, and anionic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Y.; Nagasawa, T.; Nakai, H.

    2001-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the internal rotations of the methyl group in methyl-azabenzenes, such as o- and m-methylpyridines, 2-methylpyrazine, 4-methylpyrimidine, 4-methylpyridadine, and 4-methyl-1,2,3-triazine in the ground, excited, and anionic states. The calculated rotational barriers reproduce well the experimental data. Orbital pictures are given for the barrier changes by excitation and electron attachment. An idea of π*-σ* hyperconjugation is applied for a comprehensive interpretation of the barrier changes. A correlation is found between the rotational barriers and the splitting of the lowest and next-lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals.

  10. Electronically Excited States of Higher Acenes up to Nonacene: A Density Functional Theory/Multireference Configuration Interaction Study.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Holger F; Tönshoff, Christina; Doerr, Markus; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa

    2016-01-12

    While the optical spectra of the acene series up to pentacene provide textbook examples for the annulation principle, the spectra of the larger members are much less understood. The present work provides an investigation of the optically allowed excited states of the acene series from pentacene to nonacene, the largest acene observed experimentally, using the density functional based multireference configuration method (DFT/MRCI). For this purpose, the ten lowest energy states of the B2u and B3u irreducible representations were computed. In agreement with previous computational investigations, the electronic wave functions of the acenes acquire significant multireference character with increasing acene size. The HOMO → LUMO excitation is the major contributor to the (1)La state (p band, B2u) also for the larger acenes. The oscillator strength decreases with increasing length. The (1)Lb state (α band, B3u), so far difficult to assign for the larger acenes due to overlap with photoprecursor bands, becomes almost insensitive to acene length. The (1)Bb state (β band, B3u) also moves only moderately to lower energy with increasing acene size. Excited states of B3u symmetry that formally result from double excitations involving HOMO, HOMO-1, LUMO, and LUMO+1 decrease in energy much faster with system size. One of them (D1) has very small oscillator strength but becomes almost isoenergetic with the (1)La state for nonacene. The other (D2) also has low oscillator strength as long as it is higher in energy than (1)Bb. Once it is lower in energy than the (1)Bb state, both states interact strongly resulting in two states with large oscillator strengths. The emergence of two strongly absorbing states is in agreement with experimental observations. The DFT/MRCI computations reproduce experimental excitation energies very well for pentacene and hexacene (within 0.1 eV). For the larger acenes deviations are larger (up to 0.2 eV), but qualitative agreement is observed. PMID

  11. Hydration effects on the barrier function of stratum corneum lipids: Raman analysis of ceramides 2, III and 5.

    PubMed

    Tfayli, Ali; Jamal, Dima; Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Manfait, Michel; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2013-11-01

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of the skin; its barrier function is highly dependent on the composition and the structure as well as the organization of lipids in its extracellular matrix. Ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol represent the major lipid classes present in this matrix. They play an important role in maintaining the normal hydration levels required for the normal physiological function. Despite the advancement in the understanding of the structure, composition and the function of the stratum corneum (SC), the concern of "dry skin" remains important in dermatology and care research. Most studies focus on the quantification of water in the skin using different techniques including Raman spectroscopy, while the studies that investigate the effect of hydration on the quality of the barrier function of the skin are limited. Raman spectroscopy provides structural, conformational and organizational information that could help elucidate the effect of hydration on the barrier function of the skin. In order to assess the effect of relative humidity on the lipid barrier function; we used Raman spectroscopy to follow-up the evolution of the conformation and the organization of three synthetic ceramides (CER) differing from each other by the nature of their polar heads (sphingosine, phytosphingosine and α hydroxyl sphingosine), CER 2, III and 5 respectively. CER III and 5 showed a more compact and ordered organization with stronger polar interactions at intermediate relative humidity values, while CER 2 showed opposite tendencies to those observed with CER III and 5.

  12. [Density functional theory study of surface-enhanced raman spectra and excited state of 1,4-benzenedithiol].

    PubMed

    Shao, Yang-Fan; Li, Chong-Yang; Feng, Yuan-Ming; Lin, Wang

    2014-02-01

    Raman scattering spectra and optimized geometries of the 1,4-benzenedithiol molecule and complexes have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional at the level of 6-311G+(d) basis set for C, H, S atoms and LanL2DZ for Ag, Au atoms, respectively. The optimized 1,4-benzenedithiol molecule was non-planar structure and the angle between benzene ring plane and S-H is 20.20. By means of the simulation of molecule adsorbed on gold and silver cluster, we concluded that gold clusters are nearly parallel to the benzenedithiol molecule and silver clusters are almost perpendicular to the molecular surface. The authors studied the interaction between Raman intensity and molecular properties, such as static polarizablity and charge distribution. The Raman intensity of 1,4-BDT-Au2, 1,4-BDT-Ag2 and Ag2-1,4-BDT-Au2 were in good agreement with static polarizability. The excited states of Ag2-1,4-BDT-Au2 complex were calculated using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). And the simulated absorption spectra and several allowed singlet excited states were analyzed to investigate the surface-enhanced Raman chemical enhancement mechanism. PMID:24822413

  13. Measurement of excitation function for 63Cu(n, p) 63Ni reaction up to En=15 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, S.; Shibata, T.; Imamura, M.; Ohkubo, T.; Satoh, S.; Uwamino, Y.; Nogawa, N.; Baba, M.; Matsuyama, S.; Iwasaki, S.

    1999-01-01

    The excitation function for the 63Cu(n, p) 63Ni reaction were measured using neutrons produced by the T(p, n) reaction at En=˜1.5 MeV, D(d, n) at En=˜6.5 MeV and T(d, n) at En=˜14 MeV, respectively. Irradiations were performed using the dynamitron accelerator at the Fast Neutron Laboratory of Tohoku University. After irradiation, the nickel was separated by anion-exchange and solvent extraction. The 63Ni was measured by liquid scintillation method. The cross sections obtained were compared with the calculated values of JENDL-3.

  14. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 16/O with /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Chasteler, R.M.; Henderson, R.A.; Lee, D.; Gregorich, K.E.; Nurmia, M.J.; Welch, R.B.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 249/Cf with 90- to 150-MeV /sup 16/O ions. A comparison of the maxima of the mass-yield curves measured in this experiment with those for the reactions of /sup 18/O ions with /sup 249/Cf shows different shifts from those that have been measured for reactions of the /sup 16,18/O and /sup 20,22/Ne ion pairs with /sup 248/Cm. However, the shifts appear similar to those recently measured for reactions of these ion pairs with /sup 254/Es.

  15. Multiphoton excitation microscopy of in vivo human skin. Functional and morphological optical biopsy based on three-dimensional imaging, lifetime measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Masters, B R; So, P T; Gratton, E

    1998-02-01

    Two-photon excitation microscopy has the potential as an effective, noninvasive, diagnostic tool for in vivo examination of human deep tissue structure at the subcellular level. By using infrared photons as the excitation source in two-photon microscopy, a significant improvement in penetration depth can be achieved because of the much lower tissue scattering and absorption coefficients in the infrared wavelengths. Two-photon absorption occurs primarily at the focal point and provides the physical basis for optical sectioning. Multiphoton excitation microscopy at 730 nm was used to image in vivo human skin autofluorescence from the surface to a depth of about 200 microns. The spectroscopic data suggest that reduced pyridine nucleotides, NAD(P)H, are the primary source of the skin autofluorescence using 730 nm excitation. This study demonstrates the use of multiphoton excitation microscopy for functional imaging of the metabolic states of in vivo human skin cells and provides a functional and morphological optical biopsy.

  16. SERS Activity of Silver Nanoparticles Functionalized with A Desferrioxamine B Derived Ligand for FE(III) Binding and Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinetto, P.; Taglietti, A.; Pasotti, L.; Pallavicini, P.; Dacarro, G.; Giulotto, E.; Grandi, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the SERS activity of colloidal silver nanoparticles functionalized with a ligand, derived from the siderophore desferrioxamine B (desferal, DFO), an iron chelator widely used in biological and medical applications. The ligand was equipped with a sulfur-containing moiety to ensure optimal binding with silver surfaces. By means of Raman and SERS effects we monitored the route of material preparation from the modified DFO-S molecule to the colloidal aggregates. The results indicate that the functionalization of the chelating agent does not affect its binding ability towards Fe(III). The resulting functionalized silver nanoparticles are a promising SERS tag for operation in biological environments. The Fe-O stretching signature, arising when DFO-S grafted to silver nanoparticles binds Fe(III), could provide a tool for cation sensing in solution.

  17. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the G-III Swept-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    In support of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge [ACTE] project at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, displacement transfer functions were applied to the swept wing of a Gulfstream G-III airplane (Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, Georgia) to obtain deformed shape predictions. Four strainsensing lines (two on the lower surface, two on the upper surface) were used to calculate the deformed shape of the G III wing under bending and torsion. There being an insufficient number of surface strain sensors, the existing G III wing box finite element model was used to generate simulated surface strains for input to the displacement transfer functions. The resulting predicted deflections have good correlation with the finite-element generated deflections as well as the measured deflections from the ground load calibration test. The convergence study showed that the displacement prediction error at the G III wing tip can be reduced by increasing the number of strain stations (for each strain-sensing line) down to a minimum error of l.6 percent at 17 strain stations; using more than 17 strain stations yielded no benefit because the error slightly increased to 1.9% when 32 strain stations were used.

  18. Trs20 is required for TRAPP III complex assembly at the PAS and its function in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Taussig, David; Lipatova, Zhanna; Segev, Nava

    2014-03-01

    The modular TRAPP complex acts as a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Ypt/Rab GTPases. Whereas TRAPP I and TRAPP II regulate the exocytic pathway, TRAPP III functions in autophagy. The TRAPP subunit Trs20 is not required for assembly of core TRAPP or its Ypt1 GEF activity. Interestingly, mutations in the human functional ortholog of Trs20, Sedlin, cause spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda (SEDT), a cartilage-specific disorder. We have shown that Trs20 is required for TRAPP II assembly and identified a SEDT-linked mutation, Trs20-D46Y, which causes a defect in this process. Here we show that Trs20 is also required for assembly of TRAPP III at the pre-autophagosomal structure (PAS). First, recombinant Trs85, a TRAPP III-specific subunit, associates with TRAPP only in the presence of Trs20, but not Trs20-D46Y mutant protein. Second, a TRAPP complex with Ypt1 GEF activity co-precipitates with Trs85 from wild type, but not trs20ts mutant, cell lysates. Third, live-cell colocalization analysis indicates that Trs85 recruits core TRAPP to the PAS via the linker protein Trs20. Finally, trs20ts mutant cells are defective in selective and non-selective autophagy. Together, our results show that Trs20 plays a role as an adaptor in the assembly of TRAPP II and TRAPP III complexes, and the SEDT-linked mutation causes a defect in both processes.

  19. Cobalt(III)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Indazoles and Furans by C–H Bond Functionalization/Addition/Cyclization Cascades

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of operationally straightforward and cost-effective routes for the assembly of heterocycles from simple inputs is important for many scientific endeavors, including pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and materials research. In this article we describe the development of a new air-stable cationic Co(III) catalyst for convergent, one-step benchtop syntheses of N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans by C–H bond additions to aldehydes followed by in situ cyclization and aromatization. Only a substoichiometric amount of AcOH is required as an additive that is both low-cost and convenient to handle. The syntheses of these heterocycles are the first examples of Co(III)-catalyzed additions to aldehydes, and reactions are demonstrated for a variety of aromatic, heteroaromatic, and aliphatic derivatives. The syntheses of both N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans have been performed on 20 mmol scales and should be readily applicable to larger scales. The reported heterocycle syntheses also demonstrate the use of directing groups that have not previously been applied to Co(III)-catalyzed C–H bond functionalizations. Additionally, the synthesis of furans demonstrates the first example of Co(III)-catalyzed functionalization of alkenyl C–H bonds. PMID:25494296

  20. Functional testing of space flight induced changes in tonic motor control by using limb-attached excitation and load devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallasch, Eugen; Kozlovskaya, Inessa

    2007-02-01

    Long term space flights induce atrophy and contractile changes on postural muscles such effecting tonic motor control. Functional testing of tonic motor control structures is a challenge because of the difficulties to deliver appropriate test forces on crew members. In this paper we propose two approaches for functional testing by using limb attached loading devices. The first approach is based on a frequency and amplitude controllable moving magnet exciter to deliver sinusoidal test forces during limb postures. The responding limb deflection is recorded by an embedded accelerometer to obtain limb impedance. The second approach is based on elastic limb loading to evoke self-excited oscillations during arm extensions. Here the contraction force at the oscillation onset provides information about limb stiffness. The rationale for both testing approaches is based on Feldman's λ-model. An arm expander based on the second approach was probed in a 6-month MIR space flight. The results obtained from the load oscillations, confirmed that this device is well suited to capture space flight induced neuromuscular changes.

  1. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  2. Genetic Inhibition of CaMKII in Dorsal Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Reduces Functional Excitatory Synapses and Enhances Intrinsic Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Klug, Jason R.; Mathur, Brian N.; Kash, Thomas L.; Wang, Hui-Dong; Matthews, Robert T.; Robison, A. J.; Anderson, Mark E.; Deutch, Ariel Y.; Lovinger, David M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Winder, Danny G.

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). CaMKII is dynamically regulated by changes in dopamine signaling, as occurs in Parkinson's disease as well as addiction. Although CaMKII has been extensively studied in the hippocampus where it regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, relatively little is known about how it modulates neuronal function in the striatum. Therefore, we examined the impact of selectively overexpressing an EGFP-fused CaMKII inhibitory peptide (EAC3I) in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) using a novel transgenic mouse model. EAC3I-expressing cells exhibited markedly decreased excitatory transmission, indicated by a decrease in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). This decrease was not accompanied by changes in the probability of release, levels of glutamate at the synapse, or changes in dendritic spine density. CaMKII regulation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a major means by which the kinase regulates neuronal function in the hippocampus. We found that the decrease in striatal excitatory transmission seen in the EAC3I mice is mimicked by deletion of GluA1. Further, while CaMKII inhibition decreased excitatory transmission onto MSNs, it increased their intrinsic excitability. These data suggest that CaMKII plays a critical role in setting the excitability rheostat of striatal MSNs by coordinating excitatory synaptic drive and the resulting depolarization response. PMID:23028932

  3. A partial loss-of-function mutation in an Arabidopsis RNA polymerase III subunit leads to pleiotropic defects

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kaeli C. M.; Yu, Yu; Gao, Lei; Eng, Ryan C.; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.; Chen, Xuemei; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Plants employ five DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (Pols) in transcription. One of these polymerases, Pol III, has previously been reported to transcribe 5S rRNA, tRNAs, and a number of small RNAs. However, in-depth functional analysis is complicated by the fact that knockout mutations in Pol subunits are typically lethal. Here, we report the characterization of the first known viable Pol III subunit mutant, nrpc7-1. This mutant was originally isolated from a forward genetic screen designed to identify enhancers of the autoimmune mutant snc1, which contains a gain-of-function mutation in a nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptor-encoding gene. The nrpc7-1 mutation occurs in an intron–exon splice site and results in intron retention in some NRPC7 transcripts. There is a global disruption in RNA equilibrium in nrpc7-1, exemplified by the altered expression of a number of RNA molecules, some of which are not reported to be transcribed by Pol III. There are developmental defects associated with the mutation, as homozygous mutant plants are dwarf, have stunted roots and siliques, and possess serrated leaves. These defects are possibly due to altered small RNA stability or activity. Additionally, the nrpc7-1 mutation confers an NLR-specific alternative splicing defect that correlates with enhanced disease resistance, highlighting the importance of alternative splicing in regulating NLR activity. Altogether, these results reveal novel roles for Pol III in maintaining RNA homeostasis, adjusting the expression of a diverse suite of genes, and indirectly modulating gene splicing. Future analyses using the nrpc7-1 mutant will be instrumental in examining other unknown Pol III functions. PMID:26865731

  4. Cognitive Profiles of Adults with Asperger's Disorder, High-Functioning Autism, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified Based on the WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanai, Chieko; Tani, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Yamada, Takashi; Ota, Haruhisa; Watanabe, Hiromi; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the cognitive profiles of high-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) in adults based on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale III (WAIS-III). We examined cognitive profiles of adults with no intellectual disability (IQ greater than 70), and in adults with Asperger's disorder (AS; n = 47), high-functioning autism (HFA;…

  5. Spread of excitation in 3-D models of the anisotropic cardiac tissue. III. Effects of ventricular geometry and fiber structure on the potential distribution.

    PubMed

    Colli Franzone, P; Guerri, L; Pennacchio, M; Taccardi, B

    1998-07-01

    In a previous paper we studied the spread of excitation in a simplified model of the left ventricle, affected by fiber structure and obliqueness, curvature of the wall and Purkinje network. In the present paper we investigate the extracellular potential distribution u in the same ventricular model. Given the transmembrane potential v, associated with the spreading excitation, the extracellular potential u is obtained as solution of a linear elliptic equation with the source term related to v. The potential distributions were computed for point stimulations at different intramural depths. The results of the simulations enabled us to identify a number of common features which appears in all the potential patterns irrespective of pacing site. In addition, by splitting the sources into an axial and conormal component, we were able to evaluate the contribution of the classical uniform dipole layer to the total potential field and the role of the superimposed axial component.

  6. When is a type III functional response stabilizing? Theory and practice of predicting plankton dynamics under enrichment.

    PubMed

    Uszko, Wojciech; Diehl, Sebastian; Pitsch, Nadine; Lengfellner, Kathrin; Müller, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The curvature of generalized Holling type functional response curves is controlled by a shape parameter b yielding hyperbolic type II (b = 1) to increasingly sigmoid type III (b > 1) responses. Empirical estimates of b vary considerably across taxa. Larger consumer-resource body mass ratios have been suggested to generate more pronounced type III responses and therefore to promote dynamic stability. The dependence of consumer- resource stability on b has, however, not been systematically explored, and the accurate empirical determination of b is challenging. Specifically, the shape of the functional response of the pelagic grazer Daphnia feeding on phytoplankton, and its consequences for stability, remain controversial. We derive a novel analytical condition relating b to local stability of consumer-resource interactions and use it to predict stability of empirically parameterized models of Daphnia and phytoplankton under enrichment. Functional response parameters were experimentally derived for two species of Daphnia feeding separately on single cultures of two different phytoplankton species. All experimentally studied Daphnia-algae systems exhibited type III responses. Parameterized type III responses are predicted to stabilize the modeled Daphnia-phytoplankton dynamics in some species pairs but not in others. Remarkably, stability predictions differ depending on whether functional response parameters are derived from clearance vs. ingestion rates. Accurate parameter estimation may therefore require fitting to both rates. In addition, our estimates of b for filter-feeding Daphnia are much smaller than predicted for actively hunting predators at similar consumer-resource body mass ratios. This suggests that the relationship between functional response shape and body mass ratios may vary with predation mode. PMID:26909430

  7. Light-harvesting ytterbium(III)-porphyrinate-BODIPY conjugates: synthesis, excitation-energy transfer, and two-photon-induced near-infrared-emission studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Xunjin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Tam, Hoi-Lam; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2013-01-01

    Based on a donor-acceptor framework, several conjugates have been designed and prepared in which an electron-donor moiety, ytterbium(III) porphyrinate (YbPor), was linked through an ethynyl bridge to an electron-acceptor moiety, boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY). Photoluminescence studies demonstrated efficient energy transfer from the BODIPY moiety to the YbPor counterpart. When conjugated with the YbPor moiety, the BODIPY moiety served as an antenna to harvest the lower-energy visible light, subsequently transferring its energy to the YbPor counterpart, and, consequently, sensitizing the Yb(III) emission in the near-infrared (NIR) region with a quantum efficiency of up to 0.73% and a lifetime of around 40 μs. Moreover, these conjugates exhibited large two-photon-absorption cross-sections that ranged from 1048-2226 GM and strong two-photon-induced NIR emission.

  8. Complete genome sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of functionally diverse Lysinibacillus sphaericus III(3)7.

    PubMed

    Rey, Andrés; Silva-Quintero, Laura; Dussán, Jenny

    2016-09-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus III(3)7 is a native Colombian strain, the first one isolated from soil samples. This strain has shown high levels of pathogenic activity against Culex quinquefaciatus larvae in laboratory assays compared to other members of the same species. Using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology we sequenced, annotated (de novo) and described the genome of strain III(3)7, achieving a complete genome sequence status. We then performed a comparative analysis between the newly sequenced genome and the ones previously reported for Colombian isolates L. sphaericus OT4b.31, CBAM5 and OT4b.25, with the inclusion of L. sphaericus C3-41 that has been used as a reference genome for most of previous genome sequencing projects. We concluded that L. sphaericus III(3)7 is highly similar with strain OT4b.25 and shares high levels of synteny with isolates CBAM5 and C3-41. PMID:27419068

  9. Parallel transmit excitation at 1.5 T based on the minimization of a driving function for device heating

    SciTech Connect

    Gudino, N.; Sonmez, M.; Nielles-Vallespin, S.; Faranesh, A. Z.; Lederman, R. J.; Balaban, R. S.; Hansen, M. S.; Yao, Z.; Baig, T.; Martens, M.; Griswold, M. A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To provide a rapid method to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) E-field coupling and consequent heating in long conductors in an interventional MRI (iMRI) setup. Methods: A driving function for device heating (W) was defined as the integration of the E-field along the direction of the wire and calculated through a quasistatic approximation. Based on this function, the phases of four independently controlled transmit channels were dynamically changed in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. During the different excitation configurations, the RF induced heating in a nitinol wire immersed in a saline phantom was measured by fiber-optic temperature sensing. Additionally, a minimization of W as a function of phase and amplitude values of the different channels and constrained by the homogeneity of the RF excitation field (B{sub 1}) over a region of interest was proposed and its results tested on the benchtop. To analyze the validity of the proposed method, using a model of the array and phantom setup tested in the scanner, RF fields and SAR maps were calculated through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. In addition to phantom experiments, RF induced heating of an active guidewire inserted in a swine was also evaluated. Results: In the phantom experiment, heating at the tip of the device was reduced by 92% when replacing the body coil by an optimized parallel transmit excitation with same nominal flip angle. In the benchtop, up to 90% heating reduction was measured when implementing the constrained minimization algorithm with the additional degree of freedom given by independent amplitude control. The computation of the optimum phase and amplitude values was executed in just 12 s using a standard CPU. The results of the FDTD simulations showed similar trend of the local SAR at the tip of the wire and measured temperature as well as to a quadratic function of W, confirming the validity of the quasistatic approach for the presented problem at 64 MHz. Imaging and heating

  10. Parallel transmit excitation at 1.5 T based on the minimization of a driving function for device heating

    PubMed Central

    Gudino, N.; Sonmez, M.; Yao, Z.; Baig, T.; Nielles-Vallespin, S.; Faranesh, A. Z.; Lederman, R. J.; Martens, M.; Balaban, R. S.; Hansen, M. S.; Griswold, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a rapid method to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) E-field coupling and consequent heating in long conductors in an interventional MRI (iMRI) setup. Methods: A driving function for device heating (W) was defined as the integration of the E-field along the direction of the wire and calculated through a quasistatic approximation. Based on this function, the phases of four independently controlled transmit channels were dynamically changed in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. During the different excitation configurations, the RF induced heating in a nitinol wire immersed in a saline phantom was measured by fiber-optic temperature sensing. Additionally, a minimization of W as a function of phase and amplitude values of the different channels and constrained by the homogeneity of the RF excitation field (B1) over a region of interest was proposed and its results tested on the benchtop. To analyze the validity of the proposed method, using a model of the array and phantom setup tested in the scanner, RF fields and SAR maps were calculated through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. In addition to phantom experiments, RF induced heating of an active guidewire inserted in a swine was also evaluated. Results: In the phantom experiment, heating at the tip of the device was reduced by 92% when replacing the body coil by an optimized parallel transmit excitation with same nominal flip angle. In the benchtop, up to 90% heating reduction was measured when implementing the constrained minimization algorithm with the additional degree of freedom given by independent amplitude control. The computation of the optimum phase and amplitude values was executed in just 12 s using a standard CPU. The results of the FDTD simulations showed similar trend of the local SAR at the tip of the wire and measured temperature as well as to a quadratic function of W, confirming the validity of the quasistatic approach for the presented problem at 64 MHz. Imaging and heating

  11. Functional interaction between Cerebratulus lacteus cytolysin A-III and phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Blumenthal, K.M.

    1988-05-15

    A study on the interaction between bee venom phospholipase A/sub 2/ and Cerebratulus lacteus cytolysin A-III, a major hemolysin secreted by this organism has been carried out. The hemolytic activity of A-III in phosphate-buffered saline is increased 5-fold in the presence of phospholipase A/sub 2/ from bee venom. Dansylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPE) labeled, phosphatidylcholine-containing liposomes and human erythrocyte membranes were employed to study the interaction between these two proteins. In DPE-liposomes, A-III alone had no effect on DPE fluorescence nor did it enhance either the phospholipase A/sub 2/-dependent fluorescence increase or blue shift in emission maximum, indicating that the cytolysis is not a major phospholipase A/sub 2/-activator. However, when DPE was incorporated into erythrocyte membranes, A-III alone induced a 40% fluorescence increase and a 5 nm blue shift, implying a transient activation of an endogenous phospholipase A/sub 2/. Further studies using synthetic lysophosphatidylcholine and free fatty acids demonstrated that the hemolytic activity of A-III is potentiated by free fatty acids, a product of phospholipid degradation catalyzed by phospholipase A/sub 2/. Subsequent analysis of this phenomenon by gel filtration chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, chemical cross-linking, and measurement of (/sup 14/C)oleic acid binding by the cytolysin demonstrated that binding of oleic acid to A-III causes aggregation of the toxin molecules to a tetrameric form which has a higher ..cap alpha..-helix content and a greater activity than the monomer.

  12. Can we Predict Quantum Yields Using Excited State Density Functional Theory for New Families of Fluorescent Dyes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Alexander W.; Lin, Zhou; Shepherd, James J.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-06-01

    For a fluorescent dye, the quantum yield characterizes the efficiency of energy transfer from the absorbed light to the emitted fluorescence. In the screening among potential families of dyes, those with higher quantum yields are expected to have more advantages. From the perspective of theoreticians, an efficient prediction of the quantum yield using a universal excited state electronic structure theory is in demand but still challenging. The most representative examples for such excited state theory include time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS). In the present study, we explore the possibility of predicting the quantum yields for conventional and new families of organic dyes using a combination of TDDFT and ROKS. We focus on radiative (kr) and nonradiative (knr) rates for the decay of the first singlet excited state (S_1) into the ground state (S_0) in accordance with Kasha's rule. M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950). For each dye compound, kr is calculated with the S_1-S_0 energy gap and transition dipole moment obtained using ROKS and TDDFT respectively at the relaxed S_1 geometry. Our predicted kr agrees well with the experimental value, so long as the order of energy levels is correctly predicted. Evaluation of knr is less straightforward as multiple processes are involved. Our study focuses on the S_1-T_1 intersystem crossing (ISC) and the S_1-S_0 internal conversion (IC): we investigate the properties that allow us to model the knr value using a Marcus-like expression, such as the Stokes shift, the reorganization energy, and the S_1-T_1 and S_1-S_0 energy gaps. Taking these factors into consideration, we compare our results with those obtained using the actual Marcus theory and provide explanation for discrepancy. T. Kowalczyk, T. Tsuchimochi, L. Top, P.-T. Chen, and T. Van Voorhis, J. Chem. Phys., 138, 164101 (2013). M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950).

  13. Rh(III)-catalyzed relay carbenoid functionalization of aromatic C-H bonds: access to π-conjugated fused heteroarenes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ying; Chen, Xun; Liu, Xin; Su, Shi-Jian; Li, Jianzhang; Zeng, Wei

    2016-04-30

    A novel Rh(III)-catalyzed relay cross-coupling/cyclization cascade between arylketoimines and diazoesters is described. This transformation provides a concise access to unique π-conjugated 1-azaphenalenes (1-APLEs) via a double aryl Csp(2)-H bond carbenoid functionalization process. As illustrative examples, the 1-APLE-based π-conjugated molecules which possess low-lying HOMO levels could be converted to promising organic optoelectronic materials. PMID:27048944

  14. Time-dependent density functional theory study of cobalt corrinoids: Electronically excited states of coenzyme B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andruniów, Tadeusz; Jaworska, Maria; Lodowski, Piotr; Zgierski, Marek Z.; Dreos, Renata; Randaccio, Lucio; Kozlowski, Pawel M.

    2009-09-01

    The analysis of the electronic spectra of adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and its derivative in which the trans axial base was replaced by a water molecule (AdoCbi-H2O) has been performed by means of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The latter corresponds to the situation encountered in strongly acidic conditions. The TDDFT electronic transitions and oscillator strengths were calculated at the optimized B3LYP and BP86 ground state equilibrium geometries. A comparison of the orbital energy diagrams obtained with the B3LYP and BP86 functionals reveals a different orbital order and composition of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals. In B3LYP the lowest-energy transitions are of π /d→π*, π /d→σ*, and π /d→d characters while in the case of BP86 they are mainly d /π→π* and d →π*. The long range charge transfer transitions involving excitations from adenine π orbitals to antibonding corrin π* orbital can be observed at low energies, especially in BP86 results. Calculated electronic excitations were used to simulate the absorption spectra for a direct comparison with the absorption spectra recorded for AdoCbl at different pH values. As previously found for methylcobalamin [see Andruniów et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 085101 (2008)] also for AdoCbl the two-parameter scaling technique is required to obtain a satisfactory agreement between theoretical and experimental spectra. Both functionals correctly predict the shifting of the lowest intense transition toward blue by approximately 13nm upon changing pH from 7 to 1.

  15. Iron(III) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid complex on polyallylamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: immobilization, direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hailing; Cui, Yanyun; Li, Pan; Zhou, Yiming; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Tang, Yawen; Chen, Yu; Lu, Tianhong

    2013-05-01

    A nonenzymatic iron(III) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Fe(III)-DETPA) complex based amperometric sensor for the analytical determination of hydrogen peroxide was developed. By combining the electrostatic interaction between the Fe(III)-DETPA complex and polyallylamine (PAH) functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as well as the ionotropic crosslinking interaction between PAH and ethylenediamine-tetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP), the electroactive Fe(III)-DETPA complex was successfully incorporated within the MWCNT matrix, and firmly immobilized on the Au substrate electrode. The fabricated electrochemical sensor was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical methods. The influences of solution pH and ionic strength on the electrochemical sensor were investigated. The prepared electrochemical sensor had a fast response to hydrogen peroxide (<3 s) and an excellent linear range of concentration from 1.25 × 10(-8) to 4.75 × 10(-3) M with a detection limit of 6.3 × 10(-9) M under the optimum conditions.

  16. Structure, Evolution, and Functions of Bacterial Type III Toxin-Antitoxin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goeders, Nathalie; Chai, Ray; Chen, Bihe; Day, Andrew; Salmond, George P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that encode a toxin (that targets an essential cellular process) and an antitoxin that neutralises or suppresses the deleterious effect of the toxin. Based on the molecular nature of the toxin and antitoxin components, TA systems are categorised into different types. Type III TA systems, the focus of this review, are composed of a toxic endoribonuclease neutralised by a non-coding RNA antitoxin in a pseudoknotted configuration. Bioinformatic analysis shows that the Type III systems can be classified into subtypes. These TA systems were originally discovered through a phage resistance phenotype arising due to a process akin to an altruistic suicide; the phenomenon of abortive infection. Some Type III TA systems are bifunctional and can stabilise plasmids during vegetative growth and sporulation. Features particular to Type III systems are explored here, emphasising some of the characteristics of the RNA antitoxin and how these may affect the co-evolutionary relationship between toxins and cognate antitoxins in their quaternary structures. Finally, an updated analysis of the distribution and diversity of these systems are presented and discussed. PMID:27690100

  17. Density Relaxation in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Combining Relaxed Density Natural Orbitals and Multireference Perturbation Theories for an Improved Description of Excited States.

    PubMed

    Ronca, Enrico; Angeli, Celestino; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pastore, Mariachiara

    2014-09-01

    Making use of the recently developed excited state charge displacement analysis [E. Ronca et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054110 (2014)], suited to quantitatively characterize the charge fluxes coming along an electronic excitation, we investigate the role of the density relaxation effects in the overall description of electronically excited states of different nature, namely, valence, ionic, and charge transfer (CT), considering a large set of prototypical small and medium-sized molecular systems. By comparing the response densities provided by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and the corresponding relaxed densities obtained by applying the Z-vector postlinear-response approach [N. C. Handy and H. F. Schaefer, J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5031 (1984)] with those obtained by highly correlated state-of-the-art wave function calculations, we show that the inclusion of the relaxation effects is imperative to get an accurate description of the considered excited states. We also examine what happens at the quality of the response function when an increasing amount of Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange is included in the functional, showing that the usually improved excitation energies in the case of CT states are not always the consequence of an improved description of their overall properties. Remarkably, we find that the relaxation of the response densities is always able to reproduce, independently of the extent of HF exchange in the functional, the benchmark wave function densities. Finally, we propose a novel and computationally convenient strategy, based on the use of the natural orbitals derived from the relaxed TDDFT density to build zero-order wave function for multireference perturbation theory calculations. For a significant set of different excited states, the proposed approach provided accurate excitation energies, comparable to those obtained by computationally demanding ab initio calculations.

  18. Unrestricted density functional theory based on the fragment molecular orbital method for the ground and excited state calculations of large systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Sakurai, Minoru; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2014-04-14

    We extended the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method interfaced with density functional theory (DFT) into spin unrestricted formalism (UDFT) and developed energy gradients for the ground state and single point excited state energies based on time-dependent DFT. The accuracy of FMO is evaluated in comparison to the full calculations without fragmentation. Electronic excitations in solvated organic radicals and in the blue copper protein, plastocyanin (PDB code: 1BXV), are reported. The contributions of solvent molecules to the electronic excitations are analyzed in terms of the fragment polarization and quantum effects such as interfragment charge transfer.

  19. Unrestricted density functional theory based on the fragment molecular orbital method for the ground and excited state calculations of large systems.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Sakurai, Minoru; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2014-04-14

    We extended the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method interfaced with density functional theory (DFT) into spin unrestricted formalism (UDFT) and developed energy gradients for the ground state and single point excited state energies based on time-dependent DFT. The accuracy of FMO is evaluated in comparison to the full calculations without fragmentation. Electronic excitations in solvated organic radicals and in the blue copper protein, plastocyanin (PDB code: 1BXV), are reported. The contributions of solvent molecules to the electronic excitations are analyzed in terms of the fragment polarization and quantum effects such as interfragment charge transfer.

  20. Can anisotropic exchange be reliably calculated using density functional methods? A case study on trinuclear Mn(III)-M(III)-Mn(III) (M=Fe, Ru, and Os) cyanometalate single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2014-01-01

    Density functional studies have been performed on a set of trinuclear single-molecule magnets (SMMs) of general formula [{Mn2(5-Br salen)2(MeOH)2}M(CN)6](NEt4) (M=Fe(III) (1), Ru(III) (2) and Os(III) (3); 5-Brsalen=N,N'-ethylenebis(5-bromosalicylidene)iminato anion). We have computed the orbital-dependent exchange interaction for all three complexes for the first time using DFT and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods. DFT calculations yield the anisotropic exchange as J(ξξ)=3.5 cm(-1) for 1; J(ξξ)=12.1 cm(-1), J(ζζ)=-6.9 cm(-1) and J(ηη)=-14 cm(-1) for 2; and J(ξξ)=23.7 cm(-1) and J(ζζ) =-11.1 cm(-1) for 3. The computed values are in agreement with the experimental report, and this suggests that the established methodology can be used to compute the anisotropic exchange in larger clusters. Our calculations reiterate the fact that the exchange is described by a three-axis anisotropic exchange for complexes 2 and 3 as evidenced by the experiments. A stronger exchange coupling as we move down the periodic table from 3d to 5d is reproduced by our calculations, and the origin of this enhancement in the exchange interaction has been probed by using molecular orbital analysis. The electronic origin of different types of exchange observed in this series is found to be related to the energy difference between possible degenerate pairs and the nature of orbital interactions. By computing the exchange interaction, the single-ion anisotropy of Mn(III) and zero-field splitting of the S=9/2 ground state of complexes 1-3 using CASSCF and/or DFT methods, we have attempted to shed light on the issue of anisotropic exchange and the barrier height for the magnetisation reversal in SMMs. Comprehensive magneto-structural correlations have been developed to offer clues on how to further enhance the barrier height in this class of SMMs. PMID:24288194

  1. Excitation functions of alpha particle induced reactions on natTi up to 40 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. S.; Scholten, B.

    2016-08-01

    Excitation functions of the reactions natTi(α,x)48Cr, natTi(α,x)48V and natTi(α,x)46,48Sc were determined by the stacked-foil activation technique up to 40 MeV. The radioactivities produced in the natTi target were measured by γ-ray spectrometry using HPGe detector. The reaction natTi(α,x)51Cr was used to determine the beam parameters. New experimental values for the above reactions have been obtained. An intercomparison of our data with the available literature values has been done. The cross section results obtained in this work could be useful in defining new monitor reactions, radiation safety and isotope production.

  2. Converging genetic and functional brain imaging evidence links neuronal excitability to working memory, psychiatric disease, and brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Heck, A.; Fastenrath, M.; Ackermann, S.; Auschra, B.; Bickel, H.; Coynel, D.; Gschwind, L.; Jessen, F.; Kaduszkiewicz, H.; Maier, W.; Milnik, A.; Pentzek, M.; Riedel-Heller, S.G.; Ripke, S.; Spalek, K.; Sullivan, P.; Vogler, C.; Wagner, M.; Weyerer, S.; Wolfsgruber, S.; de Quervain, D.; Papassotiropoulos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Working memory, the capacity of actively maintaining task-relevant information during a cognitive task, is a heritable trait. Working memory deficits are characteristic for many psychiatric disorders. We performed genome-wide gene-set enrichment analyses in multiple independent data sets of young and aged cognitively healthy subjects (n = 2’824), and in a large schizophrenia case-control sample (n = 32’143). The voltage-gated cation channel activity gene-set, consisting of genes related to neuronal excitability, was robustly linked to performance in working memory-related tasks across ages, and to schizophrenia. Functional brain imaging in 707 healthy participants linked this gene-set also to working memory-related activity in the parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Gene-set analyses may help to dissect the molecular underpinnings of cognitive dimensions, brain activity and psychopathology. PMID:24529980

  3. Near and Above Ionization Electronic Excitations with Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, Kenneth A.; Govind, Niranjan

    2013-11-12

    We present a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) prescription for capturing near and post-ionization excitations based on non-Hermitian von Neumann density matrix propagation with atom-centered basis sets, tuned range-separated DFT, and a phenomenological imaginary molecular orbital-based absorbing potential to mimic coupling to the continuum. The computed extreme ultraviolet absorption spectra for acetylene (C2H2), water (H2O), and Freon 12 (CF2Cl2) agree well with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data over the range 0 to 50 eV. The absorbing potential removes spurious high energy finite basis artifacts, yielding correct bound to bound transitions, metastable (autoionizing) resonance states, and consistent overall absorption shapes.

  4. Near and Above Ionization Electronic Excitations with Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Kenneth; Govind, Niranjan

    2013-11-12

    We present a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) prescription for capturing near and post-ionization excitations based on non-Hermitian von Neumann density matrix propagation with atom-centered basis sets, tuned range-separated DFT, and a phenomenological imaginary molecular orbital-based absorbing potential to mimic coupling to the continuum. The computed extreme ultraviolet absorption spectra for acetylene (C2H2), water (H2O), and Freon 12 (CF2Cl2) agree well with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data over the range of 0-50 eV. The absorbing potential removes spurious high-energy finite basis artifacts, yielding correct bound-to-bound transitions, metastable (autoionizing) resonance states, and consistent overall absorption shapes. PMID:26583412

  5. Comparative assessment of density functional methods for evaluating essential parameters to simulate SERS spectra within the excited state energy gradient approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Mozhdeh; Jamshidi, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    The prospect of challenges in reproducing and interpretation of resonance Raman properties of molecules interacting with metal clusters has prompted the present research initiative. Resonance Raman spectra based on the time-dependent gradient approximation are examined in the framework of density functional theory using different methods for representing the exchange-correlation functional. In this work the performance of different XC functionals in the prediction of ground state properties, excitation state energies, and gradients are compared and discussed. Resonance Raman properties based on time-dependent gradient approximation for the strongly low-lying charge transfer states are calculated and compared for different methods. We draw the following conclusions: (1) for calculating the binding energy and ground state geometry, dispersion-corrected functionals give the best performance in comparison to ab initio calculations, (2) GGA and meta GGA functionals give good accuracy in calculating vibrational frequencies, (3) excited state energies determined by hybrid and range-separated hybrid functionals are in good agreement with EOM-CCSD calculations, and (4) in calculating resonance Raman properties GGA functionals give good and reasonable performance in comparison to the experiment; however, calculating the excited state gradient by using the hybrid functional on the hessian of GGA improves the results of the hybrid functional significantly. Finally, we conclude that the agreement of charge-transfer surface enhanced resonance Raman spectra with experiment is improved significantly by using the excited state gradient approximation.

  6. Calculations of Excitation Functions of Some Structural Fusion Materials for ( n, t) Reactions up to 50 MeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Durgu, C.; Aktı, N. N.; Okuducu, Ş.

    2010-06-01

    Fusion serves an inexhaustible energy for humankind. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, the working out the systematics of ( n, t) reaction cross sections is of great importance for the definition of the excitation function character for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n, t) reactions for some structural fusion materials such as 27Al, 51V, 52Cr, 55Mn, and 56Fe have been investigated. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 27Al( n, t)25Mg, 51V( n, t)49Ti, 52Cr( n, t)50V, 55Mn( n, t)53Cr and 56Fe( n, t)54Mn reactions have been carried out up to 50 MeV incident neutron energy. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the new evaluated the geometry dependent hybrid model, hybrid model and the cascade exciton model. Equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, we have calculated ( n, t) reaction cross-sections by using new evaluated semi-empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  7. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-15

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency {omega} on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (={omega}/2{pi}) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f {<=} 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent ''hot tail'' is observed at f{>=} 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the ''hot tail'' is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of {omega}, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower {omega} may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency {nu}{sub en}; the transition being dictated by {omega} {approx} 2{pi}{nu}{sub en}.

  8. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-01

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency ω on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (=ω/2π) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f ≤ 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent "hot tail" is observed at f ≥ 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the "hot tail" is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of ω, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower ω may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency νen; the transition being dictated by ω ˜ 2πνen.

  9. Comparison of polar motion excitation function derived from equivalent water thickness data, obtained from filtered stokes coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagalski, T.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that the estimates of the Earth's gravity field produced by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission can be used to infer changes in equivalent water thickness (EWT). However, inadequately smoothed GRACE satellite mission EWT data contain significant striping and thus ought to be filtered to improve signal to noise ratio. We used Stokes coefficients data from GFZ (GeoForschungsZentrum), JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and CSR (Center for Space Research), filtered by decorrelation anisotropic filters: DDK3, DDK2 and DDK1 (Kusche et al., 2009) and made available in the ICGEM (International Center for Global Earth Models). To determine gravimetric excitation function of polar motion for the entire globe or selected areas, we convert gravity coefficients into Equivalent Water Thickness fields. To eliminate stripes from the maps of the EWT, one uses anisotropic filters (Kusche et al., 2009) that are smoothing the EWT data. In this study we investigate the influence of decorrelation anisotropic DDK filters used to process the GRACE EWT fields on the determined polar motion gravimetric excitation functions. We investigate the effect of these filters for four regions: 1) entire Earth, 2) ocean area, 3) land area and 4) Tibetan Plateau area (a rectangle bounded by 4 points A(37.N,78.E), B(37.N,102.E), C(28.N,78.E), D(28.N,102.E). Stokes coefficients are made available on the ICGEM web site. The data contain spherical harmonic coefficients delivered by three research centers: CSR, GFZ, JPL. The time span of the data is 2002 - 2010. The time resolution is 30 days. The ICGEM delivers either the raw Stokes coefficients or filtered Stokes coefficients after application of the anisotropic filters. Computation were based on the following equations

  10. Investigations of the potential functions of weakly bound diatomic molecules and laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Three variations on the Dunham series expansion function of the potential of a diatomic molecule are compared. The differences among these expansions lie in the choice of the expansion variable, lambda. The functional form of these variables are lambda/sub s/ = l-r/sub e//r for the Simon-Parr-Finlan version, lambda/sub T/ - 1-(r/sub e//r)/sup p/ for that of Thakkar, and lambda/sub H/ = 1-exp(-rho(r/r/sub e/-1) for that of Huffaker. A wide selection of molecular systems are examined. It is found that, for potentials in excess of thirty kcal/mole, the Huffaker expansion provides the best description of the three, extrapolating at large internuclear separation to a value within 10% of the true dissociation energy. For potentials that result from the interaction of excited states, all series expansions show poor behavior away from the equilibrium internuclear separation of the molecule. The series representation of the potentials of weakly bound molecules are examined in more detail. The ground states of BeAr/sup +/, HeNe/sup +/, NaAr, and Ar/sub 2/ and the excited states of HeNe+, NaNe, and NaAr are best described by the Thakkar expansion. Finally, the observation of laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization in a flowing afterglow is reported. The reaction Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca + h nu ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(5p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ occurs when the photon energy, h nu, is approximately equal to the energy difference between the metastable argon and one of the fine structure levels of the ion's doublet. By monitoring the cascade fluorescence of the above reaction and comparing it to the flourescence from the field-free process Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(4p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ a surprisingly large cross section of 6.7 x 10/sup 3/ A/sup 2/ is estimated.

  11. Ground- and excited-state diatomic bond lengths, vibrational levels, and potential-energy curves from conventional and localized Hartree-Fock-based density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teale, Andrew M.; Tozer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Ground- and excited-state diatomic bond lengths, vibrational levels, and potential-energy curves are determined using conventional and localized Hartree-Fock (LHF)-based density-functional theory. Exchange only and hybrid functionals (with various fractions of exchange) are considered, together with a standard generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Ground-state bond lengths and vibrational wave numbers are relatively insensitive to whether orbital exchange is treated using the conventional or LHF approach. Excited-state calculations are much more sensitive. For a standard fraction of orbital exchange, N2 and CO vertical excitation energies at experimental bond lengths are accurately described by both conventional and LHF-based approaches, providing an asymptotic correction is present. Excited-state bond lengths and vibrational levels are more accurate with the conventional approach. The best quality, however, is obtained with an asymptotically corrected GGA functional. For the ground and lowest four singlet excited states, the GGA mean absolute errors in bond lengths are 0.006 Å (0.5%) and 0.011 Å (0.8%) for N2 and CO, respectively. Mean absolute errors in fundamental vibrational wavenumbers are 49 cm-1 (2.7%) and 68 cm-1 (5.0%), respectively. The GGA potential-energy curves are compared with near-exact Rydberg-Klein-Rees curves. Agreement is very good for the ground and first excited state, but deteriorates for the higher states.

  12. Gene family structure, expression and functional analysis of HD-Zip III genes in angiosperm and gymnosperm forest trees

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    the functions that have been assigned to close homologs in herbaceous plants. Conclusions This study provides an overview of HD-zip III genes related to woody plant development and identifies sequences putatively involved in secondary vascular growth in angiosperms and in gymnosperms. These gene sequences are candidate regulators of wood formation and could be a source of molecular markers for tree breeding related to wood properties. PMID:21143995

  13. Density functional investigation of the electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of a multichromophoric antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2016-05-01

    We report an electronic structure study of a multichromophoric molecular complex containing two of each borondipyrromethane dye, Zn-tetraphenyl-porphyrin, bisphenyl anthracene and a fullerene. The snowflake shaped molecule behaves like an antenna capturing photon at different frequencies and transferring the photon energy to the porphyrin where electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin to the fullerene. The study is performed within density functional formalism using large polarized Guassian basis sets (12,478 basis functions in total). The energies of the HOMO and LUMO states in the complex, as adjudged by the ionization potential and the electron affinity values, show significant differences with respect to their values in participating subunits in isolation. These differences are also larger than the variations of the ionization potential and electron affinity values observed in non-bonded C60-ZnTPP complexes in co-facial arrangement or end-on orientations. An understanding of the origin of these differences is obtained by a systematic study of the effect of structural strain, the presence of ligands, the effect of orbital delocalization on the ionization energy and the electron affinity. Finally, a few lowest charge transfer energies involving electronic transitions from the porphyrin component to the fullerene subunit of the complex are predicted.

  14. Functional initiators for both ATRP and ROP catalyzed by iron(III) catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Yang, C.; Cheng, C. J.

    2016-07-01

    α-Trichloromethyl benzyl alcohol was successfully used as initiators for both AGET ATRP and ROP reactions, which was catalyzed by only one non-toxic and very cheap catalyst iron(III) chloride. The corresponding polymers PMMA and PCL were characterized by 1H NMR, and their molecular mass were calculated as 7.53 kDa and 10.08 kDa, respectively.

  15. Structure and function of the ESCRT-II-III interface in multivesicular body biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Young Jun; Wollert, Thomas; Boura, Evzen; Hurley, James H.

    2009-09-08

    The ESCRT-II-ESCRT-III interaction coordinates the sorting of ubiquitinated cargo with the budding and scission of intralumenal vesicles into multivesicular bodies. The interacting regions of these complexes were mapped to the second winged helix domain of human ESCRT-II subunit VPS25 and the first helix of ESCRT-III subunit VPS20. The crystal structure of this complex was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. Residues involved in structural interactions explain the specificity of ESCRT-II for Vps20, and are critical for cargo sorting in vivo. ESCRT-II directly activates ESCRT-III-driven vesicle budding and scission in vitro via these structural interactions. VPS20 and ESCRT-II bind membranes with nanomolar affinity, explaining why binding to ESCRT-II is dispensable for the recruitment of Vps20 to membranes. Docking of the ESCRT-II-VPS202 supercomplex reveals a convex membrane-binding surface, suggesting a hypothesis for negative membrane curvature induction in the nascent intralumenal vesicle.

  16. OFF-ON-OFF Dual Emission at Visible and UV Wavelengths from Carbazole Functionalized β-Diketonate Europium(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yuki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Yuasa, Junpei

    2016-06-23

    This work demonstrates dual emission "OFF-ON-OFF" switching at visible and UV wavelengths of a carbazole functionalized β-diketone (LH) by a simple change of a europium(III) ion (Eu(3+)) concentration in the submicromolar concentration range. In the presence of 0.25 equiv of Eu(3+) (5 μM), LH forms a luminescent 4:1 complex ([Eu(3+)(L(-))4](-)) exhibiting dual emission at 357 and 613 nm resulting from the local excitation of the carbazole ring and ligand-sensitized luminescence from the Eu(3+)-β-diketonate unit, respectively. The 4:1 complex begins to convert into a 2:1 complex ([Eu(3+)(L(-))2](+)) via a 3:1 complex [Eu(3+)(L(-))3] above a molar ratio ([Eu(3+)]/[LH]) of 0.25, which provides the opportunity for binding of solvent methanol molecules to the vacant site of the Eu(3+) ion in the complex ([Eu(3+)(L(-))2(MeOH)n](+)). The OH oscillators of coordinated methanol molecules facilitate the nonradiative pathway of the Eu(3+) emission; hence the emission at 613 nm almost disappears above the 0.50 equivalent of Eu(3+) (11 μM), while the UV emission at 357 nm remains mostly constant over the whole concentration range. PMID:27241957

  17. Rapid homeostatic plasticity of intrinsic excitability in a central pattern generator network stabilizes functional neural network output.

    PubMed

    Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2012-07-11

    Neurons and networks undergo a process of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes output by integrating activity levels with network and cellular properties to counter longer-term perturbations. Here we describe a rapid compensatory interaction among a pair of potassium currents, I(A) and I(KCa), that stabilizes both intrinsic excitability and network function in the cardiac ganglion of the crab, Cancer borealis. We determined that mRNA levels in single identified neurons for the channels which encode I(A) and I(KCa) are positively correlated, yet the ionic currents themselves are negatively correlated, across a population of motor neurons. We then determined that these currents are functionally coupled; decreasing levels of either current within a neuron causes a rapid increase in the other. This functional interdependence results in homeostatic stabilization of both the individual neuronal and the network output. Furthermore, these compensatory increases are mechanistically independent, suggesting robustness in the maintenance of neural network output that is critical for survival. Together, we generate a complete model for homeostatic plasticity from mRNA to network output where rapid post-translational compensatory mechanisms acting on a reservoir of channels proteins regulated at the level of gene expression provide homeostatic stabilization of both cellular and network activity. PMID:22787050

  18. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  19. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification.

    PubMed

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Blewett, Nathan H; Iben, James R; Lamichhane, Tek N; Cherkasova, Vera; Hafner, Markus; Maraia, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP) III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR) that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m(2)2G26) modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m(2)2G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m(2)2G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m(2)2G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m(2)2G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells. PMID:26720005

  20. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification

    PubMed Central

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G.; Blewett, Nathan H.; Iben, James R.; Lamichhane, Tek N.; Cherkasova, Vera; Hafner, Markus; Maraia, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP) III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR) that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m2 2G26) modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m2 2G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m2 2G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m2 2G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m2 2G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells. PMID:26720005

  1. Rapid development of Purkinje cell excitability, functional cerebellar circuit, and afferent sensory input to cerebellum in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Yi; Ulrich, Brittany; Issa, Fadi A; Wan, Jijun; Papazian, Diane M

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish has significant advantages for studying the morphological development of the brain. However, little is known about the functional development of the zebrafish brain. We used patch clamp electrophysiology in live animals to investigate the emergence of excitability in cerebellar Purkinje cells, functional maturation of the cerebellar circuit, and establishment of sensory input to the cerebellum. Purkinje cells are born at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf). By 4 dpf, Purkinje cells spontaneously fired action potentials in an irregular pattern. By 5 dpf, the frequency and regularity of tonic firing had increased significantly and most cells fired complex spikes in response to climbing fiber activation. Our data suggest that, as in mammals, Purkinje cells are initially innervated by multiple climbing fibers that are winnowed to a single input. To probe the development of functional sensory input to the cerebellum, we investigated the response of Purkinje cells to a visual stimulus consisting of a rapid change in light intensity. At 4 dpf, sudden darkness increased the rate of tonic firing, suggesting that afferent pathways carrying visual information are already active by this stage. By 5 dpf, visual stimuli also activated climbing fibers, increasing the frequency of complex spiking. Our results indicate that the electrical properties of zebrafish and mammalian Purkinje cells are highly conserved and suggest that the same ion channels, Nav1.6 and Kv3.3, underlie spontaneous pacemaking activity. Interestingly, functional development of the cerebellum is temporally correlated with the emergence of complex, visually-guided behaviors such as prey capture. Because of the rapid formation of an electrically-active cerebellum, optical transparency, and ease of genetic manipulation, the zebrafish has great potential for functionally mapping cerebellar afferent and efferent pathways and for investigating cerebellar control of motor behavior.

  2. Cell adhesion molecule L1 contributes to neuronal excitability regulating the function of voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Lignani, Gabriele; Medrihan, Lucian; Bosco, Federica; Contestabile, Andrea; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Ferrea, Enrico; Schachner, Melitta; Benfenati, Fabio; Giovedì, Silvia; Baldelli, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    L1 (also known as L1CAM) is a trans-membrane glycoprotein mediating neuron-neuron adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic interactions. Although experimental evidence has implicated L1 in axonal outgrowth, fasciculation and pathfinding, its contribution to voltage-gated Na(+) channel function and membrane excitability has remained unknown. Here, we show that firing rate, single cell spiking frequency and Na(+) current density are all reduced in hippocampal excitatory neurons from L1-deficient mice both in culture and in slices owing to an overall reduced membrane expression of Na(+) channels. Remarkably, normal firing activity was restored when L1 was reintroduced into L1-deficient excitatory neurons, indicating that abnormal firing patterns are not related to developmental abnormalities, but are a direct consequence of L1 deletion. Moreover, L1 deficiency leads to impairment of action potential initiation, most likely due to the loss of the interaction of L1 with ankyrin G that produces the delocalization of Na(+) channels at the axonal initial segment. We conclude that L1 contributes to functional expression and localization of Na(+) channels to the neuronal plasma membrane, ensuring correct initiation of action potential and normal firing activity. PMID:26985064

  3. Damage detection of metro tunnel structure through transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis using local excitation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Yi, Xiaohua; Zhu, Dapeng; Xie, Xiongyao; Wang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    In a modern metropolis, metro rail systems have become a dominant mode for mass transportation. The structural health of a metro tunnel is closely related to public safety. Many vibration-based techniques for detecting and locating structural damage have been developed in the past several decades. However, most damage detection techniques and validation tests are focused on bridge and building structures; very few studies have been reported on tunnel structures. Among these techniques, transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are two well-known diagnostic approaches. The former operates in frequency domain and the latter in time domain. Both approaches can be applied to detect and locate damage through acceleration data obtained from sensor arrays. Furthermore, the two approaches can directly utilize structural response data without requiring excitation measurement, which offers advantages in field testing on a large structure. In this research, a numerical finite element model of a metro tunnel is built and different types of structural defects are introduced at multiple locations of the tunnel. Transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are applied to perform structural damage detection and localization, based on simulated structural vibration data. Numerical results demonstrate that the introduced defects can be successfully identified and located. The sensitivity and feasibility of the two approaches have been verified when sufficient distribution of measurement locations is available. Damage detection results of the two different approaches are compared and discussed.

  4. How Bond Length Alternation and Thermal Disorder Affect the Optical Excitation Energies of π-Conjugated Chains: A Combined Density Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Bois, Juliana; Körzdörfer, Thomas

    2016-04-12

    We dissect the sources of error leading to inaccuracies in the description of the geometry and optical excitation energies of π-conjugated polymers. While the ground-state bond length alternation is shown to be badly reproduced by standard functionals, the recently adapted functionals PBEh* and ωPBE* as well as the double hybrid functional XYGJ-OS manage to replicate results obtained at the CCSD(T) level. By analysis of the bond length alternation in the excited state, a sensitive dependence of the exciton localization on the long-range behavior of the functional and the amount of Hartree-Fock exchange present is shown. Introducing thermal disorder through molecular dynamics simulations allows the consideration of a range of thermally accessible configurations of each oligomer, including trans to cis rotations, which break the conjugation of the backbone. Thermal disorder has a considerable effect when combined with functionals that overestimate the delocalization of the excitation, such as B3LYP. For functionals with a larger amount of exact exchange such as our PBEh* and ωPBE*, however, the effect is small, as excitations are often localized enough to fit between twists in the chain. PMID:26960057

  5. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory via linear response

    DOE PAGES

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I.; Beylkin, Gregory; Harrison, Robert J.

    2015-02-25

    Using the fully numerical method for time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm–Dancoff (TD) approximation we use a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach to present our findings. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. Moreover, the integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using amore » numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. Finally, we introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.« less

  6. Multiresolution quantum chemistry in multiwavelet bases: excited states from time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory via linear response

    SciTech Connect

    Yanai, Takeshi; Fann, George I.; Beylkin, Gregory; Harrison, Robert J.

    2015-02-25

    Using the fully numerical method for time-dependent Hartree–Fock and density functional theory (TD-HF/DFT) with the Tamm–Dancoff (TD) approximation we use a multiresolution analysis (MRA) approach to present our findings. From a reformulation with effective use of the density matrix operator, we obtain a general form of the HF/DFT linear response equation in the first quantization formalism. It can be readily rewritten as an integral equation with the bound-state Helmholtz (BSH) kernel for the Green's function. The MRA implementation of the resultant equation permits excited state calculations without virtual orbitals. Moreover, the integral equation is efficiently and adaptively solved using a numerical multiresolution solver with multiwavelet bases. Our implementation of the TD-HF/DFT methods is applied for calculating the excitation energies of H2, Be, N2, H2O, and C2H4 molecules. The numerical errors of the calculated excitation energies converge in proportion to the residuals of the equation in the molecular orbitals and response functions. The energies of the excited states at a variety of length scales ranging from short-range valence excitations to long-range Rydberg-type ones are consistently accurate. It is shown that the multiresolution calculations yield the correct exponential asymptotic tails for the response functions, whereas those computed with Gaussian basis functions are too diffuse or decay too rapidly. Finally, we introduce a simple asymptotic correction to the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) so that in the TDDFT calculations, the excited states are correctly bound.

  7. Non-local exchange correlation functionals impact on the structural, electronic and optical properties of III-V arsenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najwa Anua, N.; Ahmed, R.; Shaari, A.; Saeed, M. A.; Haq, Bakhtiar Ul; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2013-10-01

    Exchange correlation (XC) energy functionals play a vital role in the efficiency of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, more soundly in the calculation of fundamental electronic energy bandgap. In the present DFT study of III-arsenides, we investigate the implications of XC-energy functional and corresponding potential on the structural, electronic and optical properties of XAs (X = B, Al, Ga, In). Firstly we report and discuss the optimized structural lattice parameters and the band gap calculations performed within different non-local XC functionals as implemented in the DFT-packages: WIEN2k, CASTEP and SIESTA. These packages are representative of the available code in ab initio studies. We employed the LDA, GGA-PBE, GGA-WC and mBJ-LDA using WIEN2k. In CASTEP, we employed the hybrid functional, sX-LDA. Furthermore LDA, GGA-PBE and meta-GGA were employed using SIESTA code. Our results point to GGA-WC as a more appropriate approximation for the calculations of structural parameters. However our electronic bandstructure calculations at the level of mBJ-LDA potential show considerable improvements over the other XC functionals, even the sX-LDA hybrid functional. We report also the optical properties within mBJ potential, which show a nice agreement with the experimental measurements in addition to other theoretical results.

  8. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  9. β-III spectrin underpins ankyrin R function in Purkinje cell dendritic trees: protein complex critical for sodium channel activity is impaired by SCA5-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Yvonne L; Perkins, Emma M; Cairncross, Callum J; Lyndon, Alastair R; Skehel, Paul A; Jackson, Mandy

    2014-07-15

    Beta III spectrin is present throughout the elaborate dendritic tree of cerebellar Purkinje cells and is required for normal neuronal morphology and cell survival. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) and spectrin associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 are human neurodegenerative diseases involving progressive gait ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Both disorders appear to result from loss of β-III spectrin function. Further elucidation of β-III spectrin function is therefore needed to understand disease mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic options. Here, we report that β-III spectrin is essential for the recruitment and maintenance of ankyrin R at the plasma membrane of Purkinje cell dendrites. Two SCA5-associated mutations of β-III spectrin both reduce ankyrin R levels at the cell membrane. Moreover, a wild-type β-III spectrin/ankyrin-R complex increases sodium channel levels and activity in cell culture, whereas mutant β-III spectrin complexes fail to enhance sodium currents. This suggests impaired ability to form stable complexes between the adaptor protein ankyrin R and its interacting partners in the Purkinje cell dendritic tree is a key mechanism by which mutant forms of β-III spectrin cause ataxia, initially by Purkinje cell dysfunction and exacerbated by subsequent cell death. PMID:24603075

  10. Excitation function shape and neutron spectrum of the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Hernández, Guido; Mastinu, Pierfrancesco; Maggiore, Mario; Pranovi, Lorenzo; Prete, Gianfranco; Praena, Javier; Capote-Noy, Roberto; Gramegna, Fabiana; Lombardi, Augusto; Maran, Luca; Scian, Carlo; Munaron, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The forward-emitted low energy tail of the neutron spectrum generated by the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction on a thick target at a proton energy of 1893.6 keV was measured by time-of-flight spectroscopy. The measurement was performed at BELINA (Beam Line for Nuclear Astrophysics) of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. Using the reaction kinematics and the proton on lithium stopping power the shape of the excitation function is calculated from the measured neutron spectrum. Good agreement with two reported measurements was found. Our data, along with the previous measurements, are well reproduced by the Breit-Wigner single-resonance formula for s -wave particles. The differential yield of the reaction is calculated and the widely used neutron spectrum at a proton energy of 1912 keV was reproduced. Possible causes regarding part of the 6.5% discrepancy between the 197Au(n ,γ ) cross section measured at this energy by Ratynski and Kappeler [Phys. Rev. C 37, 595 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevC.37.595] and the one obtained using the Evaluated Nuclear Data File version B-VII.1 are given.

  11. Validation of Earth orientation parameters (EOP), geophysical excitation functions ( EF) and the second degree gravity field coefficients (GFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiker, A.; Schmidt, M.

    2012-04-01

    The project P9 of the research group "Earth rotation and geophysical processes" aims at the combined analysis and validation of Earth rotation observations and models (see Göttl et al. EGU 2012 poster). The EOP, EF and GFC are linked by the Earth tensor of inertia. This link is used for a sophisticated mutual validation. A least squares adjustment model which estimate the unknown tensor of inertia was developed for this purpose. Additionally variance and covariance components are estimated. The results of the adjustment model are the residuals for each data series and the adjusted tensor of inertia. It is assumed that the residuals contain the inconsistencies between the various time series. A thorough analysis of the residuals in the time and frequency domain reveals the systematic effects within the residuals. The adjusted variance and covariance components allow to check the standard deviations and in some cases the correlations given by the data centers. We present the results obtained from the combined analysis of IERS EOP, two different atmospheric and oceanic excitation functions (NCEP/ECCO from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and ERAInterim/OMCT from the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam) and six different gravity field solutions (five GRACE solutions and one SLR solution).

  12. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior. PMID:949223

  13. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  14. New evolution equations for the joint response-excitation probability density function of stochastic solutions to first-order nonlinear PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, D.; Karniadakis, G.E.

    2012-08-30

    By using functional integral methods we determine new evolution equations satisfied by the joint response-excitation probability density function (PDF) associated with the stochastic solution to first-order nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). The theory is presented for both fully nonlinear and for quasilinear scalar PDEs subject to random boundary conditions, random initial conditions or random forcing terms. Particular applications are discussed for the classical linear and nonlinear advection equations and for the advection-reaction equation. By using a Fourier-Galerkin spectral method we obtain numerical solutions of the proposed response-excitation PDF equations. These numerical solutions are compared against those obtained by using more conventional statistical approaches such as probabilistic collocation and multi-element probabilistic collocation methods. It is found that the response-excitation approach yields accurate predictions of the statistical properties of the system. In addition, it allows to directly ascertain the tails of probabilistic distributions, thus facilitating the assessment of rare events and associated risks. The computational cost of the response-excitation method is order magnitudes smaller than the one of more conventional statistical approaches if the PDE is subject to high-dimensional random boundary or initial conditions. The question of high-dimensionality for evolution equations involving multidimensional joint response-excitation PDFs is also addressed.

  15. Structure-function relationships within Keppler-type antitumor ruthenium(III) complexes: the case of 2-aminothiazolium[trans-tetrachlorobis(2-aminothiazole)ruthenate(III)].

    PubMed

    Mura, Pasquale; Piccioli, Francesca; Gabbiani, Chiara; Camalli, Mercedes; Messori, Luigi

    2005-07-11

    Keppler-type ruthenium(III) complexes exhibit promising antitumor properties. We report here a study of 2-aminothiazolium[trans-tetrachlorobis(2-aminothiazole)ruthenate(III)], both in the solid state and in solution. The crystal structure has been solved and found to exhibit classical features. Important solvatochromic effects were revealed. Notably, we observed that introduction of an amino group in position 2 greatly accelerates chloride hydrolysis compared to the thiazole analogue; this latter finding may be of interest for a fine-tuning of the reactivity of these novel metallodrugs.

  16. A comprehensive study of sensorimotor cortex excitability in chronic cocaine users: Integrating TMS and functional MRI data☆

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Colleen A.; DeVries, William; Dowdle, Logan T.; West, Julia A.; Siekman, Bradley; Li, Xingbao; George, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disruptions in motor control are often overlooked features of chronic cocaine users. During a simple sensorimotor integration task, for example, cocaine users activate a larger area of cortex than controls but have lower functional connectivity between the cortex and dorsal striatum, which is further correlated with poor performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether abnormal cortical excitability in cocaine users was related to disrupted inhibitory or excitatory mechanisms, as measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods A battery of TMS measures were acquired from 87 individuals (50 cocaine dependent, 37 controls). Functional MRI data were acquired from a subset of 28 individuals who performed a block-design finger tapping task. Results TMS measures revealed that cocaine users had significantly higher resting motor thresholds and higher intracortical cortical facilitation (ICF) than controls. There was no between-group difference in either measure of cortical inhibition. Task-evoked BOLD signal in the motor cortex was significantly correlated with ICF in the cocaine users. There was no significant difference in brain-skull distance between groups. Conclusion These data demonstrated that cocaine users have disrupted cortical facilitation (as measured with TMS), which is related to elevated BOLD signal. Cortical inhibition, however, is largely intact. Given the relationship between ICF and glutamatergic agents, this may be a potentially fruitful and treatable target in addiction. Finally, among controls the distance from the scalp to the cortex was correlated with the motor threshold which may be a useful parameter to integrate into therapeutic TMS protocols in the future. PMID:26541870

  17. Selective solid-phase extraction and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) Ions in wastewater using diethylenetriamine-functionalized carbon nanotubes dispersed in graphene oxide colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangbing; Cui, Yuemei; Chang, Xijun; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) were dispersed in graphene oxide (GO) colloids to be further functionalized with diethylenetriamine (DETA), resulting in GO-MCNTs-DETA nanocomposites for the solid-phase extraction and analysis of Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions at the trace levels in wastewater. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) indicates that this new solid-phase sorbent could facilitate the maximum static adsorption capacities of 5.4, 13.8, 6.6 and 9.5 mg g(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, showing the adsorption capacity up to 95% within about 30 min. Moreover, the detection limits of the GO-MCNTs-DETA-based analysis method were found to be 0.16, 0.50, 0.24 and 0.38 ng mL(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, with the relative standard deviation of lower than 3.0% (n=5). Importantly, common coexisting ions showed no significant interference on the separation and pre-concentration of these heavy metal ions at pH 4.0. Subsequently, the GO-MCNTs-DETA sorbent was successfully employed for the separation and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions in wastewater samples yielding 75-folds concentration factors. PMID:26695275

  18. Functional assignment to positively selected sites in the core type III effector RipG7 from Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Keke; Remigi, Philippe; Anisimova, Maria; Lonjon, Fabien; Kars, Ilona; Kajava, Andrey; Li, Chien-Hui; Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Vailleau, Fabienne; Genin, Stéphane; Peeters, Nemo

    2016-05-01

    The soil-borne pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum causes bacterial wilt in a broad range of plants. The main virulence determinants of R. solanacearum are the type III secretion system (T3SS) and its associated type III effectors (T3Es), translocated into the host cells. Of the conserved T3Es among R. solanacearum strains, the Fbox protein RipG7 is required for R. solanacearum pathogenesis on Medicago truncatula. In this work, we describe the natural ripG7 variability existing in the R. solanacearum species complex. We show that eight representative ripG7 orthologues have different contributions to pathogenicity on M. truncatula: only ripG7 from Asian or African strains can complement the absence of ripG7 in GMI1000 (Asian reference strain). Nonetheless, RipG7 proteins from American and Indonesian strains can still interact with M. truncatula SKP1-like/MSKa protein, essential for the function of RipG7 in virulence. This indicates that the absence of complementation is most likely a result of the variability in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of RipG7. We identified 11 sites under positive selection in the LRR domains of RipG7. By studying the functional impact of these 11 sites, we show the contribution of five positively selected sites for the function of RipG7CMR15 in M. truncatula colonization. This work reveals the genetic and functional variation of the essential core T3E RipG7 from R. solanacearum. This analysis is the first of its kind on an essential disease-controlling T3E, and sheds light on the co-evolutionary arms race between the bacterium and its hosts.

  19. Helical packing of needles from functionally altered Shigella type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Frank S; Daniell, Sarah; Kenjale, Roma; Saurya, Saroj; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D; Booy, Frank; Lea, Susan M; Blocker, Ariel

    2005-11-25

    Gram-negative bacteria commonly interact with eukaryotic host cells using type III secretion systems (TTSSs or secretons), which comprise cytoplasmic, transmembrane and extracellular domains. The extracellular domain is a hollow needle-like structure protruding 60 nm beyond the bacterial surface. The TTSS is activated to transfer bacterial proteins directly into a host cell only upon physical contact with the target cell. We showed previously that the monomer of the Shigella flexneri needle, MxiH, assembles into a helical structure with parameters similar to those defining the architecture of the extracellular components of bacterial flagella. By analogy with flagella, which are known to exist in different helical states, we proposed that changes in the helical packing of the needle might be used to sense host cell contact. Here, we show that, on the contrary, mutations within MxiH that lock the TTSS into altered secretion states do not detectably alter the helical packing of needles. This implies that either: (1) host cell contact is signalled through the TTSS via helical changes in the needle that are significantly smaller than those linked to structural changes in the flagellar filament and therefore too small to be detected by our analysis methods or (2) that signal transduction in this system occurs via a novel molecular mechanism. PMID:16243352

  20. The nearby Abell clusters. III. Luminosity functions for eight rich clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Oegerle, W.R.; Hoessel, J.G. Washburn Observatory, Madison, WI )

    1989-11-01

    Red photographic data on eight rich Abell clusters are combined with previous results on four other Abell clusters to study the luminosity functions of the clusters. The results produce a mean value of the characteristic galaxy magnitude (M asterisk) that is consistent with previous results. No relation is found between the magnitude of the first-ranked cluster galaxy and M asterisk, suggesting that the value of M asterisk is not changed by dynamical evolution. The faint ends of the luminosity functions for many of the clusters are quite flat, validating the nonuniversality in the parametrization of Schechter (1976) functions for rich clusters of galaxies. 40 refs.

  1. 78 FR 9802 - Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ..., December 28, 2012 (77 FR 76382). The final and temporary regulations provide guidance regarding the... Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Correction to final and temporary regulations. SUMMARY: This document contains corrections...

  2. Empirical calibration of the near-infrared Ca II triplet - III. Fitting functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Cardiel, N.; Vazdekis, A.; Peletier, R. F.

    2002-02-01

    Using a near-infrared stellar library of 706 stars with a wide coverage of atmospheric parameters, we study the behaviour of the CaII triplet strength in terms of effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity. Empirical fitting functions for recently defined line-strength indices, namely CaT*, CaT and PaT, are provided. These functions can be easily implemented into stellar population models to provide accurate predictions for integrated CaII strengths. We also present a thorough study of the various error sources and their relation to the residuals of the derived fitting functions. Finally, the derived functional forms and the behaviour of the predicted CaII are compared with those of previous works in the field.

  3. Translation and Validation of Enhanced Asian Rome III Questionnaires in Bengali Language for Diagnosis of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M Masudur; Ghoshal, Uday C; Rowshon, A H M; Ahmed, Faruque; Kibria, Md Golam; Hasan, Mahmud; Gwee, Kok-Ann; Whitehead, William E

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), diagnosed by symptom-based criteria due to lack of biomarkers, need translated-validated questionnaires in different languages. As Bengali, the mother tongue of Bangladesh and eastern India, is the seventh most spoken language in the world, we translated and validated the Enhanced Asian Rome III questionnaire (EAR3Q) in this language. Methods The EAR3Q was translated in Bengali as per guideline from the Rome Foundation. The translated questionnaire was validated prospectively on Bengali-speaking healthy subjects (HS, n = 30), and patients with functional dyspepsia (FD, n = 35), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, n = 40) and functional constipation (FC, n = 12) diagnosed by clinicians using the Rome III criteria. The subjects were asked to fill-in the questionnaire again after 2 weeks, to check for its reproducibility. Results During translation, the original and the backward translated English versions of the questionnaire demonstrated high concordance. Sensitivity of the Bengali questionnaire to diagnose patients with FD, IBS, FC, and HS was 100%, 100%, 75%, and 100%, respectively, considering diagnosis by the clinicians as the gold standard. On test-retest reliability analysis, Kappa values for FD, IBS, FC, and HS were 1.0, 1.0, 0.83, and 1.0, respectively. The Bengali questionnaire detected considerable overlap of FD symptoms among patients with IBS, IBS among patients with FD, and FD among patients with FC, which were not detected by the clinicians. Conclusions We successfully translated and validated the EAR3Q in Bengali. We believe that this translated questionnaire will be useful for clinical evaluation and research on FGIDs in the Bengali-speaking population. PMID:26690730

  4. Long-lived room-temperature deep-red-emissive intraligand triplet excited state of naphthalimide in cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes and its application in triplet-triplet annihilation-based upconversion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jifu; Wu, Wanhua; Zhao, Jianzhang

    2012-06-25

    Cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes with acetylide ppy and bpy ligands were prepared (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) in which naphthal (Ir-2) and naphthalimide (NI) were attached onto the ppy (Ir-3) and bpy ligands (Ir-4) through acetylide bonds. [Ir(ppy)(3)] (Ir-1) was also prepared as a model complex. Room-temperature phosphorescence was observed for the complexes; both neutral and cationic complexes Ir-3 and Ir-4 showed strong absorption in the visible range (ε=39,600  M(-1)  cm(-1) at 402 nm and ε=25,100  M(-1)  cm(-1) at 404 nm, respectively), long-lived triplet excited states (τ(T)=9.30 μs and 16.45 μs) and room-temperature red emission (λ(em)=640 nm, Φ(p)=1.4 % and λ(em)=627 nm, Φ(p)=0.3 %; cf. Ir-1: ε=16,600  M(-1)  cm(-1) at 382 nm, τ(em)=1.16 μs, Φ(p)=72.6 %). Ir-3 was strongly phosphorescent in non-polar solvent (i.e., toluene), but the emission was completely quenched in polar solvents (MeCN). Ir-4 gave an opposite response to the solvent polarity, that is, stronger phosphorescence in polar solvents than in non-polar solvents. Emission of Ir-1 and Ir-2 was not solvent-polarity-dependent. The T(1) excited states of Ir-2, Ir-3, and Ir-4 were identified as mainly intraligand triplet excited states ((3)IL) by their small thermally induced Stokes shifts (ΔE(s)), nanosecond time-resolved transient difference absorption spectroscopy, and spin-density analysis. The complexes were used as triplet photosensitizers for triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) upconversion and quantum yields of 7.1 % and 14.4 % were observed for Ir-2 and Ir-3, respectively, whereas the upconversion was negligible for Ir-1 and Ir-4. These results will be useful for designing visible-light-harvesting transition-metal complexes and for their applications as triplet photosensitizers for photocatalysis, photovoltaics, TTA upconversion, etc.

  5. A new mutation in the KINDLIN-3 gene ablates integrin-dependent leukocyte, platelet, and osteoclast function in a patient with leukocyte adhesion deficiency-III.

    PubMed

    Crazzolara, Roman; Maurer, Kathrin; Schulze, Harald; Zieger, Barbara; Zustin, Jozef; Schulz, Ansgar S

    2015-09-01

    Disabling mutations in integrin-mediated cell signaling have been a major focus of interest over the last decade for patients affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency-III (LAD-III). In this study, we identified a new C>T point mutation in exon 13 in the FERMT3 gene in an infant diagnosed with LAD-III and showed that KINDLIN-3 expression is required for platelet aggregation and leukocyte function, but also osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. After allogeneic bone marrow transplant, all overt symptoms disappeared. This newly identified mutation along with its novel role in dysregulation of bone homeostasis extends our understanding of KINDLIN-3 in humans.

  6. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics: Optical Excitation Function of H(1s-2p) Produced by electron Impact from Threshold to 1.8 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Slevin, J. A.; Shemansky, D. E.; McConkey, J. W.; Bray, I.; Dziczek, D.; Kanik, I.; Ajello, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The optical excitation function of prompt Lyman-Alpha radiation, produced by electron impact on atomic hydrogen, has been measured over the extended energy range from threshold to 1.8 keV. Measurements were obtained in a crossed-beams experiment using both magnetically confined and electrostatically focused electrons in collision with atomic hydrogen produced by an intense discharge source. A vacuum-ultraviolet mono- chromator system was used to measure the emitted Lyman-Alpha radiation. The absolute H(1s-2p) electron impact excitation cross section was obtained from the experimental optical excitation function by normalizing to the accepted optical oscillator strength, with corrections for polarization and cascade. Statistical and known systematic uncertainties in our data range from +/- 4% near threshold to +/- 2% at 1.8 keV. Multistate coupling affecting the shape of the excitation function up to 1 keV impact energy is apparent in both the present experimental data and present theoretical results obtained with convergent close- coupling (CCC) theory. This shape function effect leads to an uncertainty in absolute cross sections at the 10% level in the analysis of the experimental data. The derived optimized absolute cross sections are within 7% of the CCC calculations over the 14 eV-1.8 keV range. The present CCC calculations converge on the Bethe- Fano profile for H(1s-2p) excitation at high energy. For this reason agreement with the CCC values to within 3% is achieved in a nonoptimal normalization of the experimental data to the Bethe-Fano profile. The fundamental H(1s-2p) electron impact cross section is thereby determined to an unprecedented accuracy over the 14 eV - 1.8 keV energy range.

  7. BEAN 2.0: an integrated web resource for the identification and functional analysis of type III secreted effectors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaobao; Lu, Xiaotian; Zhang, Ziding

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria inject type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) into host cells to sabotage their immune signaling networks. Because T3SEs constitute a meeting-point of pathogen virulence and host defense, they are of keen interest to host–pathogen interaction research community. To accelerate the identification and functional understanding of T3SEs, we present BEAN 2.0 as an integrated web resource to predict, analyse and store T3SEs. BEAN 2.0 includes three major components. First, it provides an accurate T3SE predictor based on a hybrid approach. Using independent testing data, we show that BEAN 2.0 achieves a sensitivity of 86.05% and a specificity of 100%. Second, it integrates a set of online sequence analysis tools. Users can further perform functional analysis of putative T3SEs in a seamless way, such as subcellular location prediction, functional domain scan and disorder region annotation. Third, it compiles a database covering 1215 experimentally verified T3SEs and constructs two T3SE-related networks that can be used to explore the relationships among T3SEs. Taken together, by presenting a one-stop T3SE bioinformatics resource, we hope BEAN 2.0 can promote comprehensive understanding of the function and evolution of T3SEs. Database URL: http://systbio.cau.edu.cn/bean/ PMID:26120140

  8. BEAN 2.0: an integrated web resource for the identification and functional analysis of type III secreted effectors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaobao; Lu, Xiaotian; Zhang, Ziding

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria inject type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) into host cells to sabotage their immune signaling networks. Because T3SEs constitute a meeting-point of pathogen virulence and host defense, they are of keen interest to host-pathogen interaction research community. To accelerate the identification and functional understanding of T3SEs, we present BEAN 2.0 as an integrated web resource to predict, analyse and store T3SEs. BEAN 2.0 includes three major components. First, it provides an accurate T3SE predictor based on a hybrid approach. Using independent testing data, we show that BEAN 2.0 achieves a sensitivity of 86.05% and a specificity of 100%. Second, it integrates a set of online sequence analysis tools. Users can further perform functional analysis of putative T3SEs in a seamless way, such as subcellular location prediction, functional domain scan and disorder region annotation. Third, it compiles a database covering 1215 experimentally verified T3SEs and constructs two T3SE-related networks that can be used to explore the relationships among T3SEs. Taken together, by presenting a one-stop T3SE bioinformatics resource, we hope BEAN 2.0 can promote comprehensive understanding of the function and evolution of T3SEs.

  9. Piaget's Structural Developmental Psychology. III. Function and the Problem of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Third in a series of five essays on Piaget, this article examines the dynamic, functional aspects of Piagetian theory through an identification and analysis of two major models for understanding interaction and change: assimilation/accommodation and scientific inquiry. (Author/CM)

  10. Functional Significance of Iron Deficiency. Annual Nutrition Workshop Series, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enwonwu, Cyril O., Ed.

    Iron deficiency anemia impairs cognitive performance, physical capacity, and thermoregulation. Recent evidence suggests that these functional impairments are also evident in subclinical nonanemic iron deficiency. Very little is known about the relevance of the latter to the health of blacks, who have been shown to have the highest prevalence of…

  11. THE HALO MASS FUNCTION FROM EXCURSION SET THEORY. III. NON-GAUSSIAN FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, Michele; Riotto, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    We compute the effect of primordial non-Gaussianity on the halo mass function, using excursion set theory. In the presence of non-Gaussianity, the stochastic evolution of the smoothed density field, as a function of the smoothing scale, is non-Markovian and beside 'local' terms that generalize Press-Schechter (PS) theory, there are also 'memory' terms, whose effect on the mass function can be computed using the formalism developed in the first paper of this series. We find that, when computing the effect of the three-point correlator on the mass function, a PS-like approach which consists in neglecting the cloud-in-cloud problem and in multiplying the final result by a fudge factor {approx_equal}2, is in principle not justified. When computed correctly in the framework of excursion set theory, in fact, the 'local' contribution vanishes (for all odd-point correlators the contribution of the image Gaussian cancels the PS contribution rather than adding up), and the result comes entirely from non-trivial memory terms which are absent in PS theory. However it turns out that, in the limit of large halo masses, where the effect of non-Gaussianity is more relevant, these memory terms give a contribution which is the same as that computed naively with PS theory, plus subleading terms depending on derivatives of the three-point correlator. We finally combine these results with the diffusive barrier model developed in the second paper of this series, and we find that the resulting mass function reproduces recent N-body simulations with non-Gaussian initial conditions, without the introduction of any ad hoc parameter.

  12. Tight-binding approximations to time-dependent density functional theory — A fast approach for the calculation of electronically excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüger, Robert; van Lenthe, Erik; Heine, Thomas; Visscher, Lucas

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new method of calculating electronically excited states that combines a density functional theory based ground state calculation with a linear response treatment that employs approximations used in the time-dependent density functional based tight binding (TD-DFTB) approach. The new method termed time-dependent density functional theory TD-DFT+TB does not rely on the DFTB parametrization and is therefore applicable to systems involving all combinations of elements. We show that the new method yields UV/Vis absorption spectra that are in excellent agreement with computationally much more expensive TD-DFT calculations. Errors in vertical excitation energies are reduced by a factor of two compared to TD-DFTB.

  13. Ground- and excited-state properties of inorganic solids from full-potential density-functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, P.; Vidya, R.; Vajeeston, P.; Kjekshus, A.; Fjellvåg, H.

    2003-12-01

    The development in theoretical condensed-matter science based on density-functional theory (DFT) has reached a level where it is possible, from "parameter-free" quantum mechanical calculations to obtain total energies, forces, vibrational frequencies, magnetic moments, mechanical and optical properties and so forth. The calculation of such properties are important in the analyses of experimental data and they can be predicted with a precision that is sufficient for comparison with experiments. It is almost impossible to do justice to all developments achieved by DFT because of its rapid growth. Hence, it has here been focused on a few advances, primarily from our laboratory. Unusual bonding behaviors in complex materials are conveniently explored using the combination of charge density, charge transfer, and electron-localization function along with crystal-orbital Hamilton-population analyses. It is indicated that the elastic properties of materials can reliably be predicted from DFT calculations if one takes into account the structural relaxations along with gradient corrections in the calculations. Experimental techniques have their limitations in studies of the structural stability and pressure-induced structural transitions in hydride materials whereas the present theoretical approach can be applied to reliably predict properties under extreme pressures. From the spin-polarized, relativistic full-potential calculations one can study novel materials such as ruthenates, quasi-one-dimensional oxides, and spin-, charge-, and orbital-ordering in magnetic perovskite-like oxides. The importance of orbital-polarization correction to the DFT to predict the magnetic anisotropy in transition-metal compounds and magnetic moments in lanthanides and actinides are emphasized. Apart from the full-potential treatment, proper magnetic ordering as well as structural distortions have to be taken into account to predict correctly the insulating behavior of transition-metal oxides

  14. A primer on molecular biology for imagers: III. Proteins: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Sunil D; Li, King C P

    2004-04-01

    This article along with the first 2 in this series (4,12) completes the discussion on the key molecules and process inside the cell namely, DNA, RNA, and proteins. These 3 articles provide a very basic foundation for understanding molecular biology concepts and summarize some of the work of numerous scientists over the past century. We understand these processes far better now than we did in the past, but clearly this knowledge is by no means complete and a number of basic scientists are working hard to elucidate and understand the fundamental mechanisms that operate within a cell. Genes and gene products work with each other in complex, interconnected pathways, and in perfect harmony to make a functional cell, tissue, and an organism as a whole. There is a lot of cross-talk that happens between different proteins that interact with various other proteins, DNA, and RNA to establish pathways, networks, and molecular systems as a team working to perfection. The past 15 years have seen the rapid development of systems biology approaches. We live in an era that emphasizes multi-disciplinary, cross-functional teams to perform science rather than individual researchers working on the bench on a very specific problem. Global approaches have become more common and the amount of data generated must be managed by trained bioinformatics personnel and large computers. In our subsequent articles, we will discuss these global approaches and the areas of genomics, functional genomics, and proteomics that have revolutionized the way we perform science. PMID:15109017

  15. Speciation of La(III) chloride complexes in water and acetonitrile: a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Sieffert, Nicolas; Partouche, Aurélie; Chaumont, Alain; Wipff, Georges

    2012-12-17

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CMPD) simulations and static computations are reported at the BLYP level of density functional theory (DFT) for mixed [LaCl(x)(H(2)O)(y)(MeCN)(z)](3-x) complexes in aqueous and nonaqueous solution (acetonitrile). Both methodologies predict coordination numbers (i.e., x + y + z) that are successively lower than nine as the Cl content increases from x = 0 to 3. While the static DFT method with implicit solvation through a polarizable continuum model overestimates the binding strength of chloride and erroneously predicts [LaCl(2)(H(2)O)(5)](+) as global free-energy minimum, constrained CPMD simulations with explicit solvent and thermodynamic integration reproduce the weak binding of chloride in water reasonably well. Special attention is called to the dipole moments of coordinated water molecules as function of coligands and solvent, evaluated through maximally localized Wannier function centers along the CPMD trajectories. Cooperative polarization of these water ligands by the metal cation and the surrounding solvent is remarkably sensitive to fluctuations of the La-O distances and, to a lesser extent, on the La-water tilt angles. The mean dipole moment of water ligands is rather insensitive to the other coligands, oscillating around 3.2 D, 3.5 D, and 3.3 D in MeCN, water, and [dmim]Cl solution, respectively, the latter being an archetypical ionic liquid.

  16. Polarization measurement analysis. III. Analysis of the polarization angle dispersion function with high precision polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alina, D.; Montier, L.; Ristorcelli, I.; Bernard, J.-P.; Levrier, F.; Abdikamalov, E.

    2016-10-01

    High precision polarization measurements, such as those from the Planck satellite, open new opportunities for the study of the magnetic field structure as traced by polarimetric measurements of the interstellar dust emission. The polarization parameters suffer from bias in the presence of measurement noise. It is critical to take into account all the information available in the data in order to accurately derive these parameters. In our previous work, we studied the bias on polarization fraction and angle, various estimators of these quantities, and their associated uncertainties. The goal of this paper is to characterize the bias on the polarization angle dispersion function that is used to study the spatial coherence of the polarization angle. We characterize for the first time the bias on the conventional estimator of the polarization angle dispersion function and show that it can be positive or negative depending on the true value. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to explore the impact of the noise properties of the polarization data, as well as the impact of the distribution of the true polarization angles on the bias. We show that in the case where the ellipticity of the noise in (Q,U) varies by less than 10%, one can use simplified, diagonal approximation of the noise covariance matrix. In other cases, the shape of the noise covariance matrix should be taken into account in the estimation of the polarization angle dispersion function. We also study new estimators such as the dichotomic and the polynomial estimators. Though the dichotomic estimator cannot be directly used to estimate the polarization angle dispersion function, we show that, on the one hand, it can serve as an indicator of the accuracy of the conventional estimator and, on the other hand, it can be used for deriving the polynomial estimator. We propose a method for determining the upper limit of the bias on the conventional estimator of the polarization angle dispersion function. The

  17. Excited-State Electronic Structure with Configuration Interaction Singles and Tamm–Dancoff Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory on Graphical Processing Units

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Excited-state calculations are implemented in a development version of the GPU-based TeraChem software package using the configuration interaction singles (CIS) and adiabatic linear response Tamm–Dancoff time-dependent density functional theory (TDA-TDDFT) methods. The speedup of the CIS and TDDFT methods using GPU-based electron repulsion integrals and density functional quadrature integration allows full ab initio excited-state calculations on molecules of unprecedented size. CIS/6-31G and TD-BLYP/6-31G benchmark timings are presented for a range of systems, including four generations of oligothiophene dendrimers, photoactive yellow protein (PYP), and the PYP chromophore solvated with 900 quantum mechanical water molecules. The effects of double and single precision integration are discussed, and mixed precision GPU integration is shown to give extremely good numerical accuracy for both CIS and TDDFT excitation energies (excitation energies within 0.0005 eV of extended double precision CPU results). PMID:21687784

  18. Modeling laser induced molecule excitation using real-time time-dependent density functional theory: application to 5- and 6-benzyluracil.

    PubMed

    Bende, Attila; Toşa, Valer

    2015-02-28

    The fully propagated real time-dependent density functional theory method has been applied to study the laser-molecule interaction in 5- and 6-benzyluracil (5BU and 6BU). The molecular geometry optimization and the time-dependent electronic dynamics propagation were carried out using the M11-L local meta-NGA (nonseparable gradient approximations) exchange-correlation functional together with the def2-TZVP basis set. Different laser field parameters like direction, strength, and wavelength have been varied in order to estimate the conditions for an efficient excitation of the molecules. The results show that the two molecules respond differently to the applied laser field and therefore specific laser field parameters have to be chosen for each of them in order to get efficient and selective excitation behavior. It was also found that from the molecular excitation point of view not only the magnitude of the transition dipoles between the involved orbitals but also their orientation with respect to the laser field is important. On the other hand, it was shown that the molecular excitation is a very complex overlapping of different one-electron orbital depopulation-population processes of the occupied and virtual orbitals.

  19. Electronic and chemical state of aluminum from the single- (K) and double-electron excitation (KLII&III, KLI) x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of α-alumina, sodium aluminate, aqueous Al³⁺•(H₂O)₆, and aqueous Al(OH)₄⁻

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, John L.; Govind, Niranjan; Huthwelker, Thomas; Bylaska, Eric J.; Vjunov, Aleksei; Pin, Sonia; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.

    2015-07-02

    We probe, at high energy resolution, the double electron excitation (KLII&II) x-ray absorption region that lies approximately 115 eV above the main Al K-edge (1566 eV) of α-alumina and sodium aluminate. The two solid standards, α-alumina (octahedral) and sodium aluminate (tetrahedral) are compared to aqueous species that have the same Al coordination symmetries, Al³⁺•6H₂O (octahedral) and Al(OH)₄⁻ (tetrahedral). For the octahedral species, the edge height of the KLII&III-edge is approximately 10% of the main K-edge however the edge height is much weaker (3% of K-edge height) for Al species with tetrahedral symmetry. For the α-alumina and aqueous Al³⁺•6H₂O the KLII&III spectra contain white line features and extended absorption fine structure (EXAFS) that mimics the K-edge spectra. The KLII&III-edge feature interferes with an important region of the extended-XAFS region of the spectra for the K-edge of the crystalline and aqueous standards. The K-edge spectra and K-edge positions are predicted using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The TDDFT calculations for the K-edge XANES spectra reproduce the observed transitions in the experimental spectra of the four Al species. The KLII&III and KLI onsets and their corresponding chemical shifts for the four standards are estimated using the delta self-consistent field (ΔSCF) method. Research by JLF, NG, EJB, AV, TDS was supported by U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. NG thanks Amity Andersen for help with the α-Al₂O₃ and tetrahedral sodium aluminate (NaAlO₂) clusters. All the calculations were performed using the Molecular Science Computing Capability at EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at

  20. Chemical association in simple models of molecular and ionic fluids. III. The cavity function

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y. ); Stell, G. )

    1992-01-15

    Exact equations which relate the cavity function to excess solvation free energies and equilibrium association constants are rederived by using a thermodynamic cycle. A zeroth-order approximation, derived previously by us as a simple interpolation scheme, is found to be very accurate if the associative bonding occurs on or near the surface of the repulsive core of the interaction potential. If the bonding radius is substantially less than the core radius, the approximation overestimates the association degree and the association constant. For binary association, the zeroth-order approximation is equivalent to the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) of Wertheim. For {ital n}-particle association, the combination of the zeroth-order approximation with a linear'' approximation (for {ital n}-particle distribution functions in terms of the two-particle function) yields the first-order TPT result. Using our exact equations to go beyond TPT, near-exact analytic results for binary hard-sphere association are obtained. Solvent effects on binary hard-sphere association and ionic association are also investigated. A new rule which generalizes Le Chatelier's principle is used to describe the three distinct forms of behaviors involving solvent effects that we find. The replacement of the dielectric-continuum solvent model by a dipolar hard-sphere model leads to improved agreement with an experimental observation. Finally, equation of state for an {ital n}-particle flexible linear-chain fluid is derived on the basis of a one-parameter approximation that interpolates between the generalized Kirkwood superposition approximation and the linear approximation. A value of the parameter that appears to be near optimal in the context of this application is obtained from comparison with computer-simulation data.

  1. Chemical association in simple models of molecular and ionic fluids. III. The cavity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yaoqi; Stell, George

    1992-01-01

    Exact equations which relate the cavity function to excess solvation free energies and equilibrium association constants are rederived by using a thermodynamic cycle. A zeroth-order approximation, derived previously by us as a simple interpolation scheme, is found to be very accurate if the associative bonding occurs on or near the surface of the repulsive core of the interaction potential. If the bonding radius is substantially less than the core radius, the approximation overestimates the association degree and the association constant. For binary association, the zeroth-order approximation is equivalent to the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) of Wertheim. For n-particle association, the combination of the zeroth-order approximation with a ``linear'' approximation (for n-particle distribution functions in terms of the two-particle function) yields the first-order TPT result. Using our exact equations to go beyond TPT, near-exact analytic results for binary hard-sphere association are obtained. Solvent effects on binary hard-sphere association and ionic association are also investigated. A new rule which generalizes Le Chatelier's principle is used to describe the three distinct forms of behaviors involving solvent effects that we find. The replacement of the dielectric-continuum solvent model by a dipolar hard-sphere model leads to improved agreement with an experimental observation. Finally, equation of state for an n-particle flexible linear-chain fluid is derived on the basis of a one-parameter approximation that interpolates between the generalized Kirkwood superposition approximation and the linear approximation. A value of the parameter that appears to be near optimal in the context of this application is obtained from comparison with computer-simulation data.

  2. The cytoskeletal system of nucleated erythrocytes. III. Marginal band function in mature cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Marginal bands (MBs) of microtubules are believed to function during morphogenesis of nonmammalian vertebrate erythrocytes, but there has been little evidence favoring a continuing role in mature cells. To test MB function, we prepared dogfish erythrocytes with and without MBs at the same temperature by (a) stabilization of the normally cold- labile MB at 0 degree C by taxol, and (b) inhibition of MB reassembly at room temperature by nocodazole or colchicine. We then compared the responses of these cells to mechanical stress by fluxing them through capillary tubes. Before fluxing , cells with or without MBs had normal flattened elliptical shape. After fluxing , deformation was consistently observed in a much greater percentage of cells lacking MBs. The difference in percent deformation between the two cell types was highly significant. That the MB is an effector of cell shape was further documented in studies of the formation of singly or doubly pointed dogfish erythrocytes that appear during long-term incubation of normal cells at room temperature. On-slide perfusion experiments revealed that the pointed cells contain MBs of corresponding pointed morphology. Incubation of cells with and without MBs showed that they become pointed only when they contain MBs, indicating that the MB acts as a flexible frame which can deform and support the cell surface from within. To test this idea further, cells with and without MBs were exposed to hyperosmotic conditions. Many of the cells without MBs collapsed and shriveled , whereas those with MBs did not. The results support the view that the MB has a continuing function in mature erythrocytes, resisting deformation and/or rapidly returning deformed cells to an efficient equilibrium shape in the circulation. PMID:6144686

  3. Cosmology with massive neutrinos III: the halo mass function and an application to galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Costanzi, Matteo; Borgani, Stefano; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Xia, Jun-Qing; Castorina, Emanuele; Sefusatti, Emiliano E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it E-mail: xiajq@ihep.ac.cn E-mail: castori@sissa.it

    2013-12-01

    We use a suite of N-body simulations that incorporate massive neutrinos as an extra-set of particles to investigate their effect on the halo mass function. We show that for cosmologies with massive neutrinos the mass function of dark matter haloes selected using the spherical overdensity (SO) criterion is well reproduced by the fitting formula of Tinker et al. (2008) once the cold dark matter power spectrum is considered instead of the total matter power, as it is usually done. The differences between the two implementations, i.e. using P{sub cdm}(k) instead of P{sub m}(k), are more pronounced for large values of the neutrino masses and in the high end of the halo mass function: in particular, the number of massive haloes is higher when P{sub cdm}(k) is considered rather than P{sub m}(k). As a quantitative application of our findings we consider a Planck-like SZ-clusters survey and show that the differences in predicted number counts can be as large as 30% for ∑m{sub ν} = 0.4 eV. Finally, we use the Planck-SZ clusters sample, with an approximate likelihood calculation, to derive Planck-like constraints on cosmological parameters. We find that, in a massive neutrino cosmology, our correction to the halo mass function produces a shift in the σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.27){sup γ} relation which can be quantified as Δγ ∼ 0.05 and Δγ ∼ 0.14 assuming one (N{sub ν} = 1) or three (N{sub ν} = 3) degenerate massive neutrino, respectively. The shift results in a lower mean value of σ{sub 8} with Δσ{sub 8} = 0.01 for N{sub ν} = 1 and Δσ{sub 8} = 0.02 for N{sub ν} = 3, respectively. Such difference, in a cosmology with massive neutrinos, would increase the tension between cluster abundance and Planck CMB measurements.

  4. The functional neuroanatomy of Tourette's syndrome: an FDG PET study III: functional coupling of regional cerebral metabolic rates.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, K J; Schooler, C; Schoenbach, C; Herscovitch, P; Chase, T N; Braun, A R

    2002-07-01

    Functional coupling of regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose measured with [18F]-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET was compared in 18 drug-free patients with Tourette's Syndrome (TS) and 16 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Pearson product-moment correlation matrices containing correlations between metabolic rates in regions sampled throughout the brain were generated independently for TS patients and controls and compared. Significant differences between Z-transformed correlation coefficients were used to identify group differences, and revealed that the connectivity of the ventral striatum was most severely affected in TS. Changes in the coupling of other brain areas-primary motor areas, somatosensory association areas, and insula-also appeared to differentiate TS patients and controls. Evaluation of interrelationships between cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits revealed the existence of functional connections between the motor and lateral orbitofrontal circuits in both groups, however, a reversal in the pattern of these interactions differentiated TS patients and controls. In controls, activity in these circuits appeared to be negatively correlated-i.e. increased activity in one is associated with relative inactivity the other. In TS patients, on the other hand, activity in the motor and lateral orbitofrontal circuits appears to be positively coupled. These results lend further credence to the hypothesis that altered limbic-motor interactions represent a pathophysiological hallmark of this disease.

  5. Numerical simulation of the transient photoconductivity in a-Si:H as a function of excitation density

    SciTech Connect

    Feist, H.; Kunst, M.

    1997-07-01

    The dependence of the transient photoconductivity induced by pulsed excitation (TPC) on the excitation density is discussed with the help of numerical simulations. It is shown that recombination between excess mobile electrons and all excess holes (mainly localized) can explain the excitation density dependence of the TPC amplitude of standard a-Si:H at room temperature using a rate parameter k{sub BB} of 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 3}/s. This model leads to a decay faster than experimentally observed in the time range from 40 ns to 1 {micro}s. A variation of the recombination model is presented that gives short time range. Moreover comparison of the simulations with experimental data yields limits for the parameters of the conduction band tail. In particular, the time necessary to establish a dynamic equilibrium of excess electrons between delocalized states in the conduction band and localized states in the tail appears to be very informative.

  6. Lowest excited states and optical absorption spectra of donor-acceptor copolymers for organic photovoltaics: a new picture emerging from tuned long-range corrected density functionals.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Laxman; Doiron, Curtis; Sears, John S; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2012-11-01

    Polymers with low optical gaps are of importance to the organic photovoltaics community due to their potential for harnessing a large portion of the solar energy spectrum. The combination along their backbones of electron-rich and electron-deficient fragments contributes to the presence of low-lying excited states that are expected to display significant charge-transfer character. While conventional hybrid functionals are known to provide unsatisfactory results for charge-transfer excitations at the time-dependent DFT level, long-range corrected (LRC) functionals have been reported to give improved descriptions in a number of systems. Here, we use such LRC functionals, considering both tuned and default range-separation parameters, to characterize the absorption spectra of low-optical-gap systems of interest. Our results indicate that tuned LRC functionals lead to simulated optical-absorption properties in good agreement with experimental data. Importantly, the lowest-lying excited states (excitons) are shown to present a much more localized nature than initially anticipated.

  7. ANALYTICAL THEORY FOR THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION. III. TIME DEPENDENCE AND STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebelle, Patrick

    2013-06-20

    The present paper extends our previous theory of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by including time dependence and by including the impact of the magnetic field. The predicted mass spectra are similar to the time-independent ones with slightly shallower slopes at large masses and peak locations shifted toward smaller masses by a factor of a few. Assuming that star-forming clumps follow Larson-type relations, we obtain core mass functions in good agreement with the observationally derived IMF, in particular, when taking into account the thermodynamics of the gas. The time-dependent theory directly yields an analytical expression for the star formation rate (SFR) at cloud scales. The SFR values agree well with the observational determinations of various Galactic molecular clouds. Furthermore, we show that the SFR does not simply depend linearly on density, as is sometimes claimed in the literature, but also depends strongly on the clump mass/size, which yields the observed scatter. We stress, however, that any SFR theory depends, explicitly or implicitly, on very uncertain assumptions like clump boundaries or the mass of the most massive stars that can form in a given clump, making the final determinations uncertain by a factor of a few. Finally, we derive a fully time dependent model for the IMF by considering a clump, or a distribution of clumps accreting at a constant rate and thus whose physical properties evolve with time. In spite of its simplicity, this model reproduces reasonably well various features observed in numerical simulations of converging flows. Based on this general theory, we present a paradigm for star formation and the IMF.

  8. Multiple functional UV devices based on III-Nitride quantum wells for biological warfare agent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Savage, Susan; Persson, Sirpa; Noharet, Bertrand; Junique, Stéphane; Andersson, Jan Y.; Liuolia, Vytautas; Marcinkevicius, Saulius

    2009-02-01

    We have demonstrated surface normal detecting/filtering/emitting multiple functional ultraviolet (UV) optoelectronic devices based on InGaN/GaN, InGaN/AlGaN and AlxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures with operation wavelengths ranging from 270 nm to 450 nm. Utilizing MQW structure as device active layer offers a flexibility to tune its long cut-off wavelength in a wide UV range from solar-blind to visible by adjusting the well width, well composition and barrier height. Similarly, its short cut-off wavelength can be adjusted by using a GaN or AlGaN block layer on a sapphire substrate when the device is illuminated from its backside, which further provides an optical filtering effect. When a current injects into the device under forward bias the device acts as an UV light emitter, whereas the device performs as a typical photodetector under reverse biases. With applying an alternating external bias the device might be used as electroabsorption modulator due to quantum confined Stark effect. In present work fabricated devices have been characterized by transmission/absorption spectra, photoresponsivity, electroluminescence, and photoluminescence measurements under various forward and reverse biases. The piezoelectric effect, alloy broadening and Stokes shift between the emission and absorption spectra in different InGaN- and AlGaN-based QW structures have been investigated and compared. Possibilities of monolithic or hybrid integration using such multiple functional devices for biological warfare agents sensing application have also be discussed.

  9. Effect of Peruvosid (CD412) on excitability and functional refractory period of atrial and ventricular tissues in cardiomyopathy caused by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Moleiro, Frederico; Anselmi, Alfonso; Suárez, Régulo; Suárez, José Angel; Drayer, Alberto

    1970-01-01

    Attempts were made to produce myocarditis by Trypanosoma cruzi inoculation in healthy dog puppies 6 to 8 weeks old. Significant electrocardiographic abnormalities were produced, coinciding with interstitial inflammatory processes in the cardiac tissue and with degenerative changes in the myocardial fibres. In puppies showing these changes, profound changes in the excitability and the functional refractory period of the atrial and ventricular muscular tissue were observed. The administration of Peruvosid in doses of 0·0240 to 0·0647 mg./kg. tended to diminish the excitability, previously increased by the inflammatory process, at the same time increasing the functional refractory period duration which had previously been shortened. The fact that Peruvosid corrects these fundamental factors in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias suggests that the drug may be useful in the treatment of cardiac insufficiency produced by Chagas' myocardiopathy, in which arrhythmias are one of the basic characteristics. Images PMID:4985863

  10. Measurements and analyses of principal dynamic parameters of building structures as a function of type of vibration excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmański, Cezary; Bochenek, Wojciech; Passia, Henryk; Szade, Adam

    2006-06-01

    The methods of direct measurement and analysis of the dynamic response of a building structure through real-time recording of the amplitude of low-frequency vibration (tilt) have been presented. Subject to analyses was the reaction induced either by kinematic excitation (road traffic and mining-induced vibration) or controlled action of solid-fuel rocket micro-engines installed on the building. The forces were analysed by means of a set of transducers installed both in the ground and on the structure. After the action of excitation forces has been stopped, the system (structure) makes damped vibration around the static equilibrium position. It has been shown that the type of excitation affects the accuracy of evaluation of principal dynamic parameters of the structure. In the authors opinion these are the decrement of damping and natural vibration frequency. Positive results of tests with the use of excitation by means of short-action (0.6 second) rocket micro-engines give a chance to develop a reliable method for periodical assessment of acceptable loss of usability characteristics of building structures heavily influenced by environmental effects.

  11. The photometric functions of Phobos and Deimos. III - Surface photometry of Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noland, M.; Veverka, J.

    1977-01-01

    Mariner 9 television pictures of Phobos are used to study the uniformity of a certain photometric scattering parameter over the surface of the satellite, assuming that the scattering law for Phobos can be represented by the Hapke-Irvine equation. Ways of avoiding topographically irregular areas are discussed, phase functions for Phobos are obtained from scans along the photometric equator, and the photometric behavior of selected areas not along this equator is examined. Searches are conducted for anomalously bright areas and evidence of solid rock on the surface. The results indicate that: (1) at least three large regions on the surface of Phobos are covered by a dark material of complex texture which scatters light according to the Hapke-Irvine law; (2) the average intrinsic phase coefficient of this material is 0.020 mag/deg over the phase-angle range from 20 to 80 deg; (3) even the topographically irregular areas have photometric properties similar to those of the three smooth regions; (4) the surface of Phobos is rougher than that of Deimos on the largest scale; and (5) apparent bright patches are most likely caused by local tilts of the surface.

  12. Manipulation of intestinal epithelial cell function by the cell contact-dependent type III secretion systems of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    O'Boyle, Nicky; Boyd, Aoife

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus elicits gastroenteritis by deploying Type III Secretion Systems (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into epithelial cells of the human intestinal tract. The bacteria must adhere to the human cells to allow colonization and operation of the TTSS translocation apparatus bridging the bacterium and the host cell. This article first reviews recent advances in identifying the molecules responsible for intercellular adherence. V. parahaemolyticus possesses two TTSS, each of which delivers an exclusive set of effectors and mediates unique effects on the host cell. TTSS effectors primarily target and alter the activation status of host cell signaling proteins, thereby bringing about changes in the regulation of cellular behavior. TTSS1 is responsible for the cytotoxicity of V. parahaemolyticus, while TTSS2 is necessary for the enterotoxicity of the pathogen. Recent publications have elucidated the function of several TTSS effectors and their importance in the virulence of the bacterium. This review will explore the ability of the TTSS to manipulate activities of human intestinal cells and how this modification of cell function favors bacterial colonization and persistence of V. parahaemolyticus in the host. PMID:24455490

  13. Covalent Attachment to GaP(110) - Engineering the Chemical Functionalization of a III-V Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. J.; Ugeda, M. M.; Liu, Wenjun; Yu, Min; Tilley, T. Don; Pérez, Rubén; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Crommie, M. F.

    2014-03-01

    With its 2.3 eV bulk bandgap, relatively high conduction band edge, and low chemical reactivity, the (110) surface of GaP is an excellent candidate for many UV and visible light applications, such as photo-catalysis and light-induced chemical reduction. However, the reconstruction and resulting charge transfer of the surface makes it difficult to covalently attach the required molecules. Indeed, very little work has been done to understand either covalent functionalization or passivation of this surface. Here we report on a Staudinger-type, thermally-driven covalent attachment of perfluorophenyl azide (pfpa) to GaP(110). We have studied the adsorption of pfpa molecules by means of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in combination with first principles calculations. We show a progression from a physisorbed state at room temperature to a covalently attached state after exposure to slightly higher temperatures (~ 50°C). The developed approach is expected to be valid for various other functional groups attached to the azide, as well as other III-V semiconductors.

  14. Time-dependent density functional theory study on the electronic excited-state hydrogen bonding of the chromophore coumarin 153 in a room-temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dandan; Hao, Ce; Wang, Se; Dong, Hong; Qiu, Jieshan

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, in order to investigate the electronic excited-state intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the chromophore coumarin 153 (C153) and the room-temperature ionic liquid N,N-dimethylethanolammonium formate (DAF), both the geometric structures and the infrared spectra of the hydrogen-bonded complex C153-DAF(+) in the excited state were studied by a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. We theoretically demonstrated that the intermolecular hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3) in the hydrogen-bonded C153-DAF(+) complex is significantly strengthened in the S(1) state by monitoring the spectral shifts of the C=O group and O-H group involved in the hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3). Moreover, the length of the hydrogen bond C(1) = O(1)···H(1)-O(3) between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom decreased from 1.693 Å to 1.633 Å upon photoexcitation. This was also confirmed by the increase in the hydrogen-bond binding energy from 69.92 kJ mol(-1) in the ground state to 90.17 kJ mol(-1) in the excited state. Thus, the excited-state hydrogen-bond strengthening of the coumarin chromophore in an ionic liquid has been demonstrated theoretically for the first time.

  15. Highly efficient implementation of pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory for the calculation of excitation energies of large molecules.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yixiang; Hughes, Thomas; Giesen, Dave; Halls, Mathew D; Goldberg, Alexander; Vadicherla, Tati Reddy; Sastry, Madhavi; Patel, Bhargav; Sherman, Woody; Weisman, Andrew L; Friesner, Richard A

    2016-06-15

    We have developed and implemented pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) in the quantum mechanics package Jaguar to calculate restricted singlet and restricted triplet, as well as unrestricted excitation energies with either full linear response (FLR) or the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) with the pseudospectral length scales, pseudospectral atomic corrections, and pseudospectral multigrid strategy included in the implementations to improve the chemical accuracy and to speed the pseudospectral calculations. The calculations based on pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory with full linear response (PS-FLR-TDDFT) and within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (PS-TDA-TDDFT) for G2 set molecules using B3LYP/6-31G*(*) show mean and maximum absolute deviations of 0.0015 eV and 0.0081 eV, 0.0007 eV and 0.0064 eV, 0.0004 eV and 0.0022 eV for restricted singlet excitation energies, restricted triplet excitation energies, and unrestricted excitation energies, respectively; compared with the results calculated from the conventional spectral method. The application of PS-FLR-TDDFT to OLED molecules and organic dyes, as well as the comparisons for results calculated from PS-FLR-TDDFT and best estimations demonstrate that the accuracy of both PS-FLR-TDDFT and PS-TDA-TDDFT. Calculations for a set of medium-sized molecules, including Cn fullerenes and nanotubes, using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G(**) basis set show PS-TDA-TDDFT provides 19- to 34-fold speedups for Cn fullerenes with 450-1470 basis functions, 11- to 32-fold speedups for nanotubes with 660-3180 basis functions, and 9- to 16-fold speedups for organic molecules with 540-1340 basis functions compared to fully analytic calculations without sacrificing chemical accuracy. The calculations on a set of larger molecules, including the antibiotic drug Ramoplanin, the 46-residue crambin protein, fullerenes up to C540 and nanotubes up to 14×(6,6), using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G

  16. Highly efficient implementation of pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory for the calculation of excitation energies of large molecules.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yixiang; Hughes, Thomas; Giesen, Dave; Halls, Mathew D; Goldberg, Alexander; Vadicherla, Tati Reddy; Sastry, Madhavi; Patel, Bhargav; Sherman, Woody; Weisman, Andrew L; Friesner, Richard A

    2016-06-15

    We have developed and implemented pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) in the quantum mechanics package Jaguar to calculate restricted singlet and restricted triplet, as well as unrestricted excitation energies with either full linear response (FLR) or the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) with the pseudospectral length scales, pseudospectral atomic corrections, and pseudospectral multigrid strategy included in the implementations to improve the chemical accuracy and to speed the pseudospectral calculations. The calculations based on pseudospectral time-dependent density-functional theory with full linear response (PS-FLR-TDDFT) and within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (PS-TDA-TDDFT) for G2 set molecules using B3LYP/6-31G*(*) show mean and maximum absolute deviations of 0.0015 eV and 0.0081 eV, 0.0007 eV and 0.0064 eV, 0.0004 eV and 0.0022 eV for restricted singlet excitation energies, restricted triplet excitation energies, and unrestricted excitation energies, respectively; compared with the results calculated from the conventional spectral method. The application of PS-FLR-TDDFT to OLED molecules and organic dyes, as well as the comparisons for results calculated from PS-FLR-TDDFT and best estimations demonstrate that the accuracy of both PS-FLR-TDDFT and PS-TDA-TDDFT. Calculations for a set of medium-sized molecules, including Cn fullerenes and nanotubes, using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G(**) basis set show PS-TDA-TDDFT provides 19- to 34-fold speedups for Cn fullerenes with 450-1470 basis functions, 11- to 32-fold speedups for nanotubes with 660-3180 basis functions, and 9- to 16-fold speedups for organic molecules with 540-1340 basis functions compared to fully analytic calculations without sacrificing chemical accuracy. The calculations on a set of larger molecules, including the antibiotic drug Ramoplanin, the 46-residue crambin protein, fullerenes up to C540 and nanotubes up to 14×(6,6), using the B3LYP functional and 6-31G

  17. Critical Assessment of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Excited States of Open-Shell Systems: II. Doublet-Quartet Transitions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2016-06-14

    Compared with closed-shell systems, open-shell systems place three additional challenges to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) for electronically excited states: (a) the spin-contamination problem is a serious issue; (b) the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel may be numerically instable; and (c) the single-determinant description of open-shell ground states readily becomes energetically instable. Confined to flip-up single excitations, the spin-contamination problem can largely be avoided by using the spin-flip TD-DFT (SF-TD-DFT) formalism, provided that a noncollinear XC kernel is employed. As for the numerical instabilities associated with such a kernel, only an ad hoc scheme has been proposed so far, viz., the ALDA0 kernel, which amounts to setting the divergent components (arising from density gradients and kinetic energy density) simply to zero. The ground-state instability problem can effectively be avoided by introducing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to TD-DFT. Therefore, on a general basis, the SF-TDA/ALDA0 Ansatz is so far the only promising means within the TD-DFT framework for flip-up single excitations of open-shell systems. To assess systematically the performance of SF-TDA/ALDA0, in total 61 low-lying quartet excited states of the benchmark set of 11 small radicals [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2016, 12, 238] are investigated with various XC functionals. Taking the MRCISD+Q (multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus the Davidson correction) results as benchmark, it is found that the mean absolute errors of SF-TDA/ALDA0 with the SAOP (statistical averaging of model orbital potentials), global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals are in the range of 0.2-0.4 eV. This is in line not only with the typical accuracy of TD-DFT for singlet and triplet excited states of closed-shell systems but also with the gross accuracy of spin-adapted TD-DFT for spin-conserving excited states of open-shell systems. PMID

  18. Critical Assessment of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Excited States of Open-Shell Systems: II. Doublet-Quartet Transitions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2016-06-14

    Compared with closed-shell systems, open-shell systems place three additional challenges to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) for electronically excited states: (a) the spin-contamination problem is a serious issue; (b) the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel may be numerically instable; and (c) the single-determinant description of open-shell ground states readily becomes energetically instable. Confined to flip-up single excitations, the spin-contamination problem can largely be avoided by using the spin-flip TD-DFT (SF-TD-DFT) formalism, provided that a noncollinear XC kernel is employed. As for the numerical instabilities associated with such a kernel, only an ad hoc scheme has been proposed so far, viz., the ALDA0 kernel, which amounts to setting the divergent components (arising from density gradients and kinetic energy density) simply to zero. The ground-state instability problem can effectively be avoided by introducing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to TD-DFT. Therefore, on a general basis, the SF-TDA/ALDA0 Ansatz is so far the only promising means within the TD-DFT framework for flip-up single excitations of open-shell systems. To assess systematically the performance of SF-TDA/ALDA0, in total 61 low-lying quartet excited states of the benchmark set of 11 small radicals [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2016, 12, 238] are investigated with various XC functionals. Taking the MRCISD+Q (multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus the Davidson correction) results as benchmark, it is found that the mean absolute errors of SF-TDA/ALDA0 with the SAOP (statistical averaging of model orbital potentials), global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals are in the range of 0.2-0.4 eV. This is in line not only with the typical accuracy of TD-DFT for singlet and triplet excited states of closed-shell systems but also with the gross accuracy of spin-adapted TD-DFT for spin-conserving excited states of open-shell systems.

  19. Systematic defect donor levels in III-V and II-VI semiconductors revealed by hybrid functional density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petretto, Guido; Bruneval, Fabien

    2015-12-01

    The identification of defect levels from photoluminescence spectroscopy is a useful but challenging task. Density-functional theory (DFT) is a highly valuable tool to this aim. However, the semilocal approximations of DFT that are affected by a band gap underestimation are not reliable to evaluate defect properties, such as charge transition levels. It is now established that hybrid functional approximations to DFT improve the defect description in semiconductors. Here we demonstrate that the use of hybrid functionals systematically stabilizes donor defect states in the lower part of the band gap for many defects, impurities or vacancies, in III-V and in II-VI semiconductors, even though these defects are usually considered as acceptors. These donor defect states are a very general feature and, to the best of our knowledge, have been overlooked in previous studies. The states we identify here may challenge the older assignments to photoluminescent peaks. Though appealing to screen quickly through the possible stable charge states of a defect, semilocal approximations should not be trusted for that purpose.

  20. Supramolecular Structure and Functional Analysis of the Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Qun; Liu, Xingzhong; Wei, Hai-Lei

    2016-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of plant and animal bacterial pathogens directs the secretion and injection of proteins into host cells. Some homologous genes of T3SS were found also in non-pathogenic bacteria, but the organization of its machinery and basic function are still unknown. In this study, we identified a T3SS gene cluster from the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 and isolated the corresponding T3SS apparatus. The T3SS gene cluster of strain 2P24 is similar organizationally to that of pathogenic P. syringae, except that it lacks the regulator hrpR and the hrpK1 and hrpH genes, which are involved in translocation of proteins. Electron microscopy revealed that the T3SS supramolecular structure of strain 2P24 was comprised of two distinctive substructures: a long extracellular, filamentous pilus, and a membrane-embedded base. We show that strain 2P24 deploys a harpin homolog protein, RspZ1, to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi leaves with protein that is partially purified, and by complementing the hrpZ1 mutation of pHIR11. The T3SS of strain 2P24 retained ability to secrete effectors, whereas its effector translocation activity appeared to be excessively lost. Mutation of the rscC gene from 2P24 T3SS abolished the secretion of effectors, but the general biocontrol properties were unaffected. Remarkably, strain 2P24 induced functional MAMP-triggered immunity that included a burst of reactive oxygen species, strong suppression of challenge cell death, and disease expansion, while it was not associated with the secretion functional T3SS. PMID:26779224

  1. Role of Autocleavage in the Function of a Type III Secretion Specificity Switch Protein in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Monjarás Feria, Julia V.; Lefebre, Matthew D.; Stierhof, York-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein machines employed by many Gram-negative bacteria to inject bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to promote bacterial survival and colonization. The core unit of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins through the bacterial envelope. A distinct feature of the T3SS is that protein export occurs in a strictly hierarchical manner in which proteins destined to form the needle complex filament and associated structures are secreted first, followed by the secretion of effectors and the proteins that will facilitate their translocation through the target host cell membrane. The secretion hierarchy is established by complex mechanisms that involve several T3SS-associated components, including the “switch protein,” a highly conserved, inner membrane protease that undergoes autocatalytic cleavage. It has been proposed that the autocleavage of the switch protein is the trigger for substrate switching. We show here that autocleavage of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium switch protein SpaS is an unregulated process that occurs after its folding and before its incorporation into the needle complex. Needle complexes assembled with a precleaved form of SpaS function in a manner indistinguishable from that of the wild-type form. Furthermore, an engineered mutant of SpaS that is processed by an external protease also displays wild-type function. These results demonstrate that the cleavage event per se does not provide a signal for substrate switching but support the hypothesis that cleavage allows the proper conformation of SpaS to render it competent for its switching function. PMID:26463164

  2. Supramolecular Structure and Functional Analysis of the Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Qun; Liu, Xingzhong; Wei, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of plant and animal bacterial pathogens directs the secretion and injection of proteins into host cells. Some homologous genes of T3SS were found also in non-pathogenic bacteria, but the organization of its machinery and basic function are still unknown. In this study, we identified a T3SS gene cluster from the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 and isolated the corresponding T3SS apparatus. The T3SS gene cluster of strain 2P24 is similar organizationally to that of pathogenic P. syringae, except that it lacks the regulator hrpR and the hrpK1 and hrpH genes, which are involved in translocation of proteins. Electron microscopy revealed that the T3SS supramolecular structure of strain 2P24 was comprised of two distinctive substructures: a long extracellular, filamentous pilus, and a membrane-embedded base. We show that strain 2P24 deploys a harpin homolog protein, RspZ1, to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi leaves with protein that is partially purified, and by complementing the hrpZ1 mutation of pHIR11. The T3SS of strain 2P24 retained ability to secrete effectors, whereas its effector translocation activity appeared to be excessively lost. Mutation of the rscC gene from 2P24 T3SS abolished the secretion of effectors, but the general biocontrol properties were unaffected. Remarkably, strain 2P24 induced functional MAMP-triggered immunity that included a burst of reactive oxygen species, strong suppression of challenge cell death, and disease expansion, while it was not associated with the secretion functional T3SS. PMID:26779224

  3. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C.; Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-01

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH4, NH3, H2O, SiH4, PH3, SH2, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  4. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 40/Ca and /sup 48/Ca ions with /sup 248/Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Fowler, M.M.; Daniels, W.R.; von Gunten, H.R.; Lee, D.; Moody, K.J.; Gregorich, K.; Welch, R.; Seaborg, G.T.; Bruechle, W.

    1985-05-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with 234- to 294-MeV /sup 40/Ca ions and with 239- to 318-MeV /sup 48/Ca ions. The maxima of the isotopic distributions for these elements occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions. The shapes of the distributions and the half-widths of about 2.5 mass numbers are quite similar to those observed previously for reactions of /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 22/Ne with /sup 248/Cm. In general, the excitation functions for /sup 40/Ca show maxima near the Coulomb barrier while those for /sup 48/Ca are about 20 MeV above the barrier. The cross sections decrease rather slowly with increasing projectile energy over the energy range studied, indicating that the additional projectile energy is not manifested as excitation energy of these actinide products.

  5. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C. Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-28

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O, SiH{sub 4}, PH{sub 3}, SH{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  6. In Vitro Assessment Reveals Parameters-Dependent Modulation on Excitability and Functional Connectivity of Cerebellar Slice by Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rongyu; Zhang, Guanghao; Weng, Xiechuan; Han, Yao; Lang, Yiran; Zhao, Yuwei; Zhao, Xiaobo; Wang, Kun; Lin, Qiuxia; Wang, Changyong

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an increasingly common technique used to selectively modify neural excitability and plasticity. There is still controversy concerning the cortical response to rTMS of different frequencies. In this study, a novel in vitro paradigm utilizing the Multi-Electrodes Array (MEA) system and acute cerebellar slicing is described. In a controllable environment that comprises perfusion, incubation, recording and stimulation modules, the spontaneous single-unit spiking activity in response to rTMS of different frequencies and powers was directly measured and analyzed. Investigation using this in vitro paradigm revealed frequency-dependent modulation upon the excitability and functional connectivity of cerebellar slices. The 1-Hz rTMS sessions induced short-term inhibition or lagged inhibition, whereas 20-Hz sessions induced excitation. The level of modulation is influenced by the value of power. However the long-term response fluctuated without persistent direction. The choice of evaluation method may also interfere with the interpretation of modulation direction. Furthermore, both short-term and long-term functional connectivity was strengthened by 1-Hz rTMS and weakened by 20-Hz rTMS. PMID:27000527

  7. Excited protein states of human tear lipocalin for low- and high-affinity ligand binding revealed by functional AB loop motion.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2010-06-01

    Human tear lipocalin (TL), a prominent member of lipocalin family, exhibits functional and structural promiscuity. The plasticity of loop regions modulates entry to the ligand pocket at the "open" end of the eight-stranded beta-barrel. Site-directed multi-distance measurements using fluorescence resonance energy transfer between functional loops register two excited protein states for low- and high-affinity ligand binding. At low pH, the longest loop AB adopts the conformation of the low-affinity excited protein state that matches the crystal structure of holo-TL at pH 8. A "crankshaft" like movement is detected for the loop AB in a low pH transition. At pH 7.3 the holo-protein assumes a high-affinity excited protein state, in which the loop AB is more compact (RMS=3.1A). In the apo-holo transition, the reporter Trp 28 moves about 4.5A that reflects a decrease in distance between Glu27 and Lys108. This interaction fixes the loop AB conformation for the high-affinity mode. No such movement is detected at low pH, where Glu27 is protonated. Data strongly indicate that the protonation state of Glu27 modulates the conformation of the loop AB for high- and low-affinity binding. PMID:20439130

  8. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Zarycz, M Natalia C; Provasi, Patricio F; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2015-12-28

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH4, NH3, H2O, SiH4, PH3, SH2, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  9. Hydrological excitation of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.; Kolaczek, B.

    2006-08-01

    Hydrological excitation of the polar motion (HAM) were computed from the available recently hydrological data series (NCEP, ECMWF, CPC water storage and LaD World simulations of global continental water) and compared. Time variable seasonal spectra of these hydrological excitation functions and of the geodetic excitation function of polar motion computed from the polar motion COMB03 data were compared showing big differences in their temporal characteristics and the necessity of the further improvement of the HAM models. Seasonal oscillations of the global geophysical excitation functions (AAM + OAM + HAM) and their time variations were compared also. These hydrological excitation functions do not close the budget of the global geophysical excitation function of polar motion.

  10. Density functional theory investigations of the homoleptic tris(dithiolene) complexes [M(dddt)(3)](-q) (q = 3, 2 ; M = Nd(3+) and U(3+/4+)) related to lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation.

    PubMed

    Meskaldji, Samir; Belkhiri, Lotfi; Arliguie, Thérèse; Fourmigué, Marc; Ephritikhine, Michel; Boucekkine, Abdou

    2010-04-01

    The structures of the homoleptic lanthanide and actinide tris(dithiolene) complexes [M(dddt)(3)](q-) (q = 3, M = Nd(3+) and q = 3 or 2, M = U(3+/4+)) have been investigated using relativistic Density Functional Theory (DFT) computations including spin-orbit corrections coupled with the COnductor-like Screening Model (COSMO) for a realistic solvation approach. The dithiolene ligands are known to be very efficient at stabilizing metal high oxidation states. The aim of the work is to explain the peculiar symmetric folding of the three Mdddt metallacycles in these complexes, some of them existing under a polymeric form, in relation with the Ln(III)/An(III) differentiation. In the [M(dddt)(3)(py)](q-) species, where an additional pyridine ligand is linked to the metal center, the Mdddt moieties appear to be almost planar. The study brings to light the occurrence of a M...C=C interaction explaining the Mdddt folding of the [U(dddt)(3)](q-) uranium species, the metal 5f electrons playing a driving role. No such interaction appears in the case of the Nd(III) complex, and the folding of the rather flexible dddt ligands in the polymeric structure of this species should be mainly due to steric effects. Moreover, the analysis of the normal modes of vibration shows that the U(III) complex [U(dddt)(3)](3-), which has not yet been isolated, is thermodynamically stable. It appears that the X-ray characterized U(IV) complex [U(dddt)(3)](2-) should be less stable than the calculated U(III) complex in a polar solvent.

  11. Ultrafast dynamics of the dielectric functions of ZnO and BaTiO{sub 3} thin films after intense femtosecond laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, S.; Seifert, G.; Chouthe, S.; Graener, H.; Böntgen, T.; Sturm, C.; Schmidt-Grund, R.; Grundmann, M.

    2014-02-07

    The ultrafast carrier dynamics of epitaxial ZnO and BaTiO{sub 3} thin films after intense excitation at 3.10 eV and 4.66 eV photon energy has been studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy. Modelling the transient transmission changes on the basis of spectroscopic ellipsometry data and pertinent equilibrium model dielectric functions extended by additional terms for the effects at high carrier density (P-band luminescence and stimulated emission from electron-hole-plasma), a self-consistent parameterized description was obtained for both materials. Excited carrier lifetimes in the range of ≈2 to ≈60 ps and long-lived thermal effects after several hundred ps have been identified in both materials. These findings form a reliable basis to quantitatively describe future femtosecond studies on ZnO/BaTiO{sub 3} heterolayer systems.

  12. Reliability of a Shuttle Run Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy Who Are Classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System Level III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuren, Olaf; Bosma, Liesbeth; Takken, Tim

    2011-01-01

    For children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level III there is no running-based field test available to assess their cardiorespiratory fitness. The current study investigated whether a shuttle run test can be reliably (test-retest) performed in a group of children with…

  13. Functional cloning of Vibrio parahaemolyticus type III secretion system 1 in Escherichia coli K-12 strain as a molecular syringe.

    PubMed

    Akeda, Yukihiro; Kimura, Tomomi; Yamasaki, Aiko; Kodama, Toshio; Iida, Tetsuya; Honda, Takeshi; Oishi, Kazunori

    2012-10-19

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of gram-negative bacteria involves dedicated protein translocation machinery that directly injects proteins into target cells. Pathogenic bacteria already benefit from this unique system. The successful functional cloning of this useful tool into non-pathogenic bacteria would help establish novel clinical and basic biotechnology strategies in areas such as vaccine administration, the development of screening systems for anti-T3SS drugs and the target-specific delivery of bioactive compounds. In this study, we successfully cloned the Vibrio parahaemolyticus T3SS1 genetic locus into a non-pathogenic Escherichia coli K-12 strain. Assays performed here revealed that the T3SS1 cloned into the E. coli K-12 strain has the ability to translocate V. parahaemolyticus T3SS1 secreted proteins. Importantly, we also observed this system to allow the E. coli K-12 strain to inject foreign protein, as well as the V. parahaemolyticus T3SS effector, into cultured cells. These results demonstrate a prospective useful tool with experimental and therapeutic applications.

  14. Functional characterization of a class III acid endochitinase from the traps of the carnivorous pitcher plant genus, Nepenthes.

    PubMed

    Rottloff, Sandy; Stieber, Regina; Maischak, Heiko; Turini, Florian G; Heubl, Günther; Mithöfer, Axel

    2011-08-01

    Carnivory in plants is an adaptation strategy to nutrient-poor environments and soils. Carnivorous plants obtain some additional mineral nutrients by trapping and digesting prey; the genus Nepenthes is helped by its specialized pitcher traps. To make the nutrients available, the caught prey needs to be digested, a process that requires the concerted activity of several hydrolytic enzymes. To identify and investigate the various enzymes involved in this process, fluid from Nepenthes traps has been analysed in detail. In this study, a novel type of Nepenthes endochitinase was identified in the digestion fluid of closed pitchers. The encoding endochitinase genes have been cloned from eight different Nepenthes species. Among these, the deduced amino acid sequence similarity was at least 94.9%. The corresponding cDNA from N. rafflesiana was heterologously expressed, and the purified protein, NrChit1, was biochemically characterized. The enzyme, classified as a class III acid endochitinase belonging to family 18 of the glycoside hydrolases, is secreted into the pitcher fluid very probably due to the presence of an N-terminal signal peptide. Transcriptome analyses using real-time PCR indicated that the presence of prey in the pitcher up-regulates the endochitinase gene not only in the glands, which are responsible for enzyme secretion, but at an even higher level, in the glands' surrounding tissue. These results suggest that in the pitchers' tissues, the endochitinase as well as other proteins from the pitcher fluid might fulfil a different, primary function as pathogenesis-related proteins.

  15. Cobalt(III)-Mediated Permanent and Stable Immobilization of Histidine-Tagged Proteins on NTA-Functionalized Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Seraphine V; Schenk, Franziska C; Spatz, Joachim P

    2016-02-24

    We present the cobalt(III)-mediated interaction between polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-modified surfaces as a general approach for a permanent, oriented, and specific protein immobilization. In this approach, we first form the well-established Co(2+) -mediated interaction between NTA and His-tagged proteins and subsequently oxidize the Co(2+) center in the complex to Co(3+) . Unlike conventionally used Ni(2+) - or Co(2+) -mediated immobilization, the resulting Co(3+) -mediated immobilization is resistant toward strong ligands, such as imidazole and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and washing off over time because of the high thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the Co(3+) complex. This immobilization method is compatible with a wide variety of surface coatings, including silane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass, thiol SAMs on gold surfaces, and supported lipid bilayers. Furthermore, once the cobalt center has been oxidized, it becomes inert toward reducing agents, specific and unspecific interactions, so that it can be used to orthogonally functionalize surfaces with multiple proteins. Overall, the large number of available His-tagged proteins and materials with NTA groups make the Co(3+) -mediated interaction an attractive and widely applicable platform for protein immobilization.

  16. Transcriptional profiling of Bordetella pertussis reveals requirement of RNA chaperone Hfq for Type III secretion system functionality.

    PubMed

    Bibova, Ilona; Hot, David; Keidel, Kristina; Amman, Fabian; Slupek, Stephanie; Cerny, Ondrej; Gross, Roy; Vecerek, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of human whooping cough (pertussis) produces a complex array of virulence factors in order to establish efficient infection in the host. The RNA chaperone Hfq and small regulatory RNAs are key players in posttranscriptional regulation in bacteria and have been shown to play an essential role in virulence of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. This study represents the first attempt to characterize the Hfq regulon of the human pathogen B. pertussis under laboratory conditions as well as upon passage in the host and indicates that loss of Hfq has a profound effect on gene expression in B. pertussis. Comparative transcriptional profiling revealed that Hfq is required for expression of several virulence factors in B. pertussis cells including the Type III secretion system (T3SS). In striking contrast to the wt strain, T3SS did not become operational in the hfq mutant passaged either through mice or macrophages thereby proving that Hfq is required for the functionality of the B. pertussis T3SS. Likewise, expression of virulence factors vag8 and tcfA encoding autotransporter and tracheal colonization factor, respectively, was strongly reduced in the hfq mutant. Importantly, for the first time we demonstrate that B. pertussis T3SS can be activated upon contact with macrophage cells in vitro.

  17. Adsorption of La(III) in aqueous systems by N-(2-hydroxyethyl) salicylaldimine-functionalized mesoporous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Tadjarodi, Azadeh Jalalat, Vahideh; Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • HESI-SBA-15 as a new adsorbent was synthesized for the first time. • This adsorbent was selective for lanthanum ion removal in presence of other ions. • The factors that affected adsorption of La(III) in aqueous solution were studied. • La{sup 3+} uptake process was according to pseudo-second-order kinetic model. - Abstract: In this work, a novel modified SBA-15 with covalently bonded N-(2-hydroxyethyl) salicylaldimine Schiff base as a ligand (HESI-SBA-15) was successfully synthesized, characterized and used as a selective absorbent for lanthanum ions removal from water systems. The structure and physicochemical properties were identified by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption–desorption, thermogravimetric analysis and FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area and BJH pore size. These techniques have confirmed that the Schiff base ligand was successfully grafted on the SBA-15 surface and ordered arrangement of the silica support was preserved under functionalization. The effect of pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, ionic strength and initial metal ions concentration were studied by using a batch method. This new adsorbent showed high adsorption capacity and selectivity for lanthanum in the presence of other ions. The adsorption process was exactly according to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorbent showed a good reusability after four cycles recovery.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of Bordetella pertussis reveals requirement of RNA chaperone Hfq for Type III secretion system functionality

    PubMed Central

    Bibova, Ilona; Hot, David; Keidel, Kristina; Amman, Fabian; Slupek, Stephanie; Cerny, Ondrej; Gross, Roy; Vecerek, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of human whooping cough (pertussis) produces a complex array of virulence factors in order to establish efficient infection in the host. The RNA chaperone Hfq and small regulatory RNAs are key players in posttranscriptional regulation in bacteria and have been shown to play an essential role in virulence of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. This study represents the first attempt to characterize the Hfq regulon of the human pathogen B. pertussis under laboratory conditions as well as upon passage in the host and indicates that loss of Hfq has a profound effect on gene expression in B. pertussis. Comparative transcriptional profiling revealed that Hfq is required for expression of several virulence factors in B. pertussis cells including the Type III secretion system (T3SS). In striking contrast to the wt strain, T3SS did not become operational in the hfq mutant passaged either through mice or macrophages thereby proving that Hfq is required for the functionality of the B. pertussis T3SS. Likewise, expression of virulence factors vag8 and tcfA encoding autotransporter and tracheal colonization factor, respectively, was strongly reduced in the hfq mutant. Importantly, for the first time we demonstrate that B. pertussis T3SS can be activated upon contact with macrophage cells in vitro. PMID:25674816

  19. Dynamic properties of monomeric insect erythrocruorin III from Chironomus thummi-thummi: relationships between structural flexibility and functional complexity.

    PubMed Central

    Di Iorio, E E; Tavernelli, I; Yu, W

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of geminate carbon monoxide binding to the monomeric component III of Chironomus thummi-thummi erythrocruorin, a protein that undergoes pH-induced conformational changes linked to a pronounced Bohr effect. Measurements were performed from cryogenic temperatures to room temperature in 75% glycerol and either 0.1 M potassium phosphate (pH 7) or 0.1 potassium borate (pH 9) after nanosecond laser photolysis. The distributions of the low temperature activation enthalpy g(H) for geminate ligand binding derived from the kinetic traces are quite narrow and are influenced by temperature both below and above approximately 170 K, the glass transition temperature. The thermal evolution of the CO binding kinetics between approximately 50 K and approximately 170 K indicates the presence of some degree of structural relaxation, even in this temperature range. Above approximately 220 K the width of the g(H) progressively decreases, and at 280 K geminate CO binding becomes exponential in time. Based on a comparison with analogous investigations of the homodimeric hemoglobin from Scapharca inaequivalvis, we propose a link between dynamic properties and functional complexity. PMID:9370468

  20. Is kidney function affecting the management of myocardial infarction? A retrospective cohort study in patients with normal kidney function, chronic kidney disease stage III-V, and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marc; Karam, Boutros; Faddoul, Geovani; Douaihy, Youssef El; Yacoub, Harout; Baydoun, Hassan; Boumitri, Christine; Barakat, Iskandar; Saifan, Chadi; El-Charabaty, Elie; Sayegh, Suzanne El

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are three times more likely to have myocardial infarction (MI) and suffer from increased morbidity and higher mortality. Traditional and unique risk factors are prevalent and constitute challenges for the standard of care. However, CKD patients have been largely excluded from clinical trials and little evidence is available to guide evidence-based treatment of coronary artery disease in patients with CKD. Our objective was to assess whether a difference exists in the management of MI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) among patients with normal kidney function, CKD stage III-V, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital for the diagnosis of MI between January 2005 and December 2012. Patients were assigned to one of three groups according to their kidney function: Data collected on the medical management and the use of statins, platelet inhibitors, beta-blockers, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers were compared among the three cohorts, as well as medical interventions including: catheterization and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) when indicated. Chi-square test was used to compare the proportions between nominal variables. Binary logistic analysis was used in order to determine associations between treatment modalities and comorbidities, and to account for possible confounding factors. Three hundred and thirty-four patients (mean age 67.2±13.9 years) were included. In terms of management, medical treatment was not different among the three groups. However, cardiac catheterization was performed less in ESRD when compared with no CKD and CKD stage III-V (45.6% vs 74% and 93.9%) (P<0.001). CABG was performed in comparable proportions in the three groups and CABG was not associated with the degree of CKD (P=0.078) in binary

  1. Source mechanism of long-period events at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan, inferred from waveform inversion of the effective excitation functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.; Chouet, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the source mechanism of long-period (LP) events observed at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, Japan, based on waveform inversions of their effective excitation functions. The effective excitation function, which represents the apparent excitation observed at individual receivers, is estimated by applying an autoregressive filter to the LP waveform. Assuming a point source, we apply this method to seven LP events the waveforms of which are characterized by simple decaying and nearly monochromatic oscillations with frequency in the range 1-3 Hz. The results of the waveform inversions show dominant volumetric change components accompanied by single force components, common to all the events analyzed, and suggesting a repeated activation of a sub-horizontal crack located 300 m beneath the summit crater lakes. Based on these results, we propose a model of the source process of LP seismicity, in which a gradual buildup of steam pressure in a hydrothermal crack in response to magmatic heat causes repeated discharges of steam from the crack. The rapid discharge of fluid causes the collapse of the fluid-filled crack and excites acoustic oscillations of the crack, which produce the characteristic waveforms observed in the LP events. The presence of a single force synchronous with the collapse of the crack is interpreted as the release of gravitational energy that occurs as the slug of steam ejected from the crack ascends toward the surface and is replaced by cooler water flowing downward in a fluid-filled conduit linking the crack and the base of the crater lake. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of Gastric and Duodenal Eosinophils in Children with Abdominal Pain Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders According to Rome III Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (AP-FGID) is common in children and adults. However, the mechanism of AP-FGID is not clearly known. Recently, micro-inflammation, especially eosinophilia in the gastrointestinal tract, was suggested in the pathophysiology of AP-FGID in adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of gastric and duodenal eosinophilia with pediatric AP-FGID. Methods In total, 105 pediatric patients with AP-FGID were recruited and classified into 4 subgroups based on the Rome III criteria. Eosinophil counts in the gastric and duodenal tissues of children with AP-FGID were compared to those from normal pathology references or those of children with Helicobacter pylori infection. Tissue eosinophil counts were also compared among the 4 subtypes of AP-FGID. Results Eosinophil counts in the gastric antrum and body were significantly higher in children with AP-FGID than normal reference values. Duodenal eosinophil counts were higher in children with AP-FGID, but not significantly when compared with normal reference values. There were no significant differences in eosinophil counts of the stomach or duodenum among the 4 subtypes of AP-FGID. Eosinophils counts in the gastric antrum and body were significantly higher in children with H. pylori infection than in those with AP-FGID. Duodenal eosinophilia was prominent in cases of H. pylori infection, but not statistically significant when compared with AP-FGID. Conclusions Our study revealed that gastric eosinophilia is associated with AP-FGID in children, regardless of the subtype of functional abdominal pain. This suggests some contribution of gastrointestinal eosinophils in the development of pediatric AP-FGID. PMID:27053514

  3. Functional characterization of the type III secretion ATPase SsaN encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 2.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yukie; Miki, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Sayaka; Haneda, Takeshi; Ito, Masahiro; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A type III secretion system (T3SS) is utilized by a large number of gram-negative bacteria to deliver effectors directly into the cytosol of eukaryotic host cells. One essential component of a T3SS is an ATPase that catalyzes the unfolding of proteins, which is followed by the translocation of effectors through an injectisome. Here we demonstrate a functional role of the ATPase SsaN, a component of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS (T3SS-2) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. SsaN hydrolyzed ATP in vitro and was essential for T3SS function and Salmonella virulence in vivo. Protein-protein interaction analyses revealed that SsaN interacted with SsaK and SsaQ to form the C ring complex. SsaN and its complex co-localized to the membrane fraction under T3SS-2 inducing conditions. In addition, SsaN bound to Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) specific chaperones, including SsaE, SseA, SscA, and SscB that facilitated translocator/effector secretion. Using an in vitro chaperone release assay, we demonstrated that SsaN dissociated a chaperone-effector complex, SsaE and SseB, in an ATP-dependent manner. Effector release was dependent on a conserved arginine residue at position 192 of SsaN, and this was essential for its enzymatic activity. These results strongly suggest that the T3SS-2-associated ATPase SsaN contributes to T3SS-2 effector translocation efficiency.

  4. How Do Executive Functions Fit with the Cattell-Horn-Carroll Model? Some Evidence from a Joint Factor Analysis of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System and the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Randy G.; Bergeron, Renee; Hamilton, Gloria; Parra, Gilbert R.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relations among executive functions and cognitive abilities through a joint exploratory factor analysis and joint confirmatory factor analysis of 25 test scores from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System and the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities. Participants were 100 children and adolescents…

  5. Bismuth(III) triflate-catalyzed direct conversion of corticosteroids into highly functionalized 17-ketosteroids by cleavage of the C17-dihydroxyacetone side chain.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rui M A; Salvador, Jorge A R; Le Roux, Christophe; Paixão, José A

    2009-11-01

    The use of bismuth(III) triflate as catalyst for the direct conversion of corticosteroids into highly functionalized 17-ketosteroids by cleavage of the C17-dihydroxyacetone side chain is reported. This catalytic process is very chemoselective, since functionalities of the starting corticosteroids, such as Delta(4)-3-keto, Delta(1,4)-3-keto, 11beta-hydroxyl, and 9beta,11beta-epoxide, remained intact. PMID:19799442

  6. Application of recent double-hybrid density functionals to low-lying singlet-singlet excitation energies of large organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, F. Di; Trouillas, P.; Adamo, C.; Sancho-García, J. C.

    2013-10-01

    The present work assesses some recently developed double-hybrid density functionals (B2π-PLYP, PBE0-DH, and PBE0-2) using linear-response Tamm-Dancoff Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory. This assessment is achieved against experimentally derived low-lying excitation energies of large organic dyes of recent interest, including some excitations dominated by charge-transfer transitions. Comparisons are made with some of the best-performing methods established from the literature, such as PBE0 or B3LYP hybrid or the recently proposed B2-PLYP and B2GP-PLYP double-hybrid models, to ascertain their quality and robustness on equal footing. The accuracy of parameter-free or empirical forms of double-hybrid functionals is also briefly discussed. Generally speaking, it turns out that double-hybrid expressions always provide more accurate estimates than corresponding hybrid methods. Double-hybrid functionals actually reach averaged accuracies of 0.2 eV, that can be admittedly considered close to any intended accuracy limit within the present theoretical framework.

  7. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  8. Oscillator strengths and collision strengths for S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The present calculation, in a close-coupled approximation for the energy range up to 1,000,000 K, yields collision strengths for the electron impact excitation of S III from the ground 3p2 3P state to the excited states 3s3p3 3D0, 3P0, 3S0, 3d 3D0, 3P0, and 4s 3P0. Also obtained are those transitions' oscillator strengths, and strengths for others involving 3p2 1D and 1S. Configuration-interaction target wave functions yielding oscillator strengths that are accurate to 20 percent are used in collision strength calculations.

  9. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  10. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  11. Electronic Excitations in Push-Pull Oligomers and Their Complexes with Fullerene from Many-Body Green's Functions Theory with Polarizable Embedding.

    PubMed

    Baumeier, Björn; Rohlfing, Michael; Andrienko, Denis

    2014-08-12

    We present a comparative study of excited states in push-pull oligomers of PCPDTBT and PSBTBT and prototypical complexes with a C60 acceptor using many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We analyze excitations in oligomers up to a length of 5 nm and find that for both materials the absorption energy practically saturates for structures larger than two repeat units due to the localized nature of the excitation. In the bimolecular complexes with C60, the transition from Frenkel to charge transfer excitons is generally exothermic and strongly influenced by the acceptor's position and orientation. The high CT binding energy of the order of 2 eV results from the lack of an explicit molecular environment. External polarization effects are then modeled in a GW-BSE based QM/MM approach by embedding the donor-acceptor complex into a polarizable lattice. The lowest charge transfer exciton is energetically stabilized by about 0.5 eV, while its binding energy is reduced to about 0.3 eV. We also identify a globally unbound charge transfer state with a more delocalized hole at higher energy while still within the absorption spectrum, which opens another potential pathway for charge separation. For both PCPDTBT and PSBTBT, the energetics are largely similar with respect to absorption and the driving force to form intermediate charge transfer excitations for free charge generation. These results support that the higher power conversion efficiency observed for solar cells using PSBTBT as donor material is a result of molecular packing rather than of the electronic structure of the polymer.

  12. Optical properties of the Eu(III)-La(III)-complex-doped polyolefine film and rod samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogreb, Roman; Popov, Oleg; Lirtsman, Vlad; Pyshkin, Oleg; Kazachkov, Alexander; Musin, Albina; Finkelshtein, Binyamin; Shmukler, Yuri; Davidov, Dan; Bormashenko, Edward

    2005-04-01

    The work is devoted to luminescent properties of trivalent lanthanide complexes dispersed in thermoplastic host matrices. Polyethylene-based film and polypropylene-based rod both doped with these complexes were manufactured using an extrusion technique. Two kinds of dopants were used: Eu(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-1,10-phenanthroline complex (Eu(III)) and Eu(III)-La(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex (Eu(III)-La(III)). Comparison was made between these samples regarding absorption, excitation, emission and a lifetime of luminescence. Dependence of emission intensity on the excitation energy was determined. Emission spectra of the films were studied at room and helium temperatures. Optical properties of Eu(III) samples are different from Eu(III)-La(III) samples. Significant difference in spectra of these two types of samples may be attributed to the La(III) action.

  13. Functional characterization of a class III acid endochitinase from the traps of the carnivorous pitcher plant genus, Nepenthes.

    PubMed

    Rottloff, Sandy; Stieber, Regina; Maischak, Heiko; Turini, Florian G; Heubl, Günther; Mithöfer, Axel

    2011-08-01

    Carnivory in plants is an adaptation strategy to nutrient-poor environments and soils. Carnivorous plants obtain some additional mineral nutrients by trapping and digesting prey; the genus Nepenthes is helped by its specialized pitcher traps. To make the nutrients available, the caught prey needs to be digested, a process that requires the concerted activity of several hydrolytic enzymes. To identify and investigate the various enzymes involved in this process, fluid from Nepenthes traps has been analysed in detail. In this study, a novel type of Nepenthes endochitinase was identified in the digestion fluid of closed pitchers. The encoding endochitinase genes have been cloned from eight different Nepenthes species. Among these, the deduced amino acid sequence similarity was at least 94.9%. The corresponding cDNA from N. rafflesiana was heterologously expressed, and the purified protein, NrChit1, was biochemically characterized. The enzyme, classified as a class III acid endochitinase belonging to family 18 of the glycoside hydrolases, is secreted into the pitcher fluid very probably due to the presence of an N-terminal signal peptide. Transcriptome analyses using real-time PCR indicated that the presence of prey in the pitcher up-regulates the endochitinase gene not only in the glands, which are responsible for enzyme secretion, but at an even higher level, in the glands' surrounding tissue. These results suggest that in the pitchers' tissues, the endochitinase as well as other proteins from the pitcher fluid might fulfil a different, primary function as pathogenesis-related proteins. PMID:21633084

  14. Solvent effects on optical excitations of poly para phenylene ethynylene studied by QM/MM simulations based on many-body Green's functions theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, B.; Karttunen, M.; Baumeier, B.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic excitations in dilute solutions of poly para phenylene ethynylene (poly-PPE) are studied using a QM/MM approach combining many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation with polarizable force field models. Oligomers up to a length of 7.5 nm (10 repeat units) functionalized with nonyl side chains are solvated in toluene and water, respectively. After equilibration using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), the system is partitioned into a quantum region (backbone) embedded into a classical (side chains and solvent) environment. Optical absorption properties are calculated solving the coupled QM/MM system self-consistently and special attention is paid to the effects of solvents. The model allows to differentiate the influence of oligomer conformation induced by the solvation from electronic effects related to local electric fields and polarization. It is found that the electronic environment contributions are negligible compared to the conformational dynamics of the conjugated PPE. An analysis of the electron-hole wave function reveals a sensitivity of energy and localization characteristics of the excited states to bends in the global conformation of the oligomer rather than to the relative of phenyl rings along the backbone.

  15. Angular distribution, kinetic energy distributions, and excitation functions of fast metastable oxygen fragments following electron impact of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.; Faris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact was studied using the methods of translational spectroscopy and angular distribution analysis. Earlier time of flight studies revealed two overlapping spectra, the slower of which was attributed to metastable CO(a3 pi) fragments. The fast peak is the focus of this study. Threshold energy, angular distribution, and improve time of flight measurements indicate that the fast peak actually consists of five overlapping features. The slowest of the five features is found to consist of metastable 0(5S) produced by predissociation of a sigma u + state of CO2 into 0(5S) + CO(a3 pi). Oxygen Rydberg fragments originating directly from a different sigma u + state are believed to make up the next fastest feature. Mechanisms for producing the three remaining features are discussed.

  16. The absence of core fucose up-regulates GnT-III and Wnt target genes: a possible mechanism for an adaptive response in terms of glycan function.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Ayako; Kitazume, Shinobu; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Nakajima, Kazuki; Oka, Ritsuko; Fujinawa, Reiko; Korekane, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Wada, Yoshinao; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2014-04-25

    Glycans play key roles in a variety of protein functions under normal and pathological conditions, but several glycosyltransferase-deficient mice exhibit no or only mild phenotypes due to redundancy or compensation of glycan functions. However, we have only a limited understanding of the underlying mechanism for these observations. Our previous studies indicated that 70% of Fut8-deficient (Fut8(-/-)) mice that lack core fucose structure die within 3 days after birth, but the remainder survive for up to several weeks although they show growth retardation as well as emphysema. In this study, we show that, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from Fut8(-/-) mice, another N-glycan branching structure, bisecting GlcNAc, is specifically up-regulated by enhanced gene expression of the responsible enzyme N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III). As candidate target glycoproteins for bisecting GlcNAc modification, we confirmed that level of bisecting GlcNAc on β1-integrin and N-cadherin was increased in Fut8(-/-) MEFs. Moreover using mass spectrometry, glycan analysis of IgG1 in Fut8(-/-) mouse serum demonstrated that bisecting GlcNAc contents were also increased by Fut8 deficiency in vivo. As an underlying mechanism, we found that in Fut8(-/-) MEFs Wnt/β-catenin signaling is up-regulated, and an inhibitor against Wnt signaling was found to abrogate GnT-III expression, indicating that Wnt/β-catenin is involved in GnT-III up-regulation. Furthermore, various oxidative stress-related genes were also increased in Fut8(-/-) MEFs. These data suggest that Fut8(-/-) mice adapted to oxidative stress, both ex vivo and in vivo, by inducing various genes including GnT-III, which may compensate for the loss of core fucose functions.

  17. Description of electron transfer in the ground and excited states of organic donor–acceptor systems by single-reference and multi-reference density functional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael

    2014-09-28

    Electron transfer in the ground and excited states of a model donor–acceptor (D–A) system is investigated using the single-reference and multi-reference density functional theory (DFT) methods. To analyze the results of the calculations, a simple two-site multi-reference model was derived that predicts a stepwise electron transfer in the S{sub 0} state and a wave-like dependence of the S{sub 1} electron transfer on the external stimulus. The standard single-reference Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT approach and the time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) method failed to describe the correct dependence of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} electron transfer on the external electric field applied along the donor–acceptor system. The multi-reference DFT approach, the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method, was able to successfully reproduce the correct behavior of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} electron transfer on the applied field. The REKS method was benchmarked against experimentally measured gas phase charge transfer excitations in a series of organic donor–acceptor complexes and displayed its ability to describe this type of electronic transitions with a very high accuracy, mean absolute error of 0.05 eV with the use of the standard range separated density functionals. On the basis of the calculations undertaken in this work, it is suggested that the non-adiabatic coupling between the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} states may interfere with the electron transfer in a weakly coupled donor–acceptor system. It is also suggested that the electronic excitation of a D{sup +}–A{sup −} system may play a dual role by assisting the further electron transfer at certain magnitudes of the applied electric field and causing the backward transfer at lower electric field strengths.

  18. Regulation of the Tumor-Suppressor Function of the Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Complex by Ubiquitin and SUMO

    PubMed Central

    Reidick, Christina; El Magraoui, Fouzi; Meyer, Helmut E.; Stenmark, Harald; Platta, Harald W.

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of cancer is often associated with a dysfunction in one of the three central membrane-involution processes—autophagy, endocytosis or cytokinesis. Interestingly, all three pathways are controlled by the same central signaling module: the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex and its catalytic product, the phosphorylated lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P). The activity of the catalytic subunit of the PI3K-III complex, the lipid-kinase VPS34, requires the presence of the membrane-targeting factor VPS15 as well as the adaptor protein Beclin 1. Furthermore, a growing list of regulatory proteins associates with VPS34 via Beclin 1. These accessory factors define distinct subunit compositions and thereby guide the PI3K-III complex to its different cellular and physiological roles. Here we discuss the regulation of the PI3K-III complex components by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. Especially Beclin 1 has emerged as a highly regulated protein, which can be modified with Lys11-, Lys48- or Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by distinct E3 ligases from the RING-, HECT-, RBR- or Cullin-type. We also point out other cross-links of these ligases with autophagy in order to discuss how these data might be merged into a general concept. PMID:25545884

  19. Thiol-functionalized Fe3O4/SiO2 microspheres with superparamagnetism and their adsorption properties for Au(III) ion separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiangqian; Zhang, Wei; Gai, Ligang; Jiang, Haihui; Tian, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Thiol-functionalized Fe3O4/SiO2 microspheres (Fe3O4/SiO2-SH) with high saturation magnetization (69.3 emu g-1), superparamagnetism, and good dispersibility have been prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction method in combination with a modified Stöber method. The as-prepared composite magnetic spheres are characterized with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), zeta potential, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference magnetometer, and tested in separation of Au(III) ions from aqueous solutions. The data for Au(III) adsorption on Fe3O4/SiO2-SH are analyzed with the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models, and the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion kinetics models. The adsorption behaviors of Au(III) on Fe3O4/SiO2-SH follow the Langmuir isotherm model, and the adsorption process conforms to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Au(III) on Fe3O4/SiO2-SH is 43.7 mg g-1. Acetate anions play an important role yet Cu(II) ions have little interference in the adsorption of Au(III) on the adsorbent. A satisfactory recovery percentage of 89.5% is acquired by using an eluent with 1 M thiourea and 5% HCl, although thiols have a high affinity to Au(III) ions based on the hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) theory by Pearson.

  20. Excitation function for 63Cu(n,p)63Ni reaction in neutron energy range up to 15 MeV.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, K; Ota, Y; Akamine, M; Shibata, S; Shibata, T; Ito, Y; Imamura, M; Uwamino, Y; Nogawa, N; Baba, M; Iwasaki, S; Matsuyama, S

    2008-10-01

    The excitation function for the (63)Cu(n,p)(63)Ni reaction has been measured by activation method using the 4.5 MV Dynamitron accelerator of the Fast Neutron Laboratory of Tohoku University. Copper plates and hollow spherical copper shells were irradiated by neutrons of various energy up to 14.9 MeV produced by the T(p,n), D(d,n), and T(d,n) reactions. The (63)Ni produced in the irradiated copper target was chemically separated. The beta-rays emitted from the extracted (63)Ni were measured by a liquid scintillation method. The cross sections obtained were compared with the evaluated data files of JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI and FENDL/A-2.0. Consequently, it is found that FENDL/A-2.0 is consistent with our experimental data in the energy range studied in this work. The effect of proton shell appeared in the excitation function obtained is also discussed.

  1. Complete and incomplete fusion reactions in the {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm system: Excitation functions and recoil range distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Sharma, B.K.; Singh, B.P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H.D.; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K.S.

    2004-10-01

    With the view to study complete and incomplete fusion in heavy ion induced reactions, experiments have been carried out for measuring excitation functions for several reactions in the system {sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm at energies near the Coulomb barrier to well above it, using an activation technique. The measured excitation functions have been compared with those calculated theoretically using three different computer codes viz., ALICE-91, CASCADE and PACE2. The enhancement of experimentally measured cross sections for alpha emission channels over their theoretical prediction has been attributed to the fact that these residues are formed not only by complete fusion but also through incomplete fusion. In order to separate out the relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion, the recoil range distributions of eight residues produced in the interaction of {sup 16}O with {sup 169}Tm at {approx_equal}87 MeV have been measured. The recoil range distributions indicate significant contributions from incomplete fusion at {approx_equal}87 MeV for some of the channels.

  2. Scc1 (CP0432) and Scc4 (CP0033) Function as a Type III Secretion Chaperone for CopN of Chlamydia pneumoniae▿†

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Herzog, Eugenia; Joseph, Sabrina S.; Avery, Ann K.; Coba, Jose A.; Wolf, Katerina; Fields, Kenneth A.; Plano, Gregory V.

    2011-01-01

    The Chlamydia pneumoniae CopN protein is a member of the YopN/TyeA/InvE/MxiC family of secreted proteins that function to regulate the secretion of type III secretion system (T3SS) translocator and effector proteins. In this study, the Scc1 (CP0432) and Scc4 (CP0033) proteins of C. pneumoniae AR-39 were demonstrated to function together as a type III secretion chaperone that binds to an N-terminal region of CopN. The Scc1/Scc4 chaperone promoted the efficient secretion of CopN via a heterologous T3SS, whereas, the Scc3 chaperone, which binds to a C-terminal region of CopN, reduced CopN secretion. PMID:21571996

  3. Contrasting Anticancer Activity of Half-Sandwich Iridium(III) Complexes Bearing Functionally Diverse 2-Phenylpyridine Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and antiproliferative activity of 15 iridium(III) half-sandwich complexes of the type [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(R′-phenyl)-R-pyridine)Cl] bearing either an electron-donating (−OH, −CH2OH, −CH3) or electron-withdrawing (−F, −CHO, −NO2) group at various positions on the 2-phenylpyridine (2-PhPy) chelating ligand giving rise to six sets of structural isomers. The X-ray crystal structures of [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(2′-fluorophenyl)pyridine)Cl] (1) and [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(4′-fluorophenyl)pyridine)Cl] (2) exhibit the expected “piano-stool” configuration. DFT calculations showed that substituents caused only localized effects on the electrostatic potential surface of the chelating 2-PhPy ligand of the complexes. Hydrolysis of all complexes is rapid, but readily reversed by addition of NaCl. The complexes show preferential binding to 9-ethylguanine over 9-methyladenine and are active catalysts for the oxidation of NADH to NAD+. Antiproliferative activity experiments in A2780 ovarian, MCF-7 breast, A549 lung, and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines showed IC50 values ranging from 1 to 89 μM, with the most potent complex, [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(2′-methylphenyl)pyridine)Cl] (13) (A2780 IC50 = 1.18 μM), being 10× more active than the parent, [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-phenylpyridine)Cl], and 2× more active than [(η5-CpxPh)Ir(2-phenylpyridine)Cl]. Intriguingly, contrasting biological activities are observed between structural isomers despite exhibiting similar chemical reactivity. For pairs of structural isomers both the nature and position of the functional group can affect the hydrophobicity of the complex. An increase in hydrophobicity resulted in enhanced cellular-iridium accumulation in A2780 ovarian cells, which generally gave rise to an increase in potency. The structural isomers [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(4′-fluorophenyl)pyridine)Cl] (2) and [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-phenyl-5-fluoropyridine)Cl] (4) preferentially localized in the cytosol > membrane and particulate

  4. Testing time-dependent density functional theory with depopulated molecular orbitals for predicting electronic excitation energies of valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer states and potential energies near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaohong L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2014-09-14

    Kohn-Sham (KS) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with most exchange-correlation functionals is well known to systematically underestimate the excitation energies of Rydberg and charge-transfer excited states of atomic and molecular systems. To improve the description of Rydberg states within the KS TDDFT framework, Gaiduk et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 253005 (2012)] proposed a scheme that may be called HOMO depopulation. In this study, we tested this scheme on an extensive dataset of valence and Rydberg excitation energies of various atoms, ions, and molecules. It is also tested on a charge-transfer excitation of NH{sub 3}-F{sub 2} and on the potential energy curves of NH{sub 3} near a conical intersection. We found that the method can indeed significantly improve the accuracy of predicted Rydberg excitation energies while preserving reasonable accuracy for valence excitation energies. However, it does not appear to improve the description of charge-transfer excitations that are severely underestimated by standard KS TDDFT with conventional exchange-correlation functionals, nor does it perform appreciably better than standard TDDFT for the calculation of potential energy surfaces.

  5. Excited Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Asia; Ahern, Terence L.; Henderson, Sean O.

    2011-01-01

    Excited (or agitated) delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. PMID:21691475

  6. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  7. Structure/Function Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase in the Brown Alga Ectocarpus siliculosus Reveals a Biochemical Pathway in Phlorotannin Monomer Biosynthesis[W

    PubMed Central

    Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Delage, Ludovic; Leroux, Cédric J.-J.; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Creis, Emeline; Gall, Erwan Ar; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie; Czjzek, Mirjam; Potin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Brown algal phlorotannins are structural analogs of condensed tannins in terrestrial plants and, like plant phenols, they have numerous biological functions. Despite their importance in brown algae, phlorotannin biosynthetic pathways have been poorly characterized at the molecular level. We found that a predicted type III polyketide synthase in the genome of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus, PKS1, catalyzes a major step in the biosynthetic pathway of phlorotannins (i.e., the synthesis of phloroglucinol monomers from malonyl-CoA). The crystal structure of PKS1 at 2.85-Å resolution provided a good quality electron density map showing a modified Cys residue, likely connected to a long chain acyl group. An additional pocket not found in other known type III PKSs contains a reaction product that might correspond to a phloroglucinol precursor. In vivo, we also found a positive correlation between the phloroglucinol content and the PKS III gene expression level in cells of a strain of Ectocarpus adapted to freshwater during its reacclimation to seawater. The evolution of the type III PKS gene family in Stramenopiles suggests a lateral gene transfer event from an actinobacterium. PMID:23983220

  8. Functional and computational analysis of amino acid patterns predictive of type III secretion system substrates in Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs) deliver proteins called effectors into eukaryotic cells. Although N-terminal amino acid sequences are required for translocation, the mechanism of substrate recognition by the T3SS is unknown. Almost all actively deployed T3SS substrates in the plant path...

  9. Graduate Student WAIS-III Scoring Accuracy Is a Function of Full Scale IQ and Complexity of Examiner Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Richard, David C. S.

    2005-01-01

    Research on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) suggests that practicing clinical psychologists and graduate students make item-level scoring errors that affect IQ, index, and subtest scores. Studies have been limited in that Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ) and examiner administration,…

  10. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  11. Reduced L-type Ca2+ current and compromised excitability induce loss of skeletal muscle function during acute cooling in locust.

    PubMed

    Findsen, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes; Pedersen, Thomas Holm

    2016-08-01

    Low temperature causes most insects to enter a state of neuromuscular paralysis, termed chill coma. The susceptibility of insect species to chill coma is tightly correlated to their distribution limits and for this reason it is important to understand the cellular processes that underlie chill coma. It is known that muscle function is markedly depressed at low temperature and this suggests that chill coma is partly caused by impairment in the muscle per se. To find the cellular mechanism(s) underlying muscle dysfunction at low temperature, we examined the effect of low temperature (5°C) on several events in excitation-contraction coupling in the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria). Intracellular membrane potential recordings during single nerve stimulations showed that 70% of fibers at 20°C produced an action potential (AP), while only 55% of fibers were able to fire an AP at 5°C. Reduced excitability at low temperature was caused by an ∼80% drop in L-type Ca(2+) current and a depolarizing shift in its activation of around 20 mV, which means that a larger endplate potential would be needed to activate the muscle AP at low temperature. In accordance, we showed that intracellular Ca(2+) transients were largely absent at low temperature following nerve stimulation. In contrast, maximum contractile force was unaffected by low temperature in chemically skinned muscle bundles, which demonstrates that the function of the contractile filaments is preserved at low temperature. These findings demonstrate that reduced L-type Ca(2+) current is likely to be the most important factor contributing to loss of muscle function at low temperature in locust. PMID:27247315

  12. Nonadiabatic coupling vectors for excited states within time-dependent density functional theory in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Curchod, Basile F. E.; Laktionov, Andrey; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2010-11-01

    Recently, we have proposed a scheme for the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings and nonadiabatic coupling vectors within linear response time-dependent density functional theory using a set of auxiliary many-electron wavefunctions [I. Tavernelli, E. Tapavicza, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124107 (2009)]. As demonstrated in a later work [I. Tavernelli, B. F. E. Curchod, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 196101 (2009)], this approach is rigorous in the case of the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings between the ground state and any excited state. In this work, we extend this formalism to the case of coupling between pairs of singly excited states with the same spin multiplicity. After proving the correctness of our formalism using the electronic oscillator approach by Mukamel and co-workers [S. Tretiak and S. Mukamel, Chem. Rev. (Washington, D.C.) 102, 3171 (2002)], we tested the method on a model system, namely, protonated formaldimine, for which we computed S1/S2 nonadiabatic coupling vectors and compared them with results from high level (MR-CISD) electronic structure calculations.

  13. Nonadiabatic coupling vectors for excited states within time-dependent density functional theory in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Curchod, Basile F E; Laktionov, Andrey; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2010-11-21

    Recently, we have proposed a scheme for the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings and nonadiabatic coupling vectors within linear response time-dependent density functional theory using a set of auxiliary many-electron wavefunctions [I. Tavernelli, E. Tapavicza, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124107 (2009)]. As demonstrated in a later work [I. Tavernelli, B. F. E. Curchod, and U. Rothlisberger, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 196101 (2009)], this approach is rigorous in the case of the calculation of nonadiabatic couplings between the ground state and any excited state. In this work, we extend this formalism to the case of coupling between pairs of singly excited states with the same spin multiplicity. After proving the correctness of our formalism using the electronic oscillator approach by Mukamel and co-workers [S. Tretiak and S. Mukamel, Chem. Rev. (Washington, D.C.) 102, 3171 (2002)], we tested the method on a model system, namely, protonated formaldimine, for which we computed S(1)/S(2) nonadiabatic coupling vectors and compared them with results from high level (MR-CISD) electronic structure calculations. PMID:21090851

  14. Intersystem Crossing Pathway in Quinoline-Pyrazole Isomerism: A Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Study on Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Lan, Sheng-Cheng; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Lin, Sheng-Hsien

    2015-06-18

    The dynamics of the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) reaction of quinoline-pyrazole (QP) isomers, designated as QP-I and QP-II, has been investigated by means of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). A lower barrier has been found in the potential energy curve for the lowest singlet excited state (S1) along the proton-transfer coordinate of QP-II compared with that of QP-I; however, this is at variance with a recent experimental report [J. Phys. Chem. A 2010, 114, 7886-7891], in which the authors proposed that the ESIPT reaction would only proceed in QP-I due to the absence of a PT emission for QP-II. Therefore, several deactivating pathways have been investigated to determine whether fluorescence quenching occurs in the PT form of QP-II (PT-II). The S1 state of PT-II has nπ* character, which is a well-known dark state. Moreover, the energy gap between the S1 and T2 states is only 0.29 eV, implying that an intersystem crossing (ISC) process would occur rapidly following the ESIPT reaction. Therefore, it is demonstrated that the ESIPT could successfully proceed in QP-II and that the PT emission would be quenched by the ISC process.

  15. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Type III Secretion System from Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Joe, Anna; Mavrodi, Olga V.; Hassan, Karl A.; Weller, David M.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Loper, Joyce E.; Alfano, James R.; Thomashow, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96 represents a group of rhizosphere strains responsible for the suppressiveness of agricultural soils to take-all disease of wheat. It produces the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and aggressively colonizes the roots of cereal crops. In this study, we analyzed the genome of Q8r1-96 and identified a type III protein secretion system (T3SS) gene cluster that has overall organization similar to that of the T3SS gene cluster of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. We also screened a collection of 30 closely related P. fluorescens strains and detected the T3SS genes in all but one of them. The Q8r1-96 genome contained ropAA and ropM type III effector genes, which are orthologs of the P. syringae effector genes hopAA1-1 and hopM1, as well as a novel type III effector gene designated ropB. These type III effector genes encoded proteins that were secreted in culture and injected into plant cells by both P. syringae and Q8r1-96 T3SSs. The Q8r1-96 T3SS was expressed in the rhizosphere, but mutants lacking a functional T3SS were not altered in their rhizosphere competence. The Q8r1-96 type III effectors RopAA, RopB, and RopM were capable of suppressing the hypersensitive response and production of reactive oxygen species, two plant immune responses. PMID:20971913

  16. Functional analysis of ssaJ and the ssaK/U operon, 13 genes encoding components of the type III secretion apparatus of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2.

    PubMed

    Hensel, M; Shea, J E; Raupach, B; Monack, D; Falkow, S; Gleeson, C; Kubo, T; Holden, D W

    1997-04-01

    We have investigated the structure and transcriptional organization of 13 genes of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) that encode components of the second type III secretion apparatus of Salmonella typhimurium. ssaK, L, M, V, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U constitute one operon of 10 kb. ssaJ lles upstream of ssaK and is the terminal gene of another operon. The deduced products of ssaJ, ssaK, ssaV, ssaN, ssaO, ssaQ, ssaR, ssaS, ssaT, and ssaU show greatest similarity to the Yersinia spp. genes yscJ, yscL, lcrD, yscN, yscO, yscQ, yscR, yscS, yscT, and yscU, respectively. The products of the ssaL, ssaM and ssaP genes do not have significant similarity to products of other type III secretion systems, and might be important for the specific function of the SPI2 type III secretion system. Bacterial strains carrying different ssa mutations display minor alterations in terms of serum sensitivity when compared with the wild-type strain, but none are defective in replication within macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. However, some of the ssa mutant strains invade HEp2 cells less efficiently and are less cytotoxic to RAW 264.7 macrophages than the wild-type strain. We show that the invasion defect is correlated with a lack of SipC in culture supernatants of these mutant strains. SipC is a product of the SPI1 type III secretion system of S. typhimurium, and is important for epithelial cell invasion. Therefore, mutations in SPI2 can affect the SPI1 secretion system, which raises the possibility of an interaction between the two type III secretion systems.

  17. Site-specific functionalization for chemical speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) using polyaniline impregnated nanocellulose composite: equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Priyanka; Varshney, Shilpa; Srivastava, Shalini

    2015-10-01

    Site-specific functionalizations are the emergent attention for the enhancement of sorption latent of heavy metals. Limited chemistry has been applied for the fabrication of diafunctionalized materials having potential to tether both environmentally stable oxidation states of chromium (Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Polyaniline impregnated nanocellulose composite (PANI-NCC) has been fabricated using click chemistry and explored for the removal of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from hydrological environment. The structure, stability, morphology, particle size, surface area, hydrophilicity, and porosity of fabricated PANI-NCC were characterized comprehensively using analytical techniques and mathematical tools. The maximum sorption performance of PANI-NCC was procured for (Cr(III): 47.06 mg g-1; 94.12 %) and (Cr(VI): 48.92 mg g-1; 97.84 %) by equilibrating 0.5 g sorbent dose with 1000 mL of 25 mg L-1 chromium conc. at pH 6.5 and 2.5 for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively. The sorption data showed a best fit to the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The negative value of ∆ G° (-8.59 and -11.16 kJ mol-1) and ∆ H° (66.46 × 10-1 and 17.84 × 10-1 kJ mol-1), and positive value of ∆ S° (26.66 and 31.46 J mol-1K-1) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, reflect the spontaneous, feasibility, and exothermic nature of the sorption process. The application of fabricated PANI-NCC for removing both the forms of chromium in the presence of other heavy metals was also tested at laboratory and industrial waste water regime. These findings open up new avenues in the row of high performance, scalable, and economic nanobiomaterial for the remediation of both forms of chromium from water streams.

  18. Evidence of iron (III) reduction in γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles due to meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Eloiza S.; Lima, Emilia C. D.; Soler, Maria A. G.; Silva, Fabio R. L.; Azevedo, Ricardo B.; Morais, Paulo C.

    2014-03-01

    In this study we report on the meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) surface functionalization of nanosized maghemite particles which were obtained from oxidation of freshly-precipitated magnetite nanoparticles. Stable magnetic sols were produced while using [DMSA]/[Fe] in a wide range (2 to 90%) of values for the surface functionalization protocol. We found experimental evidence of Fe (III) reduction down to Fe (II) in the whole range of [DMSA]/[Fe] values employed, though presenting differences for lower and higher values of DMSA/Fe molar ratio. At lower (up to 10%) [DMSA]/[Fe] values the DMSA-functionalized iron oxide core remains essentially maghemite while the reduced Fe (II) ions move out to the bulk solution as soluble species. In contrast, at higher (20% and above) [DMSA]/[Fe] values the DMSA-functionalized iron oxide core holds the reduced Fe (II) on its crystal structure. The thiol group oxidation, via disulfide bridge formation, plays a key role in the Fe (III) reduction to Fe (II) during the surface functionalization process. We hypothesize that at higher [DMSA]/[Fe] values (20% and above) intermolecular disulfide bridge formation dominates, leading to the onset of a network at the nanoparticle’s surface, thus preventing the surface reduced Fe (II) ions moving out into the bulk solution. Experimental evidence based on visual inspection and different techniques (UV-vis-IR spectroscopy, chemical analysis, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy) are present to support the model picture herein introduced.

  19. Spatiotemporal Patterns of a Predator-Prey System with an Allee Effect and Holling Type III Functional Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jinfeng

    A diffusive Gause type predator-prey system with Allee effect in prey growth and Holling type III response subject to Neumann boundary conditions is investigated. Existence of nonconstant positive steady state solutions is proved by Leray-Schauder degree theory and bifurcation theory. Global stability of the positive equilibrium of the system is also investigated. Moreover, bifurcations of spatially homogeneous and nonhomogeneous periodic solutions are analyzed. Our rigorous results justify some recent ecological observations.

  20. Synthesis and application of Amberlite xad-4 functionalized with alizarin red-s for preconcentration and adsorption of rhodium (III)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A new chelating resin was prepared by coupling Amberlite XAD-4 with alizarin red-s through an azo spacer, characterized by infra-red spectroscopy and thermal analysis and studied for Rh(III) preconcentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for rhodium monitoring in the environment. The optimum pH for sorption of the metal ion was 6.5. The sorption capacity was found 2.1 mg/g of resin for Rh(III). A recovery of 88% was obtained for the metal ion with 1.5 M HCl as eluting agent. Kinetic adsorption data were analyzed by adsorption and desorption times of Rh(III) on modified resin. Scat chard analysis revealed that the homogeneous binding sites were formed in the polymers. The linear regression equation was Q/C = –1.3169Q + 27.222 (R2 = 0.9239), for Rh were formed in the SPE sorbent,Kd and Qmax for the affinity binding sites were calculated to be 0.76 μmol/mL and 20.67 μmol/g, respectively. The equilibrium data and parameters of Rh(III) adsorption on modified resin were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Redlich–Peterson models. The experimental adsorption isotherm was in good concordance with Langmuir and Freundlich models (R2 > 0.998) and based on the Langmuir isotherm the maximum amount of adsorption (qmax) was 4.842 mg/g. The method was applied for rhodium ions determination in environmental samples. with high recovery (>80%). PMID:23369526

  1. Thermotoga maritima ribonuclease III. Characterization of thermostable biochemical behavior and analysis of conserved base pairs that function as reactivity epitopes for the Thermotoga 23S rRNA precursor.

    PubMed

    Nathania, Lilian; Nicholson, Allen W

    2010-08-24

    The cleavage of double-stranded (ds) RNA by ribonuclease III is a conserved early step in bacterial rRNA maturation. Studies on the mechanism of dsRNA cleavage by RNase III have focused mainly on the enzymes from mesophiles such as Escherichia coli. In contrast, neither the catalytic properties of extremophile RNases III nor the structures and reactivities of their cognate substrates have been described. The biochemical behavior of RNase III of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima was analyzed using purified recombinant enzyme. T. maritima (Tm) RNase III catalytic activity exhibits a broad optimal temperature range of approximately 40-70 degrees C, with significant activity at 95 degrees C. Tm-RNase III cleavage of substrate is optimally supported by Mg(2+) at >or=1 mM concentrations. Mn(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) also support activity but with reduced efficiencies. The enzyme functions optimally at pH 8 and approximately 50-80 mM salt concentrations. Small RNA hairpins that incorporate the 16S and 23S pre-rRNA stem sequences are efficiently cleaved by Tm-RNase III at sites that are consistent with production in vivo of the immediate precursors to the mature rRNAs. Analysis of pre-23S substrate variants reveals a dependence of reactivity on the base-pair (bp) sequence in the proximal box (pb), a site of protein contact that functions as a positive recognition determinant for Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III substrates. The dependence of reactivity on the pb sequence is similar to that observed with Ec-RNase III substrates. In fact, Tm-RNase III cleaves an Ec-RNase III substrate with identical specificity and is inhibited by antideterminant bp that also inhibit Ec-RNase III. These results indicate the conservation, across a broad phylogenetic distance, of positive and negative determinants of reactivity of bacterial RNase III substrates.

  2. Subsystem density-functional theory as an effective tool for modeling ground and excited states, their dynamics and many-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Sinha, Debalina; Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-05-01

    Subsystem density-functional theory (DFT) is an emerging technique for calculating the electronic structure of complex molecular and condensed phase systems. In this topical review, we focus on some recent advances in this field related to the computation of condensed phase systems, their excited states, and the evaluation of many-body interactions between the subsystems. As subsystem DFT is in principle an exact theory, any advance in this field can have a dual role. One is the possible applicability of a resulting method in practical calculations. The other is the possibility of shedding light on some quantum-mechanical phenomenon which is more easily treated by subdividing a supersystem into subsystems. An example of the latter is many-body interactions. In the discussion, we present some recent work from our research group as well as some new results, casting them in the current state-of-the-art in this review as comprehensively as possible.

  3. Excitation functions for production of heavy actinides from interactions of /sup 18/O with /sup 248/Cm and /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.; Moody, K.J.; Nurmia, M.J.; Seaborg, G.T.; von Gunten, H.R.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1983-06-01

    Excitation functions have been measured for the production of isotopes of Bk through Fm in bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with 97- to 122-MeV /sup 18/O ions and of isotopes of Bk through No in bombardments of /sup 249/Cf with 91- to 150-MeV /sup 18/O ions. The cross sections and widths of the mass distributions for the actinides produced in these reactions are very similar for transfer of the same numbers of nucleons. A semiquantitative comparison of the experimental results with calculations based on a simple model shows that calculations of this type are helpful in selection of projectile-target systems and optimum energies for production of specific actinide isotopes and for synthesis of as yet unknown heavy isotopes and elements. Comparisons of experimental results with calculations show that, in general, about half of the kinetic energy of the projectile is transferred to the actinide product.

  4. Total Reaction Cross Section Excitation Function Studies for 6He Interaction with 181Ta, 59Co, natSi, 9Be Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Yu. G.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Borcea, C.; Demekhina, N. A.; Eshanov, A. G.; Ivanov, M. P.; Kabdrakhimova, G. D.; Kabyshev, A. M.; Kugler, A.; Kuterbekov, K. A.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Maj, A.; Maslov, V. A.; Negret, A.; Skobelev, N. K.; Testov, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Voskobojnik, E. I.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.

    2015-06-01

    Total reaction cross section excitation functions σR(E) were measured for 6He secondary beam particles on 181Ta, 59Co, natSi and 9Be targets in a wide energy range by direct and model-independent method. This experimental method was based on prompt n-γ 4π-technique applied in event-by event mode. A high efficiency CsI(Tl) γ-spectrometer was used for the detection of reaction products (prompt γ-quanta and neutrons) accompanying each reaction event. Using the ACCULINNA fragment-separator 6He fragments (produced by 11B primary beam with 9Be target) are separated and transported to n-γ shielded experimental cave at FLNR JINR. The measured total reaction cross section data σR(E) for the above mentioned reactions are compared with a theoretical calculation based on the optical potential with the real part having the double-folding form.

  5. Excitation functions for 7Be, 22,24Na production in Mg and Al by deuteron irradiations up to 50 MeV.

    PubMed

    Hermanne, A; Takács, S; Tárkányi, F; Adam-Rebeles, R; Ignatyuk, A

    2012-12-01

    New experimental data for production of (7)Be and (22,24)Na in deuteron irradiation of (nat)Mg and Al up to 50 MeV are presented. The induced activity, measured with HPGe spectroscopy, allows us to determine excitation functions of (nat)Mg(d,x) and (27)Al(d,x) reactions involved in the activation process with reference to (nat)Ti(d,x)(48)V monitor cross sections. A comparison with experimental literature values and results from updated theoretical codes is discussed. Thick target yields were derived from fits to our cross-sections and integrated personnel dose was calculated for different irradiation cycles and exposure scenarios around high power deuteron accelerator facilities. PMID:23044286

  6. Extension of excitation functions up to 50 MeV for activation products in deuteron irradiations of Pr and Tm targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2016-09-01

    Extension up to 50 MeV incident deuteron energy is presented for excitation functions of activation products formed in monoisotopic Tm (169Tm) and Pr (141Pr). By stacked foil irradiations direct and/or cumulative production of 140,139m,138Nd, 138mPr, 141,139,137m,135Ce on Pr and 166,169Yb, 166,167,168Tm on Tm targets were measured. Confirmation of earlier experimental results for all investigated radionuclides is found and the influence of the higher energy on thick target yields and batch production of medically relevant radionuclides (140Nd, 139Pr (as decay product of 139mNd), 166,169Yb, 167Tm) is discussed. A comparison of experimental values with TALYS1.6 code results (predicted values from TENDL-2015 on-line library) shows a better description of the (d,pxn) reactions than older ones.

  7. Excitation function for deuteron induced nuclear reactions on natural ytterbium for production of high specific activity 177g Lu in no-carrier-added form for metabolic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Simone; Groppi, Flavia; Gandini, Andrea; Gini, Luigi; Abbas, Kamel; Holzwarth, Uwe; Simonelli, Federica; Bonardi, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Deuteron-induced nuclear reactions for generation of no-carrier-added Lu radionuclides were investigated using the stacked-foil activation technique on natural Yb targets at energies up to E(d)=18.18 MeV. Excitation functions of the reactions (nat)Yb(d,xn)(169,170,171,172,173,174g,174m,176m,177g)Lu and (nat)Yb(d,pxn)(169,175,177)Yb have been measured, among them three ((169)Lu, (174m)Lu and (176m)Lu) are reported for the first time. The upper limit of the contamination from the long-lived metastable level (177m)Lu was evaluated too. Thick-target yields for all investigated radionuclides are calculated.

  8. Electron impact excitation of the electronic states of N2. III - Transitions in the 12.5-14.2-eV energy-loss region at incident energies of 40 and 60 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Trajmar, S.; Cartwright, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of electron energy-loss data at incident electron energies of 40 and 60 eV has led to the determination of normalized absolute differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of five optically-allowed singlet states, two known triplet states, and two unknown triplet-like states of N2, lying in the energy-loss range 12.5-14.2 eV. The range of scattering angles was 5 to 138 deg. The optically allowed transitions and the known triplet excitations are identified. Cross sections for excitation to two unidentified triplet-like states at 13.155 and 13.395 eV were also obtained. The relationship of the generalized oscillator strength for the dipole-allowed states obtained from the described data to known optical oscillator strengths is discussed.

  9. Collisional energy transfer probabilities of highly excited molecules from KCSI. III. Azulene: P(E',E) and moments of energy transfer for energies up to 40 000 cm-1 via self-calibrating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hold, Uwe; Lenzer, Thomas; Luther, Klaus; Symonds, Andrew C.

    2003-12-01

    Complete experimental transition probability density functions P(E',E) have been determined for collisions between highly vibrationally excited azulene and several bath gases over a wide energy range. This was achieved by applying 2-color "kinetically controlled selective ionization (KCSI)" [U. Hold, T. Lenzer, K. Luther, K. Reihs, and A. C. Symonds, J. Chem. Phys. 112, 4076 (2000)]. The results are "self-calibrating," i.e., independent of any empirical calibration curve, as usually needed in traditional energy transfer experiments like time-resolved ultraviolet absorption or infrared fluorescence. The complete data set can be described by our recently introduced monoexponential 3-parameter P(E',E) form with a parametric exponent Y in the argument, P(E',E)∝exp[-{(E-E')/(C0+C1ṡE)}Y]. For small colliders (helium, argon, xenon, N2, and CO2) the P(E',E) show increased amplitudes in the wings compared to a monoexponential form (Y<1). For larger colliders, the wings of P(E',E) have an even smaller amplitude (Y>1) than that provided by a monoexponential. Approximate simulations show that the wings of P(E',E) at amplitudes <1×10-6 (cm-1)-1 have a nearly negligible influence on the population distributions and the net energy transfer. All optimized P(E',E) representations exhibit a linear energy dependence of the collision parameter α1(E)=C0+C1ṡE, which also results in an (approximately) linear dependence of <ΔE> and <ΔE2>1/2. The energy transfer parameters presented in this study have benchmark character in certainty and accuracy, e.g., with only 2%-5% uncertainty for our <ΔE> data below 25 000 cm-1. Deviations of previously reported first moment data from ultraviolet absorption and infrared fluorescence measurements can be traced back to either the influence of azulene self-collisions or well-known uncertainties in calibration curves.

  10. Measurements of Excitation Functions and Line Polarizations for Electron Impact Excitation of the n = 2, 3 States of Atomic Hydrogen in the Energy Range 11 - 2000 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Kanik, I.; Slevin, J.; Franklin, B.; Shemansky, D.

    1993-01-01

    The electron-atomic hydrogen scattering system is an important testing ground for theoretical models and has received a great deal of attention from experimentalists and theoreticians alike over the years. A complete description of the excitation process requires a knowledge of many different parameters, and experimental measurements of these parameters have been performed in various laboratories around the world. As far as total cross section data are concerned it has been noted that the discrepancy between the data of Long et al. and Williams for n = 2 excitations needs to be resolved in the interests of any further refinement of theory. We report new measurements of total cross sections and atomic line polarizations for both n=2 and n=3 excitations at energies from threshold to 2000 eV...

  11. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Guide Documents:  Project Guide Data Products User's Guide  (PDF) Relevant Documents:  ...

  12. Dye-loaded zeolite L @silica core-shell composite functionalized with europium(III) complexes for dipicolinic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yige; Yue, Yuping; Li, Huanrong; Zhao, Qi; Fang, Yi; Cao, Pengpeng

    2011-01-01

    Novel core-shell composites have been developed by immobilization of non-luminescent europium(III) complexes onto the surface of silica shells that are coated on the surface of luminescent dye-loaded zeolite L nano-crystals. The obtained core-shell composites were used for the ratiometric detection of dipicolinic acid (DPA) molecules. The dyes located in the channels of the zeolite L host are protected from any interaction with the environment of the particles and therefore provide a stable reference signal which can eliminate the need for instrument-specific calibration curves for DPA quantification in an analyte.

  13. Formation of iron(III) (hydr)oxides on polyaspartate- and alginate-coated substrates: effects of coating hydrophilicity and functional group.

    PubMed

    Ray, Jessica R; Lee, Byeongdu; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Jun, Young-Shin

    2012-12-18

    To better understand the transport of contaminants in aqueous environments, we need more accurate information about heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation of iron(III) hydroxide nanoparticles in the presence of organics. We combined synchrotron-based grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and SAXS and other nanoparticle and substrate surface characterization techniques to observe iron(III) (hydr)oxide [10⁻⁴ M Fe(NO₃)₃ in 10 mM NaNO₃] precipitation on quartz and on polyaspartate- and alginate-coated glass substrates and in solution (pH = 3.7 ± 0.2). Polyaspartate was determined to be the most negatively charged substrate and quartz the least; however, after 2 h, total nanoparticle volume calculations--from GISAXS--indicate that positively charged precipitation on quartz is twice that of alginate and 10 times higher than on polyaspartate, implying that electrostatics do not govern iron(III) (hydr)oxide nucleation. On the basis of contact angle measurements and surface characterization, we concluded that the degree of hydrophilicity may control heterogeneous nucleation on quartz and organic-coated substrates. The arrangement of functional groups at the substrate surface (--OH and --COOH) may also contribute. These results provide new information for elucidating the effects of polymeric organic substrate coatings on the size, volume, and location of nucleating iron hydroxides, which will help predict nanoparticle interactions in natural and engineered systems.

  14. Functional insights into the Shigella type III needle tip IpaD in secretion control and cell contact.

    PubMed

    Schiavolin, Lionel; Meghraoui, Alaeddine; Cherradi, Youness; Biskri, Latéfa; Botteaux, Anne; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm

    2013-04-01

    Type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) are complex nanomachines that insert a translocation pore into the host cell membrane through which effector proteins are injected into the cytosol. In Shigella, the pore is inserted by a needle tip complex that also controls secretion. IpaD is the key protein that rules the composition of the tip complex before and upon cell contact or Congo red (CR) induction. However, how IpaD is involved in secretion control and translocon insertion remains not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotypic analysis of 20 10-amino acids deletion variants all along the coiled-coil and the central domains of IpaD (residues 131-332). Our results highlight three classes of T3S phenotype; (i) wild-type secretion, (ii) constitutive secretion of all classes of effectors, and (iii) constitutive secretion of translocators and early effectors, but not of late effectors. Our data also suggest that the composition of the tip complex defines both the T3SA inducibility state and late effectors secretion. Finally, we shed light on a new aspect regarding the contact of the needle tip with cell membrane by uncoupling the Shigella abilities to escape macrophage vacuole, and to insert the translocation pore or to invade non-phagocytic cells.

  15. Grafting of functionalized [Fe(III)(salten)] complexes to Au(111) surfaces via thiolate groups: surface spectroscopic characterization and comparison of different linker designs.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Hanne; Kathirvel, Ketheeswari; Petersen, Finn; Strunskus, Thomas; Bannwarth, Alexander; Meyer, Sven; Tuczek, Felix

    2013-07-01

    Functionalization of surfaces with spin crossover complexes is an intensively studied topic. Starting from dinuclear iron(III)-salten complexes [Fe(salten)(pyS)]2(BPh4)2 and [Fe(thiotolylsalten)(NCS)]2 with disulfide-containing bridging ligands, corresponding mononuclear complexes [Fe(salten)(pyS)](+) and [Fe(thiotolylsalten)(NCS)] are covalently attached to Au(111) surfaces (pySH, pyridinethiol; salten, bis(3-salicylidene-aminopropyl)amine). The adsorbed monolayers are investigated by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Comparison of the surface vibrational spectra with bulk data allows us to draw conclusions with respect to the geometry of the adsorbed complexes. An anomaly is observed in the spectra of the surface-adsorbed monolayer of [Fe(salten)(pyS)](+), which suggests that the salten ligand is partially decoordinated from the Fe(III) center and one of its phenolate arms binds to the Au(111) surface. For complex [Fe(thiotolylsalten)(NCS)] that is bound to the Au(111) surface via a thiolate-functionalized salten ligand, this anomaly is not observed, which indicates that the coordination sphere of the complex in the bulk is retained on the surface. The implications of these results with respect to the preparation of surface-adsorbed monolayers of functional transition-metal complexes are discussed.

  16. Coproporphyrins I and III as Functional Markers of OATP1B Activity: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation in Preclinical Species.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Dai, Jun; Liu, Tongtong; Cheng, Yaofeng; Chen, Weiqi; Freeden, Chris; Zhang, Yingru; Humphreys, W Griffith; Marathe, Punit; Lai, Yurong

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B function can lead to serious clinical drug-drug interactions, thus a thorough evaluation of the potential for this type of interaction must be completed during drug development. Therefore, sensitive and specific biomarkers for OATP function that could be used in conjunction with clinical studies are currently in demand. In the present study, preclinical evaluations were conducted to characterize the suitability of coproporphyrins (CPs) I and III as markers of hepatic OATP functional activity. Active uptake of CPs I and III was observed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells singly expressing human OATP1B1 (hOATP1B1), hOATP1B3, cynomolgus monkey OATP1B1 (cOATP1B1), or cOATP1B3, as well as human and monkey hepatocytes. Cyclosporin A (100 mg/kg, oral) markedly increased the area under the curve (AUC) plasma concentrations of CPs I and III by 2.6- and 5.2-fold, while rifampicin (15 mg/kg, oral) increased the AUCs by 2.7- and 3.6-fold, respectively. As the systemic exposure increased, the excretion of both isomers in urine rose from 1.6- to 4.3-fold in monkeys. In agreement with this finding, the AUC of rosuvastatin (RSV) in cynomolgus monkeys increased when OATP1B inhibitors were coadministered. In Oatp1a/1b gene cluster knockout mice (Oatp1a/1b(-/-)), CPs in plasma and urine were significantly increased compared with wild-type animals (7.1- to 18.4-fold; P < 0.001), which were also in agreement with the changes in plasma RSV exposure (14.6-fold increase). We conclude that CPs I and III in plasma and urine are novel endogenous biomarkers reflecting hepatic OATP function, and the measurements have the potential to be incorporated into the design of early clinical evaluation. PMID:26907622

  17. Induction of Cytotoxicity in Pyridine Analogues of the Anti-metastatic Ru(III) Complex NAMI-A by Ferrocene Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Mu, Changhua; Chang, Stephanie W; Prosser, Kathleen E; Leung, Ada W Y; Santacruz, Stephanie; Jang, Thalia; Thompson, John R; Yapp, Donald T T; Warren, Jeffrey J; Bally, Marcel B; Beischlag, Timothy V; Walsby, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel ferrocene (Fc) functionalized Ru(III) complexes was synthesized and characterized. These compounds are derivatives of the anti-metastatic Ru(III) complex imidazolium [trans-RuCl4(1H-imidazole) (DMSO-S)] (NAMI-A) and are derived from its pyridine analogue (NAMI-Pyr), with direct coupling of Fc to pyridine at the 4 or 3 positions, or at the 4 position via a two-carbon linker, which is either unsaturated (vinyl) or saturated (ethyl). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-vis spectroscopic studies of the ligand exchange processes of the compounds in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) report similar solution behavior to NAMI-Pyr. However, the complex with Fc substitution at the 3 position of the coordinated pyridine shows greater solution stability, through resistance to the formation of oligomeric species. Further EPR studies of the complexes with human serum albumin (hsA) indicate that the Fc groups enhance noncoordinate interactions with the protein and help to inhibit the formation of protein-coordinated species, suggesting the potential for enhanced bioavailability. Cyclic voltammetry measurements demonstrate that the Fc groups modestly reduce the reduction potential of the Ru(III) center as compared to NAMI-Pyr, while the reduction potentials of the Fc moieties of the four compounds vary by 217 mV, with the longer linkers giving significantly lower values of E1/2. EPR spectra of the compounds with 2-carbon linkers show the formation of a high-spin Fe(III) species (S = 5/2) in PBS with a distinctive signal at g = 4.3, demonstrating oxidation of the Fe(II) ferrocene center and likely reflecting degradation products. Density functional theory calculations and paramagnetic (1)H NMR describe delocalization of spin density onto the ligands and indicate that the vinyl linker could be a potential pathway for electron transfer between the Ru and Fe centers. In the case of the ethyl linker, electron transfer is suggested to occur via an indirect

  18. Induction of Cytotoxicity in Pyridine Analogues of the Anti-metastatic Ru(III) Complex NAMI-A by Ferrocene Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Mu, Changhua; Chang, Stephanie W; Prosser, Kathleen E; Leung, Ada W Y; Santacruz, Stephanie; Jang, Thalia; Thompson, John R; Yapp, Donald T T; Warren, Jeffrey J; Bally, Marcel B; Beischlag, Timothy V; Walsby, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel ferrocene (Fc) functionalized Ru(III) complexes was synthesized and characterized. These compounds are derivatives of the anti-metastatic Ru(III) complex imidazolium [trans-RuCl4(1H-imidazole) (DMSO-S)] (NAMI-A) and are derived from its pyridine analogue (NAMI-Pyr), with direct coupling of Fc to pyridine at the 4 or 3 positions, or at the 4 position via a two-carbon linker, which is either unsaturated (vinyl) or saturated (ethyl). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-vis spectroscopic studies of the ligand exchange processes of the compounds in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) report similar solution behavior to NAMI-Pyr. However, the complex with Fc substitution at the 3 position of the coordinated pyridine shows greater solution stability, through resistance to the formation of oligomeric species. Further EPR studies of the complexes with human serum albumin (hsA) indicate that the Fc groups enhance noncoordinate interactions with the protein and help to inhibit the formation of protein-coordinated species, suggesting the potential for enhanced bioavailability. Cyclic voltammetry measurements demonstrate that the Fc groups modestly reduce the reduction potential of the Ru(III) center as compared to NAMI-Pyr, while the reduction potentials of the Fc moieties of the four compounds vary by 217 mV, with the longer linkers giving significantly lower values of E1/2. EPR spectra of the compounds with 2-carbon linkers show the formation of a high-spin Fe(III) species (S = 5/2) in PBS with a distinctive signal at g = 4.3, demonstrating oxidation of the Fe(II) ferrocene center and likely reflecting degradation products. Density functional theory calculations and paramagnetic (1)H NMR describe delocalization of spin density onto the ligands and indicate that the vinyl linker could be a potential pathway for electron transfer between the Ru and Fe centers. In the case of the ethyl linker, electron transfer is suggested to occur via an indirect

  19. Electronic states of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers: Extreme-ultra violet excited photoelectron spectroscopy observations and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sasaki, Fumio; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Ishitsuka, Tomoaki; Tomie, Toshihisa; Ootsuka, Teruhisa; Watanabe, Shuji; Shimoi, Yukihiro; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2013-02-28

    We have investigated electronic states in the valence electron bands for the thin films of three thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) compounds, 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)thiophene (BP1T), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)benzene (AC5), and 1,4-bis{l_brace}5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]thiophen-2-yl{r_brace}benzene (AC5-CF{sub 3}), by using extreme-UV excited photoelectron spectroscopy (EUPS). By comparing both EUPS spectra and secondary electron spectra between AC5 and AC5-CF{sub 3}, we confirm that CF{sub 3} substitution to AC5 deepens valence states by 2 eV, and increases the ionization energy by 3 eV. From the cut-off positions of secondary electron spectra, the work functions of AC5, AC5-CF{sub 3}, and BP1T are evaluated to be 3.8 eV, 4.8 eV, and 4.0 eV, respectively. We calculate molecular orbital (MO) energy levels by the density functional theory and compare results of calculations with those of experiments. Densities of states obtained by broadening MO levels well explain the overall features of experimental EUPS spectra of three TPCOs.

  20. Novel europium (III)-gatifloxacin complex structure with dual functionality for pH sensing and metal recognition in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Muhua; Zheng, Yuhui; Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Qianming

    2016-10-01

    A new type of Eu(III)-gatifloxacin complex with characteristic red luminescence has been prepared. Due to the presence of ionization effect linked to the organic chromophore, the molecular fluorescent sensor demonstrated variable pH-sensitive absorption and emission curves. The red emission derived from europium ions was strong during pH range 8-10. Between pH = 7 and 4, the europium emission remained relatively stable and fluorescence signals of gatifloxacin has been improved substantially. Under acidic conditions (pH = 1 to 3), the dramatic changes in the emission colors (from red, yellow to green) were clearly observed. Moreover, the excitation wavelength can be extended into the visible light range (Ex = 411 nm) by using the concentration effect experiment. Importantly, it gave turn-off emissions in the presence of Cu2+ or Fe3+ and the detection limits were determined to be 6.5 μM for Cu2+ and 6.2 μM for Fe3+ respectively.

  1. Functional Interaction between Type III-Secreted Protein IncA of Chlamydophila psittaci and Human G3BP1

    PubMed Central

    Borth, Nicole; Litsche, Katrin; Franke, Claudia; Sachse, Konrad; Saluz, Hans Peter; Hänel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydophila (Cp.) psittaci, the causative agent of psittacosis in birds and humans, is the most important zoonotic pathogen of the family Chlamydiaceae. These obligate intracellular bacteria are distinguished by a unique biphasic developmental cycle, which includes proliferation in a membrane-bound compartment termed inclusion. All Chlamydiaceae spp. possess a coding capacity for core components of a Type III secretion apparatus, which mediates specific delivery of anti-host effector proteins either into the chlamydial inclusion membrane or into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Here we describe the interaction between Type III-secreted protein IncA of Cp. psittaci and host protein G3BP1 in a yeast two-hybrid system. In GST-pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments both in vitro and in vivo interaction between full-length IncA and G3BP1 were shown. Using fluorescence microscopy, the localization of G3BP1 near the inclusion membrane of Cp. psittaci-infected Hep-2 cells was demonstrated. Notably, infection of Hep-2 cells with Cp. psittaci and overexpression of IncA in HEK293 cells led to a decrease in c-Myc protein concentration. This effect could be ascribed to the interaction between IncA and G3BP1 since overexpression of an IncA mutant construct disabled to interact with G3BP1 failed to reduce c-Myc concentration. We hypothesize that lowering the host cell c-Myc protein concentration may be part of a strategy employed by Cp. psittaci to avoid apoptosis and scale down host cell proliferation. PMID:21304914

  2. A system for identifying post-invasion functions of invasion genes: requirements for the Mxi-Spa type III secretion pathway of Shigella flexneri in intercellular dissemination.

    PubMed

    Schuch, R; Sandlin, R C; Maurelli, A T

    1999-11-01

    Invasion and intercellular spread are hallmarks of Shigella pathogenicity. Invasion of the eukaryotic cell cytosol requires a type III secretion system (Mxi-Spa) and its cognate set of secreted Ipa invasins. Once intracellular, the IcsA protein directs a form of actin-based motility that helps to drive intracellular bacterial movement, formation of cellular protrusions and cell-to-cell spread. Work in our laboratory has focused on identifying additional factors required for this intercellular form of dissemination. In this study, we sought to identify novel contributions of the type III secretion pathway to post-invasion-specific processes, distinct from its previously characterized roles in invasion. Studies of post-invasion Ipa and Mxi-Spa functions are complicated by an absolute requirement for these virulence proteins in invasion. To circumvent this problem, we developed a system called TIER (for test of intracellular expression requirements), whereby specific ipa, mxi or spa loci are transiently expressed before infection of tissue culture cell monolayers (thus supporting invasion), but then repressed after invasion in the intracellular environment. Such invasive type III secretion mutants (called TIER mutants) were severely restricted in their ability to spread intercellularly and form plaques in confluent tissue culture cell monolayers. Intercellular spread defects were associated with the repression of most type III pathway components examined, including structural (MxiM and Spa33), secreted effector (IpaB, IpaC and IpaD) and regulatory elements (VirF and VirB). A kinetic analysis of bacterial growth in L2 cell monolayers showed that each of the TIER mutants was defective with respect to long-term intracellular proliferation and viability. Examination of TIER mutant-infected monolayers by electron microscopy revealed that the type III pathway was required for a late step in intercellular spread - bacterial escape from protrusion-derived, double

  3. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operations and the maintenance and repair of property and equipment of all types and classes, regardless of... periodic maintenance operations and the maintenance and repair of property and equipment of all types and... in function 5400 Maintenance, or function 6400 Aircraft and Traffic Servicing. 5400Maintenance....

  4. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) study on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in 2-hydroxybenzoyl compounds: Significance of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Xin; Yang, Dapeng; Sui, Xiao; Wang, Dandan

    2013-02-01

    The excited-state properties of intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in methyl salicylate (MS) and its effects on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) have been investigated using theoretical methods. From the geometric optimization and IR spectra in the ground and excited states calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods respectively, the IMHB is demonstrated to be significantly strengthened upon excitation to excited state S1. Thereby, the ESIPT is facilitated by the excited-state IMHB strengthening since ESIPT takes place through IMHB. In addition, the absorption and fluorescence peaks of the S1 state are also calculated using the TD-DFT method. It is noted that the calculated spectra are in good agreement with the experimental results, which has confirmed the ESIPT mechanism of MS first proposed by Weller. Moreover, other four 2-hydroxybenzoyl compounds forming strong IMHB are investigated to understand the effect of substituent R on the ESIPT process. We find that the hydrogen bond strength can be controlled by the inductive field effect of the substituent. Thus it is inferred that the ESIPT reaction can be facilitated by the inductive effect of electron-donating substituent.

  5. Functional FLT1 genetic variation is a prognostic factor for recurrence in stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glubb, Dylan M.; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Jiang, Chen; Crona, Daniel; Etheridge, Amy S.; Mirza, Osman; Zhang, Wei; Seiser, Eric L.; Rzyman, Witold; Jassem, Jacek; Auman, Todd; Hirsch, Fred R.; Owzar, Kouros; Camps, Carlos; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Innocenti, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis We propose that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of the VEGF-pathway of angiogenesis will associate with survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Fifty-three SNPs in VEGF-pathway genes were genotyped in 150 European stage I-III NSCLC patients and tested for associations with patient survival. Replication was performed in an independent cohort of 142 European stage I-III patients. Reporter gene assays were used to assess the effects of SNPs on transcriptional activity. Results In the initial cohort, five SNPs associated (q<0.05) with relapse-free survival (RFS). The minor alleles of intronic FLT1 SNPs, rs7996030 and rs9582036, associated with reduced RFS (HR=1.67 [95% CI, 1.22 to 2.29] and HR=1.51 [95% CI, 1.14 to 2.01], respectively) and reduced transcriptional activity. The minor alleles of intronic KRAS SNPs, rs12813551 and rs10505980, associated with increased RFS (HR=0.64 [0.46 to 0.87] and HR=0.64 [0.47 to 0.87], respectively) and the minor allelic variant of rs12813551 also reduced transcriptional activity. Lastly, the minor allele of the intronic KRAS SNP rs10842513 associated with reduced RFS (HR=1.65 [95% CI, 1.16 to 2.37]). Analysis of the functional variants suggests they are located in transcriptional enhancer elements. The negative effect of rs9582036 on RFS was confirmed in the replication cohort (HR=1.69 [0.99 to 2.89], p=0.028) and the association was significant in pooled analysis of both cohorts (HR=1.67 [1.21-2.30], p=0.0001). Conclusions The functional FLT1 variant rs9582036 is a prognostic determinant of recurrence in stage I-III NSCLC. Its predictive value should be tested in the adjuvant setting of stage I-III NSCLC. PMID:26134224

  6. Experimental and calculated excitation functions for discrete-line gamma-ray production due to 1-40 MeV neutron interactions with sup 56 Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.; Fu, C.Y.; Hetrick, D.M.; Larson, D.C.; Todd, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Measuring cross sections for gamma-ray production from tertiary reactions is one of the ways to gain experimental information about these reactions. To this end, inelastic and other nonelastic neutron interactions with {sup 56}Fe have been studied for incident neutron energies between 0.8 and 41 MeV. An iron sample isotopically enriched in the mass 56 isotope was used. Gamma rays representing 70 transitions among levels in residual nuclei were identified, and production cross sections were deduced. The reactions studies were {sup 56}Fe(n,n{prime}){sup 56}Fe, {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn, {sup 56}Fe(n,2n){sup 55}Fe, {sup 56}Fe(n,d + n,np){sup 55}Mn, {sup 56}Fe(n, t + n, nd + n,2np){sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Fe(n,{alpha}){sup 53}Cr, {sup 56}Fe(n,n{alpha}){sup 52}Cr, and {sup 56}Fe(n,3n){sup 54}Fe. Experimental excitation functions have been compared with cross sections calculated using the nuclear reaction model code TNG, with generally favorable results. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Excitation function for the production of {sup 262}Bh (Z=107) in the odd-Z-projectile reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 55}Mn, n)

    SciTech Connect

    Folden, C.M. III; Nelson, S.L.; Duellmann, Ch.E.; Schwantes, J.M.; Zielinski, P.M.; Nitsche, H.; Hoffman, D.C.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K.E.

    2006-01-15

    The excitation function for production of {sup 262}Bh in the odd-Z-projectile reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 55}Mn, n) has been measured at three projectile energies using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. In total, 33 decay chains originating from {sup 262}Bh and 2 decay chains originating from {sup 261}Bh were observed. The measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. The maximum cross section of 540{sub -150}{sup +180} pb is observed at a lab-frame center-of-target energy of 264.0 MeV and is more than five times larger than that expected based on previously reported results for production of {sup 262}Bh in the analogous even-Z-projectile reaction {sup 209}Bi({sup 54}Cr, n). Our results indicate that the optimum beam energy in one-neutron-out heavy-ion fusion reactions can be estimated simply using the optimum energy rule proposed by SwiaPtecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski.

  8. Excitation function for the production of 262Bh (Z = 107) in theodd-Z projectile reaction 208Pb(55Mn, n)

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, C.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Schwantes, J.M.; Sudowe, R.; Zielinski, P.M.; Gregorich, K.E.; Nitsche, H.; Hoffman, D.C.

    2005-05-16

    The excitation function for production of 262Bh in the odd-Z-projectile reaction 208Pb(55Mn,n) has been measured at three projectile energies using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. In total, 33 decay chains originating from 262Bh and 2 decay chains originating from 261Bh were observed. The measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. The maximum cross section of 540 +180 - 150 pb is observed at a lab-frame center-of-target energy of 264.0 MeV and is more than fives times larger than that expected based on previously reported results for production of 262Bh in the analogous even-Z-projectile reaction 209Bi(54Cr,n). Our results indicate that the optimum beam energy in one-neutron-out heavy-ion fusion reactions can be estimated simply using the ''Optimum Energy Rule'' proposed by Swiatecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski.

  9. Molecular orbital studies (hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity, and first electron excitation), vibrational investigation and theoretical NBO analysis of 2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzaldehyde by density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataraj, A.; Balachandran, V.; Karthick, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out using Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the range 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-100 cm-1, respectively, for the 2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzaldehyde (HBB). The experimental spectra were recorded in the solid phase. The fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of vibrational bands were evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) with the standard B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) method and basis set. Normal co-ordinate calculations were performed with the DFT force field corrected by a recommended set of scaling factors yielding fairly good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. Simulation of infrared and Raman spectra utilizing the results of these calculations led to excellent overall agreement with the observed spectral patterns. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. The optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) were compared with experimental values of related compound. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions and the charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The directly calculated ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), electronegativity (χ), electrophilicity index (ω), hardness (η), chemical potential (μ), and first electron excitation (τ) are all correlated with the HOMO and LUMO energies with their molecular properties. These show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Furthermore, molecular electrostatic potential maps (MESP) of the molecule have been calculated.

  10. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, Tino; Summers, Jeffery J.; Hinder, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE) and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group) or the vertex (SHAM group). Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning. PMID:26167305

  11. Description of excited states in [Re(Imidazole)(CO)3 (Phen)](+) including solvent and spin-orbit coupling effects: Density functional theory versus multiconfigurational wavefunction approach.

    PubMed

    Fumanal, Maria; Daniel, Chantal

    2016-10-15

    The low-lying electronic excited states of [Re(imidazole)(CO)3 (phen)](+) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) ranging between 420 nm and 330 nm have been calculated by means of relativistic spin-orbit time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and wavefunction approaches (state-average-CASSCF/CASPT2). A direct comparison between the theoretical absorption spectra obtained with different methods including SOC and solvent corrections for water points to the difficulties at describing on the same footing the bands generated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT), intraligand (IL) transition, and ligand-to-Ligand- charge transfer (LLCT). While TD-DFT and three-roots-state-average CASSCF (10,10) reproduce rather well the lowest broad MLCT band observed in the experimental spectrum between 420 nm and 330 nm, more flexible wavefunctions enlarged either by the number of roots or by the number of active orbitals and electrons destabilize the MLCT states by introducing IL and LLCT character in the lowest part of the absorption spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27510636

  12. Linker mutations dissociate the function of synaptotagmin I during evoked and spontaneous release and reveal membrane penetration as a step during excitation-secretion coupling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huisheng; Bai, Hua; Xue, Renhao; Takahashi, Hirohide; Edwardson, J. Michael; Chapman, Edwin R.

    2014-01-01

    The Ca2+ sensor for rapid synaptic vesicle exocytosis, synaptotagmin I (syt), is largely composed of two Ca2+-sensing C2-domains, C2A and C2B. We have investigated the apparent synergy between the tandem C2 domains by altering the length and rigidity of the linker that connects them. The behavior of the linker mutants revealed a correlation between the ability of the C2-domains to penetrate membranes in response to Ca2+ and to drive evoked neurotransmitter release in cultured mouse neurons, uncovering a step in excitation-secretion coupling. Atomic force microscopy experiments indicate that the synergy between these C2-domains involves intra-molecular interactions between them. Thus, syt function is profoundly affected by changes in the physical nature of the linker that connects its tandem C2-domains. Moreover, the linker mutations uncoupled syt-mediated regulation of evoked and spontaneous release, revealing that syt also acts as a fusion clamp prior to the Ca2+ trigger. PMID:24657966

  13. Reaction mechanism in the {sup 16}O+{sup 27}Al system: Measurements and analysis of excitation functions and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Singh, Devendra P.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H. D.

    2007-06-15

    To study the dynamics of heavy ion fusion reactions in the lower mass region, experiments were carried out to measure the cross sections of radioactive residues produced in the interaction of the {sup 16}O ion with {sup 27}Al target nucleus at 19 different energies in very close intervals covering the energy range from {approx_equal}58 to 94 MeV, using the well-known recoil catcher off-line {gamma}-ray spectroscopy technique. The simulation of experimental data was performed using statistical-model-based computer codes, viz., CASCADE, PACE2, and ALICE-91. The analysis of measured excitation functions indicates that these residues are likely to be produced by complete fusion, incomplete fusion, and direct reaction processes. Furthermore, to confirm the contribution of different reaction channels, a complementary experiment was performed that measured the angular distributions of the residues produced in the {sup 16}O+{sup 27}Al system at 85 MeV beam energy. The analysis of the results of both experiments indicates that at these energies, the direct reactions compete with complete fusion and incomplete fusion reaction processes.

  14. Excitation function of the alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on enriched 116Cd, production of the theranostic isotope 117mSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.; Aikawa, M.; Szűcs, Z.; Saito, M.

    2016-10-01

    117mSn is one of the radioisotopes can be beneficially produced through alpha particle irradiation. The targets were prepared by deposition of 116Cd metal onto high purity 12 μm thick Cu backing. The average deposited thickness was 21.9 μm. The beam energy was thoroughly measured by Time of Flight (TOF) methods and proved to be 51.2 MeV. For the experiment the well-established stacked foil technique was used. In addition to the Cd targets, Ti foils were also inserted into the stacks for energy and intensity monitoring. The Cu backings were also used for monitoring and as recoil catcher of the reaction products from the cadmium layer. The activities of the irradiated foils were measured with HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry and cross section values were determined. As a result excitation functions for the formation of 117mSn, 117m,gIn, 116mIn, 115mIn and 115m,gCd from enriched 116Cd were deduced and compared with the available literature data and with the results of the nuclear reaction model code calculations EMPIRE 3.2 and TALYS 1.8. Yield curves were also deduced for the measured nuclear reactions and compared with the literature.

  15. Description of excited states in [Re(Imidazole)(CO)3 (Phen)](+) including solvent and spin-orbit coupling effects: Density functional theory versus multiconfigurational wavefunction approach.

    PubMed

    Fumanal, Maria; Daniel, Chantal

    2016-10-15

    The low-lying electronic excited states of [Re(imidazole)(CO)3 (phen)](+) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) ranging between 420 nm and 330 nm have been calculated by means of relativistic spin-orbit time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and wavefunction approaches (state-average-CASSCF/CASPT2). A direct comparison between the theoretical absorption spectra obtained with different methods including SOC and solvent corrections for water points to the difficulties at describing on the same footing the bands generated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT), intraligand (IL) transition, and ligand-to-Ligand- charge transfer (LLCT). While TD-DFT and three-roots-state-average CASSCF (10,10) reproduce rather well the lowest broad MLCT band observed in the experimental spectrum between 420 nm and 330 nm, more flexible wavefunctions enlarged either by the number of roots or by the number of active orbitals and electrons destabilize the MLCT states by introducing IL and LLCT character in the lowest part of the absorption spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Theoretical studies of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Besley, Nicholas A.

    2014-10-06

    Time-dependent density functional theory is the most widely used quantum chemical method for studying molecules in electronically excited states. However, excited states can also be computed within Kohn-Sham density functional theory by exploiting methods that converge the self-consistent field equations to give excited state solutions. The usefulness of single reference self-consistent field based approaches for studying excited states is demonstrated by considering the calculation of several types of spectroscopy including the infrared spectroscopy of molecules in an electronically excited state, the rovibrational spectrum of the NO-Ar complex, core electron binding energies and the emission spectroscopy of BODIPY in water.

  17. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  18. Modeling the chelation of As(III) in lewisite by dithiols using density functional theory and solvent-assisted proton exchange.

    PubMed

    Harper, Lenora K; Bayse, Craig A

    2015-12-01

    Dithiols such as British anti-lewisite (BAL, rac-2,3-dimercaptopropanol) are an important class of antidotes for the blister agent lewisite (trans-2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine) and, more generally, are chelating agents for arsenic and other toxic metals. The reaction of the vicinal thiols of BAL with lewisite through the chelation of the As(III) center has been modeled using density functional theory (DFT) and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE), a microsolvation method that uses a network of water molecules to mimic the role of bulk solvent in models of aqueous phase chemical reactions. The small activation barriers for the stepwise SN2-type nucleophilic attack of BAL on lewisite (0.7-4.9kcal/mol) are consistent with the favorable leaving group properties of the chloride and the affinity of As(III) for soft sulfur nucleophiles. Small, but insignificant, differences in activation barriers were found for the initial attack of the primary versus secondary thiol of BAL and the R vs S enantiomer. An examination of the relative stability of various dithiol-lewisite complexes shows that ethanedithiols like BAL form the most favorable chelation complexes because the angles formed in five-membered ring are most consistent with the hybridization of As(III). More obtuse S-As-S angles are required for larger chelate rings, but internal As⋯N or As⋯O interactions can enhance the stability of moderate-sized rings. The low barriers for lewisite detoxification by BAL and the greater stability of the chelation complexes of small dithiols are consistent with the rapid reversal of toxicity demonstrated in previously reported animal models.

  19. Oxidative debromination and degradation of tetrabromo-bisphenol A by a functionalized silica-supported iron(III)-tetrakis(p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qianqian; Mizutani, Yusuke; Maeno, Shohei; Fukushima, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a commonly used brominated flame retardant, also functions as an endocrine disruptor. Thus, the degradation of TBBPA has attracted considerable interest among the scientific community. Iron(III)-porphyrin complexes are generally regarded as "green" catalysts and have been reported to catalyze the efficient degradation and dehalogenation of halogenated phenols in environmental wastewaters. However, they are quickly deactivated due to self-degradation in the presence of an oxygen donor, such as KHSO₅. In the present study, an iron(III)-tetrakis (p-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrin (FeTPPS) was immobilized on imidazole-modified silica (FeTPPS/IPS) via coordination of the Fe(III) with the nitrogen atom in imidazole to suppress self-degradation and thus enhance the catalyst reusability. The oxidative degradation and debromination of TBBPA and the influence of humic acid (HA), a major component in leachates, on the oxidation of TBBPA was investigated. More than 95% of the TBBPA was degraded in the pH range from 3 to 8 in the absence of HA, while the optimal pH for the reaction was at pH 8 in the presence of HA. Although the rate of degradation was decreased in the presence of HA, over 95% of the TBBPA was degraded within 12 h in the presence of 28 mg-C L⁻¹ of HA. At pH 8, the FeTPPS/IPS catalyst could be reused up to 10 times without any detectable loss of activity for TBBPA for degradation and debromination, even in the presence of HA. PMID:23666004

  20. Raptor ablation in skeletal muscle decreases Cav1.1 expression and affects the function of the excitation-contraction coupling supramolecular complex.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rubén J; Mosca, Barbara; Treves, Susan; Maj, Marcin; Bergamelli, Leda; Calderon, Juan C; Bentzinger, C Florian; Romanino, Klaas; Hall, Michael N; Rüegg, Markus A; Delbono, Osvaldo; Caputo, Carlo; Zorzato, Francesco

    2015-02-15

    The protein mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase regulating a number of biochemical pathways controlling cell growth. mTOR exists in two complexes termed mTORC1 and mTORC2. Regulatory associated protein of mTOR (raptor) is associated with mTORC1 and is essential for its function. Ablation of raptor in skeletal muscle results in several phenotypic changes including decreased life expectancy, increased glycogen deposits and alterations of the twitch kinetics of slow fibres. In the present paper, we show that in muscle-specific raptor knockout (RamKO), the bulk of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is mainly associated in its cAMP-non-stimulated form with sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. In addition, 3[H]-ryanodine and 3[H]-PN200-110 equilibrium binding show a ryanodine to dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) ratio of 0.79 and 1.35 for wild-type (WT) and raptor KO skeletal muscle membranes respectively. Peak amplitude and time to peak of the global calcium transients evoked by supramaximal field stimulation were not different between WT and raptor KO. However, the increase in the voltage sensor-uncoupled RyRs leads to an increase of both frequency and mass of elementary calcium release events (ECRE) induced by hyper-osmotic shock in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibres from raptor KO. The present study shows that the protein composition and function of the molecular machinery involved in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling is affected by mTORC1 signalling.

  1. Cell wall-bound cationic and anionic class III isoperoxidases of pea root: biochemical characterization and function in root growth.

    PubMed

    Kukavica, Biljana M; Veljovicc-Jovanovicc, Sonja D; Menckhoff, Ljiljana; Lüthje, Sabine

    2012-07-01

    Cell wall isolated from pea roots was used to separate and characterize two fractions possessing class III peroxidase activity: (i) ionically bound proteins and (ii) covalently bound proteins. Modified SDS-PAGE separated peroxidase isoforms by their apparent molecular weights: four bands of 56, 46, 44, and 41kDa were found in the ionically bound fraction (iPOD) and one band (70kDa) was resolved after treatment of the cell wall with cellulase and pectinase (cPOD). Isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns for iPODs and cPODs were significantly different: five iPODs with highly cationic pI (9.5-9.2) were detected, whereas the nine cPODs were anionic with pI values between pH 3.7 and 5. iPODs and cPODs showed rather specific substrate affinity and different sensitivity to inhibitors, heat, and deglycosylation treatments. Peroxidase and oxidase activities and their IEF patterns for both fractions were determined in different zones along the root and in roots of different ages. New iPODs with pI 9.34 and 9.5 were induced with root growth, while the activity of cPODs was more related to the formation of the cell wall in non-elongating tissue. Treatment with auxin that inhibits root growth led to suppression of iPOD and induction of cPOD. A similar effect was obtained with the widely used elicitor, chitosan, which also induced cPODs with pI 5.3 and 5.7, which may be specifically related to pathogen defence. The differences reported here between biochemical properties of cPOD and iPOD and their differential induction during development and under specific treatments implicate that they are involved in specific and different physiological processes. PMID:22760472

  2. SseBCD Proteins Are Secreted by the Type III Secretion System of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 and Function as a Translocon

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, Thomas; Deiwick, Jörg; Rappl, Catherine; Freeman, Jeremy A.; Schröder, Werner; Miller, Samuel I.; Hensel, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The type III secretion system encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) is required for systemic infections and intracellular accumulation of Salmonella enterica. This system is induced by intracellular Salmonella and subsequently transfers effector proteins into the host cell. Growth conditions either inducing expression of the type III secretion system or the secretion of substrate proteins were defined. Here we report the identification of a set of substrate proteins consisting of SseB, SseC, and SseD that are secreted by the SPI2 system in vitro. Secretion was observed if bacterial cells were exposed to acidic pH after growth in minimal medium with limitation of Mg2+ or phosphate. SseB, -C, and -D were isolated in a fraction detached from the bacterial cell surface by mechanical shearing, indicating that these proteins are predominantly assembled into complexes on the bacterial cell surface. The three proteins were required for the translocation of SPI2 effector proteins SspH1 and SspH2 into infected host cells. Thus, SseB, SseC, and SseD function as the translocon for effector proteins by intracellular Salmonella. PMID:11567004

  3. X-ray characterization of tripyridinium bis[tetrabromidoferrate(III)] bromide asymmetric unit in solution by Debye function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniasadi, F.; Sahraei, N.; Fathi, M. B.; Tehranchi, M. M.; Safari, N.; Amani, V.

    2016-09-01

    Abundant asymmetric unit of the [FeBr4]2[py.H]3Br magnetic molecule in the acetonitrile solvent was characterized via Debye function analysis (DFA) of the X-ray powder diffraction pattern from dilute solution. A diluted solution of the material in acetonitrile solvent has been prepared to reduce, as far as possible, the interaction between the molecular units. The X-ray diffraction from the sample was measured and Debye function simulations of three out of ten chemically plausible molecular units were observed to suitably comply with the experimental results. These three configurations were further optimized with first-principles method in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) and the most stable structure according to the calculated total energy is presented.

  4. Viewing Instructions Accompanying Action Observation Modulate Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David J.; McCormick, Sheree A.; Williams, Jacqueline; Holmes, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Action observation interventions may have the potential to contribute to improved motor function in motor (re)learning settings by promoting functional activity and plasticity in the motor regions of the brain. Optimal methods for delivering such interventions, however, have yet to be established. This experiment investigated the effect on corticospinal excitability of manipulating the viewing instructions provided to participants (N = 21) prior to action observation. Specifically, motor evoked potential responses measured from the right hand muscles following single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the left motor cortex were compared when participants were instructed to observe finger-thumb opposition movement sequences: (i) passively; (ii) with the intent to imitate the observed movement; or (iii) whilst simultaneously and actively imagining that they were performing the movement as they observed it. All three action observation viewing instructions facilitated corticospinal excitability to a greater extent than did observation of a static hand. In addition, the extent to which corticospinal excitability was facilitated was greater during combined observation and imagery, compared to passive observation. These findings have important implications for the design of action observation interventions in motor (re)learning settings, where instructions that encourage observers to simultaneously imagine themselves performing the observed movement may offer the current optimal method for improving motor function through action observation. PMID:26869901

  5. Switchable NLO response induced by rotation of metallacarboranes [Ni(III/IV)(C2B9H11)2](-/0) and C-,B-functionalized derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ma, Na-Na; Li, Shu-Jun; Yan, Li-Kai; Qiu, Yong-Qing; Su, Zhong-Min

    2014-04-01

    The rotary motion based on metallacarboranes around a molecular axis can be controlled by simple electron transfer processes, which provides a basis for the structure-property relationship for the nonlinear optical (NLO) switching. However, this phenomenon has not been previously reported in the development of NLO properties of metallacarboranes. In this work, the metallacarboranes [Ni(III/IV)(C2B9H11)2](-/0) and their C-,B-functionalized derivatives are studied by the density functional theory (DFT) method. By calculating relative energies, we obtained the stable states before and after rotation controlled by simple electron transfer. Then, the static and frequency-dependent second-order NLO properties were calculated by several DFT functionals. According to the TDDFT results, the large NLO responses of the studied compounds are mainly caused by substituent group-to-carborane cage charge transfer (L'LCT) and substituent group-to-metal charge transfer (L'MCT) processes. The order of first hyperpolarizabilities (β values) illustrates that the NLO response can be enhanced by introducing a strong electron-donating group. Significantly, the geometric interconversions resulting from the redox reaction of 1C/1T-6C/6T allow the NLO responses to be switched "ON" or "OFF". The B(9,9')-methoxyphenyl-functionalized derivative of nickelacarborane, having low energetic cost and large different NLO responses between two states (from 0 to 20 998 a.u.), can be an excellent switchable NLO material.

  6. Efficient cross-coupling of aryl Grignard reagents with alkyl halides by recyclable ionic iron(III) complexes bearing a bis(phenol)-functionalized benzimidazolium cation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chong-Liang; Xie, Cun-Fei; Wu, Yu-Feng; Sun, Hong-Mei; Shen, Qi; Zhang, Yong

    2013-12-14

    A novel bis(phenol)-functionalized benzimidazolium salt, 1,3-bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)benzimidazolium chloride (H3LCl, 1), was designed and used to prepare ionic iron(III) complexes of the type [H3L][FeX4] (X = Cl, 2; X = Br, 3). Both 2 and 3 were characterized by elemental analysis, Raman spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. The catalytic performances of 2 and 3 in cross-coupling reactions using aryl Grignard reagents with primary and secondary alkyl halides bearing β-hydrogens were studied. This analysis shows that complex 2 has good potential for alkyl chloride-mediated coupling. In comparison, complex 3 showed slightly lower catalytic activity. After decanting the product contained in the ethereal layer, complex 2 could be recycled at least eight times without significant loss of catalytic activity.

  7. Novel red phosphorescent polymers bearing both ambipolar and functionalized Ir(III) phosphorescent moieties for highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Lian, Meng; Yu, Yue; Yan, Xiaogang; Xu, Xianbin; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Guijiang; Wu, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel red phosphorescent polymers is successfully developed through Suzuki cross-coupling among ambipolar units, functionalized Ir(III) phosphorescent blocks, and fluorene-based silane moieties. The photophysical and electrochemical investigations indicate not only highly efficient energy-transfer from the organic segments to the phosphorescent units in the polymer backbone but also the ambipolar character of the copolymers. Benefiting from all these merits, the phosphorescent polymers can furnish organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with exceptional high electroluminescent (EL) efficiencies with a current efficiency (η L ) of 8.31 cd A(-1) , external quantum efficiency (η ext ) of 16.07%, and power efficiency (η P ) of 2.95 lm W(-1) , representing the state-of-the-art electroluminescent performances ever achieved by red phosphorescent polymers. This work here might represent a new pathway to design and synthesize highly efficient phosphorescent polymers.

  8. Efficient cross-coupling of aryl Grignard reagents with alkyl halides by recyclable ionic iron(III) complexes bearing a bis(phenol)-functionalized benzimidazolium cation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chong-Liang; Xie, Cun-Fei; Wu, Yu-Feng; Sun, Hong-Mei; Shen, Qi; Zhang, Yong

    2013-12-14

    A novel bis(phenol)-functionalized benzimidazolium salt, 1,3-bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)benzimidazolium chloride (H3LCl, 1), was designed and used to prepare ionic iron(III) complexes of the type [H3L][FeX4] (X = Cl, 2; X = Br, 3). Both 2 and 3 were characterized by elemental analysis, Raman spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. The catalytic performances of 2 and 3 in cross-coupling reactions using aryl Grignard reagents with primary and secondary alkyl halides bearing β-hydrogens were studied. This analysis shows that complex 2 has good potential for alkyl chloride-mediated coupling. In comparison, complex 3 showed slightly lower catalytic activity. After decanting the product contained in the ethereal layer, complex 2 could be recycled at least eight times without significant loss of catalytic activity. PMID:24145602

  9. A functional marker centromere with no detectable alpha-satellite, satellite III, or CENP-B protein: activation of a latent centromere?

    PubMed Central

    Voullaire, L E; Slater, H R; Petrovic, V; Choo, K H

    1993-01-01

    We report the investigation of an unusual human supernumerary marker chromosome 10 designated "mar del(10)." This marker is present together with two other marker chromosomes in the karyotype of a boy with mild developmental delay. It has a functional centromere at a primary constriction and is mitotically stable. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using alpha-satellite and satellite III DNA as probes failed to detect any signal at the primary constriction site. CENP-B protein could not be demonstrated, although the presence of at least some centromeric proteins was confirmed using a CREST antiserum. Consideration of these and other cytogenetic and FISH results supports a mechanism of formation of the mar del(10) chromosome involving the activation of a latent intercalary centromere at 10q25. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7684888

  10. Electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures from X-ray absorption near edge structure, X-ray excited optical luminescence, and density functional theory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M. W.; Yiu, Y. M. Sham, T. K.; Ward, M. J.; Liu, L.; Hu, Y.; Zapien, J. A.; Liu, Yingkai

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure and optical properties of a series of iso-electronic and iso-structural CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray excited optical luminescence at various absorption edges of Cd, S, and Se. It is found that the system exhibits compositions, with variable local structure in-between that of CdS and CdSe accompanied by tunable optical band gap between that of CdS and CdSe. Theoretical calculation using density functional theory has been carried out to elucidate the observations. It is also found that luminescence induced by X-ray excitation shows new optical channels not observed previously with laser excitation. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  11. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  12. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  13. Functional Network Overlap as Revealed by fMRI Using sICA and Its Potential Relationships with Functional Heterogeneity, Balanced Excitation and Inhibition, and Sparseness of Neuron Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D.; Worhunsky, Patrick D.; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation. PMID:25714362

  14. Photophysical effects of metal-carbon sigma bonds in ortho-metalated complexes of Ir(III) and Rh(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, S.; King, K.A.; Spellane, P.J.; Watts, R.J.

    1984-10-31

    Dichloro-bridged dimers of the type (M(L)/sub 2/Cl)/sub 2/, where L is 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) or benzo(h)quinoline (bzq) and M is Rh(III) or Ir(III), have been characterized by /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopies and by absorption and emission spectroscopies. The NMR results confirm previous formulations of the complexes as dichloro-bridged ortho-metalated dimers in halocarbon solvents but indicate that they are cleaved to monomeric species of the type M(L)/sub 2/CIS in ligating solvents such as dimethylformamide (S = solvent). The absorption spectra of each of the complexes contain several low-energy bands which are assigned as metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) transitions. All four of the dimers emit light following photoexcitation of their glassy solutions at 77 K. Their emission spectra and lifetimes lead to assignments of their emitting states as intraligand for the Rh(III) dimers and MLCT for the Ir(III) dimers. The Ir(III) dimers are also found to emit light following excitation at 295 K in deaerated dichloromethane. No emission is seen from the Rh(III) dimers under these conditions. Comparison of these results with previous results from studies of similar Rh(III) and Ir(III) complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) indicates that the ortho-metalated ligands are considerably higher than bpy and phen in the spectrochemical series. In addition to raising the energy of ligand field excited states in their complexes, relative to similar bpy and phen species, they induce lower energy charge-transfer transitions. These effects are consistent with the synergistic function of the ortho-metalated ligands as both strong sigma donors and ..pi.. acceptors.

  15. Collisional redistribution of radiation. III - The equation of motion for the correlation function and the scattered spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1980-01-01

    Computations were made of the scattering of monochromatic radiation by a degenerate atom in the binary-collision approximation for field strengths whose products of the Rabi frequency for atomic transition and the duration of a strong collision are much less than 1. An expression of motion for the correlation function is derived which does not exclude the region where thermal correlations may be neglected; the equation is valid outside the quantum-regression regime, and has a straightforward solution for practical cases. Solutions for the weak-field linear response regime are presented in terms of generalized absorption and emission profiles which depend on the indices of the atomic multipoles.

  16. Structural and Functional Similarity between the Bacterial Type III Secretion System Needle Protein PrgI and the Eukaryotic Apoptosis Bcl-2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Powers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional similarity is challenging to identify when global sequence and structure similarity is low. Active-sites or functionally relevant regions are evolutionarily more stable relative to the remainder of a protein structure and provide an alternative means to identify potential functional similarity between proteins. We recently developed the FAST-NMR methodology to discover biochemical functions or functional hypotheses of proteins of unknown function by experimentally identifying ligand binding sites. FAST-NMR utilizes our CPASS software and database to assign a function based on a similarity in the structure and sequence of ligand binding sites between proteins of known and unknown function. Methodology/Principal Findings The PrgI protein from Salmonella typhimurium forms the needle complex in the type III secretion system (T3SS). A FAST-NMR screen identified a similarity between the ligand binding sites of PrgI and the Bcl-2 apoptosis protein Bcl-xL. These ligand binding sites correlate with known protein-protein binding interfaces required for oligomerization. Both proteins form membrane pores through this oligomerization to release effector proteins to stimulate cell death. Structural analysis indicates an overlap between the PrgI structure and the pore forming motif of Bcl-xL. A sequence alignment indicates conservation between the PrgI and Bcl-xL ligand binding sites and pore formation regions. This active-site similarity was then used to verify that chelerythrine, a known Bcl-xL inhibitor, also binds PrgI. Conclusions/Significance A structural and functional relationship between the bacterial T3SS and eukaryotic apoptosis was identified using our FAST-NMR ligand affinity screen in combination with a bioinformatic analysis based on our CPASS program. A similarity between PrgI and Bcl-xL is not readily apparent using traditional global sequence and structure analysis, but was only identified because of conservation in ligand binding sites

  17. THE MOST METAL-POOR STARS. III. THE METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION AND CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR FRACTION , ,

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, David; Norris, John E.; Bessell, M. S.; Asplund, M.; Christlieb, N.; Beers, Timothy C.; Barklem, P. S.; Frebel, Anna; Ryan, S. G. E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: martin@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu E-mail: afrebel@mit.edu

    2013-01-01

    We examine the metallicity distribution function (MDF) and fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in a sample that includes 86 stars with [Fe/H] {<=} -3.0, based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectroscopy, of which some 32 objects lie below [Fe/H] = -3.5. After accounting for the completeness function, the 'corrected' MDF does not exhibit the sudden drop at [Fe/H] = -3.6 that was found in recent samples of dwarfs and giants from the Hamburg/ESO survey. Rather, the MDF decreases smoothly down to [Fe/H] = -4.1. Similar results are obtained from the 'raw' MDF. We find that the fraction of CEMP objects below [Fe/H] = -3.0 is 23% {+-} 6% and 32% {+-} 8% when adopting the Beers and Christlieb and Aoki et al. CEMP definitions, respectively. The former value is in fair agreement with some previous measurements, which adopt the Beers and Christlieb criterion.

  18. Calculation of the total electron excitation cross section in the Born approximation using Slater wave functions for the Li (2s yields 2p), Li (2s yields 3p), Na (3s yields 4p), Mg (3p yields 4s), Ca (4s yields 4p) and K (4s yields 4p) excitations. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simsic, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    Excitation of neutral atoms by inelastic scattering of incident electrons in gaseous nebulae were investigated using Slater Wave functions to describe the initial and final states of the atom. Total cross sections using the Born Approximation are calculated for: Li(2s yields 2p), Na(3s yields 4p), k(4s yields 4p). The intensity of emitted radiation from gaseous nebulae is also calculated, and Maxwell distribution is employed to average the kinetic energy of electrons.

  19. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  20. Synthesis, structure, spectra and reactivity of iron(III) complexes of imidazole and pyrazole containing ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Dhanalakshmi, Thirumanasekaran; Suresh, Eringathodi; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2009-10-21

    A series of new 1 : 1 iron(iii) complexes of the type [Fe()Cl(3)], where is a tridentate 3N donor ligand, has been isolated and studied as functional models for catechol dioxygenases. The ligands (1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-ylmethyl)pyrid-2-ylmethyl-amine (), N,N-dimethyl-N'-(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine () and N-(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-ylmethyl)-N'-phenylethane-1,2-diamine () are linear while the ligands tris(1-pyrazolyl)methane (), tris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)methane () and tris(3-iso-propylpyrazolyl)methane () are tripodal ones. All the complexes have been characterized by spectral and electrochemical methods. The X-ray crystal structure of the dinuclear catecholate adduct [Fe()(TCC)](2)O, where TCC(2-) is a tetrachlorocatecholate dianion, has been successfully determined. In this complex both the iron(iii) atoms are bridged by a mu-oxo group and each iron(iii) center possesses a distorted octahedral coordination geometry in which the ligand is facially coordinated and the remaining coordination sites are occupied by the TCC(2-) dianion. Spectral studies suggest that addition of a base like Et(3)N induces the mononuclear complex species [Fe()(TCC)Cl] to dimerize forming a mu-oxo-bridged complex. The spectral and electrochemical properties of the catecholate adducts of the complexes generated in situ reveal that a systematic variation in the ligand donor atom type significantly influences the Lewis acidity of the iron(iii) center and hence the interaction of the complexes with simple and substituted catechols. The 3,5-di-tert-butylcatecholate (DBC(2-)) adducts of the type [Fe()(DBC)Cl], where is a linear tridentate ligand (), undergo mainly oxidative intradiol cleavage of the catechol in the presence of dioxygen. Also, the extradiol-to-intradiol product selectivity (E : I) is enhanced upon removal of the coordinated chloride ion in these adducts to obtain [Fe()(DBC)(Sol)](+) and upon incorporating coordinated N-methylimidazolyl nitrogen in

  1. Detection of the nanomolar level of total Cr[(iii) and (vi)] by functionalized gold nanoparticles and a smartphone with the assistance of theoretical calculation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenwen; Cao, Fengjing; Zheng, Wenshu; Tian, Yue; Xianyu, Yunlei; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Ke; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    We report a method for rapid, effective detection of both Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) (in the form of Cr3+ and Cr2O72-, the main species of chromium in the natural environment) by making use of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The limit of detection (LOD) is 10 nM with the naked eye and the assay can be applied in detecting chromium in polluted soil from Yun-Nan Province in Southwest China. We use density functional theory to calculate the change of the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of the interactions between the DMSA-Au NP system and various metal ions, which shows that DMSA-Au NPs have high specificity for both Cr3+ and Cr2O72-.We report a method for rapid, effective detection of both Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) (in the form of Cr3+ and Cr2O72-, the main species of chromium in the natural environment) by making use of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The limit of detection (LOD) is 10 nM with the naked eye and the assay can be applied in detecting chromium in polluted soil from Yun-Nan Province in Southwest China. We use density functional theory to calculate the change of the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of the interactions between the DMSA-Au NP system and various metal ions, which shows that DMSA-Au NPs have high specificity for both Cr3+ and Cr2O72-. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ΔG of the interactions between the DMSA-AuNPs and various metal ions, models of the metal ions (Mn+) and six water molecules, DLS results for DMSA-Au NPs before and after adding Cr3+, Cr2O72-, Cr3+ and Cr2O72- mixtures, comparison of the performance of different sensors. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06726f

  2. Anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine: Part III: the “unstable” cervical spine †

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Marion

    1990-01-01

    In this, the last of the three part series on the anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine, the clinical entity-instability-is addressed. A summative definition of instability, addressing both the clinical and radiographic issues, is presented based on current available literature. The etiology of instability is discussed as it pertains to three possible mechanisms: acute trauma, latent evidence of trauma and repetitive microtrauma. The anatomical, clinical and radiographic aspects in each of these meachanisms is discussed. A case report is presented to illustrate the salient features of this potentially disastrous condition. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of defineable limits in each of the presented definitions, calling for future research into the clinical and radiographic correlations of abnormal cervical motion. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  3. A theoretical study of the structures and chemical bonds of neptunium (III) molecules by a density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yao-Peng; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Du, Lei-Qiang; Wu, Fang-Xian; Ding, Xiao-Bin

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, equilibrium structures and chemical bond characteristics of neptunium trihalide molecules NpX3 (X = F, Cl, Br and I) have been investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). The influences of the size of the relativistic effective core potential (RECP) have been examined on the molecular structures. The chemical bond characteristics have also been systematically studied by calculating the density of states (DOS), bond length differences and electronic charge distributions. We have determined that the chemical bonds are mainly ionic in those molecules, and the covalency is enhancing while ionicity decreases from NpF3 to NpI3. The calculated bond energies show that the interaction strength in NpX3 molecules becomes weaker as the halogen atoms becoming heavier.

  4. Hybrid inorganic/organic alumina adsorbents-functionalized-purpurogallin for removal and preconcentration of Cr(III), Fe(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) from underground water.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Hafez, Osama F; Osman, Maher M; Yakout, Amr A; Alrefaay, Ahmed

    2010-04-15

    Metal pollution is well recognized as one of the major environmental problems that must be imperatively addressed and solved. In this study, three types of alumina adsorbents (I-III) were physically immobilized with purporogallin as a chelating ion exchangers. These were found to exhibit strong capability and selectivity characters for a series of heavy metal ions. Surface modification of hybrid alumina was characterized and identified from the determination of surface coverage and infrared analysis. Hybrid alumina adsorbents were identified for their strong resistivity to acid leaching in pH>2-7 as well as their high thermal stability up to 350 degrees C. The ability of newly synthesized hybrid inorganic/organic alumina adsorbents (I-III) to bind and extract various metal ions was examined and evaluated in various buffer solutions (pH 1.0-7.0) via determination of the metal adsorption capacity values. These were identified as high as 420-560, 500-580 and 500-590 micromol g(-1) for alumina adsorbents (I), (II) and (III), respectively in the case of high concentration levels of Cr(III), Fe(III) and Cu(II). The influence of alumina matrices were highly characterized when low concentration levels (microg ml(-1) and ng ml(-1)) of metal ions were used. Hybrid alumina adsorbents were successfully applied for selective extraction, removal and preconcentration of various heavy metals from underground water samples with percentage recovery values of 92-100+/-1-3%. PMID:20031308

  5. Hybrid inorganic/organic alumina adsorbents-functionalized-purpurogallin for removal and preconcentration of Cr(III), Fe(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) from underground water.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Hafez, Osama F; Osman, Maher M; Yakout, Amr A; Alrefaay, Ahmed

    2010-04-15

    Metal pollution is well recognized as one of the major environmental problems that must be imperatively addressed and solved. In this study, three types of alumina adsorbents (I-III) were physically immobilized with purporogallin as a chelating ion exchangers. These were found to exhibit strong capability and selectivity characters for a series of heavy metal ions. Surface modification of hybrid alumina was characterized and identified from the determination of surface coverage and infrared analysis. Hybrid alumina adsorbents were identified for their strong resistivity to acid leaching in pH>2-7 as well as their high thermal stability up to 350 degrees C. The ability of newly synthesized hybrid inorganic/organic alumina adsorbents (I-III) to bind and extract various metal ions was examined and evaluated in various buffer solutions (pH 1.0-7.0) via determination of the metal adsorption capacity values. These were identified as high as 420-560, 500-580 and 500-590 micromol g(-1) for alumina adsorbents (I), (II) and (III), respectively in the case of high concentration levels of Cr(III), Fe(III) and Cu(II). The influence of alumina matrices were highly characterized when low concentration levels (microg ml(-1) and ng ml(-1)) of metal ions were used. Hybrid alumina adsorbents were successfully applied for selective extraction, removal and preconcentration of various heavy metals from underground water samples with percentage recovery values of 92-100+/-1-3%.

  6. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  7. Thyroid Function in Women after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer Stage II/III: Comparison With Controls From a Population Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Reinertsen, Kristin Valborg; Cvancarova, Milada; Wist, Erik; Bjoro, Trine; Dahl, Alv A.; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: A possible association between thyroid diseases (TD) and breast cancer (BC) has been debated. We examined prevalence and development of TD in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC compared with women from a general population. Secondarily, we explored the impact of two different radiotherapy (RT) techniques (standardized field arrangements vs. computed tomography [CT]-based dose planning) on TD in BC patients examined 35-120 months after primary BC treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 403 BC patients completed a questionnaire about TD and had blood samples taken for analyses of thyroid function. All had undergone postoperative RT with or without (2%) adjuvant systemic treatment. The results in the BC patients were compared with a cancer-free, age-matched control group from a general population (CGr). Results: There was higher prevalence of self-reported hypothyroidism in the BC patients as compared with the CGr (18% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). The raised prevalence was predominantly due to a substantial increase in the development of hypothyroidism after BC diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of hypothyroidism before BC diagnosis was similar to that observed in the CGr. Patients treated with CT-based RT showed a trend for increased post-BC development of hypothyroidism as compared with those treated with standardized field arrangements (p = 0.08). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is significantly increased in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC. Radiation to the thyroid gland may be a contributing factor. BC patients should be routinely screened for hypothyroidism.

  8. Ionic iron(III) complexes of bis(phenol)-functionalized imidazolium cations: synthesis, structures and catalysis for aryl Grignard cross-coupling of alkyl halides.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hai-ning; Xing, Ya-lin; Xia, Cong-liang; Sun, Hong-mei; Shen, Qi; Zhang, Yong

    2012-10-14

    A series of bis(phenol)-functionalized imidazolium salts, 1,3-bis(4,6-di-R(1)-2-hydroxybenzyl)-2-R(2)-4,5-di-R(3)-imidazolium chlorides H(3)L(n)Cl (R(1) = (t)Bu, R(2) = R(3) = H, H(3)L(1)Cl, 1; R(1) = CH(3), R(2) = R(3) = H, H(3)L(2)Cl, 2; R(1) = (t)Bu, R(2) = H, R(3) = Cl, H(3)L(3)Cl, 3; R(1) = (t)Bu, R(2) = CH(3), R(3) = H, H(3)L(4)Cl, 4), were used to produce a novel series of ionic iron(III) complexes [H(3)L(n)][FeX(4)] (n = 1, X = Cl, 5; n = 2, X = Cl, 6; n = 3, X = Cl, 7; n = 4, X = Cl, 8; n = 1, X = Br, 9; n = 3, X = Br, 10). All of the complexes were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Elemental analysis and X-ray crystallography were also used. All of the complexes were non-hygroscopic and air-stable, with five of them existing as solids (5, 7-10) and one as an oil (6) at room temperature. A preliminary catalytic study on the cross-coupling reactions of aryl Grignard reagents with primary and secondary alkyl halides bearing β-hydrogens, revealed that all of the ionic iron(III) complexes exhibited good to excellent catalytic activity. Complexes 5, 6 and 8 exhibited optimal activity, whereas 7, 9 and 10 showed only moderate activity. Furthermore, by simply decanting the cross-coupling product in the ether layer, complexes 5 and 6 could be reused in at least seven successive runs without significant loss in catalytic activity.

  9. Expression and secretion of Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 virulence genes in response to acidification exhibit differential requirements of a functional type III secretion apparatus and SsaL.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Brian K; Brown, Nat F; Valdez, Yanet; Brumell, John H; Finlay, B Brett

    2004-11-26

    Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 is pivotal to the intracellular survival of Salmonella and for virulence in mammals. SPI-2 encodes virulence factors (called effectors) that are translocated into the host cell, a type III secretion apparatus and a two-component regulatory system that regulates intracellular expression of SPI-2. Salmonella SPI-2 secretion activity appears to be induced in response to acidification of the vacuole in which it replicates. Here we show that the expression of the SPI-2 proteins, SseB and SseD (filament and pore forming components of the secretion apparatus, respectively) in response to acidification requires an intact secretion system and SsaL, a Salmonella homologue of SepL, a regulator required for type III-dependent secretion of translocators but not effectors in attaching and effacing gastrointestinal pathogens. We show that the expression of SPI-2-encoded effectors is acid-regulated but can be uncoupled from the expression of filament and translocon components, thus showing a differential requirement of SsaL for expression. The secretion and translocation of SPI-2-encoded effectors requires SsaL, but SsaL is dispensable for the secretion of SPI-2 effectors encoded in other pathogenicity loci, suggesting a secretion regulation function for SsaL. Further, we demonstrate that the differential expression of adjacent genes within the sseA operon (sseD and sseE) occurs at the transcriptional level. These data indicate that a Salmonella SPI-2 activation state is achieved by an acidregulated response that requires SsaL. These data also suggest the existence of a previously unrecognized regulatory element within SPI-2 for the "effector operon" region downstream of sseD that might demarcate the expression of translocators and effectors.

  10. The evolution of the [O II], H β and [O III] emission line luminosity functions over the last nine billions years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparat, Johan; Zhu, Guangtun; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Norberg, Peder; Newman, Jeffrey; Tresse, Laurence; Richard, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Raichoor, Anand; Prada, Francisco; Maraston, Claudia; Yèche, Christophe; Delubac, Timothée; Jullo, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Emission line galaxies are one of the main tracers of the large-scale structure to be targeted by the next-generation dark energy surveys. To provide a better understanding of the properties and statistics of these galaxies, we have collected spectroscopic data from the VVDS and DEEP2 deep surveys and estimated the galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) of three distinct emission lines, [O II}] (λ λ 3726,3729) (0.5 < z < 1.3), Hβ (λ4861) (0.3 < z < 0.8) and [O {III}] (λ 5007) (0.3 < z < 0.8). Our measurements are based on 35 639 emission line galaxies and cover a volume of ˜107 Mpc3. We present the first measurement of the Hβ LF at these redshifts. We have also compiled LFs from the literature that were based on independent data or covered different redshift ranges, and we fit the entire set over the whole redshift range with analytic Schechter and Saunders models, assuming a natural redshift dependence of the parameters. We find that the characteristic luminosity (L*) and density (φ*) of all LFs increase with redshift. Using the Schechter model over the redshift ranges considered, we find that, for [O {II}] emitters, the characteristic luminosity L*(z = 0.5) = 3.2 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.7 ± 0.2 from z = 0.5 to 1.3; for Hβ emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 1.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.0 ± 0.2 from z = 0.3 to 0.8; and for [O {III}] emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 7.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 3.5 ± 0.4 from z = 0.3 to 0.8.

  11. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  12. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Ly, Julien Q M; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-06-24

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation.

  13. Lehr's fields of campaniform sensilla in beetles (Coleoptera): functional morphology. III. Modification of elytral mobility or shape in flying beetles.

    PubMed

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Gorb, Stanislav; Radchenko, Vladimir; Gladun, Dmytro

    2015-03-01

    Some flying beetles have peculiar functional properties of their elytra, if compared with the vast majority of beetles. A "typical" beetle covers its pterothorax and the abdomen from above with closed elytra and links closed elytra together along the sutural edges. In the open state during flight, the sutural edges diverge much more than by 90°. Several beetles of unrelated taxa spread wings through lateral incisions on the elytra and turn the elytron during opening about 10-12° (Cetoniini, Scarabaeus, Gymnopleurus) or elevate their elytra without partition (Sisyphus, Tragocerus). The number of campaniform sensilla in their elytral sensory field is diminished in comparison with beetles of closely related taxa lacking that incision. Elytra are very short in rove beetles and in long-horn beetles Necydalini. The abundance of sensilla in brachyelytrous long-horn beetles Necydalini does not decrease in comparison with macroelytrous Cerambycinae. Strong reduction of the sensory field was found in brachyelytrous Staphylinidae. Lastly, there are beetles lacking the linkage of the elytra down the sutural edge (stenoelytry). Effects of stenoelytry were also not uniform: Oedemera and flying Meloidae have the normal amount of sensilla with respect to their body size, whereas the sensory field in the stenoelytrous Eulosia bombyliformis is 5-6 times less than in chafers of the same size but with normally linking broad elytra.

  14. Novel ncRNAs transcribed by Pol III and elucidation of their functional relevance by biophysical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gavazzo, Paola; Vassalli, Massimo; Costa, Delfina; Pagano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade the role of non coding (nc) RNAs in neurogenesis and in the onset of neurological diseases has been assessed by a multitude of studies. In this scenario, approximately 30 small RNA polymerase (pol) III–dependent ncRNAs were recently identified by computational tools and proposed as regulatory elements. The function of several of these transcripts was elucidated in vitro and in vivo confirming their involvement in cancer and in metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. Emerging biophysical technologies together with the introduction of a physical perspective have been advantageous in regulatory RNA investigation providing original results on: (a) the differentiation of neuroblastoma (NB) cells towards a neuron-like phenotype triggered by Neuroblastoma Differentiation Marker 29 (NDM29) ncRNA; (b) the modulation of A-type K+ current in neurons induced by the small ncRNA 38A and (c) the synthesis driven by 17A ncRNA of a GABAB2 receptor isoform unable to trigger intracellular signaling. Moreover, the application of Single Cell Force Spectroscopy (SCFS) to these studies suggests a correlation between the malignancy stage of NB and the micro-adhesive properties of the cells, allowing to investigate the molecular basis of such a correlation. PMID:24223537

  15. Lehr's fields of campaniform sensilla in beetles (Coleoptera): functional morphology. III. Modification of elytral mobility or shape in flying beetles.

    PubMed

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Gorb, Stanislav; Radchenko, Vladimir; Gladun, Dmytro

    2015-03-01

    Some flying beetles have peculiar functional properties of their elytra, if compared with the vast majority of beetles. A "typical" beetle covers its pterothorax and the abdomen from above with closed elytra and links closed elytra together along the sutural edges. In the open state during flight, the sutural edges diverge much more than by 90°. Several beetles of unrelated taxa spread wings through lateral incisions on the elytra and turn the elytron during opening about 10-12° (Cetoniini, Scarabaeus, Gymnopleurus) or elevate their elytra without partition (Sisyphus, Tragocerus). The number of campaniform sensilla in their elytral sensory field is diminished in comparison with beetles of closely related taxa lacking that incision. Elytra are very short in rove beetles and in long-horn beetles Necydalini. The abundance of sensilla in brachyelytrous long-horn beetles Necydalini does not decrease in comparison with macroelytrous Cerambycinae. Strong reduction of the sensory field was found in brachyelytrous Staphylinidae. Lastly, there are beetles lacking the linkage of the elytra down the sutural edge (stenoelytry). Effects of stenoelytry were also not uniform: Oedemera and flying Meloidae have the normal amount of sensilla with respect to their body size, whereas the sensory field in the stenoelytrous Eulosia bombyliformis is 5-6 times less than in chafers of the same size but with normally linking broad elytra. PMID:25499796

  16. Functional role of inorganic trace elements in angiogenesis part III: (Ti, Li, Ce, As, Hg, Va, Nb and Pb).

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-02-01

    Many essential elements exist in nature with significant influence on human health. Angiogenesis is vital in developmental, repair, and regenerative processes, and its aberrant regulation contributes to pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to explore the role of these elements in such a vital process. This is third in a series of reviews that serve as an overview of the role of inorganic elements in regulation of angiogenesis and vascular function. Here we will review the roles of titanium, lithium, cerium, arsenic, mercury, vanadium, niobium, and lead in these processes. The roles of other inorganic elements in angiogenesis were discussed in part I (N, Fe, Se, P, Au, and Ca) and part II (Cr, Si, Zn, Cu, and S) of these series. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanisms, and potential activities of these elements are briefly discussed. An electronic search was performed on the role of these elements in angiogenesis from January 2005 to April 2014. These elements can promote and/or inhibit angiogenesis through different mechanisms. The anti-angiogenic effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles comes from the inhibition of angiogenic processes, and not from its toxicity. Lithium affects vasculogenesis but not angiogenesis. Nanoceria treatment inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Vanadium treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced cytotoxic effects through interactions with DNA. The negative impact of mercury on endothelial cell migration and tube formation activities was dose and time dependent. Lead induced IL-8 production, which is known to promote tumor angiogenesis. Thus, understanding the impact of these elements on angiogenesis will help in development of new modalities to modulate angiogenesis under various conditions.

  17. Functional role of inorganic trace elements in angiogenesis part III: (Ti, Li, Ce, As, Hg, Va, Nb and Pb).

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-02-01

    Many essential elements exist in nature with significant influence on human health. Angiogenesis is vital in developmental, repair, and regenerative processes, and its aberrant regulation contributes to pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to explore the role of these elements in such a vital process. This is third in a series of reviews that serve as an overview of the role of inorganic elements in regulation of angiogenesis and vascular function. Here we will review the roles of titanium, lithium, cerium, arsenic, mercury, vanadium, niobium, and lead in these processes. The roles of other inorganic elements in angiogenesis were discussed in part I (N, Fe, Se, P, Au, and Ca) and part II (Cr, Si, Zn, Cu, and S) of these series. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanisms, and potential activities of these elements are briefly discussed. An electronic search was performed on the role of these elements in angiogenesis from January 2005 to April 2014. These elements can promote and/or inhibit angiogenesis through different mechanisms. The anti-angiogenic effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles comes from the inhibition of angiogenic processes, and not from its toxicity. Lithium affects vasculogenesis but not angiogenesis. Nanoceria treatment inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Vanadium treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced cytotoxic effects through interactions with DNA. The negative impact of mercury on endothelial cell migration and tube formation activities was dose and time dependent. Lead induced IL-8 production, which is known to promote tumor angiogenesis. Thus, understanding the impact of these elements on angiogenesis will help in development of new modalities to modulate angiogenesis under various conditions. PMID:26638864

  18. Ecotoxicological risks associated with land treatment of petrochemical wastes. III. Immune function and hematology of cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James; Carlson, Ruth; Janz, David; Lochmiller, Robert; Schroder, Jackie; Basta, Nicholas

    2003-02-28

    Landfarming is a widely used method of treating petrochemical waste through microbial bio-degradation. The effects of residual petrochemical contamination on wildlife, especially terrestrial mammals, are poorly understood. The effects of contaminants on the immune system and hematology of cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) living on five abandoned petrochemical landfarms (units 1-5) in Oklahoma were studied. Cotton rats were sampled seasonally (summer and winter) from each landfarm and from five ecologically matched reference sites for 2 yr (1998-2000) and returned to the laboratory for immunological and hematological assays. Overall analysis indicated that rats inhabiting landfarms exhibited decreased relative spleen size compared to rats collected from reference sites, with the landfarm at unit 1 showing the greatest reduction. Cotton rats collected from landfarms also had increased hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet levels and decreased blood leukocytes during summer. During winter, an increase in the number of popliteal node white blood cells was observed from rats collected on landfarms. No marked difference was detected for lymphocyte proliferation in response to concanavalin A, pokeweed, or interleukin-2. Lymphokine-activated killer cell lytic ability showed a seasonal pattern, but no treatment differences. No differences between landfarm and reference sites were detected in the hypersensitivity reaction of rats given an intradermal injection of phytohemagluttinin (PHA-P). Comparisons within individual sites indicated that two sites (units 1 and 3) had the greatest effects on immune function and hematology of cotton rats. The results of this study suggest that residual petrochemical waste affects the immune system and hematology of cotton rats living on abandoned landfarms during summer and is complicated by variation in the contaminants found on individual petroleum sites.

  19. THE UDF05 FOLLOW-UP OF THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD. III. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 6

    SciTech Connect

    Su Jian; Stiavelli, Massimo; Bergeron, Eddie; Bradley, Larry; Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Lucas, Ray A.; Panagia, Nino; Pavlovsky, Cheryl; Oesch, Pascal; Carollo, Marcella; Lilly, Simon; Trenti, Michele; Giavalisco, Mauro; Mobasher, Bahram

    2011-09-10

    In this paper, we present a derivation of the rest-frame 1400 A luminosity function (LF) at redshift six from a new application of the maximum likelihood method by exploring the five deepest Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) fields, i.e., the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, two UDF05 fields, and two Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. We work on the latest improved data products, which makes our results more robust than those of previous studies. We use unbinned data and thereby make optimal use of the information contained in the data set. We focus on the analysis to a magnitude limit where the completeness is larger than 50% to avoid possibly large errors in the faint end slope that are difficult to quantify. We also take into account scattering in and out of the dropout sample due to photometric errors by defining for each object a probability that it belongs to the dropout sample. We find the best-fit Schechter parameters to the z {approx} 6 LF are {alpha} = 1.87 {+-} 0.14, M{sub *} = -20.25 {+-} 0.23, and {phi}{sub *} = 1.77{sup +0.62}{sub -0.49} x 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}. Such a steep slope suggests that galaxies, especially the faint ones, are possibly the main sources of ionizing photons in the universe at redshift six. We also combine results from all studies at z {approx} 6 to reach an agreement in the 95% confidence level that -20.45 < M{sub *} < -20.05 and -1.90 < {alpha} < -1.55. The luminosity density has been found not to evolve significantly between z {approx} 6 and z {approx} 5, but considerable evolution is detected from z {approx} 6 to z {approx} 3.

  20. IGM CONSTRAINTS FROM THE SDSS-III/BOSS DR9 Lyα FOREST TRANSMISSION PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Spergel, David N.; Weinberg, David H.; Hogg, David W.; Viel, Matteo; Bolton, James S.; Bailey, Stephen; Carithers, William; Schlegel, David J.; Pieri, Matthew M.; Lundgren, Britt; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-02-01

    The Lyα forest transmission probability distribution function (PDF) is an established probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) astrophysics, especially the temperature-density relationship of the IGM. We measure the transmission PDF from 3393 Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) quasars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 9, and compare with mock spectra that include careful modeling of the noise, continuum, and astrophysical uncertainties. The BOSS transmission PDFs, measured at (z) = [2.3, 2.6, 3.0], are compared with PDFs created from mock spectra drawn from a suite of hydrodynamical simulations that sample the IGM temperature-density relationship, γ, and temperature at mean density, T {sub 0}, where T(Δ) = T {sub 0}Δ{sup γ} {sup –} {sup 1}. We find that a significant population of partial Lyman-limit systems (LLSs) with a column-density distribution slope of β{sub pLLS} ∼ – 2 are required to explain the data at the low-transmission end of transmission PDF, while uncertainties in the mean Lyα forest transmission affect the high-transmission end. After modeling the LLSs and marginalizing over mean transmission uncertainties, we find that γ = 1.6 best describes the data over our entire redshift range, although constraints on T {sub 0} are affected by systematic uncertainties. Within our model framework, isothermal or inverted temperature-density relationships (γ ≤ 1) are disfavored at a significance of over 4σ, although this could be somewhat weakened by cosmological and astrophysical uncertainties that we did not model.

  1. Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks with Six-Coordinated Ln(III) Ions and Free Functional Organic Sites for Adsorptions and Extensive Catalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Zhu, Min; Xia, Li; Wu, Yunlong; Hua, Hui; Xie, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Three chelating-amino-functionalized lanthanide metal-organic frameworks, Y-DDQ, Dy-DDQ and Eu-DDQ, were synthesized with a flexible dicarboxylate ligand based on quinoxaline (H2DDQ = N, N'-dibenzoic acid-2,3-diaminoquinoxaline). The three-dimensional framework is constructed by the H2DDQ linkers connecting the zigzag ladders, showing a net of sra topology. In the structures, one kind of Ln(III) ions metal centers are six-coordinated and thus can potentially behave as open metal sites (OMSs), while the free chelating amino groups can act as free functional organic sites (FOSs). The N2 and Ar adsorption behaviors indicate that these Ln-DDQ exhibits stable microporous frameworks with high surface area after remove of the solvents. Owing to presence of OMSs and FOSs, these MOFs show good ability of CO2, dyes captures and Lewis acid catalyst for cyanosilylation reaction. In view of the existing FOSs in the framework, Pd NPs were immobilized onto the MOFs through graft interactions between free chelating amino groups and metal ions precursor using postsynthetic modification. The well dispersed Pd@Ln-DDQs exhibit efficient and recyclable catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and they can also act as an excellent catalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions with the exposed Pd NPs. PMID:27431731

  2. Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks with Six-Coordinated Ln(III) Ions and Free Functional Organic Sites for Adsorptions and Extensive Catalytic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Zhu, Min; Xia, Li; Wu, Yunlong; Hua, Hui; Xie, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Three chelating-amino-functionalized lanthanide metal-organic frameworks, Y-DDQ, Dy-DDQ and Eu-DDQ, were synthesized with a flexible dicarboxylate ligand based on quinoxaline (H2DDQ = N, N′-dibenzoic acid-2,3-diaminoquinoxaline). The three-dimensional framework is constructed by the H2DDQ linkers connecting the zigzag ladders, showing a net of sra topology. In the structures, one kind of Ln(III) ions metal centers are six-coordinated and thus can potentially behave as open metal sites (OMSs), while the free chelating amino groups can act as free functional organic sites (FOSs). The N2 and Ar adsorption behaviors indicate that these Ln-DDQ exhibits stable microporous frameworks with high surface area after remove of the solvents. Owing to presence of OMSs and FOSs, these MOFs show good ability of CO2, dyes captures and Lewis acid catalyst for cyanosilylation reaction. In view of the existing FOSs in the framework, Pd NPs were immobilized onto the MOFs through graft interactions between free chelating amino groups and metal ions precursor using postsynthetic modification. The well dispersed Pd@Ln-DDQs exhibit efficient and recyclable catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and they can also act as an excellent catalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions with the exposed Pd NPs. PMID:27431731

  3. Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks with Six-Coordinated Ln(III) Ions and Free Functional Organic Sites for Adsorptions and Extensive Catalytic Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu; Zhu, Min; Xia, Li; Wu, Yunlong; Hua, Hui; Xie, Jimin

    2016-07-01

    Three chelating-amino-functionalized lanthanide metal-organic frameworks, Y-DDQ, Dy-DDQ and Eu-DDQ, were synthesized with a flexible dicarboxylate ligand based on quinoxaline (H2DDQ = N, N‧-dibenzoic acid-2,3-diaminoquinoxaline). The three-dimensional framework is constructed by the H2DDQ linkers connecting the zigzag ladders, showing a net of sra topology. In the structures, one kind of Ln(III) ions metal centers are six-coordinated and thus can potentially behave as open metal sites (OMSs), while the free chelating amino groups can act as free functional organic sites (FOSs). The N2 and Ar adsorption behaviors indicate that these Ln-DDQ exhibits stable microporous frameworks with high surface area after remove of the solvents. Owing to presence of OMSs and FOSs, these MOFs show good ability of CO2, dyes captures and Lewis acid catalyst for cyanosilylation reaction. In view of the existing FOSs in the framework, Pd NPs were immobilized onto the MOFs through graft interactions between free chelating amino groups and metal ions precursor using postsynthetic modification. The well dispersed Pd@Ln-DDQs exhibit efficient and recyclable catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and they can also act as an excellent catalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions with the exposed Pd NPs.

  4. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons. III. Diffusion of photo-produced H2 as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Dartois, E.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) has been proposed as one of the carbonaceous solids detected in the interstellar medium. Energetic processing of the a-C:H particles leads to the dissociation of the C-H bonds and the formation of hydrogen molecules and small hydrocarbons. Photo-produced H2 molecules in the bulk of the dust particles can diffuse out to the gas phase and contribute to the total H2 abundance. Aims: We have simulated this process in the laboratory with plasma-produced a-C:H and a-C:D analogs under astrophysically relevant conditions to investigate the dependence of the diffusion as a function of temperature. Methods: Experimental simulations were performed in a high-vacuum chamber, with complementary experiments carried out in an ultra-high-vacuum chamber. Plasma-produced a-C:H and a-C:D analogs were UV-irradiated using a microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. Molecules diffusing to the gas-phase were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer, providing a measurement of the outgoing H2 or D2 flux. By comparing the experimental measurements with the expected flux from a one-dimensional diffusion model, a diffusion coefficient D could be derived for experiments carried out at different temperatures. Results: Dependence on the diffusion coefficient D with the temperature followed an Arrhenius-type equation. The activation energy for the diffusion process was estimated (ED(H2) = 1660 ± 110 K, ED(D2) = 2090 ± 90 K), as well as the pre-exponential factor (D0(H2) = 0.0007 cm2 s-1, D0(D2) = 0.0045 cm2 s-1). Conclusions: The strong decrease of the diffusion coefficient at low dust particle temperatures exponentially increases the diffusion times in astrophysical environments. Therefore, transient dust heating by cosmic rays needs to be invoked for the release of the photo-produced H2 molecules in cold photon-dominated regions, where destruction of the aliphatic component in hydrogenated amorphous carbons most probably takes place.

  5. Luminescent properties of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes with para- and ortho-ethoxybenzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyushkin, V. T.; Mutuzova, M. Kh.; Shamsutdinova, M. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    The luminescent properties of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes with para- and ortho-ethoxybenzoic acids are studied. The excitation energies of the triplet states of ligands are determined, a hypothesis is made about the efficient luminescence of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes, the geometry of the coordination polyhedron of a europium complex is established, and the luminescence quantum yields of the complexes in solution are determined.

  6. Pair Excitations in Fermi Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Helga M.; Krotscheck, Eckhard; Schörkhuber, Karl; Springer, Josef

    2006-09-01

    We present a theory of multi-pair excitations in strongly interacting Fermi systems. Based on an equations-of-motion approach for time-dependent pair correlations it leads to a qualitatively new structure of the density-density response function. Our theory reduces to both, i) the "correlated" random-phase approximation (RPA) for fermions if the two-pair excitations are ignored, and ii) the correlated Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory for bosons in the appropriate limit. The theory preserves the two first energy-weighted sum rules. A familiar problem of the standard RPA is that its zero-sound mode is energetically much higher than found in experiments. The popular cure of introducing an average effective mass in the Lindhard function violates sum rules and describes the physics incorrectly. We demonstrate that the inclusion of correlated pair excitations gives the correct dispersion. As in 4He, a modification of the effective mass is unnecessary also in 3He.

  7. A prevalidation study on the in vitro skin irritation function test (SIFT) for prediction of acute skin irritation in vivo: results and evaluation of ECVAM Phase III.

    PubMed

    Heylings, J R; Diot, S; Esdaile, D J; Fasano, W J; Manning, L A; Owen, H M

    2003-04-01

    A prevalidation study sponsored by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) on in vitro tests for acute skin irritation is aimed at identifying non-animal tests capable of discriminating irritants (I) from non-irritants (NI), as defined according to European Union and OECD. This paper reports on Phase III for one of the methods, the skin integrity function test (SIFT), assessing the protocol performance of the SIFT, in terms of reproducibility and predictive ability, in three laboratories. The barrier function properties of excised mouse skin were determined using a set of 20 coded chemicals (10 I, 10 NI), using the endpoints of trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) and electrical resistance (ER). The basis of the SIFT prediction model is if the ratios of the pre- and post-application values for either TEWL or ER are greater than five-fold, then the test chemical is deemed irritant (I). If the ratio of both parameters is less than five-fold then the chemical is deemed non-irritant (NI). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that the intra-lab reproducibility was acceptable but that the inter-lab reproducibility was not. Overall, the SIFT test under-predicted the irritancy of the test chemicals chosen for Phase III with an overall accuracy of only 55%. The sensitivity value (ability to correctly predict I) was only 30%. The specificity (ability to predict NI) of the test was better at 80%. A retrospective examination of the SIFT results was undertaken using Student's t-test and a significance level of P<0.05 to predict an irritant based on changes in the TEWL ratio values. This improved the predictivity of the SIFT test, giving a specificity of 60%, a sensitivity of 80% and an overall accuracy of 70%. Appropriate modifications to the prediction model have now been made and the SIFT will be re-examined in a new validation exercise to investigate the potential of this non-animal method to predict acute skin irritation potential. PMID:12650665

  8. Molecular properties of excited electronic state: Formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical second energy derivatives within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory/molecular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiao; Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-05-01

    This work extends our previous works [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011); J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184111 (2011)] on analytical excited-state energy Hessian within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to couple with molecular mechanics (MM). The formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical first and second energy derivatives of TDDFT/MM excited state with respect to the nuclear and electric perturbations are presented. Their performances are demonstrated by the calculations of adiabatic excitation energies, and excited-state geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities for a number of benchmark systems. The consistent results with the full quantum mechanical method and other hybrid theoretical methods indicate the reliability of the current numerical implementation of developed algorithms. The computational accuracy and efficiency of the current analytical approach are also checked and the computational efficient strategies are suggested to speed up the calculations of complex systems with many MM degrees of freedom. Finally, we apply the current analytical approach in TDDFT/MM to a realistic system, a red fluorescent protein chromophore together with part of its nearby protein matrix. The calculated results indicate that the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond interactions between the chromophore and the protein matrix is responsible for the large Stokes shift.

  9. Molecular properties of excited electronic state: formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical second energy derivatives within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory/molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiao; Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-05-14

    This work extends our previous works [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011); J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184111 (2011)] on analytical excited-state energy Hessian within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to couple with molecular mechanics (MM). The formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical first and second energy derivatives of TDDFT/MM excited state with respect to the nuclear and electric perturbations are presented. Their performances are demonstrated by the calculations of adiabatic excitation energies, and excited-state geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities for a number of benchmark systems. The consistent results with the full quantum mechanical method and other hybrid theoretical methods indicate the reliability of the current numerical implementation of developed algorithms. The computational accuracy and efficiency of the current analytical approach are also checked and the computational efficient strategies are suggested to speed up the calculations of complex systems with many MM degrees of freedom. Finally, we apply the current analytical approach in TDDFT/MM to a realistic system, a red fluorescent protein chromophore together with part of its nearby protein matrix. The calculated results indicate that the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond interactions between the chromophore and the protein matrix is responsible for the large Stokes shift. PMID:24832314

  10. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Studies of [(H3buea)FeIII-X]n1 (X= S2-, O2-,OH-): Comparison of Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding in Oxo and Sulfido Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Abhishek; Hocking, Rosalie K.; Larsen, Peter; Borovik, Andrew S.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-27

    Iron L-edge, iron K-edge, and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed on a series of compounds [Fe{sup III}H{sub 3}buea(X)]{sup n-} (X = S{sup 2-}, O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}). The experimentally determined electronic structures were used to correlate to density functional theory calculations. Calculations supported by the data were then used to compare the metal-ligand bonding and to evaluate the effects of H-bonding in Fe{sup III}-O vs Fe{sup III-}S complexes. It was found that the Fe{sup III-}O bond, while less covalent, is stronger than the FeIII-S bond. This dominantly reflects the larger ionic contribution to the Fe{sup III-}O bond. The H-bonding energy (for three H-bonds) was estimated to be -25 kcal/mol for the oxo as compared to -12 kcal/mol for the sulfide ligand. This difference is attributed to the larger charge density on the oxo ligand resulting from the lower covalency of the Fe-O bond. These results were extended to consider an Fe{sup IV-}O complex with the same ligand environment. It was found that hydrogen bonding to Fe{sup IV-}O is less energetically favorable than that to Fe{sup III-}O, which reflects the highly covalent nature of the Fe{sup IV-}O bond.

  11. Effects of Cr(III) and CR(VI) on nitrification inhibition as determined by SOUR, function-specific gene expression and 16S rRNA sequence analysis of wastewater nitrifying enrichments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on ammonia oxidation, the transcriptional responses of functional genes involved in nitrification and changes in 16S rRNA level sequences were examined in nitrifying enrichment cultures. The nitrifying bioreactor was operated as a continuous react...

  12. Energy Dependence of the Ruthenium(II)-Bipyridine Metal-to-Ligand-Charge-Transfer Excited State Radiative Lifetimes: Effects of ππ*(bipyridine) Mixing.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ryan A; Tsai, Chia Nung; Mazumder, Shivnath; Lu, I Chen; Lord, Richard L; Schlegel, H Bernhard; Chen, Yuan Jang; Endicott, John F

    2015-06-18

    The variations in band shape with excited state energy found for the triplet metal to ligand charge transfer ((3)MLCT) emission spectra of ruthenium-bipyridine (Ru-bpy) chromophores at 77 K have been postulated to arise from excited state/<