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Sample records for iii line wings

  1. The broad Hα, [O III] line wings in stellar supercluster A of NGC 2363 and the turbulent mixing layer hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, L.; Drissen, L.; Ubeda, L.; Raga, A. C.; Robert, C.; Krongold, Y.

    2009-06-01

    Context: Supercluster A in the extragalactic H ii region NGC 2363 is remarkable for the hypersonic gas seen as faint extended broad emission lines with a full-width zero intensity of 7000 km s-1. Aims: We explore the possibility that the observed broad profiles are the result of the interaction of a high-velocity cluster wind with dense photoionized clumps. Methods: The geometry considered is that of near static photoionized condensations at the surface of which turbulent mixing layers arise as a result of the interaction with the hot wind. The approximative treatment of turbulence was carried out using the mixing length approach of Cantó & Raga. The code mappings ic was used to derive the mean quantities describing the flow and to compute the line emissivities within the turbulent layers. The velocity projection in three dimensions of the line sources was carried out analytically. Results: A fast entraining wind of up to ≈ 4300 km s-1 appears to be required to reproduce the faint wings of the broad Hα and [O iii] profiles. A slower wind of 3500 km s-1, however, can still reproduce the bulk of the broad component and does provide a better fit than an ad hoc Gaussian profile. Conclusions: Radial acceleration in 3D (away from supercluster A) of the emission gas provides a reasonable first-order fit to the broad line component. No broad component is predicted for the [N ii] and [S ii] lines, as observed. The wind velocity required is uncomfortably high and alternative processes that would provide comparable constant acceleration of the emission gas up to 4000 km s-1 might have to be considered.

  2. A far wing line shape theory and its application to the foreign-broadened water continuum absorption. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The far wing line shape theory developed previously and applied to the calculation of the continuum absorption of pure water vapor is extended to foreign-broadened continua. Explicit results are presented for H2O-N2 and H2O-CO2 in the frequency range from 0 to 10,000/cm. For H2O-N2 the positive and negative resonant frequency average line shape functions and absorption coefficients are computed for a number of temperatures between 296 and 430 K for comparison with available laboratory data. In general the agreement is very good.

  3. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the G-III Swept-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    In support of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge [ACTE] project at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, displacement transfer functions were applied to the swept wing of a Gulfstream G-III airplane (Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, Georgia) to obtain deformed shape predictions. Four strainsensing lines (two on the lower surface, two on the upper surface) were used to calculate the deformed shape of the G III wing under bending and torsion. There being an insufficient number of surface strain sensors, the existing G III wing box finite element model was used to generate simulated surface strains for input to the displacement transfer functions. The resulting predicted deflections have good correlation with the finite-element generated deflections as well as the measured deflections from the ground load calibration test. The convergence study showed that the displacement prediction error at the G III wing tip can be reduced by increasing the number of strain stations (for each strain-sensing line) down to a minimum error of l.6 percent at 17 strain stations; using more than 17 strain stations yielded no benefit because the error slightly increased to 1.9% when 32 strain stations were used.

  4. Swept wing attachment line contamination fence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A device for controlling attachment line contamination on an airfoil is presented. A fence is installed on the leading edge of the airfoil in the freestream direction perpendicular to the airfoil, outboard of the fuselage boundary layer. The inboard side of the fence arrests the spanwise movement of the turbulent boundary layer while the laminar boundary layer on the outboard side of the fence eliminates any further turbulent contamination of the attachment line.

  5. Emission line galaxies and active galactic nuclei in WINGS clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Bettoni, D.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fasano, G.; Fritz, J.; Cava, A.; Varela, J.; Omizzolo, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present the analysis of the emission line galaxies members of 46 low-redshift (0.04 < z < 0.07) clusters observed by WINGS (WIde-field Nearby Galaxy cluster Survey). Emission line galaxies were identified following criteria that are meant to minimize biases against non-star-forming galaxies and classified employing diagnostic diagrams. We examined the emission line properties and frequencies of star-forming galaxies, transition objects, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs: LINERs and Seyferts), unclassified galaxies with emission lines, and quiescent galaxies with no detectable line emission. A deficit of emission line galaxies in the cluster environment is indicated by both a lower frequency, and a systematically lower Balmer emission line equivalent width and luminosity with respect to control samples; this implies a lower amount of ionized gas per unit mass and a lower star formation rate if the source is classified as Hii region. A sizable population of transition objects and of low-luminosity LINERs (≈ 10-20% of all emission line galaxies) are detected among WINGS cluster galaxies. These sources are a factor of ≈1.5 more frequent, or at least as frequent, as in control samples with respect to Hii sources. Transition objects and LINERs in clusters are most affected in terms ofline equivalent width by the environment and appear predominantly consistent with so-called retired galaxies. Shock heating can be a possible gas excitation mechanism that is able to account for observed line ratios. Specific to the cluster environment, we suggest interaction between atomic and molecular gas and the intracluster medium as a possible physical cause of line-emitting shocks. The data whose description is provided in Table B.1, and emission line catalog of the WINGS database are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A83

  6. Spinning Characteristics of Wings III : a Rectangular and Tapered Clark Y Monoplane Wing with Rounded Tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamber, M J; House, R O

    1937-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the spinning characteristics of Clark Y monoplane wings with different plan forms. A rectangular wing and a wing tapered 5:2, both with rounded tips, were tested on the N.A.C.A. spinning balance in the 5-foot vertical wind tunnel. The aerodynamic characteristics of the models and a prediction of the angles of sideslip for steady spins are given. Also included is an estimate of the yawning moment that must be furnished by the parts of the airplane to balance the inertia couples and wing yawing moment for spinning equilibrium. The effects on the spin of changes in plan form and of variations of some of the important parameters are discussed and the results are compared with those for a rectangular wing with square tips. It is concluded that for a conventional monoplane using Clark Y wing the sideslip will be algebraically larger for the wing with the rounded tip than for the wing with the square tip and will be largest for the tapered wing. The effect of plan form on the spin will vary with the type of airplane; and the provision of a yawing-moment coefficient of -0.025 (i.e., opposing the spin) by the tail, fuselage, and interference effects will insure against the attainment of equilibrium on a steady spin for any of the plan forms tested and for any of the parameters used in the analysis.

  7. Brightness fluctuations in the K-line wings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, M. Y.; Orrall, F. Q.

    1973-01-01

    A power-spectrum and cross-spectrum analysis has been made of measurements of temporal fluctuations of intensity observed in the K-line wing (2.07 A from line center) and of simultaneous measurements of temporal fluctuations of Doppler displacement of the cores of 3931.122 Fe I and 3933 Ca II (K3). The measurements were made in a quiet region near the center of the sun's disk. We find that the average power spectra of the intensity fluctuations have two significant peaks of about equal strength: one at 0.0033 Hz (300-sec period); and one at about 0.001 Hz (1000-sec period). The average rms value of these intensity fluctuations is 0.0435 plus or minus 0.0082. Maximum brightness comes before maximum violet displacement of the Fe I line.

  8. An improved quasistatic line-shape theory: The effects of molecular motion on the line wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A theory is presented for the modification of the line-shape functions and absorption coefficient due to the breakdown of the quasistatic approximation. This breakdown arises from the effects of molecular motion and increases the absorption in the near wings. Numerical calculations for the high-frequency wing of the nu(sub 3) band of CO2 broadened by Ar are reported and it is shown that these effects are significant near the bandhead. The importance of such corrections in other spectral regions and for other systems is discussed briefly.

  9. Kinetic equations for a density matrix describing nonlinear effects in spectral line wings

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A. I. Shalagin, A. M.

    2011-11-15

    Kinetic quantum equations are derived for a density matrix with collision integrals describing nonlinear effects in spectra line wings. These equations take into account the earlier established inequality of the spectral densities of Einstein coefficients for absorption and stimulated radiation emission by a two-level quantum system in the far wing of a spectral line in the case of frequent collisions. The relationship of the absorption and stimulated emission probabilities with the characteristics of radiation and an elementary scattering event is found.

  10. A lifting line model to investigate the influence of tip feathers on wing performance.

    PubMed

    Fluck, M; Crawford, C

    2014-11-24

    Bird wings have been studied as prototypes for wing design since the beginning of aviation. Although wing tip slots, i.e. wings with distinct gaps between the tip feathers (primaries), are very common in many birds, only a few studies have been conducted on the benefits of tip feathers on the wing's performance, and the aerodynamics behind tip feathers remains to be understood. Consequently most aircraft do not yet copy this feature. To close this knowledge gap an extended lifting line model was created to calculate the lift distribution and drag of wings with tip feathers. With this model, is was easily possible to combine several lifting surfaces into various different birdwing-like configurations. By including viscous drag effects, good agreement with an experimental tip slotted reference case was achieved. Implemented in C++ this model resulted in computation times of less than one minute per wing configuration on a standard notebook computer. Thus it was possible to analyse the performance of over 100 different wing configurations with and without tip feathers. While generally an increase in wing efficiency was obtained by splitting a wing tip into distinct, feather-like winglets, the best performance was generally found when spreading more feathers over a larger dihedral angle out of the wing plane. However, as the results were very sensitive to the precise geometry of the feather fan (especially feather twist) a careless set-up could just as easily degrade performance. Hence a detailed optimization is recommended to realize the full benefits by simultaneously optimizing feather sweep, twist and dihedral angles.

  11. Intermittent Turbulence in the Attachment Line Flow Formed on an Infinite Swept Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poll, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The transition process which takes place in the attachment-line boundary layer in the presence of gross contamination is an issue of considerable interest to wing designers. It is well known that this flow is very sensitive to the presence of isolated roughness and that transition can be initiated at a very low value of the local medium thickness Reynolds number.Moreover, once the attachment line is turbulent, the flow over the whole wing chords, top and bottom surface, will be turbulent and this has major implications for wind drag.

  12. Determination of the Mass Moments and Radii of Inertia of the Sections of a Tapered Wing and the Center-of-Gravity Line along the Wing Span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. V.

    1943-01-01

    For computing the critical flutter velocity of a wing among the data required are the position of the line of centers of gravity of the wing sections along the span and the mass moments and radii of inertia of any section of the wing about the axis passing through the center of gravity of the section. A sufficiently detailed computation of these magnitudes even if the weights of all the wing elements are known, requires a great deal of time expenditure. Thus a rapid competent worker would require from 70 to 100 hours for the preceding computations for one wing only, while hundreds of hours would be required if all the weights were included. With the aid of the formulas derived in the present paper, the preceding work can be performed with a degree of accuracy sufficient for practical purposes in from one to two hours, the only required data being the geometric dimensions of the outer wing (tapered part), the position of its longerons, the total weight of the outer wing, and the approximate weight of the longerons, The entire material presented in this paper is applicable mainly to wings of longeron construction of the CAHI type and investigations are therefore being conducted by CAHI for the derivation of formulas for the determination of the preceding data for wings of other types.

  13. Berry phases and profiles of line wings and rainbow satellites induced by optical collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuryło, R.; Szudy, J.; Baylis, W. E.

    2015-09-01

    The concept of Berry phase is included in an analysis of the intensity distribution in far wings of pressure-broadened spectral lines emitted or absorbed by atoms placed in an external cone-rotating electric field. Particular attention is focused on frequency regions where rainbow satellite bands appear. A classical-path treatment that employs the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is used to derive an expression for the line shape, and it uses a dipole transition moment calculated with quasimolecular wave functions given by the Berry version of the adiabatic approximation. It is found that in the presence of an external rotating electric field, the intensity distribution in far wings can be expressed in terms of the universal line shape function of the unified Franck-Condon theory once energy shifts due to Stark and Berry effects are taken into account. We show that the influence of Berry phase in the profiles of the far wings can be manifested either in the form of deviations of observed profiles from the quasistatic distribution or the appearance of additional features in the vicinity of the maximum of the rainbow satellite band. As an example, the modification of the rainbow satellite at 162.3 nm in the red wing of the self-broadened Lyman-α line of hydrogen, caused by an external rotating electric field, is considered.

  14. The extreme wings of atomic emission and absorption lines. [in low pressure gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.; Sando, K. M.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of the extreme wings of atomic and molecular emission and absorption lines in low pressure gases. Classical and semiclassical results are compared with accurate quantal calculations of the self-broadening of Lyman-alpha in the hydrogen absorption spectrum that arises from quasimolecular transition. The results of classical, quantal, and semiclassical calculations of the absorption coefficient in the red wing are shown for temperatures of 500, 200, and 100 K. The semiclassical and quantal spectra agree well in shape at 500 K. Various other findings are discused.

  15. 7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDING NO. 10, PRODUCER GAS & EXHAUSTER BLDG., PLANT A.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant A, Parts I, II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  16. 43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS H-1 TO H-10 INCL., GRINDING, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLANT 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of the District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  17. 38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS G-1 TO G-10 INCL., PURIFICATION, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLAN 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  18. Linearized Lifting-Surface and Lifting-line Evaluations of Sidewash Behind Rolling Triangular Wings at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, Percy J

    1957-01-01

    The lifting-surface sidewash behind rolling triangular wings has been derived for a range of supersonic Mach numbers for which the wing leading edges remain swept behind the mark cone emanating from the wing apex. Variations of the sidewash with longitudinal distance in the vertical plane of symmetry are presented in graphical form. An approximate expression for the sidewash has been developed by means of an approach using a horseshoe-vortex approximate-lifting-line theory. By use of this approximate expression, sidewash may be computed for wings of arbitrary plan form and span loading. A comparison of the sidewash computed by lifting-surface and lifting-line expressions for the triangular wing showed good agreement except in the vicinity of the trailing edge when the leading edge approached the sonic condition. An illustrative calculation has been made of the force induced by the wing sidewash on a vertical tail located in various longitudinal positions.

  19. Calculations of the Supersonic Wave Drag of Nonlifting Wings with Arbitrary Sweepback and Aspect Ratio: Wings Swept Behind the Mach Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, Sidney M; Swanson, Margaret D

    1947-01-01

    On the basis of a recently developed theory for finite sweptback wings at supersonic speeds, calculations of the supersonic wave drag at zero lift were made for a series of wings having thin symmetrical biconvex sections with untapered plan forms and various angles of sweepback and aspect ratios. The results are presented in a unified form so that a single chart permits the direct determination of the wave drag for this family of airfoils for an extensive range of aspect ratio and sweepback angle for stream Mach numbers up to a value corresponding to that at which the Mach line coincides with the wing leading edge. The calculations showed that in general the wave-drag coefficient decreased with increasing sweepback. At Mach numbers for which the Mach lines are appreciably ahead of the wing leading edge, the 'wave-drag coefficient decreased to an important extent with increases in aspect ratio or slenderness ratio. At Mach numbers for which the Mach lines approach the wing leading edge (Mach numbers approaching a value equal to the secant of the angle of sweepback), the wave-drag coefficient decreased with reductions in aspect ratio or slenderness ratio. In order to check the results obtained by the theory, a comparison was made with the results of tests at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory of sweptback wing attached to a freely falling body. The variation of the drag with Mach number and aspect ratio as given by the theory appeared to be in reasonable

  20. A z ∼ 5.7 Lyα emission line with an ultrabroad red wing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huan; Wang, JunXian; Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Infante, Leopoldo E-mail: jxw@mail.ustc.edu.cn E-mail: smalhotr@asu.edu E-mail: linfante@astro.puc.cl

    2014-03-20

    Using the Lyα emission line as a tracer of high-redshift, star-forming galaxies, hundreds of Lyα emission line galaxies (LAEs) at z > 5 have been detected. These LAEs are considered to be low-mass young galaxies, critical to the re-ionization of the universe and the metal enrichment of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) and the intergalactic medium (IGM). It is assumed that outflows in LAEs can help both ionizing photons and Lyα photons escape from galaxies. However, we still know little about the outflows in high-redshift LAEs due to observational difficulties, especially at redshift >5. Models of Lyα radiative transfer predict asymmetric Lyα line profiles with broad red wings in LAEs with outflows. Here, we report a z ∼ 5.7 Lyα emission line with a broad red wing extending to >1000 km s{sup –1} relative to the peak of Lyα line, which has been detected in only a couple of z > 5 LAEs until now. If the broad red wing is ascribed to gas outflow instead of active galactic nucleus activity, the outflow velocity could be larger than the escape velocity (∼500 km s{sup –1}) of a typical halo mass of z ∼ 5.7 LAEs, which is consistent with the idea that outflows in LAEs disperse metals to CGM and IGM.

  1. FAINT CO LINE WINGS IN FOUR STAR-FORMING (ULTRA)LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Zschaechner, Laura; Bolatto, Alberto; Weiss, Axel

    2015-09-20

    We report the results of a search for large velocity width, low-intensity line wings—a commonly used signature of molecular outflows—in four low redshift (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies that appear to be dominated by star formation. The targets were drawn from a sample of fourteen targets presented in Chung et al., who showed the stacked CO spectrum of the sample to exhibit 1000 km s{sup −1}-wide line wings. We obtained sensitive, wide bandwidth imaging of our targets using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We detect each target at very high significance but do not find the claimed line wings in these four targets. Instead, we constrain the flux in the line wings to be only a few percent. Casting our results as mass outflow rates following Cicone et al. we show them to be consistent with a picture in which very high mass loading factors preferentially occur in systems with high active galactic nucleus contributions to their bolometric luminosity. We identify one of our targets, IRAS 05083 (VII Zw 31), as a candidate molecular outflow.

  2. A modified Eddington-Barbier relation in highly coherent resonance-line wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, K. G.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that resonance-line wings are just as useful in inferring plane-parallel stellar chromospheric S sub L distributions as complete redistribution (CRD) profiles. Although coherent scattering effects at a given frequency tend to average depth-dependent parameters over a larger volume than in CRD, this effect can be offset by simply looking closer to line center, where the same depth-dependent information exists as in CRD, albeit somewhat more compressed in frequency space. For resonance lines with high excitation energies such as Ly-alpha, steep Planck function gradients can invalidate the modified Eddington-Barbier approach given, but this problem also exists in CRD.

  3. Oscillations of the sun's chromosphere. II - H-alpha line centre and wing filtergram time sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, F.; von Uexkuell, M.

    1985-03-01

    In order to investigate the dynamics of the solar chromosphere we perform a Fourier analysis of time sequences (total duration 128 min) of Hα photographic filtergrams taken simultaneously at disc centre in line centre and ±0.5 Å from the line centre. The results are: (i) At low frequencies (periods >450 s) the brightness fluctuations are caused by the temporal evolution of Hα structures at the boundaries of the chromospheric network. We observe that much of the coarse chromospheric structure survives the 128 min time span. We derive lifetimes of 2-8 min for the small-scale structure and 5-20 min for the larger structures. (ii) The modal structure of the 5 min oscillation is clearly visible in the power spectra of the three filtergram. The fundamental (f) mode can be followed to high horizontal wavenumbers kh ≍3.7 Mm-1 and follows the expected relationship ω2f = gkh, where g is the surface gravity. (iii) A chromospheric resonant mode cannot be found in the k - ω plane. (iv) The higher resonant p modes reach into the acoustic wave domain (periods T ≍ 150 s) and thus require the transition zone as the upper reflecting layer. (v) We find no evidence for internal gravity waves. (vi) From a coherence and phase analysis we conclude that the brightness fluctuations of the chromospheric structure seen in -0.5 Å lead those in +0.5 Å by 2 min at kh =2 Mm -1 and by 4 min at kh =0.5 Mm-1. (vii) From the same coherence and phase analysis we can identify acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere with periods as short as 80 s. They possess as much power as the 5 min oscillations and are seen better outside the chromospheric network than within the network. (viii) The phase difference between intensity in Hα line centre and velocity, constructed from the two Hα wing filtergrams, decreases from about 90° at low frequencies and high wavenumbers to 0° at high frequencies and low wavenumbers. Tentatively we interpret this as a change from mainly standing waves for the low

  4. Comparisons of MgII core-wing data with Ground-Based Ca K-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Preminger, D.

    2011-12-01

    Magnesium_II core-wing ratio data will be compared with ground-based K-line photometry for most of cycle 22 and 23. The ground-based data is the photmetric sum computed from the composite K-line obtained from the San Fernando Observatory. We will examine several MgII core-wing composites. This work is partially supported by grants NNX11AB51G from NASA and ATM-0848518 from NSF.

  5. The optically thin C III spectrum - Line and multiplet intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    C III line/multiplet intensities expected under optically thin conditions are presented over the density/ temperature ranges 4.0 - 12.0 and 4.6 - 5.0 (40,000 - l00,000 K). These improved values are obtained from a hybrid level/term calculation which makes use of the most recently available atomic data and extends the treatment down to lower densities than were achieved with our previous term representation. Some illustrative applications are given, including a brief description of the importance of the present data for interpretation of the strong C III line emission from carbon Wolf-Rayet stars.

  6. The optically thin C III spectrum - Line and multiplet intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1993-05-01

    C III line/multiplet intensities expected under optically thin conditions are presented over the density/ temperature ranges 4.0 - 12.0 and 4.6 - 5.0 (40,000 - l00,000 K). These improved values are obtained from a hybrid level/term calculation which makes use of the most recently available atomic data and extends the treatment down to lower densities than were achieved with our previous term representation. Some illustrative applications are given, including a brief description of the importance of the present data for interpretation of the strong C III line emission from carbon Wolf-Rayet stars.

  7. The optically thin C III spectrum - Line and multiplet intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    C III line/multiplet intensities expected under optically thin conditions are presented over the density/ temperature ranges 4.0 - 12.0 and 4.6 - 5.0 (40,000 - l00,000 K). These improved values are obtained from a hybrid level/term calculation which makes use of the most recently available atomic data and extends the treatment down to lower densities than were achieved with our previous term representation. Some illustrative applications are given, including a brief description of the importance of the present data for interpretation of the strong C III line emission from carbon Wolf-Rayet stars.

  8. A far wing line shape theory and its application to the water vibrational bands (II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a far wing line shape theory based on binary collision and quasi-static approximations. The theory is applicable for both the LF and HF wings of vibrational-rotational bands. It is used to calculate the frequency and temperature dependence of the continuous absorption coefficient for frequencies up to 10,000/cm for pure water vapor. The results are compared with existing laboratory data in the 2400-2700/cm window and in the 3000-4300/cm band center region, with field measurements in the 2000-2225/cm region and with a recent experimental measurement near 9466/cm. It is concluded that both the magnitude and temperature dependence of the water vapor continuum can be accounted for by the present theory without the introduction of any adjustable parameters. Refinements of the theory and extension to foreign-broadened absorption are also discussed.

  9. A far wing line shape theory and its application to the water vibrational bands (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1992-06-01

    Attention is given to a far wing line shape theory based on binary collision and quasi-static approximations. The theory is applicable for both the LF and HF wings of vibrational-rotational bands. It is used to calculate the frequency and temperature dependence of the continuous absorption coefficient for frequencies up to 10,000/cm for pure water vapor. The results are compared with existing laboratory data in the 2400-2700/cm window and in the 3000-4300/cm band center region, with field measurements in the 2000-2225/cm region and with a recent experimental measurement near 9466/cm. It is concluded that both the magnitude and temperature dependence of the water vapor continuum can be accounted for by the present theory without the introduction of any adjustable parameters. Refinements of the theory and extension to foreign-broadened absorption are also discussed.

  10. A Mach line panel method for computing the linearized supersonic flow over planar wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, F. E.; Rubbert, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for solving the linearized supersonic flow over planar wings using panels bounded by two families of Mach lines. Polynomial distributions of source and doublet strength lead to simple, closed form solutions for the aerodynamic influence coefficients, and a nearly triangular matrix yields rapid solutions for the singularity parameters. The source method was found to be accurate and stable both for analysis and design boundary conditions. Similar results were obtained with the doublet method for analysis boundary conditions on the portion of the wing downstream of the supersonic leading edge, but instabilities in the solution occurred for the region containing a portion of the subsonic leading edge. Research on the method was discontinued before this difficulty was resolved.

  11. Interpretation of the [ClIII] Lines in Gaseous Nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J; Walker, M F; Krueger, T K

    1970-05-01

    The intensity ratio of the green lambdalambda5517 and 5537 lines of [ClIII] serves as an indicatrix of the electron density in many gaseous nebulae whose spectra can be observed with an image converter. Quantitative interpretation of the line ratio requires accurate values of the collisional strengths and transition probabilities. With improved values of these parameters we have revised electron densities for a number of nebulae; the results seem to be in good accord with those derived from other criteria.

  12. A far-wing line shape theory which satisfies the detailed balance principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Boulet, C.

    1995-01-01

    A far-wing theory in which the validity of the detailed balance principle is maintained in each step of the derivation is presented. The role of the total density matrix including the initial correlations is analyzed rigorously. By factoring out the rapidly varying terms in the complex-time development operator in the interaction representation, better approximate expressions can be obtained. As a result, the spectral density can be expressed in terms of the line-coupling functions in which two coupled lines are arranged symmetrically and whose frequency detunings are omega - 1/2(omega(sub ji) + omega (sub j'i'). Using the approximate values omega - omega(sub ji) results in expressions that do not satisfy the detailed balance principle. However, this principle remains satisfied for the symmetrized spectral density in which not only the coupled lines are arranged symmetrically, but also the initial and final states belonging to the same lines are arranged symmetrically as well.

  13. WINGS-SPE. III. Equivalent width measurements, spectral properties, and evolution of local cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Moretti, A.; Varela, J.; Bettoni, D.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Marziani, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Cluster galaxies are the ideal sites to look at when studying the influence of the environment on the various aspects of the evolution of galaxies, such as the changes in their stellar content and morphological transformations. In the framework of wings, the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey, we have obtained optical spectra for ~6000 galaxies selected in fields centred on 48 local (0.04 < z < 0.07) X-ray selected clusters to tackle these issues. Aims: By classifying the spectra based on given spectral lines, we investigate the frequency of the various spectral types as a function of both the clusters' properties and the galaxies' characteristics. In this way, using the same classification criteria adopted for studies at higher redshift, we can consistently compare the properties of the local cluster population to those of their more distant counterparts. Methods: We describe a method that we have developed to automatically measure the equivalent width of spectral lines in a robust way, even in spectra with a non optimal signal-to-noise ratio. This way, we can derive a spectral classification reflecting the stellar content, based on the presence and strength of the [Oii] and Hδ lines. Results: After a quality check, we are able to measure 4381 of the ~6000 originally observed spectra in the fields of 48 clusters, of which 2744 are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. The spectral classification is then analysed as a function of galaxies' luminosity, stellar mass, morphology, local density, and host cluster's global properties and compared to higher redshift samples (MORPHS and EDisCS). The vast majority of galaxies in the local clusters population are passive objects, being also the most luminous and massive. At a magnitude limit of MV < -18, galaxies in a post-starburst phase represent only ~11% of the cluster population, and this fraction is reduced to ~5% at MV < -19.5, which compares to the 18% at the same magnitude limit for high

  14. Super- and sub-Lorentzian effects in the Ar-broadened line wings of HCl gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Ha; Li, Gang; Ebert, Volker; Hartmann, Jean-Michel

    2017-05-01

    Using previously recorded spectra of HCl diluted in Ar gas at room temperature for several pressure conditions, we show that the absorptions in between successive P and R transitions are significantly different from those predicted using purely Lorentzian line shapes. Direct theoretical predictions of the spectra are also made using requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations and an input HCl-Ar interaction potential. They provide the time evolution of the dipole auto-correlation function (DAF) whose Fourier-Laplace transform yields the absorption spectrum. These calculations very well reproduce the observed super-Lorentzian behavior in the troughs between the intense lines in the central part of the band and the tendency of absorption to become sub-Lorentzian in the band wings between high J lines. The analysis shows that the former behavior is essentially due to incomplete collisions which govern the DAF at very short times. In addition, the increasing influence of line-mixing when going away from the band center explains the tendency of absorption to become more and more sub-Lorentzian in the wings.

  15. Wind-tunnel investigation of aerodynamic efficiency of three planar elliptical wings with curvature of quarter-chord line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.

    1993-01-01

    Three planar, untwisted wings with the same elliptical chord distribution but with different curvatures of the quarter-chord line were tested in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-ft TPT) and the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel (7 x 10 HST). A fourth wing with a rectangular planform and the same projected area and span was also tested. Force and moment measurements from the 8-ft TPT tests are presented for Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.5 and angles of attack from -4 degrees to 7 degrees. Sketches of the oil-flow patterns on the upper surfaces of the wings and some force and moment measurements from the 7 x 10 HST tests are presented at a Mach number of 0.5. Increasing the curvature of the quarter-chord line makes the angle of zero lift more negative but has little effect on the drag coefficient at zero lift. The changes in lift-curve slope and in the Oswald efficiency factor with the change in curvature of the quarter-chord line (wingtip location) indicate that the elliptical wing with the unswept quarter-chord line has the lowest lifting efficiency and the elliptical wing with the unswept trailing edge has the highest lifting efficiency; the crescent-shaped planform wing has an efficiency in between.

  16. Numerical lifting line theory applied to drooped leading-edge wings below and above stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Corda, S.; Van Wie, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical iterative solution to the classical Prandtl lifting-line theory, suitably modified for poststall behavior, is used to study the aerodynamic characteristics of straight rectangular finite wings with and without leading-edge droop. This study is prompted by the use of such leading-edge modifications to inhibit stall/spins in light general aviation aircraft. The results indicate that lifting-line solutions at high angle of attack can be obtained that agree with experimental data to within 20%, and much closer for many cases. Therefore, such solutions give reasonable preliminary engineering results for both drooped and undrooped wings in the poststall region. However, as predicted by von Karman, the lifting-line solutions are not unique when sectional negative lift slopes are encountered. In addition, the present numerical results always yield symmetrical lift distributions along the span, in contrast to the asymmetrical solutions observed by Schairer in the late 1930's. Finally, a series of parametric tests at low angle of attack indicate that the effect of drooped leading edges on aircraft cruise performance is minimal.

  17. [Fe III] EMISSION LINES IN THE PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 2392

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Chau, W.; Hsia, C.-H.; Kwok, S.; Fang, X.; Liu, X.-W.; Koning, N.

    2012-07-20

    NGC 2392 is a young double-shell planetary nebula (PN). Its intrinsic structure and shaping mechanism are still not fully understood. In this paper we present new spectroscopic observations of NGC 2392. The slits were placed at two different locations to obtain the spectra of the inner and outer regions. Several [Fe III] lines are clearly detected in the inner region. We infer that NGC 2392 might have an intrinsic structure similar to the bipolar nebula Mz 3, which also exhibits a number of [Fe III] lines arising from the central regions. In this scenario, the inner and outer regions of NGC 2392 correspond to the inner lobes and the outer outflows of Mz 3, respectively. We construct a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic model to examine our hypothesis. We also compare the physical conditions and chemical composition of the inner and outer regions, and discuss the implications on the formation of this type of PN.

  18. Stark Shift Measurement of Some Xe III Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Djurovic, S.; Cirisaif, M.; Pelaez, R. J.; Aparicio, J. A.; Mar, S.

    2008-10-22

    Examination of ionized xenon spectrum is of a great interest for plasma diagnostic purposes, theory testing and different applications. In this paper, we present Stark shift data for one blue and five UV Xe III lines. One line belongs to the 5d-6p transition, while all other lines belong to 6s-6p transition. Most of the existing papers are devoted to Stark width measurements and only one paper deals with shift data of the lines studied herein. A low-pressure pulsed arc with 95% of helium and 5% of xenon was used as a plasma source. All measurements were performed under following plasma conditions: electron density (0.2-1.4)10{sup 23}m{sup -3} and electron temperature 18000-23000 K.

  19. Interpretation of the [ClIII] Lines in Gaseous Nebulae

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Czyzak, S. J.; Walker, M. F.; Krueger, T. K.

    1970-01-01

    The intensity ratio of the green λλ5517 and 5537 lines of [ClIII] serves as an indicatrix of the electron density in many gaseous nebulae whose spectra can be observed with an image converter. Quantitative interpretation of the line ratio requires accurate values of the collisional strengths and transition probabilities. With improved values of these parameters we have revised electron densities for a number of nebulae; the results seem to be in good accord with those derived from other criteria. PMID:16591829

  20. Emission Line Ratios of FE III as Astrophysical Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Sibasish; Tyndall, Niall B.; Keenan, Francis P.; Ballance, Connor P.; Ramsbottom, Catherine A.; Ferland, Gary J.; Hibbert, Alan

    2017-05-01

    Recent, state-of-the-art calculations of A-values and electron impact excitation rates for Fe iii are used in conjunction with the Cloudy modeling code to derive emission-line intensity ratios for optical transitions among the fine-structure levels of the 3d6 configuration. A comparison of these with high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of gaseous nebulae reveals that previous discrepancies found between theory and observation are not fully resolved by the latest atomic data. Blending is ruled out as a likely cause of the discrepancies, because temperature- and density-independent ratios (arising from lines with common upper levels) match well with those predicted by theory. For a typical nebular plasma with electron temperature {T}{{e}}=9000 K and electron density {N}{{e}}={10}4 {{cm}}-3, cascading of electrons from the levels {}3{{{G}}}5, {}3{{{G}}}4 and {}3{{{G}}}3 plays an important role in determining the populations of lower levels, such as {}3{{{F}}}4, which provide the density diagnostic emission lines of Fe iii, such as {}5{{{D}}}4 - {}3{{{F}}}4 at 4658 Å. Hence, further work on the A-values for these transitions is recommended, ideally including measurements if possible. However, some Fe iii ratios do provide reliable {N}{{e}}-diagnostics, such as 4986/4658. The Fe iii cooling function, calculated with Cloudy using the most recent atomic data, is found to be significantly greater at T e ≃ 30,000 K than predicted with the existing Cloudy model. This is due to the presence of additional emission lines with the new data, particularly in the 1000-4000 Å wavelength region.

  1. Characterization of cell lines developed from the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca coagulata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    PubMed

    Kamita, Shizuo G; Do, Zung N; Samra, Aman I; Hagler, James R; Hammock, Bruce D

    2005-01-01

    Four continuous cell lines were established from the embryos of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca coagulata (Say), an economically important insect vector of bacterial pathogens of grape, almond, citrus, oleander, and other agricultural and ornamental plantings. The cell lines were designated GWSS-Z10, GWSS-Z15, GWSS-G3, and GWSS-LH. The GWSS-Z10, GWSS-Z15, and GWSS-G3 lines were cultured in Ex-Cell 401 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), whereas the GWSS-LH line was cultured in LH medium supplemented with 20% FBS. The cell lines were characterized in terms of their morphology, growth, protein composition, and polymerase chain reaction- amplification patterns of their chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid. The population doubling times of GWSS-Z10, GWSS-Z15, GWSS-G3, and GWSS-LH were 46.2, 90.9, 100.3, and 60.2 h, respectively. These lines should be useful for the study of insect-pathogenic viruses of leafhoppers, aphids, treehoppers, and other related insects as well as plant-pathogenic viruses that are transmitted by these insects.

  2. Subcritical instability on the attachment-line of an infinite swept wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, T. K.; Dipankar, A.

    2005-04-01

    The leading-edge contamination (LEC) problem of an infinite swept wing is shown here as vortex-induced instability. The governing equation for receptivity is presented for LEC in terms of disturbance energy based on the Navier-Stokes equation. The unperturbed shear layer given by the swept Hiemenz boundary-layer solution is two-dimensional and an exact solution of incompressible the Navier-Stokes equation. Thus, the LEC problem is solved numerically by solving the full two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation. The contamination at the attachment-line is shown by solving a receptivity to a convecting vortex moving outside the attachment-line boundary layer, which triggers subcritical spatio-temporal instability.

  3. Height formation of bright points observed by IRIS in Mg II line wings during flux emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubecka, M.; Schmieder, B.; Berlicki, A.; Heinzel, P.; Dalmasse, K.; Mein, P.

    2016-09-01

    Context. A flux emergence in the active region AR 111850 was observed on September 24, 2013 with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Many bright points are associated with the new emerging flux and show enhancement brightening in the UV spectra. Aims: The aim of this work is to compute the altitude formation of the compact bright points (CBs) observed in Mg II lines in the context of searching Ellerman bombs (EBs). Methods: IRIS provided two large dense rasters of spectra in Mg II h and k lines, Mg II triplet, C II and Si IV lines covering all the active region and slit jaws in the two bandpasses (1400 Å and 2796 Å) starting at 11:44 UT and 15:39 UT, and lasting 20 min each. Synthetic profiles of Mg II and Hα lines are computed with non-local thermodynamic equlibrium (NLTE) radiative transfer treatment in 1D solar atmosphere model including a hotspot region defined by three parameters: temperature, altitude, and width. Results: Within the two IRIS rasters, 74 CBs are detected in the far wings of the Mg II lines (at +/-1 Å and 3.5 Å). Around 10% of CBs have a signature in Si IV and CII. NLTE models with a hotspot located in the low atmosphere were found to fit a sample of Mg II profiles in CBs. The Hα profiles computed with these Mg II CB models are consistent with typical EB profiles observed from ground based telescopes e.g. THEMIS. A 2D NLTE modelling of fibrils (canopy) demonstrates that the Mg II line centres can be significantly affected but not the peaks and the wings of Mg II lines. Conclusions: We conclude that the bright points observed in Mg II lines can be formed in an extended domain of altitudes in the photosphere and/or the chromosphere (400 to 750 km). Our results are consistent with the theory of heating by Joule dissipation in the atmosphere produced by magnetic field reconnection during flux emergence.

  4. A Note about Self-Induced Velocity Generated by a Lifting-Line Wing or Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Franklin D.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents an elementary analysis of the induced velocity created by a field of vortices that reside in the wake of a rotor blade. Progress achieved by other researchers in the last 70 years is briefly reviewed. The present work is presented in four stages of complexity that carry a lifting-line representation of a fixed wing into a single-blade rotor. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the lifting rotor's spiraling vortex wake structure has very high induced power when compared to the ideal wing. For an advanced ratio of one-half, induced power is on the order of 10 times that of the wing when the comparison is made at wingspan equal to rotor diameter and wing and rotor having equal lift.

  5. Avian Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Kuykendoll, K.; Rhew, R.; Jones, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the avian wing geometry (Seagull, Merganser, Teal and Owl) extracted from non-contact surface measurements using a three-dimensional laser scanner. The geometric quantities, including the camber line and thickness distribution of airfoil, wing planform, chord distribution, and twist distribution, are given in convenient analytical expressions. Thus, the avian wing surfaces can be generated and the wing kinematics can be simulated. The aerodynamic characteristics of avian airfoils in steady inviscid flows are briefly discussed. The avian wing kinematics is recovered from videos of three level-flying birds (Crane, Seagull and Goose) based on a two-jointed arm model. A flapping seagull wing in the 3D physical space is re-constructed from the extracted wing geometry and kinematics.

  6. Collision frequencies in density-matrix kinetic equations describing nonlinear effects in the wings of spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, Anatolii M

    2011-11-30

    Using the eikonal approximation, we have calculated effective collision frequencies in density-matrix kinetic equations describing nonlinear effects in the wings of spectral lines. We have established the relation between the probabilities of absorption and stimulated emission and the characteristics of the radiation and elementary scattering event. The example of the power interaction potential shows that quantum mechanical calculation of the collision frequencies in the eikonal approximation and previously known spectral line wing theory give similar results for the probability of radiation absorption.

  7. Atomic Data and Spectral Line Intensities for Ne III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Thomas, R. J.; Landi, E.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron impact collision strengths, energy levels, oscillator strengths and spontaneous radiative decay rates are calculated for Ne III. The configurations used are 2s(sup 2) 2p(sup 4),2s2p(sup 5),2s(sup 2) 2p(sup 3)3s, and 2s(sup 2)3p(sup 3)3d giving rise to 57 fine-structure levels in intermediate coupling. Collision strengths are calculated at five incident energies, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 Ry. Excitation rate coefficients are calculated by assuming a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution at an electron temperature of logT,(K)=5.0, corresponding to maximum abundance of Ne III. Using the excitation rate coefficients and the radiative transition rates, statistical equilibrium equations for level populations are solved at electron densities covering the range of 10(exp 8)-10(exp 14) per cubic centimeter. Relative spectral line intensities are calculated. Proton excitation rates between the lowest three levels have been included in the statistical equilibrium equations. The predicted Ne III line intensities are compared with SERTS rocket measurements of a solar active region and of a laboratory EUV light source.

  8. Collision strengths for nebular [O III] optical and infrared lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-07-01

    We present electron collision strengths and their thermally averaged values for the nebular forbidden lines of the astronomically abundant doubly ionized oxygen ion, O2+, in an intermediate coupling scheme using the Breit-Pauli relativistic terms as implemented in an R-matrix atomic scattering code. We use several atomic targets for the R-matrix scattering calculations including one with 72 atomic terms. We also compare with new results obtained using the intermediate coupling frame transformation method. We find spectroscopically significant differences against a recent Breit-Pauli calculation for the excitation of the [O III] λ4363 transition but confirm the results of earlier calculations.

  9. Hyper III on ramp with single-piece pivot wing installed & Princeton sailwing on ground, with Da

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III's shape provided too little lift to land without some type of deployable wing. The single free flight was made using a simulated one-piece pivot wing, which was attached to the upper surface of the fuselage. This used a wing kit from an HP-11 sailplane, which was assembled by Daniel Garrabrant (shown in the photo). Another possible wing was the Flexible Princeton Sailwing. The piloted Hyper III flights were to be made using an SA-16B Albatross seaplane as the drop aircraft. The Hyper III would be carried under the SA-16B's wing on a drop-tank rack. Flight Research Center Director Paul Bikle asked NASA Headquarters for permission to exchange the Center's C-47 for the SA-16. Headquarters turned down this request, effectively ending the possibility of Hyper III flights with a pilot on board. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the

  10. Hyper III on ramp with single-piece pivot wing installed & Princeton sailwing on ground, with Da

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III's shape provided too little lift to land without some type of deployable wing. The single free flight was made using a simulated one-piece pivot wing, which was attached to the upper surface of the fuselage. This used a wing kit from an HP-11 sailplane, which was assembled by Daniel Garrabrant (shown in the photo). Another possible wing was the Flexible Princeton Sailwing. The piloted Hyper III flights were to be made using an SA-16B Albatross seaplane as the drop aircraft. The Hyper III would be carried under the SA-16B's wing on a drop-tank rack. Flight Research Center Director Paul Bikle asked NASA Headquarters for permission to exchange the Center's C-47 for the SA-16. Headquarters turned down this request, effectively ending the possibility of Hyper III flights with a pilot on board. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the

  11. Extension of the quasistatic far-wing line shape theory to multicomponent anisotropic potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The formalism developed previously for the calculation of the far-wing line shape function and the corresponding absorption coefficient using a single-component anisotropic interaction term and the binary collision and quasistatic approximations is generalized to multicomponent anisotropic potential functions. Explicit expressions are presented for several common cases, including the long-range dipole-dipole plus dipole-quadrupole interaction and a linear molecule interacting with a perturber atom. After determining the multicomponent functional representation for the interaction between the CO2 and Ar from previously published data, we calculate the theoretical line shape function and the corresponding absorption due to the nu(sub 3) band of CO2 in the frequency range 2400-2580 cm(exp -1) and compare our results with previous calculations carried out using a single-component anisotropic interaction, and with the results obtained assuming Lorentzian line shapes. The principal uncertainties in the present results, possible refinements of the theoretical formalism, and the applicability to other systems are discussed briefly.

  12. ORIGIN OF SPATIAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN THE WINGS OF THE Ca I 4227 A line

    SciTech Connect

    Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N.; Anusha, L. S.; Stenflo, J. O.; Bianda, M.; Ramelli, R.

    2009-07-10

    Polarization that is produced by coherent scattering can be modified by magnetic fields via the Hanle effect. This has opened a window to explorations of solar magnetism in parameter domains not accessible to the Zeeman effect. According to standard theory the Hanle effect should only be operating in the Doppler core of spectral lines but not in the wings. In contrast, our observations of the scattering polarization in the Ca I 4227 A line reveal the existence of spatial variations of the scattering polarization throughout the far line wings. This raises the question whether the observed spatial variations in wing polarization have a magnetic or nonmagnetic origin. A magnetic origin may be possible if elastic collisions are able to cause sufficient frequency redistribution to make the Hanle effect effective in the wings without causing excessive collisional depolarization, as suggested by recent theories for partial frequency redistribution (PRD) with coherent scattering in magnetic fields. To model the wing polarization we bypass the problem of solving the full polarized radiative transfer equations and instead apply an extended version of the technique based on the 'last scattering approximation'. It assumes that the polarization of the emergent radiation is determined by the anisotropy of the incident radiation field at the last scattering event. We determine this anisotropy from the observed limb darkening as a function of wavelength throughout the spectral line. The empirical anisotropy profile is used together with the single-scattering redistribution matrix, which contains all the PRD, collisional, and magnetic field effects. The model further contains a continuum opacity parameter, which increasingly dilutes the polarized line photons as we move away from the line center, and a continuum polarization parameter that represents the observed polarization level far from the line. This model is highly successful in reproducing the observed Stokes Q

  13. Atomic Data and Spectral Line Intensities for Ne III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Thomas, R. J.; Landi, E.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A number of satellites and rockets have been launched to observe radiation from the Sun and other astrophysical objects. Line radiation is emitted when the electron impact excited levels decay to the lower levels by photon emission. From this radiation, the physical parameters such as electron temperature and density of the astrophysical plasma, elemental abundance, and opacity can be inferred. Ne III lines have been observed in H II regions, Ne-rich filaments in supernovae, and planetary nebulae. The allowed line at 489.50 Angstroms due to the transition 2s(sup 2) 2p(sup 5) (sup 3) P2 (goes to) 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 4)(sup 3)P2 has been identified in the solar spectrum by Vernazza and Reeves using Skylab observations. Other Ne III lines in the solar EUV spectrum have been reported by Thomas and Neupert based on observations from the Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) instrument. Atomic data for Ne III have been calculated by using a set of programs developed at, University College, London. The Superstructure and Distorted Wave (DW) programs have been updated over the years. In the Superstructure program, configuration interaction can be taken into account and radial functions are calculated in a modified Thomas-Fermi-Amaldi potential. This is a statistical potential and depends on parameters lambda 1 which are determined by optimizing the weighted sum of term energies. They are found to be lambda(sub 0)=1.2467, lambda(sub 1)=1.1617, and lambda(sub 2)=1.0663. The relativistic corrections are included by using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian as a perturbation to the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian. The same potential is used to calculate reactance matrices in the DW approximation in LS coupling. Collision strengths in intermediate coupling are obtained by using term coupling coefficients obtained from the Superstructure program. In this calculation, the configurations used are 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 4), 2s2p(sup 5), 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)3s, 2s(sup 2)p(sup 3)3d giving rise

  14. Supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio missile model with wing and tail controls and with tails in line and interdigitated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a low-aspect ratio cruciform missile model with all-movable wings and tails. The configuration was tested at Mach numbers from 1.50 to 4.63 with the wings in the vertical and horizontal planes and with the wings in a 45 deg roll plane with tails in line and interdigitated.

  15. Atomic Data and Spectral Line Intensities for Ne III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, E.; Bhartia, A. K.

    2004-01-01

    Electron impact collision strengths, energy levels, oscillator strengths, and spontaneous radiative decay rates are calculated for Ne III. The configurations used are 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 4), 2s2p(sup 5), 2p(sup 6), 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)3(sub s), 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)3p, and 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)3d giving rise to 86 fine-structure levels in intermediate coupling. Collision strengths are calculated at five incident energies, 5.2, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Ry. Excitation rate coefficients are calculated as a function of electron temperature by assuming a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution. Using the excitation rate coefficients and the radiative transition rates, statistical equilibrium equations for level populations are solved at electron densities covering the range of 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 14)/cc at an electron temperature of logTe/K = 5.0, corresponding to maximum abundance of Ne III. Relative spectral line intensities are calculated.

  16. Broad-wing molecular lines without internal energy sources. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blitz, Leo; Magnani, Loris; Wandel, Amri

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of broad CO wings in four high-latitude molecular clouds which do not have associated internal energy sources is reported. The velocity width of the wings is as much as five times greater than the width of the cloud cores. Neither visible stars brighter than the background population, optical nebulosity, nor IRAS point sources are found at the position of the wings, except for one case with an IRAS source 3 arcmin from the peak position of the wings. The possibility that the wings are the result of conductive interfaces resulting from cold molecular clouds in a hotter ambient medium is examined, and it is concluded that the expected column density of such gas is more than three orders of magnitude smaller than that observed.

  17. The determination of the topological structure of skin friction lines on a rectangular wing-body combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.; Fearn, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    A short tutorial in the application of topological ideas to the intepretation of oil flow patterns is presented. Topological concepts such as critical points, phase portraits, topological stability, and indexing are discussed. These concepts are used in an ordered procedure to construct phase portraits of skin friction lines with oil flow patterns for a wing-body combination and two angles of attack. The relationship between the skin friction phase portrait and planar cuts of the velocity field is also discussed.

  18. Annular wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An annular wing particularly suited for use in supporting in flight an aircraft characterized by the absence of directional stabilizing surfaces is described. The wing comprises a rigid annular body of a substantially uniformly symmetrical configuration characterized by an annular positive lifting surface and cord line coincident with the segment of a line radiating along the surface of an inverted truncated cone. A decalage is established for the leading and trailing semicircular portions of the body, relative to instantaneous line of flight, and a dihedral for the laterally opposed semicircular portions of the body, relative to the line of flight. The direction of flight and climb angle or glide slope angle are established by selectively positioning the center of gravity of the wing ahead of the aerodynamic center along the radius coincident with an axis for a selected line of flight.

  19. Tests of Nacelle-Propeller Combinations in Various Positions with Reference to Wings III : Clark Y Wing - Various Radial-engine Cowlings - Tractor Propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald H

    1933-01-01

    This report is the third of a series giving the results obtained in the 20-foot wind tunnel on the interference drag, and propulsive efficiency of nacelle-propeller-wing combinations. The first report gave the results of the tests of an NACA cowled air-cooled engine nacelle with tractor propeller located in 21 positions with reference to a thick wing. The second report gave the results for several engine cowlings and nacelles with tractor propeller located in four positions with reference to same wing. The present report gives results of tests of the same nacelles and cowlings in the same positions with reference to a smaller wing of Clark y section. The lift, drag, and propulsive efficiency were determined at several angles of attack for each cowling and in each nacelle location.

  20. Boeing's X-48B Blended Wing Body technology demonstrator shows off its unique lines at sunset on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA DFRC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-24

    Boeing's X-48B Blended Wing Body technology demonstrator shows off its unique lines at sunset on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. (Boeing photo # SMF06_F_KOEH_X48B-0900a)

  1. Boeing's X-48B Blended Wing Body technology demonstrator shows off its unique lines at sunset on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA DFRC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-24

    Boeing's X-48B Blended Wing Body technology demonstrator shows off its unique lines at sunset on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. (Boeing photo # SMF06_F_KOEH_X48B-0955)

  2. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research: Phase II- Volume III-Truss Braced Wing Aeroelastic Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Allen, Timothy J.; Droney, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This Test Report summarizes the Truss Braced Wing (TBW) Aeroelastic Test (Task 3.1) work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, which includes the time period of February 2012 through June 2014. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Virginia Tech, and NextGen Aeronautics. The model was fabricated by NextGen Aeronautics and designed to meet dynamically scaled requirements from the sized full scale TBW FEM. The test of the dynamically scaled SUGAR TBW half model was broken up into open loop testing in December 2013 and closed loop testing from January 2014 to April 2014. Results showed the flutter mechanism to primarily be a coalescence of 2nd bending mode and 1st torsion mode around 10 Hz, as predicted by analysis. Results also showed significant change in flutter speed as angle of attack was varied. This nonlinear behavior can be explained by including preload and large displacement changes to the structural stiffness and mass matrices in the flutter analysis. Control laws derived from both test system ID and FEM19 state space models were successful in suppressing flutter. The control laws were robust and suppressed flutter for a variety of Mach, dynamic pressures, and angle of attacks investigated.

  3. Interaction of the hemolytic lectin, CEL-III, with cultured human leukemic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sallay, I; Moriwaki, S; Nakamura, O; Yasuda, S; Kimura, M; Yamasaki, N; Itoh, K; Ohba, H

    2000-12-01

    We studied interaction of CEL-III with cultured human leukemic cell lines and lymphocytes from normal adults by evaluating the extent of cytotoxicity and cytoagglutination. Among acute T lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines, CEL-III displayed increased toxicity against different acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines as a function of increasing differentiation stage. In the case of acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines, CEL-III showed strong cytotoxicity against relatively immature cell lines. We found that CEL-III was more toxic for ALL cell lines than leukocytes obtained from peripheral blood of healthy adults. Strong influence of the additional amount of calcium ion on the extent of cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, we describe a new way to evaluate the extent of cytoagglutination in "% of agglutinated cells". These findings make CEL-III a promising candidate in research for lectins which bind to and destroy only the targeted leukemic cells.

  4. Apparent [O III] variability in the narrow line Seyfert I Mrk142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-Guang; Feng, Long-Long

    2016-03-01

    In this Letter, we checked spectral properties of the well-known narrow line Seyfert I Mrk142, in order to try to find effects of narrow line variability on BLR radius of Mrk142 which is an outlier in the R-L plane. Although, no improvement can be found on BLR radius, apparent narrow line variability can be confirmed in Mrk142. Using the public spectra collected from the Lick AGN Monitoring Project, the spectral scaling method based on assumption of constant [O III] line is first checked by examining broad and narrow emission line properties. We find that with the application of the spectral scaling method, there is a strong correlation between the [O III] line flux and the [O III] line width, but weaker correlations between the broad Hα flux and the broad Hβ flux, and between the broad Hα flux and the continuum emission at 5100 Å. The results indicate that the assumption of constant [O III] line is not preferred, and caution should be exercised when applying the spectral scaling calibration method. And then, we can find a strong correlation between the [O III] line flux and the continuum emission at 5100 Å, which indicates apparent short-term variability of the [O III] line in Mrk142 over about two months.

  5. Temperature dependences of mechanisms responsible for the water-vapor continuum absorption. I. Far wings of allowed lines.

    PubMed

    Ma, Q; Tipping, R H; Leforestier, C

    2008-03-28

    It is well known that the water-vapor continuum plays an important role in the radiative balance in the Earth's atmosphere. This was first discovered by Elsasser almost 70 years ago, and since that time there has been a large body of work, both experimental and theoretical, on this topic. It has been experimentally shown that for ambient atmospheric conditions, the continuum absorption scales quadratically with the H(2)O number density and has a strong, negative temperature dependence (T dependence). Over the years, there have been three different theoretical mechanisms postulated: Far wings of allowed transitions, water dimers, and collision-induced absorption. Despite the improvements in experimental data, at present there is no consensus on which mechanism is primarily responsible for the absorption. The first mechanism proposed was the accumulation of the far-wing absorption of the strong allowed transitions. Later, absorption by water dimers was proposed and this mechanism provides a qualitative explanation for the strong, negative T dependence. Recently, some atmospheric modelers have proposed that collision-induced absorption is one of the major contributors. However, based on improvements in the theoretical calculation of accurate far-wing line shapes, ab initio dimer calculations, and theoretical collision-induced absorptions, it is now generally accepted that the dominant mechanism for the absorption in the infrared (IR) windows is that due to the far wings. Whether this is true for other spectral regions is not presently established. Although all these three mechanisms have a negative T dependence, their T dependences will be characterized by individual features. To analyze the characteristics of the latter will enable one to assess their roles with more certainty. In this paper, we present a detailed study of the T dependence of the far-wing absorption mechanism. We will then compare our theoretical calculations with the most recent and accurate

  6. Computer program for calculating supersonic flow on the windward side conical delta wings by the method of lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klunker, E. B.; South, J. C., Jr.; Davis, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for a program that calculates the supersonic flow on the windward side of conical delta wings with shock attached at the sharp leading edge by the method of lines. The program also has a limited capability for computing the flow about circular and elliptic cones at incidence. It provides information including the shock shape, flow field, isentropic surface-flow properties, and force coefficients. A description of the program operation, a sample computation, and a FORTRAN 4 program listing are included.

  7. Indication of the Hanle Effect by Comparing the Scattering Polarization Observed by CLASP in the Lyα and Si iii 120.65 nm Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Uitenbroek, H.; Kubo, M.; Tsuneta, S.; Goto, M.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Bando, T.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, S.; Giono, G.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Cirtain, J.; Champey, P.; Auchère, F.; Štěpán, J.; Belluzzi, L.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Manso Sainz, R.; De Pontieu, B.; Ichimoto, K.; Carlsson, M.; Casini, R.

    2017-05-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter is a sounding rocket experiment that has provided the first successful measurement of the linear polarization produced by scattering processes in the hydrogen Lyα line (121.57 nm) radiation of the solar disk. In this paper, we report that the Si iii line at 120.65 nm also shows scattering polarization and we compare the scattering polarization signals observed in the Lyα and Si iii lines in order to search for observational signatures of the Hanle effect. We focus on four selected bright structures and investigate how the U/I spatial variations vary between the Lyα wing, the Lyα core, and the Si iii line as a function of the total unsigned photospheric magnetic flux estimated from Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations. In an internetwork region, the Lyα core shows an antisymmetric spatial variation across the selected bright structure, but it does not show it in other more magnetized regions. In the Si iii line, the spatial variation of U/I deviates from the above-mentioned antisymmetric shape as the total unsigned photospheric magnetic flux increases. A plausible explanation of this difference is the operation of the Hanle effect. We argue that diagnostic techniques based on the scattering polarization observed simultaneously in two spectral lines with very different sensitivities to the Hanle effect, like Lyα and Si iii, are of great potential interest for exploring the magnetism of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region.

  8. ANALYSIS OF BREIT-PAULI TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FOR LINES IN O III

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, C. Froese; Tachiev, G.; Rubin, R. H.; Rodriguez, M.

    2009-09-20

    Accurate atomic data are essential for understanding the properties of both O III lines produced by the Bowen fluorescence mechanism and [O III] forbidden lines observed in numerous gaseous nebulae. Improved Breit-Pauli transition probabilities have been published for the carbon sequence. Included were revised data for O III. The present paper analyzes the accuracy of the data specifically for O III by comparison with other theory as well as some recent experiments and observations. For the electric dipole transition probabilities, good agreement is found for allowed Bowen fluorescence lines between predictions of intensity ratios with observed data. For forbidden transitions, the Breit-Pauli magnetic dipole transition operator requires corrections that often are neglected. Good agreement is found when these transition probabilities are computed with multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock methods.

  9. The winged scapula.

    PubMed

    Fiddian, N J; King, R J

    1984-05-01

    Twenty-five patients with 23 different types of winging of the scapula are described. A simple clinical and etiologic classification of the winged scapula is proposed based on the study of these patients in conjunction with a review of the literature. Winging of the scapula is either static or dynamic. Static winging is due to fixed deformity in the shoulder girdle, spine, or ribs. Dynamic winging is due to a neuromuscular disorder. The great variety of lesions that produce winging of the scapula may be classified anatomically into four types: Type I, nerve; Type II, muscle; Type III, bone; and Type IV, joint. Winging of the scapula is a surprisingly common physical sign, but because it is often asymptomatic it receives little attention. However, symptoms of pain, weakness, or cosmetic deformity may demand attention, and it is hoped that this classification will help in the diagnosis and assessment of these patients.

  10. The Balmer Lines of He ii in the Blue Wing of the Hydrogen Lyman α Line Observed in a Quiescent Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, J.-C.; Eurin, G.; Curdt, W.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the prominence observations in the Lyman α line of Curdt et al. ( Astron. Astrophys. 511, L4, 2010) and focus on the bump in the blue wing of the line, which we identify with He ii Balmer lines. We determine the transition candidates, derive an upper limit for the width of the profile and an associated non-thermal velocity close to 0 km s-1, with the assumption that the kinetic temperature is equal to the formation temperature. We compare the total intensity with the corresponding H Lyman α intensity and find a ratio much lower than that measured by Ebadi, Vial, and Ajabshirizadeh ( Solar Phys. 257, 91, 2009) in other Lyman lines. We confirm this result with observations performed by Schwartz et al. (private communication, 2014), we discuss a possible interpretation, and suggest that this issue needs to be addressed closely in future observations.

  11. Nebular and auroral emission lines of [Cl III] in the optical spectra of planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Keenan, F P; Aller, L H; Ramsbottom, C A; Bell, K L; Crawford, F L; Hyung, S

    2000-04-25

    Electron impact excitation rates in Cl III, recently determined with the R-matrix code, are used to calculate electron temperature (T(e)) and density (N(e)) emission line ratios involving both the nebular (5517.7, 5537.9 A) and auroral (8433.9, 8480.9, 8500.0 A) transitions. A comparison of these results with observational data for a sample of planetary nebulae, obtained with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, reveals that the R(1) = I(5518 A)/I(5538 A) intensity ratio provides estimates of N(e) in excellent agreement with the values derived from other line ratios in the echelle spectra. This agreement indicates that R(1) is a reliable density diagnostic for planetary nebulae, and it also provides observational support for the accuracy of the atomic data adopted in the line ratio calculations. However the [Cl iii] 8433.9 A line is found to be frequently blended with a weak telluric emission feature, although in those instances when the [Cl iii] intensity may be reliably measured, it provides accurate determinations of T(e) when ratioed against the sum of the 5518 and 5538 A line fluxes. Similarly, the 8500.0 A line, previously believed to be free of contamination by the Earth's atmosphere, is also shown to be generally blended with a weak telluric emission feature. The [Cl iii] transition at 8480.9 A is found to be blended with the He i 8480.7 A line, except in planetary nebulae that show a relatively weak He i spectrum, where it also provides reliable estimates of T(e) when ratioed against the nebular lines. Finally, the diagnostic potential of the near-UV [Cl iii] lines at 3344 and 3354 A is briefly discussed.

  12. Nebular and auroral emission lines of [Cl iii] in the optical spectra of planetary nebulae

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Francis P.; Aller, Lawrence H.; Ramsbottom, Catherine A.; Bell, Kenneth L.; Crawford, Fergal L.; Hyung, Siek

    2000-01-01

    Electron impact excitation rates in Cl III, recently determined with the R-matrix code, are used to calculate electron temperature (Te) and density (Ne) emission line ratios involving both the nebular (5517.7, 5537.9 Å) and auroral (8433.9, 8480.9, 8500.0 Å) transitions. A comparison of these results with observational data for a sample of planetary nebulae, obtained with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, reveals that the R1 = I(5518 Å)/I(5538 Å) intensity ratio provides estimates of Ne in excellent agreement with the values derived from other line ratios in the echelle spectra. This agreement indicates that R1 is a reliable density diagnostic for planetary nebulae, and it also provides observational support for the accuracy of the atomic data adopted in the line ratio calculations. However the [Cl iii] 8433.9 Å line is found to be frequently blended with a weak telluric emission feature, although in those instances when the [Cl iii] intensity may be reliably measured, it provides accurate determinations of Te when ratioed against the sum of the 5518 and 5538 Å line fluxes. Similarly, the 8500.0 Å line, previously believed to be free of contamination by the Earth's atmosphere, is also shown to be generally blended with a weak telluric emission feature. The [Cl iii] transition at 8480.9 Å is found to be blended with the He i 8480.7 Å line, except in planetary nebulae that show a relatively weak He i spectrum, where it also provides reliable estimates of Te when ratioed against the nebular lines. Finally, the diagnostic potential of the near-UV [Cl iii] lines at 3344 and 3354 Å is briefly discussed. PMID:10759562

  13. Fe II, [O III], and Balmer Lines in High Redshift QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, K. L.; Hill, G. J.; Elston, R.

    1992-12-01

    We present spectra of rest-frame optical lines in several high luminosity QSOs with z > 2, taken at KPNO with the Cryogenic Spectrometer on the 2.1m telescope. Using the spectra of the Hβ region, we have fit the amplitudes of Hβ , [O III], and Fe II (the latter using the I Zw 1 iron template created by Boroson and Green 1992). We have firm measurements of optical Fe II in three of the four objects, two of which should be considered strong optical Fe II emitters. We found significant [O III] flux in only one (1413+117, a lensed QSO; Kayser et al. 1990). Our measurements show several interesting results. First, the low measured [O III] fluxes are consistent with a high luminosity extrapolation of the low luminosity anticorrelation between L and [O III]. The strong [O III] measured for 1413+117 is consistent with an intermediate intrinsic luminosity and an amplification factor of 10 or more. The other two high redshift [O III] measurements in the literature (Kuhr et al. 1984; Carswell et al. 1991) are not consistent with this relation, having larger [O III] than expected. The [O III] and Fe II equivalent widths are consistent with the Boroson and Green (1992) low redshift sample, with the possible exception of 1413+117, which seems to have excess of [O III] or Fe II, lying in a region not populated by low redshift objects.

  14. Vortex flap flow reattachment line and subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic data on 50 deg to 74 deg Delta wings on common fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, N. T.; Huffman, J. K.; Johnson, T. D., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Positions of the primary vortex flow reattachment line and longitudinal aerodynamic data were obtained at Mach number 0.3 for a systematic series of vortex flaps on delta wing body configurations with leading edge sweeps of 50, 58, 66, and 74 deg. The investigation was performed to study the parametric effects of wing sweep, vortex flap geometry and deflection, canards, and trailing edge flaps on the location of the primary vortex reattachment line relative to the flap hinge line. The vortex reattachment line was located via surface oil flow photographs taken at selected angles of attack. Force and moment measurements were taken over an angle of attack range of -1 deg to 22 deg at zero sideslip angle for many configurations to further establish the data base and to assess the aforementioned parametric effects on longitudinal aerodynamics. Both the flow reattachment and aerodynamic data are presented.

  15. Formulas for the Supersonic Loading, Lift, and Drag of Flat Swept-Back Wings with Leading Edges Behind the Mach Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Doris

    1951-01-01

    The method of superposition of linearized conical flows has been applied to the calculation of the aerodynamic properties, in supersonic flight, of thin flat, swept-back wings at an angle of attack. The wings are assumed to have rectilinear plan forms, with tips parallel to the stream, and to taper in the conventional sense. The investigation covers the moderately supersonic speed range where the Mach lines from the leading-edge apex lie ahead of the wing. The trailing edge may lie ahead of or behind the Mach lines from its apex. The case in which the Mach cone from one tip intersects the other tip is not treated. Formulas are obtained for the load distribution, the total lift, and the drag due to lift. For the cases in which the trailing edge is outside the Mach cone from its apex the formulas are complete. For wings with both leading and trailing edges behind their respective Mach lines, a degree of approximation is necessary. Charts of some of the functions derived are included to facilitate computing, and several examples are worked out in outline.

  16. POLARIZED LINE FORMATION IN MULTI-DIMENSIONAL MEDIA. III. HANLE EFFECT WITH PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Anusha, L. S.; Nagendra, K. N.

    2011-09-01

    In two previous papers, we solved the polarized radiative transfer (RT) equation in multi-dimensional (multi-D) geometries with partial frequency redistribution as the scattering mechanism. We assumed Rayleigh scattering as the only source of linear polarization (Q/I, U/I) in both these papers. In this paper, we extend these previous works to include the effect of weak oriented magnetic fields (Hanle effect) on line scattering. We generalize the technique of Stokes vector decomposition in terms of the irreducible spherical tensors T{sup K}{sub Q}, developed by Anusha and Nagendra, to the case of RT with Hanle effect. A fast iterative method of solution (based on the Stabilized Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate-Gradient technique), developed by Anusha et al., is now generalized to the case of RT in magnetized three-dimensional media. We use the efficient short-characteristics formal solution method for multi-D media, generalized appropriately to the present context. The main results of this paper are the following: (1) a comparison of emergent (I, Q/I, U/I) profiles formed in one-dimensional (1D) media, with the corresponding emergent, spatially averaged profiles formed in multi-D media, shows that in the spatially resolved structures, the assumption of 1D may lead to large errors in linear polarization, especially in the line wings. (2) The multi-D RT in semi-infinite non-magnetic media causes a strong spatial variation of the emergent (Q/I, U/I) profiles, which is more pronounced in the line wings. (3) The presence of a weak magnetic field modifies the spatial variation of the emergent (Q/I, U/I) profiles in the line core, by producing significant changes in their magnitudes.

  17. Polarized Line Formation in Multi-dimensional Media. III. Hanle Effect with Partial Frequency Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusha, L. S.; Nagendra, K. N.

    2011-09-01

    In two previous papers, we solved the polarized radiative transfer (RT) equation in multi-dimensional (multi-D) geometries with partial frequency redistribution as the scattering mechanism. We assumed Rayleigh scattering as the only source of linear polarization (Q/I, U/I) in both these papers. In this paper, we extend these previous works to include the effect of weak oriented magnetic fields (Hanle effect) on line scattering. We generalize the technique of Stokes vector decomposition in terms of the irreducible spherical tensors {T}^K_Q, developed by Anusha & Nagendra, to the case of RT with Hanle effect. A fast iterative method of solution (based on the Stabilized Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate-Gradient technique), developed by Anusha et al., is now generalized to the case of RT in magnetized three-dimensional media. We use the efficient short-characteristics formal solution method for multi-D media, generalized appropriately to the present context. The main results of this paper are the following: (1) a comparison of emergent (I, Q/I, U/I) profiles formed in one-dimensional (1D) media, with the corresponding emergent, spatially averaged profiles formed in multi-D media, shows that in the spatially resolved structures, the assumption of 1D may lead to large errors in linear polarization, especially in the line wings. (2) The multi-D RT in semi-infinite non-magnetic media causes a strong spatial variation of the emergent (Q/I, U/I) profiles, which is more pronounced in the line wings. (3) The presence of a weak magnetic field modifies the spatial variation of the emergent (Q/I, U/I) profiles in the line core, by producing significant changes in their magnitudes.

  18. Seyfert galaxy narrow-line regions. I - Observations of forbidden O III lambda 5007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, J. M.; Carleton, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    High-resolution (23 km/s) spectra of the forbidden O III emission line at 500.7 nm from the nuclear regions of 32 Seyfert galaxies and low-redshift QSOs have been obtained at the Smithsonian Institution/University of Arizona Multiple Mirror Telescope. The properties of the data are summarized by a group of measures which efficiently describe the entire line profiles, are stable in the presence of noise, and have easily visualized geometric meaning. The distributions of line profile measures are shown. In particular, typical forbidden O III FWHM values of 200-520 km/s (mean + or - 1 sigma) and a highly significant tendency for the lines to fall off more slowly on the blue than on the red side of the peak have been found, in agreement with previous work. Using galaxian system velocities obtained from absorption-line measurements, the distribution of differences between forbidden O III emission-line velocities and galaxian system velocities has been determined; in disagreement with previous work, this distribution has been found to be consistent with symmetry about zero difference velocity.

  19. Inflatable wing

    DOEpatents

    Priddy, Tommy G.

    1988-01-01

    An inflatable wing is formed from a pair of tapered, conical inflatable tubes in bonded tangential contact with each other. The tubes are further connected together by means of top and bottom reinforcement boards having corresponding longitudinal edges lying in the same central diametral plane passing through the associated tube. The reinforcement boards are made of a stiff reinforcement material, such as Kevlar, collapsible in a direction parallel to the spanwise wing axis upon deflation of the tubes. The stiff reinforcement material cooperates with the inflated tubes to impart structural I-beam characteristics to the composite structure for transferring inflation pressure-induced tensile stress from the tubes to the reinforcement boards. A plurality of rigid hoops shaped to provide airfoil definition are spaced from each other along the spanwise axis and are connected to the top and bottom reinforcement boards. Tension lines are employed for stabilizing the hoops along the trailing and leading edges thereof.

  20. Direct potential and temperature effects on the MgHe line-core and far-wing photoabsorption profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Reggami, L.; Bouledroua, M.

    2011-03-15

    The present study deals with the collisional broadening of monatomic magnesium, evolving in a helium buffer gas, in the wavelength and temperature ranges 260-310 nm and 100-3000 K, respectively. The computed emission and absorption spectral profiles are based on the most recent potential-energy curves and transition dipole moments. The required interatomic Mg(3s{sup 2})+He(1s{sup 2}) and Mg(3s3p)+He(1s{sup 2}) potentials are constructed from two different sets. The purpose of this treatment is twofold. First, using the quantum-mechanical Baranger impact approximation, the width and shift of the line-core spectra are determined and their variation law with temperature is examined. Then, the satellite structures in the blue and red wings are analyzed quantum mechanically. The calculations show especially that the free-free transitions contribute most to the MgHe photoabsorption spectra and that a satellite structure is observable beyond the temperature 1800 K around the wavelengths 272 or 276 nm, depending on the used potential set. Weak satellites have also been investigated and, for all cases, the obtained results showed good agreement with those already published.

  1. Photospheric models of solar active regions and the network based on the Mg II h and k line wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, N. D.; Linsky, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    From a comparison between observed and computed wings of the Mg II resonance lines, distributions of temperature versus mass column density for solar photospheric layers in plages and in the chromospheric network are derived. The theoretical profiles are computed assuming partial coherent scattering. In the active regions, temperatures exceed those in the quiet sun by up to 200 K near the temperature minimum and up to 400 K in deeper layers. In the observed network structure, the temperature is enhanced by 200 K at the temperature minimum but is the same as that in the quiet sun at greater depths. The difference in the slope of the temperature distribution between the network and plages is real, but may refer only to long elements of the network rather than to the brightest portions. Adjacent to the network is a region in which the temperatures are similar to those in the quiet sun, except immediately below the temperature minimum, where the temperatures are depressed by 150 K.

  2. Empirical NLTE analyses of solar spectral lines. III - Iron lines versus LTE models of the photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.; Kostik, R. I.

    1982-11-01

    We compare observational indications of departures from LTE in solar Fe I lines with published NLTE computations in the context of discrepancies between empirical LTE and NLTE models of the solar atmosphere. We find that the importance of departures from LTE in Fe I and similar spectra is often underestimated through neglect of opacity departures. We demonstrate with numerical experiments that the peculiarities of the LTE models are artifacts due to the neglect of NLTE departures; in particular, we so explain the Holweger-Müller LTE model quantitatively. However, we show also that the NLTE formation of most optical metal lines is fortuitously well-mimicked by LTE computation when using LTE models. Thus, LTE-derived metal abundances and empirical oscillator strengths happen to be fairly precise. The same may hold for the use of theoretical radiative- equilibrium models in stellar abundance determinations.

  3. Hydrogen line and continuum emission in young stellar objects. III - Line ratios and physical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Costa, Jose L.; Kwan, John

    1990-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the dependence of Br-gamma/Br-alpha and other hydrogen line ratios on nucleon density (over the range 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 12th/cu cm), column density (about 10 to the 18th - 10 to the 24th/sq cm), young stellar object (YSO) luminosity (about 10-10,000 solar luminosities), and distance of the gas cloud from the YSO, r (about 10 to the 12th - 10 to the 14th cm). For a given continuum model, the value of Br-gamma/Br-alpha can provide a constraint on r. The ionization and thermal structures of the emission region are described. The electron fraction is fairly constant and is small (less than 10 percent) in the region where most of the hydrogen line fluxes are produced. The temperature in this region is also quite constant, with a value of 5000-7000 K.

  4. WINGS: a WIde-field nearby Galaxy-cluster survey. III. Deep near-infrared photometry of 28 nearby clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentinuzzi, T.; Woods, D.; Fasano, G.; Riello, M.; D'Onofrio, M.; Varela, J.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Fritz, J.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Kjærgaard, P.

    2009-07-01

    Context: This is the third paper in a series devoted to the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS). WINGS is a long-term project aimed at gathering wide-field, multiband imaging and spectroscopy of galaxies in a complete sample of 77 X-ray selected, nearby clusters (0.04WINGS sample and describes the procedures followed to construct them. Methods: The raw data has been reduced at CASU and special care has been devoted to the final coadding, drizzling technique, astrometric solution, and magnitude calibration for the WFCAM pipeline-processed data. We constructed the photometric catalogs based on the final calibrated, coadded mosaics (≈0.79 deg^2) in J (19 clusters) and K (27 clusters) bands. A customized interactive pipeline was used to clean the catalogs and to make mock images for photometric errors and completeness estimates. Results: We provide deep near-infrared photometric catalogs (90% complete in detection rate at total magnitudes J≈ 20.5, K≈ 19.4, and in classification rate at J≈19.5 and K≈ 18.5), giving positions, geometrical parameters, total and aperture magnitudes for all detected sources. For each field we classify the detected sources as stars, galaxies, and objects of “unknown” nature. Based on observations taken at the United Kingdom Infra-Red Telescope, operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the UK. J and K photometric catalogs are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/501/851

  5. Diagnostics of the κ-distribution using Si III lines in the solar transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, E.; Kulinová, A.

    2011-07-01

    Aims: The solar transition region satisfies the conditions for appearance of the non-thermal κ-distribution. We aim to prove the occurrence of the non-thermal κ-distribution in the solar transition region and diagnose its parameters. Methods: The intensity ratios of Si iii lines observed by SUMER in 1100-1320 Å region do not correspond to the line ratios computed under the assumption of the Maxwellian electron distribution. We computed a set of synthetic Si iii spectra for the electron κ-distributions with different values of the parameter κ. We had to include the radiation field in our calculations to explain the observed line ratios. We propose diagnostics of the parameter κ and other plasma parameters and analyze the effect of the different gradient of differential emission measures (DEM) on the presented calculations. Results: The used line ratios are sensitive to T, density and the parameter κ. All these parameters were determined from the SUMER observations for the coronal hole (CH), quiet Sun (QS) and active region (AR) using our proposed diagnostics. A strong gradient of DEM influences the diagnosed parameters of plasma. The essential contributions to the total line intensities do not correspond to single T but a wider range of T, and they originate in different atmospheric layers. The amount of the contributions from these atmospheric layers depends on the gradient of DEM and the shape of the electron distribution function. Conclusions: The κ-distribution is able to explain the observed Si iii line spectrum in the transition region. The degree of non-thermality increases with the activity of the solar region, it is lower for CH and higher for the AR. The DEM influences the diagnosed T and Ne but it has only little effect on the diagnostics of the parameter κ.

  6. Constraints on the merging of the transition lines at the tricritical point in a wing-structure phase diagram

    DOE PAGES

    Taufour, Valentin; Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Kogan, Vladimir G.

    2016-08-19

    Here, we consider the phase diagram of a ferromagnetic system driven to a quantum phase transition with a tuning parameter $p$. Before being suppressed, the transition becomes of the first order at a tricritical point, from which wings emerge under application of the magnetic field H in the T $-$ p $-$ H phase diagram. We show that the edge of the wings merge with tangent slopes at the tricritical point.

  7. Concentration dependence of the wings of a dipole-broadened magnetic resonance line in magnetically diluted lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobov, V. E.; Kucherov, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The singularities of the time autocorrelation functions (ACFs) of magnetically diluted spin systems with dipole-dipole interaction (DDI), which determine the high-frequency asymptotics of autocorrelation functions and the wings of a magnetic resonance line, are studied. Using the self-consistent fluctuating local field approximation, nonlinear equations are derived for autocorrelation functions averaged over the independent random arrangement of spins (magnetic atoms) in a diamagnetic lattice with different spin concentrations. The equations take into account the specificity of the dipole-dipole interaction. First, due to its axial symmetry in a strong static magnetic field, the autocorrelation functions of longitudinal and transverse spin components are described by different equations. Second, the long-range type of the dipole-dipole interaction is taken into account by separating contributions into the local field from distant and near spins. The recurrent equations are obtained for the expansion coefficients of autocorrelation functions in power series in time. From them, the numerical value of the coordinate of the nearest singularity of the autocorrelation function is found on the imaginary time axis, which is equal to the radius of convergence of these expansions. It is shown that in the strong dilution case, the logarithmic concentration dependence of the coordinate of the singularity is observed, which is caused by the presence of a cluster of near spins whose fraction is small but contribution to the modulation frequency is large. As an example a silicon crystal with different 29Si concentrations in magnetic fields directed along three crystallographic axes is considered.

  8. SAGE III Educational Outreach and Student's On-Line Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. C.; Moore, S. W.; Walters, S. C.

    2002-05-01

    Students On-Line Atmospheric Research (SOLAR) is a NASA-sponsored educational outreach program aimed at raising the level of interest in science among elementary, middle, and high school students. SOLAR is supported by, and closely linked to, NASA's Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III). SAGE III, launched on a Russian METEOR 3M spacecraft in December 2001, is a key component of NASA's Earth Observing System. It will monitor the quantity and distribution of aerosols, ozone, clouds, and other important trace gases in the upper atmosphere. Early data from SAGE III indicate that the instrument is performing as expected. SAGE III measurements will extend the long-term data record established by its predecessors, SAGE I and SAGE II, which spans from 1979 to the present. In addition, SAGE III's added measurement capabilities will provide more detailed data on certain atmospheric species. SOLAR selects interesting topics related to the science issues addressed by the SAGE III experiments, and develops educational materials and projects to enhance science teaching, and to help students realize the relevance of these issues to our lives on Earth. For example, SOLAR highlights some of the major questions regarding the health of the atmosphere such as possible influences of aerosols on global climate, and atmospheric processes related to ozone depletion. The program features projects to give students hands-on experience with scientific equipment and help develop skills in collecting, analyzing, and reporting science results. SOLAR focuses on helping teachers become familiar with current research in the atmospheric sciences, helping teachers integrate SOLAR developed educational materials into their curriculum. SOLAR gives special presentations at national and regional science teacher conferences and conducts a summer teacher workshop at the NASA Langley Research Center. This poster will highlight some of the key features of the SOLAR program and will present

  9. Cell line with endogenous EGFRvIII expression is a suitable model for research and drug development purposes.

    PubMed

    Stec, Wojciech J; Rosiak, Kamila; Siejka, Paulina; Peciak, Joanna; Popeda, Marta; Banaszczyk, Mateusz; Pawlowska, Roza; Treda, Cezary; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina; Rieske, Piotr

    2016-05-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common and malignant brain tumor, characterized by high cellular heterogeneity. About 50% of glioblastomas are positive for EGFR amplification, half of which express accompanying EGFR mutation, encoding truncated and constitutively active receptor termed EGFRvIII. Currently, no cell models suitable for development of EGFRvIII-targeting drugs exist, while the available ones lack the intratumoral heterogeneity or extrachromosomal nature of EGFRvIII.The reports regarding the biology of EGFRvIII expressed in the stable cell lines are often contradictory in observations and conclusions. In the present study, we use DK-MG cell line carrying endogenous non-modified EGFRvIII amplicons and derive a sub-line that is near depleted of amplicons, whilst remaining identical on the chromosomal level. By direct comparison of the two lines, we demonstrate positive effects of EGFRvIII on cell invasiveness and populational growth as a result of elevated cell survival but not proliferation rate. Investigation of the PI3K/Akt indicated no differences between the lines, whilst NFκB pathway was over-active in the line strongly expressing EGFRvIII, finding further supported by the effects of NFκB pathway specific inhibitors. Taken together, these results confirm the important role of EGFRvIII in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of tumor behavior. Moreover, the proposed models are stable, making them suitable for research purposes as well as drug development process utilizing high throughput approach.

  10. Cell line with endogenous EGFRvIII expression is a suitable model for research and drug development purposes

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Wojciech J.; Rosiak, Kamila; Siejka, Paulina; Peciak, Joanna; Popeda, Marta; Banaszczyk, Mateusz; Pawlowska, Roza; Treda, Cezary; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina; Rieske, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and malignant brain tumor, characterized by high cellular heterogeneity. About 50% of glioblastomas are positive for EGFR amplification, half of which express accompanying EGFR mutation, encoding truncated and constitutively active receptor termed EGFRvIII. Currently, no cell models suitable for development of EGFRvIII-targeting drugs exist, while the available ones lack the intratumoral heterogeneity or extrachromosomal nature of EGFRvIII. The reports regarding the biology of EGFRvIII expressed in the stable cell lines are often contradictory in observations and conclusions. In the present study, we use DK-MG cell line carrying endogenous non-modified EGFRvIII amplicons and derive a sub-line that is near depleted of amplicons, whilst remaining identical on the chromosomal level. By direct comparison of the two lines, we demonstrate positive effects of EGFRvIII on cell invasiveness and populational growth as a result of elevated cell survival but not proliferation rate. Investigation of the PI3K/Akt indicated no differences between the lines, whilst NFκB pathway was over-active in the line strongly expressing EGFRvIII, finding further supported by the effects of NFκB pathway specific inhibitors. Taken together, these results confirm the important role of EGFRvIII in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of tumor behavior. Moreover, the proposed models are stable, making them suitable for research purposes as well as drug development process utilizing high throughput approach. PMID:27004406

  11. The Density Matrix of H20 - N2 In the Coordinate Representation: A Monte Carlo Calculation of the Far-Wing Line Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    The far-wing line shape theory within the binary collision and quasistatic framework has been developed using the coordinate representation. Within this formalism, the main computational task is the evaluation of multidimensional integrals whose variables are the orientational angles needed to specify the initial and final positions of the system during transition processes. Using standard methods, one is able to evaluate the 7-dimensional integrations required for linear molecular systems, or the 7-dimensional integrations for more complicated asymmetric-top (or symmetric-top) molecular systems whose interaction potential contains cyclic coordinates. In order to obviate this latter restriction on the form of the interaction potential, a Monte Carlo method is used to evaluate the 9-dimensional integrations required for systems consisting of one asymmetric-top (or symmetric-top) and one linear molecule, such as H20-N2. Combined with techniques developed previously to deal with sophisticated potential models, one is able to implement realistic potentials for these systems and derive accurate, converged results for the far-wing line shapes and the corresponding absorption coefficients. Conversely, comparison of the far-wing absorption with experimental data can serve as a sensitive diagnostic tool in order to obtain detailed information on the short-range anisotropic dependence of interaction potentials.

  12. The luminous infrared composite Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 7679 through the [O III] λ 5007 emission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankulova, I. M.; Golev, V. K.; Jockers, K.

    2007-07-01

    Context: NGC 7679 (Mrk 534) is a nearby (z = 0.0177) nearly face-on SB0 luminous infrared Sy2 galaxy in which starburst and AGN activities co-exist. The ionization structure is maintained by both the AGN power-law continuum and starburst. The galaxy is a bright X-ray source possessing a low X-ray column density NH < 4 × 1020 cm-2. Aims: The Compton-thin nature of such unabsorbed objects infers that the simple formulation of the Unified model for SyGs is not applicable in their case. The absorption is likely to originate at larger scales instead of the pc-scale molecular torus. The main goal of this article is to investigate both gas distribution and ionization structure in the circumnuclear region of NGC 7679 in search for the presence of a hidden Sy1-type nucleus, using the [O III]λ5007 luminosity as a tracer of AGN activity. Methods: NGC 7679 was observed with the 2m RCC reflector of the Ukraine National Astronomical Observatory at peak Terskol, Caucasus, Russia. The observations were carried out in October 1996 with the Focal Reducer of the Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Germany. All observations were taken with tunable Fabry-Perot narrow-band imaging with spectral FWHM of the Airy profile δλ between 3 and 4 Å depending on the used wavelength. Results: The [O III]λ5007 emission-line image of the circumnuclear region of NGC 7679 shows elliptical isophotes extended along the PA ≈ 80° in the direction of the counterpart galaxy NGC 7682. There is a maximum of this emission which is shifted ~4 arcsec from the center as defined by the continuum emission. The maximum of ionization by the AGN power-law continuum traced by [O III]λ5007/Hα ratio is displaced by ~13 arcsec eastward from the nucleus. The direction where high ionization is observed at PA ≈ 80° ± 10° coincides with the direction to the companion galaxy NGC 7682 (PA ≈ 72°). On the contrary, at PA ~ 0° the ionization in the circumnuclear region is entirely due to hot stars

  13. First Detection of the [O III] 88 μm Line at High Redshifts: Characterizing the Starburst and Narrow-line Regions in Extreme Luminosity Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferkinhoff, C.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Parshley, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.

    2010-05-01

    We have made the first detections of the 88 μm [O III] line from galaxies in the early universe, detecting the line from the lensed active galactic nucleus (AGN)/starburst composite systems APM 08279+5255 at z = 3.911 and SMM J02399-0136 at z = 2.8076. The line is exceptionally bright from both systems, with apparent (lensed) luminosities ~1011 L sun. For APM 08279, the [O III] line flux can be modeled in a star formation paradigm, with the stellar radiation field dominated by stars with effective temperatures, T eff > 36,000 K, similar to the starburst found in M82. The model implies ~35% of the total far-IR luminosity of the system is generated by the starburst, with the remainder arising from dust heated by the AGN. The 88 μm line can also be generated in the narrow-line region of the AGN if gas densities are around a few 1000 cm-3. For SMM J02399, the [O III] line likely arises from H II regions formed by hot (T eff > 40,000 K) young stars in a massive starburst that dominates the far-IR luminosity of the system. The present work demonstrates the utility of the [O III] line for characterizing starbursts and AGN within galaxies in the early universe. These are the first detections of this astrophysically important line from galaxies beyond a redshift of 0.05.

  14. Electron-impact Excitation Collision Strengths and Theoretical Line Intensities for Transitions in S III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log Te (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s 23p 2, 3s3p 3, 3s 23p3d, 3s 23p4s, 3s 23p4p, and 3s 23p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  15. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  16. Synoptic and fast events on the sun according to observations at the center and wings of the Ca II K line at the Kislovodsk Mountain station patrol telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Kirpichev, R. V.; Pashchenko, M. P.; Shramko, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Observations performed at the solar telescope-spectroheliograph, which has continuously automatically operated at MAS MAO RAS, were analyzed. Measurements of the activity index in the Ca II K line, which were performed according to the program of synoptic observations, are presented. The development of the solar flares observed at the center and on the wings of the Ca II K line was compared with observations in the X-ray and radio bands. It was shown that the time variations in the intensity in the 1-8 Å range according to the Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellites' (GOES) data and in the Ca II K line are close to each other and that the total X-ray flux and Ca II K intensity amplitude substantially correlate during the entire flare.

  17. Flight-Test Evaluation of the Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of 0.5-Scale Models of the Fairchild Lark Pilotless-Aircraft Configuration: Standard Configuration with Wing Flaps Deflected 60 Degrees and Model having Tail in Line with Wings, TED No. NACA 2387

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, David G.

    1947-01-01

    Flight tests were conducted at the Flight Test Station of the Pilotless Aircraft Research Division at Wallop Island, Va., to determine the longitudinal control and stability characteristics of 0.5-scale models of the Fairchild Lark pilotless aircraft with the tail in line with the wings a d with the horizontal wing flaps deflected 60 deg. The data were obtained by the use of a telemeter and by radar tracking.

  18. Tests of a Triangular Wing of Aspect Ratio 2 in the Ames 12-foot Pressure Wind Tunnel III : the Effectiveness and Hinge Moments of a Skewed Wing-tip Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbe, Carl D; Tinling, Bruce E

    1948-01-01

    Results of wind-tunnel tests of a semispan model of a triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 with a skewed wing-tip flap are presented. Lift, drag, pitching-moment, and hinge-moment data are included for subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.95. The flap showed extremely high hinge moments and low effectiveness as a longitudinal control. Although less affected by compressibility, this flap is indicated to be inferior to a constant-chord flap when applied to this triangular wing.

  19. On-line solid-phase extraction and multisyringe flow injection analysis of Al(III) and Fe(III) in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Vanloot, Pierre; Branger, Catherine; Margaillan, André; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Boudenne, Jean-Luc; Coulomb, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    A new analytical method was developed for on-line monitoring of residual coagulants (aluminium and iron salts) in potable water. The determination was based on a sequential procedure coupling an extraction/enrichment step of the analytes onto a modified resin and a spectrophotometric measurement of a surfactant-sensitized binary complex formed between eluted analytes and Chrome Azurol S. The optimization of the solid phase extraction was performed using factorial design and a Doehlert matrix considering six variables: sample percolation rate, sample metal concentration, flow-through sample volume (all three directly linked to the extraction step), elution flow rate, concentration and volume of eluent (all three directly linked to the elution step). A specific reagent was elaborated for sensitive and specific spectrophotometric determination of Al(III) and Fe(III), by optimizing surfactant and ligand concentrations and buffer composition. The whole procedure was automated by a multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system. Detection limits of 4.9 and 5.6 microg L(-1) were obtained for Al(III) and Fe(III) determination , respectively, and the linear calibration graph up to 300 microg L(-1) (both for Al(III) and Fe(III)) was well adapted to the monitoring of drinking water quality. The system was successfully applied to the on-site determination of Al(III) and Fe(III) at the outlet of two water treatment units during two periods of the year (winter and summer conditions).

  20. Transition Probabilities for the 1815 and 3344 Å Forbidden Lines of NE III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daw, Adrian; Parkinson, William H.; Smith, Peter L.; Calamai, Anthony G.

    2000-04-01

    We have measured the radiative lifetime of the 2s22p4 1S0 metastable level of Ne2+ (Ne III) to be 223+/-11 ms at the 90% confidence level by observing the photons emitted at 1815 Å by a decaying population of 1S0 Ne2+ ions produced and stored in a radio-frequency ion trap. This is the first lifetime measurement for an excited term of a ground configuration ion in the second row of the periodic table. The transition probabilities (A-values) for the forbidden transitions in the ground configurations of these ions are required for astrophysical line-ratio diagnostics. Using calculated branching ratios, we estimate that A(λ1815)=1.94+/-0.17 and A(λ3344)=2.55+/-0.19 s-1. Because these numbers have a sum with an experimentally determined uncertainty of 5%, they will provide more accurate results than the calculated A-values for determining electron temperature and density from astrophysical Ne III line ratios.

  1. Transition Probabilities for the 1815 and 3344 Å Forbidden Lines of Ne iii.

    PubMed

    Daw; Parkinson; Smith; Calamai

    2000-04-20

    We have measured the radiative lifetime of the 2s22p4 1S0 metastable level of Ne2+ (Ne iii) to be 223+/-11 ms at the 90% confidence level by observing the photons emitted at 1815 Å by a decaying population of 1S0 Ne2+ ions produced and stored in a radio-frequency ion trap. This is the first lifetime measurement for an excited term of a ground configuration ion in the second row of the periodic table. The transition probabilities (A-values) for the forbidden transitions in the ground configurations of these ions are required for astrophysical line-ratio diagnostics. Using calculated branching ratios, we estimate that A&parl0;lambda1815&parr0;=1.94+/-0.17 and A&parl0;lambda3344&parr0;=2.55+/-0.19 s-1. Because these numbers have a sum with an experimentally determined uncertainty of 5%, they will provide more accurate results than the calculated A-values for determining electron temperature and density from astrophysical Ne iii line ratios.

  2. Spectrophotometry near the atmospheric cutoff of the strongest Bowen resonance fluorescence lines of O III in two planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Opal, Chet B.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometric results are presented for the stronger, well-resolved Bowen O III resonance fluorescence emission lines in the planetary nebulae 7027 and NGC 7662 down to and including the intrinsically strong line at 3133 A. These data are combined with results from the IUE atlas of spectra and similar results for the longer wavelength lines by Likkel and Aller (1986) to give the first full coverage of the Bowen lines. Good agreement is found with fluorescence theory for the primary cascade lines, except for the Likkel and Aller results. The efficiency of conversion of the exciting He II Ly-alpha into O III lines is determined, and values comparable to other planetary nebulae are found.

  3. A Spectral-line Analysis of the G8 III Standard ɛ VIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, David F.

    2017-08-01

    Eleven seasons of spectroscopic data comprised of 107 exposures for the stable G8 III standard star, ɛ Vir are analyzed for projected rotation rate and granulation parameters. A Fourier analysis of the line shapes yield v sin i = 3.06 ± 0.20 km s-1 and a radial-tangential macroturbulence dispersion ζ RT = 5.16 ± 0.08 km s-1. The radial velocity over nine seasons is constant to 18 m s-1. The absolute radial velocity with granulation blueshifts (but not gravitational redshift) removed is -14120 ± 75 m s-1. Line-depth ratios show the temperature to be constant to 0.7 K over 11 years, although a small secular rise or cyclic variation ˜1 K cannot be ruled out. The third-signature plot shows that the star has granulation velocities 10% larger than the Sun's. Mapping the Fe i λ6253 line bisector on to the third-signature plot indicates a normal-for-giants flux deficit area of 12.8%, indicating ˜134 K temperature difference between granules and lanes. Deficit velocities of GK giants are seen to shift to higher values with higher luminosity, ˜0.75 km s-1 over ΔM V ˜ 1.5, indicating larger velocity differences between granules and lanes for giants higher in the HR diagram.

  4. Searching for Dwarf H Alpha Emission-line Galaxies within Voids III: First Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. Ward; Draper, Christian; McNeil, Stephen; Joner, Michael D.

    2017-02-01

    The presence or absence of dwarf galaxies with {M}r\\prime > -14 in low-density voids is determined by the nature of dark matter halos. To better understand what this nature is, we are conducting an imaging survey through redshifted Hα filters to look for emission-line dwarf galaxies in the centers of two nearby galaxy voids called FN2 and FN8. Either finding such dwarfs or establishing that they are not present is a significant result. As an important step in establishing the robustness of the search technique, we have observed six candidates from the survey of FN8 with the Gillett Gemini telescope and GMOS spectrometer. All of these candidates had emission, although none was Hα. The emission in two objects was the [O iii]λ4959, 5007 doublet plus Hβ, and the emission in the remaining four was the [O ii]λ3727 doublet, all from objects beyond the void. While no objects were within the void, these spectra show that the survey is capable of finding emission-line dwarfs in the void centers that are as faint as {M}r\\prime ∼ -12.4, should they be present. These spectra also show that redshifts estimated from our filtered images are accurate to several hundred km s‑1 if the line is identified correctly, encouraging further work in finding ways to conduct redshift surveys through imaging alone.

  5. Conceptual design report for environmental, safety and health phase III FY-91 line item

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    The Mound Facility (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by the facility`s activities. Design has been completed, and construction is in progress for Phase I of this multiphase program. Phase II has been submitted for fiscal year (FY) 89 funding and Phase IV is being submitted as an FY 92 line item. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) addresses Phase III of the ES&H program.

  6. First Detection of the [O(sub III)] 88 Micrometers Line at High Redshifts: Characterizing the Starburst and Narrow-Line Regions in Extreme Luminosity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkinhoff, C.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Parshley, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    We have made the first detections of the 88 micrometers [O(sub III)] line from galaxies in the early universe, detecting the line from the lensed active galactic nucleus (AGN)/starburst composite systems APM 08279+5255 at z 3.911 and SMM J02399-0136 at z = 2.8076. The line is exceptionally bright from both systems, with apparent (lensed) luminosities approx.10(exp 11) Solar Luminosity, For APM 08279, the [O(sub III)] line flux can be modeled in a star formation paradigm, with the stellar radiation field dominated by stars with effective temperatures, T(sub eff) > 36,000 K, similar to the starburst found in M82. The model implies approx.35% of the total far-IR luminosity of the system is generated by the starburst, with the remainder arising from dust heated by the AGN. The 881,tm line can also be generated in the narrow-line region of the AGN if gas densities are around a few 1000 cu cm. For SMM J02399, the [O(sub III)] line likely arises from HII regions formed by hot (T(sub eff) > 40,000 K) young stars in a massive starburst that dominates the far-IR luminosity of the system. The present work demonstrates the utility of the [O(sub III)] line for characterizing starbursts and AGN within galaxies in the early universe. These are the first detections of this astrophysically important line from galaxies beyond a redshift of 0.05.s

  7. First Detection of the [O(sub III)] 88 Micrometers Line at High Redshifts: Characterizing the Starburst and Narrow-Line Regions in Extreme Luminosity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkinhoff, C.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Parshley, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    We have made the first detections of the 88 micrometers [O(sub III)] line from galaxies in the early universe, detecting the line from the lensed active galactic nucleus (AGN)/starburst composite systems APM 08279+5255 at z 3.911 and SMM J02399-0136 at z = 2.8076. The line is exceptionally bright from both systems, with apparent (lensed) luminosities approx.10(exp 11) Solar Luminosity, For APM 08279, the [O(sub III)] line flux can be modeled in a star formation paradigm, with the stellar radiation field dominated by stars with effective temperatures, T(sub eff) > 36,000 K, similar to the starburst found in M82. The model implies approx.35% of the total far-IR luminosity of the system is generated by the starburst, with the remainder arising from dust heated by the AGN. The 881,tm line can also be generated in the narrow-line region of the AGN if gas densities are around a few 1000 cu cm. For SMM J02399, the [O(sub III)] line likely arises from HII regions formed by hot (T(sub eff) > 40,000 K) young stars in a massive starburst that dominates the far-IR luminosity of the system. The present work demonstrates the utility of the [O(sub III)] line for characterizing starbursts and AGN within galaxies in the early universe. These are the first detections of this astrophysically important line from galaxies beyond a redshift of 0.05.s

  8. On-line updating Gaussian mixture model for aircraft wing spar damage evaluation under time-varying boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Bao, Qiao; Mei, Hanfei

    2014-12-01

    Structural health monitoring technology for aerospace structures has gradually turned from fundamental research to practical implementations. However, real aerospace structures work under time-varying conditions that introduce uncertainties to signal features that are extracted from sensor signals, giving rise to difficulty in reliably evaluating the damage. This paper proposes an online updating Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM)-based damage evaluation method to improve damage evaluation reliability under time-varying conditions. In this method, Lamb-wave-signal variation indexes and principle component analysis (PCA) are adopted to obtain the signal features. A baseline GMM is constructed on the signal features acquired under time-varying conditions when the structure is in a healthy state. By adopting the online updating mechanism based on a moving feature sample set and inner probability structural reconstruction, the probability structures of the GMM can be updated over time with new monitoring signal features to track the damage progress online continuously under time-varying conditions. This method can be implemented without any physical model of damage or structure. A real aircraft wing spar, which is an important load-bearing structure of an aircraft, is adopted to validate the proposed method. The validation results show that the method is effective for edge crack growth monitoring of the wing spar bolts holes under the time-varying changes in the tightness degree of the bolts.

  9. The Frequency Detuning Correction and the Asymmetry of Line Shapes: The Far Wings of H2O-H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A far-wing line shape theory which satisfies the detailed balance principle is applied to the H2O-H2O system. Within this formalism, two line shapes are introduced, corresponding to band-averages over the positive and negative resonance lines, respectively. Using the coordinate representation, the two line shapes can be obtained by evaluating 11-dimensional integrations whose integrands are a product of two factors. One depends on the interaction between the two molecules and is easy to evaluate. The other contains the density matrix of the system and is expressed as a product of two 3-dimensional distributions associated with the density matrices of the absorber and the perturber molecule, respectively. If most of the populated states are included in the averaging process, to obtain these distributions requires extensive computer CPU time, but only have to be computed once for a given temperature. The 11-dimensional integrations are evaluated using the Monte Carlo method, and in order to reduce the variance, the integration variables are chosen such that the sensitivity of the integrands on them is clearly distinguished.

  10. Composite Spectra of Broad Absorption Line Quasars in SDSS-III BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Hanna; Hamann, Fred; Paris, Isabelle; Capellupo, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars in the SDSS-III BOSS survey. We’re particularly interested in BALs because they arise from quasar outflows, which may be a source of feedback to the host galaxy. We analyze median composite spectra for BOSS QSOs in the redshift range 2.1 to 3.4 sorted by the strength of the BAL absorption troughs, parameterized by the Balnicity Index (BI), to study trends in the emission and absorption properties of BAL quasars. The wavelength coverage and high number of quasars observed in the BOSS survey allow us to examine BALs in the Lyman forest. Our main preliminary results when sorting the quasars by BI are 1) doublet absorption lines such as P V 1128A show a 1:1 ratio across all BI, indicating large column densities at all BI. This suggests that weaker BAL troughs result from smaller covering fractions rather than lower column densities. 2) The He II emission line, which is a measure of the far-UV/near-UV hardness of the ionizing continuum, is weaker in the larger BI composite spectra, indicating a far-UV spectral softening correlated with BI. This is consistent with the radiatively-driven BAL outflows being helped by intrinsically weaker ionizing continuum shapes (e.g., Baskin, Laor, and Hamann 2013). We also find a trend for slightly redder continuum slopes in the larger BI composite spectra, suggesting that the slope differences in the near-UV are also intrinsic.

  11. Systematic experimental study of the Stark broadening of C II, C III, N II, N III, O II and O III spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, B.; Popovic, M. V.; Konjevic, N.

    1999-04-01

    We report the experimental Stark widths of plasma broadened lines belonging to 3s-3p and 3p-3d transitions of singly and doubly ionized C, N and O emitters. The light source was a low pressure pulsed arc. The plasma electron densities were determined from the width of the Hell P{sub {alpha}} line while the electron temperatures were measured from the relative line intensities of five N II spectral lines.

  12. Type 2 Active Galactic Nuclei with Double-Peaked [O III] Lines: Narrow-Line Region Kinematics or Merging Supermassive Black Hole Pairs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2010-01-01

    We present a sample of 167 type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked [O III] λλ4959,5007 narrow emission lines, selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The double-peaked profiles can be well modeled by two velocity components, blueshifted and redshifted from the systemic velocity. Half of these objects have a more prominent redshifted component. In cases where the Hβ emission line is strong, it also shows two velocity components whose line-of-sight (LOS) velocity offsets are consistent with those of [O III]. The relative LOS velocity offset between the two components is typically a few hundred km s-1, larger by a factor of ~1.5 than the line full width at half maximum of each component. The offset correlates with the host stellar velocity dispersion σ*. The host galaxies of this sample show systematically larger σ*, stellar masses, and concentrations, and older luminosity-weighted mean stellar ages than a regular type 2 AGN sample matched in redshift, [O III] λ5007 equivalent width, and luminosity; they show no significant difference in radio properties. These double-peaked features could be due to narrow-line region kinematics, or binary black holes. The statistical properties do not show strong preference for or against either scenario, and spatially resolved optical imaging, spectroscopy, radio or X-ray follow-up are needed to draw firm conclusions.

  13. Comparisons of mapped magnetic field lines with the source path of the 7 April 1995 type III solar radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Gosling, J. T.; Malaspina, D. M.; Neudegg, D.; Steward, G.; Lobzin, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Ideally, the sources of type III solar radio bursts, which are produced mainly by flare-accelerated electron beams, trace the magnetic field lines along which the beams propagate from the Sun to interplanetary space. A recently developed 2-D approach for large-scale mapping of magnetic field lines between the Sun and Earth in the solar equatorial plane is applied to the sources of the 7 April 1995 type III radio burst imaged by Ulysses and Wind. The approach uses near-Earth solar wind data and a solar wind model with intrinsic nonradial magnetic field at the source surface of the solar wind. Quantitative agreement is found between the mapped field lines, the observed path of the radio source centroids, and the field configurations inferred from solar wind suprathermal electrons observed by Wind. Moreover, the mapped field lines are consistent with Wind not observing the in situ type III electron beam, Langmuir waves, and local radio emission for this type III event.

  14. Line identifications in the ultraviolet spectra of Tau Herculis, B5 IV, and Zeta Draconis, B6 III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.; Adelman, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    Tables of the lines found on two tracings each of the ultraviolet spectrum of Tau Her, B5 IV, and Zeta Dra, B6 III, made by the Copernicus satellite and possible identifications are given. The ranges 1025-1451A for Tau Her and 1035 to 1425A for Zeta Dra are covered by the U2 spectrometer at a resolution of 0.2A; the ranges 2028 to 2959A for Tau Her and 2000 to 3000A for Zeta Dra are covered by the V2 spectrometer at a resolution of 0.4A. The observed density of lines in the U2 region is 1.1 lines/A for Tau Her and 1.7 lines/A for Zeta Dra. In the V2 region it is 0.8 lines/A for Tau Her and 0.9 lines/A for Zeta Dra.

  15. ACTE Wing Loads Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) project modified a Gulfstream III (GIII) aircraft with a new flexible flap that creates a seamless transition between the flap and the wing. As with any new modification, it is crucial to ensure that the aircraft will not become overstressed in flight. To test this, Star CCM a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program was used to calculate aerodynamic data for the aircraft at given flight conditions.

  16. [Down-regulated βIII-tubulin expression can reverse paclitaxel resistance in A549/taxol cells lines].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Yinling; Guo, Qisen

    2014-08-20

    Chemotherapy drug resistance is the primary causes of death in patients with pulmonary carcinoma which make tumor recurrence or metastasis. β-tubulin is the main cell targets of anti-microtubule drug. Increased expression of βIII-tubulin has been implicated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. To explore the relationship among the expression level of βIII-tubulin and the sensitivity of A549/Taxolcell lines to Taxol and cell cycles and cell apoptosis by RNA interference-mediated inhibition of βIII-tubulin in A549/Taxol cells. Three pairs of siRNA targetd βIII-tubulin were designed and prepared, which were transfected into A549/Taxol cells using LipofectamineTM 2000. We detected the expression of βIII-tubulin mRNA using Real-time fluorescence qRT-PCR. Tedhen we selected the most efficient siRNA by the expression of βIII-tubulin mRNA in transfected group. βIII-tubulin protein level were mesured by Western blot. The taxol sensitivity in transfected group were evaluated by MTT assay. And the cell apoptosis and cell cycles were determined by flow cytometry. βIII-tubulin mRNA levels in A549/Taxol cells were significantly decreased in transfected grop by Real-time qRT-PCR than control groups. And βIII-tubulin siRNA-1 sequence showed the highest transfection efficiency, which was (87.73±4.87)% (P<0.01); Western blot results showed that the expressional level of BIII tublin protein was significantly down-reulated in the transfectant cells than thant in the control cells. By MTT assay, we showed that the inhibition ratio of Taxol to A549/Taxol cells transfeced was higher than that of control group (51.77±4.60)% (P<0.01). The early apoptosis rate of A549/Taxol cells in transfected group were significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.01); G2-M content in taxol group obviously increased than untreated samples by the cell cycle (P<0.05). βIII-tubulin down-regulated significantly sensitized NSCLC A549/Taxol cells to Paclitaxel.

  17. Automated measurement of Drosophila wings.

    PubMed

    Houle, David; Mezey, Jason; Galpern, Paul; Carter, Ashley

    2003-12-11

    Many studies in evolutionary biology and genetics are limited by the rate at which phenotypic information can be acquired. The wings of Drosophila species are a favorable target for automated analysis because of the many interesting questions in evolution and development that can be addressed with them, and because of their simple structure. We have developed an automated image analysis system (WINGMACHINE) that measures the positions of all the veins and the edges of the wing blade of Drosophilid flies. A video image is obtained with the aid of a simple suction device that immobilizes the wing of a live fly. Low-level processing is used to find the major intersections of the veins. High-level processing then optimizes the fit of an a priori B-spline model of wing shape. WINGMACHINE allows the measurement of 1 wing per minute, including handling, imaging, analysis, and data editing. The repeatabilities of 12 vein intersections averaged 86% in a sample of flies of the same species and sex. Comparison of 2400 wings of 25 Drosophilid species shows that wing shape is quite conservative within the group, but that almost all taxa are diagnosably different from one another. Wing shape retains some phylogenetic structure, although some species have shapes very different from closely related species. The WINGMACHINE system facilitates artificial selection experiments on complex aspects of wing shape. We selected on an index which is a function of 14 separate measurements of each wing. After 14 generations, we achieved a 15 S.D. difference between up and down-selected treatments. WINGMACHINE enables rapid, highly repeatable measurements of wings in the family Drosophilidae. Our approach to image analysis may be applicable to a variety of biological objects that can be represented as a framework of connected lines.

  18. Generic Wing, Pylon, and Moving Finned Store

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    66.4 cm 2.9 Area of planform 1425.8 cm’ 2.10 Location of reference of profiles and NACA 64A010 airfoil section over entire span definition of profiles...2.11 Lofting procedure between reference Straight line sections 2.12 Form of wing-body, or wing-root NACA 64A010 airfoil section; note references...below junction 2.13 Form of wing tip NACA 64A010 airfoil section 2.14 Wing centerbody Ogive-cylinder: Tangent at wailing edge of wing. Nose 16.51 cm from

  19. Theoretical emission line ratios for [Fe III] and [Fe VII] applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Francis P.; Aller, Lawrence H.; Ryans, Robert S. I.; Hyung, Siek

    2001-01-01

    Recent calculations of electron impact excitation rates and Einstein A-coefficients for transitions among the 3d6 levels of Fe III and among the 3d2 levels of Fe VII are used to derive theoretical emission line ratios applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae. Results for [Fe III] are generated for electron temperatures Te = 7,000–20,000 K and densities Ne = 102-108 cm−3, whereas those for [Fe VII] are provided for Te = 10,000–30,000 K and Ne = 102-108 cm−3. The theoretical line ratios are significantly different in some instances from earlier calculations and resolve discrepancies between theory and observation found for the planetary nebulae IC 4997 and NGC 7027. PMID:11493676

  20. Theoretical emission line ratios for [Fe III] and [Fe VII] applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae.

    PubMed

    Keenan, F P; Aller, L H; Ryans, R S; Hyung, S

    2001-08-14

    Recent calculations of electron impact excitation rates and Einstein A-coefficients for transitions among the 3d(6) levels of Fe III and among the 3d(2) levels of Fe VII are used to derive theoretical emission line ratios applicable to the optical and infrared spectra of gaseous nebulae. Results for [Fe III] are generated for electron temperatures T(e) = 7,000-20,000 K and densities N(e) = 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3), whereas those for [Fe VII] are provided for T(e) = 10,000-30,000 K and N(e) = 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3). The theoretical line ratios are significantly different in some instances from earlier calculations and resolve discrepancies between theory and observation found for the planetary nebulae IC 4997 and NGC 7027.

  1. EARLY RESULTS FROM THE GALACTIC O-STAR SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: C III EMISSION LINES IN Of SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Sota, Alfredo; MaIz Apellaniz, Jesus; Alfaro, Emilio J.; Barba, Rodolfo H.; Arias, Julia I.; Gamen, Roberto C. E-mail: sota@iaa.es E-mail: emilio@iaa.es E-mail: rbarba@dfuls.cl E-mail: rgamen@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar

    2010-03-10

    On the basis of an extensive new spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, we introduce the Ofc category, which consists of normal spectra with C III {lambda}{lambda}4647-4650-4652 emission lines of comparable intensity to those of the Of defining lines N III {lambda}{lambda}4634-4640-4642. The former feature is strongly peaked to spectral type O5, at all luminosity classes, but preferentially in some associations or clusters and not others. The relationships of this phenomenon to the selective C III {lambda}5696 emission throughout the normal Of domain, and to the peculiar, variable Of?p category, for which strong C III {lambda}{lambda}4647-4650-4652 emission is a defining characteristic, are discussed. Magnetic fields have recently been detected on two members of the latter category. We also present two new extreme Of?p stars, NGC 1624-2 and CPD -28 deg. 2561, bringing the number known in the Galaxy to five. Modeling of the behavior of these spectral features can be expected to better define the physical parameters of both normal and peculiar objects, as well as the atomic physics involved.

  2. The hind wing of the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria Forskål). III. A finite element analysis of a deployable structure.

    PubMed

    Herbert, R C; Young, P G; Smith, C W; Wootton, R J; Evans, K E

    2000-10-01

    Finite element analysis is used to model the automatic cambering of the locust hind wing during promotion: the umbrella effect. It was found that the model required a high degree of sophistication before replicating the deformations found in vivo. The model has been validated using experimental data and the deformations recorded both in vivo and ex vivo. It predicts that even slight modifications to the geometrical description used can lead to significant changes in the deformations observed in the anal fan. The model agrees with experimental data and produces deformations very close to those seen in free-flying locusts. The validated model may be used to investigate the varying geometries found in orthopteran anal fans and the stresses found throughout the wing when loaded.

  3. Copernicus studies of interstellar material in the Perseus II complex. III - The line of sight to Zeta Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectrophotometric data obtained with Copernicus are used to analyze the distribution, composition, density, temperature, and kinematics of the interstellar material along the line of sight to Zeta Persei. The far-UV extinction curve for the star is evaluated along with the kinematics of the interstellar gas, observations of atomic and molecular hydrogen, curves of growth for neutral and ionized species, atomic abundances and depletions, ionization equilibria, and observations of CO and OH lines. The results show that there are apparently three clouds along the line of sight to Zeta Persei: a main cloud at approximately +13 km/s which contains most of the material and forms all the neutral and molecular lines as well as most of the ionic lines, a second component at +22 km/s which must contribute to the strong UV lines of most ions, and a third component at roughly +2 km/s which gives rise to a strong Si III line at 1206 A. It is also found that the UV extinction curve has a somewhat steep far-UV rise, indicating the presence of a substantial number of small grains, and that about 30% of the hydrogen nuclei over the entire line of sight are in molecular form.

  4. Wing on a String

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike; Brand, Lance

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an activity that shows students how flight occurs. The "wing on a string" is a simple teacher-made frame that consists of PVC pipe, fishing line, and rubber bands--all readily available hardware store items. The only other materials/tools involved are a sheet of paper, some pieces of a soda straw, a stapler,…

  5. Wing on a String

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike; Brand, Lance

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an activity that shows students how flight occurs. The "wing on a string" is a simple teacher-made frame that consists of PVC pipe, fishing line, and rubber bands--all readily available hardware store items. The only other materials/tools involved are a sheet of paper, some pieces of a soda straw, a stapler,…

  6. Star formation in Chamaeleon I and III: a molecular line study of the starless core population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitali, A. E.; Belloche, A.; Garrod, R. T.; Parise, B.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The Chamaeleon dark molecular clouds are excellent nearby targets for low-mass star formation studies. Even though they belong to the same cloud complex, Cha I and II are actively forming stars while Cha III shows no sign of ongoing star formation. Aims: We aim to determine the driving factors that have led to the very different levels of star formation activity in Cha I and III and examine the dynamical state and possible evolution of the starless cores within them. Methods: Observations were performed in various molecular transitions with the APEX and Mopra telescopes. We examine the kinematics of the starless cores in the clouds through a virial analysis, a search for contraction motions, and velocity gradients. The chemical differences in the two clouds are explored through their fractional molecular abundances, derived from a non-LTE analysis, and comparison to predictions of chemical models. Results: Five cores are gravitationally bound in Cha I and one in Cha III. The so-called infall signature indicating contraction motions is seen toward 8-17 cores in Cha I and 2-5 cores in Cha III, which leads to a range of 13-28% of the cores in Cha I and 10-25% of the cores in Cha III that are contracting and may become prestellar. There is no significant difference in the turbulence level in the two clouds. Future dynamical interactions between the cores will not be dynamically significant in either Cha I or III, but the subregion Cha I North may experience collisions between cores within ~0.7 Myr. Turbulence dissipation in the cores of both clouds is seen in the high-density tracers N2H+ 1-0 and HC3N 10-9 which have lower non-thermal velocity dispersions compared to C17O 2-1, C18O 2-1, and C34S 2-1. Evidence of depletion in the Cha I core interiors is seen in the abundance distributions of the latter three molecules. The median fractional abundance of C18O is lower in Cha III than Cha I by a factor of ~2. The median abundances of most molecules (except

  7. Scapular Winging

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Benjamin W. T.; Geoghegan, John M.; Wallace, W. Angus; Manning, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    This review explores the causes of scapula winging, with overview of the relevant anatomy, proposed aetiology and treatment. Particular focus is given to lesions of the long thoracic nerve, which is reported to be the most common aetiological factor. PMID:27582902

  8. Chicken line-dependent mortality after experimental infection with three type IIxIII recombinant Toxoplasma gondii clones.

    PubMed

    Schares, G; Herrmann, D C; Maksimov, P; Matzkeit, B; Conraths, F J; Moré, G; Preisinger, R; Weigend, S

    2017-09-01

    Three genetically different clones of Toxoplasma gondii, also different in mouse virulence, were studied by experimental infection in chickens. For the experiments, four chicken lines were used, which differed in phylogenetic origin and performance level: two white egg layer lines, one with high laying performance (WLA), one with low (R11) and two brown layer lines, also displaying high (BLA) and low (L68) egg number. Chickens were intraperitoneally infected with three different T. gondii isolates representing type IIxIII recombinant clones, i.e. showing both, type II- and type III-specific alleles. These clones (K119/2 2C10, B136/1 B6H6, K119/2 A7) had exhibited virulence differences in a mouse model. In chickens, a significantly higher mortality was observed in white layer lines, but not in brown layer lines, suggesting that differences in the phylogenetic background may influence the susceptibility of chickens for toxoplasmosis. In addition, antibody (IgY) levels varied in surviving chickens at 31 days post infection. While low to intermediate antibody levels were observed in white layers, intermediate to high levels were measured in brown layers. Infection with a T. gondii clone showing low chicken virulence resulted in higher antibody levels in all chicken lines compared to infection with T. gondii clones of intermediate or high chicken virulence. This was in agreement with the parasite load as determined by real-time PCR. Overall, results show that progeny resulting from natural sexual recombination of T. gondii clonal lineages, may differ in their virulence for mice and chickens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploring AGN-starburst coexistence in galaxies at z ˜ 0.8 using the [O III]4959+5007/[O III]4363 line ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, M.

    2016-09-01

    Using detailed modelling, we analyse the spectra observed from the sample galaxies at z ˜ 0.8 presented by Ly et al., constraining the models by the [O III]5007+4959/[O III]4363 line ratios. Composite models (shock + photoionization) are adopted. Shock velocities ≥100 km s-1 and pre-shock densities n0 ˜ 200 cm-3 characterize the gas surrounding the starburst (SB), while n0 are higher by a factor of 1.5-10 in the AGN emitting gas. SB effective temperatures are similar to those of quiescent galaxies (T* ˜ 4-7 × 104 K). Cloud geometrical thicknesses in the SB are ≤1016 cm, indicating major fragmentation, while in AGN they reach >10 pc. O/H are about solar for all the objects, except for a few AGN clouds with O/H = 0.3-0.5 solar. SB models reproduce most of the data within the observational errors. About half of the objects' spectra are well fitted by an accreting AGN. Some galaxies show multiple radiation sources, such as SB + AGN, or a double AGN.

  10. Coronal Magnetic Field Lines and Electrons Associated with Type III-V Radio Bursts in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, P.; Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ebenezer, E.

    2017-06-01

    We recently investigated some of the hitherto unreported observational characteristics of the low frequency (85-35 MHz) type III-V bursts from the Sun using radio spectropolarimeter observations. The quantitative estimates of the velocities of the electron streams associated with the above two types of bursts indicate that they are in the range ≳0.13c-0.02 c for the type V bursts, and nearly constant ({≈ }0.4c) for the type III bursts. We also find that the degree of circular polarization of the type V bursts vary gradually with frequency/heliocentric distance as compared to the relatively steeper variation exhibited by the preceding type III bursts. These imply that the longer duration of the type V bursts at any given frequency (as compared to the preceding type III bursts) which is its defining feature, is due to the combined effect of the lower velocities of the electron streams that generate type V bursts, spread in the velocity spectrum, and the curvature of the magnetic field lines along which they travel.

  11. THE SDSS-III APOGEE SPECTRAL LINE LIST FOR H-BAND SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Shetrone, M.; Bizyaev, D.; Chojnowski, D.; Lawler, J. E.; Prieto, C. Allende; Zamora, O.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Souto, D.; Smith, V. V.; Cunha, K.; Holtzman, J.; Pérez, A. E. García; Sobeck, J.; Majewski, S.; Mészáros, Sz.; Koesterke, L.; Zasowski, G.

    2015-12-15

    We present the H-band spectral line lists adopted by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). The APOGEE line lists comprise astrophysical, theoretical, and laboratory sources from the literature, as well as newly evaluated astrophysical oscillator strengths and damping parameters. We discuss the construction of the APOGEE line list, which is one of the critical inputs for the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline, and present three different versions that have been used at various stages of the project. The methodology for the newly calculated astrophysical line lists is reviewed. The largest of these three line lists contains 134,457 molecular and atomic transitions. In addition to the format adopted to store the data, the line lists are available in MOOG, Synspec, and Turbospectrum formats. The limitations of the line lists along with guidance for its use on different spectral types are discussed. We also present a list of H-band spectral features that are either poorly represented or completely missing in our line list. This list is based on the average of a large number of spectral fit residuals for APOGEE observations spanning a wide range of stellar parameters.

  12. Instabilities in line-driven stellar winds. III - Wave propagation in the case of pure line absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owocki, S. P.; Rybicki, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of small-amplitude velocity perturbations is examined in the idealized case of a stellar wind that is driven by pure line absorption of the star's continuum radiation. It is established that the instability in the supersonic region is of the advective type relative to the star, but of the absolute type relative to the wind itself. It is also shown that the inward propagation of information in such a wind is limited to the sound speed, in contrast to the theory of Abbott, which predicts inward propagation faster than sound. This apparent contradiction is resolved through an extensive discussion of the analytically soluble case of zero sound speed.

  13. AST Composite Wing Program: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karal, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The Boeing Company demonstrated the application of stitched/resin infused (S/RFI) composite materials on commercial transport aircraft primary wing structures under the Advanced Subsonic technology (AST) Composite Wing contract. This report describes a weight trade study utilizing a wing torque box design applicable to a 220-passenger commercial aircraft and was used to verify the weight savings a S/RFI structure would offer compared to an identical aluminum wing box design. This trade study was performed in the AST Composite Wing program, and the overall weight savings are reported. Previous program work involved the design of a S/RFI-base-line wing box structural test component and its associated testing hardware. This detail structural design effort which is known as the "semi-span" in this report, was completed under a previous NASA contract. The full-scale wing design was based on a configuration for a MD-90-40X airplane, and the objective of this structural test component was to demonstrate the maturity of the S/RFI technology through the evaluation of a full-scale wing box/fuselage section structural test. However, scope reductions of the AST Composite Wing Program pre-vented the fabrication and evaluation of this wing box structure. Results obtained from the weight trade study, the full-scale test component design effort, fabrication, design development testing, and full-scale testing of the semi-span wing box are reported.

  14. Microlensing of circumstellar envelopes. III. Line profiles from stellar winds in homologous expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, M. A.; Ignace, R.; Bryce, H. M.

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines line profile evolution due to the linear expansion of circumstellar material obsverved during a microlensing event. This work extends our previous papers on emission line profile evolution from radial and azimuthal flow during point mass lens events and fold caustic crossings. Both "flavours" of microlensing were shown to provide effective diagnostics of bulk motion in circumstellar envelopes. In this work a different genre of flow is studied, namely linear homologous expansion, for both point mass lenses and fold caustic crossings. Linear expansion is of particular relevance to the effects of microlensing on supernovae at cosmological distances. We derive line profiles and equivalent widths for the illustrative cases of pure resonance and pure recombination lines, modelled under the Sobolev approximation. The efficacy of microlensing as a diagnostic probe of the stellar environs is demonstrated and discussed.

  15. Exact Solutions and Bifurcations of a Modulated Equation in a Discrete Nonlinear Electrical Transmission Line (III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jibin; Chen, Fengjuan

    In this paper, we consider a modulated equation in a discrete nonlinear electrical transmission line. This model is an integrable planar dynamical system having three singular straight lines. By using the theory of singular systems to investigate the dynamical behavior for this system, we obtain bifurcations of phase portraits under different parameter conditions. Corresponding to some special level curves, we derive exact explicit parametric representations of solutions (including smooth solitary wave solutions, peakons, compactons, periodic cusp wave solutions) under different parameter conditions.

  16. Theoretical damping in roll and rolling moment due to differential wing incidence for slender cruciform wings and wing-body combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gaynor J; DUGAN DUANE W

    1952-01-01

    A method of analysis based on slender-wing theory is developed to investigate the characteristics in roll of slender cruciform wings and wing-body combinations. The method makes use of the conformal mapping processes of classical hydrodynamics which transform the region outside a circle and the region outside an arbitrary arrangement of line segments intersecting at the origin. The method of analysis may be utilized to solve other slender cruciform wing-body problems involving arbitrarily assigned boundary conditions. (author)

  17. Identification of Near-infrared [Se iii] and [Kr vi] Emission Lines in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, N. C.; Madonna, S.; Butler, K.; García-Rojas, J.; Mashburn, A. L.; Morisset, C.; Luridiana, V.; Roederer, I. U.

    2017-05-01

    We identify [Se iii] 1.0994 μm in the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 5315 and [Kr vi] 1.2330 μm in three PNe from spectra obtained with the Folded-Port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrometer on the 6.5 m Baade Telescope. Se and Kr are the two most widely detected neutron-capture elements in astrophysical nebulae, and can be enriched by s-process nucleosynthesis in PN progenitor stars. The detection of [Se iii] 1.0994 μm is particularly valuable when paired with observations of [Se iv] 2.2864 μm, as it can be used to improve the accuracy of nebular Se abundance determinations, and allows Se ionization correction factor (ICF) schemes to be empirically tested for the first time. We present new effective collision strength calculations for Se2+ and Kr5+, which we use to compute ionic abundances. In NGC 5315, we find that the Se abundance computed from Se3+/H+ is lower than that determined with ICFs that incorporate Se2+/H+. We compute new Kr ICFs that take Kr5+/H+ into account, by fitting correlations found in grids of Cloudy models between Kr ionic fractions and those of more abundant elements, and use these to derive Kr abundances in four PNe. Observations of [Se iii] and [Kr vi] in a larger sample of PNe, with a range of excitation levels, are needed to rigorously test the ICF prescriptions for Se and our new Kr ICFs. This paper includes data obtained with the 6.5-m Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  18. Recombination line intensities for hydrogenic ions. III - Effects of finite optical depth and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Storey, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect on the recombination spectrum of hydrogen arising from: (1) finite optical thickness in the Lyman lines; (2) the overlapping of Lyman lines near the series limit; (3) the absorption of Lyman lines by dust or photoionization, and (4) the long-wave radiation emitted by dust is examined. Full account is taken of electron and heavy particle collisions in redistributing energy and angular momentum. It is seen that each of these deviations from the classical Case B leads to observable effects, and that dust influences the recombination spectrum in characteristic ways that may make possible new observational constraints on dust properties in nebulosities. On the basis of these calculations it is believed that the uncertainty in the determination of the helium-to-hydrogen abundance ratio in the universe may be larger than currently claimed.

  19. Interstellar lines in spectra of extragalactic sources. III Markarian 509, Arakelian 120, and 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, D. G.; Ratcliff, S.; Blades, J. C.; Wu, C. C.; Cowie, L. L.; Morton, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    Spectra of two Seyfert galaxies, Mrk 509 and Akn 120, show galactic interstellar absorption lines of S II, Si II, and Fe II, while Si IV absorption is seen in the quasar 3C 273. The lines appear at LSR velocity of less than 100 km/s and probably lie within 3 kpc of the galactic disk. Extragalactic absorption lines are found in the spectrum of Mrk 509, with two redshift systems at z = 0.033 and 0.034 identified to have Ly-alpha and both members of the C IV doublet. In one of these systems, (D/H) is less than 0.0001. No metal-poor absorption systems are seen in the narrow redshift ranges sampled in each object, whereas one or two might have been expected.

  20. The second spectrum of niobium: III. Evaluation of line isotope shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazza, Safa

    2013-03-01

    Using isotope shift values of only one Nb II line, we propose for the first time to predict isotope shifts of all spectral lines for this ion for any pair of isotopes. For this purpose, we had recourse to ab intio calculations to determine specific mass and field shifts of all relevant Nb II configuration averages, which are respectively proportional to the Vinti integral k-factor and the charge density at the nucleus, 4л|Ψ(o)|2. With the help of very accurate level eigenvectors of these configurations and using the sharing rule, we computed specific mass and field shifts of each level. Since a transition wavenumber is the difference between two energy levels, we then deduced line isotope shifts.

  1. [O III] emission line as a tracer of star-forming galaxies at high redshifts: comparison between Hα and [O III] emitters at z=2.23 in HiZELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T. L.; Kodama, T.; Sobral, D.; Khostovan, A. A.; Hayashi, M.; Shimakawa, R.; Koyama, Y.; Tadaki, K.-i.; Tanaka, I.; Minowa, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Smail, I.; Best, P. N.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of z = 2.23 Hα and [O III] λ5007 emitters using the narrow-band-selected samples obtained from the High-z Emission Line Survey. We construct two samples of the Hα and [O III] emitters and compare their integrated physical properties. We find that the distribution of stellar masses, dust extinction, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs (sSFRs) is not statistically different between the two samples. When we separate the full galaxy sample into three subsamples according to the detections of the Hα and/or [O III] emission lines, most of the sources detected with both Hα and [O III] show log(sSFRUV) ≳ -9.5. The comparison of the three subsamples suggests that sources with strong [O III] line emission tend to have the highest star-forming activity out all galaxies that we study. We argue that the [O III] emission line can be used as a tracer of star-forming galaxies at high redshift, and that it is especially useful to investigate star-forming galaxies at z > 3, for which Hα emission is no longer observable from the ground.

  2. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey - III. An observed link between AGN Eddington ratio and narrow-emission-line ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyuseok; Schawinski, Kevin; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Lamperti, Isabella; Ricci, Claudio; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Berney, Simon; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Masetti, Nicola; Soto, Kurt T.; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the observed relationship between black hole mass (MBH), bolometric luminosity (Lbol) and Eddington ratio (λEdd) with optical emission-line ratios ([N II] λ6583/Hα, [S II] λλ6716, 6731/Hα, [O I] λ6300/Hα, [O III] λ5007/Hβ, [Ne III] λ3869/Hβ and He II λ4686/Hβ) of hard X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey. We show that the [N II] λ6583/Hα ratio exhibits a significant correlation with λEdd (RPear = -0.44, p-value = 3 × 10-13, σ = 0.28 dex), and the correlation is not solely driven by MBH or Lbol. The observed correlation between [N II] λ6583/Hα ratio and MBH is stronger than the correlation with Lbol, but both are weaker than the λEdd correlation. This implies that the large-scale narrow lines of AGN host galaxies carry information about the accretion state of the AGN central engine. We propose that [N II] λ6583/Hα is a useful indicator of Eddington ratio with 0.6 dex of rms scatter, and that it can be used to measure λEdd and thus MBH from the measured Lbol, even for high-redshift obscured AGN. We briefly discuss possible physical mechanisms behind this correlation, such as the mass-metallicity relation, X-ray heating, and radiatively driven outflows.

  3. Line shapes investigations in Yugoslavia and Serbia III (1989 - 1993). (Bibliography and citation index).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    1994-08-01

    The first part of the publication contains review and analysis of the results of spectral line shapes investigations in Yugoslavia and Serbia in the period 1989 - 1993. In the second part, the bibliography of the contributions of Yugoslav and Serbian scientists is given, together with the citation index.

  4. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere. III - Line spectrum and radius determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Line profiles are computed on the basis of the moving atmospheres from the hydrodynamic models investigated by Karp (1975). It is found that the velocity gradients in the atmosphere can be used to explain the apparent, slightly supersonic microturbulence. The total observed microturbulence is seen to be consistent with the linear sum of the classical microturbulence and that caused by the velocity gradients.

  5. Teacher-Student Interaction and Learning in On-Line Theological Education. Part III: Methodological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Mark H.

    2006-01-01

    Many theological educators ask how on-line classes can provide students with the kind of personal teacher-student interaction that is needed in a healthy and holistic approach to preparation for ministry. A quantitative study was undertaken for the purposes of examining the relationships between three major types of teacher-student interaction…

  6. Taste in chimpanzees. III: Labeled-line coding in sweet taste.

    PubMed

    Hellekant, G; Ninomiya, Y; Danilova, V

    1998-11-15

    In peripheral taste the coding mechanism remains an enigma. Among coding theories the "across-fiber pattern" argues that activity across fibers codes for taste, whereas the "labeled line" claims that activity in a particular set of fibers underlies a taste quality. We showed previously that chimpanzee chorda tympani taste fibers grouped according to human taste qualities into an S-cluster, responding predominantly to sweet stimuli, a Q-cluster, sensitive to bitter tastants, and an N-cluster, stimulated by salts. The analysis showed that information in the S-line suffices to distinguish stimuli of one taste quality from the others. However, one condition for the labeled line remained: that blockage of activity in a particular line must cause blockage of one taste quality, but of no other, or its onset give rise to the sensation of a taste quality. Here we studied this requirement with gymnemic acids and miraculin. In humans and chimpanzees, gymnemic acids suppress the sweet taste of all sweeteners whereas miraculin adds a sweet taste quality to sour stimuli. Gymnemic acids also abolish miraculin-induced sweet taste. We found that gymnemic acids practically abolished the response to every sweetener in the chimpanzee S-cluster. Equally important, they had no effect on the responses of the Q- and N-clusters. After miraculin, the S-cluster fibers responded to acids as well as to sweeteners, although they had not responded to acids before miraculin. Gymnemic acids abolished this miraculin-induced response to acids and responses to sweeteners in the S-fibers. These results link the sweet taste quality to activity in fibers of the S-cluster. Thus the S-cluster fibers satisfy the definition of the labeled-line theory: "that activity in a particular fiber type represents a specific taste quality."

  7. Long-term spectroscopic monitoring of BA-type supergiants. III. Variability of photospheric lines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufer, A.; Stahl, O.; Wolf, B.; Fullerton, A. W.; Gaeng, T.; Gummersbach, C. A.; Jankovics, I.; Kovacs, J.; Mandel, H.; Peitz, J.; Rivinius, T.; Szeifert, T.

    1997-04-01

    We obtained time series of spectra with high S/N and high resolution in wavelength and time of early-type A and late-type B supergiants (cf. Kaufer et al. 1996A&A...305..887K, Paper I, and Kaufer et al. 1996A&A...314..599K, Paper II for the analysis of the variability of the stellar envelopes). In this work we inspect the time variations of the numerous photospheric line profiles in the optical spectrum. We find complex cyclical variations of the radial velocities with a typical velocity dispersion of σ=~3km/s. The corresponding equivalent-width variations are less than 1% of their mean if we assume a common modulation mechanism for both radial velocities and equivalent width. We do not find any depth dependence of the velocity fields in the metallic lines. For αCyg the Balmer lines show an increase of the radial velocity from H27 to H8 by 3km/s, which is identified with the onset of the radially accelerating velocity field of the stellar wind. The Cleaned periodograms of the radial-velocity curves show the simultaneous excitation of multiple pulsation modes with periods longer and shorter than the estimated radial fundamental periods of the objects, which might indicate the excitation of non-radial and radial overtones, respectively. The analysis of the line-profile variations (LPV) of the photospheric line spectrum reveals prograde travelling features in the dynamical spectra. The travelling times of these features are in contradiction to the possible rotation periods of these extended, slowly rotating objects. Therefore, we suggest that these features should be identified with non-radial pulsation modes, possibly g-modes, of low order (l=|m|<~5).

  8. The function of resilin in honeybee wings.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Ning, Jian Guo; Ren, Hui Lan; Zhang, Peng Fei; Zhao, Hong Yan

    2015-07-01

    The present work aimed to reveal morphological characteristics of worker honeybee (Apis mellifera) wings and demonstrate the function of resilin on camber changes during flapping flight. Detailed morphological investigation of the wings showed that different surface characteristics appear on the dorsal and ventral side of the honeybee wings and the linking structure connecting the forewing and hindwing plays an indispensable role in honeybee flapping flight. Resilin stripes were found on both the dorsal and ventral side of the wings, and resilin patches mostly existed on the ventral side. On the basis of resilin distribution, five flexion lines and three cambered types around the lines of passive deformation of the coupled-wing profile were obtained, which defined the deformation mechanism of the wing along the chord, i.e. concave, flat plate and convex. From a movie obtained using high-speed photography from three orthogonal views of free flight in honeybees, periodic changes of the coupled-wing profile were acquired and further demonstrated that the deformation mechanism is a fundamental property for variable deformed shapes of the wing profile during flapping flight, and, in particular, the flat wing profile achieves a nice transition between downstrokes and upstrokes.

  9. Sigma Geminorum (K1 III + ?) - Variability of the ultraviolet emission lines near conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Far-ultraviolet IUE echelle spectra of the moderate-period RS CVn system Sigma Geminorum (K1 III + ?) are reported. Despite the location of the red-giant primary of Sigma Gem in a portion of the H-R diagram where cool stellar winds are common, no evidence for circumstellar absorption features or blueward asymmetries is found in the chromospheric O I (or Mg I and Mg II) emission cores. However, observations on two consecutive days indicate significant changes in the profiles of high-excitation species such as Si IV and C IV which likely were produced by the rotation of a large-scale active region (Fried et al., 1983) off the visible hemisphere of the primary.

  10. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES. III. NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND MAGNESIUM LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach; Davies, Ben; Plez, Bertrand E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2015-05-10

    Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) calculations for Mg i in red supergiant stellar atmospheres are presented to investigate the importance of NLTE for the formation of Mg i lines in the NIR J-band. Recent work using medium resolution spectroscopy of atomic lines in the J-band of individual red supergiant stars has demonstrated this technique is a very promising tool for investigating the chemical composition of the young stellar population in star forming galaxies. As in previous work, where NLTE effects were studied for iron, titanium, and silicon, substantial effects are found resulting in significantly stronger Mg i absorption lines. For the quantitative spectral analysis the NLTE effects lead to magnesium abundances significantly smaller than in local thermodynamic equilibrium with the NLTE abundance corrections varying smoothly between −0.4 dex and −0.1 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 and 4400 K. We discuss the physical reasons of the NLTE effects and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies using individual red supergiants in the young massive galactic double cluster h and χ Persei.

  11. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. III. Probability distribution functions of molecular lines in Cygnus X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Ossenkopf, V.; Klessen, R. S.; Simon, R.; Fechtenbaum, S.; Herpin, F.; Tremblin, P.; Csengeri, T.; Myers, P. C.; Hill, T.; Cunningham, M.; Federrath, C.

    2016-03-01

    The probability distribution function of column density (N-PDF) serves as a powerful tool to characterise the various physical processes that influence the structure of molecular clouds. Studies that use extinction maps or H2 column-density maps (N) that are derived from dust show that star-forming clouds can best be characterised by lognormal PDFs for the lower N range and a power-law tail for higher N, which is commonly attributed to turbulence and self-gravity and/or pressure, respectively. While PDFs from dust cover a large dynamic range (typically N ~ 1020-24 cm-2 or Av~ 0.1-1000), PDFs obtained from molecular lines - converted into H2 column density - potentially trace more selectively different regimes of (column) densities and temperatures. They also enable us to distinguish different clouds along the line of sight through using the velocity information. We report here on PDFs that were obtained from observations of 12CO, 13CO, C18O, CS, and N2H+ in the Cygnus X North region, and make a comparison to a PDF that was derived from dust observations with the Herschel satellite. The PDF of 12CO is lognormal for Av ~ 1-30, but is cut for higher Av because of optical depth effects. The PDFs of C18O and 13CO are mostly lognormal up to Av ~ 1-15, followed by excess up to Av ~ 40. Above that value, all CO PDFs drop, which is most likely due to depletion. The high density tracers CS and N2H+ exhibit only a power law distribution between Av ~ 15 and 400, respectively. The PDF from dust is lognormal for Av ~ 3-15 and has a power-law tail up to Av ~ 500. Absolute values for the molecular line column densities are, however, rather uncertain because of abundance and excitation temperature variations. If we take the dust PDF at face value, we "calibrate" the molecular line PDF of CS to that of the dust and determine an abundance [CS]/[H2] of 10-9. The slopes of the power-law tails of the CS, N2H+, and dust PDFs are -1.6, -1.4, and -2.3, respectively, and are thus consistent

  12. Habitat variation and wing coloration affect wing shape evolution in dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Outomuro, D; Dijkstra, K-D B; Johansson, F

    2013-09-01

    Habitats are spatially and temporally variable, and organisms must be able to track these changes. One potential mechanism for this is dispersal by flight. Therefore, we would expect flying animals to show adaptations in wing shape related to habitat variation. In this work, we explored variation in wing shape in relation to preferred water body (flowing water or standing water with tolerance for temporary conditions) and landscape (forested to open) using 32 species of dragonflies of the genus Trithemis (80% of the known species). We included a potential source of variation linked to sexual selection: the extent of wing coloration on hindwings. We used geometric morphometric methods for studying wing shape. We also explored the phenotypic correlation of wing shape between the sexes. We found that wing shape showed a phylogenetic structure and therefore also ran phylogenetic independent contrasts. After correcting for the phylogenetic effects, we found (i) no significant effect of water body on wing shape; (ii) male forewings and female hindwings differed with regard to landscape, being progressively broader from forested to open habitats; (iii) hindwings showed a wider base in wings with more coloration, especially in males; and (iv) evidence for phenotypic correlation of wing shape between the sexes across species. Hence, our results suggest that natural and sexual selection are acting partially independently on fore- and hindwings and with differences between the sexes, despite evidence for phenotypic correlation of wing shape between males and females.

  13. Hydrodynamic Models of Line-Driven Accretion Disk Winds III: Local Ionization Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereyra, Nicolas Antonio; Kallman, Timothy R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic models of line-driven accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variable systems and calculate wind mass-loss rates and terminal velocities. The models are 2.5-dimensional, include an energy balance condition with radiative heating and cooling processes, and includes local ionization equilibrium introducing time dependence and spatial dependence on the line radiation force parameters. The radiation field is assumed to originate in an optically thick accretion disk. Wind ion populations are calculated under the assumption that local ionization equilibrium is determined by photoionization and radiative recombination, similar to a photoionized nebula. We find a steady wind flowing from the accretion disk. Radiative heating tends to maintain the temperature in the higher density wind regions near the disk surface, rather than cooling adiabatically. For a disk luminosity L (sub disk) = solar luminosity, white dwarf mass M(sub wd) = 0.6 solar mass, and white dwarf radii R(sub wd) = 0.01 solar radius, we obtain a wind mass-loss rate of M(sub wind) = 4 x 10(exp -12) solar mass yr(exp -1) and a terminal velocity of approximately 3000 km per second. These results confirm the general velocity and density structures found in our earlier constant ionization equilibrium adiabatic CV wind models. Further we establish here 2.5D numerical models that can be extended to QSO/AGN winds where the local ionization equilibrium will play a crucial role in the overall dynamics.

  14. H I line studies of galaxies. III - Distance moduli of 822 disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottinelli, L.; Gouguenheim, L.; Paturel, G.; de Vaucouleurs, G.

    1984-06-01

    The distance scale established on the basis of a distance moduli catalog (for 822 galaxies) that was derived from 21-cm line widths via the B-band Tully-Fisher relation is compared with several independent scales having a common zero point, that are based on the indicators for luminosity index, redshift, ring diameters, brightest superassociations, and effective diameters. These are in excellent systematic agreement, and confirm the linearity of the H I scale in the 24-35 modulus interval, but indicate a small systematic zero point difference of about 0.2 mag, which must be added to the H I moduli to place them on the same 'short' distance scale defined by the others.

  15. Measurement of the transition probability of the C III 190.9 nanometer intersystem line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.; Fang, Z.; Gibbons, T. T.; Parkinson, W. H.; Smith, Peter L.

    1993-01-01

    A radio-frequency ion trap has been used to store C(2+) ions created by electron bombardment of CO. The transition probability for the 2s2p 3Po1-2s2 1S0 intersystem line of C m has been measured by recording the radiative decay at 190.9 nm. The measured A-value is 121 +/- 7/s and agrees, within mutual uncertainty limits, with that of Laughlin et al. (1978), but is 20 percent larger than that of Nussbaumer and Storey (1978). The effective collision mixing rate coefficient among the fine structure levels of 3Po and the combined quenching and charge transfer rate coefficients out of the 3Po1 level with the CO source gas have also been measured.

  16. Measurement of the transition probability of the C III 190.9 nanometer intersystem line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.; Fang, Z.; Gibbons, T. T.; Parkinson, W. H.; Smith, Peter L.

    1993-01-01

    A radio-frequency ion trap has been used to store C(2+) ions created by electron bombardment of CO. The transition probability for the 2s2p 3Po1-2s2 1S0 intersystem line of C m has been measured by recording the radiative decay at 190.9 nm. The measured A-value is 121 +/- 7/s and agrees, within mutual uncertainty limits, with that of Laughlin et al. (1978), but is 20 percent larger than that of Nussbaumer and Storey (1978). The effective collision mixing rate coefficient among the fine structure levels of 3Po and the combined quenching and charge transfer rate coefficients out of the 3Po1 level with the CO source gas have also been measured.

  17. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey - III. An Observed Link Between AGN Eddington Ratio and Narrow-Emission-Line Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Kyuseok; Schawinski, Kevin; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Lamperti, Isabella; Ricci, Claudio; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Berney, Simon; Crenshaw, D. Michael; hide

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the observed relationship between black hole mass (M(sub BH)), bolometric luminosity (L(sub bol)) and Eddington ratio (lambda(sub Edd)) with optical emission-line ratios ([N II] lambda6583/Halpha, [S II]lambda-lamda6716, 6731/Halpha, [O I] lamda6300/Halpha, [O III] lamda5007/Hbeta, [Ne III] lamda3869/Hbeta and He II lamda4686/Hbeta) of hard X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey. We show that the [N II] lamda6583/Halpha ratio exhibits a significant correlation with lamda(sub Edd) (R(sub Pear) = -0.44, p-value 3 x 10(exp. -13) sigma = 0.28 dex), and the correlation is not solely driven by M(sub BH) or L(sub bol). The observed correlation between [N II] lamda6583/Halpha ratio and M(sub BH) is stronger than the correlation with L(sub bol), but both are weaker than the lamda(sub Edd) correlation. This implies that the large-scale narrow lines of AGN host galaxies carry information about the accretion state of the AGN central engine. We propose that [N II] lamda6583/Halpha is a useful indicator of Eddington ratio with 0.6 dex of rms scatter, and that it can be used to measure lambda(sub Edd) and thus M(sub BH) from the measured L(sub bol), even for high-redshift obscured AGN. We briefly discuss possible physical mechanisms behind this correlation, such as the mass-metallicity relation, X-ray heating, and radiatively driven outflows.

  18. Line Identification of Atomic and Ionic Spectra of Holmium in the Near-UV. II. Spectra of Ho II and Ho III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başar, Gö.; Al-Labady, N.; Özdalgiç, B.; Güzelçimen, F.; Er, A.; Öztürk, I. K.; Ak, T.; Bİlİr, S.; Tamanis, M.; Ferber, R.; Kröger, S.

    2017-02-01

    Fourier Transform spectra of holmium (Ho) in the UV spectral range from 31,530 to 25,000 cm‑1 (317 to 400 nm) have been investigated, particularly focusing on the ionic lines. The distinction between the different degrees of ionization (I, II, and III) is based on differences in signal-to-noise ratios from two Ho spectra, which have been measured with different buffer gases, i.e., neon and argon. Based on 106 known Ho ii and 126 known Ho iii energy levels, 97 lines could be classified as transitions of singly ionized Ho and 9 lines could be classified as transitions of doubly ionized Ho. Of the 97 Ho ii lines, 6 have not been listed in the extant literature. Another 215 lines have been assigned to Ho ii, though they could not be classified on the basis of the known energy levels.

  19. A LABORATORY log(gf) MEASUREMENT OF THE Ti II 15873.84 Å H-BAND LINE IN SUPPORT OF SDSS-III APOGEE

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.; Shetrone, M. D. E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu

    2014-06-01

    The SDSS-III APOGEE collaboration has identified a single useable line in the H-band spectra of APOGEE target stars arising from a singly ionized species. This line of Ti II (λ{sub air} = 15873.84 Å) is therefore of great importance for use in stellar surface gravity, or log(g), determinations via the Saha equation. While a theoretical estimate of the line strength exists, to date no laboratory measurement of the line strength has been reported. Herein we report an absolute laboratory transition probability measurement for this important Ti II line. A relative line strength measurement is made of the Ti II H-band line of interest and a reference line with a previously reported absolute transition probability. This ratio is measured using multiple spectra of a high-current water-cooled HC lamp recorded with a calibrated FT-IR spectrometer.

  20. Design, fabrication, and characterization of multifunctional wings to harvest solar energy in flapping wing air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Rosado, Ariel; Gehlhar, Rachel D.; Nolen, Savannah; Gupta, Satyandra K.; Bruck, Hugh A.

    2015-06-01

    Currently, flapping wing unmanned aerial vehicles (a.k.a., ornithopters or robotic birds) sustain very short duration flight due to limited on-board energy storage capacity. Therefore, energy harvesting elements, such as flexible solar cells, need to be used as materials in critical components, such as wing structures, to increase operational performance. In this paper, we describe a layered fabrication method that was developed for realizing multifunctional composite wings for a unique robotic bird we developed, known as Robo Raven, by creating compliant wing structure from flexible solar cells. The deformed wing shape and aerodynamic lift/thrust loads were characterized throughout the flapping cycle to understand wing mechanics. A multifunctional performance analysis was developed to understand how integration of solar cells into the wings influences flight performance under two different operating conditions: (1) directly powering wings to increase operation time, and (2) recharging batteries to eliminate need for external charging sources. The experimental data is then used in the analysis to identify a performance index for assessing benefits of multifunctional compliant wing structures. The resulting platform, Robo Raven III, was the first demonstration of a robotic bird that flew using energy harvested from solar cells. We developed three different versions of the wing design to validate the multifunctional performance analysis. It was also determined that residual thrust correlated to shear deformation of the wing induced by torsional twist, while biaxial strain related to change in aerodynamic shape correlated to lift. It was also found that shear deformation of the solar cells induced changes in power output directly correlating to thrust generation associated with torsional deformation. Thus, it was determined that multifunctional solar cell wings may be capable of three functions: (1) lightweight and flexible structure to generate aerodynamic forces, (2

  1. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE LINE OF SIGHT TO BACKGROUND QUASARS. III. MULTI-OBJECT SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, H.; Barrientos, L. F.; Padilla, N.; Lacerna, I.; Lopez, S.; Lira, P.; Maureira, M. J.; Gilbank, D. G.; Ellingson, E.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2013-09-01

    We present Gemini/GMOS-S multi-object spectroscopy of 31 galaxy cluster candidates at redshifts between 0.2 and 1.0 and centered on QSO sight lines taken from Lopez et al. The targets were selected based on the presence of an intervening Mg II absorption system at a similar redshift to that of a galaxy cluster candidate lying at a projected distance <2 h{sub 71}{sup -1} Mpc from the QSO sight line (a {sup p}hotometric hit{sup )}. The absorption systems span rest-frame equivalent widths between 0.015 and 2.028 A. Our aim was three-fold: (1) to identify the absorbing galaxies and determine their impact parameters, (2) to confirm the galaxy cluster candidates in the vicinity of each quasar sightline, and (3) to determine whether the absorbing galaxies reside in galaxy clusters. In this way, we are able to characterize the absorption systems associated with cluster members. Our main findings are as follows. (1) We identified 10 out of 24 absorbing galaxies with redshifts between 0.2509 {<=} z{sub gal} {<=} 1.0955, up to an impact parameter of 142 h{sub 71}{sup -1} kpc and a maximum velocity difference of 280 km s{sup -1}. (2) We spectroscopically confirmed 20 out of 31 cluster/group candidates, with most of the confirmed clusters/groups at z < 0.7. This relatively low efficiency results from the fact that we centered our observations on the QSO location, and thus occasionally some of the cluster centers were outside the instrument field of view. (3) Following from the results above, we spectroscopically confirmed of 10 out of 14 photometric hits within {approx}650 km s{sup -1} from galaxy clusters/groups, in addition to two new ones related to galaxy group environments. These numbers imply efficiencies of 71% in finding such systems with MOS spectroscopy. This is a remarkable result since we defined a photometric hit as those cluster-absorber pairs having a redshift difference {Delta}z = 0.1. The general population of our confirmed absorbing galaxies have luminosities

  2. Isophotes of a field in the Cygnus Loop photographed in the forbidden O III and forbidden N II + H-alpha lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnik, T. G.; Toropova, M. S.

    1982-12-01

    From interference-filter image-tube photographs of a 9 arc min field in the western part of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, taken in the 5007 forbidden O III and 6584, 6563 forbidden N II + H-alpha lines, sets of isophotes are derived by an equidensitometry technique based on the Sabattier effect. The emission regions in these lines exhibit a relatively displacement, interpreted as evidence for radiative cooling of the gas behind the shock generated in the supernova outburst. An explanation is offered for the differing morphology of the nebular filaments in the forbiddden O III and forbidden N II + H-alpha lines. The anomalously high I (O III)/I(H-beta) intensity ratio may reflect a spatial separation of the corresponding emission zones.

  3. On-line determination of Sb(III) and total Sb using baker's yeast immobilized on polyurethane foam and hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegário, Amauri A.; Silva, Ariovaldo José; Pozzi, Eloísa; Durrant, Steven F.; Abreu, Cassio H.

    2006-09-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was immobilized in cubes of polyurethane foam and the ability of this immobilized material to separate Sb(III) and Sb(V) was investigated. A method based on sequential determination of total Sb (after on-line reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) with thiourea) and Sb(III) (after on-line solid-liquid phase extraction) by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry is proposed. A flow system assembled with solenoid valves was used to manage all stages of the process. The effects of pH, sample loading and elution flow rates on solid-liquid phase extraction of Sb(III) were evaluated. Also, the parameters related to on-line pre-reduction (reaction coil and flow rates) were optimized. Detection limits of 0.8 and 0.15 μg L - 1 were obtained for total Sb and Sb(III), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of river water and effluent samples. The results obtained for the determination of total Sb were in agreement with expected values, including the river water Standard Reference Material 1640 certified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Recoveries of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in spiked samples were between 81 ± 19 and 111 ±15% when 120 s of sample loading were used.

  4. Observations and theory of Mg II lines in early type stars. II - Theory and predicted profiles. III - The observations and a comparison with the predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snijders, M. A. J.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Profiles of the UV Mg II lines in the spectra of early type stars are computed in a grid of model atmospheres with effective temperatures between 8000 and 35,000 K and log g values of 2.5 to 4.0 using the LTE and non-LTE theories of line formation. The theoretical results indicate that the line cores are strengthened by non-LTE effects over the entire temperature range, resonance-line wings are weaker in the cooler models than in the LTE case, and very large deviations from LTE occur in the hot low-gravity models. These predictions are compared with the equivalent widths of the UV Mg II lines in 106 stars and of the visual lines in 48 stars (spectral types O4 to A3). The observed equivalent widths of normal stars in luminosity classes II through V are found to agree with the predictions over the entire range from O8 to A2 if a certain Mg/H abundance is adopted. The line intensities observed in supergiants, Be, Bp, and Ap stars are discussed.

  5. Galaxy Clusters in the Line of Sight to Background Quasars. III. Multi-object Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, H.; Barrientos, L. F.; López, S.; Lira, P.; Padilla, N.; Gilbank, D. G.; Lacerna, I.; Maureira, M. J.; Ellingson, E.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2013-09-01

    We present Gemini/GMOS-S multi-object spectroscopy of 31 galaxy cluster candidates at redshifts between 0.2 and 1.0 and centered on QSO sight lines taken from López et al. The targets were selected based on the presence of an intervening Mg II absorption system at a similar redshift to that of a galaxy cluster candidate lying at a projected distance <2 h_{71}^{-1} Mpc from the QSO sight line (a "photometric hit"). The absorption systems span rest-frame equivalent widths between 0.015 and 2.028 Å. Our aim was three-fold: (1) to identify the absorbing galaxies and determine their impact parameters, (2) to confirm the galaxy cluster candidates in the vicinity of each quasar sightline, and (3) to determine whether the absorbing galaxies reside in galaxy clusters. In this way, we are able to characterize the absorption systems associated with cluster members. Our main findings are as follows. (1) We identified 10 out of 24 absorbing galaxies with redshifts between 0.2509 <= z gal <= 1.0955, up to an impact parameter of 142\\ h_{71}^{-1} kpc and a maximum velocity difference of 280 km s-1. (2) We spectroscopically confirmed 20 out of 31 cluster/group candidates, with most of the confirmed clusters/groups at z < 0.7. This relatively low efficiency results from the fact that we centered our observations on the QSO location, and thus occasionally some of the cluster centers were outside the instrument field of view. (3) Following from the results above, we spectroscopically confirmed of 10 out of 14 photometric hits within ~650 km s-1 from galaxy clusters/groups, in addition to two new ones related to galaxy group environments. These numbers imply efficiencies of 71% in finding such systems with MOS spectroscopy. This is a remarkable result since we defined a photometric hit as those cluster-absorber pairs having a redshift difference Δz = 0.1. The general population of our confirmed absorbing galaxies have luminosities L_{B} \\sim L_{B}^{\\ast } and mean rest

  6. A flow method based on solvent extraction coupled on-line to a reversed micellar mediated chemiluminescence detection for selective determination of gold(III) and gallium(III) in water and industrial samples.

    PubMed

    Hasanin, Tamer H A; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive flow method, based on the combination of on-line solvent extraction with reversed micellar mediated chemiluminescence (CL) detection using rhodamine B (RB), was investigated for the selective determination of Au(III) and Ga(III) in aqueous solutions. 2.0 M HCl was the optimum for extracting Au(III) while a 5.0M HCl solution containing 2.5M LiCl was selected as an optimum acidic medium for extraction of Ga(III). The Au(III) and Ga(III) chloro-complex anions were extracted from the above aqueous acidic solutions into toluene as their ion-pair complexes with the protonated RBH(+) ion followed by membrane phase separation in a flow system. In a flow cell of a detector, the extract was mixed with the reversed micellar solution of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) in 1-hexanol-cyclohexane/water (1.0M HCl) containing 0.10 M cerium(IV) and 0.05 M lithium sulfate. Then uptake of the ion-pair by the CTAC reversed micelles and the subsequent CL oxidation of RB with Ce(IV) occurred easily and the CL signals produced were recorded. Using a flow injection system, a detection limit (DL) of 0.4 μM Au(III) and 0.6 μM Ga(III), and linear calibration graphs with dynamic ranges from the respective DLs to 10 μM for Au(III) and Ga(III) were obtained under the optimized experimental conditions. The relative standard deviations (n=6) obtained at 2.0 µM Au(III) and 4.0 µM Ga(III) were 3.0% and 2.4%, respectively. The presented CL methodology has been applied for the determination of Au(III) and Ga(III) in water and industrial samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Rituximab for the first-line treatment of stage III/IV follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dundar, Y; Bagust, A; Hounsome, J; McLeod, C; Boland, A; Davis, H; Walley, T; Dickson, R

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical and cost-effectiveness of rituximab for the first-line treatment of stage III/IV follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (FNHL) based upon the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The manufacturer's scope restricts the intervention to rituximab in combination with CVP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone) (R-CVP); the only comparator used was CVP alone. The evidence from the one included randomised controlled trial (RCT) suggests that the addition of rituximab to a CVP chemotherapy regimen has a positive effect on the outcomes of time to treatment failure, disease progression, overall tumour response, duration of response and time to new lymphoma treatment in patients with stage III/IV FNHL compared with CVP alone. Adverse events were comparable between the two arms. This study was confirmed as the only relevant RCT. The economic analyses provided by the manufacturer were modelled using a three-state Markov model with with the health states being defined as progression-free survival (PFS), progressed (in which patients have relapsed) and death (which is an absorbing state). The model generated results for a cohort of patients with an initial age of 53 and makes no distinction between men and women. The model is basic in design, with several serious design flaws and key parameter values that are probably incompatible. Attempting to rectify the identified errors and limitations of the model did not increase the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) above 30,000 pounds. Although the cost-effectiveness results obtained appear to be compelling in support of R-CVP compared with CVP for the trial population the results may not be so convincing for a more representative population. The results of the ERG analysis on the impact of age suggest that ICERs increase

  8. View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5) and rear elevations ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5) and rear elevations of facade and tis flaking wings (Wings 1 and 2) - Hospital for Sick Children, 1731 Bunker Hill Road, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. TBT: Telecommunications-Based Training in the 90s (DELTA Programme--Action Line III). Proceedings of the Workshop (Madrid, Spain, January 21-22, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    This report contains a collection of papers presented at a workshop on telecommunications-based training systems as part of the DELTA (Developing European Learning through Technological Advance) Action Line III, which addressed research in telecommunications for open and distance education. The following presentations are included: (1)…

  10. TBT: Telecommunications-Based Training in the 90s (DELTA Programme--Action Line III). Proceedings of the Workshop (Madrid, Spain, January 21-22, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    This report contains a collection of papers presented at a workshop on telecommunications-based training systems as part of the DELTA (Developing European Learning through Technological Advance) Action Line III, which addressed research in telecommunications for open and distance education. The following presentations are included: (1)…

  11. Si III OV Bright Line of Scattering Polarized Light That Has Been Observed in the CLASP and Its Center-to-Limb Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kano, Ryohei; Kubo, Masahito; Noriyuki, Narukage; Kisei, Bando; Hara, Hirohisa; Yoshiho, Suematsu; Goto, Motouji; Ishikawa, Shinnosuke; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, Ken

    2017-01-01

    The CLASP (Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro- Polarimeter) rocket experiment, in addition to the ultraviolet region of the Ly alpha emission line (121.57 nm), emission lines of Si III (120.65 nm) and OV (121.83 nm) is can be observed. These are optically thin line compared to a Ly alpha line, if Rarere captured its polarization, there is a possibility that dripping even a new physical diagnosis chromosphere-transition layer. In particular, OV bright light is a release from the transition layer, further, three P one to one S(sub 0) is a forbidden line (cross-triplet transition between lines), it was not quite know whether to polarization.

  12. Cytotoxicity of Manganese (III) Complex in Human Breast Adenocarcinoma Cell Line Is Mediated by the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Followed by Mitochondrial Damage.

    PubMed

    Al-Anbaky, Qudes; Al-Karakooly, Zeiyad; Kilaparty, Surya P; Agrawal, Megha; Albkuri, Yahya M; RanguMagar, Ambar B; Ghosh, Anindya; Ali, Nawab

    2016-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) complexes are widely studied because of their important catalytic properties in synthetic and biochemical reactions. A Mn (III) complex of an amidoamine ligand was synthesized using a tetradentate amidoamine ligand. In this study, the Mn (III) complex was evaluated for its biological activity by measuring its cytotoxicity in human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). Cytotoxic effects of the Mn (III) complex were determined using established biomarkers in an attempt to delineate the mechanism of action and the utility of the complex as a potential anticancer drug. The Mn (III) complex induces cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner as shown by microculture tetrazolium assay, a measure of cytotoxic cell death. Our results demonstrated that cytotoxic effects were significantly increased at higher concentrations of Mn (III) complex and with longer time of treatment. The IC50 (Inhibitor concentration that results in 50% cell death) value of Mn (III) complex in MCF-7 cells was determined to be 2.5 mmol/L for 24 hours of treatment. In additional experiments, we determined the Mn (III) complex-mediated cell death was due to both apoptotic and nonspecific necrotic cell death mechanisms. This was assessed by ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and flow cytometry techniques. The Mn (III) complex produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggering the expression of manganese superoxide dismutase 1 and ultimately damaging the mitochondrial function as is evident by a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential. Treatment of the cells with free radical scavenger, N, N-dimethylthiourea decreased Mn (III) complex-mediated generation of ROS and attenuated apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that the Mn (III) complex-mediated MCF-7 cell death utilizes combined mechanism involving apoptosis and necrosis perhaps due to the generation of ROS.

  13. Phase I-II study of plitidepsin and dacarbazine as first-line therapy for advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Plummer, R; Lorigan, P; Brown, E; Zaucha, R; Moiseyenko, V; Demidov, L; Soriano, V; Chmielowska, E; Andrés, R; Kudryavtseva, G; Kahatt, C; Szyldergemajn, S; Extremera, S; de Miguel, B; Cullell-Young, M; Calvert, H

    2013-09-17

    This phase I-II trial compared plitidepsin 1-h infusion alone or combined with dacarbazine (DTIC) 1-h infusion as front-line therapy for advanced melanoma. The recommended dose (RD) for plitidepsin/DTIC was defined in the first stage. In the second stage, patients were randomised to receive single-agent plitidepsin 3.2 mg m(-2) (n = 20) on days 1, 8 and 15 every 4 weeks (q4wk) or plitidepsin 2.4 mg m(-2) on days 1, 8 and 15 q4wk combined with DTIC 800 mg m(-2) q4wk (n = 38). The overall response rate with plitidepsin/DTIC was 21.4%; all responders had normal serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and performance status ≤ 1 at baseline. Median progression-free survival (PFS) with plitidepsin/DTIC was 3.3 months in all patients, and 4.3 months in those with baseline normal LDH. No responses occurred with single-agent plitidepsin and median PFS was 1.5 months. Both regimens were well tolerated. Haematological abnormalities were more common and transaminase increases more severe with plitidepsin/DTIC. Treatment-related transaminase increases leading to infusion omission on day 8 were relatively common. No drug-drug pharmacokinetic interactions were found. This plitidepsin/DTIC schedule has antitumour activity and manageable toxicity in advanced melanoma. Further evaluation of plitidepsin 2.4 mg m(-2) fortnightly and DTIC 800 mg m(-2) q4wk is recommended.

  14. Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle Wing Manufacture and Force Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLE WING MANUFACTURE AND FORCE TESTING THESIS Nathanael J...FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLE WING MANUFACTURE AND FORCE TESTING THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics...March 2011 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT/GA/ENY/11-M14 FLAPPING WING MICRO AIR VEHICLE WING MANUFACTURE AND FORCE

  15. View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5), west wall of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5), west wall of the North Wing (Wing 2) and rear elevations of the facade and its flanking wings (Wings 1 and 2) - Hospital for Sick Children, 1731 Bunker Hill Road, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. Observations of far-infrared fine structure lines: o III88.35 micrometer and oI 63.2 micrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, J. W. V.; Watson, D. M.; Townes, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of the O III 88.35 micrometer line and the O I63.2 micrometer were made with a far infrared spectrometer. The sources M17, NGC 7538, and W51 were mapped in the O III line with 1 arc minute resolution and the emission is found to be quite widespread. In all cases the peak of the emission coincides with the maximum radio continuum. The far infrared continuum was mapped simultaneously and in M17, NGC 7538, and W51 the continuum peak is found to be distinct from the center of ionization. The O III line was also detected in W3, W49, and in a number of positions in the Orion nebula. Upper limits were obtained on NGS 7027, NGC 6572, DR21, G29.9-0.0 and M82. The 63.2 micrometer O I line was detected in M17, M42, and marginally in DR21. A partial map of M42 in this line shows that most of the emission observed arises from the Trapezium and from the bright optical bar to the southeast.

  17. Isophotes of a field in the Cygnus loop photographed in the (O III) and (N II)+H. cap alpha. lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sitnik, T.G.; Toropova, M.S.

    1982-11-01

    From interference-filter image-tube photographs of a 9' field in the western part of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, taken in the lambda5007 (O III) and lambdalambda 6584, 6563 (N II) + H..cap alpha.. lines, sets of isophotes are derived by an equidensitometry technique based on the Sabattier effect. The emission regions in these lines exhibit a relative displacement, interpreted as evidence for radiative cooling of the gas behind the shock generated in the supernova outburst. An explanation is offered for the differing morphology of the nebular filaments in the (O III) and (N II) + H..cap alpha.. lines. The anomalously high I/sub Otsi/II/I/sub H/..beta.. intensity ratio may reflect a spatial separation of the corresponding emission zones.

  18. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  19. The oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, H G; Schwartz, I

    1941-01-01

    The two-dimensional problem of the oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator is treated in the manner that the wing is replaced by a plate with bends and stages and the airfoil section by a mean line consisting of one or more straights. The computed formulas and tables permit, on these premises, the prediction of the pressure distribution and of the aerodynamic reactions of oscillating elevators and tabs with any position of elevator hinge in respect to elevator leading edge.

  20. Timing of first-line cancer treatments - early versus late - a systematic review of phase III randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, A R; Quinn, G; Vadaparampil, S; Djulbegovic, B; Gwede, C K; Kumar, A

    2010-12-01

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of all phase III randomized controlled trials comparing efficacy of early versus late first-line or initial treatments for cancer. A comprehensive literature search of MEDLINE and Cochrane library databases was performed (1966-2008). Data was extracted and pooled as per the methods recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration. Of the 570 identified studies, 10 (3811 patients) met inclusion criteria: three each in prostate cancer and multiple myeloma (MM), two in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and one each in lung cancer, and follicular lymphoma. The analyses showed no survival benefit with early treatment except in prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR]=1.23, 95% CI 1.11-1.37 p<0.001). There was no survival difference in MM (HR=0.92, 95% CI 0.56-1.52 p=0.74), CLL (HR=0.76, 95% CI 0.56-1.04 p=0.09), lung cancer (HR=0.95, 95% CI 0.72-1.24 p=0.71), or follicular lymphoma (HR=1, 95% CI 0.55-1.83 p=0.99). No statistically significant difference in response rate between early and late treatment was detected in any cancer type. Data shows that delaying cancer treatments does not necessarily compromise therapeutic outcomes except possibly in locally advanced prostate cancer. These findings provide a unique window to oncologists and patients to address time-sensitive issues if desired by patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The longitudinal stability of elastic swept wings at supersonic speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, C W; Chubb, R S

    1950-01-01

    The longitudinal stability characteristics of elastic swept wings of high aspect ratio experiencing bending and torsional deformations are calculated for supersonic speed by the application of linearized lifting-surface theory. A parabolic wing deflection curve is assumed and the analysis is simplified by a number of structural approximations. The method is thereby limited in application to wings of high aspect ratio for which the root effects are small. Expressions for the lift, pitching-moment, and span load distribution characteristics are derived in terms of the elastic properties of the wing; namely, the design stress, the modulus of elasticity, the shearing modulus, and the maximum design load factor. The analysis applies to wings with leading edges swept behind the Mach lines. In all cases, however, the trailing edge is sonic or supersonic. Application of the method of analysis to wings with leading edges swept ahead of the Mach lines is discussed.

  2. Flapping of Insectile Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. Yet the effects of muscle stiffness on the performance of insect wings remain unclear. Here, we construct an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring and submerged in an oscillatory flow. The wing system is free to rotate and flap. We first explore the extent to which the flyer can withstand roll perturbations, then study its flapping behavior and performance as a function of spring stiffness. We find an optimal range of spring stiffness that results in large flapping amplitudes, high force generation and good storage of elastic energy. We conclude by conjecturing that insects may select and adjust the muscle spring stiffness to achieve desired movement. These findings may have significant implications on the design principles of wings in micro air-vehicles.

  3. Noise Testing of an Experimental Augmentor Wing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-06-21

    The augmentor wing concept was introduced during the early 1960s to enhance the performance of vertical and short takeoff (VSTOL) aircraft. The leading edge of the wing has full-span vertical flaps, and the trailing edge has double-slotted flaps. This provides aircraft with more control in takeoff and landing conditions. The augmentor wing also produced lower noise levels than other VSTOL designs. In the early 1970s Boeing Corporation built a Buffalo C-8A augmentor wing research aircraft for Ames Research Center. Researches at Lewis Research Center concentrated their efforts on reducing the noise levels of the wing. They initially used small-scale models to develop optimal nozzle screening methods. They then examined the nozzle designs on a large-scale model, seen here on an external test stand. This test stand included an airflow system, nozzle, the augmentor wing, and a muffler system below to reduce the atmospheric noise levels. The augmentor was lined with noise-reducing acoustic panels. The Lewis researchers were able to adjust the airflow to simulate conditions at takeoff and landing. Once the conditions were stabilized they took noise measurements from microphones placed in all directions from the wing, including an aircraft flying over. They found that the results coincided with the earlier small-scale studies for landing situations but not takeoffs. The acoustic panels were found to be successful.

  4. A Relation between the Mid-Infrared [Ne v] 14.3 Micrometers and [Ne III] 15.6 Micrometer Lines in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorjian, V.; Cleary, K.; Werner, M. W.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a strong correlation between the [Ne v] 14.3 mm and [Ne III] 15.6 mm emission lines arising from the narrow-line regions (NLRs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), spanning 4 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The data are compiled primarily from Spitzer Space Telescope observations of nearby Seyfert galaxies (median z p 0.01) and 3C radio sources (median z p 0.52). This correlation is consistent with earlier studies in the optical/UV bands showing that line ratios arising in the NLRs are remarkably constant across AGNs. We also show that the correlation allows only a very narrow range in ionization parameter for simple photoionization models. The observed correlation will place tight constraints on alternative models, which predict constant line ratios over a broader range in ionization parameter.

  5. A Relation between the Mid-Infrared [Ne v] 14.3 Micrometers and [Ne III] 15.6 Micrometer Lines in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorjian, V.; Cleary, K.; Werner, M. W.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a strong correlation between the [Ne v] 14.3 mm and [Ne III] 15.6 mm emission lines arising from the narrow-line regions (NLRs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), spanning 4 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The data are compiled primarily from Spitzer Space Telescope observations of nearby Seyfert galaxies (median z p 0.01) and 3C radio sources (median z p 0.52). This correlation is consistent with earlier studies in the optical/UV bands showing that line ratios arising in the NLRs are remarkably constant across AGNs. We also show that the correlation allows only a very narrow range in ionization parameter for simple photoionization models. The observed correlation will place tight constraints on alternative models, which predict constant line ratios over a broader range in ionization parameter.

  6. High-resolution autoionizing line spectra of Mg II and Al III in the 160--260-A range emitted from a Penning ionization discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Finkenthal, M.; Litman, A.; Mandelbaum, P.; Stutman, D.; Schwob, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    Spectra of aluminum and magnesium emitted from a Penning ionization discharge have been recorded in the XUV range by 2-m grazing-incidence spectrometer. Autoionizing satellite lines, originating from transitions between core excited levels lying in the continuum and ground or lowest excited states of the Na I-like Al III and Mg II, have been classified. Their implication for ionization cross-section estimates and XUV laser research is discussed.

  7. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  8. Boosting Lyα and He II λ1640 Line Fluxes from Population III Galaxies: Stochastic IMF Sampling and Departures from Case-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas-Ribas, Lluís; Dijkstra, Mark; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.

    2016-12-01

    We revisit calculations of nebular hydrogen Lyα and He ii λ1640 line strengths for Population III (Pop III) galaxies, undergoing continuous, and bursts of, star formation. We focus on initial mass functions (IMFs) motivated by recent theoretical studies, which generally span a lower range of stellar masses than earlier works. We also account for case-B departures and the stochastic sampling of the IMF. In agreement with previous work, we find that departures from case-B can enhance the Lyα flux by a factor of a few, but we argue that this enhancement is driven mainly by collisional excitation and ionization, and not due to photoionization from the n = 2 state of atomic hydrogen. The increased sensitivity of the Lyα flux to the high-energy end of the galaxy spectrum makes it more subject to stochastic sampling of the IMF. The latter introduces a dispersion in the predicted nebular line fluxes around the deterministic value by as much as a factor of ∼4. In contrast, the stochastic sampling of the IMF has less impact on the emerging Lyman Werner photon flux. When case-B departures and stochasticity effects are combined, nebular line emission from Pop III galaxies can be up to one order of magnitude brighter than predicted by “standard” calculations that do not include these effects. This enhances the prospects for detection with future facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope and large, ground-based telescopes.

  9. Natural flow wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M. (Inventor); Bauer, Steven X. S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a natural flow wing and a method for constructing the same. The method comprises contouring a three-dimensional upper surface and a three-dimensional lower surface of the natural flow wing independently of one another into a prescribed shape. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that flow and pressure-loading over an upper surface of a wing tend to be conical about an apex of the wing, producing favorable and unfavorable regions of performance based on drag. The method reduces these unfavorable regions by shaping the upper surface such that the maximum thickness near a tip of the natural flow wing moves aft, thereby, contouring the wing to coincide more closely with the conical nature of the flow on the upper surface. Nearly constant compressive loading characterizes the flow field over a lower surface of the conventional wing. Magnitude of these compressive pressures on the lower surface depends on angle of attack and on a streamwise curvature of the lower surface of the wing and not on a cross-sectional spanwise curvature. The method, thereby, shapes the lower surface to create an area as large as possible with negative slopes. Any type of swept wing may be used to obtain the final, shaped geometry of the upper and lower surfaces of the natural flow wing.

  10. Determination of chromium(III) and total chromium in seawater by on-line column preconcentration inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Shizuko; Honda, Kazuto; Shikino, Osamu; Maekawa, Norihiro; Aihara, Masato

    2000-07-01

    An automated low-pressure flow injection method with on-line column preconcentration using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described for the determination of chromium(III) and total chromium in seawater. A home-made column of commercially available iminodiacetate resin, Muromac A-1, was used to concentrate chromium(III) in seawater at a pH of 3.0. Following washing of the column with water, the chromium(III) was eluted and transferred to the plasma with 0.70 M nitric acid. Total chromium was determined after the reduction of chromium(VI) to chromium(III) with a 2-mM hydroxylamine solution at pH 1.8. Detection limit (three times the relative standard deviation of the background) of chromium(III) in the artificial seawater based on eight replicate measurements was 0.020 ng ml -1 with a sample loading time of 120 s. The precision was ±1.9%. One sample can be processed in 5 min. Calibration was accomplished by means of artificial seawater. The proposed method was verified by the analysis of two Reference Standard Materials of seawater NASS-4 and CASS-3.

  11. Tracing the evolution of avian wing digits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Mackem, Susan

    2013-06-17

    It is widely accepted that birds are a subgroup of dinosaurs, but there is an apparent conflict: modern birds have been thought to possess only the middle three fingers (digits II-III-IV) of an idealized five-digit tetrapod hand based on embryological data, but their Mesozoic tetanuran dinosaur ancestors are considered to have the first three digits (I-II-III) based on fossil evidence. How could such an evolutionary quirk arise? Various hypotheses have been proposed to resolve this paradox. Adding to the confusion, some recent developmental studies support a I-II-III designation for avian wing digits whereas some recent paleontological data are consistent with a II-III-IV identification of the Mesozoic tetanuran digits. A comprehensive analysis of both paleontological and developmental data suggests that the evolution of the avian wing digits may have been driven by homeotic transformations of digit identity, which are more likely to have occurred in a partial and piecemeal manner. Additionally, recent genetic studies in mouse models showing plausible mechanisms for central digit loss invite consideration of new alternative possibilities (I-II-IV or I-III-IV) for the homologies of avian wing digits. While much progress has been made, some advances point to the complexity of the problem and a final resolution to this ongoing debate demands additional work from both paleontological and developmental perspectives, which will surely yield new insights on mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation.

  12. Aerostructures Test Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, RIck; Voracek, David F.; Doyle, Tim; Truax, Roger; Potter, Starr; Brenner, Marty; Voelker, Len; Freudinger, Larry; Stocjt. C (off)

    2003-01-01

    The Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) was an apparatus used in a flight experiment during a program of research on aeroelastic instabilities. The ATW experiment was performed to study a specific instability known as flutter. Flutter is a destructive phenomenon caused by adverse coupling of structural dynamics and aerodynamics. The process of determining a flight envelope within which an aircraft will not experience flutter, known as flight flutter testing, is very dangerous and expensive because predictions of the instability are often unreliable. The ATW was a small-scale airplane wing that comprised an airfoil and boom (see upper part of Figure 1). For flight tests, the ATW was mounted on the F-15B/FTF-II testbed, which is a second-generation flight-test fixture described in Flight-Test Fixture for Aerodynamic Research (DRC- 95-27), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 19, No. 9, September 1995, page 84. The ATW was mounted horizontally on this fixture, and the entire assembly was attached to the undercarriage of the F-15B airplane (see lower part of Figure 1). The primary objective of the ATW project was to investigate traditional and advanced methodologies for predicting the onset of flutter. In particular, the ATW generated data that were used to evaluate a flutterometer. This particular flutterometer is an on-line computer program that uses method analysis to estimate worst-case flight conditions associated with flutter. This software was described in A Flutterometer Flight Test Tool NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 1, January 1999, page 52.

  13. High-resolution H-band spectroscopy of Be stars with SDSS-III/apogee. I. New Be stars, line identifications, and line profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chojnowski, S. Drew; Majewski, Steven R.; Hall, Matthew; Beaton, Rachael; Burton, Adam; Damke, Guillermo; Wilson, John; Whelan, David G.; Wisniewski, John P.; Shetrone, Matthew; Eikenberry, Steve; Hasselquist, Sten; Holtzman, Jon A.; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Nidever, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Zasowski, Gail; Bizyaev, Dmitry; and others

    2015-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has amassed the largest ever collection of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R∼22,500), H-band spectra for B-type emission line (Be) stars. These stars were targeted by APOGEE as telluric standard stars and subsequently identified via visual inspection as Be stars based on H i Brackett series emission or shell absorption in addition to otherwise smooth continua and occasionally non-hydrogen emission features. The 128/238 APOGEE Be stars for which emission had never previously been reported serve to increase the total number of known Be stars by ∼6%. Because the H band is relatively unexplored compared to other wavelength regimes, we focus here on identification of the H-band lines and analysis of the emission peak velocity separations (Δv{sub p}) and emission peak intensity ratios (V/R) of the usually double-peaked H i and non-hydrogen emission lines. H i Br11 emission is found to preferentially form in the circumstellar disks at an average distance of ∼2.2 stellar radii. Increasing Δv{sub p} toward the weaker Br12–Br20 lines suggests these lines are formed interior to Br11. By contrast, the observed IR Fe ii emission lines present evidence of having significantly larger formation radii; distinctive phase lags between IR Fe ii and H i Brackett emission lines further supports that these species arise from different radii in Be disks. Several emission lines have been identified for the first time including C i 16895, a prominent feature in the spectra for almost a fifth of the sample and, as inferred from relatively large Δv{sub p} compared to the Br11–Br20, a tracer of the inner regions of Be disks. Emission lines at 15760 Å and 16781 Å remain unidentified, but usually appear along with and always have similar line profile morphology to Fe ii 16878. Unlike the typical metallic lines observed for Be stars in the optical, the H-band metallic lines, such as Fe ii 16878, never exhibit any

  14. High-Resolution H-Band Spectroscopy of Be Stars With SDSS-III/Apogee: I. New Be Stars, Line Identifications, and Line Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnowski, S. Drew; Whelan, David G.; Wisniewski, John P.; Majewski, Steven R.; Hall, Matthew; Shetrone, Matthew; Beaton, Rachael; Burton, Adam; Damke, Guillermo; Eikenberry, Steve; Hasselquist, Sten; Holtzman, Jon A.; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Nidever, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Wilson, John; Zasowski, Gail; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Ebelke, Garrett; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Marchante, Moses; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has amassed the largest ever collection of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R˜22,500), H-band spectra for B-type emission line (Be) stars. These stars were targeted by APOGEE as telluric standard stars and subsequently identified via visual inspection as Be stars based on H i Brackett series emission or shell absorption in addition to otherwise smooth continua and occasionally non-hydrogen emission features. The 128/238 APOGEE Be stars for which emission had never previously been reported serve to increase the total number of known Be stars by ˜6%. Because the H band is relatively unexplored compared to other wavelength regimes, we focus here on identification of the H-band lines and analysis of the emission peak velocity separations (Δ{{v}p}) and emission peak intensity ratios (V/R) of the usually double-peaked H i and non-hydrogen emission lines. H i Br11 emission is found to preferentially form in the circumstellar disks at an average distance of ˜2.2 stellar radii. Increasing Δ{{v}p} toward the weaker Br12-Br20 lines suggests these lines are formed interior to Br11. By contrast, the observed IR Fe ii emission lines present evidence of having significantly larger formation radii; distinctive phase lags between IR Fe ii and H i Brackett emission lines further supports that these species arise from different radii in Be disks. Several emission lines have been identified for the first time including C i 16895, a prominent feature in the spectra for almost a fifth of the sample and, as inferred from relatively large Δ{{v}p} compared to the Br11-Br20, a tracer of the inner regions of Be disks. Emission lines at 15760 Å and 16781 Å remain unidentified, but usually appear along with and always have similar line profile morphology to Fe ii 16878. Unlike the typical metallic lines observed for Be stars in the optical, the H-band metallic lines, such as Fe ii 16878, never exhibit any evidence of

  15. Slotted Aircraft Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, James D. (Inventor); Witkowski, David P. (Inventor); Campbell, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A swept aircraft wing includes a leading airfoil element and a trailing airfoil element. At least one full-span slot is defined by the wing during at least one transonic condition of the wing. The full-span slot allows a portion of the air flowing along the lower surface of the leading airfoil element to split and flow over the upper surface of the trailing airfoil element so as to achieve a performance improvement in the transonic condition.

  16. Winging of the scapula.

    PubMed

    Saeed, M A; Gatens, P F; Singh, S

    1981-10-01

    Common neurogenic causes of scapular winging are serratus anterior, trapezius and rhomboid palsy. Deformity is minimal in serratus anterior palsy (long thoracic nerve); winging is accentuated by forward elevation and pushing with outstretched arms. In trapezius palsy (spinal accessory nerve), the shoulder droops and winging is accentuated by arm abduction at the shoulder level. Rhomboid weakness (dorsal scapular nerve or C5 root) is best demonstrated by slowly lowering the arms from the forward elevated position.

  17. Propeller/wing interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkowski, David P.; Johnston, Robert T.; Sullivan, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The present experimental investigation of the steady-state and unsteady-state effects due to the interaction between a tractor propeller's wake and a wing employs, in the steady case, wind tunnel measurements at low subsonic speed; results are obtained which demonstrate wing performance response to variations in configuration geometry. Other steady-state results involve the propeller-hub lift and side-force due to the wing's influence on the propeller. The unsteady effects of interaction were studied through flow visualization of propeller-tip vortex distortion over a wing, again using a tractor-propeller configuration.

  18. Propeller/wing interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkowski, David P.; Johnston, Robert T.; Sullivan, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The present experimental investigation of the steady-state and unsteady-state effects due to the interaction between a tractor propeller's wake and a wing employs, in the steady case, wind tunnel measurements at low subsonic speed; results are obtained which demonstrate wing performance response to variations in configuration geometry. Other steady-state results involve the propeller-hub lift and side-force due to the wing's influence on the propeller. The unsteady effects of interaction were studied through flow visualization of propeller-tip vortex distortion over a wing, again using a tractor-propeller configuration.

  19. Aerodynamics of wings at low Reynolds numbers: Boundary layer separation and reattachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, John

    Due to advances in electronics technology, it is now possible to build small scale flying and swimming vehicles. These vehicles will have size and velocity scales similar to small birds and fish, and their characteristic Reynolds number will be between 104 and 105. Currently, these flying and swimming vehicles do not perform well, and very little research has been done to characterize them, or to explain why they perform so poorly. This dissertation documents three basic investigations into the performance of small scale lifting surfaces, with Reynolds numbers near 104. Part I. Low Reynolds number aerodynamics. Three airfoil shapes were studied at Reynolds numbers of 1 and 2x104: a flat plate airfoil, a circular arc cambered airfoil, and the Eppler 387 airfoil. Lift and drag force measurements were made on both 2D and 3D conditions, with the 3D wings having an aspect ratio of 6, and the 2D condition being approximated by placing end plates at the wing tips. Comparisons to the limited number of previous measurements show adequate agreement. Previous studies have been inconclusive on whether lifting line theory can be applied to this range of Re, but this study shows that lifting line theory can be applied when there are no sudden changes in the slope of the force curves. This is highly dependent on the airfoil shape of the wing, and explains why previous studies have been inconclusive. Part II. The laminar separation bubble. The Eppler 387 airfoil was studied at two higher Reynolds numbers: 3 and 6x10 4. Previous studies at a Reynolds number of 6x104 had shown this airfoil experiences a drag increase at moderate lift, and a subsequent drag decrease at high lift. Previous studies suggested that the drag increase is caused by a laminar separation bubble, but the experiments used to show this were conducted at higher Reynolds numbers and extrapolated down. Force measurements were combined with flow field measurements at Reynolds numbers 3 and 6x104 to determine whether

  20. LINE-1 Methylation Status Correlates Significantly to Post-Therapeutic Recurrence in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients Receiving FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yun-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, I-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Methylation levels of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) are representative of genome-wide methylation status and crucial in maintaining genomic stability and expression. Their prognostic impact on colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy has not been well established. We evaluated the association between LINE-1 methylation status and clinicopathologic features and postoperative oncological outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients. Materials and Methods 129 UICC stage III colon cancer patients who had received radical resection and FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Global methylation was estimated by analyzing tumor LINE-1 methylation status using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing assay. Demographics, clinicopathological data, and postoperative outcomes were recorded by trained abstractors. Outcome measurements included postoperative recurrence and disease-free survival. Univariate, multivariate, and survival analyses were conducted to identify prognostic factors of oncological outcomes. Results The LINE-1 methylation of all 129 patients was measured on a 0–100 scale (mean 63.3; median 63.7, standard deviation 7.1), LINE-1 hypomethylation was more common in patients aged 65 years and above (61.7%±7.6% vs. 64.6±6.4, p=0.019) and those with post-therapeutic recurrence (61.7±7.4 vs 64.3±6.7, p=0.041). Considering risk adjustment, LINE-1 hypomethylation was found to be an independent risk factor of post-therapeutic recurrence (Adjusted OR=14.1, p=0.012). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients in the low methylation group had shorter period of disease free survival (p=0.01). In a stratified analysis that included 48 patients with post-therapeutic recurrence, it was found that those who experienced shorter period of disease free survival (≦6 months) appeared to have lower LINE-1 methylation levels than patients who reported of recurrence after 6 months (56.68±15.75 vs. 63.55±7

  1. LINE-1 Methylation Status Correlates Significantly to Post-Therapeutic Recurrence in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients Receiving FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yun-Ting; Chen, Chao-Wen; Fan, Yun-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, I-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Methylation levels of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) are representative of genome-wide methylation status and crucial in maintaining genomic stability and expression. Their prognostic impact on colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy has not been well established. We evaluated the association between LINE-1 methylation status and clinicopathologic features and postoperative oncological outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients. 129 UICC stage III colon cancer patients who had received radical resection and FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Global methylation was estimated by analyzing tumor LINE-1 methylation status using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing assay. Demographics, clinicopathological data, and postoperative outcomes were recorded by trained abstractors. Outcome measurements included postoperative recurrence and disease-free survival. Univariate, multivariate, and survival analyses were conducted to identify prognostic factors of oncological outcomes. The LINE-1 methylation of all 129 patients was measured on a 0-100 scale (mean 63.3; median 63.7, standard deviation 7.1), LINE-1 hypomethylation was more common in patients aged 65 years and above (61.7%±7.6% vs. 64.6±6.4, p=0.019) and those with post-therapeutic recurrence (61.7±7.4 vs 64.3±6.7, p=0.041). Considering risk adjustment, LINE-1 hypomethylation was found to be an independent risk factor of post-therapeutic recurrence (Adjusted OR=14.1, p=0.012). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients in the low methylation group had shorter period of disease free survival (p=0.01). In a stratified analysis that included 48 patients with post-therapeutic recurrence, it was found that those who experienced shorter period of disease free survival (≦6 months) appeared to have lower LINE-1 methylation levels than patients who reported of recurrence after 6 months (56.68±15.75 vs. 63.55±7.57, p=0.041). There was a significantly

  2. IUE observations of Si and C lines and comparison with non-LTE models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamp, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Classical model atmosphere techniques are applied to analyze IUE spectra, and to determine abundances, effective temperatures and gravities. Measurements of the equivalent widths and other properties of the line profiles of 24 photospheric lines of Si II, Si III, Si IV, C II, C III and C IV are presented in the range of 1175-1725 A for seven B and two O stars. Observed line profiles are compared with theoretical profiles computed using non-LTE theory and models, and using line-blanketed model atmospheres. Agreement is reasonably good, although strong lines are calculated to be systematically stronger than those observed, while the reverse occurs for weak lines, and empirical profiles have smaller wings than theoretical profiles. It is concluded that the present theory of line formation when used with solar abundances, represents fairly well observed UV photospheric lines of silicon and carbon ions in the atmospheres of main sequence stars of types B5-O9.

  3. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  4. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  5. Downwash measurements behind wings with detached float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersohn, E

    1931-01-01

    This investigation, which was made in the small wind tunnel having a diameter of 1.2 m (3.94 feet), embraced three wing models, behind which, at various angles of attack between 0 and 60 degrees, the static pressure and the total pressure along vertical lines (perpendicular to the direction of the undisturbed wind and to the wing span) were measured. The location of these vertical lines are indicated in Figure 1. Moreover, the wing polars were determined by the customary three-component measurements. For testing the pressure field, a Pitot tube and a static probe, both of 2 mm (0.08 in.) in diameter, were mounted 40 mm (1.57 in.) apart on the end of a shaft 1 m (39.37 in.) long.

  6. Preservation of wing leading edge suction at the plane of symmetry as a factor in wing-fuselage design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    Most fuselage geometries cover a portion of the wing leading edge near the plane of symmetry, and it seems reasonable to expect that a large fraction of the leading edge suction which would be developed by the covered wing at high angles of attack is not developed on the fuselage. This is one of the reasons that the Oswald span efficiency factor for the wing body combination fails to approach the value predicted by lifting line theory for the isolated wing. Some traditional and recent literature on wing-body interference is discussed and high Reynolds number data on wing-body-nacelle drag are reviewed. An exposed central leading edge geometry has been developed for a sailplane configuration. Low Reynolds number tests have not validated the design concept.

  7. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. III - First observational results on Milky Way gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Lu, Limin; Bahcall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Lockman, Felix J.; Sargent, W. L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption lines found near zero redshift due to Milky Way disk and halo gas in the spectra of 15 quasars observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) of the HST at a resolution of about 230 km/s are reported. Results show that Milky Way absorption lines comprise about 44 percent of all absorption lines seen in the first group of Key Project FOS spectra. Milky Way lines were observed for 3C 273 and H1821 + 643. Limits to the Mg-to-H abundance ratio obtained for very high velocity Mg II absorption detections imply gas-phase Mg abundances for the very high velocity gas ranging from more than 0.059 to more than 0.32 times the solar abundance. In all cases where high-velocity H I emission is seen, corresponding high-velocity metal-line absorption is observed.

  8. On-line chemical vapour generation of cadmium in the presence of hexacyanochromate(III) for determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Rose, Lakeysha; Arslan, Zikri; Little, Maria D

    2012-11-01

    A vapour generation (VG) procedure has been described for determination of Cd by ICP-MS. Volatile species of Cd were generated on-line by interacting acidic sample solution containing potassium hexacyanochromate(III), K3Cr(CN)6, with sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The hexacyanochromate(III) complex was generated on-line by reacting 0.04 mol L(-1) chromium(III) nitrate and 0.16 mol L(-1) potassium cyanide (KCN) solutions in water. The resulting suspension of chromium(III) hydroxide, Cr(OH)3, was fed continuously to acidic stream of sample solution in the presence of excess KCN. The experimental conditions were optimized for effective generation of volatile species of Cd. Optimum signals were obtained from reaction of sample solutions in 4% v/v HCl with 2% m/v NaBH4 solution. Presence of K3Cr(CN)6 improved the efficiency of Cd vapour generation substantially affording 15-fold higher sensitivity. This phenomenon was thought to occur through formation of reactive intermediates evolved from interaction of [Cr(CN)6](3-) with NaBH4 that react with Cd(II) to increase the yield volatile Cd species. Under the optimum conditions, no significant interferences were observed from the transition metals, including Cu and Ni, up to 1.0 μg mL(-1) levels. Among the hydride forming elements, Bi, Pb, Sb and Sn depressed the signals above 0.1 μg mL(-1). The detection limits (3s) were 6.2 and 5.2 ng L(-1) for (110)Cd and (111)Cd isotopes, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determination of Cd by ICP-MS in several certified reference materials, including Nearshore seawater (CASS-4), Bone ash (SRM 1400), Dogfish liver (DOLT-4) and Mussel tissue (SRM 2976).

  9. On-line chemical vapour generation of cadmium in the presence of hexacyanochromate(III) for determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Rose, LaKeysha; Little, Maria D.

    2012-01-01

    A vapour generation (VG) procedure has been described for determination of Cd by ICP-MS. Volatile species of Cd were generated on-line by interacting acidic sample solution containing potassium hexacyanochromate(III), K3Cr(CN)6, with sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The hexacyanochromate(III) complex was generated on-line by reacting 0.04 mol L−1 chromium(III) nitrate and 0.16 mol L−1 potassium cyanide (KCN) solutions in water. The resulting suspension of chromium(III) hydroxide, Cr(OH)3, was fed continuously to acidic stream of sample solution in the presence of excess KCN. The experimental conditions were optimized for effective generation of volatile species of Cd. Optimum signals were obtained from reaction of sample solutions in 4% v/v HCl with 2% m/v NaBH4 solution. Presence of K3Cr(CN)6 improved the efficiency of Cd vapour generation substantially affording 15-fold higher sensitivity. This phenomenon was thought to occur through formation of reactive intermediates evolved from interaction of [Cr(CN)6]3− with NaBH4 that react with Cd(II) to increase the yield volatile Cd species. Under the optimum conditions, no significant interferences were observed from the transition metals, including Cu and Ni, up to 1.0 μg mL−1 levels. Among the hydride forming elements, Bi, Pb, Sb and Sn depressed the signals above 0.1 μg mL−1. The detection limits (3s) were 6.2 and 5.2 ng L−1 for 110Cd and 111Cd isotopes, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determination of Cd by ICP-MS in several certified reference materials, including Nearshore seawater (CASS-4), Bone ash (SRM 1400), Dogfish liver (DOLT-4) and Mussel tissue (SRM 2976). PMID:23997384

  10. Formation of broad Balmer wings in symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seok-Jun; Heo, Jeong-Eun; Hong, Chae-Lin; Lee, Hee-Won

    2016-07-01

    Symbiotic stars are binary systems composed of a hot white dwarf and a mass losing giant. In addition to many prominent emission lines symbiotic stars exhibit Raman scattered O VI features at 6825 and 7088 Å. Another notable feature present in the spectra of many symbiotics is the broad wings around Balmer lines. Astrophysical mechanisms that can produce broad wings include Thomson scattering by free electrons and Raman scattering of Ly,β and higher series by neutral hydrogen. In this poster presentation we produce broad wings around Hα and H,β adopting a Monte Carlo techinique in order to make a quantitative comparison of these two mechanisms. Thomson wings are characterized by the exponential cutoff given by the termal width whereas the Raman wings are dependent on the column density and continuum shape in the far UV region. A brief discussion is provided.

  11. Folding wings like a cockroach: a review of transverse wing folding ensign wasps (Hymenoptera: Evaniidae: Afrevania and Trissevania).

    PubMed

    Mikó, István; Copeland, Robert S; Balhoff, James P; Yoder, Matthew J; Deans, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    We revise two relatively rare ensign wasp genera, whose species are restricted to Sub-Saharan Africa: Afrevania and Trissevania. Afrevania longipetiolata sp. nov., Trissevania heatherae sp. nov., T. hugoi sp. nov., T. mrimaensis sp. nov. and T. slideri sp. nov. are described, males and females of T. anemotis and Afrevania leroyi are redescribed, and an identification key for Trissevaniini is provided. We argue that Trissevania mrimaensis sp. nov. and T. heatherae sp. nov. populations are vulnerable, given their limited distributions and threats from mining activities in Kenya. We hypothesize that these taxa together comprise a monophyletic lineage, Trissevaniini, tr. nov., the members of which share the ability to fold their fore wings along two intersecting fold lines. Although wing folding of this type has been described for the hind wing of some insects four-plane wing folding of the fore wing has never been documented. The wing folding mechanism and the pattern of wing folds of Trissevaniini is shared only with some cockroach species (Blattodea). It is an interesting coincidence that all evaniids are predators of cockroach eggs. The major wing fold lines of Trissevaniini likely are not homologous to any known longitudinal anatomical structures on the wings of other Evaniidae. Members of the new tribe share the presence of a coupling mechanism between the fore wing and the mesosoma that is composed of a setal patch on the mesosoma and the retinaculum of the fore wing. While the setal patch is an evolutionary novelty, the retinaculum, which originally evolved to facilitate fore and hind wing coupling in Hymenoptera, exemplifies morphological exaptation. We also refine and clarify the Semantic Phenotype approach used in previous taxonomic revisions and explore the consequences of merging new with existing data. The way that semantic statements are formulated can evolve in parallel, alongside improvements to the ontologies themselves.

  12. 1. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM BRIDGE TO THE WEST, FACING EAST. - Cut Stone Bridge, Southern Pacific Railroad line spanning runoff channel at South Spruce Avenue, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, CA

  13. 2. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM EMBANKMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM EMBANKMENT TO THE SOUTHWEST, FACING NORTHEAST. - Cut Stone Bridge, Southern Pacific Railroad line spanning runoff channel at South Spruce Avenue, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, CA

  14. 6. VIEW OF EAST HEADWALL, TWO WING WALLS, AND CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF EAST HEADWALL, TWO WING WALLS, AND CONCRETE CULVERT (PORTION OF TOP), FACING SOUTHWEST. - Cut Stone Bridge, Southern Pacific Railroad line spanning runoff channel at South Spruce Avenue, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, CA

  15. Slar SI III line ratios from the high-resolution telescope and spectrograph on board Spacelab 2 - The effects of non-Maxellian electron distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Dufton, P. L.; Kingston, A. E.; Cook, J. W.

    1989-05-01

    Electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si III, incorporating the effects of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions (EVDFs), are presented for a range of electron temperatures appropriate to the solar transition region. A comparison of theoretical line ratios with observational data for a quiet solar region, a sunspot, and an active region obtained with the high-resolution telescope and spectrograph (HRTS) on board Spacelab 2 indicates that non-Maxwellian EVDFs may exist in the transition region. Non-Maxwellian effects appear to be larger for the sunspot than for the quiet sun, implying that the temperature gradient may be greater in the former.

  16. Supercritical Wing Technology: A Progress Report on Flight Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The papers in this compilation were presented at the NASA Symposium on "Supercritical Wing Technology: A Progress Report on Flight Evaluation" held at the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., on February 29, 1972. The purpose of the symposium was to present timely information on flight results obtained with the F-8 and T-2C supercritical wing configurations, discuss comparisons with wind-tunnel predictions, and project [ ] flight programs planned for the F-8 and F-III (TACT) airplanes.

  17. Computational wing optimization and comparisons with experiment for a semi-span wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, E. G.; Haney, H. P.; Ballhaus, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A computational wing optimization procedure was developed and verified by an experimental investigation of a semi-span variable camber wing model in the NASA Ames Research Center 14 foot transonic wind tunnel. The Bailey-Ballhaus transonic potential flow analysis and Woodward-Carmichael linear theory codes were linked to Vanderplaats constrained minimization routine to optimize model configurations at several subsonic and transonic design points. The 35 deg swept wing is characterized by multi-segmented leading and trailing edge flaps whose hinge lines are swept relative to the leading and trailing edges of the wing. By varying deflection angles of the flap segments, camber and twist distribution can be optimized for different design conditions. Results indicate that numerical optimization can be both an effective and efficient design tool. The optimized configurations had as good or better lift to drag ratios at the design points as the best designs previously tested during an extensive parametric study.

  18. STRATEGIC-1: A multiple-lines, randomized, open-label GERCOR phase III study in patients with unresectable wild-type RAS metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Bonnetain, Franck; Tournigand, Christophe; de Larauze, Marine Hug; de Gramont, Armand; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Paget, Jérôme; Hadengue, Alexandra; Notelet, Dominique; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-07-04

    The management of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is a comprehensive treatment strategy involving several lines of therapy, maintenance, salvage surgery, and treatment-free intervals. Besides chemotherapy (fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan), molecular-targeted agents such as anti-angiogenic agents (bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib) and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor agents (cetuximab, panitumumab) have become available. Ultimately, given the increasing cost of new active compounds, new strategy trials are needed to define the optimal use and the best sequencing of these agents. Such new clinical trials require alternative endpoints that can capture the effect of several treatment lines and be measured earlier than overall survival to help shorten the duration and reduce the size and cost of trials. STRATEGIC-1 is an international, open-label, randomized, multicenter phase III trial designed to determine an optimally personalized treatment sequence of the available treatment modalities in patients with unresectable RAS wild-type mCRC. Two standard treatment strategies are compared: first-line FOLFIRI-cetuximab, followed by oxaliplatin-based second-line chemotherapy with bevacizumab (Arm A) vs. first-line OPTIMOX-bevacizumab, followed by irinotecan-based second-line chemotherapy with bevacizumab, and by an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody with or without irinotecan as third-line treatment (Arm B). The primary endpoint is duration of disease control. A total of 500 patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to one of the two treatment strategies. The STRATEGIC-1 trial is designed to give global information on the therapeutic sequences in patients with unresectable RAS wild-type mCRC that in turn is likely to have a significant impact on the management of this patient population. The trial is open for inclusion since August 2013. STRATEGIC-1 is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01910610, 23 July, 2013

  19. Wing-Wake Interactions between Ipsilateral Wings in Dragonfly Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haibo; Liang, Zongxian

    2009-11-01

    Bilateral and ipsilateral wing-wing interactions can be commonly observed in insect flights. As a representative example of ipsilateral wing-wing interaction, dragonflies in flight have been widely studied. An important fact is that the flow over their hindwings is affected by the presence of the forewings. Wake capture and phase-change play very important role on aerodynamic performance of the hindwings We present a direct numerical simulation of a modeled dragonfly (Aeshna juncea) in slow flight as studied in Azuma et al (JEB 1985). Realistic morphologies of wing, body, and kinematics are used for maximum including wing and body features of a dragonfly. This work aims to study the relations between wake-topology and aerodynamic performance due to wing-wing and wing-wake interactions of dragonfly ipsilateral wings. DNS results are also compared with Local Momentum Theory (Azuma et al).

  20. Force measurements of flexible tandem wings in hovering and forward flights.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingying; Wu, Yanhua; Tang, Hui

    2015-02-06

    Aerodynamic forces, power consumptions and efficiencies of flexible and rigid tandem wings undergoing combined plunging/pitching motion were measured in a hovering flight and two forward flights with Strouhal numbers of 0.6 and 0.3. Three flexible dragonfly-like tandem wing models termed Wing I, Wing II, and Wing III which are progressively less flexible, as well as a pair of rigid wings as the reference were operated at three phase differences of 0°, 90° and 180°. The results showed that both the flexibility and phase difference have significant effects on the aerodynamic performances. In both hovering and forward flights at a higher oscillation frequency of 1 Hz (St = 0.6), the Wing III model outperformed the other wing models with larger total horizontal force coefficient and efficiency. In forward flight at the lower frequency of 0.5 Hz (St = 0.3), Wing III, rigid wings and Wing II models performed best at 0°, 90° and 180° phase difference, respectively. From the time histories of force coefficients of fore- and hind-wings, different peak values, phase lags, and secondary peaks were found to be the important reasons to cause the differences in the average horizontal force coefficients. Particle image velocimetry and deformation measurements were performed to provide the insights into how the flexibility affects the aerodynamic performance of the tandem wings. The spanwise bending deformation was found to contribute to the horizontal force, by offering a more beneficial position to make LEV more attached to the wing model in both hovering and forward flights, and inducing a higher-velocity region in forward flight.

  1. Comparison of the Antiproliferative Activity of Two Antitumour Ruthenium(III) Complexes With Their Apotransferrin and Transferrin-Bound Forms in a Human Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, B. K.; Hartmann, M.; Messori, L.; Berger, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Two ruthenium(III) complexes, namely trans-indazolium[tetrachlorobis(indazole)- ruthenate(III)], HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and trans-imidazolium[tetrachlorobis(imidazole)- ruthenate(III)], HIm[RuIm2Cl4] exhibit high anticancer activity in an autochthonous colorectal carcinoma model in rats. Recently, it has been shown that both complexes bind specifically to human serum apotransferrin and the resulting adducts have been studied through spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques with the ultimate goal of preparing adducts with good selectivity for cancer cells due to the fact that tumour cells express high amounts of transferrin receptors on their cell surface. In order to investigate whether the cellular uptake of the complexes was mediated by apotransferrin or transferrin, we compared the antiproliferative efficacy of HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and HIm[RuIm2Cl4] with its apotransferrin- and transferrin-bound form in the human colon cancer cell line SW707 using the microculture tetrazolium test (MTT). Our results show that especially the transferrin-bound forms exhibit high antiproliferative activity, which exceeds that of the free complex, indicating that this protein can act as a carrier of the ruthenium complexes into the tumor cell. PMID:18472789

  2. Flying wings / flying fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

  3. Slotted Aircraft Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassberg, John C. (Inventor); Gea, Lie-Mine (Inventor); McLean, James D. (Inventor); Witowski, David P. (Inventor); Krist, Steven E. (Inventor); Campbell, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft wing includes a leading airfoil element and a trailing airfoil element. At least one slot is defined by the wing during at least one transonic condition of the wing. The slot may either extend spanwise along only a portion of the wingspan, or it may extend spanwise along the entire wingspan. In either case, the slot allows a portion of the air flowing along the lower surface of the leading airfoil element to split and flow over the upper surface of the trailing airfoil element so as to achieve a performance improvement in the transonic condition.

  4. A Coherent Study of Emission Lines from Broadband Photometry: Specific Star Formation Rates and [O iii]/Hβ Ratio at 3 > z > 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisst, A. L.; Capak, P.; Hsieh, B. C.; Laigle, C.; Salvato, M.; Tasca, L.; Cassata, P.; Davidzon, I.; Ilbert, O.; Le Fèvre, O.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H. J.; Steinhardt, C.; Silverman, J. D.; de Barros, S.; Hasinger, G.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2016-04-01

    We measure the Hα and [O iii] emission line properties as well as specific star formation rates (sSFRs) of spectroscopically confirmed 3 < z < 6 galaxies in COSMOS from their observed colors versus redshift evolution. Our model describes consistently the ensemble of galaxies including intrinsic properties (age, metallicity, star formation history), dust attenuation, and optical emission lines. We forward-model the measured Hα equivalent widths (EW) to obtain the sSFR out to z ˜ 6 without stellar mass fitting. We find a strongly increasing rest-frame Hα EW that is flattening off above z ˜ 2.5 with average EWs of 300-600 Å at z ˜ 6. The sSFR is increasing proportionally to {(1+z)}2.4 at z < 2.2 and to {(1+z)}1.5 at higher redshifts, indicative of a fast build-up of mass in high-z galaxies within e-folding times of 100-200 Myr at z ˜ 6. The redshift evolution at z > 3 cannot be fully explained in a picture of growth driven by cold accretion. We find a progressively increasing [O iii]λ5007/Hβ ratio out to z ˜ 6, consistent with the ratios in local galaxies selected by increasing Hα EW (i.e., sSFR). This demonstrates the potential of using “local high-z analogs” to investigate the spectroscopic properties and relations of galaxies in the re-ionization epoch.

  5. Title IX Line: Vol. III, No. 1, Winter 1983 through Vol. V, No. 2, Spring/Summer 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Title IX Line, 1983

    1983-01-01

    "Title IX Line" is a periodic publication of The Center for Sex Equity in Schools, a desegregation assistance center funded by the U.S. Department of Education pursuant to Title IV of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Each issue is devoted to a separate topic. This compilation of 9 sequential issues treats the follwoing themes: (1) vocational…

  6. On-line batch production of ferrate with an chemical method and its potential application for greywater recycling with Al(III) salt.

    PubMed

    Song, Yarui; Men, Bin; Wang, Dongsheng; Ma, Jianwei

    2017-02-01

    Ferrate(VI) salt is an oxidant and coagulant for water and wastewater treatment. It is considered as a possible alternative method in greywater treatment. However, challenges have existed in putting ferrate(VI) technology into full-scale practice in water and wastewater treatment due to the instability of ferrate solution and high production cost of solid ferrate products. This study demonstrated a new approach of greywater treatment with on-line batch production of Fe(VI) to which Fe(III) salt was oxidized at a weak acidity solution. A series of experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of Fe(VI) on light greywater (total organic carbon (TOC)=19.5mg/L) and dark greywater (TOC=55mg/L) treatment under different conditions with varying pH and Fe(VI) doses. In addition, the combination use of Fe(VI) and Al(III) salts was proved to be more efficient than using the Fe(VI) salts alone at greywater recycling. The optimum dosage of Fe(VI)/Al(III) salts was 25/25mg/L for light greywater, 90/60mg/L for dark greywater, respectively. The TOC values of both light greywater and dark greywater were reduced to less than 3mg/L with the dosages. The cost for treating greywater was 0.06-0.2$/ton at ferrate(VI) dosage of 25-90mg/L and 0.008-0.024$/ton at AlCl3 dosage of 25-60mg/L. The full operating cost needs further assessment before the Fe(VI)/Al(III) technology could be implemented in greywater treatment.

  7. Marcel Besson wing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delanghe, C

    1923-01-01

    Three different Marcel Besson airfoils are investigated in terms of maximum lift, maximum fineness, minimum required power, and wing section drag. Comparisons are then made between the three airfoils.

  8. Lightplane Wing Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Venture, a kit airplane designed and manufactured by Questair, is a high performance lightplane with excellent low speed characteristics and enhanced safety due to NASA technology incorporated in its unusual wing design. In 1987, North Carolina State graduate students and Langley Research Center spent seven months researching and analyzing the Venture. The result was a wing modification, improving control and providing more usable lift. The plane subsequently set 10 world speed records.

  9. The evolution of the [O II], H β and [O III] emission line luminosity functions over the last nine billions years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparat, Johan; Zhu, Guangtun; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Norberg, Peder; Newman, Jeffrey; Tresse, Laurence; Richard, Johan; Yepes, Gustavo; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Raichoor, Anand; Prada, Francisco; Maraston, Claudia; Yèche, Christophe; Delubac, Timothée; Jullo, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Emission line galaxies are one of the main tracers of the large-scale structure to be targeted by the next-generation dark energy surveys. To provide a better understanding of the properties and statistics of these galaxies, we have collected spectroscopic data from the VVDS and DEEP2 deep surveys and estimated the galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) of three distinct emission lines, [O II}] (λ λ 3726,3729) (0.5 < z < 1.3), Hβ (λ4861) (0.3 < z < 0.8) and [O {III}] (λ 5007) (0.3 < z < 0.8). Our measurements are based on 35 639 emission line galaxies and cover a volume of ˜107 Mpc3. We present the first measurement of the Hβ LF at these redshifts. We have also compiled LFs from the literature that were based on independent data or covered different redshift ranges, and we fit the entire set over the whole redshift range with analytic Schechter and Saunders models, assuming a natural redshift dependence of the parameters. We find that the characteristic luminosity (L*) and density (φ*) of all LFs increase with redshift. Using the Schechter model over the redshift ranges considered, we find that, for [O {II}] emitters, the characteristic luminosity L*(z = 0.5) = 3.2 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.7 ± 0.2 from z = 0.5 to 1.3; for Hβ emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 1.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 2.0 ± 0.2 from z = 0.3 to 0.8; and for [O {III}] emitters L*(z = 0.3) = 7.3 × 1041 erg s-1 increases by a factor of 3.5 ± 0.4 from z = 0.3 to 0.8.

  10. Artificial insect wings with biomimetic wing morphology and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiwei; Yan, Xiaojun; Qi, Mingjing; Zhu, Yangsheng; Huang, Dawei; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Lin, Liwei

    2017-09-26

    The pursuit of a high lift force for insect-scale flapping-wing micro aerial vehicles (FMAVs) requires that their artificial wings possess biomimetic wing features which are close to those of their natural counterpart. In this work, we present both fabrication and testing methods for artificial insect wings with biomimetic wing morphology and mechanical properties. The artificial cicada (Hyalessa maculaticollis) wing is fabricated through a high precision laser cutting technique and a bonding process of multilayer materials. Through controlling the shape of the wing venation, the fabrication method can achieve three-dimensional wing architecture, including cambers or corrugations. Besides the artificial cicada wing, the proposed fabrication method also shows a promising versatility for diverse wing types. Considering the artificial cicada wing's characteristics of small size and light weight, special mechanical testing systems are designed to investigate its mechanical properties. Flexural stiffness, maximum deformation rate and natural frequency are measured and compared with those of its natural counterpart. Test results reveal that the mechanical properties of the artificial cicada wing depend strongly on its vein thickness, which can be used to optimize an artificial cicada wing's mechanical properties in the future. As such, this work provides a new form of artificial insect wings which can be used in the field of insect-scale FMAVs.

  11. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the GIII Swept-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    The displacement transfer functions (DTFs) were applied to the GIII swept wing for the deformed shape prediction. The calculated deformed shapes are very close to the correlated finite element results as well as the measured data. The convergence study showed that using 17 strain stations, the wing-tip displacement prediction error was 1.6 percent, and that there is no need to use a large number of strain stations for G-III wing shape predictions.

  12. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: III. Emission Line Diagnostics of Ensembles of H II Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Leitherer, C; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A

    2006-05-10

    We have built, as far as possible, fully self-consistent models of H II regions around aging clusters of stars. These produce strong emission line diagnostics applicable to either individual H II regions in galaxies, or to the integrated emission line spectra of disk or starburst galaxies. The models assume that the expansion and internal pressure of individual H II regions is driven by the net input of mechanical energy from the central cluster, be it through winds or supernova events. This eliminates the ionization parameter as a free variable, replacing it with a parameter which depends on the ratio of the cluster mass to the pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. These models explain why H II regions with low abundances have high excitation, and demonstrate that at least part of the warm ionized medium is the result of overlapping faint, old, large, and low pressure H II regions. We present a number of line ratios (at both optical and IR wavelengths) that provide reliable abundance diagnostics for either single H II regions or for integrated galaxy spectra, and others that are sensitive to the age of the cluster stars exciting individual H II regions.

  13. Active Control of Flapping Wings Using Wing Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokutake, Hiroshi; Sunada, Shigeru; Ohtsuka, Yukio

    A new method for the attitude control of a flapping-wing aircraft is proposed. In this method, the variations in wing deformation, that is, the feathering angle and the camber, are controlled by pulling the wing at a certain point with a thread connected to a servomotor. The experimental setup for verifying the practicability of this method was developed, and aerodynamic forces and wing deformation were measured. It was concluded that thread control caused effective wing deformation, and the variation in the deformation generated the pitching moment that controls the attitude of a flapping-wing aircraft.

  14. Computational wing design studies relating to natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, Edgar G.

    1986-01-01

    Two research studies are described which directly relate to the application of natural laminar flow (NLF) technology to transonic transport-type wing planforms. Each involved using state-of-the-art computational methods to design three-dimensional wing contours which generate significant runs of favorable pressure gradients. The first study supported the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment and involves design of a full-span glove which extends from the leading edge to the spoiler hinge line on the upper surface of an F-14 outer wing panel. A wing was designed computationally for a corporate transport aircraft in the second study. The resulting wing design generated favorable pressure gradients from the leading edge aft to the mid-chord on both upper and lower surfaces at the cruise design point. Detailed descriptions of the computational design approach are presented along with the various constraints imposed on each of the designs.

  15. Comparative analysis of BRAF, NRAS and c-KIT mutation status between tumor tissues and autologous tumor cell-lines of stage III/IV melanoma.

    PubMed

    Knol, Anne-Chantal; Pandolfino, Marie-Christine; Vallée, Audrey; Nguyen, Frédérique; Lella, Virginie; Khammari, Amir; Denis, Marc; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Dréno, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, advances in molecular biology have provided evidence of the genotypic heterogeneity of melanoma. We analysed BRAF, NRAS and c-KIT alterations in tissue samples from 63 stage III/IV melanoma patients and autologous cell-lines, using either allele-specific or quantitative PCR. The expression of BRAF V600E protein was also investigated using an anti-BRAF antibody in the same tissue samples. 81% of FFPE samples and tumor cell-lines harboured a genetic alteration in either BRAF (54%) or NRAS (27%) oncogenes. There was a strong concordance (100%) between tissue samples and tumor cell-lines. The BRAF V600E mutant-specific antibody showed high sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%) for detecting the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. The correlation was of 98% between PCR and immunohistochemistry results for BRAF mutation. These results suggest that BRAF and NRAS mutation status of tumor cells is not affected by culture conditions.

  16. High-resolution H-band Spectroscopy of Be Stars with SDSS-III/APOGEE. II. Line Profile and Radial Velocity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnowski, S. Drew; Wisniewski, John P.; Whelan, David G.; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Borges Fernandes, Marcelo; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Majewski, Steven R.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Mennickent, Ronald E.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Tang, Baitian; Hearty, Fred. R.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Pepper, Joshua; Zasowski, Gail

    2017-04-01

    We report on the H-band spectral variability of classical Be stars observed over the course of the Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), one of four subsurveys comprising SDSS-III. As described in the first paper of this series, the APOGEE B-type emission-line (ABE) star sample was culled from the large number of blue stars observed as telluric standards during APOGEE observations. In this paper, we explore the multi-epoch ABE sample, consisting of 1100 spectra for 213 stars. These “snapshots” of the circumstellar disk activity have revealed a wealth of temporal variability including, but not limited to, gradual disappearance of the line emission and vice versa over both short and long timescales. Other forms of variability include variation in emission strength, emission peak intensity ratios, and emission peak separations. We also analyze radial velocities (RVs) of the emission lines for a subsample of 162 stars with sufficiently strong features, and we discuss on a case-by-case basis whether the RV variability exhibited by some stars is caused by binary motion versus dynamical processes in the circumstellar disks. Ten systems are identified as convincing candidates for binary Be stars with as of yet undetected companions.

  17. Thin-metal lined PRD 49-III composite vessels. [evaluation of pressure vessels for burst strength and fatigue performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggatt, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Filament wound pressure vessels of various configurations were evaluated for burst strength and fatigue performance. The dimensions and characteristics of the vessels are described. The types of tests conducted are explained. It was determined that all vessels leaked in a relatively few cycles (20 to 60 cycles) with failure occurring in all cases in the metallic liner. The thin liner would de-bond from the composite and buckling took place during depressurization. No composite failures or indications of impeding composite failures were obtained in the metal-lined vessels.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Collision Strengths for [Co III] Forbidden Lines - SS5 (Storey+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, T.

    2016-04-01

    The data set consists of 105 files which are labeled as 'OMEGAmn_CoIII.dat' where m=1,2,...,14 and n=2,3,...,15 with m

  19. Low noise wing slat system with rigid cove-filled slat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmilovich, Arvin (Inventor); Yadlin, Yoram (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Concepts and technologies described herein provide for a low noise aircraft wing slat system. According to one aspect of the disclosure provided herein, a cove-filled wing slat is used in conjunction with a moveable panel rotatably attached to the wing slat to provide a high lift system. The moveable panel rotates upward against the rear surface of the slat during deployment of the slat, and rotates downward to bridge a gap width between the stowed slat and the lower wing surface, completing the continuous outer mold line shape of the wing, when the cove-filled slat is retracted to the stowed position.

  20. The Aerodynamics of Deforming Wings at Low Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert

    Flapping flight has gained much attention in the past decade driven by the desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and the desire to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Advancing our current understanding of unsteady aerodynamics is an essential component in the development of micro-air vehicles (MAV) intended to utilize flight mechanics akin to insect flight. Thus the efforts undertaken that of bio-mimicry. The complexities of insect wing motion are dissected and simplified to more tractable problems to elucidate the fundamentals of unsteady aerodynamics in biologically inspired kinematics. The MAV's fruition would satisfy long established needs in both the military and civilian sectors. Although recent studies have provided great insight into the lift generating mechanisms of flapping wings the deflection response of such wings remains poorly understood. This dissertation numerically and experimentally investigates the aerodynamic performance of passively and actively deflected wings in hover and rotary kinematics. Flexibility is distilled to discrete lines of flexion which acknowledging major flexion lines in insect wings to be the primary avenue for deformation. Of primary concern is the development of the leading-edge vortex (LEV), a high circulation region of low pressure above the wing to which much of the wing's lift generation is attributed. Two-dimensional simulations of wings with chord-wise flexibility in a freestream reveal a lift generating mechanism unavailable to rigid wings with origins in vortical symmetry breaking. The inclusion of flexibility in translating wings accelerated from rest revealed the formation time of the initial LEV was very weakly dependent on the flexible stiffness of the wing, maintaining a universal time scale of four to five chords of travel before shedding. The frequency of oscillatory shedding of the leading and trailing-edge vortices that develops after the initial vortex shedding was shown to be

  1. Phase I/II study of biweekly vinorelbine and oxaliplatin as first-line treatment in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Antonio; Servitja, Sonia; Rodríguez-Lescure, Alvaro; Calvo, Lourdes; del Barco, Sonia; Quintanar, María Teresa; Juárez, José Ignacio; Gayo, Javier; Llombart, Antonio; Tusquets, Ignasi

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this phase I/II study was to establish the recommended dose of biweekly vinorelbine and oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic breast cancer and to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of this schedule as first-line treatment. Four different dose levels of vinorelbine and oxaliplatin were selected for the phase I study: (i) 25 and 80 mg/m²; (ii) 25 and 90 mg/m²; (iii) 25 and 100 mg/m²; and (iv) 30 and 90 mg/m²; respectively. At least three patients were treated at each dose level. Overall, 12 patients were included in the phase I trial. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred at any dose level. Therefore, the fourth dose level (30 mg/m² of vinorelbine and 90 mg/m² of oxaliplatin) every 2 weeks was selected for the phase II trial. In this part, 44 patients were included and 61% completed the eight 2-week cycles of study treatment. On an intention-to-treat basis, overall response rate was 59%, and median progression-free survival and overall survival were 9.2 months (95% confidence interval: 7.6-10.9) and 18.6 months (95% confidence interval: 14.4-22.9), respectively. The main severe toxicities were neutropenia (46%) and fatigue (14%). We conclude that the biweekly combination of vinorelbine and oxaliplatin at doses of 30 mg/m² and 90 mg/m², respectively, is highly active and well tolerated as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic breast cancer.

  2. [A winged scapula].

    PubMed

    Faber, C G; Klaver, M M; Wokke, J H J

    2002-09-14

    Three patients, one woman aged 22 and two men aged 54 and 28, presented with scapular winging. In the first patient amyotrophic plexus neuralgia was diagnosed. The second patient most probably suffered from a stretch injury of the long thoracic nerve. The third patient had scapular winging due to an isolated paresis of the trapezius muscle, which was caused by an idiopathic lesion of the accessory nerve. In the first and second patient an improvement was noticeable after 9 months and 1.5 years respectively. There was no improvement in the third patient after 11 years. Paresis of the M. serratus anterior occurs due to paralysis of the N. thoracicus longus, as a result of direct compression, stump trauma, interventions such as thoracic operations, (repeated) stretch injuries or neuralgic brachial plexus amyotrophy; in these cases the scapular winging increases as the arm is lifted forwards. Paresis of the M. trapezius occurs due to the paralysis of the N. accessorius, due to trauma, interventions such as in the neck area, a space-occupying abnormality or an idiopathic abnormality; in these cases the scapular winging increases upon the arm being lifted sideways. Another possible cause of scapular winging is muscular dystrophy, especially fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Usually the prognosis for recovery from a neuropraxia and an idiopathic lesion of the N. thoracicus longus within a two-year period is good. The prognosis for an isolated lesion of the N. accessorius is much less favourable. An EMG is essential for establishing a diagnosis.

  3. Action of cytochalasin D on cells of established lines. III. Zeiosis and movements at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Godman, G C; Miranda, A F; Deitch, A D; Tanenbaum, S W

    1975-03-01

    The projection of knobby protuberances at the cell surface (zeiosis) is a general cellular response to cytochalasin D (CD), resulting from herniation of endoplasm through undefended places of the cortex during cell contractions and displacement of microfilaments induced by CD. Zeiosis is prevented by agents that interfere with the contractile response to CD, such as inhibitors of energy metabolism or cyclic AMP. The developed protrusions, which remain relatively stable in the presence of CD, contain chiefly mono- or subribosomes, and occasionally other organelles normally resident in endoplasm; compact microfilament felt occupies their bases and extends into their proximal stalks. Protein synthesis in the knobs is less than half of that in the polyribosome-containing endoplasm residual in the main body of the cell. Knobs first protrude singly near the margin of the contracting cells and rapidly cluster into small groups in the periphery even at lower temperature. The clusters then migrate centripetally and coalesce into a large aggregate near the apex of the immobilized and retracted cell: this movement is energy- and temperature-dependent. Aggregation is more prominent and stable in cell lines of epithelial derivation than in fibroblastic or other lines in which nuclear extrusion occurs more readily. The latter is regarded as a special manifestation of zeiosis. Macromarkers, such as latex spherules, migrate like the zeiotic knobs on the cell surfaces in the presence of CD. The aggregated knobs, although persistent for days in the presence of CD, are rapidly recessed after withdrawal of the agent as ruffling is resumed and the cells spread. These movements are discussed in terms of current concepts of mobility of the cell membrane.

  4. Action of cytochalasin D on cells of established lines. III. Zeiosis and movements at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The projection of knobby protuberances at the cell surface (zeiosis) is a general cellular response to cytochalasin D (CD), resulting from herniation of endoplasm through undefended places of the cortex during cell contractions and displacement of microfilaments induced by CD. Zeiosis is prevented by agents that interfere with the contractile response to CD, such as inhibitors of energy metabolism or cyclic AMP. The developed protrusions, which remain relatively stable in the presence of CD, contain chiefly mono- or subribosomes, and occasionally other organelles normally resident in endoplasm; compact microfilament felt occupies their bases and extends into their proximal stalks. Protein synthesis in the knobs is less than half of that in the polyribosome-containing endoplasm residual in the main body of the cell. Knobs first protrude singly near the margin of the contracting cells and rapidly cluster into small groups in the periphery even at lower temperature. The clusters then migrate centripetally and coalesce into a large aggregate near the apex of the immobilized and retracted cell: this movement is energy- and temperature-dependent. Aggregation is more prominent and stable in cell lines of epithelial derivation than in fibroblastic or other lines in which nuclear extrusion occurs more readily. The latter is regarded as a special manifestation of zeiosis. Macromarkers, such as latex spherules, migrate like the zeiotic knobs on the cell surfaces in the presence of CD. The aggregated knobs, although persistent for days in the presence of CD, are rapidly recessed after withdrawal of the agent as ruffling is resumed and the cells spread. These movements are discussed in terms of current concepts of mobility of the cell membrane. PMID:168210

  5. Identity of the avian wing digits: problems resolved and unsolved.

    PubMed

    Young, Rebecca L; Bever, Gabe S; Wang, Zhe; Wagner, Günter P

    2011-05-01

    Controversy over bird wing digit identity has been a touchstone for various ideas in the phylogeny of birds, homology, and developmental evolution. This review summarizes the past 10 years of progress toward understanding avian digit identity. We conclude that the sum of evidence supports the Frame Shift Hypothesis, indicating that the avian wing digits have changed anatomical location. Briefly, the derivation of birds from theropod dinosaurs and the positional identities of the avian wing digits as 2, 3, and 4¹ are no longer in question. Additionally, increasing evidence indicates that the developmental programs for identity of the wing digits are of digits I, II, and III. Therefore, the attention moves from whether the digit identity frame shift occurred, to what the mechanisms of the frame shift were, and when in evolution it happened. There is considerable uncertainty about these issues and we identify exciting new research directions to resolve them. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. The characterization of tandem and corrugated wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yongsheng; Broering, Timothy; Hord, Kyle; Prater, Russell

    2014-02-01

    Dragonfly wings have two distinct features: a tandem configuration and wing corrugation. Both features have been extensively studied with the aim to understand the superior flight performance of dragonflies. In this paper we review recent development of tandem and corrugated wing aerodynamics. With regards to the tandem configuration, this review will focus on wing/wing and wing/vortex interactions at different flapping modes and wing spacing. In addition, the aerodynamics of tandem wings under gusty conditions will be reviewed and compared with isolated wings to demonstrate the gust resistance characteristics of flapping wings. Regarding corrugated wings, we review their structural and aerodynamic characteristics.

  7. Chordwise and compressibility corrections to slender-wing theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Harvard; Sluder, Loma

    1952-01-01

    Corrections to slender-wing theory are obtained by assuming a spanwise distribution of loading and determining the chordwise variation which satisfies the appropriate integral equation. Such integral equations are set up in terms of the given vertical induced velocity on the center line or, depending on the type of wing plan form, its average value across the span at a given chord station. The chordwise distribution is then obtained by solving these integral equations. Results are shown for flat-plate rectangular, and triangular wings.

  8. Properties of impurity-bearing ferrihydrite III. Effects of Si on the structure of 2-line ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismasu, A. Cristina; Michel, F. Marc; Tcaciuc, A. Patricia; Brown, Gordon E.

    2014-05-01

    stable in natural environments with respect to reductive dissolution or transformation, and to impact the bioavailability of Fe(III).

  9. Determination of lead by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HG-ICP-MS): on-line generation of plumbane using potassium hexacyanomanganate(III).

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Arslan, Zikri; Rose, LaKeysha

    2013-01-25

    A hydride generation (HG) procedure has been described for determination of Pb by ICP-MS using potassium hexacyanomanganate(III), K(3)Mn(CN)(6), as an additive to facilitate the generation of plumbane (PbH(4)). Potassium hexacyanomanganate(III) was prepared in acidic medium as it was unstable in water. The stability of hexacyanomanganate(III) was examined in dilute solutions of HCl, HNO(3) and H(2)SO(4). The solutions prepared in 1% v/v H(2)SO(4) were found to be stable for over a period of 24h. The least suitable medium was 1% v/v HNO(3). For generation of plumbane, acidic hexacyanomanganate(III) and sample solutions were mixed on-line along a 5-cm long tygon tubing (1.14 mm i.d.) and then reacted with 2% m/v sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)). A concentration of 0.5% m/v K(3)Mn(CN)(6) facilitated the generation of PbH(4) remarkably. In comparison to H(2)SO(4), HCl provided broader working range for which optimum concentration was 1% v/v. No significant interferences were noted from transition metals and hydride forming elements, up to 0.5 μg mL(-1) levels, except Cu which depressed the signals severely. The depressive effects in the presence of 0.1 μg mL(-1) Cu were alleviated by increasing the concentration of K(3)Mn(CN)(6) to 2% m/v. Under these conditions, the sensitivity was enhanced by a factor of at least 42 to 48. The detection limit (3s) was 0.008 μg L(-1) for (208)Pb isotope. Average signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) ranged between 18 and 20 for 1.0 μg mL(-1) Pb solution. The accuracy of the method was verified by analysis of several certified reference materials, including Nearshore seawater (CASS-4), Bone ash (SRM 1400), and Mussel tissue (SRM 2976). The procedure was also successfully applied to the determination of Pb in coastal seawater samples by ICP-MS.

  10. Crystal-field analysis and calculation of two-photon absorption line strengths of dicesium sodium hexachlorogadolinate(III).

    PubMed

    Duan, Chang-Kui; Tanner, Peter A

    2010-03-31

    The crystal-field energy level calculation of the 4f(7) ion Gd(3+) in the crystal Cs(2)NaGdCl(6) has fitted 45 levels with standard deviation 12 cm(-1), with the energy parameters being consistent with those from other studies. The resulting eigenvectors have been employed in the calculation of two-photon absorption (TPA) intensities of transitions from the electronic ground state (8)S(7/2) to the crystal-field levels of excited (6)P, (6)I and (6)D multiplet terms. The TPA line strengths are highly polarization dependent and exhibit striking differences for linearly polarized incident radiation compared with circularly polarized radiation. The relative intensities are compared with those available from previous experimental studies and some reassignments have been made. Good agreement of calculated and experimental TPA spectra is found, except for the intensity ratio of the transitions to (6)P(7/2) or (6)P(5/2) compared with that to (6)P(3/2), for linear and circular polarizations, where the calculation overestimates the ratio. Reasons for this disagreement are presented.

  11. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. H.; Lan, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is developed for predicting wing rock characteristics. From available data, it can be concluded that wing rock is triggered by flow asymmetries, developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model that includes all essential aerodynamic nonlinearities is developed. The Beecham-Titchener method is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for the amplitude and frequency of the limit cycle based on the three degree-of-freedom equations of motion. An iterative scheme is developed to calculate the average aerodynamic derivatives and dynamic characteristics at limit cycle conditions. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  12. The Pharmacological Costs of First-Line Therapies in Unselected Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Review of Published Phase III Trials.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    In light of the relevant expenses of pharmacologic interventions, it might be interesting to make a balance between the cost of the new drugs administered and the difference in progression-free survival in first-line treatments for advanced colorectal cancer. We calculated the pharmacologic costs necessary to get the benefit in progression-free survival for each trial. The costs are from the pharmacy of our hospital in Legnago, Italy. We evaluated 28 phase III randomized controlled trials that included 19,958 patients. The treatment with oxaliplatin with fluorouracil and folinic acid (FOLFOX) was the most cost-effective. The addition of irinotecan to FOLFOX (FOLFOXIRI) increased the costs only marginally. The increase is bigger for combinations that include biologic agents. The pharmacologic costs of commonly used first-line regimens for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer are highly variable, and the performance of the published chemotherapy schemes depends on the selection of patients, the tumor characteristics, and the type of the scheme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Phase I/II Trial of Sorafenib in Combination with Vinorelbine as First-Line Chemotherapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Cristiano; Strepponi, Ivan; Charamis, Helen; Langleben, Adrian; Scarpi, Emanuela; Nanni, Oriana; Miller, Wilson H.; Panasci, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Preclinical models have reported a synergistic interaction between sorafenib and vinorelbine. We investigated the toxicity, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics interaction of this combination as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic breast cancer. Methods Patients were HER2-negative and treated with vinorelbine 30 mg/m2 IV days 1,8 every 21 plus daily oral sorafenib. In the phase I portion (3+3 design) patients received sorafenib 200 mg BID (cohort 1) or 400 mg BID (cohort 2). In the phase II expansion, 21 more evaluable patients were planned to receive the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in 6 patients: blood concentrations were compared for each drug in the presence or absence of the other drug. Results In cohort 1, one patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) (grade 3 pancreatitis), requiring the expansion of this cohort to 6 patients, without further documented DLTs. In cohort 2, one patient of six experienced a grade 4 DLT (asymptomatic rise in amylase not requiring drug discontinuation), establishing this dose level as the MTD (sorafenib 400 mg BID). After expansion at the MTD, a total of 27 patients (median age 57) were treated for a median of 8 cycles. One grade 5 febrile neutropenia occurred. With repeated cycles, 52% of patients required at least 1 dose reduction of either drug. One patient experienced a sustained grade 3 fatigue resulting in treatment discontinuation. The response rate was 30%. Median PFS was 5.7 months (95% CI 4.4–7.6), and clinical benefit (absence of disease progression at 6 months) was 48%. PK analysis showed a significant interaction between the two drugs, resulting in a higher Cmax of vinorelbine in the presence of sorafenib. Conclusion The combination of sorafenib and vinorelbine at full doses is feasible but not devoid of toxicity, likely also due to a significant PK interaction. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00764972 PMID:27992451

  14. The Stellar Initial Mass Function in Early-type Galaxies from Absorption Line Spectroscopy. III. Radial Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Conroy, Charlie; Villaume, Alexa; Brodie, Jean; Romanowsky, Aaron J.

    2017-06-01

    There is good evidence that the centers of massive early-type galaxies have a bottom-heavy stellar initial mass function (IMF) compared to that of the Milky Way. Here we study the radial variation of the IMF within such galaxies, using a combination of high-quality Keck spectroscopy and a new suite of stellar population synthesis models that cover a wide range in metallicity. As in the previous studies in this series, the models are fitted directly to the spectra and treat all elemental abundance ratios as free parameters. Using newly obtained spectroscopy for six galaxies, including deep data extending to ˜ 1{R}{{e}} for the galaxies NGC 1407, NGC 1600, and NGC 2695, we find that the IMF varies strongly with galactocentric radius. For all six galaxies the IMF is bottom-heavy in the central regions, with average mass-to-light ratio “mismatch” parameter α \\equiv {({\\text{}}M/L)/({\\text{}}M/L)}{MW}≈ 2.5 at R = 0. The IMF rapidly becomes more bottom-light with increasing radius, flattening off near the Milky Way value (α ≈ 1.1) at R> 0.4{R}{{e}}. A consequence is that the luminosity-weighted average IMF depends on the measurement aperture: within R={R}{{e}} we find < α {> }L=1.3{--}1.5, consistent with recent lensing and dynamical results from SLACS and {{ATLAS}}3{{D}}. Our results are also consistent with several earlier studies that were based on analyses of radial gradients of line indices. The observed IMF gradients support galaxy formation models in which the central regions of massive galaxies had a different formation history than their outer parts. Finally, we make use of the high signal-to-noise central spectra of NGC 1407 and NGC 2695 to demonstrate how we can disentangle IMF effects and abundance effects.

  15. Cytotoxic effects of bromelain in human gastrointestinal carcinoma cell lines (MKN45, KATO-III, HT29-5F12, and HT29-5M21)

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Afshin; Ehteda, Anahid; Masoumi Moghaddam, Samar; Akhter, Javed; Pillai, Krishna; Morris, David Lawson

    2013-01-01

    Background Bromelain is a pineapple stem extract with a variety of therapeutic benefits arising from interaction with a number of different biological processes. Several preclinical studies and anecdotal clinical observations have reported the anticancer properties of bromelain. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of bromelain in four human cancer cell lines of gastrointestinal origin and the mechanisms involved. Methods The gastric carcinoma cell lines (KATO-III and MKN45) and two chemoresistant subpopulations of the HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29-5M21 and HT29-5F12) were treated with a range of concentrations of bromelain, as well as with cisplatin as a positive control. The effect of bromelain on the growth and proliferation of cancer cells was determined using a sulforhodamine B assay after 72 hours of treatment. Expression of apoptosis-associated proteins in MKN45 cells treated with bromelain was analyzed by Western blotting. Results Data from our sulforhodamine B assay showed that bromelain inhibited proliferation of HT29-5F12, HT29-5M21, MKN45, and KATO-III cells, with respective half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 29, 34, 94, and 142 μg/mL. Analyzing the expression of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins in bromelain-treated MKN45 cells, we observed activation of the caspase system, cleavage of PARP and p53, overexpression of cytochrome C, attenuation of phospho-Akt and Bcl2, and removal of MUC1. Apart from the caspase-dependent apoptosis observed, emergence of cleaved p53 supports a direct, extranuclear apoptotic function of p53. Moreover, interrupted Akt signaling and attenuation of Bcl2 and MUC1 oncoproteins suggest impaired survival of cancer cells. Conclusion Our findings collectively indicate that bromelain exerts cytotoxic effects in a panel of human gastric and colon carcinoma cells. Our study of MKN45 cells implicated different mechanisms in bromelain-induced cell death. While promoting apoptosis

  16. A Method for Estimating the Rolling Moments Caused by Wing-tail Interference for Missiles at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Sherman; Hikido, Katsumi

    1953-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating the rolling moments caused by wing-tail interference for missiles composed of wing-tail-body combination. The considerations involved in determining the structure of the downwash field behind lifting cruciform wing-body combinations and the rolling moment on cruciform wings of various plan forms induced by an infinite line vortex are discussed in detail. Computations of induced rolling moments for several missile designs are compared with experimental results.

  17. [Dynamic winged scapula].

    PubMed

    Perjés, K

    1990-01-01

    Author describes the paralysis of the serratus muscle in consequence of the paralysis of the long thoracic nerve. The form of appearance is the winged of "flying" scapula. Beside the presentation of the literary and anatomical data the own cases are described. Only conservative therapy was made, an operation was in no case necessary.

  18. SMA actuators for morphing wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailovski, V.; Terriault, P.; Georges, T.; Coutu, D.

    An experimental morphing laminar wing was developed to prove the feasibility of aircraft fuel consumption reduction through enhancement of the laminar flow regime over the wing extrados. The morphing wing prototype designed for subsonic cruise flight conditions (Mach 0.2 … 0.3; angle of attack - 1 … +2∘), combines three principal subsystems: (1) flexible extrados, (2) rigid intrados and (3) an actuator group located inside the wing box. The morphing capability of the wing relies on controlled deformation of the wing extrados under the action of shape memory alloys (SMA) actuators. A coupled fluid-structure model of the morphing wing was used to evaluate its mechanical and aerodynamic performances in different flight conditions. A 0.5 m chord and 1 m span prototype of the morphing wing was tested in a subsonic wind tunnel. In this work, SMA actuators for morphing wings were modeled using a coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model and they were windtunnel validated. If the thermo-mechanical model of SMA actuators presented in this work is coupled with the previously developed structureaerodynamic model of the morphing wing, it could serve for the optimization of the entire morphing wing system.

  19. Experimental investigation of the flow on the suction side of a thin Delta wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, D.

    1981-01-01

    Surface oil flow patterns were photographed and pressure distribution measurements were carried out on a sharp edged delta wing of aspect ratio lambda = 1.0 in order to determine the influence of Reynolds number and of vortex breakdown on the flow on the suction side of the wing. The formation of the secondary vortex occurs due to separation of a laminar boundary layer in the front part of the wing and due to separation of a turbulent boundary layer in the rear part of the wing. In the case of turbulent separation, the secondary separation line is closer to the wing leading edge than in the laminar case. The position of the transition depends on the Reynolds number and on the angle of incidence. The breakdown of a vortex above the wing leads to a kink in the secondary separation line.

  20. When wings touch wakes: understanding locomotor force control by wake wing interference in insect wings.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the fluid dynamics of force control in flying insects requires the exploration of how oscillating wings interact with the surrounding fluid. The production of vorticity and the shedding of vortical structures within the stroke cycle thus depend on two factors: the temporal structure of the flow induced by the wing's own instantaneous motion and the flow components resulting from both the force production in previous wing strokes and the motion of other wings flapping in close proximity. These wake-wing interactions may change on a stroke-by-stroke basis, confronting the neuro-muscular system of the animal with a complex problem for force control. In a single oscillating wing, the flow induced by the preceding half stroke may lower the wing's effective angle of attack but permits the recycling of kinetic energy from the wake via the wake capture mechanism. In two-winged insects, the acceleration fields produced by each wing may strongly interact via the clap-and-fling mechanism during the dorsal stroke reversal. Four-winged insects must cope with the fact that the flow over their hindwings is affected by the presence of the forewings. In these animals, a phase-shift between the stroke cycles of fore- and hindwing modulates aerodynamic performance of the hindwing via leading edge vortex destruction and changes in local flow condition including wake capture. Moreover, robotic wings demonstrate that phase-lag during peak performance and the strength of force modulation depend on the vertical spacing between the two stroke planes and the size ratio between fore- and hindwing. This study broadly summarizes the most prominent mechanisms of wake-wing and wing-wing interactions found in flapping insect wings and evaluates the consequences of these processes for the control of locomotor forces in the behaving animal.

  1. Approximate calculation of multispar cantilever and semicantilever wings with parallel ribs under direct and indirect loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, Eugen

    1932-01-01

    A method is presented for approximate static calculation, which is based on the customary assumption of rigid ribs, while taking into account the systematic errors in the calculation results due to this arbitrary assumption. The procedure is given in greater detail for semicantilever and cantilever wings with polygonal spar plan form and for wings under direct loading only. The last example illustrates the advantages of the use of influence lines for such wing structures and their practical interpretation.

  2. Risk factors for GI adverse events in a phase III randomized trial of bevacizumab in first-line therapy of advanced ovarian cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Burger, Robert A; Brady, Mark F; Bookman, Michael A; Monk, Bradley J; Walker, Joan L; Homesley, Howard D; Fowler, Jeffrey; Greer, Benjamin E; Boente, Matthew; Fleming, Gini F; Lim, Peter C; Rubin, Stephen C; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Liang, Sharon X

    2014-04-20

    To evaluate risk factors for GI adverse events (AEs) within a phase III trial of bevacizumab in first-line ovarian cancer therapy. Women with previously untreated advanced disease after surgery were randomly allocated to six cycles of platinum-taxane chemotherapy plus placebo cycles (C)2 to C22 (R1); chemotherapy plus bevacizumab C2 to C6 plus placebo C7 to C22 (R2); or chemotherapy plus bevacizumab C2 to C22 (R3). Patients were evaluated for history or on-study development of potential risk factors for GI AEs defined as grade ≥ 2 perforation, fistula, necrosis, or hemorrhage. Of 1,873 patients enrolled, 1,759 (94%) were evaluable, and 2.8% (50 of 1,759) experienced a GI AE: 10 of 587 (1.7%, R1), 20 of 587 (3.4%, R2), and 20 of 585 (3.4%, R3). Univariable analyses indicated that previous treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; P = .005) and small bowel resection (SBR; P = .032) or large bowel resection (LBR; P = .012) at primary surgery were significantly associated with a GI AE. The multivariable estimated relative odds of a GI AE were 13.4 (95% CI, 3.44 to 52.3; P < .001) for IBD; 2.05 (95% CI, 1.09 to 3.88; P = .026) for LBR; 1.95 (95% CI, 0.894 to 4.25; P = .093) for SBR; and 2.15 for bevacizumab exposure (aggregated 95% CI, 1.05 to 4.40; P = .036). History of treatment for IBD, and bowel resection at primary surgery, increase the odds of GI AEs in patients receiving first-line platinum-taxane chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer. After accounting for these risk factors, concurrent bevacizumab doubles the odds of a GI AE, but is not appreciably increased by continuation beyond chemotherapy.

  3. Risk Factors for GI Adverse Events in a Phase III Randomized Trial of Bevacizumab in First-Line Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Robert A.; Brady, Mark F.; Bookman, Michael A.; Monk, Bradley J.; Walker, Joan L.; Homesley, Howard D.; Fowler, Jeffrey; Greer, Benjamin E.; Boente, Matthew; Fleming, Gini F.; Lim, Peter C.; Rubin, Stephen C.; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Liang, Sharon X.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate risk factors for GI adverse events (AEs) within a phase III trial of bevacizumab in first-line ovarian cancer therapy. Patients and Methods Women with previously untreated advanced disease after surgery were randomly allocated to six cycles of platinum-taxane chemotherapy plus placebo cycles (C)2 to C22 (R1); chemotherapy plus bevacizumab C2 to C6 plus placebo C7 to C22 (R2); or chemotherapy plus bevacizumab C2 to C22 (R3). Patients were evaluated for history or on-study development of potential risk factors for GI AEs defined as grade ≥ 2 perforation, fistula, necrosis, or hemorrhage. Results Of 1,873 patients enrolled, 1,759 (94%) were evaluable, and 2.8% (50 of 1,759) experienced a GI AE: 10 of 587 (1.7%, R1), 20 of 587 (3.4%, R2), and 20 of 585 (3.4%, R3). Univariable analyses indicated that previous treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; P = .005) and small bowel resection (SBR; P = .032) or large bowel resection (LBR; P = .012) at primary surgery were significantly associated with a GI AE. The multivariable estimated relative odds of a GI AE were 13.4 (95% CI, 3.44 to 52.3; P < .001) for IBD; 2.05 (95% CI, 1.09 to 3.88; P = .026) for LBR; 1.95 (95% CI, 0.894 to 4.25; P = .093) for SBR; and 2.15 for bevacizumab exposure (aggregated 95% CI, 1.05 to 4.40; P = .036). Conclusion History of treatment for IBD, and bowel resection at primary surgery, increase the odds of GI AEs in patients receiving first-line platinum-taxane chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer. After accounting for these risk factors, concurrent bevacizumab doubles the odds of a GI AE, but is not appreciably increased by continuation beyond chemotherapy. PMID:24637999

  4. The "red shelf" of the Hβ line in the Seyfert 1 galaxies RXS J01177+3637 and HS 0328+05.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron, P.; Gonçalves, A. C.; Véron-Cetty, M.-P.

    2002-03-01

    A few Seyfert 1s have a Hβ profile with a red wing usually called the "red shelf". The most popular interpretation of this feature is that it is due to broad redshifted lines of Hβ and [O III]λλ4959, 5007; we have observed two Seyfert 1s displaying a "red shelf" and showed that in these two objects the main contributor is most probably the He I λλ4922, 5016 lines having the velocity and width of the broad Hβ component. There is no evidence for the presence of a broad redshifted component of Hβ or [O III] in any of these two objects.

  5. Phase I/II study of gemcitabine with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin as first-line therapy in Asian women with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Zee-Wan; Ang, Peter Cher-Siang; Chowbay, Balram; Wong, Nan-Soon; See, Hui-Ti; Khoo, Kei-Siong

    2008-10-01

    This was a single institution phase I/II study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and gemcitabine in Asian women with metastatic breast cancer. PLD was administered on day 1 and gemcitabine on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks at escalating doses from 25 mg/m(2) and 1000 mg/m(2) onwards respectively. The median age was 56 years with a median disease-free interval of 43 months. Majority of the patients had visceral involvement. At PLD 35 mg/m(2) and gemcitabine 1200 mg/m(2), the overall response rate for 23 evaluable patients was 83% (1 CR, 18 PR, 3 SD, 1 PD). Six had prior adjuvant anthracyclines (3 PR, 1 SD). The median follow-up was 81 weeks and progression free interval was 29 weeks. Overall survival was 23.9 months. The dose limiting toxicities were mucositis and myelosuppression. This regimen is active and reasonably tolerated as first-line therapy.

  6. The optically thick C III spectrum. 2: Level/term populations and line/multiplet intensities using an improved hybrid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    An improved hybrid level/term calculation is employed to obtain C III level/term populations and line/fractional multiplet intensities over the extended range of electron density 4.0 less than or equal log N(sub e) less than or equal 12.0, for column lengths L ranging from zero (optically thin) to 10(exp 20)/sq cm (moderately optically thick), at electron temperatures T(sub e) approximately 40,000 K(log T(sub e) = 4.6), T(sub e) approximately 63,000 K (log T(sub e) = 4.8), T(sub e) approximately 79,500 K (log T(sub e) = 4.9), and T(sub e) = 100,000 K (log T(sub e) = 5.0). The tabulated results are relevant to the interpretation of space observations obtained over extended spectral ranges by new and planned facilities including the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) and the Far-Ultraviolet Spectrographic Explorer (FUSE).

  7. Wing shaping and strain sensing using fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Sergio Licon

    Current technologies to measure strain rely on strain gauges that become heavy with increased measurement points. One significant improvement is the Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) which allows light to reflect through a fiber optic line in relation to the strain applied on that fiber. Significant advantages over conventional strain gauges allow for a light weight detailed view of the strain applied to any structure containing these fibers. The SPACE Center in conjunction with the AERO Institute have produced preliminary conclusions on how to implement such fibers on a wing structure and how they could be used to control the shape of a wing. Such a wing structure could be built lighter and flexible than today's wings thus enabling a lighter aircraft. Further studies show that if a feedback mechanism is encompassed, flutter suppression techniques can be accomplished with the use of these fibers thus avoiding catastrophic failure.

  8. Recent applications of the transonic wing analysis computer code, TWING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, N. R.; Holst, T. L.; Thomas, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    An evaluation of the transonic-wing-analysis computer code TWING is given. TWING utilizes a fully implicit approximate factorization iteration scheme to solve the full potential equation in conservative form. A numerical elliptic-solver grid-generation scheme is used to generate the required finite-difference mesh. Several wing configurations were analyzed, and the limits of applicability of this code was evaluated. Comparisons of computed results were made with available experimental data. Results indicate that the code is robust, accurate (when significant viscous effects are not present), and efficient. TWING generally produces solutions an order of magnitude faster than other conservative full potential codes using successive-line overrelaxation. The present method is applicable to a wide range of isolated wing configurations including high-aspect-ratio transport wings and low-aspect-ratio, high-sweep, fighter configurations.

  9. The efficient solution of transonic wing flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Subramanian, N. R.; Thomas, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of the transonic-wing-analysis computer code TWING is presented. TWING utilizes a fully implicit, approximate-factorization iteration scheme to solve the full-potential equation in conservative form. A numerical elliptic-solver grid-generation scheme is used to generate the required finite-difference mesh. Several wing configurations have been analyzed, and comparisons of computed results have been made with available experimental data. Results indicate that the code is robust, accurate (when significant viscous effects are not present), and efficient. TWING generally produces solutions an order of magnitude faster than other conservative, full-potential codes using successive-line overrelaxation. The present method is applicable to a wide range of isolated wing configurations, including high-aspect-ratio transport wings and low-aspect-ratio, high-sweep, fighter configurations.

  10. Advanced Lightplane Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Neico Aviation, Inc.'s tubular fuselage frame of Prescott Pusher is heliarc welded at the factory. Wings, tail, and control surfaces are of traditional aluminum. A rear mounted 180 horsepower engine with a four bladed pusher propeller allows speeds up to 200 miles per hour; an advanced rotary engine and other powerplants being tested are expected to boost cruise speed above 200 miles per hour.

  11. Are Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies Viewed Pole-on?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    0.2’’ respectively. Figure 1 displays the position of each slit over a Barbosa et al. (2009) GMOS IFU image of the [S III] flux (which originates...C. Winge, H. Schmitt: Gemini/ GMOS IFU gas velocity ’tomography’ of the narrow line region of nearby active galaxies, MNRAS, 396 (2009) 2. [2] D...1995) 81. 4 P o S ( N L S 1 ) 0 5 0 Are NLS1s Pole-on? Travis C. Fischer 5 Figure 1: NGC 4051 GMOS IFU image showing integrated [SIII] flux

  12. Non-linear unsteady wing theory, part 1. Quasi two-dimensional behavior: Airfoils and slender wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccune, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The initial phases of a study of the large-amplitude unsteady aerodynamics of wings in severe maneuver are reported. The research centers on vortex flows, their initiation at wing surfaces, their subsequent convection, and interaction dynamically with wings and control surfaces. The focus is on 2D and quasi-2D aspects of the problem and features the development of an exact nonlinear unsteady airfoil theory as well as an approach to the crossflow problem for slender wing applications including leading-edge separation. The effective use of interactive on-line computing in quantifying and visualizing the nonsteady effects of severe maneuver is demonstrated. Interactive computational work is now possible, in which a maneuver can be initiated and its effects observed and analyzed immediately.

  13. Attachment Line Blockage Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Photographs shows the attachment-line experiment model with fairing and fence for supersonic attachment-line experiments. The fairing is intended to eliminate the wing/fuselage juncture shock and align the flow for the streamlined fence. The streamlined fence traps the turbulent fuselage boundary layer to prevent turbulent contamination of the leading edge flow.

  14. Over-the-wing propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr. (Inventor); White, E. Richard (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention is an aircraft with a system for increasing the lift drag ratio over a broad range of operating conditions. The system positions the engines and nacelles over the wing in such a position that gains in propeller efficiency is achieved simultaneously with increases in wing lift and a reduction in wing drag. Adverse structural and torsional effects on the wings are avoided by fuselage mounted pylons which attach to the upper portion of the fuselage aft of the wings. Similarly, pylon-wing interference is eliminated by moving the pylons to the fuselage. Further gains are achieved by locating the pylon surface area aft of the aircraft center of gravity, thereby augmenting both directional and longitudinal stability. This augmentation has the further effect of reducing the size, weight and drag of empennage components. The combination of design changes results in improved cruise performance and increased climb performance while reducing fuel consumption and drag and weight penalties.

  15. Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

    2015-02-01

    The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

  16. In vitro anti-proliferative activity on colon cancer cell line (HT-29) of Thai medicinal plants selected from Thai/Lanna medicinal plant recipe database "MANOSROI III".

    PubMed

    Manosroi, Aranya; Akazawa, Hiroyuki; Akihisa, Toshihiro; Jantrawut, Pensak; Kitdamrongtham, Worapong; Manosroi, Worapaka; Manosroi, Jiradej

    2015-02-23

    Thai/Lanna region has its own folklore wisdoms including the traditional medicinal plant recipes. Thai/Lanna medicinal plant recipe database "MANOSROI III" has been developed by Prof. Dr. Jiradej Manosroi. It consists of over 200,000 recipes for all diseases including cancer. To investigate the anti-proliferative and apoptotic activities on human colon cancer cell line (HT-29) as well as the cancer cell selectivity of the methanolic extracts (MEs) and fractions of the 23 selected plants from the "MANOSROI III" database. The 23 selected plants were extracted with methanol under reflux and evaluated for their anti-proliferative activity by sulforhodamine B assay. The 5 plants (Gloriosa superba, Caesalpinia sappan, Fibraurea tinctoria, Ventilago denticulata and Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) with potent anti-proliferative activity were fractionated by liquid-liquid partition to give 4 fractions including each hexane (HF), methanol-water (MF), n-butanol (BF) and water (WF) fractions. They were tested for anti-proliferative activity and cancer cell selectivity. The ME and fractions of G. superba which showed potent anti-proliferative activity were further examined for morphological changes and apoptotic activities by acridine orange (AO)/ethidium bromide (EB) staining. The ME of G. superba root showed active with the highest anti-proliferative activity at 9.17 and 1.58 folds of cisplatin and doxorubicin, respectively. After liquid-liquid partition, HF of V. denticulata, MFs of F. tinctoria, V. denticulata and BF of P. tetragonolobus showed higher anti-proliferative activities than their MEs. The MF of G. superba indicated the highest anti-proliferative activity at 7.73 and 1.34 folds of cisplatin and doxorubicin, respectively, but only 0.86 fold of its ME. The ME and HF, MF and BF of G. superba and MF of F. tinctoria demonstrated high cancer cell selectivity. At 50 µg/ml, ME, HF, MF and BF of G. superba demonstrated higher apoptotic activities than the two standard drugs

  17. Longitudinal Characteristics of a Semispan Model of the Grumman Airplane Design 83 having a Sweptback Wing and of the Model with a Straight Wing as Determined from Wing-Flow Tests at Transonic Speeds, TED No. NACA DE337

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsby, Norman S.; Kennedy, Robert M.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been made by the NACA wing-flow method to provide information on the relative longitudinal characteristics of a straight and sweptback wing in the transonic speed range. Tests were made of a semispan model of the Grumman airplane design 83 (XFlOF) incorporating a wing swept back 42.5deg with reference to quarter-chord line and also of the model with the swept wing replaced by a straight wing similar to that of the XF9F airplane. The airfoil sections were symmetrical 64l-series, with thickness ratios of 12 percent for the straight wing and 10 percent for the sweptback wing parallel to the stream direction. Measurements were made of normal force, chord force, and pitching moment at various angles of attack with the two wings both with and without the empennage, and with the fuselage alone. The tests covered a range of effective Mach numbers at the wing of the model from 0.65 to 1.10.

  18. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  19. Simulation of iced wing aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Bragg, M. B.; Kwon, O. J.; Sankar, L. N.

    1991-01-01

    The sectional and total aerodynamic load characteristics of moderate aspect ratio wings with and without simulated glaze leading edge ice were studied both computationally, using a three dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes solver, and experimentally. The wing has an untwisted, untapered planform shape with NACA 0012 airfoil section. The wing has an unswept and swept configuration with aspect ratios of 4.06 and 5.0. Comparisons of computed surface pressures and sectional loads with experimental data for identical configurations are given. The abrupt decrease in stall angle of attack for the wing, as a result of the leading edge ice formation, was demonstrated numerically and experimentally.

  20. Geometric analysis of wing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I.-CHUNG; Torres, Francisco J.; Tung, Chee

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a new geometric analysis procedure for wing sections. This procedure is based on the normal mode analysis for continuous functions. A set of special shape functions is introduced to represent the geometry of the wing section. The generators of the NACA 4-digit airfoils were included in this set of shape functions. It is found that the supercritical wing section, Korn airfoil, could be well represented by a set of ten shape functions. Preliminary results showed that the number of parameters to define a wing section could be greatly reduced to about ten. Hence, the present research clearly advances the airfoil design technology by reducing the number of design variables.

  1. Theoretical antisymmetric span loading for wings of arbitrary plan form at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, John

    1951-01-01

    A simplified lifting-surface theory that includes effects of compressibility and spanwise variation of section lift-curve slope is used to provide charts with which antisymmetric loading due to arbitrary antisymmetric angle of attack can be found for wings having symmetric plan forms with a constant spanwise sweep angle of the quarter-chord line. Consideration is given to the flexible wing in roll. Aerodynamic characteristics due to rolling, deflected ailerons, and sideslip of wings with dihedral are considered. Solutions are presented for straight-tapered wings for a range of swept plan forms.

  2. Phase III trial evaluating the addition of bevacizumab to endocrine therapy as first-line treatment for advanced breast cancer: the letrozole/fulvestrant and avastin (LEA) study.

    PubMed

    Martín, Miguel; Loibl, Sibylle; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Morales, Serafín; Martinez, Noelia; Guerrero, Angel; Anton, Antonio; Aktas, Bahriye; Schoenegg, Winfried; Muñoz, Montserrat; Garcia-Saenz, José Ángel; Gil, Miguel; Ramos, Manuel; Margeli, Mireia; Carrasco, Eva; Liedtke, Cornelia; Wachsmann, Grischa; Mehta, Keyur; De la Haba-Rodriguez, Juan R

    2015-03-20

    To test whether combining bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment, with endocrine therapy (ET) could potentially delay the emergence of resistance to ET. A multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase III, binational (Spain and Germany) study added bevacizumab (15 mg/kg every 3 weeks) to ET (ET-B; letrozole or fulvestrant) as first-line therapy in postmenopausal patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -negative and hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer. We compared progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR), response duration (RD), time to treatment failure (TTF), clinical benefit rate (CBR), and safety. From 380 patients recruited (2007 to 2011), 374 were analyzed by intent to-treat (184 patients on ET and 190 patients on ET-B). Median age was 65 years, 270 patients (72%) had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0, 178 patients (48%) had visceral metastases, and 171 patients (46%) and 195 patients (52%) had received prior chemotherapy or ET, respectively. Median PFS was 14.4 months in the ET arm and 19.3 months in the ET-B arm (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.06; P = .126). ORR, CBR, and RD with ET versus ET-B were 22% versus 41% (P < .001), 67% versus 77% (P = .041), and 13.3 months versus 17.6 months (P = .434), respectively. TTF and OS were comparable in both arms. Grade 3 to 4 hypertension, aminotransferase elevation, and proteinuria were significantly higher in the ET-B arm. Eight patients (4.2%) receiving ET-B died during study or within 30 days of end of treatment. The addition of bevacizumab to ET in first-line treatment failed to produce a statistically significant increase in PFS or OS in women with HER2-negative/hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. A randomized, multicenter, phase III study of gemcitabine combined with capecitabine versus gemcitabine alone as first-line chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo; Kim, Ho Gak; Noh, Myung Hwan; Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Chang Duck; Lee, Dong Ki; Cho, Kwang Bum; Cho, Chang Min; Moon, Jong Ho; Kim, Dong Uk; Kang, Dae Hwan; Cheon, Young Koog; Choi, Ho Soon; Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jae Kwang; Moon, Jieun; Shin, Hye Jung; Song, Si Young

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This phase III trial compared the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus capecitabine (GemCap) versus single-agent gemcitabine (Gem) in advanced pancreatic cancer as first-line chemotherapy. Methods: A total of 214 advanced pancreatic cancer patients were enrolled from 16 hospitals in South Korea between 2007 and 2011. Patients were randomly assigned to receive GemCap (oral capecitabine 1660 mg/m2 plus Gem 1000 mg/m2 by 30-minute intravenous infusion weekly for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week break every 4 weeks) or Gem (by 30-minute intravenous infusion weekly for 3 weeks every 4 weeks). Results: Median overall survival (OS) time, the primary end point, was 10.3 and 7.5 months in the GemCap and Gem arms, respectively (P = 0.06). Progression-free survival was 6.2 and 5.3 months in the GemCap and Gem arms, respectively (P = 0.08). GemCap significantly improved overall response rate compared with Gem alone (43.7% vs 17.6%; P = 0.001). Overall frequency of grade 3 or 4 toxicities was similar in each group. Neutropenia was the most frequent grade 3 or 4 toxicity in both groups. Conclusion: GemCap failed to improve OS at a statistically significant level compared to Gem treatment. This study showed a trend toward improved OS compared to Gem alone. GemCap and Gem both exhibited similar safety profiles. PMID:28072706

  4. Aeroelastic passive control optimization of supersonic composite wing with external stores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaeman, E.; Abdullah, N. A.; Kashif, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper provides a study on passive aeroelastic control optimization, by means of aeroelastic tailoring, of a composite supersonic wing equipped with external stores. The objective of the optimization is to minimize wing weight by considering the aeroelastic flutter and divergence instability speeds as constraints at several flight altitudes. The optimization variables are the composite ply angle and skin thickness of the wing box, wing rib and its control surfaces. The aeroelastic instability speed is set as constraint such that it should be higher than the flutter speed of a metallic base line model of supersonic wing having previously published. A finite element analysis is applied to determine the stiffness and mass matric of the wing and its multi stores. The boundary element method in the form of doublet lattice method is used to model the unsteady aerodynamic load. The results indicate that, for the present wing configuration, the high modulus Graphite/Epoxy composite provides a desired higher flutter speed and lower wing weight compare to that of Kevlar/Epoxy composite as well as the base line metallic wing materials. The aeroelastic boundary thus can be enlarged to higher speed zone and in the same time reduce the structural weight which is important for a further optimization process.

  5. Study of lee-side flows over conically cambered delta wings at supersonic speeds, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Watson, Carolyn B.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in which surface pressure data, flow visualization data, and force and moment data were obtained on four conical delta wing models which differed in leading-edge camber only. Wing leading-edge camber was achieved through a deflection of the outboard 30% of the local wind semispan of a reference 75 degrees swept flat delta wing. The four wing models have leading-edge deflection angles delta sub F of 0, 5, 10, and 15 degrees measured streamwise. Data for the wings with delta sub F = 10 and 15 degrees showed that hinge-line separation dominated the lee-side wing loading and prohibited the develpment of leading-edge separation on the deflected portion of wing leading edge. However, data for the wing with delta sub F = 5 degrees, a vortex was positioned on the deflected leading edge with reattachment at the hinge line. Flow visualization results were presented which detail the influence of Mach number, angle of attack, and camber on the lee-side flow characteristics of conically cambered delta wings. Analysis of photgraphic data identified the existence of 12 distinctive lee-side flow types. In general, the aerodynamic force and moment data correlated well with the pressure and flow visualization data.

  6. Naturally inspired SERS substrates fabricated by photocatalytically depositing silver nanoparticles on cicada wings.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Ichiro; Harada, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Densely stacked Ag nanoparticles with an average diameter of 199 nm were effectively deposited on TiO2-coated cicada wings (Ag/TiO2-coated wings) from a water-ethanol solution of AgNO3 using ultraviolet light irradiation at room temperature. It was seen that the surfaces of bare cicada wings contained nanopillar array structures. In the optical absorption spectra of the Ag/TiO2-coated wings, the absorption peak due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag nanoparticles was observed at 440 nm. Strong Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals of Rhodamine 6G adsorbed on the Ag/TiO2-coated wings were clearly observed using the 514.5-nm line of an Ar(+) laser. The Ag/TiO2-coated wings can be a promising candidate for naturally inspired SERS substrates.

  7. Naturally inspired SERS substrates fabricated by photocatalytically depositing silver nanoparticles on cicada wings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Densely stacked Ag nanoparticles with an average diameter of 199 nm were effectively deposited on TiO2-coated cicada wings (Ag/TiO2-coated wings) from a water-ethanol solution of AgNO3 using ultraviolet light irradiation at room temperature. It was seen that the surfaces of bare cicada wings contained nanopillar array structures. In the optical absorption spectra of the Ag/TiO2-coated wings, the absorption peak due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag nanoparticles was observed at 440 nm. Strong Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals of Rhodamine 6G adsorbed on the Ag/TiO2-coated wings were clearly observed using the 514.5-nm line of an Ar+ laser. The Ag/TiO2-coated wings can be a promising candidate for naturally inspired SERS substrates. PMID:24959110

  8. Naturally inspired SERS substrates fabricated by photocatalytically depositing silver nanoparticles on cicada wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanahashi, Ichiro; Harada, Yoshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Densely stacked Ag nanoparticles with an average diameter of 199 nm were effectively deposited on TiO2-coated cicada wings (Ag/TiO2-coated wings) from a water-ethanol solution of AgNO3 using ultraviolet light irradiation at room temperature. It was seen that the surfaces of bare cicada wings contained nanopillar array structures. In the optical absorption spectra of the Ag/TiO2-coated wings, the absorption peak due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag nanoparticles was observed at 440 nm. Strong Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals of Rhodamine 6G adsorbed on the Ag/TiO2-coated wings were clearly observed using the 514.5-nm line of an Ar+ laser. The Ag/TiO2-coated wings can be a promising candidate for naturally inspired SERS substrates.

  9. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  10. Line-vortex theory for calculation of supersonic downwash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold; Haefeli, Rudolph C

    1950-01-01

    The perturbation field induced by a line vortex in a supersonic stream and the downwash behind a supersonic lifting surface are examined to establish approximate methods for determining the downwash behind supersonic wings. Lifting-lines methods are presented for calculating supersonic downwash. A bent lifting-line method is proposed for computing the downwash field behind swept wings. When applied to triangular wings with subsonic leading edges, this method gives results that, in general, are in good agreement with the exact linearized solution. An unbent lifting-line method (horseshoe-vortex system) is proposed for unswept wings. This method is applied to determine downwash behind rectangular wings with aspect ratios of 2 and 4. Excellent agreement with exact linearized theory is obtained for both aspect ratios by placing the lifting line at the 1/2-chord point. The use of lifting-lines therefore appears promising for obtaining estimates of the downwash behind supersonic wings.

  11. Self-induced wing rock of slender delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Yip, L. P.; Chambers, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a research program aimed at exploring basic mechanisms that cause wing rock in combat aircraft, an investigation was conducted to study the aerodynamic factors which cause the low-speed wing rock exhibited by slender delta wings. A flat-plate delta wing with 80 deg leading-edge sweep was subjected to conventional static-force tests and dynamic wind-tunnel experiments which included forced-oscillation, rotary, and free-to-roll tests. In addition, visualization of the flow phenomena involved was obtained by observing tuft patterns and using a helium-bubble technique. This paper summarizes the results of this study. Fundamental information is presented on the aerodynamic mechanisms that cause the wing rock and the problem of mathematically modeling the aerodynamics and motions is discussed.

  12. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  13. Wing Flutter Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center, Orbital Research Inc. developed the Orbital Research Intelligent Control Algorithm (ORICA), the first practical hardware-independent adaptive predictive control structure, specifically suited for optimal control of complex, time-varying systems. ORICA technology has been applied to the problem of controlling aircraft wing flutter. Coupled with NASA expertise, the technology has the possibility of making jet travel safer, more cost effective by extending distance range, and lowering overall aircraft operating costs. Future application areas for ORICA include control of robots, power trains, systems with arrays of sensors, or regulating chemical plants or electrical power plant control.

  14. Pegasus ICON Wing Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-22

    Workers unload the wing for the Orbital ATK Pegasus XL rocket from a truck at Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The rocket is being prepared for NASA's Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, mission. ICON will launch from the Kwajalein Atoll aboard the Pegasus XL on Dec. 8, 2017. ICON will study the frontier of space - the dynamic zone high in Earth's atmosphere where terrestrial weather from below meets space weather above. The explorer will help determine the physics of Earth's space environment and pave the way for mitigating its effects on our technology, communications systems and society.

  15. Pegasus ICON Wing Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-22

    The wing for the Orbital ATK Pegasus XL rocket was offloaded from a truck and transporter to Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The rocket is being prepared for NASA's Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, mission. ICON will launch from the Kwajalein Atoll aboard the Pegasus XL on Dec. 8, 2017. ICON will study the frontier of space - the dynamic zone high in Earth's atmosphere where terrestrial weather from below meets space weather above. The explorer will help determine the physics of Earth's space environment and pave the way for mitigating its effects on our technology, communications systems and society.

  16. Pegasus ICON Wing Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-22

    Workers transfer the wing for the Orbital ATK Pegasus XL rocket from a truck to a forklift at Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The rocket is being prepared for NASA's Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, mission. ICON will launch from the Kwajalein Atoll aboard the Pegasus XL on Dec. 8, 2017. ICON will study the frontier of space - the dynamic zone high in Earth's atmosphere where terrestrial weather from below meets space weather above. The explorer will help determine the physics of Earth's space environment and pave the way for mitigating its effects on our technology, communications systems and society.

  17. Pegasus ICON Wing Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-22

    The wing for the Orbital ATK Pegasus XL rocket arrives by truck at Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The Pegasus rocket is being prepared for NASA's Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, mission. ICON will launch from the Kwajalein Atoll aboard the Pegasus XL on Dec. 8, 2017. ICON will study the frontier of space - the dynamic zone high in Earth's atmosphere where terrestrial weather from below meets space weather above. The explorer will help determine the physics of Earth's space environment and pave the way for mitigating its effects on our technology, communications systems and society.

  18. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Seamless Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a Gulfstream G-III airplane (Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, Georgia) swept wing modified with an experimental seamless, compliant flap called the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) flap. The stall characteristics of the modified ACTE wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified, clean wing at the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 feet above mean sea level, in free air as well as in ground effect. A polyhedral finite-volume unstructured full Navier-Stokes CFD code, STAR-CCM (registered trademark) plus (CD-adapco [Computational Dynamics Limited, United Kingdom, and Analysis & Design Application Co., United States]), was used. Steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD simulations were conducted for a clean wing and the ACTE wings at various ACTE deflection angles in free air (-2 degrees, 15 degrees, and 30 degrees) as well as in ground effect (15 degrees and 30 degrees). Solution sensitivities to grid densities were examined. In free air, the ACTE wings are predicted to stall at lower angles of attack than the clean wing. In ground effect, all wings are predicted to stall at lower angles of attack than the corresponding wings in free air. Even though the lift curves are higher in ground effect than in free air, the maximum lift coefficients for all wings are lower in ground effect. Finally, the lift increase due to ground effect for the ACTE wing is predicted to be less than the clean wing.

  19. Aeroelastic Wing Shaping Using Distributed Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor); Reynolds, Kevin Wayne (Inventor); Ting, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft has wings configured to twist during flight. Inboard and outboard propulsion devices, such as turbofans or other propulsors, are connected to each wing, and are spaced along the wing span. A flight controller independently controls thrust of the inboard and outboard propulsion devices to significantly change flight dynamics, including changing thrust of outboard propulsion devices to twist the wing, and to differentially apply thrust on each wing to change yaw and other aspects of the aircraft during various stages of a flight mission. One or more generators can be positioned upon the wing to provide power for propulsion devices on the same wing, and on an opposite wing.

  20. The natural flow wing-design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1992-01-01

    A wing-design study was conducted on a 65 degree swept leading-edge delta wing in which the wing geometry was modified to take advantage of the naturally occurring flow that forms over a slender wing in a supersonic flow field. Three-dimensional nonlinear analysis methods were used in the study which was divided into three parts: preliminary design, initial design, and final design. In the preliminary design, the wing planform, the design conditions, and the near-conical wing-design concept were derived, and a baseline standard wing (conventional airfoil distribution) and a baseline near-conical wing were chosen. During the initial analysis, a full-potential flow solver was employed to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline standard delta wing and to investigate modifications to the airfoil thickness, leading-edge radius, airfoil maximum-thickness position, and wing upper to lower surface asymmetry on the baseline near-conical wing. The final design employed an Euler solver to analyze the best wing configurations found in the initial design and to extend the study of wing asymmetry to develop a more refined wing. Benefits resulting from each modification are discussed, and a final 'natural flow' wing geometry was designed that provides an improvement in aerodynamic performance compared with that of a baseline conventional uncambered wing, linear-theory cambered wing, and near-conical wing.

  1. Optimal pitching axis location of flapping wings for efficient hovering flight.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Goosen, J F L; van Keulen, F

    2017-09-01

    Flapping wings can pitch passively about their pitching axes due to their flexibility, inertia, and aerodynamic loads. A shift in the pitching axis location can dynamically alter the aerodynamic loads, which in turn changes the passive pitching motion and the flight efficiency. Therefore, it is of great interest to investigate the optimal pitching axis for flapping wings to maximize the power efficiency during hovering flight. In this study, flapping wings are modeled as rigid plates with non-uniform mass distribution. The wing flexibility is represented by a linearly torsional spring at the wing root. A predictive quasi-steady aerodynamic model is used to evaluate the lift generated by such wings. Two extreme power consumption scenarios are modeled for hovering flight, i.e. the power consumed by a drive system with and without the capacity of kinetic energy recovery. For wings with different shapes, the optimal pitching axis location is found such that the cycle-averaged power consumption during hovering flight is minimized. Optimization results show that the optimal pitching axis is located between the leading edge and the mid-chord line, which shows close resemblance to insect wings. An optimal pitching axis can save up to 33% of power during hovering flight when compared to traditional wings used by most of flapping wing micro air vehicles (FWMAVs). Traditional wings typically use the straight leading edge as the pitching axis. With the optimized pitching axis, flapping wings show higher pitching amplitudes and start the pitching reversals in advance of the sweeping reversals. These phenomena lead to higher lift-to-drag ratios and, thus, explain the lower power consumption. In addition, the optimized pitching axis provides the drive system higher potential to recycle energy during the deceleration phases as compared to their counterparts. This observation underlines the particular importance of the wing pitching axis location for energy-efficient FWMAVs when

  2. X-31 wing removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    U.S. and German personnel of the X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Technology Demonstrator aircraft program removing the right wing of the aircraft, which was ferried from Edwards Air Force Base, California, to Europe on May 22, 1995 aboard an Air Force Reserve C-5 transport. The X-31, based at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was ferried to Europe and flown in the Paris Air Show in June. The wing of the X-31 was removed on May 18, 1995, to allow the aircraft to fit inside the C-5 fuselage. Officials of the X-31 project used Manching, Germany, as a staging base to prepare the aircraft for the flight demonstration. At the air show, the X-31 demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems to provide controlled flight at very high angles of attack. The aircraft arrived back at Edwards in a Air Force Reserve C-5 on June 25, 1995 and off loaded at Dryden June 27. The X-31 aircraft was developed jointly by Rockwell International's North American Aircraft Division (now part of Boeing) and Daimler-Benz Aerospace (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm), under sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Defense and The German Federal Ministry of Defense.

  3. X-31 wing removal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-05-18

    U.S. and German personnel of the X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Technology Demonstrator aircraft program removing the right wing of the aircraft, which was ferried from Edwards Air Force Base, California, to Europe on May 22, 1995 aboard an Air Force Reserve C-5 transport. The X-31, based at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was ferried to Europe and flown in the Paris Air Show in June. The wing of the X-31 was removed on May 18, 1995, to allow the aircraft to fit inside the C-5 fuselage. Officials of the X-31 project used Manching, Germany, as a staging base to prepare the aircraft for the flight demonstration. At the air show, the X-31 demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems to provide controlled flight at very high angles of attack. The aircraft arrived back at Edwards in a Air Force Reserve C-5 on June 25, 1995 and off loaded at Dryden June 27. The X-31 aircraft was developed jointly by Rockwell International's North American Aircraft Division (now part of Boeing) and Daimler-Benz Aerospace (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm), under sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Defense and the German Federal Ministry of Defense.

  4. X-31 wing removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    U.S. and German personnel of the X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Technology Demonstrator aircraft program removing the right wing of the aircraft, which was ferried from Edwards Air Force Base, California, to Europe on May 22, 1995 aboard an Air Force Reserve C-5 transport. The X-31, based at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was ferried to Europe and flown in the Paris Air Show in June. The wing of the X-31 was removed on May 18, 1995, to allow the aircraft to fit inside the C-5 fuselage. Officials of the X-31 project used Manching, Germany, as a staging base to prepare the aircraft for the flight demonstration. At the air show, the X-31 demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with advanced flight control systems to provide controlled flight at very high angles of attack. The aircraft arrived back at Edwards in a Air Force Reserve C-5 on June 25, 1995 and off loaded at Dryden June 27. The X-31 aircraft was developed jointly by Rockwell International's North American Aircraft Division (now part of Boeing) and Daimler-Benz Aerospace (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm), under sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Defense and The German Federal Ministry of Defense.

  5. Beetle wings are inflatable origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Ren, Jing; Ge, Siqin; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Beetles keep their wings folded and protected under a hard shell. In times of danger, they must unfold them rapidly in order for them to fly to escape. Moreover, they must do so across a range of body mass, from 1 mg to 10 grams. How can they unfold their wings so quickly? We use high-speed videography to record wing unfolding times, which we relate to the geometry of the network of blood vessels in the wing. Larger beetles have longer unfolding times. Modeling of the flow of blood through the veins successfully accounts for the wing unfolding speed of large beetles. However, smaller beetles have anomalously short unfolding times, suggesting they have lower blood viscosity or higher driving pressure. The use of hydraulics to unfold complex objects may have implications in the design of micro-flying air vehicles.

  6. Flutter of asymmetrically swept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.; Crittenden, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Two formulations of the oblique wing flutter problem are presented; one formulation allows only simple wing bending deformations and rigid body roll as degrees of freedom, while the second formulation includes a more complex bending-torsional deformation together with the roll freedom. Flutter is found to occur in two basic modes. The first mode is associated with wing bending-aircraft roll coupling and occurs at low values of reduced frequency. The second instability mode closely resembles a classical bending-torsion wing flutter event. This latter mode occurs at much higher reduced frequencies than the first. The occurrence of the bending-roll coupling mode is shown to lead to lower flutter speeds while the bending-torsion mode is associated with higher flutter speeds. The ratio of the wing mass moment of inertia in roll to the fuselage roll moment of inertia is found to be a major factor in the determination of which of the two instabilities is critical.

  7. Quantitative evaluations of the effect of UV irradiation on the infectivity of HTLV-III (AIDS virus) with HTLV-I-carrying cell line, MT-4

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, H.; Koyanagi, Y.; Harada, S.; Yamamoto, N.

    1986-08-01

    The effect of UV irradiation on HTLV-III was quantitatively studied to evaluate the dosage of UV irradiation which inactivates the virus for sterilization of blood products and for laboratory decontamination. In order to estimate the biologic activity and quantitation of the virus, induction of HTLV-III-specific antigens and inhibition of DNA synthesis in MT-4 cells infected by UV-irradiated HTLV-III were detected by indirect immunofluorescence technique and proliferation assay using (3H)thymidine uptake, respectively. Furthermore, plaque-forming assay was performed to count the infectious viral particles. Results showed that HTLV-III was completely inactivated by 5000 J/m2 UV irradiation. Cloned UV-irradiated HTLV-III (UV-1) was obtained from a plaque that was formed by 2000 J/m2 UV-irradiated virus. When MT-4 cells were infected by the clone UV-1, ballooning degeneration of cells was predominantly induced. These ballooning cells were not usually observed in MT-4 cells infected by unirradiated HTLV-III. The resistance to UV was not different between clone UV-1 and unirradiated HTLV-III.

  8. Study on flow over finite wing with respect to F-22 raptor, Supermarine Spitfire, F-7 BG aircraft wing and analyze its stability performance and experimental values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md. Nesar; Alam, Mahbubul

    2017-06-01

    A finite wing is a three-dimensional body, and consequently the flow over the finite wing is three-dimensional; that is, there is a component of flow in the span wise direction. The physical mechanism for generating lift on the wing is the existence of a high pressure on the bottom surface and a low pressure on the top surface. The net imbalance of the pressure distribution creates the lift. As a by-product of this pressure imbalance, the flow near the wing tips tends to curl around the tips, being forced from the high-pressure region just underneath the tips to the low-pressure region on top. This flow around the wing tips is shown in the front view of the wing. As a result, on the top surface of the wing, there is generally a span wise component of flow from the tip toward the wing root, causing the streamlines over the top surface to bend toward the root. On the bottom surface of the wing, there is generally a span wise component of flow from the root toward the tip, causing the streamlines over the bottom surface to bend toward the tip. Clearly, the flow over the finite wing is three-dimensional, and therefore we would expect the overall aerodynamic properties of such a wing to differ from those of its airfoil sections. The tendency for the flow to "leak" around the wing tips has another important effect on the aerodynamics of the wing. This flow establishes a circulatory motion that trails downstream of the wing; that is, a trailing vortex is created at each wing tip. The aerodynamics of finite wings is analyzed using the classical lifting line model. This simple model allows a closed-form solution that captures most of the physical effects applicable to finite wings. The model is based on the horseshoe-shaped vortex that introduces the concept of a vortex wake and wing tip vortices. The downwash induced by the wake creates an induced drag that did not exist in the two-dimensional analysis. Furthermore, as wingspan is reduced, the wing lift slope decreases

  9. Calculation of far wing of allowed spectra: The water continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.; Ma, Q.

    1995-01-01

    A far-wing line shape theory based on the binary collision and quasistatic approximations that is applicable for both the low- and high-frequency wings of allowed vibrational-rotational lines has been developed. This theory has been applied in order to calculate the frequency and temperature dependence of the continuous absorption coefficient for frequencies up to 10,000 cm(exp -1) for pure H2O and for H2O-N2 mixtures. The calculations are made assuming an interaction potential consisting of an isotropic Lennard-Jones part and the leading long-range anisotropic part, and utilizing the measured line strengths and transition frequencies. The results compare well with existing data, both in magnitude and in temperature dependence. This leads us to the conclusion that although dimer and collision-induced absorptions are present, the primary mechanism responsible for the observed water continuum is the far-wing absorption of allowed lines. Recent progress on near-wing corrections to the theory and validations with recent laboratory measurements are discussed briefly.

  10. 54. PRODUCTION MOLD STORAGE, SECOND FLOOR, EAST WING. THE WALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. PRODUCTION MOLD STORAGE, SECOND FLOOR, EAST WING. THE WALLS OF THIS ROOM WERE ORIGINALLY LINED WITH STEAM PIPES CONNECTED TO THE BOILER WHICH WERE USED TO DRY THE TILES BEFORE FIRING. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  11. 93. PRODUCTION MOLDS STORAGE, SECOND FLOOR, EAST WING. THE WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    93. PRODUCTION MOLDS STORAGE, SECOND FLOOR, EAST WING. THE WALL OF THIS ROOM WERE ORIGINALLY LINED WITH STEAM PIPES CONNECTED TO THE BOILER WHICH WERE USED TO DRY THE TILES BEFORE FIRING. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-54. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  12. Experimental investigation on the wing-wake interaction at the mid stroke in hovering flight of dragonfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, GuoJun; Shen, GongXin

    2012-11-01

    This paper focuses on flow structures of the wing-wake interaction between the hind wing and the wake of the forewing in hovering flight of a dragonfly since there are arguments whether the wing-wake interaction is useful or not. A mechanical flapping model with two tandem wings is used to study the interaction. In the device, two identical simplified model wings are mounted to the flapping model and they are both scaled up to keep the Reynolds number similar to those of dragonfly in hovering flight since our experiment is conducted in a water tank. The kinetic pattern of dragonfly ( Aeschna juncea) is chosen because of its special interesting asymmetry. A multi-slice phase-locked stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) system is used to record flow structures around the hind wing at the mid downstroke ( t/ T=0.25) and the mid upstroke ( t/ T=0.75). To make comparison of the flow field between with and without the influence of the wake, flow structures around a single flapping wing (hind wing without the existence of the forewing) at these two stroke phases are also recorded. A local vortex identification scheme called swirling strength is applied to determine the vortices around the wing and they are visualized with the iso-surface of swirling strength. This paper also presents contour lines of ω z at each spanwise position of the hind wing, the vortex core position of the leading edge vortex (LEV) of hind wing with respect to the upper surface of hind wing, the circulation of the hind wing LEV at each spanwise position and so on. Experimental results show that dimension and strength of the hind wing LEV are impaired at the mid stroke in comparison with the single wing LEV because of the downwash from the forewing. Our results also reveal that a wake vortex from the forewing traverses the upper surface of the hind wing at the mid downstroke and its distance to the upper surface is about 40% of the wing chord length. At the instant, the distance of the hind wing

  13. Insect Wing Membrane Topography Is Determined by the Dorsal Wing Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Belalcazar, Andrea D.; Doyle, Kristy; Hogan, Justin; Neff, David; Collier, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila wing consists of a transparent wing membrane supported by a network of wing veins. Previously, we have shown that the wing membrane cuticle is not flat but is organized into ridges that are the equivalent of one wing epithelial cell in width and multiple cells in length. These cuticle ridges have an anteroposterior orientation in the anterior wing and a proximodistal orientation in the posterior wing. The precise topography of the wing membrane is remarkable because it is a fusion of two independent cuticle contributions from the dorsal and ventral wing epithelia. Here, through morphological and genetic studies, we show that it is the dorsal wing epithelium that determines wing membrane topography. Specifically, we find that wing hair location and membrane topography are coordinated on the dorsal, but not ventral, surface of the wing. In addition, we find that altering Frizzled Planar Cell Polarity (i.e., Fz PCP) signaling in the dorsal wing epithelium alone changes the membrane topography of both dorsal and ventral wing surfaces. We also examined the wing morphology of two model Hymenopterans, the honeybee Apis mellifera and the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis. In both cases, wing hair location and wing membrane topography are coordinated on the dorsal, but not ventral, wing surface, suggesting that the dorsal wing epithelium also controls wing topography in these species. Because phylogenomic studies have identified the Hymenotera as basal within the Endopterygota family tree, these findings suggest that this is a primitive insect character. PMID:23316434

  14. Analysis of KRAS/NRAS Mutations in a Phase III Study of Panitumumab with FOLFIRI Compared with FOLFIRI Alone as Second-line Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Marc; Oliner, Kelly S; Price, Timothy J; Cervantes, Andrés; Sobrero, Alberto F; Ducreux, Michel; Hotko, Yevhen; André, Thierry; Chan, Emily; Lordick, Florian; Punt, Cornelis J A; Strickland, Andrew H; Wilson, Gregory; Ciuleanu, Tudor E; Roman, Laslo; Van Cutsem, Eric; He, Pei; Yu, Hua; Koukakis, Reija; Terwey, Jan-Henrik; Jung, Andre S; Sidhu, Roger; Patterson, Scott D

    2015-12-15

    We evaluated the influence of RAS mutation status on the treatment effect of panitumumab in a prospective-retrospective analysis of a randomized, multicenter phase III study of panitumumab plus fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) versus FOLFIRI alone as second-line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC; ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT0039183). Outcomes were from the study's primary analysis. RAS mutations beyond KRAS exon 2 (KRAS exons 3, 4; NRAS exons 2, 3, 4; BRAF exon 15) were detected by bidirectional Sanger sequencing in wild-type KRAS exon 2 tumor specimens. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were coprimary endpoints. The RAS ascertainment rate was 85%; 18% of wild-type KRAS exon 2 tumors harbored other RAS mutations. For PFS and OS, the hazard ratio (HR) for panitumumab plus FOLFIRI versus FOLFIRI alone more strongly favored panitumumab in the wild-type RAS population than in the wild-type KRAS exon 2 population [PFS HR, 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.91); P = 0.007 vs. 0.73 (95% CI, 0.59-0.90); P = 0.004; OS HR, 0.81 (95% CI, 0.63-1.03); P = 0.08 vs. 0.85 (95% CI, 0.70-1.04); P = 0.12]. Patients with RAS mutations were unlikely to benefit from panitumumab. Among RAS wild-type patients, the objective response rate was 41% in the panitumumab-FOLFIRI group versus 10% in the FOLFIRI group. Patients with RAS mutations were unlikely to benefit from panitumumab-FOLFIRI and the benefit-risk of panitumumab-FOLFIRI was improved in the wild-type RAS population compared with the wild-type KRAS exon 2 population. These findings support RAS testing for patients with mCRC. Clin Cancer Res; 21(24); 5469-79. ©2015 AACR.See related commentary by Salazar and Ciardiello, p. 5415. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Sunitinib Plus Paclitaxel Versus Bevacizumab Plus Paclitaxel for First-Line Treatment of Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: A Phase III, Randomized, Open-Label Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Nicholas J.; Saleh, Mansoor N.; Paul, Devchand; Generali, Daniele; Gressot, Laurent; Copur, Mehmet S.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Minton, Susan E.; Giguere, Jeffrey K.; Smith, John W.; Richards, Paul D.; Gernhardt, Diana; Huang, Xin; Liau, Katherine F.; Kern, Kenneth A.; Davis, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A multicenter, open-label phase III study was conducted to test whether sunitinib plus paclitaxel prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) compared with bevacizumab plus paclitaxel as first-line treatment for patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer who were disease free for ≥ 12 months after adjuvant taxane treatment were randomized (1:1; planned enrollment 740 patients) to receive intravenous (I.V.) paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 every week for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles plus either sunitinib 25 to 37.5 mg every day or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg I.V. every 2 weeks. Results The trial was terminated early because of futility in reaching the primary endpoint as determined by the independent data monitoring committee during an interim futility analysis. At data cutoff, 242 patients had been randomized to sunitinib-paclitaxel and 243 patients to bevacizumab-paclitaxel. Median PFS was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (7.4 vs. 9.2 months; hazard ratio [HR] 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–2.25]; 1-sided P = .999). At a median follow-up of 8.1 months, with 79% of sunitinib-paclitaxel and 87% of bevacizumab-paclitaxel patients alive, overall survival analysis favored bevacizumab-paclitaxel (HR 1.82 [95% CI, 1.16–2.86]; 1-sided P = .996). The objective response rate was 32% in both arms, but median duration of response was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (6.3 vs. 14.8 months). Bevacizumab-paclitaxel was better tolerated than sunitinib-paclitaxel. This was primarily due to a high frequency of grade 3/4, treatment-related neutropenia with sunitinib-paclitaxel (52%) precluding delivery of the prescribed doses of both drugs. Conclusion The sunitinib-paclitaxel regimen evaluated in this study was clinically inferior to the bevacizumab-paclitaxel regimen and is not a recommended treatment option for patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21569994

  16. Sunitinib plus paclitaxel versus bevacizumab plus paclitaxel for first-line treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer: a phase III, randomized, open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Robert, Nicholas J; Saleh, Mansoor N; Paul, Devchand; Generali, Daniele; Gressot, Laurent; Copur, Mehmet S; Brufsky, Adam M; Minton, Susan E; Giguere, Jeffrey K; Smith, John W; Richards, Paul D; Gernhardt, Diana; Huang, Xin; Liau, Katherine F; Kern, Kenneth A; Davis, John

    2011-04-01

    A multicenter, open-label phase III study was conducted to test whether sunitinib plus paclitaxel prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) compared with bevacizumab plus paclitaxel as first-line treatment for patients with HER2(-) advanced breast cancer. Patients with HER2(-) advanced breast cancer who were disease free for ≥ 12 months after adjuvant taxane treatment were randomized (1:1; planned enrollment 740 patients) to receive intravenous (I.V.) paclitaxel 90 mg/m(2) every week for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles plus either sunitinib 25 to 37.5 mg every day or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg I.V. every 2 weeks. [corrected] The trial was terminated early because of futility in reaching the primary endpoint as determined by the independent data monitoring committee during an interim futility analysis. At data cutoff, 242 patients had been randomized to sunitinib-paclitaxel and 243 patients to bevacizumab-paclitaxel. Median PFS was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (7.4 vs. 9.2 months; hazard ratio [HR] 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.25]; 1-sided P = .999). At a median follow-up of 8.1 months, with 79% of sunitinib-paclitaxel and 87% of bevacizumab-paclitaxel patients alive, overall survival analysis favored bevacizumab-paclitaxel (HR 1.82 [95% CI, 1.16-2.86]; 1-sided P = .996). The objective response rate was 32% in both arms, but median duration of response was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (6.3 vs. 14.8 months). Bevacizumab-paclitaxel was better tolerated than sunitinib-paclitaxel. This was primarily due to a high frequency of grade 3/4, treatment-related neutropenia with sunitinib-paclitaxel (52%) precluding delivery of the prescribed doses of both drugs. The sunitinib-paclitaxel regimen evaluated in this study was clinically inferior to the bevacizumab-paclitaxel regimen and is not a recommended treatment option for patients with advanced breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF [O III] EMISSION FROM Ly{alpha} SELECTED FIELD GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3.1

    SciTech Connect

    McLinden, Emily M.; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hibon, Pascale; Richardson, Mark L. A.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Cresci, Giovanni; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Pasquali, Anna; Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Woodward, Charles E.

    2011-04-01

    We present the first spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] 5007 A line in two z {approx} 3.1 Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) using the new near-infrared instrument LUCIFER1 on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope. We also describe the optical imaging and spectroscopic observations used to identify these LAEs. Using the [O III] line we have measured accurate systemic redshifts for these two galaxies, and discovered a velocity offset between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} lines in both, with the Ly{alpha} line peaking 342 and 125 km s{sup -1} redward of the systemic velocity. These velocity offsets imply that there are powerful outflows in high-redshift LAEs. They also ease the transmission of Ly{alpha} photons through the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium around the galaxies. By measuring these offsets directly, we can refine both Ly{alpha}-based tests for reionization, and Ly{alpha} luminosity function measurements where the Ly{alpha} forest affects the blue wing of the line. Our work also provides the first direct constraints on the strength of the [O III] line in high-redshift LAEs. We find [O III] fluxes of 7 and 36 x10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in two z {approx} 3.1 LAEs. These lines are strong enough to dominate broadband flux measurements that include the line (in this case, K{sub s} -band photometry). Spectral energy distribution fits that do not account for the lines would therefore overestimate the 4000 A (and/or Balmer) break strength in such galaxies, and hence also the ages and stellar masses of such high-z galaxies.

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, electrochemical behavior and computational analysis of mixed diamine ligand gold(III) complexes: antiproliferative and in vitro cytotoxic evaluations against human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Jaroudi, Said S; Monim-ul-Mehboob, M; Altaf, Muhammad; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A; Wazeer, Mohammed I M; Altuwaijri, Saleh; Isab, Anvarhusein A

    2014-12-01

    The gold(III) complexes of the type [(DACH)Au(en)]Cl3, 1,2-Diaminocyclohexane ethylenediamine gold(III) chloride [where 1,2-DACH = cis-, trans-1,2- and S,S-1,2diaminocyclohexane and en = ethylenediamine] have been synthesized and characterized using various analytical and spectroscopic techniques including elemental analysis, UV-Vis and FTIR spectra; and solution as well as solid-state NMR measurements. The solid-state (13)C NMR shows that 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (1,2-DACH) and ethylenediamine (en) are strongly bound to the gold(III) center via N donor atoms. The stability of the mixed diamine ligand gold(III) was determined by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra. Their electrochemical behavior was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The structural details and relative stabilities of the four possible isomers of the complexes were also reported at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory. The coordination sphere of these complexes around gold(III) center adopts distorted square planar geometry. The computational study also demonstrates that trans- conformations is slightly more stable than the cis-conformations. The antiproliferative effects and cytotoxic properties of the mixed diamine ligand gold(III) complexes were evaluated in vitro on human gastric SGC7901 and prostate PC3 cancer cells using MTT assay. The antiproliferative study of the gold(III) complexes on PC3 and SGC7901 cells indicate that complex 1 is the most effective antiproliferative agent among mixed ligand based gold(III) complexes 1-3. The IC50 data reveal that the in vitro cytotoxicity of complexes 1 and 3 against SGC7901 cancer cells are fairly better than that of cisplatin.

  19. Assembly modes of dragonfly wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Xiao; Yin, Ya-Jun; Zhong, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    The assembly modes of dragonfly wings are observed through FEG-ESEM. Different from airplane wings, dragonfly wings are found to be assembled through smooth transition mode and global package mode. First, at the vein/membrane conjunctive site, the membrane is divided into upper and lower portions from the center layer and transited smoothly to the vein. Then the two portions pack the vein around and form the outer surface of the vein. Second, at the vein/spike conjunctive site, the vein and spike are connected smoothly into a triplet. Last, at the vein/membrane/spike conjunctive site, the membrane (i.e., the outer layer of the vein) transits smoothly to the spike, packs it around, and forms its outer layer. In short, the membrane looks like a closed coat packing the wing as a whole. The smooth transition mode and the global package mode are universal assembly modes in dragonfly wings. They provide us the references for better understanding of the functions of dragonfly wings and the bionic manufactures of the wings of flights with mini sizes.

  20. Integrated aerodynamic/structural design of a sailplane wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Gurdal, Z.; Haftka, R. T.; Strauch, G. J.; Eppard, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Using lifting-line theory and beam analysis, the geometry (planiform and twist) and composite material structural sizes (skin thickness, spar cap, and web thickness) were designed for a sailplane wing, subject to both structural and aerodynamic constraints. For all elements, the integrated design (simultaneously designing the aerodynamics and the structure) was superior in terms of performance and weight to the sequential design (where the aerodynamic geometry is designed to maximize the performance, following which a structural/aeroelastic design minimizes the weight). Integrated designs produced less rigid, higher aspect ratio wings with favorable aerodynamic/structural interactions.

  1. Finite Span Wings in Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasilschchikova, E A

    1956-01-01

    Equations are developed using the source distribution method for the velocity potential function and pressure on thin wings in steady and unsteady motion. Closed form solutions are given for harmonically oscillating wings of general plan form including the effect of the wing wake. Some useful examples are presented in an appendix for arrow, semielliptical, and hexagonal plan form wings.

  2. Effect of outer wing separation on lift and thrust generation in a flapping wing system.

    PubMed

    Mahardika, Nanang; Viet, Nguyen Quoc; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2011-09-01

    We explore the implementation of wing feather separation and lead-lagging motion to a flapping wing. A biomimetic flapping wing system with separated outer wings is designed and demonstrated. The artificial wing feather separation is implemented in the biomimetic wing by dividing the wing into inner and outer wings. The features of flapping, lead-lagging, and outer wing separation of the flapping wing system are captured by a high-speed camera for evaluation. The performance of the flapping wing system with separated outer wings is compared to that of a flapping wing system with closed outer wings in terms of forward force and downward force production. For a low flapping frequency ranging from 2.47 to 3.90 Hz, the proposed biomimetic flapping wing system shows a higher thrust and lift generation capability as demonstrated by a series of experiments. For 1.6 V application (lower frequency operation), the flapping wing system with separated wings could generate about 56% higher forward force and about 61% less downward force compared to that with closed wings, which is enough to demonstrate larger thrust and lift production capability of the separated outer wings. The experiments show that the outer parts of the separated wings are able to deform, resulting in a smaller amount of drag production during the upstroke, while still producing relatively greater lift and thrust during the downstroke.

  3. Fatigue Testing of Vampire Wings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    AD-AOA9 402 AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABS MELBOURNE (AUSTRALIA) F/G 1/3 FATIGUE TESTING OF VAMPIRE WINGS.(U) JUN 79 R A BRUTON. C A PATCHING...378 FATIGUE TESTING OF VAMPIRE WINGS by R. A. BRUTON and C. A. PATCHING ~- u-~ .~ ~ EL m! s REPORT Approved for Public Release - C- C> LSJ.1...RESEARCH LABORATORIES S TR U C T ~ ~ ~ - 7 FATIGUE TESTING OF VAMPIRE WINGS by R. A. RUTON &W C. A. /PATCHING .i2 j >1 SUMMARY k < ,/ /.. The fatigue

  4. Wing design for spin resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Dicarlo, D. J.; Glover, K. E.; Stewart, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Use of a discontinuous outboard wing leading edge to improve stall/spin characteristics has been evaluated through wind-tunnel and flight tests. Addition of such a discontinuous outboard wing leading-edge droop design to three light airplanes having NACA 6-series airfoil sections produced significant improvements in stall characteristics and spin resistance. The increased spin resistance of the modified airplanes has been related to the difference in angle of attack between the outer wing panel stall and the maximum attainable angle of attack.

  5. Mission Adaptive Wing test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birk, Frank T.; Smith, Rogers E.

    1986-01-01

    With the completion of the F-111 test-bed Mission Adaptive Wing (MAW) test program's manual flight control system, emphasis has been shifted to flight testing of MAW automatic control modes. These encompass (1) cruise camber control, (2) maneuver camber control, (3) maneuver load control, and (4) maneuver enhancement and load alleviation control. The aircraft is currently cleared to a 2.5-g maneuvering limit due to generally higher variable-incidence wing pivot loads than had been anticipated, especially at the higher wing-camber settings. Buffet is noted to be somewhat higher than expected at the higher camber settings.

  6. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Effects of Wing Bodies, Fences, Flaps, and a Fuselage Addition on the Wing Buffet Response of a Transonic-Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornette, Elden S.

    1961-01-01

    The experimental wing buffet response of a transport-type airplane model with and without wing bodies, fences, flaps, and a fuselage addition has been investigated at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 1.03. The wing had NACA 64A-series airfoil sections inclined 5 degrees to the free-stream direction. The quarter-chord line of the wing was swept back 45 degrees, the aspect ratio was 7, the taper ratio was 0.3, and the thickness ratio varied from 0.115 at the root to 0.074 at the midsemispan and was constant from that station to the tip. The wing was twisted and cambered for a design lift coefficient of 0.3. The results of the investigation indicated that a marked reduction of buffet intensity and a delay of buffet onset at transonic speeds were achieved by the addition to the wing of special bodies designed to reduce shock-induced separation. The further addition of wing fences and wing trailing-edge flaps deflected 30 degrees increased the lift coefficients at which low-speed stall buffeting occurred. An addition to the fuselage near the upper forward portion produced no consistent change in the buffet characteristics.

  7. A Flow Method for Chemiluminescence Determination of Antimony(III) and Antimony(V) Using a Rhodamine B-Cetyltrimethylammonium Chloride Reversed Micelle System Following On-Line Extraction.

    PubMed

    Hasanin, Tamer H A; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Ishizaka, Shoji; Fujiwara, Terufumi

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive flow method, based on the combination of on-line solvent extraction with reversed micellar mediated chemiluminescence (CL) detection using rhodamine B (RB), was developed for the determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) in aqueous samples. The on-line extraction procedure involved ion-pair formation of the antimony(V) chloro-complex anion with the protonated RBH(+) ion and its extraction from an aqueous hydrochloric acid solution into toluene, followed by phase separation using a microporous membrane. When in a flow cell of a detector, the ion-pair in the extract driven was mixed with the reversed micellar solution of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride in 1-hexanol-cyclohexane/water (0.60 mol dm(-3) H2SO4) containing cerium(IV), its uptake by the reversed micelles and the subsequent CL oxidation of RB with Ce(IV) occurred easily, then the produced CL signal was measured. Using the proposed flow method under the optimized experimental conditions, a detection limit (DL) of 0.35 μmol dm(-3) and a linear calibration graph with a dynamic range from DL to 16 μmol dm(-3) were obtained for Sb(V) with a precision of 1.4% relative standard deviation (n = 5) at the Sb(V) concentration of 8.2 μmol dm(-3). The present method was successfully applied to the determination of Sb(V) in water samples and to the differential determination of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in copper electrolyte industrial samples, where total antimony Sb(III) + Sb(V) was determined after oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) with Ce(IV) and Sb(III) was calculated by difference, for which the DL was almost the same as that for Sb(V).

  8. Airplane wing vibrations due to atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastel, R. L.; Caruthers, J. E.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    The magnitude of error introduced due to wing vibration when measuring atmospheric turbulence with a wind probe mounted at the wing tip was studied. It was also determined whether accelerometers mounted on the wing tip are needed to correct this error. A spectrum analysis approach is used to determine the error. Estimates of the B-57 wing characteristics are used to simulate the airplane wing, and von Karman's cross spectrum function is used to simulate atmospheric turbulence. It was found that wing vibration introduces large error in measured spectra of turbulence in the frequency's range close to the natural frequencies of the wing.

  9. Axial flow effects on robustness of vortical structures about actively deflected wings in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert; Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing flight has garnered much attention in the past decade driven by our desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Nature has demonstrated the breadth of maneuverability achievable by flapping wing flight. However, despite recent advances the role of wing flexibility remains poorly understood. In an effort to develop a deeper understanding of wing deflection effects and to explore novel approaches to increasing leading-edge vortex robustness, this three-dimensional computational study explores the aerodynamics of low aspect ratio plates, in hovering kinematics, with isolated flexion lines undergoing prescribed deflection. Major flexion lines, recognized as the primary avenue for deflection in biological fliers, are isolated here in two distinct configurations, resulting in deflection about the wing root and the wing tip, respectively. Of interest is the interaction between axial flow along the span and the vortical structures about the wing. It is proposed that the modes of deflection explored may provide a means of axial flow control for favorably promoting LEV robustness over a broad range of flapping conditions, and provide insight into the nature of flexibility in flapping wing flight. National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea.

  10. Wing rotation and lift in SUEX flapping wing mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateti, Kiron; Byrne-Dugan, Rory A.; Tadigadapa, Srinivas A.; Rahn, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    This research presents detailed modeling and experimental testing of wing rotation and lift in the LionFly, a low cost and mass producible flapping wing mechanism fabricated monolithically from SUEX dry film and powered by piezoelectric bimorph actuators. A flexure hinge along the span of the wing allows the wing to rotate in addition to flapping. A dynamic model including aerodynamics is developed and validated using experimental testing with a laser vibrometer in air and vacuum, stroboscopic photography and high definition image processing, and lift measurement. The 112 mg LionFly produces 46° flap and 44° rotation peak to peak with 12° phase lag, which generates a maximum average lift of 71 μN in response to an applied sinusoidal voltage of 75 V AC and 75 V DC at 37 Hz. Simulated wing trajectories accurately predict measured wing trajectories at small voltage amplitudes, but slightly underpredict amplitude and lift at high voltage amplitudes. By reducing the length of the actuator, reducing the mechanism amplification and tuning the rotational hinge stiffness, a redesigned device is simulated to produce a lift to weight ratio of 1.5.

  11. Effect of FUT3 gene silencing with miRNA on proliferation, invasion and migration abilities of human KATO-III gastric cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y-J; Zheng, X-F; Lu, C-H; Jiang, Q; Liu, Q; Xin, Y-H

    2016-06-30

    This study investigated the effects of FUT3 gene expression inhibition with miRNA on the proliferation, invasion and migration abilities of KATO-III cells. KATO-III cells were transfected with plasmid pcDNA™6.2-GW/EmGFP-FUT3-miR(FUT3-miRNA) and negative control plasmid in mediation of liposome, respectively, using untransfected cells as blank controls. Forty-eight hours after transfection, FUT3 mRNA levels were tested by RT-PCR. Levels of sLeA proteins were assayed by Western blot. The effects of FUT3-miRNA on the proliferation, invasion and migration of KATO-III cells were determined by CCK8 testing and Transwell assays, respectively. Results indicate that the transfection of FUT3-miRNA may down-regulate sLeA protein expression on the surface of KATO-III cells, and significantly inhibit cell proliferation (p<0.05). As compared to the negative and blank control groups, the number of invasion and migration cells in the FUT3-miRNA group decreased significantly (each p<0.05). Experimental results indicate that the miRNA expression vector which targets the FUT3 gene can effectively inhibit the proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of KATO-III cells.

  12. The Interference Effects of a Body on the Spanwise Load Distributions of Two 45 Degree Sweptback Wings of Aspect Ratio 8.02 from Low-Speed Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martina, Albert P.

    1956-01-01

    Tests of two wing-body combinations have been conducted in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel at a Reynolds number of 4 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.19 to determine the effects of the bodies on the wing span load distributions. The wings had 45 degrees sweepback of the quarter-chord line, aspect ratio 8.02, taper ratio 0.45, and incorporated 12-percent-thick airfoil sections streamwise. One wing was untwisted and uncambered whereas the second wing incorporated both twist and camber. Identical bodies of revolution, of 10:1 fineness ratio, having diameter-to-span ratios of 0.10, were mounted in mid-high-wing arrangements. The effects of wind incidence, wing fences, and flap deflection were determined for the plane uncambered wing. The addition of the body to the plane wing increased the exposed wing loading at a given lift coefficient as much as 10 percent with the body at 0 degrees incidence and 4 percent at 4 degrees incidence. The bending-moment coefficients at the wing-body juncture were increased about 2 percent with the body at 0 degrees incidence, whereas the increases were as much as 10 percent with the body at 4 degrees incidence. The spanwise load distributions due to the body on the plane wing as calculated by using a swept-wing method employing 19 spanwise lifting elements and control points generally showed satisfactory agreement with experiment. The spanwise load distributions due to body on the flapped plane wing and on the twisted and cambered wing were dissimilar to those obtained on the plane wing. Neither of the methods of calculation which were employed yielded distributions that agreed consistently with experiment for either the flapped plane wing or the twisted and cambered wing.

  13. Recent developments in rotary-wing aerodynamic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1986-01-01

    Current progress in the computational analysis of rotary-wing flowfields is surveyed, and some typical results are presented in graphs. Topics examined include potential theory, rotating coordinate systems, lifting-surface theory (moving singularity, fixed wing, and rotary wing), panel methods (surface singularity representations, integral equations, and compressible flows), transonic theory (the small-disturbance equation), wake analysis (hovering rotor-wake models and transonic blade-vortex interaction), limitations on computational aerodynamics, and viscous-flow methods (dynamic-stall theories and lifting-line theory). It is suggested that the present algorithms and advanced computers make it possible to begin working toward the ultimate goal of turbulent Navier-Stokes calculations for an entire rotorcraft.

  14. Recent developments in rotary-wing aerodynamic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1986-01-01

    Current progress in the computational analysis of rotary-wing flowfields is surveyed, and some typical results are presented in graphs. Topics examined include potential theory, rotating coordinate systems, lifting-surface theory (moving singularity, fixed wing, and rotary wing), panel methods (surface singularity representations, integral equations, and compressible flows), transonic theory (the small-disturbance equation), wake analysis (hovering rotor-wake models and transonic blade-vortex interaction), limitations on computational aerodynamics, and viscous-flow methods (dynamic-stall theories and lifting-line theory). It is suggested that the present algorithms and advanced computers make it possible to begin working toward the ultimate goal of turbulent Navier-Stokes calculations for an entire rotorcraft.

  15. Origin Story: Blended Wing Body

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA is partnering with the Boeing Company, among others, to develop and test the blended wing body aircraft. The BWB has the potential to significantly reduce fuel use and noise. In this video, Bo...

  16. Embedded Wing Propulsion Conceptual Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Saunders, John D.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of distributed propulsion work under NASA's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts or RAC project, a new propulsion-airframe integrated vehicle concept called Embedded Wing Propulsion (EWP) is developed and examined through system and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. The idea behind the concept is to fully integrate a propulsion system within a wing structure so that the aircraft takes full benefits of coupling of wing aerodynamics and the propulsion thrust stream. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of the EWP concept applied to large transport aircraft such as the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft. In this paper, some of early analysis and current status of the study are presented. In addition, other current activities of distributed propulsion under the RAC project are briefly discussed.

  17. CONNECTION BETWEEN MID-INFRARED EMISSION PROPERTIES AND NARROW-LINE REGION OUTFLOWS IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Kai; Wang Tinggui; Dong Xiaobo; Yan Lin

    2013-05-01

    The location of warm dust producing the mid-infrared (MIR) emission in type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is complex and not yet fully known. We explore this problem by studying how the MIR covering factor (CF{sub MIR} = L{sub MIR}/L{sub bol}) correlates with the fundamental parameters of AGN accretion process (such as L{sub bol}, black hole mass M{sub BH}, and Eddington ratio L/L{sub Edd}) and the properties of narrow emission lines (as represented by [O III] {lambda}5007), using large data sets derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS) and the Wide Infrared Sky Survey (WISE). First, we find that the luminosity of the [O III] wing component (L{sub wing}) correlates more tightly with the continuum luminosity ({lambda}L{sub {lambda}}(5100)) than the luminosity of the line core component (L{sub core}) does, which is in line with our previous conclusion that the wing component, generally blueshifted, originates from the polar outflows in the inner narrow-line region (NLR). We then find that the MIR CF shows the strongest correlation with L{sub wing}/L{sub bol} rather than with L{sub core}/L{sub bol} or the above fundamental AGN parameters, and the correlation becomes stronger as the infrared wavelength increases. We also confirm the anti-correlations of CF{sub MIR} with L{sub bol} and M{sub BH}, and the lack of dependence of CF{sub MIR} on the Eddington ratio. These results suggest that a large fraction of the warm dust producing MIR emission in AGNs is likely embedded in polar outflows in the NLR instead of in the torus.

  18. Oblique-wing supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An aircraft including a single fuselage having a main wing and a horizontal stabilizer airfoil pivotally attached at their centers to the fuselage is described. The pivotal attachments allow the airfoils to be yawed relative to the fuselage for high speed flight, and to be positioned at right angles with respect to the fuselage during takeoff, landing, and low speed flight. The main wing and the horizontal stabilizer are upwardly curved from their center pivotal connections towards their ends to form curvilinear dihedrals.

  19. Wing Warping and Its Impact on Aerodynamic Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Ben; Jacob, Jamey

    2007-11-01

    Inflatable wings have been demonstrated in many applications such as UAVs, airships, and missile stabilization surfaces. A major concern presented by the use of an inflatable wing has been the lack of traditional roll control surfaces. This leaves the designer with several options in order to have control about the roll axis. Since inflatable wings have a semi-flexible structure, wing warping is the obvious solution to this problem. The current method is to attach servos and control linkages to external surface of the wing that results in variation of profile chamber and angle of attack from leading edge or trailing edge deflection. Designs using internal muscles will also be discussed. This creates a lift differential between the half-spans, resulting in a roll moment. The trailing edge on the other half-span can also be deflected in the opposite direction to increase the roll moment as well as to reduce roll-yaw coupling. Comparisons show that higher L/D ratios are possible than using traditional control surfaces. An additional benefit is the ability to perform symmetric warping to achieve optimum aerodynamic performance. Via warping alone, an arbitrary span can be warped such that it has the same aerodynamic characteristics as an elliptical planform. Comparisons between lifting line theory and test results will be presented.

  20. Best supportive care (BSC) versus oxaliplatin, folinic acid and 5-fluorouracil (OFF) plus BSC in patients for second-line advanced pancreatic cancer: a phase III-study from the German CONKO-study group.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Uwe; Schwaner, Ingo; Stieler, Jens; Adler, Mathias; Seraphin, Jörg; Dörken, Bernd; Riess, Hanno; Oettle, Helmut

    2011-07-01

    Gemcitabine usually given until progressive disease (PD) is the main first-line treatment option for patients with inoperable advanced pancreatic cancer (APC). Currently there is no accepted active regimen for second-line chemotherapy. Previous phase II studies suggest clinical relevant activity of oxaliplatin, folinic acid and 5-FU (OFF). We initiated a phase III multicentre study comparing OFF versus best supportive care (BSC) in patients with APC progressing while on gemcitabine therapy. In this open randomized study, patients with CT and/or MRI confirmed progressive disease while on gemcitabine therapy were randomized 1:1 to OFF or BSC. Stratification included duration of first-line therapy (<3, 3 to 6 and >6 months), performance status (KPS 70-80%; 90-100%) and tumour stage (M1/M0). OFF consisted of folinic acid 200mg/m(2) followed by 5-fluorouracil 2g/m(2) (24h) on d1, d8, d15, d22 and oxaliplatin 85 mg/m(2) on days 8 and 22. After a rest of 3 weeks the next cycle was started on d43. A total of 165 patients were calculated to demonstrate a doubling of survival time after progression on first-line therapy. After inclusion of forty six patients the trial was terminated according to predefined protocol regulations due to insufficient accrual (lack of acceptance of BSC by patients and physicians. Patient characteristics were well balanced between both study arms. The OFF regimen was well tolerated with more patients with grade I/II paraesthesia and grade II/III nausea/emesis and diarrhoea. Median second-line survival was 4.82 [95% Confidence Interval; 4.29-5.35] months for OFF treatment and 2.30 [95% CI; 1.76-2.83] months with BSC alone (0.45 [95% CI: 0.24-0.83], p = 0.008). Median overall survival for the sequence GEM-OFF was 9.09 [95% CI: 6.97-11.21] and 7.90 [95% CI: 4.95-10.84] months for GEM-BSC (0.50 [95% CI: 0.27-0.95], p = 0.031) respectively. Although stopped prematurely, this randomized trial provides at first time evidence for the benefit of second-line

  1. Downwash in the plane of symmetry of an elliptically loaded wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    A closed-form solution for the downwash in the plane of symmetry of an elliptically loaded line is given. This theoretical result is derived from Prandtl's lifting-line theory and assumes that: (1) a three-dimensional wing can be replaced by a straight lifting line, (2) this line is elliptically loaded, and (3) the trailing wake is a flat-sheet which does not roll up. The first assumption is reasonable for distances greater than about 1 chord from the wing aerodynamic center. The second assumption is satisfied by any combination of wing twist, spanwise camber variation, or planform that approximates elliptic loading. The third assumption is justified only for high-aspect-ratio wings at low lift coefficients and downstream distances less than about 1 span from the aerodynamic center. It is shown, however, that assuming the wake to be fully rolled up gives downwash values reasonably close to those of the flat-sheet solution derived in this paper. The wing can therefore be modeled as a single horseshoe vortex with the same lift and total circulation as the equivalent ellipticity loaded line, and the predicted downwash will be a close approximation independent of aspect ratio and lift coefficient. The flat-sheet equation and the fully rolled up wake equation are both one-line formulas that predict the upwash field in front of the wing, as well as the downwash field behind it. These formulas are useful for preliminary estimates of the complex aerodynamic interaction between two wings (i.e., canard, tandem wing, and conventional aircraft) including the effects of gap and stagger.

  2. Vonoprazan, a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, as a component of first-line and second-line triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication: a phase III, randomised, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kazunari; Sakurai, Yuuichi; Shiino, Madoka; Funao, Nobuo; Nishimura, Akira; Asaka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of vonoprazan, a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, as a component of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. Design A randomised, double-blind, multicentre, parallel-group study was conducted to verify the non-inferiority of vonoprazan 20 mg to lansoprazole 30 mg as part of first-line triple therapy (with amoxicillin 750 mg and clarithromycin 200 or 400 mg) in H pylori-positive patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer history. The first 50 patients failing first-line therapy with good compliance also received second-line vonoprazan-based triple therapy (with amoxicillin 750 mg and metronidazole 250 mg) as an open-label treatment. Results Of the 650 subjects randomly allocated to either first-line triple therapy, 641 subjects completed first-line therapy and 50 subjects completed second-line therapy. The first-line eradication rate (primary end point) was 92.6% (95% CI 89.2% to 95.2%) with vonoprazan versus 75.9% (95% CI 70.9% to 80.5%) with lansoprazole, with the difference being 16.7% (95% CI 11.2% to 22.1%) in favour of vonoprazan, thus confirming the non-inferiority of vonoprazan (p<0.0001). The second-line eradication rate (secondary end point) was also high (98.0%; 95% CI 89.4% to 99.9%) in those who received second-line therapy (n=50). Both first-line triple therapies were well tolerated with no notable differences. Second-line triple therapy was also well tolerated. Conclusion Vonoprazan is effective as part of first-line triple therapy and as part of second-line triple therapy in H pylori-positive patients with a history of gastric or duodenal ulcer. Trial registration number NCT01505127. PMID:26935876

  3. [Maintenance of Pure Lines and Hybridization.] Student Materials. V.A. III. [IV-A-1 through IV-A-2].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    Part of a series of eight student learning modules in vocational agriculture, this booklet deals with plant reproduction. Topics covered include the pure line theory and its history, pure line selection, the effect of inbreeding on vitality, the definition of and reasons for hybridization in plants, and techniques for producing hybirds; a list of…

  4. [Maintenance of Pure Lines and Hybridization.] Student Materials. V.A. III. [IV-A-1 through IV-A-2].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    Part of a series of eight student learning modules in vocational agriculture, this booklet deals with plant reproduction. Topics covered include the pure line theory and its history, pure line selection, the effect of inbreeding on vitality, the definition of and reasons for hybridization in plants, and techniques for producing hybirds; a list of…

  5. 10 Gbit/s all-optical NRZ-OOK to RZ-OOK format conversion in an ultra-small III-V-on-silicon microdisk fabricated in a CMOS pilot line.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Spuesens, Thijs; Mechet, Pauline; Olivier, Nicolas; Fedeli, Jean-Marc; Regreny, Philippe; Roelkens, Gunther; van Thourhout, Dries; Morthier, Geert

    2011-11-21

    We report the demonstration of an all-optical, bias free and error-free (bit-error-rate ~10(-12)), 10 Gbit/s non-return-to-zero (NRZ) to return-to-zero (RZ) data format conversion using a 7.5 µm diameter III-V-on-silicon microdisk resonator. The device is completely processed in a 200 mm CMOS pilot line. The data format conversion is based on the phenomenon of pulse carving of an NRZ optical data stream by an optical clock. The underlying physical effect for the pulse carving is the change in the refractive index caused by the generation of free-carriers in a pump -probe configuration. We believe it to be the first NRZ-to-RZ format convertor built on a hybrid III-V-on-silicon technology platform.

  6. Dew-driven folding of insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew; Beadles, Sam; Clement, Courtney; Hu, David

    2013-11-01

    Small insect wings fold into tacos when exposed to dewfall or fog for extended times. Such shapes are tightly held together and require great force or long evaporation times for the wings to unfold. In this experimental investigation, we use time-lapse and high-speed videography on a mosquito wing exposed to fog to characterize the folding process from a flat wing to a taco. We observe a taco is formed through a series of processes involving wing bending, unbending, and subsequent tight folding of the wing following the sliding of the drop off the wing. We use a simplified 2D model to determine the forces coalescing drops exert on the wing, and present folding-resistant design suggestions for micro-aerial vehicle wings.

  7. Gyroscopic sensing in the wings of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta: the role of sensor location and directional sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Brian T; Morgansen, Kristi A

    2015-10-06

    The wings of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta are lined with mechanoreceptors called campaniform sensilla that encode wing deformations. During flight, the wings deform in response to a variety of stimuli, including inertial-elastic loads due to the wing flapping motion, aerodynamic loads, and exogenous inertial loads transmitted by disturbances. Because the wings are actuated, flexible structures, the strain-sensitive campaniform sensilla are capable of detecting inertial rotations and accelerations, allowing the wings to serve not only as a primary actuator, but also as a gyroscopic sensor for flight control. We study the gyroscopic sensing of the hawkmoth wings from a control theoretic perspective. Through the development of a low-order model of flexible wing flapping dynamics, and the use of nonlinear observability analysis, we show that the rotational acceleration inherent in wing flapping enables the wings to serve as gyroscopic sensors. We compute a measure of sensor fitness as a function of sensor location and directional sensitivity by using the simulation-based empirical observability Gramian. Our results indicate that gyroscopic information is encoded primarily through shear strain due to wing twisting, where inertial rotations cause detectable changes in pronation and supination timing and magnitude. We solve an observability-based optimal sensor placement problem to find the optimal configuration of strain sensor locations and directional sensitivities for detecting inertial rotations. The optimal sensor configuration shows parallels to the campaniform sensilla found on hawkmoth wings, with clusters of sensors near the wing root and wing tip. The optimal spatial distribution of strain directional sensitivity provides a hypothesis for how heterogeneity of campaniform sensilla may be distributed.

  8. Simultaneous separation and speciation of inorganic As(III)/As(V) and Cr(III)/Cr(VI) in natural waters utilizing capillary microextraction on ordered mesoporous Al2O3 prior to their on-line determination by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenling; Zheng, Fei; Hu, Bin

    2008-02-28

    In this paper, a system of flow injection (FI) capillary microextraction (CME) on line coupled with inductively plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was proposed for simultaneous separation and speciation of inorganic As(III)/As(V) and Cr(III)/Cr(VI) in natural waters. Ordered mesoporous Al2O3 coating was prepared by sol-gel technology and used as CME coating material. Various experimental parameters affecting the capillary microextraction of inorganic arsenic and chromium species have been investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were 0.7 and 18 ng L(-1) for As(V) and Cr(VI), 3.4 and 74 ng L(-1) for As(III) and Cr(III), respectively, with an enrichment factor of 5 and a sampling frequency of 8h(-1). The relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) were 3.1, 4.0, 2.8 and 3.9% (C=1 ng mL(-1), n=7) for As(V), As(III), Cr(VI) and Cr(III), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of inorganic arsenic and chromium species in mineral water, tap water and lake water with the recovery of 94-105%. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, two certified reference of GSBZ50027-94 and GSBZ50004-88 water samples were analyzed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. The ordered mesoporous Al2O3 coated capillary showed an excellent solvent and thermal stability and could be re-used for more than 30 times without decreasing extraction efficiency.

  9. Unsteady aerodynamics of membrane wings with adaptive compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Jillian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Membrane wings are known to provide superior aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds numbers (Re =104 -105), primarily due to passive shape adaptation to flow conditions. In addition to this passive deformation, active control of the fluid-structure interaction and resultant aerodynamic properties can be achieved through the use of dielectric elastomer actuators as the wing membrane material. When actuated, membrane pretension is decreased and wing camber increases. Additionally, actuation at resonance frequencies allows additional control over wing camber. We present results using synchronized (i) time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) to resolve the flow field, (ii) 3D direct linear transformation (DLT) to recover membrane shape, (iii) lift/drag/torque measurements and (iv) near-wake hot wire anemometry measurements to characterize the fluid-structure interactions. Particular attention is paid to cases in which the vortex shedding frequency, the membrane resonance, and the actuation frequency coincide. In quantitatively examining both flow field and membrane shape at a range of actuation frequencies and vortex shedding frequencies, this work seeks to find actuation parameters that allow for active control of boundary layer separation over a range of flow conditions. Also at Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and theoretical calculations of (1,2-diaminocyclohexane)(1,3-diaminopropane)gold(III) chloride complexes: in vitro cytotoxic evaluations against human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Jaroudi, Said S; Altaf, Muhammad; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A; Kawde, Abdel-Nasser; Altuwaijri, Saleh; Ahmad, Saeed; Isab, Anvarhusein A

    2015-10-01

    The gold(III) complexes of the type (1,2-diaminocyclohexane)(1,3-diaminopropane)gold(III) chloride, [(DACH)Au(pn)]Cl3, [where DACH = cis-, trans-1,2- and S,S-1,2-diaminocyclohexane and pn = 1,3-diaminopropane] have been synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic and analytical techniques including elemental analysis, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy; solution as well as solid-state NMR measurements. The solid-state (13)C NMR shows that 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (1,2-DACH) and 1,3-diaminopropane (pn) are strongly bound to the gold(III) center via N donor atoms. The stability of the mixed diamine ligand gold(III) was checked by UV-Vis spectroscopy and NMR measurements. The molecular structure of compound 1 (containing cis-1,2-DACH) was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The structure of 1 consists of [(cis-DACH)Au(pn)](3+) complex ion and chloride counter ions. Each gold atom in the complex ion adopts a distorted square-planar geometry. The structural details and relative stabilities of the four possible isomers of the complexes were also estimated at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theoretical calculations. The computational study demonstrates that trans- conformations are slightly more stable than the cis- conformations. The antiproliferative effects and cytotoxic properties of the mixed ligand gold(III) complexes were evaluated in vitro on human gastric SGC7901 and prostate PC3 cancer cells using MTT assay. The antiproliferative study of the gold(III) complexes on PC3 and SGC7901 cells indicate that complex 3 (containing 1S,2S-(+)-1,2-(DACH)) is the most effective antiproliferative agent. The IC50 data reveal that the in vitro cytotoxicity of complex 3 against SGC7901 cancer cells manifested similar and very pronounced cytotoxic effects with respect to cisplatin. Moreover, the electrochemical behavior, and the interaction of complex 3 with two well-known model proteins, namely, hen egg white lysozyme and bovine serum albumin is also reported.

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Study of a Rectangular Wing in a Vortical Wake at Low Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Willard G.; Lazzeroni, Frank A.

    1960-01-01

    A systematic study has been made, experimentally and theoretically, of the effects of a vortical wake on the aerodynamic characteristics of a rectangular wing at subsonic speed. The vortex generator and wing were mounted on a reflection plane to avoid body-wing interference. Vortex position, relative to the wing, was varied both in the spanwise direction and normal to the wing. Angle of attack of the wing was varied from -40 to +60. Both chordwise and spanwise pressure distributions were obtained with the wing in uniform and vortical flow fields. Stream surveys were made to determine the flow characteristics in the vortical wake. The vortex-induced lift was calculated by several theoretical methods including strip theory, reverse-flow theory, and reverse-flow theory including a finite vortex core. In addition, the Prandtl lifting-line theory and the Weissinger theory were used to calculate the spanwise distribution of vortex-induced loads. With reverse-flow theory, predictions of the interference lift were generally good, and with Weissinger's theory the agreement between the theoretical spanwise variation of induced load and the experimental variation was good. Results of the stream survey show that the vortex generated by a lifting surface of rectangular plan form tends to trail back streamwise from the tip and does not approach the theoretical location, or centroid of circulation, given by theory. This discrepancy introduced errors in the prediction of vortex interference, especially when the vortex core passed immediately outboard of the wing tip. The wake produced by the vortex generator in these tests was not fully rolled up into a circular vortex, and so lacked symmetry in the vertical direction of the transverse plane. It was found that the direction of circulation affected the induced loads on the wing either when the wing was at angle of attack or when the vortex was some distance away from the plane of the wing.

  12. Effect of structure in middle part of leading edge of a thick wing : communication from Rijks-Studiedienst voor de Luchtvaart of Amsterdam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    The experiments herein described were made for the purpose of finding whether removing a larger portion of the wing to improve the pilot's view would be possible, without too great detriment to the aerodynamic properties of the airplane. The experiments were conducted on a wing similar to the Fokker F III.

  13. An analytical study of the effects of jets located more than one jet diameter above a wing at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for calculating the effects of blowing two jets over a swept tapered wing at low subsonic speeds. The algorithm used is based on a vortex-lattice representation of the wing lifting surface and a line sink-source distribution to simulate the effects of the jet exhaust on the wing lift and drag. The method is limited to those cases in which the jet exhaust does not intersect or wash the wing. The predictions of this relatively simple procedure are in remarkably good agreement with experimentally measured interference lift and interference induced drag.

  14. An analytical study of the effects of jets located more than one jet diameter above a wing at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to calculate the effects of blowing two jets over a swept tapered wing at low subsonic speeds. The algorithm used is based on a vortex lattice representation of the wing lifting surface and a line sink-source distribution to simulate the effects of the jet exhaust on the wing lift and drag. The method is limited to those cases where the jet exhaust does not intersect or wash the wing. The predictions of this relatively simple procedure are in remarkably good agreement with experimentally measured interference lift and interference induced drag.

  15. Results of recent experiments with slotted wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachmann, G

    1925-01-01

    This report gives the results of a recent series of experiments performed on a wing designed for a cantilever monoplane. Both wings were trapezial in their ground plan, with their tips rounded elliptically. These wing sections combine all known devices for increasing the lift, namely, the slot, the increased camber and angle of attack by means of an aileron running the whole length of the span. The last advance included in the wing section was an increase in wing area by means of an auxiliary wing adjusted by a sort of rectangular joint.

  16. Investigation into the Role of Dragonfly Wing Flexibility During Passive Wing Pitch Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Yousaf; Williams, Ventress; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Wing deformation is a characteristic part of flapping wing flight. In dragonflies, a torsion wave can be observed propagating from the tip to the root during stroke reversal. In this paper, we utilize high-speed photogrammetry and 3d surface reconstruction techniques to quantify wing deformation and kinematics of a dragonfly. We then use finite elements in the absolute nodal coordinate formulation to estimate strain energy in the wing during wing pitch reversal. We use this data to analyze the role of wing structure in facilitating wing rotation and bringing about the characteristic torsion wave. The influence of the elastic force in facilitating wing rotation is then compared with inertial and aerodynamic forces as well. A quantitative look into the variation of strain energy within the insect wing during wing rotation could lead to more efficient design of dynamic wing pitching mechanisms. Supported by NSF CBET-1343154.

  17. The aerodynamic effects of wing-wing interaction in flapping insect wings.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf; Sane, Sanjay P; Dickinson, Michael

    2005-08-01

    We employed a dynamically scaled mechanical model of the small fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Reynolds number 100-200) to investigate force enhancement due to contralateral wing interactions during stroke reversal (the ;clap-and-fling'). The results suggest that lift enhancement during clap-and-fling requires an angular separation between the two wings of no more than 10-12 degrees . Within the limitations of the robotic apparatus, the clap-and-fling augmented total lift production by up to 17%, but depended strongly on stroke kinematics. The time course of the interaction between the wings was quite complex. For example, wing interaction attenuated total force during the initial part of the wing clap, but slightly enhanced force at the end of the clap phase. We measured two temporally transient peaks of both lift and drag enhancement during the fling phase: a prominent peak during the initial phase of the fling motion, which accounts for most of the benefit in lift production, and a smaller peak of force enhancement at the end fling when the wings started to move apart. A detailed digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) analysis during clap-and-fling showed that the most obvious effect of the bilateral ;image' wing on flow occurs during the early phase of the fling, due to a strong fluid influx between the wings as they separate. The DPIV analysis revealed, moreover, that circulation induced by a leading edge vortex (LEV) during the early fling phase was smaller than predicted by inviscid two-dimensional analytical models, whereas circulation of LEV nearly matched the predictions of Weis-Fogh's inviscid model at late fling phase. In addition, the presence of the image wing presumably causes subtle modifications in both the wake capture and viscous forces. Collectively, these effects explain some of the changes in total force and lift production during the fling. Quite surprisingly, the effect of clap-and-fling is not restricted to the dorsal part of the

  18. Wind-Tunnel Investigation at Low Speed of the Effects of Chordwise Wing Fences and Horizontal-Tail Position on the Static Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of an Airplane Model with a 35 Degree Sweptback Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queijo, M J; Jaquet, Byron M; Wolhart, Walter D

    1954-01-01

    Low-speed tests of a model with a wing swept back 35 degrees at the 0.33-chord line and a horizontal tail located well above the extended wing-chord plane indicated static longitudinal instability at moderate angles of attack for all configurations tested. An investigation therefore was made to determine whether the longitudinal stability could be improved by the use of chordwise wing fences, by lowering the horizontal tail, or by a combination of both. The results of the investigation showed that the longitudinal stability characteristics of the model with slats retracted could be improved at moderate angles of attack by placing chordwise wing fences at a spanwise station of about 73 percent of the wing semispan from the plane of symmetry provided the nose of the fence extended slightly beyond or around the wing leading edge.

  19. The optical depth of the 158 micrometer (C-12 II) line: Detection of the F=1 yields 0 (C-13 III) hyperfine-structure component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.; Poglitsch, A.; Madden, S. C.; Jackson, J. M.; Herrmann, F.; Genzel, R.; Geis, N.

    1991-01-01

    The first detection of the F = 1 yields 0 hyperfine component of the 158 micrometer (C-13 II) fine structure line in the interstellar medium is reported. A twelve point intensity map was obtained of the (C-13 II) distribution over the inner 190 inch (right ascension) by 190 inch (declination) regions of the Orion nebula using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. The (C-12 II)/(C-13 II) line intensity ratio varied significantly over the region mapped. It is highest (86 plus or minus 9) in the core of the Orion H II region and significantly lower (62 plus or minus 7) in the outer regions of the map, reflecting higher optical depth in the (C-12 II) line here. It is suggested that this enhanced optical depth is the result of limb brightening of the optically thin (C-13 II) line at the edges of the bowl-shaped H II region blister. If the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio is 43, the (C-12 II) line in the inner regions of the Orion nebula, has a low optical depth: tau sub 12 approximately = 0.75 plus or minus 0.25. The optical depth together with the large brightness temperature of the (C-12 II) line (approximately 160 K) requires that the excitation temperature of the P-2 sub 3/2 level be approximately 310 K, in very good agreement with the previous analysis of the physical conditions of the Orion interface region based on fine structure line intensity ratios and photodissociation region models. If the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio is 67, the line optical depth is somewhat larger (tau sub 12 approximately = 1.85), and the transition excitation temperature is somewhat smaller (approximately 190 K) than that predicted by these models. The present results therefore support values approximately = 43 for the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio in the Orion nebula.

  20. The optical depth of the 158 micrometer (C-12 II) line: Detection of the F=1 yields 0 (C-13 III) hyperfine-structure component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.; Poglitsch, A.; Madden, S. C.; Jackson, J. M.; Herrmann, F.; Genzel, R.; Geis, N.

    1991-01-01

    The first detection of the F = 1 yields 0 hyperfine component of the 158 micrometer (C-13 II) fine structure line in the interstellar medium is reported. A twelve point intensity map was obtained of the (C-13 II) distribution over the inner 190 inch (right ascension) by 190 inch (declination) regions of the Orion nebula using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. The (C-12 II)/(C-13 II) line intensity ratio varied significantly over the region mapped. It is highest (86 plus or minus 9) in the core of the Orion H II region and significantly lower (62 plus or minus 7) in the outer regions of the map, reflecting higher optical depth in the (C-12 II) line here. It is suggested that this enhanced optical depth is the result of limb brightening of the optically thin (C-13 II) line at the edges of the bowl-shaped H II region blister. If the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio is 43, the (C-12 II) line in the inner regions of the Orion nebula, has a low optical depth: tau sub 12 approximately = 0.75 plus or minus 0.25. The optical depth together with the large brightness temperature of the (C-12 II) line (approximately 160 K) requires that the excitation temperature of the P-2 sub 3/2 level be approximately 310 K, in very good agreement with the previous analysis of the physical conditions of the Orion interface region based on fine structure line intensity ratios and photodissociation region models. If the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio is 67, the line optical depth is somewhat larger (tau sub 12 approximately = 1.85), and the transition excitation temperature is somewhat smaller (approximately 190 K) than that predicted by these models. The present results therefore support values approximately = 43 for the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio in the Orion nebula.

  1. Shock Location Dominated Transonic Flight Loads on the Active Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.; Lizotte, Andrew; Lindsley, Ned J.; Stauf, Rick

    2005-01-01

    During several Active Aeroelastic Wing research flights, the shadow of the over-wing shock could be observed because of natural lighting conditions. As the plane accelerated, the shock location moved aft, and as the shadow passed the aileron and trailing-edge flap hinge lines, their associated hinge moments were substantially affected. The observation of the dominant effect of shock location on aft control surface hinge moments led to this investigation. This report investigates the effect of over-wing shock location on wing loads through flight-measured data and analytical predictions. Wing-root and wing-fold bending moment and torque and leading- and trailing-edge hinge moments have been measured in flight using calibrated strain gages. These same loads have been predicted using a computational fluid dynamics code called the Euler Navier-Stokes Three Dimensional Aeroelastic Code. The computational fluid dynamics study was based on the elastically deformed shape estimated by a twist model, which in turn was derived from in-flight-measured wing deflections provided by a flight deflection measurement system. During level transonic flight, the shock location dominated the wing trailing-edge control surface hinge moments. The computational fluid dynamics analysis based on the shape provided by the flight deflection measurement system produced very similar results and substantially correlated with the measured loads data.

  2. Numerical simulation of the tip vortex off a low-aspect-ratio wing at transonic speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.

    1984-01-01

    The viscous transonic flow around a low aspect ratio wing was computed by an implicit, three dimensional, thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver. The grid around the geometry of interest is obtained numerically as a solution to a Dirichlet problem for the cube. A low aspect ratio wing with large sweep, twist, taper, and camber is the chosen geometry. The topology chosen to wrap the mesh around the wing with good tip resolution is a C-O type mesh. The flow around the wing was computed for a free stream Mach number of 0.82 at an angle of attack of 5 deg. At this Mach number, an oblique shock forms on the upper surface of the wing, and a tip vortex and three dimensional flow separation off the wind surface are observed. Particle path lines indicate that the three dimensional flow separation on the wing surface is part of the roots of the tip vortex formation. The lifting of the tip vortex before the wing trailing edge is observed by following the trajectory of particles release around the wing tip.

  3. Elements of butterfly wing patterns.

    PubMed

    Nijhout, H F

    2001-10-15

    The color patterns on the wings of butterflies are unique among animal color patterns in that the elements that make up the overall pattern are individuated. Unlike the spots and stripes of vertebrate color patterns, the elements of butterfly wing patterns have identities that can be traced from species to species, and typically across genera and families. Because of this identity it is possible to recognize homologies among pattern elements and to study their evolution and diversification. Individuated pattern elements evolved from non-individuated precursors by compartmentalization of the wing into areas that became developmentally autonomous with respect to color pattern formation. Developmental compartmentalization led to the evolution of serially repeated elements and the emergence of serial homology. In these compartments, serial homologues were able to acquire site-specific developmental regulation and this, in turn, allowed them to diverge morphologically. Compartmentalization of the wing also reduced the developmental correlation among pattern elements. The release from this developmental constraint, we believe, enabled the great evolutionary radiation of butterfly wing patterns. During pattern evolution, the same set of individual pattern elements is arranged in novel ways to produce species-specific patterns, including such adaptations as mimicry and camouflage.

  4. Vonoprazan, a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, as a component of first-line and second-line triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication: a phase III, randomised, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kazunari; Sakurai, Yuuichi; Shiino, Madoka; Funao, Nobuo; Nishimura, Akira; Asaka, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of vonoprazan, a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, as a component of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. A randomised, double-blind, multicentre, parallel-group study was conducted to verify the non-inferiority of vonoprazan 20 mg to lansoprazole 30 mg as part of first-line triple therapy (with amoxicillin 750 mg and clarithromycin 200 or 400 mg) in H pylori-positive patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer history. The first 50 patients failing first-line therapy with good compliance also received second-line vonoprazan-based triple therapy (with amoxicillin 750 mg and metronidazole 250 mg) as an open-label treatment. Of the 650 subjects randomly allocated to either first-line triple therapy, 641 subjects completed first-line therapy and 50 subjects completed second-line therapy. The first-line eradication rate (primary end point) was 92.6% (95% CI 89.2% to 95.2%) with vonoprazan versus 75.9% (95% CI 70.9% to 80.5%) with lansoprazole, with the difference being 16.7% (95% CI 11.2% to 22.1%) in favour of vonoprazan, thus confirming the non-inferiority of vonoprazan (p<0.0001). The second-line eradication rate (secondary end point) was also high (98.0%; 95% CI 89.4% to 99.9%) in those who received second-line therapy (n=50). Both first-line triple therapies were well tolerated with no notable differences. Second-line triple therapy was also well tolerated. Vonoprazan is effective as part of first-line triple therapy and as part of second-line triple therapy in H pylori-positive patients with a history of gastric or duodenal ulcer. NCT01505127. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Aircraft wing structural detail design (wing, aileron, flaps, and subsystems)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Robert; Zable, Mike; Hughes, James; Heiser, Terry; Adrian, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, in detail, the wing, flaps, and ailerons for a primary flight trainer. Integrated in this design are provisions for the fuel system, the electrical system, and the fuselage/cabin carry-through interface structure. This conceptual design displays the general arrangement of all major components in the wing structure, taking into consideration the requirements set forth by the appropriate sections of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23 (FAR23) as well as those established in the statement of work.

  6. Outflow Kinematics Manifested by the Hα Line: Gas Outflows in Type 2 AGNs. IV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Daeun; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin

    2017-08-01

    Energetic ionized gas outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been studied as a key phenomenon related to AGN feedback. To probe the kinematics of the gas in the narrow-line region, [O iii] λ5007 has been utilized in a number of studies showing nonvirial kinematic properties due to AGN outflows. In this paper, we statistically investigate whether the Hα emission line is influenced by AGN-driven outflows by measuring the kinematic properties based on the Hα line profile and comparing them with those of [O iii]. Using the spatially integrated spectra of ∼37,000 Type 2 AGNs at z < 0.3 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, we find a nonlinear correlation between Hα velocity dispersion and stellar velocity dispersion that reveals the presence of the nongravitational component, especially for AGNs with a wing component in Hα. The large Hα velocity dispersion and velocity shift of luminous AGNs are clear evidence of AGN outflow impacts on hydrogen gas, while relatively smaller kinematic properties compared to those of [O iii] imply that the observed outflow effect on the Hα line is weaker than the case of [O iii].

  7. Wing flexibility improves bumblebee flight stability.

    PubMed

    Mistick, Emily A; Mountcastle, Andrew M; Combes, Stacey A

    2016-11-01

    Insect wings do not contain intrinsic musculature to change shape, but rather bend and twist passively during flight. Some insect wings feature flexible joints along their veins that contain patches of resilin, a rubber-like protein. Bumblebee wings exhibit a central resilin joint (1m-cu) that has previously been shown to improve vertical force production during hovering flight. In this study, we artificially stiffened bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) wings in vivo by applying a micro-splint to the 1m-cu joint, and measured the consequences for body stability during forward flight in both laminar and turbulent airflow. In laminar flow, bees with stiffened wings exhibited significantly higher mean rotation rates and standard deviation of orientation about the roll axis. Decreasing the wing's flexibility significantly increased its projected surface area relative to the oncoming airflow, likely increasing the drag force it experienced during particular phases of the wing stroke. We hypothesize that higher drag forces on stiffened wings decrease body stability when the left and right wings encounter different flow conditions. Wing splinting also led to a small increase in body rotation rates in turbulent airflow, but this change was not statistically significant, possibly because bees with stiffened wings changed their flight behavior in turbulent flow. Overall, we found that wing flexibility improves flight stability in bumblebees, adding to the growing appreciation that wing flexibility is not merely an inevitable liability in flapping flight, but can enhance flight performance. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Joint regulation of cell size and cell number in the wing blade of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    McCabe, J; French, V; Partridge, L

    1997-02-01

    We used Drosophila melanogaster to test for compensatory control of cell area and cell number in the regulation of total wing area. In two random bred wild-type base stocks collected from different geographic locations we found a negative association between the area and the number of cells in the wing blade. Three replicate lines were selected for increased or decreased wing area, with cell area maintained at the same level as in the three controls. After eight generations of selection, despite a large and highly significant difference in wing area between the large, control and small selection lines, cell area did not differ significantly between them. Rather, the difference in wing area between selection regimes was attributable to differences in cell number. Over the course of selection, the initially significant negative correlation between cell area and cell number in the wing increased, providing evidence for compensatory regulation of cell area and cell number. As a result of the increasingly negative association between the two traits, the variance in wing area declined as selection proceeded. It will be important to discover the mechanisms underlying the compensatory regulation of cell area and cell number.

  9. Aircraft wing structure detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Garrett L.; Roberts, Ron; Mallon, Bob; Alameri, Mohamed; Steinbach, Bill

    1993-01-01

    The provisions of this project call for the design of the structure of the wing and carry-through structure for the Viper primary trainer, which is to be certified as a utility category trainer under FAR part 23. The specific items to be designed in this statement of work were Front Spar, Rear Spar, Aileron Structure, Wing Skin, and Fuselage Carry-through Structure. In the design of these parts, provisions for the fuel system, electrical system, and control routing were required. Also, the total weight of the entire wing planform could not exceed 216 lbs. Since this aircraft is to be used as a primary trainer, and the SOW requires a useful life of 107 cycles, it was decided that all of the principle stresses in the structural members would be kept below 10 ksi. The only drawback to this approach is a weight penalty.

  10. Schooling of flapping wings: Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan; Becker, Alexander; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2014-11-01

    We examine the locomotion of an infinite array of wings that heave vertically with a prescribed sinusoidal motion and are free to translate in the horizontal direction. To do this, we simulate the motion of a freely translating flapping airfoil in a domain with periodic horizontal boundary conditions. These simulations indicate that the wings can ``take advantage'' of their collectively generated wake flows. In agreement with our experiments in a rotational geometry, we find ranges of flapping frequency over which there are multiple stable states of locomotion, with one of these swimming states having both higher speeds and efficiencies than an isolated flapping and locomoting wing. A simple mathematical model, which emphasizes the importance of history dependence in vortical flows, explains this multi-stability. These results may be important to understanding the role of hydrodynamic interactions in fish schooling and bird flocking.

  11. The Nichols Wing Cutting Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, James B

    1923-01-01

    Described here is wing cutting equipment for the economical production of metal wings for wind tunnel models. The machine will make any size of constant-section wing or strut up to one-sixth inch chord by 36-inch span and up to a thickness of one and one-quarter inches. It cuts a smooth, true model that is accurate to within two-thousandths of an inch on any ordinate. The holding jaws are so designed as to leave the model free of chip marks, and the only hand finishing necessary after the cutting is a rub with amunite to remove burrs. The actual change on ordinate in this finishing rub is less than .0002 inches.

  12. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  13. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  14. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  15. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  16. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps. Wing flaps, their operating mechanisms, and their supporting structures must be designed for critical...

  17. Insect Evolution: The Origin of Wings.

    PubMed

    Ross, Andrew

    2017-02-06

    The debate on the evolution of wings in insects has reached a new level. The study of primitive fossil insect nymphs has revealed that wings developed from a combination of the dorsal part of the thorax and the body wall.

  18. Evolution: taking wing with weak feathers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing

    2012-12-04

    Scientists long thought they knew what the wings of early birds looked like. But new reconstructions of Archaeopteryx and its kin suggest quite different feather arrangements on their wings with profound implications for the evolution of flight.

  19. The function of resilin in beetle wings.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, F; Gorb, S; Blickhan, R

    2000-01-01

    This account shows the distribution of elastic elements in hind wings in the scarabaeid Pachnoda marginata and coccinellid Coccinella septempunctata (both Coleoptera). Occurrence of resilin, a rubber-like protein, in some mobile joints together with data on wing unfolding and flight kinematics suggest that resilin in the beetle wing has multiple functions. First, the distribution pattern of resilin in the wing correlates with the particular folding pattern of the wing. Second, our data show that resilin occurs at the places where extra elasticity is needed, for example in wing folds, to prevent material damage during repeated folding and unfolding. Third, resilin provides the wing with elasticity in order to be deformable by aerodynamic forces. This may result in elastic energy storage in the wing. PMID:10983820

  20. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  1. Determination of lead by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HG-ICP-MS): on-line generation of plumbane using potassium hexacyanomanganate(III)

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Arslan, Zikri; Rose, LaKeysha

    2012-01-01

    A hydride generation (HG) procedure has been described for determination of Pb by ICP-MS using potassium hexacyanomanganate(III), K3Mn(CN)6, as an additive to facilitate the generation of plumbane (PbH4). Potassium hexacyanomanganate(III) was prepared in acidic medium as it was unstable in water. The stability of hexacyanomanganate(III) was examined in dilute solutions of HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4. The solutions prepared in 1% v/v/ H2SO4 were found to be stable for over a period of 24 h. The least suitable medium was 1% v/v HNO3. For generation of plumbane, acidic hexacyanomanganate(III) and sample solutions were mixed online along a 5-cm long tygon tubing (1.14 mm i.d.) and then reacted with 2% m/v sodium borohydride (NaBH4). A concentration of 0.5% m/v K3Mn(CN)6 facilitated the generation of PbH4 remarkably. In comparison to H2SO4, HCl provided broader working range for which optimum concentration was 1% v/v. No significant interferences were noted from transition metals and hydride forming elements, up to 0.5 μg mL−1 levels, except Cu which depressed the signals severely. The depressive effects in the presence of 0.1 μg mL−1 Cu were alleviated by increasing the concentration of K3Mn(CN)6 to 2% m/v. Under these conditions, the sensitivity was enhanced by a factor of at least 42 to 48. The detection limit (3s) was 0.008 μg L−1 for 208Pb isotope. Average signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) ranged between 18 and 20 for 1.0 μg mL−1 Pb solution. The accuracy of the method was verified by analysis of several certified reference materials, including Nearshore seawater (CASS-4), Bone ash (SRM 1400), and Mussel tissue (SRM 2976). The procedure was also successfully applied to the determination of Pb in coastal seawater samples by ICP-MS. PMID:23312310

  2. A comparison of the C III, O V, F VI, and Ne VII Delta n = 0 (2-2) line emissions from a laboratory plasma with theoretical predictions and astrophysical observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkenthal, M.; Yu, . L.; Lippmann, S.; Huang, L. K.; Moos, H. W.; Stratton, B. C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectra of the Delta n = 0 (2-2) transitions of Be I-like ions, C III, O V, F VI, and Ne VII emitted from the TEXT tokamak, were measured with photometrically calibrated instrumentation and compared to the predictions of several models which differ in their treatment of electron impact excitation, using either the distorted wave or R-matrix approach. It was found that the ions from C III to Ne VII were located near the edge of the plasma, at densities between 10 to the 12th and 13th/cu cm. The experimental line ratios were compared with several sets of computations. Agreement is obtained between the experimental data and computations by using the R-matrix technique. This leads to the conclusion that the effect resonances must be included in collision strength calculations, particularly at low nuclear charge. The results show that the line ratios studied may be used with confidence as electron density diagnostics for laboratory or astrophysical plasmas.

  3. Flexible-Wing-Based Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.; Jenkins, David A.; Ettinger, Scott; Lian, Yong-Sheng; Shyy, Wei; Waszak, Martin R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper documents the development and evaluation of an original flexible-wing-based Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) technology that reduces adverse effects of gusty wind conditions and unsteady aerodynamics, exhibits desirable flight stability, and enhances structural durability. The flexible wing concept has been demonstrated on aircraft with wingspans ranging from 18 inches to 5 inches. Salient features of the flexible-wing-based MAV, including the vehicle concept, flexible wing design, novel fabrication methods, aerodynamic assessment, and flight data analysis are presented.

  4. Aerodynamic and functional consequences of wing compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountcastle, Andrew M.; Daniel, Thomas L.

    A growing body of evidence indicates that a majority of insects experience some degree of wing deformation during flight. With no musculature distal to the wing base, the instantaneous shape of an insect wing is dictated by the interaction of aerodynamic forces with the inertial and elastic forces that arise from periodic accelerations of the wing. Passive wing deformation is an unavoidable feature of flapping flight for many insects due to the inertial loads that accompany rapid stroke reversals—loads that well exceed the mean aerodynamic force. Although wing compliance has been implicated in a few lift-enhancing mechanisms (e.g., favorable camber), the direct aerodynamic consequences of wing deformation remain generally unresolved. In this paper, we present new experimental data on how wing compliance may affect the overall induced flow in the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta. Real moth wings were subjected to robotic actuation in their dominant plane of rotation at a natural wing beat frequency of 25 Hz. We used digital particle image velocimetry at exceptionally high temporal resolution (2,100 fps) to assess the influence of wing compliance on the mean advective flows, relying on a natural variation in wing stiffness to alter the amount of emergent deformation (freshly extracted wings are flexible and exhibit greater compliance than those that are desiccated). We find that flexible wings yield mean advective flows with substantially greater magnitudes and orientations more beneficial to lift than those of stiff wings. Our results confirm that wing compliance plays a critical role in the production of flight forces.

  5. Aerodynamic and functional consequences of wing compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountcastle, Andrew M.; Daniel, Thomas L.

    2009-05-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that a majority of insects experience some degree of wing deformation during flight. With no musculature distal to the wing base, the instantaneous shape of an insect wing is dictated by the interaction of aerodynamic forces with the inertial and elastic forces that arise from periodic accelerations of the wing. Passive wing deformation is an unavoidable feature of flapping flight for many insects due to the inertial loads that accompany rapid stroke reversals—loads that well exceed the mean aerodynamic force. Although wing compliance has been implicated in a few lift-enhancing mechanisms (e.g., favorable camber), the direct aerodynamic consequences of wing deformation remain generally unresolved. In this paper, we present new experimental data on how wing compliance may affect the overall induced flow in the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta. Real moth wings were subjected to robotic actuation in their dominant plane of rotation at a natural wing beat frequency of 25 Hz. We used digital particle image velocimetry at exceptionally high temporal resolution (2,100 fps) to assess the influence of wing compliance on the mean advective flows, relying on a natural variation in wing stiffness to alter the amount of emergent deformation (freshly extracted wings are flexible and exhibit greater compliance than those that are desiccated). We find that flexible wings yield mean advective flows with substantially greater magnitudes and orientations more beneficial to lift than those of stiff wings. Our results confirm that wing compliance plays a critical role in the production of flight forces.

  6. Randomised phase III trial of S-1 versus capecitabine in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: SALTO study by the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, J J M; Simkens, L H J; van Rooijen, J M; van de Wouw, A J; Ten Tije, A J; Creemers, G J M; Hendriks, M P; Los, M; van Alphen, R J; Polée, M B; Muller, E W; van der Velden, A M T; van Voorthuizen, T; Koopman, M; Mol, L; van Werkhoven, E; Punt, C J A

    2017-04-05

    Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is a common side effect of capecitabine. S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine with comparable efficacy to capecitabine in gastrointestinal cancers but associated with a lower incidence of HFS in Asian patients. This study compares the incidence of HFS between S-1 and capecitabine as first-line treatment in Western metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients.

  7. On the autorotation of animal wings.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Martín-Alcántara, Antonio; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon; Dudley, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Botanical samaras spin about their centre of mass and create vertical aerodynamic forces which slow their rate of descent. Descending autorotation of animal wings, however, has never been documented. We report here that isolated wings from Anna's hummingbirds, and also from 10 species of insects, can stably autorotate and achieve descent speeds and aerodynamic performance comparable to those of samaras. A hummingbird wing loaded at its base with the equivalent of 50% of the bird's body mass descended only twice as fast as an unloaded wing, and rotated at frequencies similar to those of the wings in flapping flight. We found that even entire dead insects could stably autorotate depending on their wing postures. Feather removal trials showed no effect on descent velocity when the secondary feathers were removed from hummingbird wings. By contrast, partial removal of wing primaries substantially improved performance, except when only the outer primary was present. A scaling law for the aerodynamic performance of autorotating wings is well supported if the wing aspect ratio and the relative position of the spinning axis from the wing base are included. Autorotation is a useful and practical method that can be used to explore the aerodynamics of wing design.

  8. CFD Analysis of a T-38 Wing Fence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    the boundary layer is not the only mechanism of the fence. [16] 2.3.1 Wing Fence and Potential Flow. Dr. Karl Nickels’ book, “ Tailless Aircraft ...State University, 2001. 57 16. Nickel, Karl and Micahel Wohlfahrt. Tailless Aircraft . American Institude of Aeronautics and Astronautics,Inc., New...38 was modeled as a half aircraft with a symmetry plane down the center line and did not include the empennage. The engine inlet and exhaust were

  9. Probing the Physics of Narrow-line Regions in Active Galaxies. III. Accretion and Cocoon Shocks in the LINER NGC 1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Ho, I.-Ting; Dressel, Linda L.; Sutherland, Ralph; Kewley, Lisa; Davies, Rebecca; Hampton, Elise; Shastri, Prajval; Kharb, Preeti; Jose, Jessy; Bhatt, Harish; Ramya, S.; Scharwächter, Julia; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; James, Bethan; Juneau, Stéphanie; Srivastava, Shweta

    2015-03-01

    We present Wide Field Spectrograph integral field spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph spectroscopy for the low-ionization nuclear emission line region (LINER) galaxy NGC 1052. We infer the presence of a turbulent accretion flow forming a small-scale accretion disk. We find a large-scale outflow and ionization cone along the minor axis of the galaxy. Part of this outflow region is photoionized by the active galactic nucleus and shares properties with the extended narrow-line region of Seyfert galaxies, but the inner (R≲ 1.0″) accretion disk and the region around the radio jet appear shock excited. The emission-line properties can be modeled by a “double-shock” model in which the accretion flow first passes through an accretion shock in the presence of a hard X-ray radiation, and the accretion disk is then processed through a cocoon shock driven by the overpressure of the radio jets. This model explains the observation of two distinct densities (˜104 and ˜106 cm-3) and provides a good fit to the observed emission-line spectrum. We derive estimates for the velocities of the two shock components and their mixing fractions, the black hole mass, and the accretion rate needed to sustain the LINER emission and derive an estimate for the jet power. Our emission-line model is remarkably robust against variation of input parameters and hence offers a generic explanation for the excitation of LINER galaxies, including those of spiral type such as NGC 3031 (M81).

  10. The IRAM-30 m line survey of the Horsehead PDR. III. High abundance of complex (iso-)nitrile molecules in UV-illuminated gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratier, P.; Pety, J.; Guzmán, V.; Gerin, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Roueff, E.; Faure, A.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Complex (iso-)nitrile molecules, such as CH3CN and HC3N, are relatively easily detected in our Galaxy and in other galaxies. Aims: We aim at constraining their chemistry through observations of two positions in the Horsehead edge: the photo-dissociation region (PDR) and the dense, cold, and UV-shielded core just behind it. Methods: We systematically searched for lines of CH3CN, HC3N, C3N, and some of their isomers in our sensitive unbiased line survey at 3, 2, and 1 mm. We stacked the lines of C3N to improve the detectability of this species. We derived column densities and abundances through Bayesian analysis using a large velocity gradient radiative transfer model. Results: We report the first clear detection of CH3NC at millimeter wavelength. We detected 17 lines of CH3CN at the PDR and 6 at the dense core position, and we resolved its hyperfine structure for 3 lines. We detected 4 lines of HC3N, and C3N is clearly detected at the PDR position. We computed new electron collisional rate coefficients for CH3CN, andwe found that including electron excitation reduces the derived column density by 40% at the PDR position, where the electron density is 1-5 cm-3. While CH3CN is 30 times more abundant in the PDR (2.5 × 10-10) than in the dense core (8 × 10-12), HC3N has similar abundance at both positions (8 × 10-12). The isomeric ratio CH3NC/CH3CN is 0.15 ± 0.02. Conclusions: The significant amount of complex (iso-)nitrile molecule in the UV illuminated gas is puzzling as the photodissociation is expected to be efficient. This is all the more surprising in the case of CH3CN, which is 30 times more abundant in the PDR than in the dense core. In this case, pure gas phase chemistry cannot reproduce the amount of CH3CN observed in the UV-illuminated gas. We propose that CH3CN gas phase abundance is enhanced when ice mantles of grains are destroyed through photo-desorption or thermal-evaporation in PDRs, and through sputtering in shocks. Based on observations

  11. Bat flight with bad wings: is flight metabolism affected by damaged wings?

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christian C

    2013-04-15

    Infection of North American bats with the keratin-digesting fungus Geomyces destructans often results in holes and ruptures of wing membranes, yet it is unknown whether flight performance and metabolism of bats are altered by such injuries. I conducted flight experiments in a circular flight arena with Myotis albescens and M. nigricans individuals with an intact or ruptured trailing edge of one of the plagiopatagial membranes. In both species, individuals with damaged wings were lighter, had a higher aspect ratio (squared wing span divided by wing area) and an increased wing loading (weight divided by wing area) than conspecifics with intact wings. Bats with an asymmetric reduction of the wing area flew at similar speeds to conspecifics with intact wings but performed fewer flight manoeuvres. Individuals with damaged wings showed lower metabolic rates during flight than conspecifics with intact wings, even when controlling for body mass differences; the difference in mass-specific metabolic rate may be attributable to the lower number of flight manoeuvres (U-turns) by bats with damaged wings compared with conspecifics with intact wings. Possibly, bats compensated for an asymmetric reduction in wing area by lowering their body mass and avoiding flight manoeuvres. In conclusion, it may be that bats suffer from moderate wing damage not directly, by experiencing increased metabolic rate, but indirectly, by a reduced manoeuvrability and foraging success. This could impede a bat's ability to gain sufficient body mass before hibernation.

  12. Active Flexible Wing (AFW) Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    copy of zeach of the fbllowing records: AD B253477, XV-8A Flexible Win& Aerial Utility Vehicle, by H-. Kredit . January 1964, 144 pages AD 13252433...Counterinsurgency Operations by R.A. Wise, Feb 0965, 74 pages - AD 461202. XV-8A Flexible Wing Aerial Utility Vehicle, H. Kredit , Feb. 1965. 100 pages _-AD

  13. [Winged scapula in lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Rausch, V; Königshausen, M; Gessmann, J; Schildhauer, T A; Seybold, D

    2016-06-01

    Here we present the case of a young patient with one-sided winged scapula and lyme borreliosis. This disease can be very delimitating in daily life. If non-operative treatment fails, dynamic or static stabilization of the scapula can be a therapeutic option.

  14. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  15. The Wings for Angels Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Liberty; McMillan, Ellen; Ayers, Ann

    2012-01-01

    How can the spirits of critically ill children be raised? Alexis Weisel (co-president of the Monarch High School National Art Honor Society, 2010-2011) had this question in mind when she initiated and developed the Wings for Angels Project after hearing about the Believe in Tomorrow (BIT) organization through her art teacher, Ellen McMillan. The…

  16. Wings: Women Entrepreneurs Take Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1997-01-01

    Women's Initiative Networking Groups (WINGS) provides low- and moderate-income women in Appalachian Kentucky with training in business skills, contacts, and other resources they need to succeed as entrepreneurs. The women form informal networks to share business know-how and support for small business startup and operations. The program plans to…

  17. FLEXIBLE WING INDIVIDUAL DROP GLIDER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The feasibility of the paraglider concept as a means of descent for individual airborne troops is presented. Full-scale 22-foot inflatable wings and...in an effort to achieve system reliability. The feasibility of using the paraglider as a means of controlled delivery of airborne paratroopers was successfully demonstrated.

  18. Wing Leading Edge Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Jerman, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    This is a slide presentation showing the Left Wing Leading Edge (WLE) heat damage observations: Heavy "slag" deposits on select RCC panels. Eroded and knife-edged RCC rib sections. Excessive overheating and slumping of carrier panel tiles. Missing or molten attachment bolts but intact bushing. Deposit mainly on "inside" RCC panel. Deposit on some fractured RCC surface

  19. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  20. The Wings for Angels Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Liberty; McMillan, Ellen; Ayers, Ann

    2012-01-01

    How can the spirits of critically ill children be raised? Alexis Weisel (co-president of the Monarch High School National Art Honor Society, 2010-2011) had this question in mind when she initiated and developed the Wings for Angels Project after hearing about the Believe in Tomorrow (BIT) organization through her art teacher, Ellen McMillan. The…

  1. Aerodynamic yawing moment characteristics of bird wings.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2005-06-21

    The aerodynamic yawing moments due to sideslip are considered for wings of birds. Reference is made to the experience with aircraft wings in order to identify features which are significant for the yawing moment characteristics. Thus, it can be shown that wing sweep, aspect ratio and lift coefficient have a great impact. Focus of the paper is on wing sweep which can considerably increase the yawing moment due to sideslip when compared with unswept wings. There are many birds the wings of which employ sweep. To show the effect of sweep for birds, the aerodynamic characteristics of a gull wing which is considered as a representative example are treated in detail. For this purpose, a sophisticated aerodynamic method is used to compute results of high precision. The yawing moments of the gull wing with respect to the sideslip angle and the lift coefficient are determined. They show a significant level of yaw stability which strongly increases with the lift coefficient. It is particularly high in the lift coefficient region of best gliding flight conditions. In order to make the effect of sweep more perspicuous, a modification of the gull wing employing no sweep is considered for comparison. It turns out that the unswept wing yields yawing moments which are substantially smaller than those of the original gull wing with sweep. Another feature significant for the yawing moment characteristics concerns the fact that sweep is at the outer part of bird wings. By considering the underlying physical mechanism, it is shown that this feature is most important for the efficiency of wing sweep. To sum up, wing sweep provides a primary contribution to the yawing moments. It may be concluded that this is an essential reason why there is sweep in bird wings.

  2. Survival in patients with class III idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension treated with first line oral bosentan compared with an historical cohort of patients started on intravenous epoprostenol

    PubMed Central

    Sitbon, O; McLaughlin, V; Badesch, D; Barst, R; Black, C; Galie, N; Humbert, M; Rainisio, M; Rubin, L; Simonneau, G

    2005-01-01

    Background: The oral dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan improves exercise capacity and delays clinical worsening in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, but its use could delay starting intravenous epoprostenol, a life saving treatment. Methods: Survival in patients with functional class III idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treated with bosentan in clinical trials was compared with historical data from similar patients treated with epoprostenol in the clinic. Statistical methods were used to adjust for possible underlying differences between the two groups. Results: Baseline factors for the 139 patients treated with bosentan and the 346 treated with epoprostenol suggested that the epoprostenol cohort had more severe disease—that is, a lower cardiac index (2.01 v 2.39 l/min/m2) and higher pressures and resistance. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates after 1 and 2 years were 97% and 91%, respectively, in the bosentan cohort and 91% and 84% in the epoprostenol cohort. Cox regression analyses adjusting for differences in baseline factors showed a greater probability of death in the epoprostenol cohort (hazard ratio 2.2 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.0) in the model adjusted for haemodynamics). Alternative regression analyses and analyses to adjust for different data collection dates gave consistently similar results. When matched cohorts of 83 patients each were selected, survival estimates were similar. In the bosentan cohort 87% and 75% of patients followed for 1 and 2 years, respectively, remained on monotherapy. Conclusions: No evidence was found to suggest that initial treatment with oral bosentan, followed by or with the addition of other treatment if needed, adversely affected the long term outcome compared with initial intravenous epoprostenol in patients with class III idiopathic PAH. PMID:16055621

  3. Broad Halpha Wing Formation in the Planetary Nebula IC 4997.

    PubMed

    Lee; Hyung

    2000-02-10

    The young and compact planetary nebula IC 4997 is known to exhibit very broad wings with a width exceeding 5000 km s-1 around Halpha. We propose that the broad wings are formed through Rayleigh-Raman scattering that involves atomic hydrogen, by which Lybeta photons with a velocity width of a few 102 km s-1 are converted to optical photons and fill the Halpha broad wing region. The conversion efficiency reaches 0.6 near the line center, where the scattering optical depth is much larger than 1, and rapidly decreases in the far wings. Assuming that close to the central star there exists an unresolved inner compact core of high density, nH approximately 109-1010 cm-3, we use the photoionization code "CLOUDY" to show that sufficient Lybeta photons for scattering are produced. Using a top-hat-incident profile for the Lybeta flux and a scattering region with a H i column density NHi=2x1020 cm-2 and a substantial covering factor, we perform a profile-fitting analysis in order to obtain a satisfactory fit to the observed flux. We briefly discuss the astrophysical implications of the Rayleigh-Raman processes in planetary nebulae and other emission objects.

  4. Steps toward determination of the size and structure of the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei. III - Further observations of NGC 5548 at optical wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Alloin, D.; Axon, D.; Balonek, T. J.; Bertram, R.; Boroson, T. A.; Christensen, J. A.; Clements, S. D.; Dietrich, M.; Elvis, M.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the second year of an intensive ground-based spectroscopic and photometric study of variability in the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 are reported in order to study the relationship between continuum and emission-line variability. Relative to the first year of the monitoring program, the nucleus of NGC 5548 was considerably fainter and the continuum variations slower during the second year, but the continuum H-beta cross-correlation results for the two years are nearly identical. The variations in the broad H-beta emission-line lag behind those in the continuum by somewhat less than 20 days, as concluded from the first year's data.

  5. Steps toward determination of the size and structure of the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei. III - Further observations of NGC 5548 at optical wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Alloin, D.; Axon, D.; Balonek, T. J.; Bertram, R.; Boroson, T. A.; Christensen, J. A.; Clements, S. D.; Dietrich, M.; Elvis, M.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the second year of an intensive ground-based spectroscopic and photometric study of variability in the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 are reported in order to study the relationship between continuum and emission-line variability. Relative to the first year of the monitoring program, the nucleus of NGC 5548 was considerably fainter and the continuum variations slower during the second year, but the continuum H-beta cross-correlation results for the two years are nearly identical. The variations in the broad H-beta emission-line lag behind those in the continuum by somewhat less than 20 days, as concluded from the first year's data.

  6. The formation of interstellar molecular lines in a turbulent velocity field with finite correlation length III. Spherical clouds in hydrostatic equilibrium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piehler, G.; Kegel, W. H.

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the formation of interstellar molecular lines in a turbulent velocity field with finite correlation length, extending previous work (Albrecht & Kegel 1987; Kegel et al. 1992) to isothermal spheres in hydrostatic equilibrium as cloud models with σ>>v_ therm _. For this we use the transformed generalized radiative transfer equation (Kegel et al. 1992). We concentrate our calculations on the CO-molecule with up to 12 energy levels. We give numerical results for models with T_kin_=50K, σ=3.9km/sec (σ/v_ therm _=22), and different values of the central H_2_ density and different values of the correlation length. As our results show, accounting for a velocity field with a finite correlation length affects the line profiles, the center-to-limb variation, and the intensity ratios. We find that the higher transitions are more strongly affected than the J=1-0 transition.

  7. Formation of spectral lines in planetary atmospheres. III - The use of analytic scattering diagrams in computations of synthetic spectra for cloudy atmospheres.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    Results of some comparisons that have been made of line profiles and equivalent widths computed from atmospheric models where the scattering has been represented by the Mie theory and a simple analytic expression, the Heyney-Greenstein function. These results show that the spectroscopic features for these models are indistinguishable and demonstrate the value of using this simple analytic function in terms of the great saving in computer time when computing synthetic spectra for any cloudy planetary atmosphere.

  8. New aspects of absorption-line formation in intervening turbulent clouds - III. The inverse problem in the study of H+D profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, Sergei A.; Kegel, Wilhelm H.; Takahara, Fumio

    1999-02-01

    A new method, based on a reverse Monte Carlo technique and aimed at the inverse problem in the analysis of intergalactic (interstellar) H+D absorption profiles, is presented. We consider the process of line formation in media with a stochastic velocity field accounting for correlation effects (mesoturbulence). This approach generalizes the standard microturbulent approximation, which is commonly used to model the formation of absorption spectra in turbulent media. The method allows one to estimate, from an observed spectrum, both the physical parameters of the absorbing gas and an appropriate structure of the distribution of the velocity component parallel to the line of sight. The validity of the computational procedure is demonstrated using a series of synthetic spectra that emulate the up-to-date best quality data. The H+D Lyα, Lyβ and H I Ly-14 lines were fitted simultaneously. The confidence regions calculated for the `NH i-D/H' plane show that the difference between the recovered and adopted values does not exceed the 3σ level.

  9. Conceptual Study of Rotary-Wing Microrobotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-27

    MUMPs® 79) and Wing-T (MUMPs® 80). Shown to the right is a close-up of one of the Wing-T reticules . For each wing 5, 7.5, 10 and 12.5 μm hinge width...membrane primarily due to its adhesion properties to titanium [29-31]. MicroBat’s wings were fabricated using a 250-µm thick titanium-alloy...Figure 15b [49]. The layer structure of the MEMS wings consisted of 10 nm chromium for adhesion , 100 nm seed layer of nickel, and 10 µm

  10. F-8 oblique wing structural feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koltko, E.; Katz, A.; Bell, M. A.; Smith, W. D.; Lauridia, R.; Overstreet, C. T.; Klapprott, C.; Orr, T. F.; Jobe, C. L.; Wyatt, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of fitting a rotating oblique wing on an F-8 aircraft to produce a full scale manned prototype capable of operating in the transonic and supersonic speed range was investigated. The strength, aeroelasticity, and fatigue life of such a prototype are analyzed. Concepts are developed for a new wing, a pivot, a skewing mechanism, control systems that operate through the pivot, and a wing support assembly that attaches in the F-8 wing cavity. The modification of the two-place NTF-8A aircraft to the oblique wing configuration is discussed.

  11. Formation of Raman Scattering Wings around H alpha, H beta, and Pa alpha in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seok-Jun; Heo, Jeong-Eun; Di Mille, Francesco; Angeloni, Rodolfo; Palma, Tali; Lee, Hee-Won

    2015-12-01

    Powered by a supermassive black hole with an accretion disk, the spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are characterized by prominent emission lines including Balmer lines. The unification schemes of AGNs require the existence of a thick molecular torus that may hide the broad emission line region from the view of observers near the equatorial direction. In this configuration, one may expect that the far-UV radiation from the central engine can be Raman scattered by neutral hydrogen to reappear around Balmer and Paschen emission lines, which can be identified with broad wings. We produce Hα, Hβ, and Paα wings using a Monte Carlo technique to investigate their properties. The neutral scattering region is assumed to be a cylindrical torus specified by the inner and outer radii and the height. While the covering factor of the scattering region affects the overall strengths of the wings, the wing widths are primarily dependent on the neutral hydrogen column density {N}{{H} {{I}}} being roughly proportional to {N}{{H} {{I}}}1/2. In particular, with {N}{{H} {{I}}}={10}23 {{cm}}-2 the Hα wings typically show a width ∼ 2× {10}4 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We also find that Hα and Paα wing profiles are asymmetric with the red part stronger than the blue part and an opposite behavior is seen for Hβ wings.

  12. Second-line treatment of stage III/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pemetrexed in routine clinical practice: evaluation of performance status and health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Schuette, Wolfgang; Tesch, Hans; Büttner, Hartwig; Krause, Thomas; Soldatenkova, Victoria; Stoffregen, Clemens

    2012-01-13

    Second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) improves overall survival. There is a lack of data regarding the impact on patients' overall health condition. This prospective, non-interventional study evaluated performance status (PS) and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) during second-line pemetrexed treatment in routine clinical practice. Stage III/IV NSCLC patients who initiated second-line pemetrexed (standard vitamin and dexamethasone supplementation) were observed for a maximum of 9 treatment cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate the proportion of patients achieving improvement of Karnofsky Index (KI) of ≥ 10% (absolute) or maintaining KI ≥ 80% after the second treatment cycle ("KI benefit response"). HR-QoL was self-rated using the EuroQoL-5D questionnaire (EQ-5D). Factors potentially associated with KI benefit response were evaluated using logistic regression models. Of 521 eligible patients (73.5% Stage IV, median age 66.3 yrs, 36.1% ≥ 70 yrs, 62.0% with KI ≥ 80%), 471 (90.4%) completed at least 2 treatment cycles. 58.0% (95%CI 53.6%;62.2%) achieved KI benefit response after the second cycle. Patients with baseline KI ≥ 80%, no Grade 3/4 toxicities during the first 2 cycles, or combination regimen as prior first-line therapy were more likely to achieve a KI benefit response. EQ-5D scores improved over time. Grade 3/4 toxicities were reported in 23.8% of patients (mainly fatigue/asthenia 15.9%, neutropenia 8.7%). In this large prospective, non-interventional study of second-line pemetrexed treatment in patients with advanced NSCLC, including 36% elderly patients ( ≥ 70 years), physician-rated PS and self-rated HR-QoL were maintained or improved in the majority of patients. Registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00540241) on October 4, 2007.

  13. Rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felker, F. F.; Light, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover is described. The experimental investigation consisted of both a large-scale and small-scale test. A 0.658-scale, V-22 rotor and wing was used in the large-scale test. Wind download, wing surface pressure, rotor performance, and rotor downwash data from the large-scale test are presented. A small-scale experiment was conducted to determine how changes in the rotor/wing geometry affected the aerodynamic interactions. These geometry variations included the distance between the rotor and wing, wing incidence angle, and configurations both with the rotor axis at the tip of the wing (tilt rotor configuration) and with the rotor axis at the center of the wing (compound helicopter configuration). A wing with boundary-layer control was also tested to evaluate the effect of leading and trailing edge upper surface blowing on the wing download. A computationally efficient, semi-empirical theory was developed to predict the download on the wing. Finally, correlations between the theoretical predictions and test data are presented.

  14. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-01-13

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Additional Info:  Data Format: HDF-EOS or Big Endian/IEEE Binary SCAR-B Block:  ...

  15. Topology of Vortex-Wing Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Chris; Rockwell, Donald

    2016-11-01

    Aircraft flying together in an echelon or V formation experience aerodynamic advantages. Impingement of the tip vortex from the leader (upstream) wing on the follower wing can yield an increase of lift to drag ratio. This enhancement is known to depend on the location of vortex impingement on the follower wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine streamline topology in successive crossflow planes, which characterize the streamwise evolution of the vortex structure along the chord of the follower wing and into its wake. Different modes of vortex-follower wing interaction are created by varying both the spanwise and vertical locations of the leader wing. These modes are defined by differences in the number and locations of critical points of the flow topology, and involve bifurcation, attenuation, and mutual induction. The bifurcation and attenuation modes decrease the strength of the tip vortex from the follower wing. In contrast, the mutual induction mode increases the strength of the follower tip vortex. AFOSR.

  16. Locomotion by Tandem and Parallel Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanida, Yoshimichi

    A two-dimensional analysis was carried out on the locomotion by tandem and parallel wings in relation to the free flight of dragonflies and beetles, remarking the mutual interference between fore and hind wings. The results obtained are summarized as follows: In the case of tandem wings, (1)High thrust and propulsive efficiency can be achieved when the forewing oscillates with a definite phase lag behind the hindwing, as in the case of real dragonflies, (2)Somewhat smaller amplitude of hindwing leads to optimum condition for work sharing of two wings, (3)The hard forewing does not serve for the thrust and propulsive efficiency, whereas the hard hindwing does for the augmentation of them; In the case of parallel wings, (4)The hard wing placed near the soft wing acts nearly as an infinite plate, as for the ground effect, increasing both thrust and propulsive efficiency.

  17. Nano-mechanical properties and structural of a 3D-printed biodegradable biomimetic micro air vehicle wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salami, E.; Montazer, E.; Ward, T. A.; Ganesan, P. B.

    2017-06-01

    The biomimetic micro air vehicles (BMAV) are unmanned, micro-scaled aircraft that are bio-inspired from flying organisms to achieve the lift and thrust by flapping their wings. The main objectives of this study are to design a BMAV wing (inspired from the dragonfly) and analyse its nano-mechanical properties. In order to gain insights into the flight mechanics of dragonfly, reverse engineering methods were used to establish three-dimensional geometrical models of the dragonfly wings, so we can make a comparative analysis. Then mechanical test of the real dragonfly wings was performed to provide experimental parameter values for mechanical models in terms of nano-hardness and elastic modulus. The mechanical properties of wings were measured by nanoindentre. Finally, a simplified model was designed and the dragonfly-like wing frame structure was bio-mimicked and fabricated using a 3D printer. Then mechanical test of the BMAV wings was performed to analyse and compare the wings under a variety of simplified load regimes that are concentrated force, uniform line-load and a torque. This work opened up the possibility towards developing an engineering basis for the biomimetic design of BMAV wings.

  18. Biotransformation of Two-Line Silica-Ferrihydrite by a Dissimilatory Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium: Formation of Carbonate Green Rust in the Presence of Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kennedy, David W.

    2004-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of two Si-ferrihydrite (0.01 and 0.05 mole% Si) coprecipiates by Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32, was investigated in 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid-buffered media (pH ~7) with lactate as the electron donor. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (electron shuttle) that stimulates respiration was present in the media. Experiments were performed without and with PO43- (ranging from 1 to 20 mmol/L in media containing 50 mmol/L Fe). Our objectives were to define the combined effects of SiO44- and PO43- on the bioreducibility and biomineralization of ferrihydrites under anoxic conditions. Iron reduction was measured as a function of time, solids were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, and aqueous solutions were analyzed for Si, P, Cl- and inorganic carbon. Both of the ferrihydrites were rapidly reduced regardless of the Si content. Si concentration had no effect on the reduction rate or mineralization products. Magnetite was formed in the absence of PO43- whereas carbonate green rust GR(CO32-) ([FeII(6-x)FeIIIx(OH)12]x+(CO32-)0.5x.yH2O) and vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2.8H2O], were formed when PO43- was present. GR(CO32-) dominated as a mineral product in samples with < 4 mmol/L PO43-. The Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio of GR(CO32-) varied with PO43- concentration; it was 2 in the 1 mmol/L PO43- and approached 1 in the 4- and 10-mmol/L PO43- samples. GR appeared to form by solid-state transformation of ferrihydrite. Medium PO43- concentration dictated the mechanism of transformation. In 1 mmol/L PO43- media, an intermediate Fe(II)/Fe(III) phase with structural Fe(II), which we tentatively assigned to a protomagnetite phase, slowly transformed to GR with time. In contrast, in medium with >4 mmol/L PO43-, a residual ferrihydrite with sorbed Fe2+ phase transformed to GR. Despite similar chemistries, PO43- was shown to have a profound effect on ferrihydrite biotransformations while that of SiO44- was minimal.

  19. Biotransformation of two-line silica-ferrihydrite by a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium: formation of carbonate green rust in the presence of phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.; Kennedy, David W.

    2004-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of two Si-ferrihydrite coprecipitates (1 and 5 mole % Si) by Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32, was investigated in 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid-buffered media (pH ˜7) with lactate as the electron donor. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, an electron shuttle, was present in the media. Experiments were performed without and with PO 43- (P) (1 to 20 mmol/L) in media containing 50 mmol/L Fe. Our objectives were to define the combined effects of SiO 44- (Si) and P on the bioreducibility and biomineralization of ferrihydrites under anoxic conditions. Iron reduction was measured as a function of time, solids were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy, and aqueous solutions were analyzed for Si, P, Cl - and inorganic carbon. Both of the ferrihydrites were rapidly reduced regardless of the Si and P content. Si concentration had no effect on the reduction rate or mineralization products. Magnetite was formed in the absence of P whereas carbonate green rust GR(CO 32-) ([Fe (6-x)IIFe IIIx(OH) 12] x+(CO 32-) 0.5x · yH 2O) and vivianite [Fe 3(PO 4) 2 · 8H 2O], were formed when P was present. GR(CO 32-) dominated as a mineral product in samples with <4 mmol/L P. The Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio of GR(CO 32-) varied with P concentration; the ratio was 2 in 1 mmol/L P and approached 1 with 4- and 10 mmol/L P. Green rust appeared to form by solid-state transformation of ferrihydrite. Media P and Si concentration dictated the mechanism of transformation. In the 1 mole % Si coprecipitate with 1 mmol/L P, an intermediate Fe(II)/Fe(III) phase with structural Fe(II) slowly transformed to GR with time. In contrast, when ferrihydrite contained more Si (5 mole %) and/or contained higher P (4 mmol/L), sorbed Fe(II) and residual ferrihydrite together transformed to GR. Despite similar chemistries, P was shown to have a profound effect on extent of ferrihydrite reduction and biotransformations while that of Si was minimal.

  20. An experimental investigation of reducing advanced turboprop cabin noise by wing shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to determine if wing shielding could reduce the noise impacting the fuselage of an advanced turboprop airplane. Four wings were tested behind two eight-bladed propeller models. Significant shielding of the propeller noise was observed and a particular wing-propeller geometry was identified to provide the most shielding. Specifically, an up-inboard rotation would be needed for a low-wing airplane and a down-inboard rotation for a high-wing airplane. As the axial Mach number was increased, the position where the shielding starts moved farther downstream. This shift in the start of shielding was roughly a straight line with respect to Mach number between M = 0.7 and M = 0.8. At M = 0.85 the start of shielding does not shift any farther downstream. A simple barrier noise-reduction model gave the same trends with transducer positions as did the data, and, if corrected for Mach number shift, the model might be used to provide estimates of the wing shielding. Besides providing a barrier to the noise reaching the shielded area, the wing also reflects some of the noise back onto the unshielded area. This can make the noise difference between the unshielded and shielded areas of the fuselage larger than would be expected by simple wind shielding.

  1. It took two decades for private payor contracts to erode the bottom line: plan on a 2+ year comeback-here's how, Part III.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Penny

    2008-01-01

    This third part of a payor-contracting series focuses on the methods most payors utilize to create their reimbursement schedules. This article explores the world of Medicare RBRVS, RVUs, and even the rate-reducing budget neutrality adjuster with pointers on determining the best year of Medicare upon which to base your practice's next reimbursement rates. It tells you how to estimate the effects of a new schedule on the bottom line and by procedure, and provides a hint of contract language that needs to be modified to protect your rates--getting you ready for next issue's Part IV, in which far more contract language will be addressed.

  2. Experimental optimization of wing shape for a hummingbird-like flapping wing micro air vehicle.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yanghai; Karásek, Matěj; Lalami, Mohamed Esseghir; Preumont, André

    2017-03-06

    Flapping wing micro air vehicles (MAVs) take inspiration from natural fliers, such as insects and hummingbirds. Existing designs manage to mimic the wing motion of natural fliers to a certain extent; nevertheless, differences will always exist due to completely different building blocks of biological and man-made systems. The same holds true for the design of the wings themselves, as biological and engineering materials differ significantly. This paper presents results of experimental optimization of wing shape of a flexible wing for a hummingbird-sized flapping wing MAV. During the experiments we varied the wing 'slackness' (defined by a camber angle), the wing shape (determined by the aspect and taper ratios) and the surface area. Apart from the generated lift, we also evaluated the overall power efficiency of the flapping wing MAV achieved with the various wing design. The results indicate that especially the camber angle and aspect ratio have a critical impact on the force production and efficiency. The best performance was obtained with a wing of trapezoidal shape with a straight leading edge and an aspect ratio of 9.3, both parameters being very similar to a typical hummingbird wing. Finally, the wing performance was demonstrated by a lift-off of a 17.2 g flapping wing robot.

  3. Wing spar stress charts and wing truss proportions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1926-01-01

    In order to simplify the calculation of beams continuous over three supports, a series of charts have been calculated giving the bending moments at all the critical points and the reactions at all supports for such members. Using these charts as a basis, calculations of equivalent bending moments, representing the total stresses acting in two bay-wing trusses of proportions varying over a wide range, have been determined, both with and without allowance for column effect. This leads finally to the determination of the best proportions for any particular truss or the best strut locations in any particular airplane. The ideal proportions are found to vary with the thickness of the wing section used, the aspect ratio, and the ratio of gap to chord.

  4. Spinning Characteristics of Wings I : Rectangular Clark Y Monoplane Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamber, M J; Zimmerman, C H

    1936-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel tests of a rectangular Clark Y wing was made with the NACA spinning balance as part of a general program of research on airplane spinning. All six components of the aerodynamic force and moment were measured throughout the range of angles of attack, angles of sideslip, and values omega b/2v likely to be attained by a spinning airplane; the results were reduced to coefficient form. It is concluded that a conventional monoplane with a rectangular Clark y wing can be made to attain spinning equilibrium throughout a wide range of angles of attack but that provision of a yawing moment coefficient of -0.02 (against the spin) by the tail, fuselage, and interferences will insure against attainment of equilibrium in a steady spin.

  5. STUDIES OF NGC 6720 WITH CALIBRATED HST/WFC3 EMISSION-LINE FILTER IMAGES. III. TANGENTIAL MOTIONS USING ASTRODRIZZLE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, C. R.; Ferland, G. J.; Henney, W. J.; Peimbert, M.

    2013-06-01

    We have been able to compare with astrometric precision AstroDrizzle processed images of NGC 6720 (the Ring Nebula) made using two cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope. The time difference of the observations was 12.925 yr. This large time base allowed the determination of tangential velocities of features within this classic planetary nebula. Individual features were measured in [N II] images as were the dark knots seen in silhouette against background nebular [O III] emission. An image magnification and matching technique was also used to test the accuracy of the usual assumption of homologous expansion. We found that homologous expansion does apply, but the rate of expansion is greater along the major axis of the nebula, which is intrinsically larger than the minor axis. We find that the dark knots expand more slowly than the nebular gas, that the distance to the nebula is 720 pc {+-}30%, and that the dynamic age of the Ring Nebula is about 4000 yr. The dynamic age is in agreement with the position of the central star on theoretical curves for stars collapsing from the peak of the asymptotic giant branch to being white dwarfs.

  6. Small interfering RNAs expressed from a Pol III promoter suppress the EWS/Fli-1 transcript in an Ewing sarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Dohjima, Taikoh; Lee, Nan Sook; Li, Haitang; Ohno, Takatoshi; Rossi, John J

    2003-06-01

    The EWS/Fli-1 fusion gene encodes an oncogenic fusion protein. The fusion is a product of the translocation t(11;22) (q24;q12), which is detected in 85% of Ewing sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor cells. Utilizing intracellularly expressed 21- to 23-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the EWS/Fli-1 fusion transcript in an Ewing sarcoma cell line, we achieved a greater than 80% reduction in the EWS/Fli-1 transcript. The reduction in transcript levels was accompanied by growth inhibition of an Ewing cell line. In addition to quantitating the reduction of the fusion transcript, we carefully monitored reduction of the endogenous EWS and Fli-1 mRNAs as well. One of the two siRNAs targeted to the fusion transcript also partially downregulated the Fli-1 mRNA, further potentiating the growth inhibition. These results highlight both the power of siRNAs and the potential side reactions that need to be carefully monitored. In addition, these results provide the first demonstration of expressed siRNAs downregulating an oncogenic fusion transcript. The results and observations from these studies should prove useful in targeting other fusion transcripts characteristic of sarcomas and erythroleukemias.

  7. A search for Low Surface Brightness galaxies in the near-infrared. III. Nançay H I line observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier Ragaigne, D.; van Driel, W.; Schneider, S. E.; Balkowski, C.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2003-09-01

    A total of 334 Low Surface Brightness galaxies detected in the 2MASS all-sky near-infrared survey have been observed in the 21 cm H I line using the Nançay telescope. All have a Ks-band mean central surface brightness, measured within a 5'' radius, fainter than 18 mag arcsec-2 and a Ks-band isophotal radius at the 20 mag arcsec-2 level larger than 20''. We present global H I line parameters for the 171 clearly detected objects and the 23 marginal detections, as well as upper limits for the undetected objects. The 171 clear detections comprise 50 previously uncatalogued objects and 41 objects with a PGC entry only. Tables 3-5 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/408/465 Figures 1 and 2 are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  8. Biomarker analysis of the MITO2 phase III trial of first-line treatment in ovarian cancer: predictive value of DNA-PK and phosphorylated ACC.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Francesco; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Indraccolo, Stefano; Signoriello, Simona; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Esposito, Franca; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Franco, Renato; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Sonego, Maura; Zulato, Elisabetta; Zannoni, Gian F; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Scambia, Giovanni; Sorio, Roberto; Savarese, Antonella; Breda, Enrico; Scollo, Paolo; Ferro, Antonella; Tamberi, Stefano; Febbraro, Antonio; Natale, Donato; Di Maio, Massimo; Califano, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Lorusso, Domenica; Canevari, Silvana; Losito, Simona; Gallo, Ciro; Pignata, Sandro

    2016-11-08

    No biomarker is available to predict prognosis of patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC) and guide the choice of chemotherapy. We performed a prospective-retrospective biomarker study within the MITO2 trial on the treatment of AOC. MITO2 is a randomised multicentre phase 3 trial conducted with 820 AOC patients assigned carboplatin/paclitaxel (carboplatin: AUC5, paclitaxel: 175 mg/m², every 3 weeks for 6 cycles) or carboplatin/PLD-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (carboplatin: AUC5, PLD: 30 mg/m², every 3 weeks for 6 cycles) as first line treatment. Sixteen biomarkers (pathways of adhesion/invasion, apoptosis, transcription regulation, metabolism, and DNA repair) were studied in 229 patients, in a tissue microarray. Progression-free and overall survival were analysed with multivariable Cox model. After 72 months median follow-up, 594 progressions and 426 deaths were reported; there was no significant difference between the two arms in the whole trial. No biomarker had significant prognostic value. Statistically significant interactions with treatment were found for DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and phosphorylated acetyl-coenzymeA carboxylase (pACC), both predicting worse outcome for patients receiving carboplatin/paclitaxel. These data show that in presence of DNA-PK or pACC overexpression, carboplatin/paclitaxel might be less effective than carboplatin/PLD as first line treatment of ovarian cancer patients. Further validation of these findings is warranted.

  9. FTS Measurements of Submillimeter-Wave Atmospheric Opacity at Pampa la Bola: III. Water Vapor, Liquid Water, and 183GHz Water Vapor Line Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Matsuo, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    Further analysis has been made on the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave (100-1600GHz or 3mm-188 μm) atmospheric opacity data taken with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at Pampa la Bola, 4800 m above the sea level in northern Chile, which is the site of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Time-sequence plots of millimeter- and submillimeter-wave opacities show similar variations to each other, except for during the periods with liquid water (fog or clouds) in the atmosphere. Using millimeter- and submillimeter-wave opacity correlations under two conditions, which are affected and not affected by liquid water, we succeeded to separate the measured opacity into water vapor and liquid water opacity components. The water vapor opacity shows a good correlation with the 183GHz water vapor line opacity, which is also covered in the measured spectra. On the other hand, the liquid water opacity and the 183GHz line opacity show no correlation. S ince only the water vapor component is expected to affect the phase of interferometers significantly, and the submillimeter-wave opacity is less affected by the liquid water component, it may be possible to use the submillimeter-wave opacity for a phase correction of submillimeter interferometers.

  10. Biomarker analysis of the MITO2 phase III trial of first-line treatment in ovarian cancer: predictive value of DNA-PK and phosphorylated ACC

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Francesco; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Indraccolo, Stefano; Signoriello, Simona; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Esposito, Franca; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Franco, Renato; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Sonego, Maura; Zulato, Elisabetta; Zannoni, Gian F.; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Scambia, Giovanni; Sorio, Roberto; Savarese, Antonella; Breda, Enrico; Scollo, Paolo; Ferro, Antonella; Tamberi, Stefano; Febbraro, Antonio; Natale, Donato; Maio, Massimo Di; Califano, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Lorusso, Domenica; Canevari, Silvana; Losito, Simona; Gallo, Ciro; Pignata, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Background No biomarker is available to predict prognosis of patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC) and guide the choice of chemotherapy. We performed a prospective-retrospective biomarker study within the MITO2 trial on the treatment of AOC. Patients and methods: MITO2 is a randomised multicentre phase 3 trial conducted with 820 AOC patients assigned carboplatin/paclitaxel (carboplatin: AUC5, paclitaxel: 175 mg/m², every 3 weeks for 6 cycles) or carboplatin/PLD-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (carboplatin: AUC5, PLD: 30 mg/m², every 3 weeks for 6 cycles) as first line treatment. Sixteen biomarkers (pathways of adhesion/invasion, apoptosis, transcription regulation, metabolism, and DNA repair) were studied in 229 patients, in a tissue microarray. Progression-free and overall survival were analysed with multivariable Cox model. Results After 72 months median follow-up, 594 progressions and 426 deaths were reported; there was no significant difference between the two arms in the whole trial. No biomarker had significant prognostic value. Statistically significant interactions with treatment were found for DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and phosphorylated acetyl-coenzymeA carboxylase (pACC), both predicting worse outcome for patients receiving carboplatin/paclitaxel. Conclusion These data show that in presence of DNA-PK or pACC overexpression, carboplatin/paclitaxel might be less effective than carboplatin/PLD as first line treatment of ovarian cancer patients. Further validation of these findings is warranted. PMID:27655643

  11. On-line speciation and determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in drinking and waste water samples by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sarica, Deniz Yurtsever; Türker, A Rehber; Erol, Esra

    2006-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and selective on-line method for the speciation and determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion-pairing HPLC coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is described. The composition of the mobile phase has been optimized for better separation. The effects of column temperature, volume of injection loop, fuel flow rate of FAAS, and nebulizer suction rate of FAAS have also been investigated. Separation is accomplished in almost 2.5 min on a 25 cm length C18 column at 40 degrees C. The selectivity of the method has been established by investigating the effect of interfering elements on chromium determination. The detection limit (3sigma) achieved by the method was calculated as 3.7 ng/mL for Cr(III) and 2.0 ng/mL for Cr(VI). The proposed method has been validated by analyzing certified reference material (BCR 544) and successfully applied to the analysis of drinking water and wastewater samples with a relative error below 6%.

  12. Exposure-Response Analyses of Ramucirumab from Two Randomized, Phase III Trials of Second-line Treatment for Advanced Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Josep; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Muro, Kei; Van Cutsem, Eric; Oh, Sang Cheul; Bodoky, György; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Hironaka, Shuichi; Ajani, Jaffer A; Tomasek, Jiri; Safran, Howard; Chandrawansa, Kumari; Hsu, Yanzhi; Heathman, Michael; Khan, Azhar; Ni, Lan; Melemed, Allen S; Gao, Ling; Ferry, David; Fuchs, Charles S

    2017-10-01

    Ramucirumab is an IgG1 monoclonal antibody specific for the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. Ramucirumab, 8 mg/kg every 2 weeks, administered as monotherapy (REGARD) or in combination with paclitaxel (RAINBOW), was safe and effective in patients with previously treated advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. We evaluated exposure-efficacy and exposure-safety relationships of ramucirumab from two randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trials. Sparse pharmacokinetic samples were collected, and a population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted to predict ramucirumab minimum trough concentration at steady state (Cmin,ss). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the ramucirumab exposure (Cmin,ss)-efficacy relationship to overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate exposure-safety relationships. Analyses included 321 ramucirumab + paclitaxel and 335 placebo + paclitaxel patients from RAINBOW and 72 ramucirumab and 35 placebo patients from REGARD. Exposure-efficacy analysis showed ramucirumab Cmin,ss was a significant predictor of OS and PFS in both trials. Higher ramucirumab exposure was associated with longer OS and PFS. In RAINBOW, grade ≥3 hypertension, leukopenia, and neutropenia, but not febrile neutropenia, significantly correlated with Cmin,ss, with increased exposure leading to increased incidence. Exploratory exposure-response analyses suggest a positive relationship between efficacy and ramucirumab exposure with manageable toxicities at exposures generated from a dose of 8 mg/kg ramucirumab given every 2 weeks for patients with advanced gastric/GEJ cancer. These findings suggest an opportunity to further optimize benefit versus risk profiles of ramucirumab treatment in patients with gastric/GEJ cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2215-22. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Impact of Young Age on Treatment Efficacy and Safety in Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Patients From Nine First-Line Phase III Chemotherapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Charles D.; Bot, Brian M.; Thomas, David M.; Bleyer, Archie; Kohne, Claus-Henning; Seymour, Matthew T.; de Gramont, Aimery; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer predominantly occurs in the elderly, but approximately 5% of patients are 50 years old or younger. We sought to determine whether young age is prognostic, or whether it influences efficacy/toxicity of chemotherapy, in patients with advanced disease. Methods We analyzed individual data on 6,284 patients from nine phase III trials of advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC) that used fluorouracil-based single-agent and combination chemotherapy. End points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), response rate (RR), and grade 3 or worse adverse events. Stratified Cox and adjusted logistic-regression models were used to test for age effects and age-treatment interactions. Results A total of 793 patients (13%) were younger than 50 years old; 188 of these patients (3% of total patients) were younger than 40 years old. Grade 3 or worse nausea (10% v 7%; P = .01) was more common, and severe diarrhea (11% v 14%; P = .001) and neutropenia (23% v 26%; P < .001) were less common in young (younger than 50 years) than in older (older than 50 years) patients. Age was prognostic for PFS, with poorer outcomes occurring in those younger than 50 years (median, 6.0 v 7.5 months; hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .02), but it did not affect RR or OS. In the subset of monotherapy versus combination chemotherapy trials, the relative benefits of multiagent chemotherapy were similar for young and older patients. Results were comparable when utilizing an age cut point of 40 years. Conclusion Young age is modestly associated with poorer PFS but not OS or RR in treated patients with aCRC, and young patients have more nausea but less diarrhea and neutropenia with chemotherapy in general. Young versus older patients derive the same benefits from combination chemotherapy. Absent results of a clinical trial, standard combination chemotherapy approaches are appropriate for young patients with aCRC. PMID:21646604

  14. Analytic Lyman-alpha wing diagnostics and the chromospheric excitation balance in cool dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, K. G.

    1994-01-01

    I show that the Lyman alpha wings of cool dwarfs can be understood in terms of a very simple model, based on a simplified representation of the chromospheric hydrogen excitation balance and approximate analytic wing diagnostics in partial redistribution. Much of the complexity of the radiation transfer in the partially coherent and steeply temperature-sensitive Lyman alpha line is circumvented by this technique. The result is an expedient scheme for inverting the Lyman alpha wing profile to determine the characteristic free electron density and its gradient in the middle chromosphere. This represents an important new diagnostic for constraining chromospheric models and their radiative losses. I apply this diagnostic to the Lyman alpha wing profiles of the Sun and AU Mic and show that current instrumentation, most notably the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, is capable of providing the necessary data.

  15. H0LiCOW - III. Quantifying the effect of mass along the line of sight to the gravitational lens HE 0435-1223 through weighted galaxy counts★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Sluse, Dominique; Hilbert, Stefan; Wong, Kenneth C.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Suyu, Sherry H.; Collett, Thomas E.; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Koopmans, Leon V. E.

    2017-06-01

    Based on spectroscopy and multiband wide-field observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar HE 0435-1223, we determine the probability distribution function of the external convergence κext for this system. We measure the under/overdensity of the line of sight towards the lens system and compare it to the average line of sight throughout the Universe, determined by using the CFHTLenS (The Canada France Hawaii Lensing Survey) as a control field. Aiming to constrain κext as tightly as possible, we determine under/overdensities using various combinations of relevant informative weighting schemes for the galaxy counts, such as projected distance to the lens, redshift and stellar mass. We then convert the measured under/overdensities into a κext distribution, using ray-tracing through the Millennium Simulation. We explore several limiting magnitudes and apertures, and account for systematic and statistical uncertainties relevant to the quality of the observational data, which we further test through simulations. Our most robust estimate of κext has a median value κ^med_ext = 0.004 and a standard deviation σκ = 0.025. The measured σκ corresponds to 2.5 per cent relative uncertainty on the time delay distance, and hence the Hubble constant H0 inferred from this system. The median κ^med_ext value varies by ˜0.005 with the adopted aperture radius, limiting magnitude and weighting scheme, as long as the latter incorporates galaxy number counts, the projected distance to the main lens and a prior on the external shear obtained from mass modelling. This corresponds to just ˜0.5 per cent systematic impact on H0. The availability of a well-constrained κext makes HE 0435-1223 a valuable system for measuring cosmological parameters using strong gravitational lens time delays.

  16. Global variations in optical thickness of the atmosphere of Venus. III. Analysis of behavior of equivalent widths of CO2 lines for an inhomogeneous model atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, N. N.; Yanovitskij, E. G.

    A two-layer model of Venus atmosphere is considered. The upper layer is a gas-and-aerosol medium with a fixed lower boundary height (h = 50 km) above the planet's surface. The lower layer is a pure CO2 gas. The pressure and temperature in the layers are assumed to satisfy the polytrope equation. The observed variations in the equivalent widths of R(0) lines in the CO2 absorption bands λλ788.3 and 868.9 nm are studied within the context of this model. The observed scatter in the equivalent widths is shown to be explicable in the framework of the model of globally asymmetrical cloud layer on Venus proposed earlier by the authors. The optical thickness of the cloud layer is found in such a case to be τx = 34.4 for one hemisphere, while it is τn = 24.4 for the other hemisphere. The heights of the cloud layer upper boundary in this case are 68.4 and 75.8 km, respectively. The value τx/τn = 1.4 is in complete agreement with independent estimate obtained earlier from measurements of the integral brightness of the planet. Observed variations in the equivalent widths of R(0) lines of the CO2 absorption bands λλ782.0 and 1062.7 nm verify this estimate. Finally, variations in the height of the cloud layer upper boundary are in complete accord with observed scatter in the amount of polarization over the disk of Venus in the UV region. Further feasible observational tests of this effect are discussed.

  17. LBT observations of compact star-forming galaxies with extremely high [O III]/[O II] flux ratios: He I emission-line ratios as diagnostics of Lyman continuum leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Thuan, T. X.; Guseva, N. G.

    2017-10-01

    We present Large Binocular Telescope spectrophotometric observations of five low-redshift (z < 0.070) compact star-forming galaxies (CSFGs) with extremely high emission-line ratios O32 = [O III] λ5007/[O II] λ3727, ranging from 23 to 43. Galaxies with such high O32 are thought to be promising candidates for leaking large amounts of Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation and, at high redshifts, for contributing to the reionization of the Universe. The equivalent widths EW(H β) of the H β emission line in the studied galaxies are very high, ∼350-520 Å, indicating very young ages for the star formation bursts, <3 Myr. All galaxies are characterized by low oxygen abundances 12+logO/H = 7.46-7.79 and low masses M⋆ ∼ 106-107 M⊙, much lower than the M⋆ for known low-redshift LyC leaking galaxies, but probably more typical of the hypothetical population of low-luminosity dwarf LyC leakers at high redshifts. A broad H α emission line is detected in the spectra of all CSFGs, possibly related to expansion motions of supernova remnants. Such rapid ionized gas motions would facilitate the escape of the resonant Ly α emission from the galaxy. We show that a high O32 may not be a sufficient condition for LyC leakage and propose new diagnostics based on the He I λ3889/λ6678 and λ7065/λ6678 emission-line flux ratios. Using these diagnostics, we find that three CSFGs in our sample are likely to have density-bounded H II regions and are thus leaking large amounts of LyC radiation. The amount of leaking LyC radiation is probably much lower in the other two CSFGs.

  18. Wind Generator with Oscillating Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colidiuc, Alexandra; Galetuse, Stelian; Suatean, Bogdan

    2010-09-01

    The actual conditions of energy source distributions at the international level and the continuous increasing of all types of energy consumption lead to a new alternative source of fuel for keeping the environment clean. This paper "Wind Generator with Oscillating Wing" offers a new approach for a wind turbine and is based on the theoretical aerodynamic model. The main objective is to determinate the efficiency of this new kind of wind generator compared with some other types of wind turbines. Any energetic system which converts the free wind energy, is an advantage system. This wind turbine with oscillating wing is a model which is reducing mainly the costs for the outcome energy, compared with the actual energy costs.

  19. Swept wing ice accretion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Bidwell, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    An effort to develop a three-dimensional ice accretion modeling method is initiated. This first step toward creation of a complete aircraft icing simulation code builds on previously developed methods for calculating three-dimensional flowfields and particle trajectories combined with a two-dimensional ice accretion calculation along coordinate locations corresponding to streamlines. This work is intended as a demonstration of the types of calculations necessary to predict a three-dimensional ice accretion. Results of calculations using the 3D method for a MS-317 swept wing geometry are projected onto a 2D plane normal to the wing leading edge and compared to 2D results for the same geometry. These results indicate that the flowfield over the surface and the particle trajectories differed for the two calculations. This led to lower collection efficiencies, convective heat transfer coefficients, freezing fractions, and ultimately ice accumulation for the 3D calculation.

  20. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  1. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  2. Aerodynamic-structural study of canard wing, dual wing, and conventional wing systems for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selberg, B. P.; Cronin, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical aerodynamic-structural airplane configuration study was conducted to assess performance gains achievable through advanced design concepts. The mission specification was for 350 mph, range of 1500 st. mi., at altitudes between 30,000 and 40,000 ft. Two payload classes were studied - 1200 lb (6 passengers) and 2400 lb (12 passengers). The configurations analyzed included canard wings, closely coupled dual wings, swept forward - swept rearward wings, joined wings, and conventional wing tail arrangements. The results illustrate substantial performance gains possible with the dual wing configuration. These gains result from weight savings due to predicted structural efficiencies. The need for further studies of structural efficiencies for the various advanced configurations was highlighted.

  3. Genetic basis of wing morphogenesis in Drosophila: sexual dimorphism and non-allometric effects of shape variation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Drosophila wing represents a particularly appropriate model to investigate the developmental control of phenotypic variation. Previous studies which aimed to identify candidate genes for wing morphology demonstrated that the genetic basis of wing shape variation in D. melanogaster is composed of numerous genetic factors causing small, additive effects. In this study, we analyzed wing shape in males and females from 191 lines of D. melanogaster, homozygous for a single P-element insertion, using geometric morphometrics techniques. The analysis allowed us to identify known and novel candidate genes that may contribute to the expression of wing shape in each sex separately and to compare them to candidate genes affecting wing size which have been identified previously using the same lines. Results Our results indicate that more than 63% of induced mutations affected wing shape in one or both sexes, although only 33% showed significant differences in both males and females. The joint analysis of wing size and shape revealed that only 19% of the P-element insertions caused coincident effects on both components of wing form in one or both sexes. Further morphometrical analyses revealed that the intersection between veins showed the smallest displacements in the proximal region of the wing. Finally, we observed that mutations causing general deformations were more common than expected in both sexes whereas the opposite occurred with those generating local changes. For most of the 94 candidate genes identified, this seems to be the first record relating them with wing shape variation. Conclusions Our results support the idea that the genetic architecture of wing shape is complex with many different genes contributing to the trait in a sexually dimorphic manner. This polygenic basis, which is relatively independent from that of wing size, is composed of genes generally involved in development and/or metabolic functions, especially related to the regulation of

  4. The European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS) applied to pivotal phase III randomized-controlled trials of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in first-line for advanced non-small cell lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Remo, Andrea; Bonetti, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    To examine the magnitude of the clinical benefit from first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutations. Areas covered: The present evaluation was restricted to pivotal phase III RCTs in first-line for advanced NSCLC with activating EGFR-mutations. We have subsequently applied the European Society for Medical Oncology-Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS) to the above pivotal phase III RCTs, to derive a relative ranking of the magnitude of clinically meaningful benefit. Our study evaluated 8 phase III RCTs (including 1710 patients). The ESMO-MCBS reached high grade (grade 4) for all TKIs treatments with at least one phase III RCT for each TKI. Expert commentary: Combining pharmacological costs of drugs with the measure of efficacy, afatinib has the lowest difference in costs per month-PFS gained and a comparable high grade of magnitude of clinical benefit.

  5. Flapping Wing Flight Dynamic Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-22

    against those of Theodorsen [16], Garrick [17], Loewy [18], Issacs [19, 20], Greenberg [21], Wagner [22], and von Karman [23] as well as experimental...kinematics and this data was used to generate the nal equations of motion (added to the nonlinear equations already derived from the Newton -Euler...wings). The ight dynamic model is a six-degree-of-freedom set of dynamic equations ( Newton -Euler scheme) with translation described in the inertial

  6. Relative Loading on Biplane Wings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1933-01-01

    General, United States Army, Chief of Air Corps, War Department, Washington, D.C. HARRY F. GU;GGENHEIM, M.A., The American Ambassador, Habana, Cuba...MARVIN. ARTHUR B. COOK. HENRY C. PRATT. BENJAMIN D. FOULOIS. EDWARD P. WARNER. ERNEST J. KING. ORVILLE WRIGHT. CHARLES A. LINDBERGH. JOHN F. VICTORY...Fuchs and Hopf in chapter IV" of their uplper witngl, lower wing, and biplane, respectirely. book Aerodynamik (reference 4). l)enoting the tipper For the

  7. The Effects of Streamwise-Deflected Wing Tips on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Aspect Ratio-2 Triangular Wing, Body, and Tail Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted on a triangular wing and body combination to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics resulting from deflecting portions of the wing near the tips 900 to the wing surface about streamwise hinge lines. Experimental data were obtained for Mach numbers of 0.70, 1.30, 1.70, and 2.22 and for angles of attack ranging from -5 deg to +18 deg at sideslip angles of 0 deg and 5 deg. The results showed that the aerodynamic center shift experienced by the triangular wing and body combination as the Mach number was increased from subsonic to supersonic could be reduced by about 40 percent by deflecting the outboard 4 percent of the total area of each wing panel. Deflection about the same hinge line of additional inboard surfaces consisting of 2 percent of the total area of each wing panel resulted in a further reduction of the aerodynamic center travel of 10 percent. The resulting reductions in the stability were accompanied by increases in the drag due to lift and, for the case of the configuration with all surfaces deflected, in the minimum drag. The combined effects of reduced stability and increased drag of the untrimmed configuration on the trimmed lift-drag ratios were estimated from an analysis of the cases in which the wing-body combination with or without tips deflected was assumed to be controlled by a canard. The configurations with deflected surfaces had higher trimmed lift-drag ratios than the model with undeflected surfaces at Mach numbers up to about 1.70. Deflecting either the outboard surfaces or all of the surfaces caused the directional stability to be increased by increments that were approximately constant with increasing angle of attack at each Mach number. The effective dihedral was decreased at all angles of attack and Mach numbers when the surfaces were deflected.

  8. Effects of wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of a revolving insect wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Ryusuke; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Flexible wings of insects and bio-inspired micro air vehicles generally deform remarkably during flapping flight owing to aerodynamic and inertial forces, which is of highly nonlinear fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems. To elucidate the novel mechanisms associated with flexible wing aerodynamics in the low Reynolds number regime, we have built up a FSI model of a hawkmoth wing undergoing revolving and made an investigation on the effects of flexible wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of the revolving wing model. To take into account the characteristics of flapping wing kinematics we designed a kinematic model for the revolving wing in two-fold: acceleration and steady rotation, which are based on hovering wing kinematics of hawkmoth, Manduca sexta. Our results show that both aerodynamic and inertial forces demonstrate a pronounced increase during acceleration phase, which results in a significant wing deformation. While the aerodynamic force turns to reduce after the wing acceleration terminates due to the burst and detachment of leading-edge vortices (LEVs), the dynamic wing deformation seem to delay the burst of LEVs and hence to augment the aerodynamic force during and even after the acceleration. During the phase of steady rotation, the flexible wing model generates more vertical force at higher angles of attack (40°-60°) but less horizontal force than those of a rigid wing model. This is because the wing twist in spanwise owing to aerodynamic forces results in a reduction in the effective angle of attack at wing tip, which leads to enhancing the aerodynamics performance by increasing the vertical force while reducing the horizontal force. Moreover, our results point out the importance of the fluid-structure interaction in evaluating flexible wing aerodynamics: the wing deformation does play a significant role in enhancing the aerodynamic performances but works differently during acceleration and steady rotation, which is mainly induced by

  9. Wing-wake interaction reduces power consumption in insect tandem wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2009-05-01

    Insects are capable of a remarkable diversity of flight techniques. Dragonflies, in particular, are notable for their powerful aerial manoeuvres and endurance during prey catching or territory flights. While most insects such as flies, bees and wasps either reduced their hinds wings or mechanically coupled fore and hind wings, dragonflies have maintained two independent-controlled pairs of wings throughout their evolution. An extraordinary feature of dragonfly wing kinematics is wing phasing, the shift in flapping phase between the fore and hind wing periods. Wing phasing has previously been associated with an increase in thrust production, readiness for manoeuvrability and hunting performance. Recent studies have shown that wing phasing in tandem wings produces a twofold modulation in hind wing lift, but slightly reduces the maximum combined lift of fore and hind wings, compared to two wings flapping in isolation. Despite this disadvantage, however, wing phasing is effective in improving aerodynamic efficiency during flight by the removal of kinetic energy from the wake. Computational analyses demonstrate that this increase in flight efficiency may save up to 22% aerodynamic power expenditure compared to insects flapping only two wings. In terms of engineering, energetic benefits in four-wing flapping are of substantial interest in the field of biomimetic aircraft design, because the performance of man-made air vehicles is often limited by high-power expenditure rather than by lift production. This manuscript provides a summary on power expenditures and aerodynamic efficiency in flapping tandem wings by investigating wing phasing in a dynamically scaled robotic model of a hovering dragonfly.

  10. Wing-wake interaction reduces power consumption in insect tandem wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    Insects are capable of a remarkable diversity of flight techniques. Dragonflies, in particular, are notable for their powerful aerial manoeuvres and endurance during prey catching or territory flights. While most insects such as flies, bees and wasps either reduced their hinds wings or mechanically coupled fore and hind wings, dragonflies have maintained two independent-controlled pairs of wings throughout their evolution. An extraordinary feature of dragonfly wing kinematics is wing phasing, the shift in flapping phase between the fore and hind wing periods. Wing phasing has previously been associated with an increase in thrust production, readiness for manoeuvrability and hunting performance. Recent studies have shown that wing phasing in tandem wings produces a twofold modulation in hind wing lift, but slightly reduces the maximum combined lift of fore and hind wings, compared to two wings flapping in isolation. Despite this disadvantage, however, wing phasing is effective in improving aerodynamic efficiency during flight by the removal of kinetic energy from the wake. Computational analyses demonstrate that this increase in flight efficiency may save up to 22% aerodynamic power expenditure compared to insects flapping only two wings. In terms of engineering, energetic benefits in four-wing flapping are of substantial interest in the field of biomimetic aircraft design, because the performance of man-made air vehicles is often limited by high-power expenditure rather than by lift production. This manuscript provides a summary on power expenditures and aerodynamic efficiency in flapping tandem wings by investigating wing phasing in a dynamically scaled robotic model of a hovering dragonfly.

  11. Artificial insect wings of diverse morphology for flapping-wing micro air vehicles.

    PubMed

    Shang, J K; Combes, S A; Finio, B M; Wood, R J

    2009-09-01

    The development of flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs) demands a systematic exploration of the available design space to identify ways in which the unsteady mechanisms governing flapping-wing flight can best be utilized for producing optimal thrust or maneuverability. Mimicking the wing kinematics of biological flight requires examining the potential effects of wing morphology on flight performance, as wings may be specially adapted for flapping flight. For example, insect wings passively deform during flight, leading to instantaneous and potentially unpredictable changes in aerodynamic behavior. Previous studies have postulated various explanations for insect wing complexity, but there lacks a systematic approach for experimentally examining the functional significance of components of wing morphology, and for determining whether or not natural design principles can or should be used for MAVs. In this work, a novel fabrication process to create centimeter-scale wings of great complexity is introduced; via this process, a wing can be fabricated with a large range of desired mechanical and geometric characteristics. We demonstrate the versatility of the process through the creation of planar, insect-like wings with biomimetic venation patterns that approximate the mechanical properties of their natural counterparts under static loads. This process will provide a platform for studies investigating the effects of wing morphology on flight dynamics, which may lead to the design of highly maneuverable and efficient MAVs and insight into the functional morphology of natural wings.

  12. Flexible Wing Model for Structural Sizing and Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of a Strut-Braced Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.; Naghshineh, Amir H.; Sulaeman, Erwin; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a structural and aeroelastic model for wing sizing and weight calculation of a strut-braced wing. The wing weight is calculated using a newly developed structural weight analysis module considering the special nature of strut-braced wings. A specially developed aeroelastic model enables one to consider wing flexibility and spanload redistribution during in-flight maneuvers. The structural model uses a hexagonal wing-box featuring skin panels, stringers, and spar caps, whereas the aerodynamics part employs a linearized transonic vortex lattice method. Thus, the wing weight may be calculated from the rigid or flexible wing spanload. The calculations reveal the significant influence of the strut on the bending material weight of the wing. The use of a strut enables one to design a wing with thin airfoils without weight penalty. The strut also influences wing spanload and deformations. Weight savings are not only possible by calculation and iterative resizing of the wing structure according to the actual design loads. Moreover, as an advantage over the cantilever wing, employment of the strut twist moment for further load alleviation leads to increased savings in structural weight.

  13. BIOPLUME III

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BIOPLUME III is a two-dimensional finite difference model for simulating the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in groundwater due to the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation.

  14. Reynolds Number, Compressibility, and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on Delta-Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of Reynolds number, compressibility, and leading edge bluntness effects is presented for a 65 degree delta wing. The results of this study address both attached and vortex-flow aerodynamics and are based upon a unique data set obtained in the NASA-Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) for i) Reynolds numbers ranging from conventional wind-tunnel to flight values, ii) Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to transonic speeds, and iii) leading-edge bluntness values that span practical slender wing applications. The data were obtained so as to isolate the subject effects and they present many challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies.

  15. Randomized Phase III Trial of Irinotecan Plus Cisplatin Compared With Paclitaxel Plus Carboplatin As First-Line Chemotherapy for Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma: JGOG3017/GCIG Trial.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toru; Okamoto, Aikou; Enomoto, Takayuki; Hamano, Tetsutaro; Aotani, Eriko; Terao, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Nao; Mikami, Mikio; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Kato, Kiyoko; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Nishino, Koji; Nomura, Hiroyuki; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Pignata, Sandro; Alexandre, Jerome; Green, John; Isonishi, Seiji; Terauchi, Fumitoshi; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Aoki, Daisuke

    2016-08-20

    Clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a rare histologic subtype that demonstrates poor outcomes in epithelial ovarian cancer. The Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group conducted the first randomized phase III, CCC-specific clinical trial that compared irinotecan and cisplatin (CPT-P) with paclitaxel plus carboplatin (TC) in patients with CCC. Six hundred sixty-seven patients with stage I to IV CCC of the ovary were randomly assigned to receive irinotecan 60 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 plus cisplatin 60 mg/m(2) on day 1 (CPT-P group) every 4 weeks for six cycles or paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) plus carboplatin area under the curve 6.0 mg/mL/min on day 1 every 3 weeks for six cycles (TC group). The primary end point was progression-free survival. Secondary end points were overall survival, overall response rate, and adverse events. Six hundred nineteen patients were clinically and pathologically eligible for evaluation. With a median follow-up of 44.3 months, 2-year progression-free survival rates were 73.0% in the CPT-P group and 77.6% in TC group (hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.58; P = .85). Two-year overall survival rates were 85.5% with CPT-P and 87.4% with TC (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.61; one-sided P = .76). Grade 3/4 anorexia, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and febrile neutropenia occurred more frequently with CPT-P, whereas grade 3/4 leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, peripheral sensory neuropathy, and joint pain occurred more frequently with TC. No significant survival benefit was found for CPT-P. Both regimens were well tolerated, but the toxicity profiles differed significantly. Treatment with existing anticancer agents has limitations to improving the prognosis of CCC. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Evidence for an Inducible Repair-Recombination System in the Female Germ Line of Drosophila Melanogaster. III. Correlation between Reactivity Levels, Crossover Frequency and Repair Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Laurencon, A.; Gay, F.; Ducau, J.; Bregliano, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported evidence that the so-called reactivity level, a peculiar cellular state of oocytes that regulates the frequency of transposition of I factor, a LINE element-like retrotransposon, might be one manifestation of a DNA repair system. In this article, we report data showing that the reactivity level is correlated with the frequency of crossing over, at least on the X chromosome and on the pericentromeric region of the third chromosome. Moreover, a check for X-chromosome losses and recessive lethals produced after gamma irradiation in flies with different reactivity levels, but common genetic backgrounds, brings more precise evidence for the relationship between reactivity levels and DNA repair. Those results support the existence of a repair-recombination system whose efficiency is modulated by endogenous and environmental factors. The implications of this biological system in connecting genomic variability and environment may shed new lights on adaptative mechanisms. We propose to call it VAMOS for variability modulation system. PMID:9258678

  17. Constituents of Compositae plants III. Anti-tumor promoting effects and cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines of triterpene diols and triols from edible chrysanthemum flowers.

    PubMed

    Ukiya, Motohiko; Akihisa, Toshihiro; Tokuda, Harukuni; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Mukainaka, Teruo; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Yasukawa, Ken; Kasahara, Yoshimasa; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2002-03-08

    Fifteen pentacyclic triterpene diols and triols, consisting of: six taraxastanes, faradiol (1), heliantriol B0 (2), heliantriol C (3), 22alpha-methoxyfaradiol (4), arnidiol (5), and faradiol alpha-epoxide (6); five oleananes, maniladiol (7), erythrodiol (8), longispinogenin (9), coflodiol (10), and heliantriol A(1) (11); two ursanes, brein (12) and uvaol (13); and two lupanes, calenduladiol (14) and heliantriol B2 (15), isolated from the non-saponifiable lipid fraction of the edible flower extract of chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, in Raji cells as a primary screening test for anti-tumor-promoters. All of the compounds tested showed inhibitory effects against EBV-EA activation with potencies either comparable with or stronger than that of glycyrrhetic acid, a known natural anti-tumor-promoter. Evaluation of the cytotoxic activity of six compounds, 1-3 and 5-7, against human cancer cell lines revealed that compound 5 possesses a wide range of cytotoxicity, with GI50 values (concentration that yields 50% growth) of mostly less than 6 microM.

  18. Wing loading in 15 species of North American owls

    Treesearch

    David H. Johnson

    1997-01-01

    Information on wing morphology is important in understanding the mechanics and energetics of flight and in aspects related to reversed sexual size dimorphism in owls. I summarized wing span, wing area, wing loading, root box, and aspect ratio calculations from the available literature and from 113 owls examined in this study. Wing loading estimates for 15 species...

  19. Constraints on the wing morphology of pterosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Colin; Dyke, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Animals that fly must be able to do so over a huge range of aerodynamic conditions, determined by weather, wind speed and the nature of their environment. No single parameter can be used to determine—let alone measure—optimum flight performance as it relates to wing shape. Reconstructing the wings of the extinct pterosaurs has therefore proved especially problematic: these Mesozoic flying reptiles had a soft-tissue membranous flight surface that is rarely preserved in the fossil record. Here, we review basic mechanical and aerodynamic constraints that influenced the wing shape of pterosaurs, and, building on this, present a series of theoretical modelling results. These results allow us to predict the most likely wing shapes that could have been employed by these ancient reptiles, and further show that a combination of anterior sweep and a reflexed proximal wing section provides an aerodynamically balanced and efficient theoretical pterosaur wing shape, with clear benefits for their flight stability. PMID:21957137

  20. Rotor/Wing Interactions in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Derby, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Hover predictions of tiltrotor aircraft are hampered by the lack of accurate and computationally efficient models for rotor/wing interactional aerodynamics. This paper summarizes the development of an approximate, potential flow solution for the rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This analysis is based on actuator disk and vortex theory and the method of images. The analysis is applicable for out-of-ground-effect predictions. The analysis is particularly suited for aircraft preliminary design studies. Flow field predictions from this simple analytical model are validated against experimental data from previous studies. The paper concludes with an analytical assessment of the influence of rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This assessment examines the effect of rotor-to-wing offset distance, wing sweep, wing span, and flaperon incidence angle on tiltrotor inflow and performance.

  1. Constraints on the wing morphology of pterosaurs.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin; Dyke, Gareth

    2012-03-22

    Animals that fly must be able to do so over a huge range of aerodynamic conditions, determined by weather, wind speed and the nature of their environment. No single parameter can be used to determine-let alone measure-optimum flight performance as it relates to wing shape. Reconstructing the wings of the extinct pterosaurs has therefore proved especially problematic: these Mesozoic flying reptiles had a soft-tissue membranous flight surface that is rarely preserved in the fossil record. Here, we review basic mechanical and aerodynamic constraints that influenced the wing shape of pterosaurs, and, building on this, present a series of theoretical modelling results. These results allow us to predict the most likely wing shapes that could have been employed by these ancient reptiles, and further show that a combination of anterior sweep and a reflexed proximal wing section provides an aerodynamically balanced and efficient theoretical pterosaur wing shape, with clear benefits for their flight stability.

  2. Evaluation of installed performance of a wing-tip-mounted pusher turboprop on a semispan wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James C., Jr.; Bartlett, Glynn R.

    1987-01-01

    An exploratory investigation has been conducted at the Langley Research Center to determine the effect of a wing-tip-mounted pusher turboprop on the aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan wing. Tests were conducted on a semispan model with an upswept, untapered wing and an airdriven motor that powered an SR-2 high-speed propeller located on the tip of the wing as a pusher propeller. All tests were conducted at a Mach number of 0.70 over an angle-of-attack range from approximately -2 to 4 deg at a Reynolds number of 3.82 x 10 to the 6th based on the wing reference chord of 13 in. The data indicate that, as a result of locating the propeller behind the wing trailing edge at the wing tip in the crossflow of the wing-tip vortex, it is possible to improve propeller performance and simultaneously reduce the lift-induced drag.

  3. A Discrete-Vortex Method for Studying the Wing Rock of Delta Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainer, Thomas G.

    2002-01-01

    A discrete-vortex method is developed to investigate the wing rock problem associated with highly swept wings. The method uses two logarithmic vortices placed above the wing to represent the vortex flow field and uses boundary conditions based on conical flow, vortex rate of change of momentum, and other considerations to position the vortices and determine their strengths. A relationship based on the time analogy and conical-flow assumptions is used to determine the hysteretic positions of the vortices during roll oscillations. Static and dynamic vortex positions and wing rock amplitudes and frequencies calculated by using the method are generally in good agreement with available experimental data. The results verify that wing rock is caused by hysteretic deflections of the vortices and indicate that the stabilizing moments that limit wing rock amplitudes are the result of the one primary vortex moving outboard of the wing where it has little influence on the wing.

  4. Elements of the Wing Section Theory and of the Wing Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of the theory of wings and of wing sections which are of immediate practical value. They are proven and demonstrated by the use of the simple conceptions of kinetic energy and momentum only.

  5. Effect of wing flexibility on the experimental aerodynamic characteristics of an oblique wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, E. J.; Yee, S. C.

    1977-01-01

    A solid-aluminum oblique wing was designed to deflect considerably under load so as to relieve the asymmetric spanwise stalling that is characteristic of this type of wing by creating washout on the trailing wing panel and washin on the leading wing panel. Experimental forces, and pitching, rolling and yawing moments were measured with the wing mounted on a body of revolution. In order to vary the dynamic pressure, measurements were made at several unit Reynolds numbers, and at Mach numbers. The wing was investigated when unswept (at subsonic Mach numbers only) and when swept 45 deg, 50 deg, and 60 deg. The wing was straight tapered in planform, had an aspect ratio of 7.9 (based on the unswept span), and a profile with a maximum thickness of 4 percent chord. The results substantiate the concept that an oblique wing designed with the proper amount of flexibility self relieves itself of asymmetric spanwise stalling and the associated nonlinear moment curves.

  6. Hyper III on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III was a full-scale lifting-body remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) built at what was then the NASA Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the left or right of the initial reentry path.) The FRC added a small, deployable, skewed wing to compensate for the shape's extremely low glide ratio. Shop personnel built the 32-foot-long Hyper III and covered its tubular frame with dacron, aluminum, and fiberglass, for about $6,500. Hyper III employed the same '8-ball' attitude indicator developed for control-room use when flying the X-15, two model-airplane receivers to command the vehicle's hydraulic controls, and a telemetry system (surplus from the X-15 program) to transmit 12 channels of data to the ground not only for display and control but for data

  7. Hyper III on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III was a full-scale lifting-body remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) built at what was then the NASA Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the left or right of the initial reentry path.) The FRC added a small, deployable, skewed wing to compensate for the shape's extremely low glide ratio. Shop personnel built the 32-foot-long Hyper III and covered its tubular frame with dacron, aluminum, and fiberglass, for about $6,500. Hyper III employed the same '8-ball' attitude indicator developed for control-room use when flying the X-15, two model-airplane receivers to command the vehicle's hydraulic controls, and a telemetry system (surplus from the X-15 program) to transmit 12 channels of data to the ground not only for display and control but for data

  8. THE SPITZER c2d SURVEY OF WEAK-LINE T TAURI STARS. III. THE TRANSITION FROM PRIMORDIAL DISKS TO DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Cieza, Lucas; Koerner, David W.; Case, April; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Chapman, Nicholas; Padgett, Deborah L.; Brooke, Tim; Keller, James R.; MerIn, Bruno; Evans, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul; Sargent, Anneila; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Allen, Lori; Blake, Geoff; Mundy, Lee; Myers, Philip C.

    2010-12-01

    We present 3.6 to 70 {mu}m Spitzer photometry of 154 weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTSs) in the Chamaeleon, Lupus, Ophiuchus, and Taurus star formation regions, all of which are within 200 pc of the Sun. For a comparative study, we also include 33 classical T Tauri stars which are located in the same star-forming regions. Spitzer sensitivities allow us to robustly detect the photosphere in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8 {mu}m) and the 24 {mu}m MIPS band. In the 70 {mu}m MIPS band, we are able to detect dust emission brighter than roughly 40 times the photosphere. These observations represent the most sensitive WTTSs survey in the mid- to far-infrared to date and reveal the frequency of outer disks (r = 3-50 AU) around WTTSs. The 70 {mu}m photometry for half the c2d WTTSs sample (the on-cloud objects), which were not included in the earlier papers in this series, those of Padgett et al. and Cieza et al., are presented here for the first time. We find a disk frequency of 19% for on-cloud WTTSs, but just 5% for off-cloud WTTSs, similar to the value reported in the earlier works. WTTSs exhibit spectral energy distributions that are quite diverse, spanning the range from optically thick to optically thin disks. Most disks become more tenuous than L{sub disk}/L{sub *} = 2 x 10{sup -3} in 2 Myr and more tenuous than L{sub disk}/L{sub *} = 5 x 10{sup -4} in 4 Myr.

  9. The Spitzer c2d Survey of Weak-line T Tauri Stars. III. The Transition from Primordial Disks to Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Cieza, Lucas; Koerner, David W.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Padgett, Deborah L.; Case, April; Keller, James R.; Merín, Bruno; Evans, Neal J., II; Harvey, Paul; Sargent, Anneila; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Allen, Lori; Blake, Geoff; Brooke, Tim; Chapman, Nicholas; Mundy, Lee; Myers, Philip C.

    2010-12-01

    We present 3.6 to 70 μm Spitzer photometry of 154 weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTSs) in the Chamaeleon, Lupus, Ophiuchus, and Taurus star formation regions, all of which are within 200 pc of the Sun. For a comparative study, we also include 33 classical T Tauri stars which are located in the same star-forming regions. Spitzer sensitivities allow us to robustly detect the photosphere in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8 μm) and the 24 μm MIPS band. In the 70 μm MIPS band, we are able to detect dust emission brighter than roughly 40 times the photosphere. These observations represent the most sensitive WTTSs survey in the mid- to far-infrared to date and reveal the frequency of outer disks (r = 3-50 AU) around WTTSs. The 70 μm photometry for half the c2d WTTSs sample (the on-cloud objects), which were not included in the earlier papers in this series, those of Padgett et al. and Cieza et al., are presented here for the first time. We find a disk frequency of 19% for on-cloud WTTSs, but just 5% for off-cloud WTTSs, similar to the value reported in the earlier works. WTTSs exhibit spectral energy distributions that are quite diverse, spanning the range from optically thick to optically thin disks. Most disks become more tenuous than L disk/L * = 2 × 10-3 in 2 Myr and more tenuous than L disk/L * = 5 × 10-4 in 4 Myr.

  10. Continuous versus intermittent tamoxifen versus intermittent/alternated tamoxifen and medroxyprogesterone acetate as first line endocrine treatment in advanced breast cancer: an EORTC phase III study (10863).

    PubMed

    Beex, L; Rose, C; Mouridsen, H; Jassem, J; Nooij, M; Estape, J; Paridaens, R; Piccart, M; Gorlia, T; Lardenoije, S; Baila, L

    2006-12-01

    Continuous ligand depletion of endocrine responsive tumours may enhance resistance to therapy. Intermittent treatment with tamoxifen (T) was considered to mimic (incomplete) ligand depletion and reintroduction. Furthermore it was postulated that alternating tamoxifen with a non-cross resistant endocrine modality could (further) postpone hormone resistance. Postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer who did not progress after 4 months of first line T therapy were randomised to continue T (40 mg daily) or to 2 monthly intermittent T or intermittent/alternated T and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, 300 mg daily). At progression during break or during MPA, T should be reintroduced. Endpoints of the study were progression free survival (PFS), time to resistance to tamoxifen and overall survival (OS). Of 593 registered patients, 276 were randomised. After 8 years follow-up the median PFS for continuous T, intermittent T and intermittent/alternated T and MPA was 11.0 (8.1-15.2), 8.0 (6.2-12.4) and 10.8 (7.1-16.7) months, respectively (NS). Resistance to tamoxifen was established only in 84%, 70% and 55% of patients in the three treatment arms, respectively. The median times from randomisation to resistance to tamoxifen were 12.5 (9.1-21.1), 13.2 (8.8-19.8) and 24.0 (16.9-60.9) months, respectively (p<0.001), without translation in differences in survival times. Intermittent T or intermittent/alternated T and MPA had no impact on PFS or OS as compared with classical continuous T in patients with advanced breast cancer. Intermittent/alternated T and MPA resulted in prolonged time to resistance to T, but this might partly be due to bias by omittance of the proof of tamoxifen resistance in a high proportion of the patients in this treatment arm.

  11. Incompressible flutter characteristics of representative aircraft wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilts, C H

    1958-01-01

    This report gives the results of a detailed study of the flutter characteristics of four representative aircraft wings. This study was made using the electric-analog computer at the California Institute of Technology. During the course of this investigation eight important parameters of each wing were varied and, in addition, the effects of mass, inertia, pitching spring, and location of a concentrated mass were investigated for all four wings and at several sweepback angles.

  12. Aeroelastic Characteristics of a Circulation Control Wing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    the wing bending mode oscillating at the first cantilevered natural frequency. A first order explanation of the flutter is provided by two-dimensional...rigid body wing torsional deflections in response to the areodynamic pitching moments. Stall flutter conditions were encountered which involved only...con- siderations. It is shown that the wing stall flutter bcundaries may be established from the two-dimensioual analysis by proper scaling and by

  13. Omnidirectional and Controllable Wing Using Fluid Ejection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-22

    the air flow over the wing ’ ^ surfaces is directed internally within the fuselage. The tangential ejection of fluid outflow over Coanda edge...tangential ejection 2 outflow from a Coanda edge of a lift wing independently of its translation direction through an d ambient fluid so as...the ambient fluid. 6 SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION 7 In accordance with the present invention, a planform tvpe of wing is provided with a Coanda 8

  14. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Study for Folding Wing Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-29

    structural nonlinearities are stronger than aerodynamic nonlinearities for the cases studied. Aeroelasticity, morphing wings , folding wings , flutter...2004. 4Snyder, M., Frank, G., and Sanders, B., “Aeroelastic Analysis of a Morphing Z- Wing Configuration,” Aerospace Flutter and Dynamics Council...finite element analysis and component synthesis and the aerodynamic model is discretized using a vortex lattice. Results from the computational model

  15. 45. Photograph of line drawing in possession of the Engineering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photograph of line drawing in possession of the Engineering Division of the Directorate of Engineering and Housing. Watervliet Arsenal, New York. STEAM HEATING PLANT, SHOWING CROSS SECTION OF SOUTH WING AND PLAN OF SOUTH WING AND CENTRAL SECTION, UNDATED, REVISED JULY 27, 1915. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 110, Hagner Road between Schull & Whittemore Roads, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  16. View of Arcade interior from line of connection between First ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Arcade interior from line of connection between First Street Wing and Broadway Wing, facing east-southeast. Note infill at extreme right, where vaulted arcade space continues to Main Street - Post Office Arcade, 2118 First Street, Fort Myers, Lee County, FL

  17. 46. Photograph of line drawing in possession of the Engineering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photograph of line drawing in possession of the Engineering Division of the Directorate of Engineering and Housing, Watervliet Arsenal, New York. ELECTRIC LIGHTING PLANT, SHOWING CROSS SECTION OF SOUTH WING AND PLAN OF SOUTH WING AND CENTRAL SECTION, JULY 25, 1893, REVISED MAY 18, 1915. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 110, Hagner Road between Schull & Whittemore Roads, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  18. Euler calculations for wings using Cartesian grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, R. L., Jr.; Hassan, H. A.; Salas, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of transonic flows past wings using Cartesian grids. The calculations are based on a finite volume formulation of the Euler equations. Results are presented for a rectangular wing with a flat tip and the ONERA M6 wing. In general, the results are in good agreement with other computations and available experiment. However, Cartesian grids require a greater number of points than body fitted grids in order to resolve the flow properties near the leading edge of a swept wing.

  19. Component Modal Analysis of a Folding Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan

    This thesis explores the aeroelastic stability of a folding wing with an arbitrary number of wing segments. Simplifying assumptions are made such that it is possible to derive the equations of motion analytically. First, a general structural dynamics model based on beam theory is derived from a modal analysis using Lagrange's equations, and is used to predict the natural frequencies of different folding wing configurations. Next, the structural model is extended to an aeroelastic model by incorporating the effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces. The aeroelastic model is used to predict the flutter speed and flutter frequencies of folding wings. Experiments were conducted for three folding wing configurations---a two-segment wing, a three-segment wing, and a four-segment wing---and the outboard fold angle was varied over a wide range for each configuration. Very good agreement in both magnitude and overall trend was obtained between the theoretical and experimental structural natural frequencies, as well as the flutter frequency. For the flutter speed, very good agreement was obtained for the two-segment model, but the agreement worsens as the number of wing segments increases. Possible sources of error and attempts to improve correlation are described. Overall, the aeroelastic model predicts the general trends to good accuracy, offers some additional physical insight, and can be used to efficiently compute flutter boundaries and frequency characteristics for preliminary design or sensitivity studies.

  20. High performance forward swept wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, David G. (Inventor); Aoyagi, Kiyoshi (Inventor); Dudley, Michael R. (Inventor); Schmidt, Susan B. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A high performance aircraft capable of subsonic, transonic and supersonic speeds employs a forward swept wing planform and at least one first and second solution ejector located on the inboard section of the wing. A high degree of flow control on the inboard sections of the wing is achieved along with improved maneuverability and control of pitch, roll and yaw. Lift loss is delayed to higher angles of attack than in conventional aircraft. In one embodiment the ejectors may be advantageously positioned spanwise on the wing while the ductwork is kept to a minimum.

  1. A magnetic fluid microdevice using insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Tsuyuki, K.; Yano, T.; Takagi, K.

    2008-05-01

    A magnetic fluid microdevice using Diptera insect wings is proposed and constructed. The magnetic fluid device is composed of insect wings, a small permanent magnet, coil, and kerosene-based magnetic fluid. First, the structural properties of insect wings are studied through measurements of certain morphological parameters. Secondly, the novel type of microwind energy converter is constructed. Thirdly, the power generation characteristics of the magnetic fluid microdevice using insect wings are examined. It is found that the output power is roughly proportional to the cube of the airflow velocity.

  2. Waving Wing Aerodynamics at Low Reynolds Numbers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    canonical pitch - up , pitch -down wing maneuver, in 39th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference, AIAA 2009-3687, San Antonio, TX, 22-25 June 2009. [7] C. P. Ellington...unsteady lift generation on three-dimensional flapping wings in the MAV flight regime and, if a leading edge vortex develops at MAV-like Reynolds numbers... wing rotates in a propeller-like motion through a wing stroke angle up to 90 degrees. Unsteady lift and drag force data was acquired throughout the

  3. Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect's flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material's resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing's toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically 'optimal' solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial 'venous' wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species.

  4. Subtractive Structural Modification of Morpho Butterfly Wings.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingchen; He, Jiaqing; Ni, Mengtian; Song, Chengyi; Zhou, Lingye; Hu, Hang; Zhang, Ruoxi; Luo, Zhen; Wang, Ge; Tao, Peng; Deng, Tao; Shang, Wen

    2015-11-11

    Different from studies of butterfly wings through additive modification, this work for the first time studies the property change of butterfly wings through subtractive modification using oxygen plasma etching. The controlled modification of butterfly wings through such subtractive process results in gradual change of the optical properties, and helps the further understanding of structural optimization through natural evolution. The brilliant color of Morpho butterfly wings is originated from the hierarchical nanostructure on the wing scales. Such nanoarchitecture has attracted a lot of research effort, including the study of its optical properties, its potential use in sensing and infrared imaging, and also the use of such structure as template for the fabrication of high-performance photocatalytic materials. The controlled subtractive processes provide a new path to modify such nanoarchitecture and its optical property. Distinct from previous studies on the optical property of the Morpho wing structure, this study provides additional experimental evidence for the origination of the optical property of the natural butterfly wing scales. The study also offers a facile approach to generate new 3D nanostructures using butterfly wings as the templates and may lead to simpler structure models for large-scale man-made structures than those offered by original butterfly wings. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Aeroelastic tailoring for oblique wing lateral trim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlmann, Jonathan D.; Weisshaar, Terrence A.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1988-01-01

    Composite material aeroelastic tailoring is presently explored as a means for the correction of the roll trim imbalance of oblique-wing aircraft configurations. The concept is demonstrated through the analysis of a realistic oblique wing by a static aeroelastic computational procedure encompassing the full potential transonic aerodynamic code FLO22 and a Ritz structural plate program that models the stiffness due to symmetrical-but-unbalanced composite wing skins. Results indicate that asymetric composite tailoring reduces the aileron deflection needed for roll equilibrium, and reduces control surface hinge moment and drag. Wing skin stresses are, however, very high.

  6. Optimal redesign study of the harm wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, S. C., Jr.; Weynand, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the use of optimization techniques to improve the flutter margins of the HARM AGM-88A wing. The missile has four cruciform wings, located near mid-fuselage, that are actuated in pairs symmetrically and antisymmetrically to provide pitch, yaw, and roll control. The wings have a solid stainless steel forward section and a stainless steel crushed-honeycomb aft section. The wing restraint stiffness is dependent upon wing pitch amplitude and varies from a low value near neutral pitch attitude to a much higher value at off-neutral pitch attitudes, where aerodynamic loads lock out any free play in the control system. The most critical condition for flutter is the low-stiffness condition in which the wings are moved symmetrically. Although a tendency toward limit-cycle flutter is controlled in the current design by controller logic, wing redesign to improve this situation is attractive because it can be accomplished as a retrofit. In view of the exploratory nature of the study, it was decided to apply the optimization to a wing-only model, validated by comparison with results obtained by Texas Instruments (TI). Any wing designs that looked promising were to be evaluated at TI with more complicated models, including body modes. The optimization work was performed by McIntosh Structural Dynamics, Inc. (MSD) under a contract from TI.

  7. Wing Damage Effects on Dragonfly's maneuverability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhe; Gai, Kuo; Zeyghami, Samane; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group (FSRG) Team

    2011-11-01

    In this work, how the insect flight behavior contributes to its adaptability to limited performance condition is studied through a combined experimental and computational study. High speed photogrammetry is used to collect the data of dragonflies' takeoffs with intact and damaged wings along the chord and span separately. Then the effect of the spanwise and chordwise damage on the dragonfly wing is investigated. Results show that both changes have different effects on the wing and body kinematics and the merit of maneuverability. Two theories will be introduced to explain the wing damage tolerance behavior of the dragonfly flight. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1055949.

  8. Digest: Imperfect convergence in butterfly wing patterns.

    PubMed

    Earl, Chandra; Guralnick, Robert P; Kawahara, Akito Y

    2017-02-27

    Butterfly wing patterns are among the most diverse morphological characteristics in nature, with many of the 18,000 or so described butterfly species readily distinguished by wing pattern alone. Wing pattern serves as one of the primary means of communication among species and is thus subject to strong natural selection for mimicry and warning color (aposematism). Convergent wing patterns are particularly evident across the butterfly genus Adelpha, suggesting this genus may be a good system to study the underlying mechanisms behind mimicry. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Ramucirumab as second-line treatment in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma following first-line therapy with sorafenib: Patient-focused outcome results from the randomised phase III REACH study.

    PubMed

    Chau, Ian; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Borg, Christophe; Malfertheiner, Peter; Seitz, Jean Francois; Park, Joon Oh; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Yen, Chia-Jui; Kudo, Masatoshi; Poon, Ronnie; Pastorelli, Davide; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Baron, Ari D; Okusaka, Takuji; Bowman, L; Cui, Zhanglin Lin; Girvan, Allicia C; Abada, Paolo B; Yang, Ling; Zhu, Andrew X

    2017-08-01

    To report patient-focused outcomes as measured by quality of life (QoL) and performance status (PS) in REACH, a phase III placebo-controlled randomised study, assessing ramucirumab in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who received prior sorafenib. Eligible patients had advanced HCC, Child-Pugh A, PS 0 or 1 and prior sorafenib. Patients received ramucirumab (8 mg/kg) or placebo (1:1) on day 1 of a 2-week cycle. QoL was assessed by FACT Hepatobiliary Symptom Index (FHSI)-8 and EuroQoL (EQ-5D) at baseline; cycles 4, 10, and 16; and end of treatment. PS was assessed at baseline, each cycle, and end of treatment. Deterioration in FHSI-8 was defined as a ≥3-point decrease from baseline and PS deterioration was defined as a change of ≥2. Both intention-to-treat and pre-specified subgroup of patients with baseline serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) ≥400 ng/mL were assessed. There were 565 patients randomised to ramucirumab and placebo. Compliance with FHSI and EQ-5D was high and similar between groups. In the ITT population, deterioration in FHSI-8, EQ-5D, and PS was similar between ramucirumab and placebo. In patients with baseline AFP ≥400 ng/mL, ramucirumab significantly reduced deterioration in FHSI-8 at the end of treatment compared with placebo (P = 0.0381), and there was a trend towards a delay in the deterioration of symptoms in FHSI-8 (HR 0.690; P = 0.054) and PS (HR 0.642; P = 0.057) in favour of ramucirumab. We report one of the most comprehensive data sets of QoL and symptom burden in patients undergoing systemic therapy for advanced HCC. Ramucirumab was associated with no worsening of QoL. In patients with baseline AFP ≥400 ng/mL, the significant survival benefit observed in patients treated with ramucirumab was coupled with a trend in patient-focused outcome benefits. NCT01140347. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Projection Moire Interferometry Measurements of Micro Air Vehicle Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2001-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to measure the structural deformation of micro air vehicle (MAV) wings during a series of wind tunnel tests. The MAV wings had a highly flexible wing structure, generically reminiscent of a bat s wing, which resulted in significant changes in wing shape as a function of MAV angle-of-attack and simulated flight speed. This flow-adaptable wing deformation is thought to provide enhanced vehicle stability and wind gust alleviation compared to rigid wing designs. Investigation of the potential aerodynamic benefits of a flexible MAV wing required measurement of the wing shape under aerodynamic loads. PMI was used to quantify the aerodynamically induced changes in wing shape for three MAV wings having different structural designs and stiffness characteristics. This paper describes the PMI technique, its application to MAV testing, and presents a portion of the PMI data acquired for the three different MAV wings tested.

  11. Projection moire interferometry measurements of micro air vehicle wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2001-11-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to measure the structural deformation of micro air vehicle (MAV) wings during a series of wind tunnel tests. The MAV wings had a highly flexible wing structure, generically reminiscent of a bat's wing, which resulted in significant changes in wing shape as a function of MAV angle-of-attack and simulated flight speed. This flow-adaptable wing deformation is thought to provide enhanced vehicle stability and wind gust alleviation compared to rigid wing designs. Investigation of the potential aerodynamic benefits of a flexible MAV wing required measurement of the wing shape under aerodynamic loads. PMI was used to quantify the aerodynamically induced changes in wing shape for three MAV wings having different structural designs and stiffness characteristics. This paper describes the PMI technique, its application to MAV testing, and presents a portion of the PMI data acquired for the three different MAV wings tested.

  12. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) As of FY 2015 President’s Budget...00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Responsible Office References Program Name Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) DoD Component Air Force

  13. Transonic Aerodynamic Loading Characteristics of a Wing-Body-Tail Combination Having a 52.5 deg. Sweptback Wing of Aspect Ratio 3 With Conical Wing Camber and Body Indentation for a Design Mach Number of Square Root of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassetti, Marlowe D.; Re, Richard J.; Igoe, William B.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the effects of conical wing camber and body indentation according to the supersonic area rule on the aerodynamic wing loading characteristics of a wing-body-tail configuration at transonic speeds. The wing aspect ratio was 3, taper ratio was 0.1, and quarter-chord-line sweepback was 52.5 deg. with 3-percent-thick airfoil sections. The tests were conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 1.05 and at angles of attack from 0 deg. to 14 deg., with Reynolds numbers based on mean aerodynamic chord varying from 7 x 10(exp 6) to 8 x 10(exp 6). Conical camber delayed wing-tip stall and reduced the severity of the accompanying longitudinal instability but did not appreciably affect the spanwise load distribution at angles of attack below tip stall. Body indentation reduced the transonic chordwise center-of-pressure travel from about 8 percent to 5 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord.

  14. Spatial differences in patterns of modification: selection on hairy in Drosophila melanogaster wings.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, R B; Thompson, J N

    2000-01-01

    Artificial selection was carried out for over 45 generations to enhance and suppress expression of the mutation hairy on the Drosophila melanogaster wing. Whole chromosome mapping of X-linked and autosomal modifiers of sense organ number displayed regional differences in magnitude and direction of their effects. Regional specificity of modifier effects was also seen in some interchromosomal interactions. Scanning electron microscopy allowed precise measurement of sense organ size and position along the L3 longitudinal wing vein. Sense organ size varied in a predictable fashion along the proximal-distal axis, and the dorsal pattern differed from the ventral pattern. The high and low selection lines differed most in the proximal portion of the L3 vein. Extra sense organs in the High line were often associated with vein fragments at locations predicted from ancestral vein patterns. Thus, regional specificity of polygenic or quantitative trait locus modifier effects was identified in several different parts of the wing.

  15. Straight-line climbing flight aerodynamics of a fruit bat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, K.; Nagendra, K.; Cotter, J.; Frauenthal, M.; Tafti, D. K.

    2014-02-01

    From flight data obtained on a fruit bat, Cynopterus brachyotis, a kinematic model for straight-line flapping motion is extracted and analyzed in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) framework to gain insight into the complexity of bat flight. The intricate functional mechanics and architecture of the bat wings set it apart from other vertebrate flight. The extracted kinematic model is simulated for a range of Reynolds numbers, to observe the effect these phenomena have on the unsteady transient mechanisms of the flow produced by the flapping wings. The Strouhal number calculated from the data is high indicating that the oscillatory motion dominates the flow physics. From the obtained data, the bat exhibits fine control of its mechanics by actively varying wing camber, wing area, torsional rotation of the wing, forward and backward translational sweep of the wing, and wing conformation to dictate the fluid dynamics. As is common in flapping flight, the primary force generation is through the attached unsteady vortices on the wing surface. The bat through varying the wing camber and the wing area modulates this force output. The power requirement for the kinematics is analyzed and correlated with the aerodynamic performance.

  16. DOT tomography of the solar atmosphere. VI. Magnetic elements as bright points in the blue wing of Hα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaarts, J.; Rutten, R. J.; Sütterlin, P.; Carlsson, M.; Uitenbroek, H.

    2006-04-01

    High-resolution solar images taken in the blue wing of the Balmer H α line with the Dutch Open Telescope show intergranular magnetic elements as strikingly bright features, similar to, but with appreciably larger contrast over the surrounding granulation than their more familiar manifestation as G-band bright points. Part of this prominent appearance is due to low granular contrast, without granule/lane brightness reversal as, e.g., in the wings of Ca II H & K. We use 1D and 2D radiative transfer modeling and 3D solar convection and magnetoconvection simulations to reproduce and explain the H α wing images. We find that the blue H α wing obeys near-LTE line formation. It appears particularly bright in magnetic elements through low temperature gradients. The granulation observed in the blue wing of H α has low contrast because of the lack of H α opacity in the upper photosphere, Doppler cancellation, and large opacity sensitivity to temperature working against source function sensitivity. We conclude that the blue H α wing represents a promising proxy magnetometer to locate and track isolated intermittent magnetic elements, a better one than the G band and the wings of Ca II H & K although less sharp at given aperture.

  17. Winged launcher thermal design aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, K.

    1991-12-01

    The need for significant reduction in launch cost favors the consideration of reusable space transportation systems which are assisted by aerodynamic lift. The thermomechanical and thermochemical environments and the basic design requirements of two airbreathing vehicle classes are put in relation to vehiles like Shuttle and Hermes. Similarities as well as essential differences between the various vehicles are highlighted. State of the art thermal protection concepts and materials are analyzed with respect to winged launcher concepts. Future development trends for design and materials with potential application are identified. The need for improved thermostructural analysis and optimization techniques is outlined.

  18. Metal-truss wing spars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickard, Andrew E

    1931-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop improvements in the current methods for the calculation of the loads in members of metal truss wing spars which are subjected to combined bending and compression. The theory developed here has two important practical applications. One is the calculation of the effective moment of inertia of a truss spar from the geometry of the spar and the loads to which the spar is to be subjected. The second is the determination of the most economical location of metal for stiffening a truss spar which has too much deflection.

  19. Theoretical and Experimental Comparison of Aerodynamic Characteristics for Flexible Membrane Wings with Cambered Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrist, Andrew; Hubner, James

    2015-11-01

    Flexible membrane wings of the MAV (micro air vehicle) scale can experience improved lift/drag ratios, delays in stall, and decreased time-averaged flow separation when compared to rigid wings. Previous research examined the effect of frame camber on the time-averaged shapes of membrane wings and observed that increasing frame camber results in increased aero-induced membrane camber. This study involves a more in-depth DIC (Digital Image Correlation) analysis of the previous research to increase the understanding of the time-averaged shapes for membrane wings with cambered frames and offers a theoretical comparison to the experimental results. The author performed a theoretical lifting-line analysis based on the time-averaged shape for the membrane wings to calculate lift, induced drag, and circulation. The calculations include the effects of geometric twist, aspect ratio, and effective angle-of-attack. The wings, with an aspect ratio of 2, were fabricated with silicone rubber membranes and 3D printed cambered frames differing in percent camber, maximum camber location, and thickness. The DIC images were acquired in The University of Alabama's MAV wind tunnel as tests were performed at 10 m/s (Re = 50,000). The analysis will be discussed in the presentation. Graduate Research Assistant.

  20. Theoretical symmetric span loading at subsonic speeds for wings having arbitrary plan form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, John; Harper, Charles W

    1948-01-01

    A method is shown by which the symmetric span loading for a certain class of wings can be simply found. The geometry of these wings is limited only to the extent that they must have symmetry about the root chord, must have a straight quarter-chord line over the semispan, and must have no discontinuities in twist. A procedure is shown for finding the lift-curve slope, pitching moment, center of lift, and induced drag from the span load distribution. A method of accounting for the effects of Mach number and for changes in section lift-curve slope is also given. Charts are presented which give directly the characteristics of many wings. Other charts are presented which reduce the problem of finding the symmetric loading on all wings falling within the prescribed limits to the solution of not more than four simultaneous equations. The loadings and wing characteristics predicted by the theory are compared to those given by other theories and by experiment. It is concluded that the results given by the subject theory are satisfactory. The theory is applied to a number of wings to exhibit the effects of such variables as sweep, aspect ratio, taper, and twist. The results are compared and conclusions drawn as to the relative effects of these variables.