Science.gov

Sample records for iii operation monthly

  1. Training new operators - the first six months

    SciTech Connect

    Worthel, B.; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    The Fermilab Operations Department takes about two years to train a new Operator. The Operator's introductory (Concepts) On-the-Job-Training (OJT) gives him or her an overview of the laboratory, teaches the basic facts about all the accelerators, and it also teaches the new operator the training process used for all the rest of their OJT training. The Concepts OJT takes about four to six months for most people to complete. This paper will explain how this first six months of training sets the new employee on their path to becoming a fully trained Operator.

  2. SSPS monthly data: plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Daily operation data are given for both the central receiver and distributed collector systems for the month of June 1984. Data include meteorological data, heliostat field performance, power conversion, and electric energy production. (LEW)

  3. SSPS monthly data: plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Daily operation data are given for both the central receiver and the distributed collector systems for the month of May 1984. Data include meteorological data, heliostat field performance, power conversion, and electric energy production. (LEW)

  4. 24 CFR 904.109 - Monthly operating expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... expense” means the monthly amount needed for the following purposes: (1) Administration. Administrative... as water), if any, to be furnished by the LHA as part of operating expense; (4) Routine maintenance—common property. For community building, grounds, and other common areas, if any. The amount required...

  5. SSPS monthly data, October 1984. Plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Operation and maintenance highlights and test and evaluation highlights are presented for the Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Central Receiver System (CRS) and Distributed Collector System (DCS). The major portion of this report consists of the following plant statistics for October, 1984: monthly operation summary; CRS daily operation summary; and DCS daily operation summary.

  6. SSPS monthly data, (December 1984). Plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Operation and maintenance highlights and test and evaluation highlights are presented for the Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Central Receiver System (CRS) and Distributed Collector System (DCS). The major portion of this report consists of the following plant statistics for December 1984: monthly operation summary; CRS daily operation summary; and DCS daily operation summary.

  7. Plant operation report and daily operation summary. SSPS monthly data, March 1984. [Small Solar Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Operation and maintenance highlights and test and evaluation highlights are presented for the Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Central Receiver System (CRS) and Distributed Collector System (DCS). The major portion of this report consists of the following plant statistics: monthly operation summary for March 1984; CRS daily operation summary; and DCS daily operation summary.

  8. SSPS monthly data, August 1984: plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    Operation and maintenance highlights and test and evaluation highlights are presented for the Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Central Receiver System (CRS) and Distributed Collector System (DCS). The major portion of this report consists of the following plant statistics: monthly operation summary for August 1984; CRS daily operation summary; and DCS daily operation summary.

  9. SSPS monthly data, September 1984: plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    Operation and maintenance highlights and test and evaluation highlights are presented for Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Central Receiver System (CRS) and Distributed Collector System (DCS). The major portion of this report consists of the following plant statistics: monthly operation and summary for September 1984; CRS daily operation summary; and DCS daily operation summary. (LEW).

  10. SSPS monthly data, November 1984. Plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Operation and maintenance highlights and test and evaluation highlights are presented for the Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Central Receiver System (CRS) and Distributed Collector System (DCS). The major portion of this report consists of the following plant statistics for November 1984: monthly operation summary, CRS daily operation summary, and DCS daily operation summary.

  11. SSPS monthly data, January 1985: plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The operational, maintenance and evaluation activities and highlights that were required during the month of January 1985 for the Central Receiver System and the Distributed Collector System are summarized. Daily operational reports for these small solar power system plants are provided. Definitions of terms relating to the power systems are included. (BCS)

  12. SSPS monthly data No. 5, July 1985: plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Operation and maintenance highlights for the Central Receiver System and the Distributed Collector System are presented for the month of July, 1985. The activities in the Central Receiver System have been centered on the final preparation for the High Flux Experiment (HFE). The receiver was filled with sodium on July 24 after the Gas Chromatograph was installed. The correct operation of the PCS was tested on the last two days of the month. The operation of the DCS has been very limited. Among the causes have been the work required to install the Oil Cooler, the failure of the Main Generator, and a failure in the Uninterruptible Power Supply.

  13. Practice effects on the WAIS-III across 3- and 6-month intervals.

    PubMed

    Basso, Michael R; Carona, Francine D; Lowery, Natasha; Axelrod, Bradley N

    2002-02-01

    Fifty-one participants (age M = 24.6; education M = 14.4 years) were administered the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Third Edition (WAIS-III) at baseline and at an interval of either 3 or 6 months later. Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), Verbal IQ (VIQ), Performance IQ (PIQ), Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI), Perceptual Organization Index (POI), and Processing Speed Index (PSI) scores improved significantly across time, whereas no significant change occurred on the Working Memory Index. Specifically, test scores increased approximately 3, 11, 6, 4, 8, and 7 points, respectively on the VIQ, PIQ, FSIQ, VCI, POI, and PSI for both groups. Notably, the degree of improvement was similar regardless of whether the inter-test interval was 3 or 6 months. These findings suggest that prior exposure to the WAIS-III yields considerable increases in test scores. Reliable change indices indicated that large confidence intervals might be expected. As such, users of the WAIS-III should interpret reevaluations across these intervals cautiously.

  14. Month

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A unit of time based on the motion of the Moon around the Earth. The synodic (or lunar) month is the mean time interval between two successive new moons (i.e. the time taken for the Moon to pass through its cycle of phases) and is equal to 29.53059 mean solar days. Because the synodic month (the basis of the lunar calendar) is not equal to a whole number of days, the calendar month is rounded to ...

  15. The Mark III IR FEL: Improvements in performance and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, G.A.; Madey, J.M.J.; Straub, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Mark III IR FEL has been upgraded by the installation of a new thermionic microwave gun. The new gun yields a reduced emittance and allows operation at a higher repetition rate and an increased electron macropulse length. The RF system of the Mark III has also been phase-locked to the RF systemof the adjacent storage ring driver for the laboratory`s short-wavelength FEL sources, making possible two-color UV-IR pump probe experiments. In this paper, the design and performance of the new gun are presented and the implications of the improvements investigated.

  16. L/sub III/-edge densitometer operations manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Johnson, S.S.; Langner, D.G.; Russo, P.A.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes briefly the operation and maintenance of an L/sub III/-edge densitometer. The instrument is optimized for 50 g/l of special nuclear material, but yields better than 0.5% precision in 1000-s assays over a concentration range of 10 to 90 g/l. It can determine uranium and plutonium concentrations in a 2-ml sample cell and has been designed for both static and flowing solution measurements.

  17. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) release from leather during 8 months of simulated use

    PubMed Central

    Lidén, Carola

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Chromium (Cr) release from Cr‐tanned leather articles is a major cause of Cr contact dermatitis. It has been suggested that Cr(VI) release from leather is not necessarily an intrinsic property of the leather, but is strongly dependent on environmental conditions. Objectives To test this hypothesis for long‐term (8 months) simulated use. Materials and methods The release of total Cr and Cr(VI) from Cr‐tanned, unfinished leather was analysed in subsequent phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) immersions for a period of 7.5 months. The effect of combined ultraviolet treatment and alkaline solution (pH 12.1) was tested. Dry storage [20% relative humidity (RH)] was maintained between immersions. Atomic absorption spectroscopy, X‐ray fluorescence and diphenylcarbazide tests were used. Results Cr(VI) release was dependent on previous dry storage or alkaline treatment, but not on duration or number of previous immersions. Cr(III) release decreased with time. Fifty‐two percent of the total Cr released during the last immersion period was Cr(VI). Cr(VI) release exceeded 9 mg/kg in all immersion periods except in the first 10‐day immersion (2.6 mg/kg). Conclusions Cr(VI) release is primarily determined by environmental factors (RH prior to immersion, solution pH, and antioxidant content). The RH should be kept low prior to testing Cr(VI) release from leather. PMID:27144948

  18. Plant operation report and daily evaluation summary. SSPS monthly data, April 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Operation and maintenance highlights and test and evaluation highlights are presented for the Small Solar Power Systems (SSPS) Central Receiver System (CRS) and Distributed Collector System (DCS). The major portion of this report consists of the following plant statistics; monthly operation summary for April 1984; CRS daily operation summary; DCS daily operation summary.

  19. 46 CFR 170.135 - Operating information for a vessel with Type III subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating information for a vessel with Type III... Operating Personnel § 170.135 Operating information for a vessel with Type III subdivision. (a) In addition to the information required in 46 CFR 170.110, the stability booklet of a passenger vessel with...

  20. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. 522.10 Section 522.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN... gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. For licensing of individually...

  1. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. 522.10 Section 522.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN... gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. For licensing of individually...

  2. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. 522.10 Section 522.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN... gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. For licensing of individually...

  3. Monitoring Attention During Operant Conditioning in Six and Seven Month Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, Barbara; Vietze, Peter M.

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate more directly the effects of content and repetition of contingent visual feedback on a discrete operant pulling response and accompanying visual attention in 24 six- to seven-month old infants. Simultaneous recording was made of infant operant behavior and visual attention. Results indicated…

  4. PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER. III. ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 16 MONTHS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Barclay, Thomas; Dupree, Andrea K.; Latham, David W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; and others

    2013-02-15

    New transiting planet candidates are identified in 16 months (2009 May-2010 September) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly 5000 periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1108 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2300. Improved vetting metrics are employed, contributing to higher catalog reliability. Most notable is the noise-weighted robust averaging of multi-quarter photo-center offsets derived from difference image analysis that identifies likely background eclipsing binaries. Twenty-two months of photometry are used for the purpose of characterizing each of the candidates. Ephemerides (transit epoch, T {sub 0}, and orbital period, P) are tabulated as well as the products of light curve modeling: reduced radius (R {sub P}/R {sub *}), reduced semimajor axis (d/R {sub *}), and impact parameter (b). The largest fractional increases are seen for the smallest planet candidates (201% for candidates smaller than 2 R {sub Circled-Plus} compared to 53% for candidates larger than 2 R {sub Circled-Plus }) and those at longer orbital periods (124% for candidates outside of 50 day orbits versus 86% for candidates inside of 50 day orbits). The gains are larger than expected from increasing the observing window from 13 months (Quarters 1-5) to 16 months (Quarters 1-6) even in regions of parameter space where one would have expected the previous catalogs to be complete. Analyses of planet frequencies based on previous catalogs will be affected by such incompleteness. The fraction of all planet candidate host stars with multiple candidates has grown from 17% to 20%, and the paucity of short-period giant planets in multiple systems is still evident. The progression toward smaller planets at longer orbital periods with each new catalog release suggests that Earth-size planets in the habitable zone are forthcoming if, indeed, such planets are abundant.

  5. Planetary Candidates Observed by Kepler, III: Analysis of the First 16 Months of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Barclay, Thomas; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Brown, Timothy M.; Dupree, Andrea K.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /UC, Santa Cruz

    2012-02-01

    New transiting planet candidates are identified in sixteen months (May 2009 - September 2010) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly five thousand periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1091 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2,300. Improved vetting metrics are employed, contributing to higher catalog reliability. Most notable is the noise-weighted robust averaging of multiquarter photo-center offsets derived from difference image analysis which identifies likely background eclipsing binaries. Twenty-two months of photometry are used for the purpose of characterizing each of the new candidates. Ephemerides (transit epoch, T{sub 0}, and orbital period, P) are tabulated as well as the products of light curve modeling: reduced radius (R{sub P}/R{sub {star}}), reduced semi-major axis (d/R{sub {star}}), and impact parameter (b). The largest fractional increases are seen for the smallest planet candidates (197% for candidates smaller than 2R{sub {circle_plus}} compared to 52% for candidates larger than 2R{sub {circle_plus}}) and those at longer orbital periods (123% for candidates outside of 50 day orbits versus 85% for candidates inside of 50 day orbits). The gains are larger than expected from increasing the observing window from thirteen months (Quarter 1 - Quarter 5) to sixteen months (Quarter 1 - Quarter 6). This demonstrates the benefit of continued development of pipeline analysis software. The fraction of all host stars with multiple candidates has grown from 17% to 20%, and the paucity of short-period giant planets in multiple systems is still evident. The progression toward smaller planets at longer orbital periods with each new catalog release suggests that Earth-size planets in the Habitable Zone are forthcoming if, indeed, such planets are abundant.

  6. Neuropsychologic function in children with brain tumors. III. Interval changes in the six months following treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhern, R.K.; Kun, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-six children with primary brain tumors were studied prospectively with regard to their sensorimotor, intellectual, academic, and emotional status. Serial evaluations were conducted after surgery (pre-irradiation) and six months after the completion of radiation therapy. The timing of the second evaluation was chosen so as to antedate the late effects of irradiation. Children over 6 years old displayed significant improvement of intellectual function over time, with only 11% exhibiting deterioration on one or more cognitive parameters. In contrast, 68% of younger children clinically deteriorated in one or more areas of intellectual functioning, with prominent difficulties in memory and selective attention for age. Children under 6 years old with supratentorial tumors were less likely than those with posterior fossa tumors to improve their cognitive performance. At the second evaluation, 23% of the patients were functioning below normal (IQ less than 80) intellectually, with 50% of the younger children and 11% of the older children receiving special educational assistance. Approximately 40-50% of the patients manifested emotional adjustment problems at each evaluation. The results are discussed in terms of the clinical need to follow similar patient populations with formal psychological assessments over time, and in terms of the difficulties involved in defining factors that determine the functional status of children surviving brain tumors.

  7. National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, Christopher M.

    2002-05-28

    The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

  8. Type III Secretion: Building and Operating a Remarkable Nanomachine.

    PubMed

    Portaliou, Athina G; Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Loos, Maria S; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-02-01

    The Type III secretion system (T3SS) is a protein export pathway that is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and delivers effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells. At its core lie the injectisome (a sophisticated transmembrane secretion apparatus) and a complex network of specialized chaperones that target secretory proteins to the antechamber of the injectisome. The assembly of the system, and the subsequent secretion of proteins through it, undergo fine-tuned, hierarchical regulation. Here, we present the current understanding of the injectisome assembly process, secretion hierarchy, and the role of chaperones. We discuss these events in light of available structural and biochemical dissection and propose future directions essential to revealing mechanistic insight into this fascinating nanomachine.

  9. Blood levels of the heavy metal, lead, and caries in children aged 24-72 months: NHANES III.

    PubMed

    Wiener, R Constance; Long, D Leann; Jurevic, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Lead remains a significant pollutant. It has acute toxic and chronic effects on many tissues and accumulates in teeth and bones. The researchers for this study investigated the association of blood lead levels with the extent/severity of caries as measured by the number of decayed/filled teeth of children aged 24-72 months using data from NHANES III (the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey), accounting for the excess zero caries in the analysis and using less than 2 µg/dl as the reference blood lead level (n = 3,127). Zero-inflated negative binomial regression models indicated unadjusted extent/severity mean ratios of 1.79, 1.88 and 1.94 for the number of decayed/filled teeth in children whose blood lead levels were 2-5, 5-10 and >10 µg/dl, respectively, compared with children having <2 µg/dl blood lead levels. The results did not attenuate when other variables were added to the model for the 5-10 and >10 µg/dl levels of exposure. The adjusted extent/severity mean ratios were 1.84, 2.14 and 1.91, respectively, for the categories. This study indicated a strong association of blood lead levels with increasing numbers of carious teeth in children aged 24-72 months. These findings support other studies in an innovative analysis handling cases of children with no caries. The findings may inform caries risk assessment.

  10. Computer Pure-Tone and Operator Stress: Report III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Caroline; Covert, Douglas C.

    Pure-tone sound at 15,750 Herz generated by flyback transformers in many computer and video display terminal (VDT) monitors has stress-related productivity effects in some operators, especially women. College-age women in a controlled experiment simulating half a normal work day showed responses within the first half hour of exposure to a tone…

  11. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume III: Inspection Procedures for Specific Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume III, explains in detail the following: inspection procedures for specific sources, kraft pulp mills, animal rendering, steel mill furnaces, coking operations, petroleum refineries, chemical plants, non-ferrous smelting and refining, foundries, cement plants, aluminum…

  12. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. III. Quantum operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2007-05-01

    During the last decade, several quantum information protocols, such as quantum key distribution, teleportation or quantum computation, have attracted a lot of interest. Despite the recent success and research efforts in quantum information processing, however, we are just at the beginning of understanding the role of entanglement and the behavior of quantum systems in noisy environments, i.e. for nonideal implementations. Therefore, in order to facilitate the investigation of entanglement and decoherence in n-qubit quantum registers, here we present a revised version of the FEYNMAN program for working with quantum operations and their associated (Jamiołkowski) dual states. Based on the implementation of several popular decoherence models, we provide tools especially for the quantitative analysis of quantum operations. Apart from the implementation of different noise models, the current program extension may help investigate the fragility of many quantum states, one of the main obstacles in realizing quantum information protocols today. Program summaryTitle of program: Feynman Catalogue identifier: ADWE_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE_v3_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Operating systems: Any system that supports MAPLE; tested under Microsoft Windows XP, SuSe Linux 10 Program language used:MAPLE 10 Typical time and memory requirements: Most commands that act upon quantum registers with five or less qubits take ⩽10 seconds of processor time (on a Pentium 4 processor with ⩾2 GHz or equivalent) and 5-20 MB of memory. Especially when working with symbolic expressions, however, the memory and time requirements critically depend on the number of qubits in the quantum registers, owing to the exponential dimension growth of the associated Hilbert space. For example, complex (symbolic) noise models (with several Kraus operators) for multi-qubit systems

  13. Flight crew fatigue III: North Sea helicopter air transport operations.

    PubMed

    Gander, P H; Barnes, R M; Gregory, K B; Graeber, R C; Connell, L J; Rosekind, M R

    1998-09-01

    We studied 32 helicopter pilots before, during, and after 4-5 d trips from Aberdeen, Scotland, to service North Sea oil rigs. On duty days, subjects awoke 1.5 h earlier than pretrip or posttrip, after having slept nearly an hour less. Subjective fatigue was greater posttrip than pretrip. By the end of trip days, fatigue was greater and mood more negative than by the end of pretrip days. During trips, daily caffeine consumption increased 42%, reports of headache doubled, reports of back pain increased 12-fold, and reports of burning eyes quadrupled. In the cockpits studied, thermal discomfort and high vibration levels were common. Subjective workload during preflight, taxi, climb, and cruise was related to the crewmembers' ratings of the quality of the aircraft systems. During descent and approach, workload was affected by weather at the landing site. During landing, it was influenced by the quality of the landing site and air traffic control. Beginning duty later, and greater attention to aircraft comfort and maintenance, should reduce fatigue in these operations.

  14. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from electroplating operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Facilities engaged in electroplating operations may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who perform electroplating operations in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  15. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from wood preserving operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities engaged in wood preserving operations may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist facilities engaged in wood preserving operations in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  16. Analysis and Evaluation of 137 ESEA Title III Planning and Operational Grants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfax County Schools, Baileys Crossroads, VA. Center for Effecting Educational Change.

    The general objectives of this study were to determine the overall influence and impact on education of a sample of terminated ESEA Title III Operational and Planning Grants. The five major areas in the evaluation instrument included: characteristics, project accomplishments, provisions for continuation, project design, and final appraisals. The…

  17. Feasibility of sequential adjuvant chemotherapy with a 3-month oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine in patients with stage III and high-risk stage II colorectal cancer: JSWOG-C2 study

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruta, Atsushi; Yamashita, Kazuki; Tanioka, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Akihito; Inukai, Michio; Yamakawa, Toshiki; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Yoshimitsu, Masanori; Toyota, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Taketoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Okajima, Masazumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Six months of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is the standard adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). Also, patients with stage II CRC who are considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence often receive the same adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. We prospectively investigated the extent and degree of neuropathy suffered by stage III and high-risk stage II resectable CRC patients who underwent sequential approach involving 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine. Patients and methods Patients with completely resected stage III and high-risk stage II CRC aged ≥20 years were eligible. Patients were treated with folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) for 3 months followed by capecitabine (2,500 mg/m2 on days 1–14 every 3 weeks) for 3 months. Primary end points were frequency and the grade of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity as evaluated using the physician-based Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE) grading and the patient-based scale, self-reported Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire. Results Ninety-one patients were enrolled and 86 patients assessed. Eighty-four percent of patients completed the planned oxaliplatin-based therapy for 3 months, and 63% of patients completed all treatments for the full 6 months. Overall incidences of grade 3 or 4 peripheral sensory or motor neuropathy according to the CTCAE were 3.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Regarding the peripheral sensory neuropathy, the proportion of Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (grade C–E) and CTCAE (grade 2–4) at months 1.5/3/6 were 11.3/22.1/29.4% and 5.3/4.4/11.3%, respectively (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.47). Conclusion A sequential approach to adjuvant chemotherapy with 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine was tolerated by patients and associated with a low incidence of

  18. In-Flight Operation of the Dawn Ion Propulsion System - The First Nine Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E.; Brophy, John R.; Mikes, Steven C.; Raymond, Marc D.

    2008-01-01

    characteristics, and thermal behavior of the spacecraft and IPS were carefully evaluated. The Dawn IPS fully met all its initial checkout performance objectives. Deterministic thrusting for cruise began on December 17, 2007. Over the subsequent approximately 330 days the IPS will be operated virtually continuously at full power thrusting (approximately 91 mN) leading to a Mars flyby in February 2009. The encounter with Mars provides a gravity assist for a plane change and is the only source of post-launch delta-V apart from the IPS. Following the Mars gravity assist IPS will be operated for approximately one year at full power and for 1.3 years at throttled power levels leading to rendezvous with Vesta in August of 2011. Following nine months of orbital operations with IPS providing the propulsion needed for orbit capture, science orbit transfer and orbit maintenance and Vesta escape, Dawn will transit to Ceres with an expected arrival date of February 2015. As of June 16, 2008 the ion thrusters on Dawn have operated for close to 3,846 hours and have delivered nearly 1 km/s of delta-V to the spacecraft. Dawn IPS operation has been almost flawless during the initial checkout and six months of cruise. This paper provides an overview of Dawn's mission objectives, mission and system design, and the results of the post-launch Dawn IPS mission operations through June 2008

  19. High temperature process steam application at the Southern Union Refining Company, Hobbs, New Mexico. Solar energy in the oil patch. Final report, Phase III: operation, maintenance, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, L.E.; McGuire, D.R.

    1984-05-01

    This final report summarizes the technical reports for Phase III of this project. The third phase included the operation, maintenance, upgrade and performance reporting of a 10,080 square foot Solar Industrial Process Heat System installed at the Famariss Energy Refinery of Southern Union Refining Company near Hobbs, New Mexico. This report contains a description of the upgraded system, and a summary of the overall operation, maintenance and performance of the installed system. The results of the upgrade activities can be seen in the last two months of operational data. Steam production was significantly greater in peak flow and monthly total than at any previous time. Also monthly total cost savings was greatly improved even though natural gas costs remain much lower than originally anticipated.

  20. 14 CFR 91.189 - Category II and III operations: General operating rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ratings prescribed in § 61.3 of this chapter; (2) Each flight crewmember has adequate knowledge of, and... holders of management specifications issued in accordance with subpart K of this part. Holders of operations specifications or management specifications may operate a civil aircraft in a Category II...

  1. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  2. Pre-operative variables affecting final vision outcome with a critical review of ocular trauma classification for posterior open globe (zone III) injury

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Ho, Sue Wei; Teoh, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify pre-operative variables affecting the outcome of posterior open globe (zone III) injuries. Secondary objective was to re-look at the definition or landmarks for zone III injury and its clinical significance for predicting visual prognosis following open globe injury. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of medical records of all hospitalized patients with surgical repair of open globe injury over last 10 years at a tertiary referral eye care center in Singapore. Out of 172 eyes with open globe injury, 28 eyes (16.3%) with zone III injury was identified and reviewed further. Pre-operative visual acuity (VA) and other variables, extent of scleral wound in reference to rectus insertion, relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) and final vision outcome were recorded. Results: Median age was 37 years with male predilection (92.9%). Mean follow-up was 12.9 months. Pre-operative VA was no light perception (NLP) in 16 (57.1%) eyes. Final VA remained NLP in 14 eyes (50.0%). The factors contributing to poor post-operative vision based on univariate regression analysis were the presence of RAPD, poor pre-operative VA, blunt trauma, extent of trauma, associated traumatic cataract, hyphema, vitreous loss and associated vitreo-retinal trauma. Further on, zone III injuries with scleral wound limited anterior to rectus insertion (6 eyes) had better vision outcome than those with injuries extending beyond rectus insertion (22 eyes). Conclusion: Initial VA, blunt ocular trauma, visual axis involvement, loss of light perception, presence of RAPD, traumatic cataract, hyphema, vitreous loss were the important determinants for final visual outcome in patients with zone III injury. Wound extending posterior to rectus insertion has poorer outcome as those limited anterior to rectus insertion. We suggest that there may be a need to relook at zone III injuries with reference to rectus insertion for prognostic significance, and further studies are warranted. PMID

  3. Stapled haemorrhoidectomy in the operative treatment of grade III and IV haemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, S; Pradhan, G B N; Shrestha, R; Poudel, P; Bhattachan, C L

    2014-09-01

    Stapled haemorrhoidectomy (SH) is a minimally invasive intervention that uses a stapling device which avoids the need for wounds in the sensitive anal area and reduces the pain after surgery. This study was undertaken in Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital from January 2010 to December 2012 to evaluate the efficacy of this modality of treatment among patients (32) who presented in the Surgery OPD with grade III and grade IV haemorrhoids. The results of SH were evaluated by the relief of symptoms, severity of post operative pain, and complications of SH. Twenty five (78.1%) patients had grade III and 7 (21.9%) presented with grade IV hemorrhoids. The most frequent presentation reported in our study was bleeding per rectum with perianal prolapse. Mean operating time was 40-60 minutes whereas mean hospital stay was 1.9 days. Urinary retention was the most common complication found in 12 (37.5%) patients in the immediate post operative period. SH is a safe, rapid, and convenient surgical remedy for grade III and grade IV hemorrhoids with low rate of complications, minimal postoperative pain, and shorter hospital stay.

  4. Hazard Analysis for the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Used in One-g Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kate; Ross, Amy; Blanco, Raul; Wood, Art

    2012-01-01

    This Hazard Analysis document encompasses the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) and associated ancillary equipment. It has been prepared using JSC17773, "Preparing Hazard Analyses for JSC Ground Operation", as a guide. The purpose of this document is to present the potential hazards involved in ground (23 % maximum O2, One-g) operations of the Mark III and associated ancillary support equipment system. The hazards listed in this document are specific to suit operations only; each supporting facility (Bldg. 9, etc.) is responsible for test specific Hazard Analyses. A "hazard" is defined as any condition that has the potential for harming personnel or equipment. This analysis was performed to document the safety aspects associated with manned use of the Mark III for pressurized and unpressurized ambient, ground-based, One-g human testing. The hazards identified herein represent generic hazards inherent to all standard JSC test venues for nominal ground test configurations. Non-standard test venues or test specific configurations may warrant consideration of additional hazards analysis prior to test. The cognizant suit engineer is responsible for the safety of the astronaut/test subject, space suit, and suit support personnel. The test requester, for the test supported by the suit test engineer and suited subject, is responsible for overall safety and any necessary Test Readiness Reviews (TRR).

  5. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating... ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 11 Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations....

  6. 43 CFR 3276.12 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for facility operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... facilities, include in your monthly report of facility operations: (1) Mass of steam and/or hot water, in klbs, used or brought into the facility. For facilities using both steam and hot water, you must report the mass of each; (2) The temperature of the steam or hot water in deg. F; (3) The pressure of...

  7. 43 CFR 3276.12 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for facility operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... facilities, include in your monthly report of facility operations: (1) Mass of steam and/or hot water, in klbs, used or brought into the facility. For facilities using both steam and hot water, you must report the mass of each; (2) The temperature of the steam or hot water in deg. F; (3) The pressure of...

  8. 43 CFR 3276.12 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for facility operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... facilities, include in your monthly report of facility operations: (1) Mass of steam and/or hot water, in klbs, used or brought into the facility. For facilities using both steam and hot water, you must report the mass of each; (2) The temperature of the steam or hot water in deg. F; (3) The pressure of...

  9. 43 CFR 3276.12 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for facility operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... facilities, include in your monthly report of facility operations: (1) Mass of steam and/or hot water, in klbs, used or brought into the facility. For facilities using both steam and hot water, you must report the mass of each; (2) The temperature of the steam or hot water in deg. F; (3) The pressure of...

  10. 47 CFR 76.952 - Information to be provided by cable operator on monthly subscriber bills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation... the cable operator to omit such information. (b) The FCC community unit identifier for the...

  11. Technical Operations Support III (TOPS III). Task Order 0061: Fundamental Theory Based Assessment of Thermoelectric Merit Factor for Heusler Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Implementation of LDA Fails to Correctly Treat Correlation Effects in Highly Correlated Systems. Figure Also Compares Projected pDOS of Nickel in ii) t2g and...iii) eg States Using Both Methods .................................................................................... 16  11. Seebeck Coefficient...Power Factor and ZT Plots of NiSnZr ................................................. 17  12. DOS, Seebeck Coefficient, Power Factor and ZT Plots of

  12. Flight Dynamics Performances of the MetOp A Satellite during the First Months of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righetti, Pier Luigi; Meixner, Hilda; Sancho, Francisco; Damiano, Antimo; Lazaro, David

    2007-01-01

    The 19th of October 2006 at 16:28 UTC the first MetOp satellite (MetOp A) was successfully launched from the Baykonur cosmodrome by a Soyuz/Fregat launcher. After only three days of LEOP operations, performed by ESOC, the satellite was handed over to EUMETSAT, who is since then taking care of all satellite operations. MetOp A is the first European operational satellite for meteorology flying in a Low Earth Orbit (LEO), all previous satellites operated by EUMETSAT, belonging to the METEOSAT family, being located in the Geo-stationary orbit. To ensure safe operations for a LEO satellite accurate and continuous commanding from ground of the on-board AOCS is required. That makes the operational transition at the end of the LEOP quite challenging, as the continuity of the Flight Dynamics operations is to be maintained. That means that the main functions of the Flight Dynamics have to be fully validated on-flight during the LEOP, before taking over the operational responsibility on the spacecraft, and continuously monitored during the entire mission. Due to the nature of a meteorological operational mission, very stringent requirements in terms of overall service availability (99 % of the collected data), timeliness of processing of the observation data (3 hours after sensing) and accuracy of the geo-location of the meteorological products (1 km) are to be fulfilled. That translates in tight requirements imposed to the Flight Dynamics facility (FDF) in terms of accuracy, timeliness and availability of the generated orbit and clock solutions; a detailed monitoring of the quality of these products is thus mandatory. Besides, being the accuracy of the image geo-location strongly related with the pointing performance of the platform and with the on-board timing stability, monitoring from ground of the behaviour of the on-board sensors and clock is needed. This paper presents an overview of the Flight Dynamics operations performed during the different phases of the MetOp A

  13. How do operating conditions affect As(III) removal by iron electrocoagulation?

    PubMed

    Delaire, Caroline; Amrose, Susan; Zhang, Minghui; Hake, James; Gadgil, Ashok

    2017-04-01

    Iron electrocoagulation (Fe-EC) has been shown to effectively remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater at low cost and has the potential to improve access to safe drinking water for millions of people. Understanding how operating conditions, such as the Fe dosage rate and the O2 recharge rate, affect arsenic removal at different pH values is crucial to maximize the performance of Fe-EC under economic constraints. In this work, we improved upon an existing computational model to investigate the combined effects of pH, Fe dosage rate, and O2 recharge rate on arsenic removal in Fe-EC. We showed that the impact of the Fe dosage rate strongly depends on pH and on the O2 recharge rate, which has important practical implications. We identified the process limiting arsenic removal (As(III) oxidation versus As(V) adsorption) at different pH values, which allowed us to interpret the effect of operating conditions on Fe-EC performance. Finally, we assessed the robustness of the trends predicted by the model, which assumes a constant pH, against lab experiments reproducing more realistic conditions where pH is allowed to drift during treatment as a result of equilibration with atmospheric CO2. Our results provide a nuanced understanding of how operating conditions impact arsenic removal by Fe-EC and can inform decisions regarding the operation of this technology in a range of groundwaters.

  14. Operational Momentum in Large-Number Addition and Subtraction by 9-Month-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrink, Koleen; Wynn, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies on nonsymbolic arithmetic have illustrated that under conditions that prevent exact calculation, adults display a systematic tendency to overestimate the answers to addition problems and underestimate the answers to subtraction problems. It has been suggested that this "operational momentum" results from exposure to a…

  15. Leibstadt: a 950-MW(e) BWR/6 Mark-III in commercial operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.U.

    1985-11-01

    It may be somewhat premature to report on a plant that started up in 1984 as the first of General Electric's (GE's) BWR/6 Mark-III plants in the Western Hemisphere and commenced commercial operation on December 15, 1984. The theme of the session certainly applies to the overall Swiss nuclear program and the search for excellence has been our ambition out of economic and energy supply necessities. Leibstadt came on line just in time to cover the needs of the Swiss consumers during the winter of 84/85. It has provided reliable service from the outset and operated during the extreme European cold wave in January 1985 without interruption. In 1985 the plant is expected to cover approx.15% of the electricity needs of Switzerland. The encouraging start of commercial operation gives hope that with time Leibstadt will be able to approach the capacity factors of the other four Swiss nuclear power stations, which in 1984 were between 88.4 and 90.3%.

  16. The Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue. III. Results after 54 months of sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Segreto, A.; Ferrigno, C.; Maselli, A.; Sbarufatti, B.; Romano, P.; Chincarini, G.; Giommi, P.; Masetti, N.; Moretti, A.; Parisi, P.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2010-12-01

    Aims: We present the Second Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue obtained by analysing data acquired in the first 54 months of the Swift mission. Methods: Using our software dedicated to the analysis of data from coded mask telescopes, we analysed the BAT survey data in three energy bands (15-30 keV, 15-70 keV, 15-150 keV), obtaining a list of 1256 detections above a significance threshold of 4.8 standard deviations. The identification of the source counterparts is pursued using two strategies: the analysis of field observations of soft X-ray instruments and cross-correlation of our catalogue with source databases. Results: The survey covers 50% of the sky to a 15-150 keV flux limit of 1.0×10-11 erg cm-2 s-1 and 9.2×10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 for |b| < 10° and |b| > 10°, respectively. The Second Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue includes 1079 (~86%) hard X-ray sources with an associated counterpart (26 with a double association and 2 with a triple association) and 177 BAT excesses (~14%) that still lack a counterpart. The distribution of the BAT sources among the different object classes consists of ~19% Galactic sources, ~57% extragalactic sources, and ~10% sources with a counterpart at softer energies whose nature has not yet been determined. About half of the BAT associated sources lack a counterpart in the ROSAT catalogues. This suggests that either moderate or strong absorption may be preventing their detection in the ROSAT energy band. The comparison of our BAT catalogue with the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalogue identifies 59 BAT/Fermi correspondences: 48 blazars, 3 Seyfert galaxies, 1 interacting galaxy, 3 high mass X-ray binaries, and 4 pulsars/supernova remnants. This small number of correspondences indicates that different populations make the sky shine in these two different energy bands. Catalogue is also available in electronic firm at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  17. Conditional Monthly Weather Resampling Procedure for Operational Seasonal Water Resources Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J.; Weerts, A.; Tijdeman, E.; Welles, E.; McManamon, A.

    2013-12-01

    To provide reliable and accurate seasonal streamflow forecasts for water resources management several operational hydrologic agencies and hydropower companies around the world use the Extended Streamflow Prediction (ESP) procedure. The ESP in its original implementation does not accommodate for any additional information that the forecaster may have about expected deviations from climatology in the near future. Several attempts have been conducted to improve the skill of the ESP forecast, especially for areas which are affected by teleconnetions (e,g. ENSO, PDO) via selection (Hamlet and Lettenmaier, 1999) or weighting schemes (Werner et al., 2004; Wood and Lettenmaier, 2006; Najafi et al., 2012). A disadvantage of such schemes is that they lead to a reduction of the signal to noise ratio of the probabilistic forecast. To overcome this, we propose a resampling method conditional on climate indices to generate meteorological time series to be used in the ESP. The method can be used to generate a large number of meteorological ensemble members in order to improve the statistical properties of the ensemble. The effectiveness of the method was demonstrated in a real-time operational hydrologic seasonal forecasts system for the Columbia River basin operated by the Bonneville Power Administration. The forecast skill of the k-nn resampler was tested against the original ESP for three basins at the long-range seasonal time scale. The BSS and CRPSS were used to compare the results to those of the original ESP method. Positive forecast skill scores were found for the resampler method conditioned on different indices for the prediction of spring peak flows in the Dworshak and Hungry Horse basin. For the Libby Dam basin however, no improvement of skill was found. The proposed resampling method is a promising practical approach that can add skill to ESP forecasts at the seasonal time scale. Further improvement is possible by fine tuning the method and selecting the most

  18. The MER Mossbauer Spectrometers: 40 Months of Operation on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, Iris; Rodionov, D.; Schroeder, C.; Morris, R.; Yen, A.; Ming, D.; McCoy, T.; Mittlefehldt, D.; Gellert, R.; Cohen, B.; Schmidt, M.; Klingelhoefer, Goestar

    2007-01-01

    The primary MER objectives have been successfully completed. The total integration time of all MB measurements exceeds the duration of the primary 90-sols-mission for Spirit's MB spectrometer, and approaches this value for Opportunity's MB spectrometer. Both MB spectrometers continue to accumulate valuable scientific data after three years of operation (data is available for download [13]) The identification of aqueous minerals such as goethite in Gusev crater and jarosite at Meridiani Planum by the MER Mossbauer spectrometers is strong evidence for past water activity at the two landing sites.

  19. Phase III Drilling Operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    During July-September, 1998, a jointly funded drilling operation deepened the Long Valley Exploratory Well from 7178 feet to 9832 feet. This was the third major drilling phase of a project that began in 1989, but had sporadic progress because of discontinuities in tiding. Support for Phase III came from the California Energy Commission (CEC), the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and DOE. Each of these agencies had a somewhat different agenda: the CEC wants to evaluate the energy potential (specifically energy extraction from magma) of Long Valley Caldera; the ICDP is studying the evolution and other characteristics of young, silicic calderas; the USGS will use this hole as an observatory in their Volcano Hazards program; and the DOE, through Sandia, has an opportunity to test new geothermal tools and techniques in a realistic field environment. This report gives a description of the equipment used in drilling and testing; a narrative of the drilling operations; compiled daily drilling reports; cost information on the project; and a brief summary of engineering results related to equipment performance and energy potential. Detailed description of the scientific results will appear in publications by the USGS and other researchers.

  20. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming... GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.10 Individually owned class II and class...

  1. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming... GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.10 Individually owned class II and class...

  2. The NOνA experiment, the first 12 months of commissioning, operations and physics data

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, A.

    2015-07-15

    The NOνA experiment is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to make precision measurements of the oscillation probabilities for ν{sub µ} → ν{sub e} and ν{sub µ} → ν{sub µ} for both neutrinos and anti-neutrinos. These measurements will provide new information on the neutrino mass hierarchy, improve our knowledge of whether θ{sub 23} is non-maximal and possibility provide information on the CP violating phase δ{sub CP} of the PMNS neutrino mixing matrix. We present the observations of the first neutrino event in the NOνA far and near detectors along with data obtained during the first year of detector commissioning and operations. We use the data to demonstrate the detector’s ability to identify electron and muon neutrino events and to reject cosmic ray induced backgrounds at a level of 4 × 10{sup 7}:1. New estimates for the signal and background sensitivities of the NOνA experiment during the first year of full detector running are presented.

  3. Joint Operations 2030 - Phase III Report: The JO 2030 Capability Set (Operations interarmees 2030 - Rapport Phase III: L’ensemble capacitaire JO 2030)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    within an operational theatre must be integrated and coordinated. Tactical and operational C2, ISR and SA to work with and track those that are...others operating within the theatre during complex endeavours makes the definition of common objectives and focus extremely difficult. There is a...NATO ‘side of the story’. This can most certainly result in incorrect, possibly volatile, information being spread through a theatre of operations

  4. Removal of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) on chemically modified low-cost adsorbent: batch and column operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Palas; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Bhattacharya, Shreya; Das, Biswajit; Das, Kousik

    2013-03-01

    Batch and column operations were performed utilizing thioglycolated sugarcane carbon (TSCC), a low-cost adsorbent, to remove As(III) and As(V) from aqueous systems. Under optimized batch conditions, the TSCC could remove up to 92.7 and 91.4 % for As(III) and As(V), respectively. An artificial neural network model showed the validity of TSCC as a preferable adsorbent for arsenic [As(III) and As(V)] removal in batch studies. In column operations, removal efficiency increases with increase in influent arsenic concentration and adsorbent dose and decreases with increase in flow rate. At an adsorbent dose of 6.0 g, flow rate 3.0 mL min-1, and initial arsenic concentration 1,500 μg L-1, the arsenic uptake capacity of TSCC for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 85.01 and 83.82 μg g-1, respectively. The Thomas model was used to analyze the column experimental data. Results from the column operations indicated that the adsorption behavior of arsenic [As(III) and As(V)] fits exceptionally well with the Thomas model with high correlation coefficient and very low standard error. Examinations of scanning electron microscopy and FTIR spectroscopy reveal that high arsenic adsorption favors surface complexation on the adsorbent surface.

  5. 47 CFR 80.159 - Operator requirements of Title III of the Communications Act and the Safety Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operator... radiotelegraph auto alarm must carry a radio officer holding a first or second class radiotelegraph operator's certificate who has had at least six months service as a radio officer on board U.S. ships. If...

  6. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from roller, knife, and gravure coating operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities performing coating operations may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those using roller, knife, and gravure coating equipment in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  7. Six-month follow-up multicenter prospective study of 368 patients, phototypes III to V, on epilation efficacy using an 810-nm diode laser at low fluence.

    PubMed

    Royo, Josefina; Urdiales, Fernándo; Moreno, Javier; Al-Zarouni, Marwan; Cornejo, Paloma; Trelles, Mario A

    2011-03-01

    Laser hair removal is currently a popular cosmetic procedure. Traditional high-fluence laser treatment for hair elimination is associated with discomfort and adverse events and it is restricted to low phototype skins. A multicenter study of hair epilation with low fluences and high repetition pulse rate using an 810-nm diode laser was carried out on 368 patients (phototypes III to V) to test its efficacy in a 6-month follow-up after five treatments on the face and various body areas. Objective and subjective assessment as well as histologies show a high index of patient satisfaction due to high efficacy of hair elimination, also proved histologically by the damage observed at hair structure level. Results obtained a high degree of patient satisfaction and a low index of adverse events. Laser epilation was well accepted regarding discomfort and was also complication-free for dark and tanned skins. Treatment is easy to conduct and requires adapting the movement of the hand-piece to a constant speed in order to achieve high-energy deposit on tissue avoiding risks of burning.

  8. Pelvic Floor Disorders 6 Months after Attempted Operative Vaginal Delivery According to the Fetal Head Station: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ducarme, Guillaume; Hamel, Jean-François; Brun, Stéphanie; Madar, Hugo; Merlot, Benjamin; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the fetal head station at attempted operative vaginal delivery (aOVD), and specifically midpelvic or low aOVD, on urinary incontinence (UI), anal incontinence (AI), and perineal pain at 6 months. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 1941 women with singleton term fetuses in vertex presentation with midpelvic or low aOVD between 2008 and 2013 in a tertiary care university hospital. Methods Symptoms of urinary incontinence (UI) using the Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms questionnaire, and symptoms of anal incontinence (AI) severity using Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI) were assessed 6 months after aOVD. We measured the association between midpelvic or low aOVD and symptoms of UI, AI, and perineal pain at 6 months using multiple regression and adjusting for demographics, and risk factors of UI and AI, with adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results The study included 907 women (46.7%) who responded to the questionnaire; 18.4% (167/907) had midpelvic aOVD, and 81.6% (740/907) low; and none of women with symptoms of UI (26.6%, and 22.4%, respectively; p = 0.31), AI (15.9%, and 21.8%; p = 0.09), the FISI score, and perineal pain (17.2%, and 12.7%; p = 0.14) differed significantly between groups. The same was true for stress, urge, and mixed-type UI, severe UI and difficulty voiding. Compared with low pelvic aOVD, the aORs for symptoms of UI in midpelvic aOVD were 0.70 (0.46–1.05) and AI 1.42 (0.85–2.39). Third- and fourth-degree tears were a major risk factor of symptoms of UI (aOR 3.08, 95% CI 1.35–7.00) and AI (aOR 3.47, 95% CI 1.43–8.39). Conclusion Neither symptoms of urinary nor anal incontinence differed at 6 months among women who had midpelvic and low pelvic aOVD. These findings are reassuring and need further studies at long-term to confirm these short-term data. PMID:27992558

  9. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from printing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Printers may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist printers in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  10. Minuteman Stage III Operational Surveillance Program Seven-Year Testing Bondline Aging Study,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Liner Gel Fraction at Various Motor Locations ......... . . 25 14 Liner Moisture at Various Motor Locations ............. ... 26 6 15 Motor TC 30005 ...PageI ,,. 18 Shore A Hardness Gradient of ANB-3066 Propellant at the Forward Equator ........ ...................... .. 30 19 Motor TC 30005 ...75 I 2 Matrix for Minuteman Stage III Bondline Aging Program ........ 76 3 Motor TC 30005 Material Properties Data, Forward

  11. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Lung; Wang, Chih-Ta; Huang, Kai-Yu

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  12. Delta III reverse shoulder arthroplasty in the treatment of complex 3- and 4-part fractures of the proximal humerus: 6 to 42 months of follow up

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a growing tendency for complex proximal humerus fractures (PHF) in osteoporotic patients to be treated with reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). It has been proposed that RSA has more benefits than other treatment options. The aim of our study was to investigate preoperative characteristics as well as clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with complex 3- or 4-part PHF who had undergone primary RSA. Methods Patients with a minimum follow-up of 6 months who had undergone a primary RSA after 3- or 4-part PHF in the period between 2008 and 2011 were eligible for the study. Clinical records, X-rays and CT-scans were investigated and a clinical examination was performed. Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score and Constant-Murley score (CMS) were calculated. Sixteen patients were examined as part of the study. The mean follow-up was 20 months (range 6-42 months). According to Codman-Hertel classification we encountered 15 Hertel “12” and 1 Hertel “8” type fractures. Results Thirty-two patients (27 female – 84.4%) with a mean age of 72 years underwent operations to treat complex 3- and 4-part fractures of the proximal humerus. Sixteen patients were reexamined. In 14 cases the dominant upper extremity was on the right, in 2 cases it was on the left, in 6 cases the right side was affected and in 10 cases the left side was affected. The mean CMS was 54.8 (range 18-95) and the mean DASH was 37.5 (range 2.9-81). A trend was established between the CMS and dominance of the affected shoulder. The CMS was better if the affected shoulder was on the non-dominant side (p-value 0.051). No statistical difference was noted between age and clinical outcome. Conclusions Our mid-term follow-up shows satisfying results in terms of the treatment of severe displaced fractures in elderly patients with RSA. RSA can provide immediate relief and good shoulder function in elderly patients. Nevertheless, the question of longevity of these

  13. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  14. The CYP19 RS4646 Polymorphism IS Related to the Prognosis of Stage I–II and Operable Stage III Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiying; Guo, Yong; Xu, Xiaohong; Zheng, Yabing; Wang, Jiwen; Chen, Zhanhong; Huang, Jian; Huang, Ping; Cai, Jufen; Wang, Xiaojia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Aromatase, encoded by the CYP19 gene, catalyzes the final step of the conversion of androgens to estrogens. Given the critical role of CYP19 in estrogen synthesis, the potential influence of CYP19 rs4646 polymorphism on breast cancer survival, deserves further study. Methods Genotyping for CYP19 rs4646 variants was performed on 406 Chinese women with stage I–II and operable stage III breast cancer. Associations were evaluated between CYP19 rs4646 genotypes and disease-free survival (DFS). Results In premenopausal patients, women who are homozygous for the minor allele (AA) have a longer DFS compared with those carrying the major allele (CC or AC) (87 months versus 48.7 months; Hazard ratio (HR) = 0.56, 95 % CI = 0.318-0.985, P = 0.041). These differences were further demonstrated by a multivariate analysis (HR = 0.456, 95 % CI = 0.249-0.836, P = 0.011). Conversely, the same variant (AA) was estimated to be associated with a poorer DFS in postmenopausal women (AA versus AC or CC: 13.7 months versus 56.3 months; HR = 2.758, 95 % CI = 1.432-5.313, P = 0.002). Furthermore, the differences were confirmed by the COX proportional hazards model (HR = 2.983, 95% CI =1.494-5.955, P = 0.002). Conclusions The present study indicates that CYP19 rs4646 polymorphism is related to DFS in early breast cancer and that the prognosis index of the homozygous for the minor allele (AA) may depend on menopause status. The findings are novel, if confirmed, rs4646 genotypes may provide useful information for routine management in breast cancer. PMID:25793413

  15. 76 FR 68609 - Military Family Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... November 4, 2011 Part III The President Proclamation 8743--Military Family Month, 2011 Proclamation 8744--National Adoption Month, 2011 Proclamation 8745--National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2011 Proclamation 8746--National Diabetes Month, 2011 Proclamation 8747--National Entrepreneurship Month,...

  16. Energy expenditure, nutritional status, body composition and physical fitness of Royal Marines during a 6-month operational deployment in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Fallowfield, Joanne L; Delves, Simon K; Hill, Neil E; Cobley, Rosalyn; Brown, Pieter; Lanham-New, Susan A; Frost, Gary; Brett, Stephen J; Murphy, Kevin G; Montain, Scott J; Nicholson, Christopher; Stacey, Michael; Ardley, Christian; Shaw, Anneliese; Bentley, Conor; Wilson, Duncan R; Allsopp, Adrian J

    2014-09-14

    Understanding the nutritional demands on serving military personnel is critical to inform training schedules and dietary provision. Troops deployed to Afghanistan face austere living and working environments. Observations from the military and those reported in the British and US media indicated possible physical degradation of personnel deployed to Afghanistan. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the changes in body composition and nutritional status of military personnel deployed to Afghanistan and how these were related to physical fitness. In a cohort of British Royal Marines (n 249) deployed to Afghanistan for 6 months, body size and body composition were estimated from body mass, height, girth and skinfold measurements. Energy intake (EI) was estimated from food diaries and energy expenditure measured using the doubly labelled water method in a representative subgroup. Strength and aerobic fitness were assessed. The mean body mass of volunteers decreased over the first half of the deployment ( - 4·6 (sd 3·7) %), predominately reflecting fat loss. Body mass partially recovered (mean +2·2 (sd 2·9) %) between the mid- and post-deployment periods (P< 0·05). Daily EI (mean 10 590 (sd 3339) kJ) was significantly lower than the estimated daily energy expenditure (mean 15 167 (sd 1883) kJ) measured in a subgroup of volunteers. However, despite the body mass loss, aerobic fitness and strength were well maintained. Nutritional provision for British military personnel in Afghanistan appeared sufficient to maintain physical capability and micronutrient status, but providing appropriate nutrition in harsh operational environments must remain a priority.

  17. Urgent Fury: The Operational Leadership of Vice Admiral Joseph P. Metcalf, III

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-04

    President Ronald Reagan approved the use of military force on October 22 with orders to protect U.S. citizens on Grenada , disarm hostile forces...the small Caribbean island of Grenada in 1983. This paper focuses on Metcalf’s operational leadership during Operation URGENT FURY. It begins by...operational commander of Combined Joint Task Force 120. Examples follow from the planning and execution stages of the Grenada invasion illustrating

  18. Remedial Action Report for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Wells

    2007-08-15

    This Phase III remedial action report addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility STF-02 Gun Range at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Phase I, consisting of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operble Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory Site-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring, was addressed in a previous report. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance.

  19. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part III-A: Calculation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the second in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. This document deals exclusively with the calculation procedures, including simplified mixing formulas, aeration tank…

  20. 30 CFR 57.22204 - Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A... Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Main fans shall be— (a) Provided with a pressure-recording system; and (b) Inspected daily while operating if persons are...

  1. 30 CFR 57.22204 - Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A... Main fan operation and inspection (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines). Main fans shall be— (a) Provided with a pressure-recording system; and (b) Inspected daily while operating if persons are...

  2. H-coal pilot plant. Phase II. Construction. Phase III. Operation. Annual report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-04

    At the request of DOE Oak Ridge, ASFI agreed to assume responsibility for completion of Plant construction in December, 1979, at which time Badger Plants' on-site work was ended. This construction effort consisted of electric heat tracing and insulation of piping and instrumentation. At the close of the reporting period the work was completed, or was projected to be completed, within the ASFI budgeted amounts and by dates that will not impact Plant operations. Engineering design solutions were completed for problems encountered with such equipment as the High Pressure Letdown Valves; Slurry Block Valves; Slurry Pumps; the Bowl Mill System; the Dowtherm System; and the Ebullating Pump. A Corrosion Monitoring Program was established. With the exception of Area 500, the Antisolvent Deashing Unit, all operating units were commissioned and operated during the reporting period. Coal was first introduced into the Plant on May 29, 1980, with coal operations continuing periodically through September 30, 1980. The longest continuous coal run was 119 hours. A total of 677 tons of Kentucky No. 11 Coal were processed during the reporting period. The problems encountered were mechanical, not process, in nature. Various Environmental and Health programs were implemented to assure worker safety and protection and to obtain data from Plant operations for scientific analysis. These comprehensive programs will contribute greatly in determining the acceptability of long term H-Coal Plant operations.

  3. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume III. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater collection system workers to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. This volume contains information on operational strategies for the activated sludge process and the use of pure oxygen, the handling and disposal of solids,…

  4. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND... operating limits And monitor using these minimum frequencies Data measurement Data recording Averaging time... pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a Scrubber liquor flow rate...

  5. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND... operating limits And monitor using these minimum frequencies Data measurement Data recording Averaging time... pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a Scrubber liquor flow rate...

  6. Transiting Planets with LSST. III. Detection Rate per Year of Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacklin, Savannah R.; Lund, Michael B.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2017-04-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will generate light curves for approximately 1 billion stars. Our previous work has demonstrated that, by the end of the LSST 10-year mission, large numbers of transiting exoplanetary systems could be recovered using the LSST “deep-drilling” cadence. Here, we extend our previous work to examine how the recoverability of transiting planets over a range of orbital periods and radii evolves per year of LSST operation. As specific example systems, we consider hot Jupiters orbiting solar-type stars and hot Neptunes orbiting K-dwarfs at distances from Earth of several kpc, as well as super-Earths orbiting nearby low-mass M-dwarfs. The detection of transiting planets increases steadily with the accumulation of data over time, generally becoming large (≳10%) after 4–6 years of operation. However, we also find that short-period (≲2 days) hot Jupiters orbiting G-dwarfs and hot Neptunes orbiting K-dwarfs can already be discovered within the first 1–2 years of LSST operation.

  7. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2003-04-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has commenced on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2002, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. Discussions have been held regarding establishing potential new public data repositories, with hope for final determination in 2002.

  8. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2002-10-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has commenced on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2002, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. Discussions have been held regarding establishing potential new public data repositories, with hope for final determination in 2002.

  9. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2000-12-01

    In the past six months the NGDRS program has seen a new spike in activity, particularly in October 2000. This new spike in activity is the result of increased activities in the petroleum sector, including new funding to examine infrastructure issues facing many of the companies over the long-term. With industry conditions continuing to rapidly change and evolve, the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy has evolved as well. With the severe lack of available public data repository space and the establishment of a major national geoscience data repository facility unlikely in the near future, the focus is on increasing public awareness and access to nonproprietary company data holdings that remain in the public and private sector. Efforts still continue to identify and facilitate the entry of new repository space into the public sector. Additionally, AGI has been working with the National Academy of Sciences Board on Earth Sciences and Resources staff to initiate a study and workshop to develop a policy recommendation on geoscience data preservation and prioritization of efforts. Additional data transfer efforts were undertaken during the second half of FY00. Altura's Permian Basin core was contributed to the Texas BEG's facility in Midland. Transcription and evaluation of selected seismic data from the Santa Barbara Channel previously owned by Phillips was completed. Additionally, Chevron has released over 180,000 boxes of cores to the public through the NGDRS metadata catalog.

  10. Economic assessment of central cancer registry operations, Part III: Results from 5 programs.

    PubMed

    Tangka, Florence; Subramanian, Sujha; Beebe, Maggie Cole; Trebino, Diana; Michaud, Frances

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we report results from the cost analysis of 5 central cancer registries funded by the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR). To estimate the true economic costs of operating a cancer registry, we used a cost-assessment tool (CAT) to collect data on all registry activities, not just those funded by the NPCR. Data were collected on actual, rather than budgeted, expenditures, including personnel, consultants, information technology (IT) support, and other factors influencing costs. Factors that can affect registry costs include the amount of consolidation from abstract to incident cases, the method of data reporting, the number of edits that must be performed manually versus electronically, and the amount of interstate data exchange required of a registry. Expenditures were allocated to specific surveillance and data enhancement and analysis activities. Our study confirmed that cost per case varies across registry activities. The cost of surveillance activities per case ranges from $24.79 to $95.78 while the cost of data enhancement and analysis registry activities per reported cancer case ranges from $2.91 to $9.32. Total cost per reported cancer case also varies, ranging from $30 to slightly more than $100, with a median of $45.84. Further research using data from all NPCR-funded registries is required to assess reasons for this variation. Information gained from such an assessment will improve efficiency in registry operations and provide data to better quantify the funding requirements for expanding registry activities.

  11. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Operations, Level III

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    A Level III pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator to evaluate pollution prevention (P2) options for various waste streams: The main objective of this study was to identify and evaluate options to reduce the quantities of each waste stream generated by the TSCA Incinerator operations to realize significant environmental and/or economic benefits from P2. For each of the waste streams, P2 options were evaluated following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hierarchy to (1) reduce the quantity of waste generated, (2) recycle the waste, and/or (3) use alternate waste treatment or segregation methods. This report provides process descriptions, identification and evaluation of P2 options, and final recommendations.

  12. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2000-04-01

    In the past six months the NGDRS program has continued to engaged new contacts, identify additional data transfer targets, and improve the metadata catalog for both easier use and long-term maintainability. With industry conditions continuing to rapidly change and evolve, the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy has evolved as well. With the severe lack of available public data repository space and the establishment of a major national geoscience data repository facility unlikely in the near future, the focus is on increasing public awareness and access to nonproprietary company data holdings that remain in the public and private sector. Efforts still continue to identify and facilitate the entry of new repository space into the public sector. Additionally, AGI has been working with the National Academy of Sciences Board on Earth Sciences and Resources staff to initiate a study and workshop to develop a policy recommendation on geoscience data preservation and prioritization of efforts. Additional data transfer efforts were undertaken during the first half of FY00. AGI is working with the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology to assist in the transfer of Altura's midland core holdings to the University of Texas. Phillips has made selected seismic data from the Santa Barbara Channel available for transfer. A pilot test has been initiated to determine the cost and potential success rate at transcription of the original tapes. Additionally, redesign of the GeoTrek metadata catalog was initiated, including both a redesign of the user interface as well as making GeoTrek fully a broker, accessing multiple databases at remote locations in real time.

  13. [Technical improvement of the Kapandji-Sauvé operation, called "Technique III"].

    PubMed

    Kapandji, A I

    1998-01-01

    The tendon of the ECU in its sheath is the main element of stability of the ulnar stump. In the original procedure, it was necessary first to cut the ulna for downwards tilting of the ulnar head, so as to open the distal radio-ulnar joint to remove its cartilages. It is better to leave the ulnar head in place, just widening the dorsal aspect of the DRUJ and peel its cartilages. The ulnar head is then fixed with a cancellous screw in its place in the sigmoid notch. Just above this fixation, it is necessary to separate the ECU tendon included in its sheath from the ulnar shaft, only along a limited line 10-15 mm long, where the ulnar resection will be made. The ECU tendon is therefore not disconnected from the ulnar stump, which is better stabilized. In contrast with the original technique the ulnar resection is made in a second stage, with two ents: a distal and transverse ent, above the head fixation, and a proximal and oblique ent, making a tip on the medical side of the ulnar stump. Ulnar resection is consequently minimized by means of this obliquity. It is very important to check that this tip is 5 mm from the ulnar head cut in supination. The first eight cases show better stability of the stump and fast recovery of amplitudes of prono-supination. The patient feels "comfortable" after a period of two to six months. These advantages justify replacement of the previous technique by this procedure.

  14. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION ON THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2001-10-01

    The NGDRS has attained 72% of its targeted goal for cores and cuttings transfers, with over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. Additionally, large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remained actively involved in assisting the National Research Council with background materials and presentations for their panel convened to study the data preservation issue. A final report of the panel is expected in early 2002. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has commenced on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2002, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. Discussions have been held regarding establishing potential new public data repositories, with hope for final determination in 2002.

  15. DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III/IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS SUMMARY DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.

    2009-10-01

    Dissolution of salt from Type III/IIIA waste tanks at the Savannah River Site may create solutions with inhibitor concentrations below those currently required (0.6M OH{sup -} and 1.1M OH{sup -} + NO{sub 2}{sup -}) per the Corrosion Control Program for high nitrate salt solutions (5.5 to 8.5M NO{sub 3}{sup -}). An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of grade A537 carbon steel for waste simulants containing 4.5-8.5M NaNO{sub 3} with maximum inhibitor concentrations of 0.6M NaOH and 0.2M NaNO{sub 2}. These maximum inhibitor concentrations used in this program are at a reduced level from those currently required. Current requirements were initially established for the Types I, II and IV tanks made of A285 carbon steel. The experimental program involved corrosion testing to evaluate the pitting and stress corrosion stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of the Type III/IIIA waste tank materials. The program was conducted in two phases; the results of the first phase were reported previously (WSRC-STI-2006-00029). In this second phase, the corrosion specimens were modified to represent the 'as-fabricated' condition of the tank wall, and included specimens with mill scale, ground welds and stress-relief heat treatments. The complete description of the corrosion testing and the results are reported herein. The collective corrosion test results for A537 carbon steel in high nitrate waste simulants (4.5 - 8.5M) with the maximum inhibitor concentrations of 0.6M NaOH and 0.2M NaNO{sub 2} were as follows: (1) In long-term non-polarized U-bend testing, heat treatment, similar to the waste tank stress relief regime, reduced the incidence of cracking over the 18-month test period. Vapor space SCC was found to initiate on non-heat treated U-bend coupons. (2) In polarized U-bend testing, cracking occurred on U-bend coupons that had welds prepared similar to those in the waste tanks, i.e. ground and heat treated. (3) In electrochemical

  16. Examination of VRLA cells sampled from a battery energy storage system (BESS) after 30-months of operations

    SciTech Connect

    SZYMBORSKI,JOSEPH; HUNT,GEORGE; TSAGALIS,ANGELO; JUNGST,RUDOLPH G.

    2000-06-08

    Valve-Regulated Lead-Acid (VRLA) batteries continue to be employed in a wide variety of applications for telecommunications and Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS). With the rapidly growing penetration of internet services, the requirements for standby power systems appear to be changing. For example, at last year's INTELEC, high voltage standby power systems up to 300-vdc were discussed as alternatives to the traditional 48-volt power plant. At the same time, battery reliability and the sensitivity of VRLAS to charging conditions (e.g., in-rush current, float voltage and temperature), continue to be argued extensively. Charge regimes which provide off-line charging or intermittent charge to the battery have been proposed. Some of these techniques go against the widely accepted rules of operation for batteries to achieve optimum lifetime. Experience in the telecom industry with high voltage systems and these charging scenarios is limited. However, GNB has several years of experience in the installation and operation of large VRLA battery systems that embody many of the power management philosophies being proposed. Early results show that positive grid corrosion is not accelerated and battery performance is maintained even when the battery is operated at a partial state-of-charge for long periods of time.

  17. Failure analysis and performance evaluation of NASA inertial reference unit (DRIRU 2) after 50 months of orbital operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, K. N.; Ritter, J. W.; Skinner, D.; Vanalstine, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The first production DRIRU 2 (NASA standard high performance inertial reference unit) system was launched as a subsystem of the Modular Attitude Control System for the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft in February 1980. This hardware was retrieved during the repair of the SMM during Shuttle Flight 41-C in April 1984 and returned to Teledyne Systems Company (manufacturer) for investigation and performance measurements as directed by Goddard Space Flight Center. A failure of one of the three gyro channels occurred approximately 6.5 months after launch. The built in redundancy functioned properly, the DRIRU 2 continued to provide the required attitude control function without performance degradation. Subsequent failure of other attitude control subsystems made the SMM a candidate for the first demonstration of the shuttle in-orbit repair capabilty. The in-orbit DRIRU 2 II failure scenario and the results of the analyses/tests conducted after retrieval are discussed. Comparison of this data with similar data prior to launch demonstates the excellent stability of performance parameters achieveable with DRIRU 2.

  18. Demo III Operational Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) General Dyanmics Robotic Systems Performing Organization Report Number Sponsoring...Total Robotic Vehicle Weight: 2500 lbs – Transportable in Theater (e.g., Helo, V-22) – Ruggedization Suitable for User Appraisal • Mobility – Day

  19. β-Cell Function Improvements in Grade I/II Obese Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes 1 Month After Biliopancreatic Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira Vasques, Ana Carolina; Pareja, José Carlos; de Oliveira, Maria da Saude; Satake Novaes, Fernanda; Miranda de Oliveira Lima, Marcelo; Chaim, Élinton A.; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Cobelli, Claudio; Geloneze, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) surgery on β-cell function in grade I and II obese patients with type 2 diabetes using oral and intravenous glucose loads. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixty-eight women were divided into the following three groups: 19 lean-control (23.0 ± 2.2 kg/m2) and 18 obese-control (35.0 ± 4.8 kg/m2) subjects with normal glucose tolerance, and 31 obese patients with type 2 diabetes (36.3 ± 3.7 kg/m2). Of the 31 diabetic women, 64% underwent BPD (n = 20, BMI: 36.5 ± 3.7 kg/m2) and were reassessed 1 month after surgery. Oral glucose tolerance tests and hyperglycemic clamps were performed. Mathematical modeling was used to analyze basal and stimulated β-cell function, insulin sensitivity (IS), hepatic extraction (HE) of insulin, and delay time of β-cell response to a specific plasma glucose concentration. RESULTS After BPD, restoration of the basal disposition index (P < 0.001) and improvement of the stimulated disposition indices in oral and intravenous glucose stimulation of the β-cell were observed (P < 0.05). In both dynamic tests, there were no changes in the delay time of β-cell response. IS for oral glucose stimulation (ISoral) and intravenous clamp glucose stimulation (ISclamp) was completely normalized (P < 0.001). ISoral and ISclamp increased approximately 5.0-fold and 3.5-fold, respectively (P < 0.01). The HE of insulin increased in the basal (P < 0.05) and stimulated states (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS β-Cell function, IS, and HE of insulin improved after BPD, which improved glycemic control. PMID:24135388

  20. The role of induction chemotherapy before radiation therapy in non-operative management of stage III NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Green, M R

    1994-11-01

    Radiation therapy alone has been 'standard' management of patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer for several decades. Palliative benefits are routinely achieved but significant survival benefits have not been documented. Patterns of failure in Stage III patients emphasize the need to pursue better treatment for both local macroscopic disease and distant micrometastatic sites. Improved control in both areas will be necessary to meaningfully enhance outcome for the universe of Stage III NSCLC patients. Several randomized trials show a significant survival benefit when cisplatin-containing induction chemotherapy is administered prior to locoregional treatment. In the favorable subset of Stage III patients selected for study by CALGB, the surviving fraction at 2-5 years post-therapy was > or = 2-fold larger in the chemoradiation group than in the cohort treated with radiation alone. The French trial documented a significant decrease in distant metastases rate among the chemotherapy treated patients. In all the trials where patterns of failure are discussed, local disease persistence is the overwhelming rule. Future trials must evaluate improved induction chemotherapy approaches. Stage III patients are an ethical population in which to test induction therapy with new drug combinations randomized against already 'active' regimens for comparative efficacy. End points would be initial response rates, patterns of failure, and overall survival. The feasibility of high-dose chemotherapy regimens with growth factor and hematopoietic support followed by aggressive radiation must be tested. If feasible, trials randomizing high dose versus conventional dose induction programs within the context of sequential multimodality therapy should follow. Intensified radiation approaches such as hyperfractionation or CHART should be paired with active concurrent chemotherapy following induction chemotherapy alone. Pursuit of these approaches over the next several years will

  1. 47 CFR 80.159 - Operator requirements of Title III of the Communications Act and the Safety Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operator... Radio Operator License, as specified in § 13.7 of this chapter. (e) Each ship transporting more than...

  2. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    SciTech Connect

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer-Tropsch IV

  3. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operations. b. This subfunction shall not include expenses related to financial accounting, purchasing or... contribute to more than a single operating function such as general financial accounting activities... accounting year. Allocations of maintenance burden to capital projects, and service sales to others shall...

  4. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-08-05

    The NTS is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. NNSA/NSO is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and NSTec is the Management & Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The U10C Disposal Site is located in the northwest corner of Area 9 at the NTS (Figure 1) and is located in a subsidence crater created by two underground nuclear events, one in October 1962 and another in April 1964. The disposal site opened in 1971 for the disposal of rubbish, refuse, pathological waste, asbestos-containing material, and industrial solid waste. A Notice of Intent form to operate the disposal site as a Class II site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 26, 1994, and was acknowledged in a letter to the DOE on February 8, 1994. It operated as a state of Nevada Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS) until it closed on October 5, 1995, for retrofit as a Class III SWDS. The retrofit consisted of the installation of a minimum four-foot compacted soil layer to segregate the different waste types and function as a liner to inhibit leachate and water flow into the lower waste zone. Five neutron monitoring tubes were installed in this layer to monitor possible leachate production and water activity. Upon acceptance of the installed barrier and approval of an Operating Plan by NDEP/BFF, the site reopened in January 1996 as a Class III SWDS for the disposal of industrial solid waste and other inert waste.

  5. REO Monthly

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Howard Andrew

    2010-12-31

    A spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel that evaluates combinations of renewable energy technologies at a site and identifies the combination that minimizes life cycle cost. Constraints on the optimization such as percent of energy from renewable, available land area; available investment capital, etc make the optimization more useful. Inputs to the model include building location, number of square feet and floors; monthly energy use and cost for electric and any other fuels. Outputs include size of each RE technology total investment, utility costs, O&M costs; percent renewable; life cycle cost; rate of return; CO2 savings.

  6. POST OPERATIVE REHABILITATION OF GRADE III MEDIAL COLLATERAL LIGAMENT INJURIES: EVIDENCE BASED REHABILITATION AND RETURN TO PLAY.

    PubMed

    Logan, Catherine A; O'Brien, Luke T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-12-01

    The medial collateral ligament is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee, with injury generally sustained in the athletic population as a result of valgus contact with or without tibial external rotation. The capacity of the medial collateral ligament to heal has been demonstrated in both laboratory and clinical studies; however, complete ruptures heal less consistently and may result in persistent instability. When operative intervention is deemed necessary, anatomical medial knee reconstruction is recommended. Post-operative rehabilitation focuses on early motion and the return of normal neuromuscular firing patterns with progression based on attainment of specific phase criteria and goals. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the determinants of phase progression and the importance of objectively assessing readiness for advancement that is consistent with post-operative healing. Additional tests and validated measures to assess readiness for sport are also presented.

  7. POST OPERATIVE REHABILITATION OF GRADE III MEDIAL COLLATERAL LIGAMENT INJURIES: EVIDENCE BASED REHABILITATION AND RETURN TO PLAY

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Luke T.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The medial collateral ligament is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee, with injury generally sustained in the athletic population as a result of valgus contact with or without tibial external rotation. The capacity of the medial collateral ligament to heal has been demonstrated in both laboratory and clinical studies; however, complete ruptures heal less consistently and may result in persistent instability. When operative intervention is deemed necessary, anatomical medial knee reconstruction is recommended. Post-operative rehabilitation focuses on early motion and the return of normal neuromuscular firing patterns with progression based on attainment of specific phase criteria and goals. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the determinants of phase progression and the importance of objectively assessing readiness for advancement that is consistent with post-operative healing. Additional tests and validated measures to assess readiness for sport are also presented. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27999730

  8. Criteria for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Library Operations and Services. Phase III: Recommended Criteria and Methods for Their Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessel, C. J.; Moore, K. L.

    This report assesses and recommends criteria and methods for evaluating the performance (effectiveness and efficiency) of technical library operations and services. These criteria and methods include those identified in the state-of-the-art of library evaluation (existing criteria and methods) and those developed by adoption of criteria from the…

  9. Bivariate distributions in statistical spectroscopy studies: III. Non interacting particle strength densities for one-body transition operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, V. K. B.; Majumdar, D.

    1995-12-01

    In statistical spectroscopy, it was shown by French et al. (Ann. Phys., N.Y. 181, 235 (1988)) that the bivariate strength densities take a convolution form with the non interacting particle (NIP) strength density being convoluted with a spreading bivariate Gaussian due to interactions. Leaving aside the question of determining the parameters of the spreading bivariate Gaussian, one needs good methods for constructing the NIP bivariate strength densities I {O/ h }( E,E') ( h is a one-body hamiltonian and O is a transition operator) in large shell model spaces. A formalism for constructing I {O/ h } is developed for one-body transition operators by using spherical orbits and spherical configurations. For rapid construction and also for applying the statistical theory in large shell model spaces I {O/ h } is decomposed into partial densities defined by unitary orbit configurations (unitary orbit is a set of spherical orbits). Trace propagation formulas for the bivariate moments M rs with r+s ≤2 of the partial NIP strength densities, which will determine the Gaussian representation, are derived. In a large space numerical example with Gamow-Teller β - transition operator, the superposition of unitary orbit partial bivariate Gaussian densities is shown to give a good representation of the exact NIP strength densities. Trace propagation formulas for M rs with r+<—4 are also derived in m-particle scalar spaces which are useful for many purposes.

  10. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Refrigerator System at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Phase III of the System Performance and Operations Upgrades for 2006

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sidi-Yekhlef; R. Than; J. Tuozzolo; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen; D. Arenius

    2006-05-01

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and II of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase III, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  11. Combined state-adding and state-deleting approaches to type III multi-step rationally extended potentials: Applications to ladder operators and superintegrability

    SciTech Connect

    Marquette, Ian; Quesne, Christiane

    2014-11-15

    Type III multi-step rationally extended harmonic oscillator and radial harmonic oscillator potentials, characterized by a set of k integers m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}, ⋯, m{sub k}, such that m{sub 1} < m{sub 2} < ⋯ < m{sub k} with m{sub i} even (resp. odd) for i odd (resp. even), are considered. The state-adding and state-deleting approaches to these potentials in a supersymmetric quantum mechanical framework are combined to construct new ladder operators. The eigenstates of the Hamiltonians are shown to separate into m{sub k} + 1 infinite-dimensional unitary irreducible representations of the corresponding polynomial Heisenberg algebras. These ladder operators are then used to build a higher-order integral of motion for seven new infinite families of superintegrable two-dimensional systems separable in cartesian coordinates. The finite-dimensional unitary irreducible representations of the polynomial algebras of such systems are directly determined from the ladder operator action on the constituent one-dimensional Hamiltonian eigenstates and provide an algebraic derivation of the superintegrable systems whole spectrum including the level total degeneracies.

  12. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    from the SV Bus, specifically the Scalable Power Regulation Unit and is being amplified by the solar arrays which act as highly efficient antennas. To...Military Operations in Urban Terrain; Defense-Wide Mission Support; Air Mobility; and Space Launch Orbital Support. For military users, the GPS III...Service: The GPS III program will provide O&S for on- orbit support through the Launch and On- Orbit Support contract. For Space Vehicle (SV)01 and

  13. Operation Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin : Annual Report 1995 : Volume III - Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Colville Confederated Tribes; US Fish and Wildlife Service; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Yakama Indian Nation

    1996-06-01

    Beaver Creek Hatchery is located on the Elochoman River about 10 miles upstream from the river mouth. The Elochoman River is a north bank tributary of the lower Columbia River, just downstream of Cathlamet, Washington. The facility consists of 10 intermediate raceways, 20 raceways, (1) earthen rearing pond, (2) adult holding ponds, and a hatchery building with 60 troughs. It is staffed with 4 FTE`s. Water rights total 16,013 gpm from three sources: Elochoman River, Beaver Creek and a well. Beaver Creek water is gravity flow while the other two sources are pumped. The Elochoman River is used in summer and fall while Beaver Creek water is used from mid-November through mid-May. Filtered well water (1 cfs) is used to incubate eggs and for early rearing of fry. Water use in summer is about 5,800 gpm. Gobar Pond, a 0.93-acre earthen rearing pond located on Gobar Creek (Kalama River tributary), is operated as a satellite facility.

  14. SCAI/AATS/ACC/STS operator and institutional requirements for transcatheter valve repair and replacement, Part III: Pulmonic valve.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Ziyad M; Ruiz, Carlos E; Zahn, Evan; Ringel, Richard; Aldea, Gabriel S; Bacha, Emile A; Bavaria, Joseph; Bolman, R Morton; Cameron, Duke E; Dean, Larry S; Feldman, Ted; Fullerton, David; Horlick, Eric; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Moon, Marc R; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Trento, Alfredo; Tommaso, Carl L

    2015-07-01

    With the evolution of transcatheter valve replacement, an important opportunity has arisen for cardiologists and surgeons to collaborate in identifying the criteria for performing these procedures. Therefore, The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS), American College of Cardiology (ACC), and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) have partnered to provide recommendations for institutions to assess their potential for instituting and/or maintaining a transcatheter valve program. This article concerns transcatheter pulmonic valve replacement (tPVR). tPVR procedures are in their infancy with few reports available on which to base an expert consensus statement. Therefore, many of these recommendations are based on expert consensus and the few reports available. As the procedures evolve, technology advances, experience grows, and more data accumulate, there will certainly be a need to update this consensus statement. The writing committee and participating societies believe that the recommendations in this report serve as appropriate requisites. In some ways, these recommendations apply to institutions more than to individuals. There is a strong consensus that these new valve therapies are best performed using a Heart Team approach; thus, these credentialing criteria should be applied at the institutional level. Partnering societies used the ACC's policy on relationships with industry (RWI) and other entities to author this document (http://www.acc.org/guidelines/about-guidelines-and-clinical-documents). To avoid actual, potential, or perceived conflicts of interest due to industry relationships or personal interests, all members of the writing committee, as well as peer reviewers of the document, were asked to disclose all current healthcare-related relationships including those existing 12 months before the initiation of the writing effort. A committee of interventional cardiologists and

  15. DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III/IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS INTERIM REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Counts, K; Bruce Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

    2007-12-31

    phases of work. No SCC has occurred in the first 100 days of testing. The LAI specimens experienced minor corrosion at the liquid line with corrosion products visible on the weld material and in the heat-affected zones on either side of the welds. The VS specimens are more evenly and slightly more corroded. Polarized U-bend testing is complete after approximately 80 days of testing. No SCC occurred, but the results are inconclusive due to a competing, unexpected galvanic corrosion mechanism that interfered in the last 50 days of testing. No cracking was indicated during the first month. The tests will be repeated in order to satisfy the original objective which was to determine the effect of grinding HLW tank welds and heat treating the tanks had on corrosion. Both the non-polarized and polarized U-bend tests will continue. Additionally, cyclic polarization (CP) testing will be performed to examine the effects of surface oxides on corrosion and the differences in corrosion susceptibility between welded and un-welded areas.

  16. State of competition in gasoline marketing. The effects of refiner operation at retail (a study required by Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act)

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, J.B.; Fenili, R.N.

    1980-05-01

    Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act requires the Secretary of Energy to report to the Congress on the extent to which producers, refiners, and other suppliers of motor fuel subsidize the sale of such fuel at retail or wholesale with profits obtained from other operations. This is Part I of the report required under that Title. It addresses a number of questions relating to the central issue - the state of competition in the gasoline marketing industry. Part II of the report, to be issued this fall, will discuss the subpoenaed documents of nine integrated companies, and will contain recommendations for action, if deemed necessary. The basic thrust of Part I is an examination of three issues: (1) Are integrated refiners subsidizing their company operated gasoline retail outlets; (2) Are integrated refiners moving gasoline away from their branded dealer network into their own retail outlets; and (3) Are integrated refiners manipulating the allocation system in favor of their own retail outlets to the detriment of other gasoline marketers. At a series of regional hearings, independent marketers charged that integrated refiners were engaging in each of these practices. In essence, integrated refiners were portrayed as using unfair or illegal competitive practices which would ultimately lead to their domination of retail gasoline markets. This report addresses each allegation, after providing a historical and theoretical framework for today's debate.

  17. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  18. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  19. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  20. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  1. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  2. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  3. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  4. Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this study,…

  5. Review of the Coal and Electric Sections in the Monthly Energy Review and an Overall Review of Office of Energy Data Operations Publications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Review of the Coal and Electric Sections of the Monthly Energy Review and an Overall Review of OEDO Publications is comprised of two sections. The first, Review of Coal and Electric Power Data in the Monthly Energy Review consists of a detailed analysis of content and data presentation issues. The major findings of this section are summarized below: the coal and electric power data in the Monthly Energy Review (MER) represent the major functions of the respective industries; coal data by rank are inconsistently presented in the MER; coal value or coal cost and quality data are not adequately represented in the MER; the presentation of two or more units of measurement on the same table in MER may invite incorrect comparisons unless properly separated (e.g., - double line separation); to improve the timeliness of the data in the MER, the increased use of estimated, preliminary, and/or projected data should be considered; and the table and graphic formats used in the MER present the data clearly and concisely. The second section of the report, An Overall Review of OEDO Publications, contains the results of an analysis of data presentation in forty-six coal, gas, electric, oil and consolidated publications. A summary of our findings and recommendations is listed below: where practical, a scope of publication section and executive summary should be included in OEDO publications; table formats, including titles and endnotes should be uniform; more detailed guidelines for titling should be established by the Energy Information Administration (EIA); and a more detailed set of standards for footnotes, notes and source notes should be established by EIA.

  6. Research and operational products from the combination of a monthly hydrographic station and an oceanic buoy: The Biscay AGL fixed-point water column observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavin, Alicia; Cano, Daniel; González-Pola, Cesar; Tel, Elena; Rodriguez, Carmen; Ruiz, Manuel; Somavilla, Raquel

    2015-04-01

    Long term time series are an important tool for increasing the knowledge of ocean processes as well as for studying water masses variability in different time scales and changes and tendencies in marine ecosystems. Time series has been classically obtained by oceanographic ships that regularly cover standard sections and stations. From 1991, shelf and slope waters of the Southern Bay of Biscay are regularly sampled in a monthly hydrographic line north of Santander to a depth of 1000 m in early stages and for the whole water column down to 2580 m in recent times. Nearby, in June 2007, the IEO deployed an oceanic-meteorological buoy (AGL Buoy, 43° 50.67'N; 3° 46.20'W, and 40 km offshore, www.boya-agl.st.ieo.es). The long-term hydrographical record have allowed to define the seasonality, trends, and interannual variability at all levels, including the mixing layer and the main water masses North Atlantic Central Water and Mediterranean Water. The relation of these changes with high frequency surface conditions has been examined using the AGL buoy data from 2007 as well as satellite and reanalysis data. On that context and using that combination of sources, some products and quality controlled series of high interest and utility for scientific purposes have been developed and are offered hourly in the web page. Main products obtained are: SST and SSS anomalies, wave significant height character with respect to monthly average, and currents with respect to seasonal averages. Ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes (latent and sensible) are computed from the buoy atmospheric and oceanic measurements. Estimations of the mixed layer depth and bulk series at different water levels are provided in a monthly basis. Quality controlled series are provided for sea surface salinity, oxygen and chlorophyll data. Some sensors are particularly affected by biofouling, and monthly visits to the buoy permit to follow these sensors behaviour. Chlorophyll-fluorescence sensor is the main concern

  7. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-09-14

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan

  8. Final Report of Multicenter Canadian Phase III Randomized Trial of 3 Versus 8 Months of Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Before Conventional-Dose Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita Ludgate, Charles; Malone, Shawn; Perry, Gad; Eapen, Libni; Bowen, Julie; Robertson, Susan; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of 3 vs. 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before conventional-dose radiotherapy (RT) on disease-free survival for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 1995 and June 2001, 378 men were randomized to either 3 or 8 months of flutamide and goserelin before 66 Gy RT at four participating centers. The median baseline prostate-specific antigen level was 9.7 ng/mL (range, 1.3-189). Of the 378 men, 26% had low-, 43% intermediate-, and 31% high-risk disease. The two arms were balanced in terms of age, Gleason score, clinical T category, risk group, and presenting prostate-specific antigen level. The median follow-up for living patients was 6.6 years (range, 1.6-10.1). Of the 378 patients, 361 were evaluable, and 290 were still living. Results: The 5-year actuarial freedom from failure rate for the 3- vs. 8-month arms was 72% vs. 75%, respectively (p = 0.18). No difference was found in the failure types between the two arms. The median prostate-specific antigen level at the last follow-up visit for patients without treatment failure was 0.6 ng/mL in the 3-month arm vs. 0.50 ng/mL in the 8-month arm. The disease-free survival rate at 5 years was improved for the high-risk patients in the 8-month arm (71% vs. 42%, p = 0.01). Conclusion: A longer period of NHT before standard-dose RT did not alter the patterns of failure when combined with 66-Gy RT. High-risk patients in the 8-month arm had significant improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate.

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  10. Phase I/II Study of Neurosurgical Resection and Intra-operative Cesium-131 Radio-isotope Brachytherapy in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Wernicke, A. Gabriella; Yondorf, Menachem Z; Peng, Luke; Trichter, Samuel; Nedialkova, Lucy; Sabbas, Albert; Khulidzhanov, Fridon; Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Christos, Paul; Pannullo, Susan; Boockvar, John A.; Stieg, Phillip; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Object Resected brain metastases have a high rate of local recurrence without adjuvant therapy. Adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) remains the standard of care with the rate of local control >90%. However, WBRT is delivered over 10–15 days, which can delay other therapy and is associated with acute and long-term toxicities. Intra-operative permanent Cesium-131 (Cs-131) implants can be performed at the time of surgery, thereby avoiding any additional therapy. We evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of a novel treatment approach of brain metastases with a permanent intra-operative Cs-131 brachytherapy. Methods After IRB approval, 24 patients with a newly diagnosed metastasis to the brain (n=24) were accrued on a prospective protocol between 2010 and 2012. There were 10 frontal, 7 parietal, 4 cerebellar, 2 occipital, and 1 temporal metastases. Histology included lung (16), breast (2), kidney (2), melanoma (2), colon (1), and cervix (1). Cs-131 stranded seeds were placed as a permanent volume implant. Prescription dose was 80Gy at 5mm depth from the resection cavity surface. Distant metastases were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or WBRT, depending on the number of lesions. Primary end point was resection cavity freedom from progression (FFP). Secondary end points included distant metastases FFP, median survival, overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Results Median follow-up was 19.3 months (range, 12.89 – 29.57 months). Median age was 65 years (range, 45–84 years). Median volume of resected tumor was 10.31 cc (range, 1.77 - 87.11 cc). Median number of seeds employed was 12 (range, 4–35) with median activity per seed of 3.82 mCi (range, 3.31–4.83 mCi) and total activity of 46.91 mCi (range, 15.31–130.70 mCi). Local recurrence FFP was 100%. There was 1 adjacent leptomeningeal recurrence, resulting in a 1-year regional FFP of 93.8% (95% CI = 63.2%, 99.1%). Distant metastasis FFP was 48.4% (95% CI = 26.3%, 67.4%). Median OS was 9

  11. [Functional outcome and quality of life at least 6 months after pneumonectomy--effect of operation, adjuvant therapy, tumor stage, sex, type of pneumonia and recurrence].

    PubMed

    Fiedler, R; Neef, H; Rosendahl, W

    1999-01-01

    This study reports on the results of a checkup carried out on 38 patients subjected to an extended cancer aftercare examination at least 6 months after pneumectomy because of bronchial carcinoma, 12 of these patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Lung function data determined by body plethysmography were measured, as well as the quality of life, using the Karnofsky and Spitzer indices as well as QLQ-C30 of the EORTC. In addition, anamnestic data and postoperative ECG and blood gas analysis results were recorded. The most important findings concern restricted lung function due to pneumectomy, an IVC decrease by 33.3%, a drop in FEV1 by 27.3% and a reduction of the total lung capacity (TLC) by 14%. Moreover, a distinctly increased right heart load was seen in 23.4% of all patients. The quality of life tests revealed a slightly reduced quality of life in the external assessment indices according to Karnofsky (86 +/- 11%) and Spitzer (8.6 +/- 1.2). Self-assessment by QLQ-C30 of the EORTC, however, evidenced a clear reduction of the global quality of life (54.2 +/- 15.6) and role function, a moderate decrease of physical, emotional, cognitive and social functioning as well as a greatly increased incidence of the symptoms fatigue, dyspnea, sleep disturbances and pain after surgery. Adjuvant therapy applied in 12 patients had no significant influence, neither on lung function parameters nor on the quality of life. A more advanced tumour stage or a relapse, however, will adversely affect the quality of life.

  12. A Catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes Observed with the Fermi- Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor: The First Sixteen Months of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.

    2009-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) has been detecting on the average about one terrestrial gamma-ray flash every four weeks. This catalog presents the basic characteristics of observed TGFs from the beginning of the Fermi-GBM operation in 2008 July until 2009 October. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 30 MeV. It is found that the TGF pulses are typically shorter than previously reported, and in several cases less than 0.2ms. Extremely high counting rates are encountered 200kcps or higher per detector during portions of some TGFs. These high rates require considerable corrections (with inherent assumptions) to the observed data in order to derive the true counting rates.

  13. [Normal values of various biochemical indicators in lowland black-white dairy cows from the government sector of the Gdańsk Coast. III. Changes in those indicators during feeding seasons and in consecutive months and years].

    PubMed

    Wolańczyk-Rutkowiak, K

    1986-01-01

    In six consecutive feeding seasons the results of tests of biochemical parameters from 5329 cows were estimated. Besides, the parameters from 7229 cows for the consecutive calendar months and years in the period of 1973-1977 were evaluated. It was established that the cyclic seasonal changes were showed only by levels of proteins, sodium, magnesium and calcium. In the months from May to August a decrease of glucose level, an increase of total protein and urea levels as well as a low level of sodium existed. The values of the rest parameters changed irregularly, what ordered to be cautious in a drawing of conclusions on the basis of investigations performed in short periods of times. In particular seasons and years, such phenomena as hypoglycemia, hyperproteinemia, increased level of urea, hypochloremia, hypopotassemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia and hypophosphoremia could exist irregularly.

  14. A phase III randomized trial comparing adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus standard adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy in operable node-positive breast cancer: Final results

    SciTech Connect

    Rouesse, Jacques . E-mail: j.rouesse@stcloud-huguenin.org; Lande, Brigitte de la; Bertheault-Cvitkovic, Frederique; Serin, Daniel; Graic, Yvon; Combe, Martin; Leduc, Bernard; Lucas, Virginie; Demange, Liliane; Tan Dat Nguyen; Castera, Daniel; Krzisch, Claude; Villet, Richard; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Garbay, Jean-Remy; Nogues, Catherine

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To compare concomitant and sequential adjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens in node-positive, operable breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized, French, multicenter, phase III trial enrolling 638 eligible women with prior breast surgery and positive axillary dissection. Patients in Arm A received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 12 mg/m{sup 2} mitoxantrone, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with concomitant radiotherapy (50 Gy {+-} 10-20-Gy boost). Patients in Arm B received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 60 mg/m{sup 2} epirubicin, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with subsequent radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was administered on Day 1 every 21 days for 4 cycles. Results: Median treatment durations were 64 and 126 days (Arms A and B, respectively), with no significant difference in overall or disease-free survival. Five-year locoregional relapse-free survival favored patients with conservative surgery (two thirds of the population), with less local and/or regional recurrence in Arm A than in Arm B (3% vs. 9%; p 0.01). Multivariate analysis in this subgroup showed a 2.8-fold increased risk of locoregional recurrence with sequential chemoradiotherapy, independent of other prognostic factors (p = 0.027). Febrile neutropenia and Grade 3-4 leukopenia were significantly more frequent in Arm A. Subclinical left ventricular ejection fraction events at 1 year were more frequent with concomitant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Concomitant radiotherapy with adjuvant fluorouracil, mitoxantrone, and cyclophosphamide has significantly better locoregional control in node-positive breast cancer after conservative surgery and 50% shorter treatment, albeit with slightly more acute toxicity. With mitoxantrone no longer available for adjuvant breast cancer treatment, alternative concomitant chemoradiotherapy studies are needed.

  15. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2011-08-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  16. Note: {sup 6}Li III light intensity observation for {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} ion beam operation at Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kotaka, Yasuteru; Nishimura, Makoto; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-15

    The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum at λ = 516.7 nm was observed during {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam tuning at the Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process. However, {sup 6}Li III line intensity observation conducted in this study gives new insights into its simplification of this process. The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum from the ECR plasma was found to have a strong correlation with the extracted {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam intensity from the RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron.

  17. BIOPLUME III

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BIOPLUME III is a two-dimensional finite difference model for simulating the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in groundwater due to the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation.

  18. The Apple III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditlea, Steve

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the features, performance, peripheral devices, available software, and capabilities of the Apple III microcomputer. The computer's operating system, its hardware, and the commercially produced software it accepts are discussed. Specific applications programs for financial planning, accounting, and word processing are…

  19. Fermi at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's first 6 months in operation is provided. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy rage 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. It contains a Large Area Telescope capable of viewing the entire sky every 3 hours and a Gamma-ray Burst Monitor for viewing the entire unocculted sky. Since its launch on June 11, 2008 Fermi has provided information on pulsars, gamma ray bursts, relativistic jets, the active galactic nucleus, and a globular star cluster. This presentation describes Fermi's development, mission, instruments and recent findings.

  20. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) As of FY 2015 President’s Budget...00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Responsible Office References Program Name Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) DoD Component Air Force

  1. Randomized phase II/III trial of post-operative chemoradiotherapy comparing 3-weekly cisplatin with weekly cisplatin in high-risk patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1008).

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Futoshi; Kiyota, Naomi; Tahara, Makoto; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Fujii, Masato

    2014-08-01

    A randomized Phase II/III study was launched in Japan to evaluate the non-inferiority of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) compared with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with 3-weekly cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) for post-operative high-risk patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. This study began in October 2012, and a total of 260 patients will be accrued from 18 institutions within 5 years. The primary endpoint of the Phase II part is proportion of treatment completion and that of the Phase III part is overall survival. The secondary endpoints are relapse-free survival, local relapse-free survival, nutrition-support-free survival, non-hospitalized treatment period during permissible treatment period and adverse events. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000009125 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/].

  2. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  3. 76 FR 58373 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... September 20, 2011 Part III The President Proclamation 8712--National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2011...;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8712 of September 15, 2011 National Hispanic Heritage Month... contributions of Hispanics, and during National Hispanic Heritage Month, we celebrate the immeasurable...

  4. 77 FR 26905 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... 7, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8813--Jewish American Heritage Month, 2012 Proclamation 8814--National Foster Care Month, 2012 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0;Federal... President ] Proclamation 8813 of May 2, 2012 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2012 By the President of...

  5. Operative management of bilateral Salter-Harris type III fractures of the proximal phalanges of the great toes of a 10-year-old female ballet dancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Csonka, Akos; Sikarinkul, Eakachit; Gargyan, Istvan; Boa, Kristof; Varga, Endre

    2016-07-01

    Differentiation between the normal variant cleft epiphysis and Salter-Harris type III fracture of the first proximal phalanges of the foot in children might be challenging. The authors describe a case of a 10-year-old ballet dancer girl with bilateral epiphyseal segmentation of the first proximal phalanges of the foot, unresponsive to conservative treatment. Considered a nonhealing stress-induced fracture, operative treatment with closed reduction and Herbert screw insertion was chosen on both sides. Complete union was achieved, with significant reduction of pain. The presented case suggests that internal fixation can be a viable option in the treatment of the problem.

  6. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-02

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

  7. Natural gas monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  8. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  9. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  10. Ten Year Operating Test Results and Post-Test Analysis of a 1/10 Segment Stirling Sodium Heat Pipe, Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John, H; Minnerly, Kenneth, G; Dyson, Christopher, M.

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 yr) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described.

  11. 12 CFR 906.5 - Monthly interest rate survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Monthly interest rate survey. 906.5 Section 906... OPERATIONS OPERATIONS Monthly Interest Rate Survey (MIRS) § 906.5 Monthly interest rate survey. The Finance Board conducts its Monthly Survey of Rates and Terms on Conventional One-Family Non-farm Mortgage...

  12. 12 CFR 906.5 - Monthly interest rate survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monthly interest rate survey. 906.5 Section 906... OPERATIONS OPERATIONS Monthly Interest Rate Survey (MIRS) § 906.5 Monthly interest rate survey. The Finance Board conducts its Monthly Survey of Rates and Terms on Conventional One-Family Non-farm Mortgage...

  13. 12 CFR 906.5 - Monthly interest rate survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Monthly interest rate survey. 906.5 Section 906... OPERATIONS OPERATIONS Monthly Interest Rate Survey (MIRS) § 906.5 Monthly interest rate survey. The Finance Board conducts its Monthly Survey of Rates and Terms on Conventional One-Family Non-farm Mortgage...

  14. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  15. Pseudo Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance "modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow," some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  16. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, June 1962

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-13

    This document details activities of the Irradiation Processing Department during the month of June, 1962. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; and NPR Project.

  17. Randomized controlled phase I/II study to investigate immune stimulatory effects by low dose radiotherapy in primarily operable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The efficiencies of T cell based immunotherapies are affected by insufficient migration and activation of tumor specific effector T cells in the tumor. Accumulating evidence exists on the ability of ionizing radiation to modify the tumor microenvironment and generate inflammation. The aim of this phase I/II clinical trial is to evaluate whether low dose single fraction radiotherapy can improve T cell associated antitumor immune response in patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods/Design This trial has been designed as an investigator initiated; prospective randomised, 4-armed, controlled Phase I/II trial. Patients who are candidates for resection of pancreatic cancer will be randomized into 4 arms. A total of 40 patients will be enrolled. The patients receive 0 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 2 Gy or 5 Gy radiation precisely targeted to their pancreatic carcinoma. Radiation will be delivered by external beam radiotherapy using a 6 MV Linac with IMRT technique 48 h prior to the surgical resection. The primary objective is the determination of an active local external beam radiation dose, leading to tumor infiltrating T cells as a surrogate parameter for antitumor activity. Secondary objectives include local tumor control and recurrence patterns, survival, radiogenic treatment toxicity and postoperative morbidity and mortality, as well as quality of life. Further, frequencies of tumor reactive T cells in blood and bone marrow as well as whole blood cell transcriptomics and plasma-proteomics will be correlated with clinical outcome. An interim analysis will be performed after the enrolment of 20 patients for safety reasons. The evaluation of the primary endpoint will start four weeks after the last patient's enrolment. Discussion This trial will answer the question whether a low dose radiotherapy localized to the pancreatic tumor only can increase the number of tumor infiltrating T cells and thus potentially enhance the antitumor immune response. The study will also

  18. Hispanic Heritage Month

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hispanic-themed music and Salsa dance performances helped kick off the Johnson Space Center celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, commemorating the histories, cultures and contributions of Hispan...

  19. Tractor-Maintenance: Operation & Daily Care [and] Servicing Air Cleaner & Lubrication. Student Materials. V. A. III. [V-C-1 through V-C-4].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    Designed for use by students in vocational agricultural classes, this manual deals with tractor maintenance. Operation and daily care are the topics of the first section. Safety is also covered. In the final part of the manual, servicing the air cleaner and lubricating the engine are discussed. Both sections conclude with a quiz. (PLB)

  20. Design of Training Systems, Phase II Report, Volume III; Model Program Descriptions and Operating Procedures. TAEG Report No. 12-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Training Equipment Center, Orlando, FL. Training Analysis and Evaluation Group.

    The Design of Training Systems (DOTS) project was initiated by the Department of Defense (DOD) to develop tools for the effective management of military training organizations. Volume 3 contains the model and data base program descriptions and operating procedures designed for phase 2 of the project. Flow charts and program listings for the…

  1. Birth Month Affects Longevity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Ernest L.; Kruger, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the association between birth month and longevity for major league baseball players. Players born in the month of November had the greatest longevities whereas those born in June had the shortest life spans. These differences remained after controlling for covariates such as birth year, career length, age at debut, height, and…

  2. Evaluation of a Transportable Hot-Gas Decontamination System for the Decontamination of Explosives-Contaminated Debris & Piping. Operations & Maintenance Manual. Volume III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-27

    40reFn wmt S~Loops I andl 2 A Until you see: DISABL LSPRAMP 8 Return to norma operating mode 148 UDC5000 Universal Digital Controller Proeuct Manual...lotc Two Pouition Ec ~ apa EMA.4CS 12616 150 20 16 120 ¶2sei) Yes ftAO44A.1024 10026 to 30 Ise 24 S093 ’go While "(".Irs U405-3 16058 go .40 20. 24 3s

  3. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-11-01

    The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter.

  4. THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) REFRIGERATOR SYSTEM AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: PHASE III OF THE SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND OPERATIONS UPGRADES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect

    SIDI-YEKHLEF,A.; TUOZZOLO,J.; THAN, R.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

    2005-08-29

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and I1 of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase 111, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for, the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  5. Arnold-Chiari Malformation Type III With Meningoencephalocele: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dae Ho; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Myeong Ok; Chung, Hyung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Han Young

    2014-06-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformation type III (CM III) is an extremely rare anomaly with poor prognosis. An encephalocele with brain anomalies as seen in CM II, and herniation of posterior fossa contents like the cerebellum are found in CM III. The female infant was a twin, born at 33 weeks, weighing 1.7 kg with a huge hydrocele on the craniocervical junction. After operations were performed, she was referred to the department of rehabilitation medicine for poor motor development, swallowing dysfunction, and poor eye fixation at 22 months. The child was managed with neurodevelopmental treatment, oromotor facilitation, and light perception training. After 14 months, improvement of gross motor function was observed, including more stable head control, rolling, and improvement of visual perception. CM III has been known as a condition with poor prognosis. However, with the improvement in operative techniques and intensive rehabilitations, the prognosis is more promising than ever before. Therefore, more attention must be paid to the rehabilitation issues concerning patients with CM III.

  6. Engineering, construction, and operations in space - III: Space '92; Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference, Denver, CO, May 31-June 4, 1992. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeh, Willy Z. (Editor); Sture, Stein (Editor); Miller, Russell J. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume on engineering, construction, and operations in space discusses surface structures on the moon and Mars, surface equipment, construction, and transportation on the moon and Mars, in situ materials use and processing, and space energy. Attention is given to such orbital structures as LEO and the space station, space mining and excavation, space materials, space automation and robotics, and space life support systems. Topics addressed include lunar-based astronomy, space systems integration, terrestrial support for space functions, and space education. Also discussed are space plans, policy, and history, space science and engineering, geoengineering and space exploration, and the construction and development of a human habitat on Mars.

  7. Site Development, Operations, and Closure Plan Topical Report 5 An Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin. Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, Robert; Payne, William; Kirksey, Jim

    2015-06-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has partnered with Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) and Schlumberger Carbon Services to conduct a large-volume, saline reservoir storage project at ADM’s agricultural products processing complex in Decatur, Illinois. The Development Phase project, named the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) involves the injection of 1 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a deep saline formation of the Illinois Basin over a three-year period. This report focuses on objectives, execution, and lessons learned/unanticipated results from the site development (relating specifically to surface equipment), operations, and the site closure plan.

  8. SW LW MONTHLY

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-09

    ... 06/30/1991 Temporal Resolution:  Monthly average Tools:  Contact User Services ... Water Radiative Forcing Shortwave Radiation Surface Temperature Order Data:  Contact User Services: Order Data ...

  9. Natural Gas Monthly

    EIA Publications

    2017-01-01

    Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

  10. Natural gas monthly, October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-05

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

  11. 76 FR 55205 - National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... September 6, 2011 Part III The President Proclamation 8702--National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month, 2011... August 31, 2011 National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since the 1970s, the rate of childhood obesity in our country has tripled,...

  12. 78 FR 66603 - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... November 5, 2013 Part III The President Proclamation 9047--Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience... Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A... Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, we resolve to remain vigilant against foreign and domestic...

  13. 78 FR 34241 - African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... June 6, 2013 Part III The President Proclamation 8992--African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2013... May 31, 2013 African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of... lasting freedom. Through every generation, music has reflected and renewed our national...

  14. Design Guidelines and Criteria for User/Operator Transactions with Battlefield Automated Systems. Volume III-D. Human Factors Analyses of User/ Operator Transactions with IISS-FMS--The Intelligence Information Subsystem First Milestone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    Apprvedforpublc rlesei dst but~n*-nli~te U. S. ARMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES A Field Operating Agency under the Jurisdiction of...NO GET TAPE FILE PARAMETERS ds1 is INPUT FROM USER YES ACCEPT DATA FROM TERMINAL USER TERMINAL NO PERFORM BULK _______ DATA TRANSFER Figure A-5

  15. Heat and mass transfer scale-up issues during freeze-drying, III: control and characterization of dryer differences via operational qualification tests.

    PubMed

    Rambhatla, S; Tchessalov, S; Pikal, Michael J

    2006-04-21

    The objective of this research was to estimate differences in heat and mass transfer between freeze dryers due to inherent design characteristics using data obtained from sublimation tests. This study also aimed to provide guidelines for convenient scale-up of the freeze-drying process. Data obtained from sublimation tests performed on laboratory-scale, pilot, and production freeze dryers were used to evaluate various heat and mass transfer parameters: nonuniformity in shelf surface temperatures, resistance of pipe, refrigeration system, and condenser. Emissivity measurements of relevant surfaces such as the chamber wall and the freeze dryer door were taken to evaluate the impact of atypical radiation heat transfer during scale-up. "Hot" and "cold" spots were identified on the shelf surface of different freeze dryers, and the impact of variation in shelf surface temperatures on the primary drying time and the product temperature during primary drying was studied. Calculations performed using emissivity measurements on different freeze dryers suggest that a front vial in the laboratory lyophilizer received 1.8 times more heat than a front vial in a manufacturing freeze dryer operating at a shelf temperature of -25 degrees C and a chamber pressure of 150 mTorr during primary drying. Therefore, front vials in the laboratory are much more atypical than front vials in manufacturing. Steady-state heat and mass transfer equations were used to study a combination of different scale-up issues pertinent during lyophilization cycles commonly used for the freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals.

  16. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-28

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

  17. Petroleum supply monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-30

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas -- the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided from other sources.

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly presents data describing the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders; operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data are divided into two sections: Summary statistics and Detailed statistics.

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

  20. Developmental milestones record - 6 months

    MedlinePlus

    Normal childhood growth milestones - 6 months; Childhood growth milestones - 6 months; Growth milestones for children - 6 months ... the weight on hands (often occurs by 4 months) Able to pick up a dropped object Able ...

  1. Developmental milestones record - 12 months

    MedlinePlus

    Normal childhood growth milestones - 12 months; Growth milestones for children - 12 months; Childhood growth milestones - 12 months ... care provider. PHYSICAL AND MOTOR SKILLS A 12-month-old child is expected to: Be 3 times ...

  2. Developmental milestones record - 18 months

    MedlinePlus

    Growth milestones for children - 18 months; Normal childhood growth milestones - 18 months; Childhood growth milestones - 18 months ... PHYSICAL AND MOTOR SKILL MARKERS The typical 18-month-old: Has a closed soft spot on the ...

  3. Developmental milestones record - 4 months

    MedlinePlus

    Normal childhood growth milestones - 4 months; Childhood growth milestones - 4 months; Growth milestones for children - 4 months ... provider. PHYSICAL AND MOTOR SKILLS The typical 4-month-old baby should: Slow in weight gain to ...

  4. Developmental milestones record - 9 months

    MedlinePlus

    Growth milestones for children - 9 months; Childhood growth milestones - 9 months; Normal childhood growth milestones - 9 months ... provider. PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND MOTOR SKILLS A 9-month-old has usually reached the following milestones: Gains ...

  5. Black History Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on Black History month. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audios, magazines; includes professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  6. November 2010 monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Warren E

    2010-12-07

    These viewgraphs are to be provided to NNSA to update the status of the B61 Life Extension Project work and activities. The viewgraphs cover such issues as budget, schedule, scope, and the like. They are part of the monthly reporting process.

  7. Monthly Energy Review

    EIA Publications

    2017-01-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's primary report of recent energy statistics. Included are total energy production, consumption, and trade; energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions.

  8. Electric Power Monthly

    EIA Publications

    2017-01-01

    Provides monthly statistics at the state, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold.

  9. Monthly energy review

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  10. Monthly Energy Review

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-28

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief ``energy plugs`` (reviews of EIA publications) are included, as well.

  11. Special Awareness Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granstrom, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The article reports on the organization and implementation of a "Special Needs Awareness Month" in Quincy, Massachusetts. Noted are the heavy involvement of parents in the multiagency planning committee, and the resulting citywide displays, publications, programs, and publicity on children with special needs. (DB)

  12. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  13. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  14. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of January 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are discussed. Marketing and customer service activities in this period are presented as is the progress report of NASTRAN maintenance and support. Tables of disseminations and budget summary conclude the report.

  15. IMPETUS III, OPERATION IMP-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOSEPH, JOSEPH M.

    A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES FOR A READING PROGRAM TAUGHT BY MEANS OF THE "TALKING TYPEWRITER" IS PRESENTED. THE TALKING TYPEWRITER IS LOCATED IN A SOUNDPROOF BOOTH. THE STUDENT SITS IN FRONT OF A TYPEWRITER AND RESPONDS, REACTS, AND INTERACTS TO DIRECTIONS VOICED BY A COMPUTERIZED, MAGNETIZED PROGRAMED SYSTEM. THE CRITERIA FOR…

  16. Pacific Barrier Radar III (PACBAR III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. D.; Sigler, J. D.

    1983-11-01

    The Pacific Barrier (PACBAR III) C-band radar is being installed at the Western Space and Missile Center to furnish Revolution 0 detection of foreign launches. Previously installed on a tracking ship, the upgraded system will also identify and target space objects, maintain a catalog, and cover maneuvers and decay of space objects. Nominal operation will comprise a search of a predesignated 15 deg azimuth with the capability of detecting a 6 sq m target in a 400 km orbit, track spacecraft in orbits up to 800 km altitude, have a range resolution of about 80 yd, provide realtime payload and rocket body discrimination, and transmit two-way digital message traffic between the Center and NORAD in Cheyenne Mt. Interlaced vertical and horizontal pulses will augment the search and acquisition capabilities, and the antenna will have a 140 deg plunge range. The transmitter will function at 5.4-5.65 GHz, 320 p/sec, with a peak power of 0.8 MW, and the system will have a nonambiguous range of 32,768 nmi.

  17. Petroleum marketing monthly

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  18. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    This report presents data on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the USA during August 1982, as well as data on production, storage, imports, exports, and consumption. Selected data are also presented on the activities of the major interstate pipeline companies. Marketed production of natural gas decreased 18.2% during August 1982, compared to August 1981, from 1706 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1471 Bcf. Consumption during the same period declined as well, from 1314 Bcf to 1153 Bcf. Commencing with this issue of the Natural Gas Monthly (NGM), estimates of marketed production are provided for two more recent months, September and October. Volumes of natural gas in storage continue to run slightly ahead of year-ago levels. The volume of natural gas purchased from producers and imported by major interstate natural gas pipeline companies continues to decline. In August 1981, 864 Bcf were purchased from producers, compared to 793 Bcf in August 1982. Imports during the same period declined from 62 Bcf to 46 Bcf. Applications for determination of a maximum lawful price under the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) showed a significant increase between September and October 1982. The increase occurred principally for Section 103 classification wells (new onshore production wells), and for Section 107 classification wells (high-cost natural gas).

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-26

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  20. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  1. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-29

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: Petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  2. Earth Science With the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawodny, Joe; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Thomason, Larry; Roell, Marilee; Pitts, Mike; Moore, Randy; Hill, Charles; Flittner, David; Damadeo, Rob; Cisewski, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Aviation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the ISS in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observation in the second half of this decade. Here we discuss the mission architecture, its implementation, and data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water vapor, along with multi-wavelength aerosol extinction. Though in the visible portion of the spectrum the brightness of the Sun is one million times that of the full Moon, the SAGE III instrument is designed to cover this large dynamic range and also perform lunar occultations on a routine basis to augment the solar products. The standard lunar products were demonstrated during the SAGE III/M3M mission and include ozone, nitrogen dioxide & nitrogen trioxide. The operational flexibility of the SAGE III spectrometer accomplishes

  3. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly describe (PSM) the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply.'' Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  4. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of April 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Five articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: GAP 1.0 - Groove Analysis Program, Version 1.0; SUBTRANS - Subband/Transform MATLAB Functions for Image Processing; CSDM - COLD-SAT Dynamic Model; CASRE - Computer Aided Software Reliability Estimation; and XOPPS - OEL Project Planner/Scheduler Tool. Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and disseminations are also described along with a budget summary.

  5. Viking Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    VIKING PHASE III - With the incredible success of the Viking missions on Mars, mission operations have progressed though a series of phases - each being funded as mission success dictated its potential. The Viking Primary Mission phase was concluded in November, 1976, when the reins were passed on to the second phase - the Viking Extended Mission. The Extended Mission successfully carried spacecraft operations through the desired period of time needed to provided a profile of a full Martian year, but would have fallen a little short of connecting and overlapping a full Martian year of Viking operations which scientists desired as a means of determining the degree of duplicity in the red planet's seasons - at least for the summer period. Without this continuation of spacecraft data acquisitions to and beyond the seasonal points when the spacecraft actually began their Mars observations, there would be no way of knowing whether the changing environmental values - such as temperatures and winds atmospheric dynamics and water vapor, surface thermal dynamics, etc. - would match up with those acquired as the spacecraft began investigations during the summer and fall of 1976. This same broad interest can be specifically pursued at the surface - where hundreds of rocks, soil drifts and other features have become extremely familiar during long-term analysis. This picture was acquired on the 690th Martian day of Lander 1 operations - 4009th picture sequence commanded of the two Viking Landers. As such, it became the first picture acquired as the third phase of Viking operations got under way - the Viking Continuation Mission. Between the start of the Continuation Mission in April, 1978, until spacecraft operations are concluded in November, the landers will acquire an additional 200 pictures. These will be used to monitor the two landscaped for the surface changes. All four cameras, two on Lander 1 and two on Lander 2, continue to operate perfectly. Both landers will also

  6. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  7. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of August, 1993. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are discussed. Ten articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) MOM3D - A Method of Moments Code for Electromagnetic Scattering (UNIX Version); (2) EM-Animate - Computer Program for Displaying and Animating the Steady-State Time-Harmonic Electromagnetic Near Field and Surface-Current Solutions; (3) MOM3D - A Method of Moments Code for Electromagnetic Scattering (IBM PC Version); (4) M414 - MIL-STD-414 Variable Sampling Procedures Computer Program; (5) MEDOF - Minimum Euclidean Distance Optimal Filter; (6) CLIPS 6.0 - C Language Integrated Production System, Version 6.0 (Macintosh Version); (7) CLIPS 6.0 - C Language Integrated Production System, Version 6.0 (IBM PC Version); (8) CLIPS 6.0 - C Language Integrated Production System, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version); (9) CLIPS 6.0 - C Language Integrated Production System, Version 6.0 (DEC VAX VMS Version); and (10) TFSSRA - Thick Frequency Selective Surface with Rectangular Apertures. Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  8. 2000 African American History Month Celebration Luncheon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Early Space Exploration Conference Center at the KSC Visitor Complex, Dr. Julian M. Earls (left), deputy director for Operations, Glenn Research Center, receives a plaque from astronaut Joan Higginbotham (right) during the 2000 African American History Month Celebration Luncheon. Dr. Earls was guest speaker at the luncheon.

  9. 9 CFR 206.3 - Monthly report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STOCKYARDS PROGRAMS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE CONTRACT LIBRARY § 206.3 Monthly report. (a) Do I need... swine processing plant that it operates or at which it has swine slaughtered that has the slaughtering... report, each packer must provide the following information: (1) Number of swine to be delivered...

  10. Paliperidone Palmitate Intramuscular 3-Monthly Formulation: A Review in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Yvette N; Keating, Gillian M

    2016-10-01

    A 3-monthly formulation of intramuscular paliperidone palmitate (3-monthly paliperidone palmitate) has recently been approved for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia in adult patients in the EU (Trevicta(®)), following earlier approval in the USA (Invega Trinza(®)). This narrative review discusses the clinical use of 3-monthly paliperidone palmitate in the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia in adult patients and summarizes its pharmacological properties. The efficacy of the 3-monthly paliperidone palmitate formulation as a maintenance treatment for schizophrenia has been demonstrated in well designed, phase III trials. Three-monthly paliperidone palmitate was more effective than placebo in delaying time to relapse and reducing relapse rates, and was noninferior to 1-monthly paliperidone palmitate in the proportion of patients that remained relapse-free. The 3-monthly formulation was also more effective than placebo in controlling the symptoms of schizophrenia, whilst not differing significantly from the 1-monthly formulation in terms of symptomatic control. Three-monthly paliperidone palmitate was generally well tolerated in clinical trials, with a tolerability profile consistent with that of the 1-monthly formulation. In conclusion, 3-monthly paliperidone palmitate is a useful treatment option for adult patients with schizophrenia who are adequately treated with the 1-monthly formulation, particularly for those who would prefer, or may benefit from, longer dosing intervals.

  11. OTEC-1 test operations experience. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshide, R.K.; Klein, A.; Polino, D.L.; Poucher, F.W.

    1983-07-15

    During Phase III, the complete integrated system was operated, and information was obtained on the performance of the test article, the performance of the seawater and ammonia systems, the operation of the platform and moor systems, the effects of biofouling countermeasures, and the effects of the OTEC cycle on the environment. After several months spent in completing construction of the test system and checking out and repairing the various systems, 4 months of test operations were conducted before funding constraints caused the discontinuation of the test program. Plans were made for long-term storage and/or disposition of the test facility. The OEC test platform is currently located at Pearl Harbor, in the US Navy Inactive Reserve Fleet anchorage. The CWP was placed in underwater storage adjacent to the moor, awaiting a decision on final disposition. In October 1982, the CWP was recovered and custody given to the State of Hawaii. Although the test period lasted only about 4 months, deployment and at-sea operation of a large-scale OTEC plant was demonstrated, and information was obtained towards satisfying each of the objectives of the OTEC-1 project. This document summarizes the OTEC-1 test operations experience, discusses technical lessons learned, and makes recommendations for future OTEC plants.

  12. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. The NGM replaces three EIA reports previously published annually: Underground Natural Gas Storage in the United States; US Imports and Exports of Natural Gas; Main Line Sales of Natural Gas to Industrial Users. Some of the highlights are: marketed production of natural gas during June 1983 was estimated at 1307 billion cubic feet (Bcf), 178 Bcf (12.0 percent) below the June 1982 level; consumption of natural gas during June 1983 was an estimated 1060 Bcf, a decrease of 55 Bcf (4.9 percent) compared to June 1982 consumption; natural gas consumption in May 1983, compared to the previous May, was up 14.0 percent in the residential sector, up 7.9 percent in the commercial sector, and up 14.2 percent in the industrial sector; the volume of working gas in underground storage reservoirs at the end of June 1983 was 3.1 percent above the June 30, 1982 level; the average wellhead price of natural gas in April 1983 was $2.63 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf) compared to $2.35 per Mcf for April 1982; in June 1983, the US city average residential price for 100 therms of natural gas was $64.70 ($6.63 per Mcf), the comparable price in June 1982 was $54.80 ($5.62 per Mcf); the average wellhead (first sale) price for natural gas purchases projected for July 1983 by selected interstate pipeline companies was $2.72 per Mcf, in July 1982 the average price was $2.45 per Mcf.

  13. Monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Robert J., II; Smith, Wayne

    1992-01-01

    This report is the mid-year report intended for the design concepts for the communication network for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) facility being built at Yellow Creek near Iuka, MS. The overall network is to include heterogeneous computers, to use various protocols, and to have different bandwidths. Performance consideration must be given to the potential network applications in the network environment. The performance evaluation of X window applications was given the major emphasis in this report. A simulation study using Bones will be included later. This mid-year report has three parts: Part 1 is an investigation of X window traffic using TCP/IP over Ethernet networks; part 2 is a survey study of performance concepts of X window applications with Macintosh computers; and the last part is a tutorial on DECnet protocols. The results of this report should be useful in the design and operation of the ASRM communication network.

  14. 17 CFR 1.33 - Monthly and confirmation statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in all open contracts marked to the market; and (iii) Any customer funds carried with the futures... accounts during the monthly reporting period, including all customer funds and funds on deposit with... in the money, if any; (iv) Any customer funds carried in such customer's account(s); and (v)...

  15. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This document highlights activities, events, and analysis results of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with natural gas industry operations. Data highlights: (1) Marketed production of natural gas during February 1983 was estimated at 1387 billion cubic feet (Bcf), 178 Bcf (11.4 percent) below the February 1982 level; (2) Consumption of natural gas during February 1983 was an estimated 1709 Bcf, a decrease of 258 Bcf (13.1 percent) compared to February 1982 consumption; (3) Consumption declined in all market sectors in January 1983 compared to January 1982; (4) The volume of working gas in underground storage reservoirs at the end of February 1983 was 31.7 percent above the February 28, 1982 level; (5) The average wellhead price of natural gas in December 1982 was $2.56 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf). In December 1981 the average was $2.16 per Mcf; (6) In February 1983, the US city average residential price for 100 therms of natural gas was $59.99; and (7) The average wellhead (first sale) price for natural gas purchases projected for March 1983 by selected interstate pipeline companies was $2.79 per Mcf. The feature article in this issue is entitled Recent Trends in Natural Gas Well Costs. Information is presented under the headings: industry overview, explanatory notes, data sources, and selected recurring natural gas and related reports. 5 figures, 24 tables. (DMC)

  16. Your Child's Development: 6 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Development: 6 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: 6 Months A A A Notice your baby doing anything new? Big strides in development are happening this month. That's because the left side of the brain ...

  17. Your Child's Development: 2 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Development: 2 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: 2 Months A A A Your baby develops from head ... some new skills your baby may have this month: Communication and Language Skills develops more distinct cries ...

  18. Your Child's Development: 1 Month

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child’s Development: 1 Month KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child’s Development: 1 Month A A A Have you ever noticed how ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Baby's Growth: 1 Month Your Baby's Hearing, Vision, and Other Senses: 1 ...

  19. Your Child's Development: 15 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Development: 15 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: 15 Months A A A Toddlers this age are learning ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Child's Checkup: 15 Months Delayed Speech or Language Development Nutrition Guide for ...

  20. Your Child's Development: 6 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Development: 6 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: 6 Months Print A A A en español El desarrollo ... new? Big strides in development are happening this month. That's because the left side of the brain ...

  1. Your Child's Development: 9 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Development: 9 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: 9 Months Print A A A en español El desarrollo de su hijo: 9 meses Nine-month-olds have a new understanding of the world. ...

  2. Your Child's Development: 2 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Development: 2 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: 2 Months Print A A A en español El desarrollo ... some new skills your baby may have this month: Communication and Language Skills develops more distinct cries ...

  3. Monthly energy review, August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Monthly Energy Review for the month of August 1997, presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  4. Operation Shadow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Marilyn Parrish

    Operation Shadow provides materials for a career education program which gives students ages 11-13 an opportunity to relate school subjects to the world of work. Students spend one month in classroom activities, including study of characteristics of self and others and how these characteristics and interests affect one's choice of a life career.…

  5. Petroleum supply monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-27

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum supply annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  6. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-15

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  7. Petroleum supply monthly, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administrations for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 65 tabs.

  8. Petroleum supply monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  9. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-28

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly, August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-30

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) district movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  11. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  12. Six months therapy for tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Sophie; Ryan, Hannah; Modi, Manish; Bhatia, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    presented them separately using a complete-case analysis. We assessed the quality of the evidence narratively, as using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was inappropriate with no direct comparisons between short- and prolonged-course regimens. Main results Four RCTs and 12 prospective cohort studies met our inclusion criteria, and included a total of 1881 participants with TBM. None of the included RCTs directly compared six months versus longer regimens, so we analysed all data as individual cohorts to obtain relapse rates in each set of cohorts. We included seven cohorts of participants treated for six months, with a total of 458 participants. Three studies were conducted in Thailand, two in South Africa, and one each in Ecuador and Papua New Guinea between the 1980s and 2009. We included 12 cohorts of participants treated for longer than six months (ranging from eight to 16 months), with a total of 1423 participants. Four studies were conducted in India, three in Thailand and one each in China, South Africa, Romania, Turkey and Vietnam, between the late 1970s and 2011. The proportion of participants classified as having stage III disease (severe) was higher in the cohorts treated for six months (33.2% versus 16.9%), but the proportion with known concurrent HIV was higher in the cohorts treated for longer (0/458 versus 122/1423). Although there were variations in the treatment regimens, most cohorts received isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide during the intensive phase. Investigators achieved follow-up beyond 18 months after completing treatment in three out of the seven cohorts treated for six months, and five out of the 12 cohorts treated for eight to 16 months. All studies had potential sources of bias in their estimation of the relapse rate, and comparisons between the cohorts could be confounded. Relapse was an uncommon event across both groups of cohorts (3/369 (0.8%) with six months treatment versus 7

  13. Comparative humoral and cellular immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in healthy women aged 18-45 years: follow-up through Month 48 in a Phase III randomized study.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Takacs, Peter; Catteau, Grégory; Dessy, Francis J; Moris, Philippe; Lin, Lan; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported higher anti-HPV-16 and -18 immune responses induced by HPV-16/18 vaccine compared with HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine at Month 7 (one month after completion of full vaccination series) in women aged 18-45 y in an observer-blind study NCT00423046; the differences of immune response magnitudes were maintained up to Month 24. Here we report follow-up data through Month 48. At Month 48, in according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity (seronegative and DNA-negative for HPV type analyzed at baseline), geometric mean titers of serum neutralizing antibodies were 2.0- to 5.2-fold higher (HPV-16) and 8.6- to 12.8-fold higher (HPV-18) in HPV-16/18 vaccine group than in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group. The majority of women in both vaccine groups remained seropositive for HPV-16. The same trend was observed for HPV-18 in HPV-16/18 vaccine group; however, seropositivity rates in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group decreased considerably, particularly in the older age groups. In the total vaccinated cohort (regardless of baseline serological and HPV-DNA status), anti-HPV-16 and -18 neutralizing antibody levels induced by HPV-16/18 vaccine were higher than those induced by HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. CD4+ T-cell response for HPV-16 and HPV-18 was higher in HPV-16/18 vaccine group than in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group. Memory B-cell responses appeared similar between vaccine groups. Both vaccines were generally well tolerated. Overall, the higher immune response observed with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was maintained up to Month 48. A head-to-head study incorporating clinical endpoints would be required to confirm whether the observed differences in immune response between the vaccines influence the duration of protection they provided.

  14. Natural gas monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured articles for this month are: Opportunities with fuel cells, and revisions to monthly natural gas data.

  15. Natural gas monthly, August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-24

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature article is on US Natural Gas Imports and Exports 1994.

  16. Monthly energy review, January 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Major activities covered include production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for fossil fuels, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  17. Natural Gas Monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-10

    The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature articles are: US Production of Natural Gas from Tight Reservoirs: and Expanding Rule of Underground Storage.

  18. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  19. A fault tolerant design for autonomous attitude control of the DSCS-III communication satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J.; Mettler, E.

    1983-01-01

    The first of a new series of satellites, which will provide the principal elements in the Defense Space Communications System (DSCS), was launched on Oct. 31, 1982. This satellite, DSCS-III, is part of a system which will consist of super-high frequency communications satellites in synchronous, equatorial orbits, continuously operating in four widely separate geographic regions. The DSCS-III is designed both to maintain critical communications in the presence of an electronic jamming threat and to survive nuclear radiation exposure. The results of the present investigation are to provide a basis for the design of a spacecraft tolerant of on-board failures, survivable against external threats, and capable of performing its mission autonomously for periods as long as six months.

  20. The Nimbus III Michelson Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Hanel, R A; Schlachman, B; Clark, F D; Prokesh, C H; Taylor, J B; Wilson, W M; Chaney, L

    1970-08-01

    The Michelson interferometer flown on Nimbus III in April 1969 has obtained infrared emission spectra of the earth and its atmosphere within 400 cm(-1) and 2000 cm(-1) (5 micro and 25 micro). Spectra of good quality have been recorded with a spectral resolution corresponding to 5 cm(-1). This paper discusses the design of the instrument including the optical layout, the phase locked loop operation of the Michelson motor, and the functioning of the reference interferometer. The methods of data reduction and in-flight calibration are demonstrated on sample spectra recorded while in orbit around the earth.

  1. Haida Months of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogo, Robert

    Students are introduced to Haida vocabulary in this booklet which briefly describes the seasons and traditional seasonal activities of Southeastern Alaska Natives. The first section lists the months in English and Haida; e.g., January is "Taan Kungaay," or "Bear Hunting Month." The second section contains seasonal names in…

  2. Natural gas monthly, February 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  3. Natural gas monthly, November 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. Natural gas monthly, January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  5. Your Child's Development: 15 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Development: 15 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: 15 Months Print A A A en español ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Child's Checkup: 15 ... Speech or Language Development Nutrition Guide for Toddlers Safe Exploring for Toddlers ...

  6. Natural gas monthly, December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  7. Monthly energy review, January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  8. Monthly energy review, May 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  9. Monthly energy review, June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 36 figs., 61 tabs.

  10. Monthly energy review, November 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 75 tabs.

  11. Monthly energy review, July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs. 73 tabs.

  12. Monthly energy review, October 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  13. Monthly energy review, November 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  14. Monthly energy review, March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 74 tabs.

  15. Monthly energy review, November 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 91 tabs.

  16. Monthly energy review, February 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  17. Monthly Energy Review, February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-26

    This monthly publication presents an overview of EIA`s recent monthly energy statistics, covering the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief descriptions (`energy plugs`) on two EIA publications are presented at the start.

  18. Monthly energy review: April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This monthly report presents an overview of energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. A section is also included on international energy. The feature paper which is included each month is entitled ``Energy equipment choices: Fuel costs and other determinants.`` 37 figs., 59 tabs.

  19. Celebration Time: Black History Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkney, Andrea Davis

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, more students, teachers, and librarians are aware of African-American History Month and try to give it greater attention. However, the author questions herself if people do really "celebrate" African-American History Month or is it just something folks feel obligated to do, so they "celebrate" by displaying a collection of books about…

  20. III-nitride nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key figure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical confinement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve single-mode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode operation. The first method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-off condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter efficiency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, specifically a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip

  1. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine: follow-up from months 12-24 in a Phase III randomized study of healthy women aged 18-45 years.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Meric, Dorothée; Dessy, Francis J; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique; Dubin, Gary

    2011-12-01

    In this observer-blind study (NCT00423046), women (N=1,106), stratified by age (18-26, 27-35, 36-45 y), were randomized (1:1) to receive the HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Months 0, 1, 6) or the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (Gardasil® Merck & Co., Inc., Months 0, 2, 6). Month 7 results were previously reported; we now report Month 24 results. In the according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity (seronegative and DNA-negative at baseline for HPV type analyzed), seropositivity rates of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) [pseudovirion-based neutralization assay] were, across all age strata, 100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 97.5-100% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-16, and 99.0-100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 72.3-84.4% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-18. Corresponding geometric mean titers (GMTs) were 2.4-5.8-fold higher for HPV-16 and 7.7-9.4-fold higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine versus the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine; HPV-16 and HPV-18 GMTs were significantly higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (p< 0.0001) in the total vaccinated cohort (received ≥1 vaccine dose, irrespective of baseline sero/DNA-status). Similar results were obtained using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Positivity rates and GMTs of antigen-specific IgG antibodies in cervicovaginal secretions (ELISA) were not significantly different between vaccines. At Month 24, CD4⁺ T-cell responses for HPV-16 and HPV-18 were higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine; memory B-cell response was higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine and similar between vaccines for HPV-16. Both vaccines were generally well tolerated. Although an immunological correlate of protection has not been defined, differences in the magnitude of immune response between vaccines may represent determinants of duration of protection.

  2. Class I versus Class III radical hysterectomy in stage IB1 (tumor ≤ 2 cm) cervical cancer: a matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Shang, Chun-liang; Du, Qi-qiao; Wu, Di; Liang, Yan-chun; Liu, Tian-yu; Huang, Jia-ming; Yao, Shu-zhong

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims: The long-term oncological outcome of Class I hysterectomy to treat stage IB1 cervical cancer is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare the surgical and long-term oncological outcomes of Class I hysterectomy and Class III radical hysterectomy for treatment of stage IB1 cervical cancer (tumor ≤ 2 cm). Methods: Seventy stage IB1 cervical cancer patients (tumor ≤ 2 cm) underwent Class I hysterectomy and 577 stage IB1 cervical cancer patients (tumor ≤ 2 cm) underwent Class III radical hysterectomy were matched with known risk factors for recurrence by greedy algorithm. Clinical, pathologic and follow-up data were retrospectively collected. Five-year survival outcomes were assessed using Kaplan-Meier model. Results: After matching, a total of 70 patient pairs (Class I - Class III) were included. The median follow-up times were 75 (range, 26-170) months in the Class III group and 75 (range, 27-168) months in the Class I group. The Class I and Class III group had similar 5-year recurrence-free survival rates (RFS) (98.6% vs. 97.1%, P = 0.56) and overall survival rates (OS) (100.0% vs. 98.5%, P = 0.32). Compared with the Class III group, the Class I group resulted in significantly shorter operating time, less intra-operative blood loss, less intraoperative complications, less postoperative complications, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusions: These findings suggest that Class I hysterectomy is an oncological safe alternative to Class III radical hysterectomy in treatment of stage IB1 cervical cancer (tumor ≤ 2 cm) and Class I hysterectomy is associated with fewer perioperative complication and earlier recovery.

  3. Benchmarking homogenization algorithms for monthly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M. J.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratiannil, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.; Willett, K.

    2013-09-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies. The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous values at various averaging scales, ii) the error in linear trend estimates and iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data. Moreover, state-of-the-art relative homogenization algorithms developed to work with an inhomogeneous reference are shown to perform best. The study showed that currently automatic algorithms can perform as well as manual ones.

  4. Multinational Operations (REV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-07

    military operations with an acceptable level of risk . See JP 3-0, Joint Operations, and JP 4-02, Health Service Support, for information on planning...perform their mission. It will also ensure that the associated risks in utilizing contingency contracting support (force protection, health issues...Support ............................................................................................. III-36 • Health Service Support

  5. Natural gas monthly, December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The article this month is entitled ``Recent Trends in Natural Gas Spot Prices.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. Natural gas monthly, May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``Restructuring energy industries: Lessons from natural gas.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  7. Natural gas monthly, June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-24

    The natural gas monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article for this month is Natural Gas Industry Restructuring and EIA Data Collection.

  8. Natural gas monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is the executive summary from Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  9. Natural gas monthly, June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-21

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month feature is on the value of underground storage in today`s natural gas industry.

  10. Natural gas monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured article for this month is on US coalbed methane production.

  11. Plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The operational, maintenance and evaluation activities and highlights that were required during the month of February 1985 are summarized for the Central Receiver System and the Distributed Collector System. (BCS)

  12. III-Nitride Nanowire Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key gure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical con nement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve singlemode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode op eration. The rst method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-o condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter e ciency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, speci cally a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip that emit

  13. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of ... may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough ...

  14. Seven Months of the Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    This multi-wavelength movie of the Sun covers seven months of activity (April 25 - Nov. 30, 2011), the majority of the SDO mission to date. The frames combine images taken at the same time in three...

  15. Your Child's Development: 9 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Development: 9 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: ... bye" starts pointing to objects Movement and Physical Development sits without support, pulls to stand, and walks ...

  16. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-26

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  17. Monthly Energy Review, July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-07-27

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include: Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Oil and Gas Resource Development, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, International Energy. (VC)

  18. Monthly energy review, July 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This document presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Activities covered include: U.S. production, consumption, trade, stock, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  19. Monthly energy review, August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  20. Natural gas monthly, May 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Natural gas monthly, July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  2. Natural gas monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-20

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  3. Natural gas monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-22

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  4. Natural gas monthly, October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-23

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary of the terms used in this report is provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication. 6 figs., 30 tabs.

  5. Natural gas monthly, November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-29

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  6. Natural gas monthly: December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  7. Natural gas monthly, April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-27

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  8. Natural gas monthly, September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-27

    The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  9. Natural gas monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-27

    The Natural Gas Monthly NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  10. Natural gas monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-26

    The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  11. Natural gas monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  12. Natural gas monthly, June 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  13. Monthly energy review, April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy data. A brief summary of the monthly and historical comparison data is provided in Section 1 of the report. A highlight section of the report provides an assessment of summer 1997 motor gasoline price increases.

  14. Monthly energy review, April 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public.

  15. Monthly energy review, August 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  16. ESEA III Evaluation and Dissemination: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balyeat, Ralph R.; Norman, C. Douglas

    This study surveyed evaluation and dissemination/diffusion practices of ESEA III projects funded in the 1969 fiscal year, which projects are nearing the end of their operations as federally supported programs. The study attempted to discover if (1) the projects were evaluated in accordance with generally accepted procedures, (2) the project…

  17. 78 FR 1121 - National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... January 7, 2013 Part III The President Proclamation 8924--National Slavery and Human Trafficking... and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation This month, we rededicate ourselves to stopping one of the greatest human rights abuses of...

  18. Safety and immunogenicity of fully liquid DTaP₅-IPV-Hib pediatric combination vaccine (Pediacel®) compared to DTaP₃-HBV-IPV/Hib (Infanrix® Hexa) when coadministered with heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) as a booster at 11-18 months of age: a phase III, modified double-blind, randomized, controlled, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Berner, Reinhard; Boisnard, Florence; Thomas, Stéphane; Mwawasi, Grace; Reynolds, Donna

    2012-07-27

    This study compared the safety and immunogenicity of DTaP₅-IPV-Hib vaccine (followed by monovalent hepatitis B vaccine [HBV]) and DTaP₃-HBV-IPV/Hib vaccines, both coadministered with PCV7, as a fourth-dose booster in toddlers 11-18 months who had a hexavalent vaccine primary series. The fever rate within 4 days of DTaP₅-IPV-Hib was noninferior to DTaP₃-HBV-IPV/Hib. DTaP₅-IPV-Hib induced a marked immune response and had a similar safety and immunogenicity profile compared with DTaP₃-HBV-IPV/Hib. Fully liquid DTaP₅-IPV-Hib can be used as a booster after a hexavalent vaccine primary series; where required, a fourth dose of monovalent HBV can be administered after DTaP₅-IPV-Hib (NCT ID: NCT00355654).

  19. Vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode

    DOEpatents

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan; Fischer, Arthur J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2017-03-14

    A vertical III-nitride thin-film power diode can hold off high voltages (kV's) when operated under reverse bias. The III-nitride device layers can be grown on a wider bandgap template layer and growth substrate, which can be removed by laser lift-off of the epitaxial device layers grown thereon.

  20. Innovative and Exemplary Projects in Missouri Schools [Title III, ESEA].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    Forty-eight projects funded by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title III, and providing the funds to public school districts to demonstrate the feasibility of educational innovations, are described in this document about Missouri ESEA Title III exemplary programs. Nineteen projects completing the third year of operation, thirteen…

  1. Three-dimensional computed tomographic evaluation of Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis with an external device in syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Wery, M F; Nada, R M; van der Meulen, J J; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-03-01

    There is little anteroposterior growth of the midface in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who are followed up over time without intervention. A Le Fort III with distraction osteogenesis can be done to correct this. This is a controlled way in which to achieve appreciable stable advancement of the midface without the need for bone grafting, but the vector of the movement is not always predictable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the 3-dimensional effect of Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis with an external frame. Ten patients (aged 7-19 years) who had the procedure were included in the study. The le Fort III procedure and the placement of the external frame were followed by an activation period and then a 3-month retention period. Computed tomographic (CT) images taken before and after operation were converted and loaded into 3-dimensional image rendering software and compared with the aid of a paired sample t test and a colour-coded qualitative analysis. Comparison of the CT data before and after distraction indicated that the amount of midface advancement was significant. Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis is an effective way to advance the midface. However, the movement during osteogenesis is not always exactly in the intended direction, and a secondary operation is often necessary. Three-dimensional evaluation over a longer period of time is necessary.

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-07-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates. 3 figs.

  3. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  4. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  5. Natural gas monthly, April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  6. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-13

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  7. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-17

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  8. Type III burst pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun; Fu, Qijun; Lu, Quankang

    2000-05-01

    We present a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0-2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO). Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. We call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is a nice interpretation of type III burst pair since the plasma beta β~=0.01 is much less than 1 and the beams have velocity of about 1.07×10^8 cm s^-1 after leaving the reconnection region if we assume that the ambient magnetic field strength is about 100 G.

  9. Type III burst pair.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongjun, Ning; Fu, Qijun; Quankang, Lu

    2000-05-01

    Presents a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0 - 2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory. Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. The authors call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is an interpretation of type III burst pair.

  10. Cp*Rh(III) and Cp*Ir(III)-catalysed redox-neutral C-H arylation with quinone diazides: quick and facile synthesis of arylated phenols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shang-Shi; Jiang, Chun-Yong; Wu, Jia-Qiang; Liu, Xu-Ge; Li, Qingjiang; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Li, Ding; Wang, Honggen

    2015-06-25

    Cp*Rh(III)- and Cp*Ir(III)-catalysed direct C-H arylation with quinone diazides as efficient coupling partners is disclosed. This redox-neutral protocol offers a facile, operationally simple and environmentally benign access to arylated phenols. The reaction represents the first example of Cp*Ir(III)-catalysed C-H direct arylation reaction.

  11. Natural gas monthly, April 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-06

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. There are two feature articles in this issue: Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends, Executive summary; and Special report: Natural gas 1998: A preliminary summary. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  12. Natural gas monthly, October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article in this issue is a special report, ``Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  13. Electric power monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  14. Natural gas monthly, April 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are present3ed each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas pipeline and system expansions.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  15. Monthly energy review, July 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 75 tabs.

  16. Monthly energy review, June 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  17. Petroleum marketing monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-26

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  18. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-07

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  19. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-25

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  20. Electric power monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  1. Electric power monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  2. Titan III feasibility for HL-20 prototype missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Scott W.; Beaver, Brian A.; Edelman, Amy L.; Sholes, Elizabeth H.

    1993-10-01

    A set of studies was performed to investigate the feasibility of using the Titan III launch vehicle to launch an unmanned prototype HL-20 personnel launch system and, potentially, operational HL-20 missions. The launch of an HL-20 spacecraft on a Titan III poses a unique set of concerns, primarily because the lifting body vehicle is carried on top of the Titan vehicle without a fairing. The Titan III/HL-20 feasibility study addressed the primary vehicle issues of performance, aerodynamics, loads, control and stability, launch availability, and vehicle configuration for the launch of an unmanned HL-20 prototype vehicle. Titan launch operations, launch site systems, and facilities were assessed to determine HL-20 operations compatibility. Additional studies determined the potential launch opportunity and window capabilities of the Titan III for the operational HL-20 mission and the existing Titan III's reliability. The feasibility study determined that the Titan III system, with minor changes, is compatible with the HL-20 vehicle and mission. It could provide nearly daily launch windows for a rendezvous with Space Station Freedom. Titan III reliability, when combined with the HL-20 launch escape system, provides a sufficiently high probability of crew survival to support its consideration as the primary vehicle for HL-20 operational missions.

  3. Titan III Feasibility for HL-20 Prototype Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Scott W.; Beaver, Brian A.; Edelman, Amy L.; Sholes, Elizabeth H.

    1993-01-01

    A set of studies was performed to investigate the feasibility of using the Titan III launch vehicle to launch an unmanned prototype HL-20 personnel launch system and, potentially, operational HL-20 missions. The launch of an HL-20 spacecraft on a Titan III poses a unique set of concerns, primarily because the lifting body vehicle is carried on top of the Titan vehicle without a fairing. The Titan III/HL-20 feasibility study addressed the primary vehicle issues of performance, aerodynamics, loads, control and stability, launch availability, and vehicle configuration for the launch of an unmanned HL-20 prototype vehicle. Titan launch operations, launch site systems, and facilities were assessed to determine HL-20 operations compatibility. Additional studies determined the potential launch opportunity and window capabilities of the Titan III for the operational HL-20 mission and the existing Titan III's reliability. The feasibility study determined that the Titan III system, with minor changes, is compatible with the HL-20 vehicle and mission. It could provide nearly daily launch windows for a rendezvous with Space Station Freedom. Titan III reliability, when combined with the HL-20 launch escape system, provides a sufficiently high probability of crew survival to support its consideration as the primary vehicle for HL-20 operational missions.

  4. Large-Scale Operations Management Test of Use of the White Amur for Control of Problem Aquatic Plants. Report 2. First Year Poststocking Results. Volume III. The Plankton and Benthos of Lake Conway, Florida,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    algae or macrophytes. 2. Eutrophic lakes tend to be dominated by either macrophytes or algae , but not both. Which of the two primary producers...light transmission, and high sustained biomass of blue- green algae throughout the year. With the exception of shoreline emer- gents, macrophytes are...demonstrated later, reduced water trans- parency during the warmer months is most likely due to greater biomass of suspended algae associated with

  5. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  6. Monthly energy review, November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-24

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  7. Natural gas monthly, August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-05

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector oganizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 33 tabs.

  8. Science 102: This Month's Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This task asks readers to figure out why when you stir a cup of hot liquid and tap on the side of the cup with a spoon, the pitch of sound starts low and ends up high. The solution to last month's tasks relating to the circumference of the Earth and how many stars are in the (visible) sky is also presented.

  9. Prediction of Malaysian monthly GDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hin, Pooi Ah; Ching, Soo Huei; Yeing, Pan Wei

    2015-12-01

    The paper attempts to use a method based on multivariate power-normal distribution to predict the Malaysian Gross Domestic Product next month. Letting r(t) be the vector consisting of the month-t values on m selected macroeconomic variables, and GDP, we model the month-(t+1) GDP to be dependent on the present and l-1 past values r(t), r(t-1),…,r(t-l+1) via a conditional distribution which is derived from a [(m+1)l+1]-dimensional power-normal distribution. The 100(α/2)% and 100(1-α/2)% points of the conditional distribution may be used to form an out-of sample prediction interval. This interval together with the mean of the conditional distribution may be used to predict the month-(t+1) GDP. The mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), estimated coverage probability and average length of the prediction interval are used as the criterions for selecting the suitable lag value l-1 and the subset from a pool of 17 macroeconomic variables. It is found that the relatively better models would be those of which 2 ≤ l ≤ 3, and involving one or two of the macroeconomic variables given by Market Indicative Yield, Oil Prices, Exchange Rate and Import Trade.

  10. Monthly energy review, June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-26

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  11. Monthly energy review, November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. International energy and thermal and metric conversion factors are included.

  12. Natural gas monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-03

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary is included. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

  13. Monthly energy review, February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-24

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, consumption, prices, imports, and exports for the following US energy sources: petroleum; petroleum products; natural gas; coal; electricity; and nuclear energy. The section on international energy contains data for world crude oil production and consumption, petroleum stocks in OECD countries, and nuclear electricity gross generation.

  14. Monthly energy review, October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-26

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  15. Monthly energy review, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-25

    The Monthly Energy Review provides an overview of the production, distribution, and consumption of energy derived from petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. It also discusses oil and gas resource development, energy prices, and issues relevant to international energy markets.

  16. Monthly energy review, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Monthly Energy Review provides information on production, distribution, consumption, prices, imports, and exports for the following US energy sources: petroleum; petroleum products; natural gas; coal; electricity; and nuclear energy. The section on international energy contains data for world crude oil production and consumption, petroleum stocks in OECD countries, and nuclear electricity gross generation.

  17. Monthly energy review, January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum,natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal metric conversion factors.

  18. Monthly energy review, May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Monthly Energy Review provides an overview of the production, distribution, and consumption of energy derived from petroleum natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. It also discusses oil and gas resource development, energy prices, and issues relevant to international energy markets.

  19. Monthly energy review, July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This document presents an overview of the recent monthly energy statistics from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Statistical data covers activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for fossil fuels , nuclear energy, and electricity. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  20. Monthly energy review, December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-22

    This document provides data on monthly energy use and fossil fuels. The following sections are included: Highlights: Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1985--1990; Highlights: assessment of energy use in multibuilding facilities; energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices; and international energy.

  1. Monthly energy review, April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Monthly Energy Review contains statistical data on the following: energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. In addition, an energy overview is provided, and, for the April issue, Energy use and carbon emissions; Some international comparisons.

  2. Monthly energy review, April 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This report presents an overview of monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. International energy and thermal metric conversion factors are included.

  3. Electric Power Monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-12

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost in fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 12 refs., 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  4. Electric power monthly, March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-20

    This report for March 1995, presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  5. Natural gas monthly, December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This document highlights activities, events, and analysis of interest to the public and private sector associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also included.

  6. Premenstrual Exacerbations: Achieving Stability All Month, Every Month.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Laura G

    2017-04-01

    Premenstrual syndrome, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or premenstrual exacerbation of a psychiatric condition may disrupt 10 years of a woman's life over the course of her reproductive lifespan. As health care practitioners, nurses see women who experience these premenstrual symptom exacerbations in all treatment settings. Premenstrual exacerbation of psychiatric illness is a common phenomenon, and it is treatable; however, research is limited and evidence-based guidelines for treatment are sparse. The current article offers insights and an algorithm, extrapolated from the existing literature, into a lesser-known treatment strategy, semi-intermittent dosing, which will provide symptom stability all month, every month. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(4), 9-13.].

  7. Electric power monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

  8. Benchmarking homogenization algorithms for monthly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M. J.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2012-01-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random independent break-type inhomogeneities with normally distributed breakpoint sizes were added to the simulated datasets. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study. After the deadline at which details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed, 22 additional solutions were submitted. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  9. Hierarchical investigating the predictive value of p53, COX2, EGFR, nm23 in the post-operative patients with colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dachuan; Shao, Yingjie; Zheng, Xiao; Li, Xiaodong; Xiong, Yuqi; Wu, Changping; Jiang, Jingting

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between p53, COX2, EGFR, nm23 expression and the progression free survival (PFS) of post-operative patients with colorectal carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of p53, COX2, EGFR and nm23 in 459 specimens from colorectal carcinoma patients. Kaplan-Meier estimates, Cox proportional hazard regression analyses and hierarchical analyses were performed on the collected data. Kaplan-Meier estimates analysis suggested that EGFR expression was as a negative predictor, the median PFS of patients with EGFR high expression was 21.73 months, and the median PFS of patients with low EGFR expression was 57.83 months (χ2=20.880, P<0.001); nm23 expression was positive predictive factor for the prognosis of patients with colorectal carcinoma, the median PFS of patients with high nm23 expression was 37.77 months, and the median PFS was 21.47 months in the patients with low nm23 expression (χ2=7.364, P=0.007). Cox regression analysis revealed that comparing with the patients with low expression of EGFR, the patients with high EGFR expression were at higher risk of tumor progression (HR=1.667, P=0.004); Comparing with the patients with high nm23 expression, the patients with nm23 low expression had a higher risk of tumor progression (HR=0.412, P<0.001); and the risk of tumor progression was higher in the patients with high EGFR expression and low nm23 expression (HR=0.245, P<0.001). Hierarchical analysis showed that EGFR expression mainly correlates with the PFS of TNM stage I-II colorectal cancer patients, the median PFS was 33.53 months in the TNM stage I-II colorectal cancer patients with high EGFR expression patients; The median PFS of the TNM stage I-II colorectal cancer patients with low EGFR expression was 70.43 months (χ2=9.530, P=0.002); The median PFS was 19.2 months in the TNM stage III-IV colorectal cancer patients with high expression EGFR, the PFS of the TNM stage III-IV colorectal

  10. 100-Kilowatt solar photovoltaic flat-panel power system for the combined Beverly High School/C. H. Patten Vocational High School, Beverly, Massachusetts. Phase III. System operation and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Addiss, R.R. Jr.

    1985-06-01

    This report describes the first year's operation of a 100-kW photovoltaic flat-plate system at Beverly High School, Beverly, Massachusetts. Also included in the report are separate first-year reports by Stone and Webster, New England Electric System, and the Beverly Public School System. Over the reporting period, the systems produced nearly 90,000 kWh of electricity valued at nearly $5000 at an average buy-back rate from the utility of 5.78 cents/kWh. The cost of operation and maintenance during this first year was excessive, nearly equal to the total value derived from the energy. The system reliability problems have been addressed, and the operation and maintenance for the next year is expected to be about 10% of the energy value.

  11. Summary of Session III

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-06-19

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002.

  12. Natural Gas Monthly August 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. Explanatory notes supplement the information found in tables of the report. A description of the data collection surveys that support the NGM is provided. A glossary of the terms used in this report is also provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication.

  13. Natural gas monthly, August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

  14. Petroleum marketing monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: Summary Statistics; Crude Oil Prices; Prices of Petroleum Products; Volumes of Petroleum Products; and Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local Consumption. The feature article is entitled ``The Second Oxygenated Gasoline Season.`` 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  15. Petroleum marketing monthly, September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum product sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  16. Monthly energy review, March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Energy production during December 1997 totaled 5.9 quadrillion Btu, a 2.8 percent increase from the level of production during December 1996. Coal production increased 9.5 percent, natural gas production increased 3.9 percent, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.1 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.9 percent from the level of production during December 1996.

  17. Petroleum marketing monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: summary statistics; crude oil prices; prices of petroleum products; volumes of petroleum products; and prime supplier sales volumes of petroleum products for local consumption. 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  18. Petroleum marketing monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-15

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product Sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  19. Introducing 'Image of the Month'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brian, Jones

    2016-04-01

    The Editors of Sedimentary Geology are pleased to announce the establishment of an 'Image of the Month', to appear in each issue of the journal. The idea is to publish outstanding examples of sedimentary features, at all scales, as a means of increasing their visibility and so promoting further discussion and exchange of ideas within the community. The image could be at the scale of satellite image, aerial photograph, outcrop, specimen or thin section.

  20. Natural gas monthly, May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-24

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  1. Natural gas monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-25

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The NGM also features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  2. Monthly energy review, December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-21

    This publication presents an overview of EIA`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. An energy preview of alternative fuel providers vehicle fleet surveys is included. The publication is intended for use by members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public.

  3. Monthly energy review, October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Information is also provided for oil and gas resource development. International energy statistics are given for petroleum production, consumption, and stocks, and for nuclear electricity gross generation. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  4. Electric Power monthly, November 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  5. Electric power monthly, May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and Stage agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities in Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  6. Electric power monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-16

    The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  7. Electric Power Monthly, June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-13

    The EPM is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 40 tabs.

  8. Electric power monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-26

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  9. Electric power monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-20

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  10. Precise control of caval and hepatic vessels: Surgical technique to treat level III caval thrombus concomitant to renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Bin; Liu, Ning; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Yiduo; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Chao; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Weidong; Chen, Shuqiu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the surgical techniques, safety, and prevention of complications of nephrectomy and removal of tumour thrombus for treating level III inferior vena cava (IVC) concomitant to renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We did this by precise controlling IVC and hepatic vessels without a vascular bypass. Methods: In this series, we included 5 patients with level III IVC tumour thrombus below the hepatic vein concomitant to RCC. After precisely controlling the IVC and hepatic vessels, we then removed the thrombus en bloc with the renal vein. Blood loss volume, IVC clamping time, hypotension time, resuscitation, cardiocerebrovascular complications, and postoperative organ dysfunction were observed. Results: Surgery was successfully performed without perioperative death. Blood loss volume was 900 to 1500 mL, operation time was 165 to 250 minutes, vascular clamping time was 8 to 12 minutes, and intraoperative hypotension time was 9 to 12 minutes. Serious perioperative complications were not observed. Local recurrence was not observed during the 9 to 24 months of follow-up. One patient exhibited disease-free survival, 3 developed lung or liver metastasis, and 1 died 11 months after surgery. Conclusion: Precise control of IVC and hepatic pedicle vessels, without vascular bypass, is a safe and effective surgical treatment for level III tumor thrombus below the hepatic vein concomitant to RCC. The procedure was conducted without increased risks of intraoperative hypotensive shock, difficult resuscitation, pulmonary embolism, and multiple organ dysfunctions. PMID:26600890

  11. Petroleum marketing monthly, August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-07

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented. 12 figs., 49 tabs.

  12. Petroleum marketing monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-22

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, education institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  13. Petroleum supply monthly: December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Data are presented which describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. Data are presented in two sections: Summary Statistics, presenting a time series of selected petroleum data on a U.S. level, and Detailed Statistics, presenting statistics for the most current month available as well as year to date.

  14. Monthly energy review, September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Information is also provided on international energy, including petroleum production, consumption, and stocks and nuclear electricity gross generation. This issues provides a brief industry overview and a detailed analysis of the spring 1996 gasoline price runup, crude oil supply issues, U.S. crude oil imports, petroleum stocks, futures markets, refining cash margin trends, and the financial performance of U.S. refining and marketing firms. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  15. Petroleum marketing monthly, November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed costs of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  16. Petroleum marketing monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-25

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  17. China's first family planning publicity month.

    PubMed

    Shen, G

    1983-05-01

    China conducted its 1st nationwide Family Planning Publicity Month in 1983, from New Year's Day to Spring Festival (February 13). The campaign emphasized the rural areas and focused on explaining why family planning is a state policy. The most noticeable achievements of this campaign were that every household became familiar with the fact that family planning is a basic state policy. The majority of the population take this policy seriously, realizing that strict control of population growth is both a good and imperative policy. More than 1,830,000 propaganda columns and photo exhibitions were displayed, 5,900,000 radio and television programs broadcast, 2,010,000 theatrical performances, movie and slide showings presented, and 97,000,000 copies of materials published for public dissemination. The activities were varied and interesting, vivid and lively, and purposeful and persuasive. 1 of the most effective methods of publicizing population control has been the presentation of comparative statistics. This aspect of the campaign was a specific and lively form of education in population theory and practice. The presentation of statistics that show the relationship among population, land use, grain produce, and income enabled the population to reason out why population growth needs to match economic and social development. Another important accomplishment of the publicity month was that a large number of couples of reproductive age became convinced of the need to use contraception. According to the incomplete statistics, 8,860,000 people had surgical operations for birth control. The universal promotion of ligations by either partner of a reproductive couple who already had given birth to a 2nd child was an important development of family planning technique promoted simultaneously with the promotion of IUDs. The increase in the number of people doing family planning work was another achievement of the publicity month. More than 15,240,000 publicity personnel and 760

  18. Treatment of pseudo Class III malocclusion by modified Hawleys appliance with inverted labial bow.

    PubMed

    Negi, K S; Sharma, K R

    2011-01-01

    Pseudo Class III malocclusion is characterized by an anterior crossbite with functional forward mandibular displacement. Various appliances have been devised for early treatment of a pseudo Class III. The aim of this article is to highlight the method of construction and use a simple removable appliance termed as "Modified Hawleys appliance with inverted labial bow" to treat psuedo class III malocclusion in the mixed dentition period. It also emphasizes the importance of differentiating between true Class III and pseudo Class III. This appliance in this type of malocclusion enabled the correction of a dental malocclusion in a few months and therapeutic stability of a mesially positioned mandible encouraging favorable skeletal growth.

  19. The Mark III VLBI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Levine, J. I.; Nesman, E. F.; Webber, J. C.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    Geodetic measurements have errors in centimeter range. Collection of three reports describes both equipment and results of some measurements taken with Mark III very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) system. Has demonstrated high accuracy over short baselines, where phase-delay measurements used. Advanced hardware, called Mark III A, developed to improve system performance and efficiency. Original Mark III hardware and III A subsystem upgrades developed as part of NASA Crustal Dynamics Project at Haystack Observatory.

  20. Natural gas monthly, February 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through February 1998 for many data series, and through November 1997 for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the natural gas data contained in this issue are: Preliminary estimates for January and February 1998 show that dry natural gas production, net imports, and consumption are all within 1 percent of their levels in 1997. Warmer-than-normal weather in recent months has resulted in lower consumption of natural gas by the residential sector and lower net withdrawals of gas from under round storage facilities compared with a year ago. This has resulted in an estimate of the amount of working gas in storage at the end of February 1998 that is 18 percent higher than in February 1997. The national average natural gas wellhead price is estimated to be $3.05 per thousand cubic feet in November 1997, 7 percent higher than in October. The cumulative average wellhead price for January through November 1997 is estimated to be $2.42 per thousand cubic feet, 17 percent above that of the same period in 1996. This price increase is far less than 36-percent rise that occurred between 1995 and 1996. 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  1. Natural gas monthly, July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-21

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Explanatory Notes supplement the information found in tables of the report. A description of the data collection surveys that support the NGM is provided in the Data Sources section. A glossary of the terms used in this report is also provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication. All natural gas volumes are reported at a pressure base of 14.73 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) and at 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Cubic feet are converted to cubic meters by applying a factor of 0.02831685.

  2. Influence of gamma irradiation on uranium determination by Arsenazo III in the presence of Fe(II)/Fe(III).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong; Kang, Mingliang; Wang, Chunli; Liu, Chunli; Grambow, Bernd; Duro, Lara; Suzuki-Muresan, Tomo

    2014-07-01

    Arsenazo III is a widely used reagent for the concentration measurement of uranium and other actinides in aqueous samples. This study indicates that, for routine aqueous samples, due to the strong complexing ability with Arsenazo III, Fe(III) can significantly decrease the UV-Vis absorbance of the U(VI)-Arsenazo III complex, whereas the influence of Fe(II) on the absorbance is negligible. However, when Fe(II) is present in a gamma-irradiated U(VI) aqueous sample, it can give rise to the Fenton reaction, which produces oxidizing radicals that decompose the subsequently added Arsenazo III, leading to a sharp decrease in the absorbance of the U(VI)-Arsenazo III complex. The decrease in absorbance depends on the iron content and irradiation dose. Furthermore, the oxidizing radicals from the Fenton reaction induced by gamma irradiation can be continually produced. Even if the irradiated solution has been aged for more than one month in the absence of light at room temperature and without the exclusion of oxygen, the reactivity of the radicals did not decrease toward the subsequently added Arsenazo III. This finding demonstrates that the presence of Fe(II) in gamma-irradiated U(VI) aqueous samples can lead to incorrect U(VI) measurement using the Arsenazo III method, and a new method needs to be developed for the quantitative determination of U(VI) in the presence of gamma radiation and ferrous iron.

  3. Quality Assurance of 4D-CT Scan Techniques in Multicenter Phase III Trial of Surgery Versus Stereotactic Radiotherapy (Radiosurgery or Surgery for Operable Early Stage (Stage 1A) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer [ROSEL] Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; Lieshout, Maarten van; Schuring, Danny; Heumen, Marielle J.T. van; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Widder, Joachim; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Senan, Suresh

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scanning techniques in institutions participating in a Phase III trial of surgery vs. stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All 9 centers performed a 4D-CT scan of a motion phantom (Quasar, Modus Medical Devices) in accordance with their in-house imaging protocol for SBRT. A cylindrical cedar wood insert with plastic spheres of 15 mm (o15) and 30 mm (o30) diameter was moved in a cosine-based pattern, with an extended period in the exhale position to mimic the actual breathing motion. A range of motion of R = 15 and R = 25 mm and breathing period of T = 3 and T = 6 s were used. Positional and volumetric imaging accuracy was analyzed using Pinnacle version 8.1x at various breathing phases, including the mid-ventilation phase and maximal intensity projections of the spheres. Results: Imaging using eight CT scanners (Philips, Siemens, GE) and one positron emission tomography-CT scanner (Institution 3, Siemens) was investigated. The imaging protocols varied widely among the institutions. No strong correlation was found between the specific scan protocol parameters and the observed results. Deviations in the maximal intensity projection volumes averaged 1.9% (starting phase of the breathing cycle [o]15, R = 15), 12.3% (o15, R = 25), and -0.9% (o30, R = 15). The end-expiration volume deviations (13.4%, o15 and 2.5%, o30), were, on average, smaller than the end-inspiration deviations (20.7%, o15 and 4.5%, o30), which, in turn, were smaller than the mid-ventilation deviations (32.6%, o15 and 8.0%, o30). A slightly larger variation in the mid-ventilation origin position was observed (mean, -0.2 mm; range, -3.6-4.2) than in the maximal intensity projection origin position (mean, -0.1 mm; range, -2.5-2.5). The range of motion was generally underestimated (mean, -1.5 mm; range, -5.5-1). Conclusions: Notable differences were seen in the 4D-CT imaging protocols

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-06-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into technical tasks which address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates: source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  5. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-05-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) funds the project. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  6. LOFT Monthly Progress Report for July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    N. C. Kaufman

    1980-08-01

    During July, the LOFT test sequence underwent careful review which determined that changes would be appropriate. Evaluation of Tests L3-4 and L6-1 indicated they would not add significantly to the information base available from other experiments; therefore, these tests were cancelled. As shown in the Management Summary Schedule included in this report, the next test to be run is L3-5, scheduled for mid-September. Test L3-5 will be a small-break test in the cold leg side of the operating loop of the plant. Work efforts during July concentrated on plant preparation for the mid-September test. Installation of a new small-break path from the cold leg to the blowdown suppression tank, together with the associated new instrumentation installations, were well underway and on schedule at month's end. The Actual spending rate to date is in agreement with current budgets and authorized funding levels.

  7. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-10-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. LOFT Monthly Progress Report for February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    N. C. Kaufman

    1980-03-01

    The significant event of February was the on-schedule conduct of Test L3-2 on February 7. This was the second LOFT small break test with nuclear heat. It simulated a break of a one-inch pipe in a large commercial plant, whereas Test L3-1 had simulated a break of a four-inch pipe. For Test L3-2, the reactor plant and emergency core cooling system appeared to function as expected, although preliminary data evaluation indicates a higher break flow than expected, with a correspondingly greater depressurization. As the month ended, data evaluation was continuing. During February, Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidance was received that would require Tests L3-5 and L3-6 to use nuclear heat. Previously these tests, the next planned tests, had been designed as nonnuclear tests with and without operating coolant pumps. This revised guidance will require a replanning of the entire program schedule for better facility use. At the end of the month, replanning was underway. Costs for February are right on budget, although manpower levels are somewhat greater than budget. This latter variance results from an intentional manpower-material interchange.

  9. Stennis observes Women's History Month

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    NASA John C. Stennis Space Center employees observed Women's History Month on March 17 with a panel discussion that featured accomplished women of the facility. The gathering featured (l to r): Pam Covington, manager of the NASA Office of External Affairs at Stennis; Mary Jones, assistant chief of staff with the Navy Meterology & Oceanography Command; and Lauren Underwood, senior research scientist with Science Systems and Applications, Inc. In addition to the panel discussion, the Stennis Diversity Council and Patriot Technologies also hosted a pair of 'lunch-and-learn' sessions focused on women's issues and history. The luncheons featured videos on Sally Hemings, the slave widely recognized as the mistress of President Thomas Jefferson; and several mothers of U.S. presidents.

  10. Studies in Natural Illumination in Schoolrooms. Part III

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1929-11-01

    PI"C HEALTH BULLIN No. 188 STUDIESJIN ATURA ILUMINATION IN SCHOOLROOMSA f1-~7~PART III 20 U. 0 49990809 433 UngimED STATES ý-REASURY DE~PART1WENT... ilumination ratio of desk No. 14 for each month and hour of observation ---------------------------------------------- 55 29. Mean illumination ratio of desk

  11. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Efforts in the area of nuclear reactors and scientific computations are reported, including: robotics; reactor irradiation of nonend-bonded target slugs; computer link with Los Alamos National Laboratory; L-reactor thermal mitigation; aging of carbon in SRP reactor airborne activity confinement systems; and reactor risk assessment for earthquakes. Activities in chemical processes and environmental technology are reported, including: solids formation in a plutonium product stream; revised safety analysis reporting for F and H-Canyon operations; organic carbon analysis of DWPF samples; applications of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry; water chemistry analyzer for SRP reactors; and study of a biological community in Par Pond. Defense waste and laboratory operations activities include: Pu-238 waste incinerator startup; experimental canister frit blaster; saltstone disposal area design; powder metallurgy core diameter measurement; and a new maintenance shop facility. Nuclear materials planning encompasses decontamination and decommissioning of SRP facilities and a comprehensive compilation of environmental and nuclear safety issues. (LEW)

  12. Type III Hyperlipoproteinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Eighteen patients with type III hyperlipoproteinaemia, diagnosed on the basis of skin lesions, serum lipids, and lipoprotein electrophoresis, have been fully investigated over a period of 15 years. The incidence of coronary artery disease was only slightly increased, and was not increased at all among first-degree relatives. Peripheral occlusive arterial disease was probably more common. An increased incidence of carbohydrate intolerance was found in neither the patients nor their relatives. The effects of treatment on the skin were uniformly good. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5783124

  13. Your Child's Development: 1 Year (12 Months)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old Your Child’s Development: 1 Year (12 Months) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child’s Development: 1 Year (12 Months) A A A Your little one is now ... THIS TOPIC Your Child's Checkup: 1 Year (12 Months) Your Baby's Growth: 12 Months Your Baby's Hearing, ...

  14. 75 FR 1263 - National Mentoring Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Mentoring Month, 2010 Proclamation 8471--National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, 2010 #0... of January 4, 2010 National Mentoring Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A... have an enormous, lasting effect on a child's life. During National Mentoring Month, we recognize...

  15. Choroid plexus papillomas of the III ventricle in infants. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Costa, J M; Ley, L; Claramunt, E; Lafuente, J

    1997-05-01

    The III ventricle is an uncommon location for choroid plexus papilloma at any age. We describe three new cases of choroid plexus papillomas of the III ventricle (CPPs). All children were boys under 4 months of age and all presented with increased intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus and macrocephaly. The three were examined by preoperative computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography. Two of them were investigated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The first case was treated with a right corticofrontal transventricular approach and subtotal resection, so that he required a second operation through a transcallosal approach. In the other two cases a transcallosal approach was used. Two children needed permanent ventriculo-peritoneal shunts. The average follow-up of 4.3 years has revealed no neurological deficits in any case. The timing of and the need for shunting are major considerations. Clinical and imaging follow-up (CT and/or ultrasonography) are very helpful in controlling postoperative hydrocephalus and subdural effusion, avoiding unnecessary shunting in many cases. The operative approaches, transcortical and transcallosal, are discussed.

  16. The Zeplin-Iii Veto Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scovell, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    An active veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III two phase Xenon, direct dark matter device is described. The design consists of 52 plastic scintillator segments, individually read out by high efficiency photomultipliers, coupled to a Gd loaded passive polypropylene shield. Experimental work was performed to determine the plastic scintillator characteristics which were used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation of the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an active veto detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of tagging over 65% of expected coincident nuclear recoil events in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III, and over 14% for gamma ray rejection (gamma and neutron rate is predicted by simulation), while contributing no significant additional background. In addition it will also provide valuable diagnostic capabilities. The inclusion of the veto to ZEPLIN-III will aid to significantly improve the sensitivity to spin independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections 10-9 pb.

  17. Modelling the arsenic (V) and (III) adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, I.; Meghea, A.; Peleanu, I.; Gonzalo, A.; Valiente, M.; Zaharescu, M.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic has gained great notoriety historically for its toxic properties. In aquatic environment, arsenic can exist in several oxidation states, as both inorganic and organometallic species. As (V) is less toxic than As (III). Most research has been directed to the control of arsenic pollution of potable water. Various techniques such as precipitation with iron and aluminium hydroxides, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and adsorption are used for As (V) removal from surface and waste waters. Because of the easy handling of sludge, its free operation and regeneration capability, the adsorption technique has secured a place as one of the advanced methods of arsenic removal. A study of As (III) and As (V) sorption onto some different adsorbents (Fe (III) — iminodiacetate resin, nanocomposite materials, Fe(III) — forager sponge) referring to kinetic considerations and modelling of the process will be presented. All the systems studied are better described by Freundlich-Langmuir isotherm and the rate constant evaluation shows a sub-unitary order for the adsorption process.

  18. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  19. Plant operation report and daily operation summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    The operational, maintenance and evaluation activities and highlights that were required during the month of March 1985 for the Central Receiver System (CRS) and the Distributed Collector System (DCS) are summarized. Both the CRS and the DCS suffered serious reductions in their operational ability; the CRS due to a pending trace heating repair. The DCS was out of service due to a failure in the Power Conversion System feedwater pump. (BCS)

  20. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  1. Natural gas monthly, January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This publication, the Natural Gas Monthly, presents the most recent data on natural gas supply, consumption, and prices from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Of special interest in this issue are two articles summarizing reports recently published by EIA. The articles are {open_quotes}Natural Gas Productive Capacity{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Outlook for Natural Gas Through 2015,{close_quotes} both of which precede the {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} section. With this issue, January 1997, changes have been made to the format of the Highlights section and to several of the tabular and graphical presentations throughout the publication. The changes to the Highlights affect the discussion of developments in the industry and the presentation of weekly storage data. An overview of the developments in the industry is now presented in a brief summary followed by specific discussions of supply, end-use consumption, and prices. Spot and futures prices are discussed as appropriate in the Price section, together with wellhead and consumer prices.

  2. Natural gas monthly, November 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through November for many data series, and through August for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the most recent data estimates are: (1) Preliminary estimates of dry natural gas production and total consumption available through November 1997 indicate that both series are on track to end the year at levels close to those of 1996. Cumulative dry production is one-half percent higher than in 1996 and consumption is one-half percent lower. (2) Natural gas production is estimated to be 52.6 billion cubic feet per day in November 1997, the highest rate since March 1997. (3) After falling 8 percent in July 1997, the national average wellhead price rose 10 percent in August 1997, reaching an estimated $2.21 per thousand cubic feet. (4) Milder weather in November 1997 compared to November 1996 has resulted in significantly lower levels of residential consumption of natural gas and net storage withdrawls than a year ago. The November 1997 estimates of residential consumption and net withdrawls are 9 and 20 percent lower, respectively, than in November 1996.

  3. Monthly Energy Review, February 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Energy production during November 1997 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.3-percent decrease from the level of production during November 1996. Natural gas production increased 2.8 percent, production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.7 percent, and coal production decreased 1.6 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 1.1 percent from the level of production during November 1996. Energy consumption during November 1997 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 0.1 percent above the level of consumption during November 1996. Consumption of natural gas increased 1.5 percent, consumption of coal fell 0.3 percent, while consumption of petroleum products decreased 0.2 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.8 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during November 1997 totaled 1.7 quadrillion Btu, 8.6 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 6.3 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 1.2 percent. Net exports of coal fell 17.8 percent from the level in November 1996.

  4. Electric power monthly, June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-15

    Total net generation by electric utilities in the United States for the month of June 1988 was 232,183 gigawatthours, 3 percent higher than the amount reported a year ago. Although temperatures (measured by cooling degree days) for June 1988 were 9 percent warmer than normal, they were 3 percent cooler than for June 1987. A large portion of that higher demand for electricity was met by nuclear-powered generation. Net generation from nuclear power during June 1988 (44,079 gigawatthours) was only 1 percent below the record set in January of this year, and 21 percent above that reported in June 1987 (36,560 gigawatthours). The only energy source other than nuclear that reported higher levels of net generation during June 1988 was coal, up 2 percent over the same period last year. Warmer-than-normal temperatures did, however, have an affect on various parts of the country. For example, on Wednesday, June 22, 1988, unseasonably high temperatures forced the Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland Interconnection (PJM) into a system-wide 5-percent voltage reduction for 2 hours. Contributing to that reduction in voltage was the shutdown of the Three Mile Island, Unit 1, for refueling and the closing of the Peach Bottom Units 2 and 3 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Three Mile Island, Unit 1, normally provides the PJM system with about 800 megawatts while the two Peach Bottom units, combined, provide approximately 2100 megawatts. 10 refs., 1 fig., 27 tabs.

  5. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    Brief summaries are given in the areas of defense waste and laboratory operations, nuclear reactors and scientific computation, and chemical processes and environmental technology. The performance of waste glass samples has been tested. A prototype Pu-238 waste incinerator is being tested. A monitor system is being developed to allow unattended computer system operation. A program to review and update the Reactor Technical Standards and Specifications is in progress. Analysis of a medium LOCA in a reactor D/sub 2/O coolant system is reported. Preliminary results are given for alternative degreasers. Modernization of a JOSHUA computer system is reported. The safety of a fuel tube fabrication building is discussed. The program to evaluate reactor materials is summarized. A design has been developed for a silver-mordenite packed bed reactor to remove radioactive iodine from uranium fuel dissolver off-gas. Automated online analyzers were developed. Ground-penetrating radar has been evaluated. The safety of two space probes powered by plutonium dioxide thermal generators was evaluated. (LEW)

  6. Hubble Space Telescope. Update: 18 months in orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In April 1990, Space Shuttle Discovery launched the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). An 18 month in-orbit update of the operations and performance of the HST is presented. Numerous color photographs are shown of objects already observed, and mission plans are presented for future observations by the HST.

  7. Purification of swine carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme III and measurement of its levels in tissues and plasma.

    PubMed

    Nishita, T; Harada, T; Sakanoue, H; Arai, S; Itoh, S; Orito, K; Arishima, K

    2014-02-01

    The changes in the levels of carbonic anhydrase isozyme III (CA-III) in swine plasma and urine have not been previously determined or reported. CA-III is relatively specific to skeletal muscles, and should therefore be a useful diagnostic marker for muscle diseases. We isolated CA-III from swine muscle tissues and determined CA-III levels in the plasma and urine from both healthy and diseased pigs. The levels of CA-III in the tissues of female swine (age, 3 months) and plasma of young swine (age, 1-5 months) and adult female pigs (age, 2-3 years) were determined using the ELISA system for swine CA-III. The mean (± SD) levels of CA-III in the skeletal muscles were 3.8 ± 3.2 mg/g (wet tissue), and in the plasma, 230 ± 193 ng/ml at 1 month, 189 ± 208 ng/ml at 2 months, 141 ± 148 ng/ml at 3 months, 78 ± 142 ng/ml at 4 months and 53 ± 99 ng/ml at 5 months. The mean level of CA-III in the plasma samples from 2- to 3-year-old pigs was 18 ± 60 ng/ml. CA-III in the plasma samples was found to decrease from 1 month until 3 years of age (p < 0.01). We performed far-western blotting to clarify the cause of the observed decrease in CA-III in plasma. Our results demonstrated that CA-III is bound to the transferrin and albumin. In addition, we determined that the levels of CA-III in plasma and urine samples were higher in diseased swine compared with the healthy pigs.

  8. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-10-04

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NNSS and National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NNSS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NNSS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NNSS. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NNSS (Figure 1), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. The site will be used for the disposal of regulated Asbestiform Low-Level Waste (ALLW), small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM) and PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water. The term asbestiform is

  9. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus. III. Scaling theory for high pressure operation and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2016-12-01

    practice of designs optimized at pressures less than 10 mbar of deuterium. These examples show that the upper limit for operating pressure is of technological (and not physical) origin.

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  11. Petroluem Supply Monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-04

    Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  12. Background investigation in EDELWEISS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, Silvia

    2015-08-17

    Protection from and rejection of backgrounds is a key issue for the EDELWEISS-III direct dark matter detection experiment which aims at exploring the 10{sup −9} pb cross-section region for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction. The detector is located in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory and consists of 36 advanced FID germanium detectors operating at 18 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify eventual rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. I will discuss the background and the methods of rejecting it with the FID detectors. Detector performances and the first analysis of data acquired in a long-term campaign will be presented as well. The FID detector technology is not limited to EDELWEISS-III but can further be employed in the next generation of cryogenic detector experiments.

  13. BES-III distributed computing status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, S. D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Korenkov, V. V.; Li, W. D.; Lin, T.; Ma, Z. T.; Nicholson, C.; Pelevanyuk, I. S.; Suo, B.; Trofimov, V. V.; Tsaregorodtsev, A. U.; Uzhinskiy, A. V.; Yan, T.; Yan, X. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Zhemchugov, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The BES-III experiment at the Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing, China) is aimed at the precision measurements in e+e- annihilation in the energy range from 2.0 till 4.6 GeV. The world's largest samples of J/psi and psi' events and unique samples of XYZ data have been already collected. The expected increase of the data volume in the coming years required a significant evolution of the computing model, namely shift from a centralized data processing to a distributed one. This report summarizes a current design of the BES-III distributed computing system, some of key decisions and experience gained during 2 years of operations.

  14. LOFT Monthly Progress Report for October 1980

    SciTech Connect

    N. C. Kaufman

    1980-11-01

    During the month of October, several significant events occurred. Three tests, L6-1, L6-2, and L6-3, in the anticipated transient series were completed. These tests were conducted to provide information on plant control systems and operator responses to transients in which the initiating event was not a loss of primary coolant. These transient tests and others scheduled for the future will add greatly to predicting responses for such transient conditions. On the 16th and 17th of October, LOFT hosted a technology transfer meeting in which representatives from more than sixty power utilities in the United States and several foreign countries participated. The purpose of this LOFT/Utility Technology Transfer meeting was to provide an open forum through which utility personnel could become better informed about the LOFT project, its past, present, and future experimental program, and how this program could serve industry needs. Several recommendations for LOFT were made by the utility community; these suggestons are being looked at very closely and correspondence with the utility representatives continues. Members of the ACRS committee met in Idaho Falls during October to review the scope of the LOFT program. General approval of the LOFT program was expressed by the ACRS, and several recommendations were made. Requests were also made for additional briefings when LOFT has further scoped the potentially more severe large break transients. Plant preparations were underway during October for the next LOFT test scheduled for mid-December. This test, designated L3-6, will be another in the small break series, with the break occurring in the intact loop of the cold leg. Budget and actuals are showing good agreement for the first month of FY-81, except for a small underrun in the manpower level which is expected to be corrected in the near future.

  15. Long-term regeneration of the rat sciatic nerve through a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide: tissue reactions with focus on collagen III/IV reformation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Koen; Meek, Marcel F; van der Werff, John F A; van Wachem, Pauline B; van Luyn, Marja J A

    2004-05-01

    Long-term studies on nerve-guide regeneration are scarce. Therefore, in rats, long-term (16 months) sciatic nerve regeneration through poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) [poly(DLLA-epsilon-CL)] nerve guides was studied and compared with the nonoperated control side. Poly(DLLA-epsilon-CL) degradation and possible long-term foreign body reaction against poly(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides, as well as the distribution of both collagen type III and IV were studied. In vivo poly(DLLA-epsilon-CL) studies have been performed before but not for such long time points; also, a detailed analysis of collagen III/IV has not been presented before. The results demonstrate that biodegradable poly(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides yield good nerve regeneration and collagen III/IV deposition relative to the anatomy of the control side. Regenerated nerve showed almost similar collagen type III/IV distribution patterns as compared with the nonoperated control side, although the delineation of matrix was clearer in the control side. The relative amount of collagen III and IV immunostaining in nerve cross-sections did not, however, differ between the control nerve tissue and the operated side after 16 months. After 16 months of implantation, however, some very small fragments of biomaterial could still be found on the edge of the epineurium of the regenerated nerve, indicating remnants of a secondary foreign body reaction. The biomaterial fragments and foreign body reaction did not influence the nerve regeneration process after 16 months. Biodegradable poly(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides are useful for long-term bridging of short peripheral nerve gaps.

  16. Clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with stage III esophageal carcinoma: a single-center experience from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Vahide I; Kara, Sakire P; Kucukplakci, Bulent; Demirkasimoglu, Taciser; Misirlioglu, Cem; Ozgen, Aytul; Elgin, Yesim; Sanri, Ergun; Altundag, Kadri; Ozdamar, Nadi

    2008-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is an extremely deadly disease, and prognosis is poor. We retrospectively evaluated stage III esophageal carcinoma patients in our center. Median age of the patients was 52. Men to women ratio were 3/1. Epidermoid carcinoma was the major histology. Incidence of esophageal carcinoma was higher in the distal and middle third of the esophagus. In 19 patients tumor size was more than 5 cm. In total of 17 of the patients were operated. About 58 patients were irradiated. About 45 of the patients were irradiated with curative intent, 31 of them were primarily irradiated and 14 of them were irradiated postoperatively. Only 13 of the patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Overall 1, 2, 3, and 4 year survival rates were 38.9%, 11.1%, 5.6%, and %1.9, respectively and median survival was 12 months. Median survival for tumors located in cervical esophageal, middle esophagus, and distal esophagus were 23, 8, and 14 months, respectively. One, 2, 3, 4 year survival rates of operated patients were 58.8%, 29.4%, 17.6%, 5.9%, respectively and median survival was 23 months. For inoperable patients 1 and 2 year survival rates were 29.7% and 2.7% and median survival was 8 months. Differences between operable and inoperable patients were statistically significant (P: 0.0003). One, 2, 3, 4 years survival results of patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was 62.5%, 25%, 12.5%, 12.5% and median survival was 21 months, 1, 2, 3, 4 years survival results of patients treated with surgery and concurrent chemoradiotherapy was 55.6%, 33.3%, 22.2%, and 0% and median survival was 27 months. There was no statistically significant difference between groups (P: 0.5390). During the therapy, disphagia was the major side effect observed in seven patients. Fatigue, pain, and mild weight loss were the other side effects. Three patients could not tolerate the treatment and left the therapy. We demonstrated that stage III esophageal carcinoma is an extremely

  17. 20 CFR 404.211 - Computing your average indexed monthly earnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... period of 3 months, or one-half the time after the child's birth or before the child attained age 3. (iii... determined from a sampling of these reports. (2) For the years 1978 through 1990, all remuneration reported.... (3) For years after 1990, all remuneration reported as wages on Form W-2 to the Internal...

  18. 20 CFR 404.211 - Computing your average indexed monthly earnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... period of 3 months, or one-half the time after the child's birth or before the child attained age 3. (iii... determined from a sampling of these reports. (2) For the years 1978 through 1990, all remuneration reported.... (3) For years after 1990, all remuneration reported as wages on Form W-2 to the Internal...

  19. 20 CFR 404.211 - Computing your average indexed monthly earnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... period of 3 months, or one-half the time after the child's birth or before the child attained age 3. (iii... determined from a sampling of these reports. (2) For the years 1978 through 1990, all remuneration reported.... (3) For years after 1990, all remuneration reported as wages on Form W-2 to the Internal...

  20. 18-24 Months: Your Child's Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources & Services Parenting Resource 18–24 Months: Your Child’s Development Download Files Feb 10, 2016 This is a ... home language in the same sentence. Downloads Your Child's Development: 18–24 Months PDF 464 KB Read more ...

  1. 15-18 Months: Your Child's Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources & Services Parenting Resource 15–18 Months: Your Child’s Development Download Files Feb 10, 2016 Your toddler is ... Stages Back to top Explore more from Your Child's Development: Age-Based Tips From Birth to 36 Months ...

  2. Infant Development: Birth to 3 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... major infant development milestones from birth to 3 months — and know what to do when something's not ... A lot happens during your baby's first three months. Most babies reach certain milestones at similar ages, ...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.264 - Laundry machinery and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operation of laundry machines. This section does not apply to dry-cleaning operations. (c) Point-of-operation guards—(1) Washroom machines. (i) (ii) Washing machine. (a) (b) Each washing machine shall be... loaded or unloaded. (2) Starching and drying machines. (i)-(ii) (iii) Drying tumbler. (a) (b) Each...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.264 - Laundry machinery and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operation of laundry machines. This section does not apply to dry-cleaning operations. (c) Point-of-operation guards—(1) Washroom machines. (i) (ii) Washing machine. (a) (b) Each washing machine shall be... loaded or unloaded. (2) Starching and drying machines. (i)-(ii) (iii) Drying tumbler. (a) (b) Each...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.264 - Laundry machinery and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operation of laundry machines. This section does not apply to dry-cleaning operations. (c) Point-of-operation guards—(1) Washroom machines. (i) (ii) Washing machine. (a) (b) Each washing machine shall be... loaded or unloaded. (2) Starching and drying machines. (i)-(ii) (iii) Drying tumbler. (a) (b) Each...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.264 - Laundry machinery and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operation of laundry machines. This section does not apply to dry-cleaning operations. (c) Point-of-operation guards—(1) Washroom machines. (i) (ii) Washing machine. (a) (b) Each washing machine shall be... loaded or unloaded. (2) Starching and drying machines. (i)-(ii) (iii) Drying tumbler. (a) (b) Each...

  7. 77 FR 17321 - Women's History Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ...#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8780 of March 1, 2012 Women's History Month... History Month, we commemorate their struggles, celebrate centuries of progress, and reaffirm our steadfast... chances for lasting peace. In the months ahead, my Administration will continue to collaborate...

  8. 75 FR 54455 - National Wilderness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8553 of August 31, 2010 National Wilderness Month, 2010 By the President of... diverse lands, remarkable wildlife, and untamed beauty during National Wilderness Month, we also look back... month, we renew our pledge to build upon the legacy of our forebears. Together, we must ensure...

  9. 77 FR 207 - National Mentoring Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... January 3, 2012 Part IV The President Proclamation 8768--National Mentoring Month, 2012 Proclamation 8769--National Stalking Awareness Month, 2012 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0;Federal Register... President ] Proclamation 8768 of December 28, 2011 National Mentoring Month, 2012 By the President of...

  10. 78 FR 54743 - National Preparedness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9009 of August 30, 2013 National Preparedness Month, 2013 By the President of... communities' resilience. During National Preparedness Month, we refocus our efforts on readying ourselves, our... Month theme, ``You Can Be the Hero,'' asks all Americans to ready themselves to assist in case...

  11. 77 FR 66515 - Military Family Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since our Nation's earliest... Military Family Month, we honor our military families and recommit to showing them the fullest care and... who have perished in the line of duty. This month, we reaffirm that we will always lift up...

  12. 76 FR 32857 - Great Outdoors Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8687 of May 31, 2011 Great Outdoors Month, 2011 By the President of the United... stretching over rolling hills and rivers raging through stone-faced cliffs. During Great Outdoors Month, we... healthy, active, and energized, while reconnecting with their natural heritage. This month, let each of...

  13. 75 FR 81083 - National Mentoring Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8619 of December 21, 2010 National Mentoring Month, 2011 By the President of... challenging times and support their journey into adulthood. During National Mentoring Month, we honor these... the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim January 2011 as National Mentoring Month. I...

  14. 78 FR 14433 - Women's History Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8935 of February 28, 2013 Women's History Month, 2013 By the President of the... your talents will take you. Women's History Month is a time to remember those who fought to make that... Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2013 as Women's History Month. I...

  15. 78 FR 66609 - National Adoption Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9049 of October 31, 2013 National Adoption Month, 2013 By the President of... million children and teenagers. During National Adoption Month, we celebrate these families and stand... parents and children. This month, we celebrate adopted children, teenagers, and their diverse families....

  16. 78 FR 26225 - Older Americans Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ...;#0; ] Proclamation 8971 of April 30, 2013 Older Americans Month, 2013 By the President of the United... together to honor older Americans in a special way during the month of May. We carry that tradition forward... the best our country has to offer. This month, we pay tribute to the men and women who raised us,...

  17. 77 FR 26651 - Older Americans Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ...;#0; ] Proclamation 8809 of May 1, 2012 Older Americans Month, 2012 By the President of the United... Americans Month, ``Never Too Old to Play,'' celebrates the accomplishments of older Americans and encourages... future their children and grandchildren deserve. During Older Americans Month, we celebrate...

  18. 76 FR 25523 - Older Americans Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8663 of April 29, 2011 Older Americans Month, 2011 By the President of the... contributions of a new generation of American seniors. Each year, we set aside the month of May to honor older... and wisdom. The theme for this year's Older Americans Month, ``Older Americans: Connecting...

  19. 75 FR 10631 - Women's History Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ...#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8481 of March 2, 2010 Women's History Month... History Month is an opportunity for us to recognize the contributions women have made to our Nation, and... employment opportunities for women and girls. ] This month, let us carry forth the legacy of our mothers...

  20. 78 FR 66615 - National Entrepreneurship Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9052 of October 31, 2013 National Entrepreneurship Month, 2013 By the... Entrepreneurship Month, we celebrate America's innovators, support small businesses, and empower entrepreneurs to... challenges of our time. As we observe this month and celebrate Global Entrepreneurship Week, let us...

  1. 77 FR 55097 - National Preparedness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8854 of August 31, 2012 National Preparedness Month, 2012 By the President of..., emergencies and natural disasters have tested the fabric of our country. During National Preparedness Month... family. This month, let us honor that spirit by standing with all those affected by recent severe...

  2. 75 FR 23559 - Older Americans Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ...;#0; ] Proclamation 8506 of April 28, 2010 Older Americans Month, 2010 By the President of the United... past and help us meet the challenges of the present. During Older Americans Month, we show our support...'s theme for Older Americans Month, ``Age Strong, Live Long,'' recognizes the efforts of people...

  3. 76 FR 55211 - National Wilderness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8704 of September 1, 2011 National Wilderness Month, 2011 By the President of... are defined by its diversity and empowered by its richness. This month, we honor this land that we... has shaped America. During National Wilderness Month, let each of us embrace our Nation's legacy...

  4. 77 FR 66523 - National Entrepreneurship Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8899 of November 1, 2012 National Entrepreneurship Month, 2012 By the... business or a new industry. During National Entrepreneurship Month, we celebrate the hard work, ingenuity... catalyze their success. ] This month, and during Global Entrepreneurship Week, let us renew the spirit...

  5. 76 FR 11931 - Women's History Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8630 of February 28, 2011 Women's History Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation During Women's History Month, we reflect on the extraordinary... recognition of those who will come after us, this month, we recommit to erasing the remaining...

  6. 78 FR 853 - National Mentoring Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... Mentoring Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Our American family is... Mentoring Month, we pay special tribute to the men and women who enrich the lives of our young people and... Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim January 2013 as National Mentoring Month....

  7. 77 FR 66517 - National Adoption Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8896 of November 1, 2012 National Adoption Month, 2012 By the President of... knowing the love and protection of a permanent family. During National Adoption Month, we give voice to... nurture their development and well-being. Later this month, many Americans will also mark...

  8. 76 FR 33119 - National Oceans Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8688 of June 2, 2011 National Oceans Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation During National Oceans Month, we celebrate the value of our oceans to... the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 2011 as National Oceans Month. I call...

  9. 78 FR 54747 - National Wilderness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9011 of August 30, 2013 National Wilderness Month, 2013 By the President of... have passed through America's most treasured landscapes, leaving their beauty unmarred. This month, we... world, bolstering local businesses and supporting American jobs. During National Wilderness Month,...

  10. 77 FR 33603 - National Oceans Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8836 of June 1, 2012 National Oceans Month, 2012 By the President of the... across America. During National Oceans Month, we reaffirm our commitment to the oceans and celebrate the... National Oceans Month, let us celebrate our heritage as a seafaring Nation by instilling an ethic of...

  11. 75 FR 32083 - National Oceans Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8531 of May 28, 2010 National Oceans Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Each year during National Oceans Month, we rededicate ourselves to... the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 2010 as National Oceans Month. I call...

  12. 77 FR 13185 - Women's History Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8780 of March 1, 2012 Women's History Month, 2012 By the President of the... Women's History Month, we commemorate their struggles, celebrate centuries of progress, and reaffirm our... conflict and improving the chances for lasting peace. In the months ahead, my Administration will...

  13. 75 FR 32077 - Great Outdoors Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8528 of May 28, 2010 Great Outdoors Month, 2010 By the President of the United... friends. During Great Outdoors Month, we renew our enduring commitment to protect our natural landscapes... the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 2010 as Great Outdoors Month. I urge...

  14. 77 FR 33597 - Great Outdoors Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8833 of June 1, 2012 Great Outdoors Month, 2012 By the President of the..., trials, and triumphs. During Great Outdoors Month, we celebrate our long legacy of environmental... Outdoors Month is a time for all Americans to share in the natural splendor of which we are all...

  15. 78 FR 33955 - Great Outdoors Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8988 of May 31, 2013 Great Outdoors Month... Great Outdoors Month, we celebrate the land entrusted to us by our forebears and resolve to pass it on... inspired us toward bold new horizons. This month, let us reflect on those timeless gifts, and let us vow...

  16. 77 FR 55101 - National Wilderness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8856 of August 31, 2012 National Wilderness Month, 2012 By the President of... Administration is working to carry that legacy forward during the 21st. In my first months as President, I was... Americans and as inhabitants of this small planet. During National Wilderness Month, let us celebrate...

  17. 78 FR 33961 - National Oceans Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8991 of May 31, 2013 National Oceans Month, 2013 By the President of the... long-term health of our marine ecosystems. Let us mark this month by renewing those goals, reinvesting... Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 2013 as National Oceans Month. I...

  18. 76 FR 54917 - National Preparedness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... September 2, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8700--National Preparedness Month, 2011 #0; #0; #0... Preparedness Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Whenever our Nation... a vital role in securing our country. The National Preparedness Month Coalition gives everyone...

  19. 5 CFR 1650.13 - Monthly payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... or a portion of the account balance in a series of substantially equal monthly payments, to be paid... receiving monthly payments, regardless of the calculation method, can elect at any time to receive the... withdraw their account balances in a series of monthly payments cannot transfer or roll over money from...

  20. Monthly Financial Reporting: Keeping the Community Informed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate, timely, and concise monthly financial reporting is achieved through mastering statistics. A Grafton, Massachusetts school business manager's monthly presentation to the school committee is a composite of all the statistics he has reviewed during the previous month. This presentation reports where and how funds have been spent and…

  1. Title III and Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Title III Quarterly, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Title III projects dealing with cultural diversity in the classroom are described in this issue of the Title III Quarterly. Major articles are devoted to the following projects: Two Arts Culture Three Project, developing the crafts and music of mountain whites, blacks, and Cherokees; the Rota Bilingual Project, the Marianas District, emphasizing…

  2. SUPERSTARS III: 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  3. Using dBase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Four articles on dBASE III include three on library applications: a photocopy invoicing system for interlibrary loan, a vertical file subject headings list program, and a subject index to statistical resources. Another article explains the differences between interpreters and compilers and the advantages of the Clipper compiler for dBASE III. (EM)

  4. SUPERSTARS III: 3-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  5. Management of pseudo Class III malocclusion--synergistic approach with fixed and functional appliance.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gyan P

    2013-01-01

    Class III malocclusion has been divided into two subtypes: skeletal and pseudo-Class III. A pseudo Class III malocclusion should be treated as early as possible to reduce the functional shift of the mandible and increase maxillary arch length. A case of pseudo-Class III malocclusion was presented here. A 11-year-old boy came with an anterior cross bite, the treatment was done with Fixed appliance (Roth prescription) and Reverse Twin block therapy. This case demonstrated that an anterior cross bite was corrected after 10 months of treatment.

  6. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, cultural and technical experts nominated by the regional Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Project reports and references used in the reports are made available to the public in a public reading room. Project progress is documented in this monthly report, which is available to the public. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. 40 CFR 280.110 - Reporting by owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL STANDARDS AND CORRECTIVE ACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF UNDERGROUND... mechanism, (iii) Failure of a guarantor to meet the requirements of the financial test, (iv)...

  8. Assessment of hoist failure rate for Payload Transporter III

    SciTech Connect

    Demmie, P.N.

    1994-02-01

    Assessment of the hoist failure rate for the Payload Transporter Type III (PT-III) hoist was completed as one of the ground transportation tasks for the Minuteman II (MMIII) Weapon System Safety Assessment. The failures of concern are failures that lead to dropping a reentry system (RS) during hoist operations in a silo or the assembly, storage, and inspection building for a MMIII wing. After providing a brief description of the PT-III hoist system, the author summarizes his search for historical data from industry and the military services for failures of electric hoist systems. Since such information was not found, the strategy for assessing a failure rate was to consider failure mechanisms which lead to load-drop accidents, estimate their rates, and sum the rates for the PT-III hoist failure rate. The author discusses failure mechanisms and describes his assessment of a chain failure rate that is based on data from destructive testing of a chain of the type used for the PT-III hoist and projected usage rates for hoist operations involving the RS. The main result provides upper bounds for chain failure rates that are based on these data. No test data were found to estimate failure rates due to mechanisms other than chain failure. The author did not attempt to quantify the effects of human factors on the PT-III hoist failure rate.

  9. Space Processing Applications Rocket project SPAR III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, F.

    1978-01-01

    This document presented the engineering report and science payload III test report and summarized the experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of five scientific experiments conducted during the third Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight flown by NASA in December 1976. The five individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: Liquid Mixing, Interaction of Bubbles with Solidification Interfaces, Epitaxial Growth of Single Crystal Film, Containerless Processing of Beryllium, and Contact and Coalescence of Viscous Bodies.

  10. Deployable Network Operations Center (DNOC): A Collaborative Technology Infostructure Designed to Support Tactical Sensor-Decision Maker Network Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    6 II. OPERATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR TSDN ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING ..................................................................................................................9...13 3. Organizational Learning Stage.........................................................14 III. KEY COMPONENTS OF... ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING ...........................17 A. VISION & STRATEGY................................................................................17

  11. III-nitride-based avalanche photo detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, Ryan; Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; Bayram, Can; Razeghi, Manijeh; Ulmer, Melville P.

    2010-08-01

    Research into III-Nitride based avalanche photodiodes (APDs) is motivated by the need for high sensitivity ultraviolet (UV) detectors in numerous civilian and military applications. By designing III-Nitride photodetectors that utilize low-noise impact ionization high internal gain can be realized-GaN APDs operating in Geiger mode can achieve gains exceeding 1×107. Thus with careful design, it becomes possible to count photons at the single photon level. In this paper we review the current state of the art in III-Nitride visible-blind APDs and discuss the critical design choices necessary to achieve high performance Geiger mode devices. Other major technical issues associated with the realization of visible-blind Geiger mode APDs are also discussed in detail and future prospects for improving upon the performance of these devices are outlined. The photon detection efficiency, dark count rate, and spectral response of or most recent Geiger-mode GaN APDs on free-standing GaN substrates are studied under low photon fluxes, with single photon detection capabilities being demonstrated. We also present our latest results regarding linear mode gain uniformity: the study of gain uniformity helps reveal the spatial origins of gain so that we can better understand the role of defects.

  12. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  13. Is conservative treatment still defensible in grade III acromioclavicular dislocation? Are there predictive factors of poor outcome?

    PubMed

    Rasmont, Quentin; Delloye, Christian; Bigare, Elisa; Van Isacker, Tom

    2015-03-01

    The optimal treatment of grade III acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation is still controversial. Recent studies recommend surgery at that stage whereas meta-analysis favours conservative management. The objective of the present investigation was to analyse a clinical series of non-operated grade III AC dislocations and to determine their functional status. Thirty-five patients treated conservatively with a grade III acromioclavicular dislocation were retrospectively reviewed. Simple shoulder test, Oxford shoulder and bilateral Constant shoulder score were used for assessment. Various predictive criteria of poor outcome, particularly scapular dyskinesis were taken into account for analysis. Overall mean and median Constant Score of the injured side were 92.9 and 94, whilst the contralateral shoulder values were respectively 94.9 and 95 (mean and median scores). Ten patients had scapular dyskinesis. Laterality, shoulder activity and scapular dyskinesis were not statistically related to worse outcome. Twenty-eight (80%) patients resumed normal activity within six months. All but two patients were subjectively very satisfied or satisfied. Conservative treatment provided satisfactory results whatever the shoulder activity. No risk factors were predictive of a poorer outcome. Conservative management should remain the first option to manage these injuries.

  14. Low verbal assessment with the Bayley-III.

    PubMed

    Visser, Linda; Ruiter, Selma A J; Van der Meulen, Bieuwe F; Ruijssenaars, Wied A J J M; Timmerman, Marieke E

    2014-10-24

    Recently, the authors have developed the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal for developmental assessment of children with language impairment. The Low Verbal version consists of an accommodated cognition scale, and non-accommodated communication and motor scales. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the validity and added value of the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal for children with a language impairment, in relation to the standard Bayley-III-NL for children without impairment. We administered the Bayley-III Low Verbal to 69 children with language impairment, and the standard Bayley-III-NL to 1132 children without impairments. We used an evaluation form for test administrators and interviews with developmental psychologists to evaluate the suitability of the Low Verbal version for the target group. We analyzed the test results using nonparametric item response theory (IRT) to investigate whether test results can be reasonably compared across the two groups. The results of the IRT analyses support the validity of the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal: the test items do not suffer from differential item functioning (DIF) across the two groups, and thus measure the ability levels of interest in the same way. The results of the evaluation form and interviews confirm that the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal has added value for testing children with a language impairment, especially for children up to 36 months old. It is also suitable for children with general developmental delay. We conclude that the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal can validly assess the cognitive, language, and motor development of young children with a language impairment and is the preferred instrument for this target group.

  15. Type III frontal sinusotomy: surgical technique, indications, outcomes, a multi-university retrospective study of 120 cases.

    PubMed

    Eloy, P; Vlaminck, S; Jorissen, M; Hellings, P; Timmermans, M; Daele, J; Ransky, P; Hassid, S; Van Zele, T; Bachert, C; Poirrier, A L; Bertrand, B

    2011-01-01

    Draf in 1991. The procedure--which is also known as the modified endoscopic Lothrop procedure--aims to create the largest possible anteroposterior and lateral to lateral opening between both frontal sinuses and the nasal cavities. This requires the resection of the medial floor of both frontal sinuses, the intersinus septum and the superior nasal septum. The authors present a retrospective study including a cohort of 120 patients who underwent surgery in six Belgian university ENT departments. Mean follow-up was 24.6 months (range: 5-36 months). This paper describes the surgical procedure and reviews the indications, comorbidities, outcomes and complications of the type III frontal sinusotomy. Some correlations are also established with the data published in the worldwide literature. The authors conclude that the Draf III is a demanding procedure requiring considerable expertise in endoscopic sinus surgery. The procedure is effective with a success rate of 87.5%. Indeed, 12.5% of patients only experienced closure of the neoostium while 20% of all the patients had unchanged or worse symptomatology. The percentage of post-operative complications is 7.5%. All complications were managed successfully.

  16. Operational waste volume projection

    SciTech Connect

    Koreski, G.M.; Strode, J.N.

    1995-06-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the tri-party agreement. Assumptions are current as of June 1995.

  17. 14 CFR 29.1585 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... compliance with § 29.1353 (c)(6)(ii) or (c)(6)(iii), the operating procedures for disconnecting the battery from its charging source must be furnished. (e) If the unusable fuel supply in any tank exceeds...

  18. Echelle Blaze Shift vs. MSM Monthly Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, Jeff

    2002-07-01

    In the near future, monthly MSM offsets will probably be disabled for STIS echelle gratings, alleviating to some extent calibration problems associated with the monthly offsets. The data from this program will be used to improve empirical and optical models relating wavelength and blaze function shifts. These models will in turn be used to improve the calibration of archival echelle data obtained while monthly MSM offsets were enabled. The flux standard HZ43 will be observed with the E230H echelle grating at a central wavelength of 2513 Angstroms. Five exposures will be obtained, each with a different monthly offset applied to the Mode Select Mechanism {MSM}.

  19. 45 CFR 233.28 - Monthly reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ELIGIBILITY IN FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.28 Monthly reporting. (a) State plans specifying retrospective budgeting shall require that recipients with earned income, other than income from...

  20. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetic type of cranial mononeuropathy III is a complication of diabetes . It causes double vision and eyelid drooping . ... Cooper ME, Vinik AI, Plutzky J, Boulton AJM. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  1. Functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) III--modus operandi.

    PubMed

    Vardimon, A D; Graber, T M; Voss, L R; Muller, T P

    1990-02-01

    An intraoral intermaxillary appliance has been developed for the treatment of Class III malocclusions that exhibit midface sagittal deficiency with or without mandibular excess. The functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) III consists of upper and lower acrylic plates with a permanent magnet incorporated into each plate. The upper magnet is linked to a retraction screw. The upper magnet is retracted periodically (e.g., monthly) to stimulate maxillary advancement and mandibular retardation. The attractive mode neodymium magnets used in this study produced a horizontal force of 98 gm and a vertical force of 371 gm. Six female Macaca fascicularis monkeys were treated with FOMA IIIs. An additional three animals were treated with sham appliances. After 4 months of treatment, the following results were found: the growth pattern of the cranial base (saddle angle) was not altered; midfacial protraction did occur along a recumbent hyperbolic curve with a horizontal maxillary displacement and an anterosuperior premaxillary rotation; the cumulative protraction of the maxillary complex was initiated at the pterygomaxillary fissure with an additional contribution provided by other circummaxillary sutures (zygomaticomaxillary s., transverse s., premaxillary s.); and inhibition of mandibular length was minimal, but a tendency toward a vertical condylar growth pattern was observed. The interaction between sutural and condylar growth sites appeared biphasic, characterized by an immediate and rapid excitation of the circummaxillary sutures followed by a delayed and slow suppression of the condylar cartilage. Long-term animal and clinical FOMA III studies are recommended.

  2. GPM Science Status Fourteen Months after Launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skofronick Jackson, Gail; Huffman, George

    2015-04-01

    Water is fundamental to life on Earth. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, launched February 27, 2014, is an international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products. The joint NASA-JAXA GPM Core Observatory serves as the cornerstone and anchor to unite the constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory carries a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. As a science mission with integrated application goals, GPM is designed to (1) advance precipitation measurement capability from space through combined use of active and passive microwave sensors, (2) advance the knowledge of the global water/energy cycle and freshwater availability through better description of the space-time variability of global precipitation, and (3) improve weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of instantaneous precipitation rates and time-integrated rainfall accumulation. Since launch, the instruments have been collecting outstanding precipitation data. New scientific insights resulting from these fourteen months of GPM data, an overview of the GPM mission concept and science activities

  3. Retrieval of wintertime monthly climatological precipitation from snow survey data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anslow, F. S.

    2015-12-01

    For the purposes of developing high resolution maps of monthly climate normals for precipitation in British Columbia, the data-sparse high elevation regions present a substantial problem. These locations suffer from a sparse observational network to begin with and the measurements sites that do exist are often unable to accurately record solid precipitation amounts owing to undercatch associated with blowing snow, instrument capping, instrument failure, bridging over snow pillows or grossly inadequate instrumentation such as tipping buckets. British Columbia's River Forecast centre operates a fairly extensive network of snow survey sites which are accessed on a monthly basis beginning as early as January in a given year and running through June at sites where snow is present. These measurements have long temporal histories which enables their use as proxies for monthly precipitation during the months when instrument measurement is most difficult. These are proxy indicators because SWE on the ground is a product of accumulated snow minus evaporation and any meltwater that has percolated through the snowpack. We present a simple method for retrieving monthly climatological precipitation from snow survey sites and demonstrate the effects of including the data in construction of Parameter Regression on Independent Slopes Model precipitation climatology maps.

  4. Evolution of knee kinematics three months after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Alice, Bonnefoy-Mazure; Stéphane, Armand; Yoshisama, Sagawa Junior; Pierre, Hoffmeyer; Domizio, Suvà; Hermes, Miozzari; Katia, Turcot

    2015-02-01

    In patients with debilitating knee osteoarthritis, total knee replacement is the most common surgical procedure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that knee kinematics one year after total knee replacement are still altered compared to the healthy joint. However, little is known regarding impairments and functional limitations of patients several months after total knee replacement. The aim of this study was to describe the evolution of the knee gait kinematic in patients with knee osteoarthritis before and three months after a total knee replacement. Ninety patients who were to undergo total knee replacement were included in this study. Twenty-three subjects were recruited as the control group. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed before and three months after surgery. The spatio-temporal parameters and three-dimensional knee kinematics for the operated limb were evaluated during a comfortable gait and compared between groups (the before and after surgery groups and the control group). Three months after surgery, patients always walk with a slower gait velocity and lower knee flexion-extension movements compared to the control group. However, a degree of progress was observed in term of the stride and step length, gait velocity and knee alignment in the coronal plane. Our results suggest that the disability is still significant for most patients three months after total knee replacement. A better understand of the impairments and functional limitations following surgery would help clinicians design rehabilitation programs. Moreover, patients should be informed that rehabilitation after total knee replacement is a long process.

  5. Palladium(III)-Catalyzed Fluorination of Arylboronic Acid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Pingping; Murphy, Jennifer M.; Ritter, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    A practical, palladium-catalyzed synthesis of aryl fluorides from arylboronic acid derivatives is presented. The reaction is operationally simple and amenable to multi-gram-scale synthesis. Evaluation of the reaction mechanism suggests a single-electron-transfer pathway, involving a Pd(III) intermediate that has been isolated and characterized. PMID:24040932

  6. Palladium(III)-catalyzed fluorination of arylboronic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mazzotti, Anthony R; Campbell, Michael G; Tang, Pingping; Murphy, Jennifer M; Ritter, Tobias

    2013-09-25

    A practical, palladium-catalyzed synthesis of aryl fluorides from arylboronic acid derivatives is presented. The reaction is operationally simple and amenable to multigram-scale synthesis. Evaluation of the reaction mechanism suggests a single-electron-transfer pathway, involving a Pd(III) intermediate that has been isolated and characterized.

  7. DOTSYS III: A Portable Program for Braille Translation. Rev. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Joseph E., Ed.; And Others

    DOTSYS III is a COBOL program for the translation of English text into standard English braille, also known as grade 2 braille. Text in foreign languages or English may be transliterated as grade 1 braille or "computer" braille. The program's method of operation together with instructions on using the program, modifying or extending the…

  8. Rhizosphere iron (III) deposition and reduction in a Juncus effusus L.-dominated wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, J.V.; Emerson, D.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (III) plaque forms on the roots of wetland plants from the reaction of Fe(II) with O2 released by roots. Recent laboratory studies have shown that Fe plaque is more rapidly reduced than non-rhizosphere Fe(III) oxides. The goals of the current study were to determine in situ rates of: (i) Fe(III) reduction of root plaque and soil Fe(III) oxides, (ii) root Fe(III) deposition, and (iii) root and soil organic matter decomposition. Iron (III) reduction was investigated using a novel buried-bag technique in which roots and soil were buried in heat-sealed membrane bags (Versapor 200 membrane, pore size = 0.2 ??m) in late fall following plant senescence. Bags were retrieved at monthly intervals for 1 yr to assess changes in total C and Fe mass, Fe mineralogy, Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio, and the abundances of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB). The soil C and Fe pools did not change significantly throughout the year, but root C and total root Fe mass decreased by 40 and 70%, respectively. When total Fe losses were adjusted for changes in the ratio of Fe(II)/Fe(III), over 95% of the Fe(III) in the plaque was reduced during the 12-mo study, at a peak rate of 0.6 mg Fe(III) g dry weight-1 d-1 (gdw-1 d-1). These estimates exceed the crude estimate of Fe(III) accumulation [0.3 mg Fe(III) g dry weight-1 d-1] on bare-root plants that were transplanted into the wetland for a growing season. We concluded that root plaque has the potential to be reduced as rapidly as it is deposited under field conditions. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  9. 9 CFR 206.3 - Monthly report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... will be available on the Internet on the GIPSA Web site (http://www.usda.gov/gipsa/) and at USDA GIPSA... GIPSA through the Internet on the GIPSA Web site (http://www.usda.gov/gipsa/) or at USDA GIPSA, Suite... business day of each month. The monthly reports will be available on the Internet on the GIPSA Web...

  10. Your Child's Development: 2 Years (24 Months)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Your Child’s Development: 2 Years (24 Months) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child’s Development: 2 Years (24 Months) Print A A A en español El desarrollo de su hijo: 2 años (24 meses) Tired of changing diapers? When ...

  11. 42 CFR 408.20 - Monthly premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... into account in computing actuarrial rates or premium amounts. (b) Criteria and procedures for the... enrollees) the lower of the following: (i) The actuarial rate for the aged. (ii) The monthly premium... calculate actuarial rates or standard monthly premiums. (c) Premiums for calendar years 1984 through...

  12. 76 FR 68617 - National Diabetes Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8746 of November 1, 2011 National Diabetes Month, 2011 By the President of... diabetes, the number of Americans burdened by this disease continues to grow at a rapid pace. During National Diabetes Month, we commemorate the work of caregivers, researchers, medical professionals,...

  13. 30-36 Months: Your Child's Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources & Services Parenting Resource 30–36 Months: Your Child’s Development Download Files Feb 10, 2016 Older toddlers are ... go?” Then you two can switch. Downloads Your Child's Development: 30–36 Months PDF 373 KB Read more ...

  14. Gregorian calendar bias in monthly temperature databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerveny, Randall S.; Svoma, Bohumil M.; Balling, Robert C.; Vose, Russell S.

    2008-10-01

    In this study we address a systematic bias in climate records that manifests due to the establishment of the Gregorian calendar system and exerts a statistically significant effect on monthly and seasonal temperature records. The addition of one extra day in February normally every fourth year produces a significant seasonal drift in the monthly values of that year in four major temperature datasets used in climate change analysis. The addition of a `leap year day' for the Northern Hemisphere creates statistically significantly colder months of July to December and, to a lesser degree warmer months of February to June than correspondingly common (non-leap year) months. The discovery of such a fundamental bias in four major temperature datasets used in climate analysis (and likely present in any dataset displaying strong annual cycles, e.g., U.S. streamflow data) indicates the continued need for detailed scrutiny of climate records for such biases.

  15. Cognitive development in patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (Sanfilippo syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III, Sanfilippo syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in the degradation of heparan sulfate. MPS III is characterized by progressive mental deterioration resulting in severe dementia. A number of potentially disease-modifying therapies are studied. As preservation of cognitive function is the ultimate goal of treatment, assessment of cognitive development will be essential in order to evaluate treatment efficacy. However, no large scale studies on cognitive levels in MPS III patients, using formal psychometric tests, have been reported. Methods We aimed to assess cognitive development in all 73 living patients with MPS III in the Netherlands. Results Cognitive development could be assessed in 69 patients. In 39 of them developmental level was estimated > 3 months and formal psychometric testing was attempted. A remarkable variation in the intellectual disability was detected. Conclusions Despite special challenges encountered, testing failed in only three patients. The observed broad variation in intellectual disability, should be taken into account when designing therapeutic trials. PMID:21689409

  16. 77 FR 76382 - Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ...This document contains both final regulations and temporary regulations regarding the requirements to qualify as a Type III supporting organization that is operated in connection with one or more supported organizations. The regulations reflect changes to the law made by the Pension Protection Act of 2006. The regulations will affect Type III supporting organizations and their supported......

  17. 78 FR 9802 - Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... requirements to qualify as a Type III supporting organization that is operated in connection with one or more... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG31; 1545-BL38 Payout Requirements for Type III Supporting Organizations That Are Not Functionally Integrated; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS),...

  18. Patient-reported outcomes 3 months after spine surgery: is it an accurate predictor of 12-month outcome in real-world registry platforms?

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; Asher, Anthony L; Godil, Saniya S; Devin, Clinton J; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT The health care landscape is rapidly shifting to incentivize quality of care rather than quantity of care. Quality and outcomes registry platforms lie at the center of all emerging evidence-driven reform models and will be used to inform decision makers in health care delivery. Obtaining real-world registry outcomes data from patients 12 months after spine surgery remains a challenge. The authors set out to determine whether 3-month patient-reported outcomes accurately predict 12-month outcomes and, hence, whether 3-month measurement systems suffice to identify effective versus noneffective spine care. METHODS All patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery for degenerative disease at a single medical institution over a 2-year period were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal registry. Patient-reported outcome instruments (numeric rating scale [NRS], Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], 12-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-12], EQ-5D, and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale) were recorded prospectively at baseline and at 3 months and 12 months after surgery. Linear regression was performed to determine the independent association of 3- and 12-month outcome. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine whether improvement in general health state (EQ-5D) and disability (ODI) at 3 months accurately predicted improvement and achievement of minimum clinical important difference (MCID) at 12 months. RESULTS A total of 593 patients undergoing elective lumbar surgery were included in the study. There was a significant correlation between 3-month and 12-month EQ-5D (r = 0.71; p < 0.0001) and ODI (r = 0.70; p < 0.0001); however, the authors observed a sizable discrepancy in achievement of a clinically significant improvement (MCID) threshold at 3 versus 12 months on an individual patient level. For postoperative disability (ODI), 11.5% of patients who achieved an MCID threshold at 3 months dropped below this threshold at 12 months; 10

  19. Impact analysis of Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbis, P.P.

    1993-12-01

    An analysis of the impact of the Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III into a nonyielding target at 46 m.p.h. and 30 m.p.h., and into a yielding target at 46 m.p.h. is presented. The analysis considers the structural response of the tiedown system which secures the Minuteman III re-entry system to the floor of the payload transporter. A finite element model of the re-entry system, its tiedown system, which includes tie-rods and shear pins, and the pallet plate which is attached to the transporter floating plate, was constructed. Because accelerations of the payload transporter are not known, acceleration data from one-quarter scale testing of the Safe Secure Trailer was used to investigate the response of the tiedown system. These accelerations were applied to the pallet plate. The ABAQUS computer code was used to predict the forces in the members of the tiedown system.

  20. Dissociation of cerium(III) and neodymium(III) phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomova, T. N.

    2015-07-01

    The kinetics of dissociation of phthalocyanine complexes with cerium(III) and neodymium(III) (X)LnPc (X = Cl-, Br-, AcO-) under the action of acetic acid in ethanol with isolation of the macrocyclic ligand depending on the temperature was studied. The kinetic equations with the numerical values of rate constants, activation parameters, and the stoichiometric mechanisms with the limiting simple reaction between the nonionized AcOH molecule and (phthalocyaninato)lanthanide(III) in the axially coordinated ((X)LnPc, cerium complexes) or axially ionized ([(AcOH)LnPc]+X-, neodymium complexes) state were derived by solving the direct and inverse problems. As shown by a comparative analysis of quantitative kinetic data, the state is determined by the electronic structure of the metal cation and the mutual effect of the axial and equatorial ligands in the first coordination sphere.