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Sample records for iii secretion signals

  1. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-24

    The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates, effector proteins, are not. We have used a machine learning approach to identify new secreted effectors. The method integrates evolutionary measures, such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, and sequence-based features, such as G+C content, amino acid composition and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from Salmonella typhimurium and validated on a corresponding set of effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. The method was able to identify all of the known effectors in P. syringae with a specificity of 84% and sensitivity of 82%. The reciprocal validation, training on P. syringae and validating on S. typhimurium, gave similar results with a specificity of 86% when the sensitivity level was 87%. These results show that type III effectors in disparate organisms share common features. We found that maximal performance is attained by including an N-terminal sequence of only 30 residues, which agrees with previous studies indicating that this region contains the secretion signal. We then used the method to define the most important residues in this putative secretion signal. Finally, we present novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated, and apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This approach is a novel and effective way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  2. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, George; Brown, Roslyn N.; Mushamiri, Ivy T.; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Taiwo, Rukayat; Stufkens, Afke; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-05-01

    effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly defined. Effector N-termini are thought to contain the signal, but they lack homology, possess no identifiable motif, and adopt intrinsically disordered structures. We identified a panel of RNA secretion signals that facilitated reporter translocation into host cells via a mechanism dependent upon the RNA chaperone Hfq. Each of these signals was localized to an RNA leader sequence preceding the translational start codon. To obtain this panel of RNA signals, we fused untranslated leader sequences from 42 different Salmonella effector proteins to the adenylate cyclase reporter (CyaA'), and tested each of them for translocation into J774 macrophages. RNA sequences derived from five effectors, gtgA, cigR, gogB, sseL, and steD were sufficient for CyaA' injection into host cells. The gtgA RNA also directed translocation of the β-lactamase reporter. To determine the mechanism of signal recognition, we identified proteins that bound specifically to the gtgA RNA. One of the unique proteins identified was Hfq. Translocation of all five UTR fusions was abolished in the Hfq mutant, confirming the importance of Hfq. Our results suggest that Hfq may direct a subset of RNA transcripts to the T3S apparatus for translation and secretion. Signal diversity may explain why the T3S signal has been difficult to define.

  3. Secretion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Cytotoxins is Dependent on Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Wu, B.; Baek, M.S.; Camargo, A.; Nguyen, A.; Slusher, N.A.; Srinivasan, R.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Lynch, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can, like other bacterial species, exist in antimicrobial resistant sessile biofilms and as free-swimming, planktonic cells. Specific virulence factors are typically associated with each lifestyle and several two-component response regulators have been shown to reciprocally regulate transition between biofilm-associated chronic, and free-swimming acute infections. Quorum sensing (QS) signal molecules belonging to the las and rhl systems are known to regulate virulence gene expression by P. aeruginosa. However the impact of a recently described family of novel quorum sensing signals produced by the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS) biosynthetic pathway, on the transition between these modes of infection is less clear. Using clonal isolates from a patient developing ventilator-associated pneumonia, we demonstrated that clinical observations were mirrored by an in vitro temporal shift in isolate phenotype from a non-secreting, to a Type III cytotoxin secreting (TTSS) phenotype and further, that this phenotypic change was PQS-dependent. While intracellular type III cytotoxin levels were unaffected by PQS concentration, cytotoxin secretion was dependent on this signal molecule. Elevated PQS concentrations were associated with inhibition of cytotoxin secretion coincident with expression of virulence factors such as elastase and pyoverdin. In contrast, low concentrations or the inability to biosynthesize PQS resulted in a reversal of this phenotype. These data suggest that expression of specific P. aeruginosa virulence factors appears to be reciprocally regulated and that an additional level of PQS-dependent posttranslational control, specifically governing type III cytotoxin secretion, exists in this species. PMID:20570614

  4. Substrate-Activated Conformational Switch on Chaperones Encodes aTargeting Signal in Type III Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Ai, Xuanjun; Portaliou, Athina G.; Minetti, Conceicao A.S.A.; Remeta, David P.; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Targeting of type III secretion proteins at the injectisome is an important process in bacterial virulence. Nevertheless, how the injectisome specifically recognizes TTS substrates among all bacterial proteins is unknown. A TTS peripheral membrane ATPase protein located at the base of the injectisome has been implicated in the targeting process. We have investigated the targeting of the EspA filament protein and its cognate chaperone CesAB to the EscN ATPase of the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We show that EscN selectively engages the EspA-loaded CesAB, but not the unliganded CesAB. Structure analysis revealed that the targeting signal is encoded in a disorder-order structural transition in CesAB that is elicited only upon binding of its physiological substrate, EspA. Abrogation of the interaction between the CesAB–EspA complex and EscN resulted in severe secretion and infection defects. We further show that the targeting and secretion signals are distinct and the two processes are likely regulated by different mechanisms. PMID:23523349

  5. Genetic Dissection of the Signaling Cascade that Controls Activation of the Shigella Type III Secretion System from the Needle Tip

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, I.; Martinez-Argudo, I.; Blocker, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (T3SSs) for virulence. The Shigella T3SS consists of a hollow needle, made of MxiH and protruding from the bacterial surface, anchored in both bacterial membranes by multimeric protein rings. Atop the needle lies the tip complex (TC), formed by IpaD and IpaB. Upon physical contact with eukaryotic host cells, T3S is initiated leading to formation of a pore in the eukaryotic cell membrane, which is made of IpaB and IpaC. Through the needle and pore channels, further bacterial proteins are translocated inside the host cell to meditate its invasion. IpaD and the needle are implicated in transduction of the host cell-sensing signal to the T3S apparatus. Furthermore, the sensing-competent TC seems formed of 4 IpaDs topped by 1 IpaB. However, nothing further is known about the activation process. To investigate IpaB’s role during T3SS activation, we isolated secretion-deregulated IpaB mutants using random mutagenesis and a genetic screen. We found ipaB point mutations in leading to defects in secretion activation, which sometimes diminished pore insertion and host cell invasion. We also demonstrated IpaB communicates intramolecularly and intermolecularly with IpaD and MxiH within the TC because mutations affecting these interactions impair signal transduction. PMID:27277624

  6. Decreased abundance of type III secretion system-inducing signals in Arabidopsis mkp1 enhances resistance against Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Wan, Ying; Kim, Young-Mo; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Peck, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Genes encoding the virulence-promoting type III secretion system (T3SS) in phytopathogenic bacteria are induced at the start of infection, indicating that recognition of signals from the host plant initiates this response. However, the precise nature of these signals and whether their concentrations can be altered to affect the biological outcome of host–pathogen interactions remain speculative. Here we use a metabolomic comparison of resistant and susceptible genotypes to identify plant-derived metabolites that induce T3SS genes in Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and report that mapk phosphatase 1 (mkp1), an Arabidopsis mutant that is more resistant to bacterial infection, produces decreased levels of these bioactive compounds. Consistent with these observations, T3SS effector expression and delivery by DC3000 was impaired when infecting the mkp1 mutant. The addition of bioactive metabolites fully restored T3SS effector delivery and suppressed the enhanced resistance in the mkp1 mutant. Pretreatment of plants with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to induce PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) also restricts T3SS effector delivery and enhances resistance by unknown mechanisms, and the addition of the bioactive metabolites similarly suppressed both aspects of PTI. Together, these results demonstrate that DC3000 perceives multiple signals derived from plants to initiate its T3SS and that the level of these host-derived signals impacts bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24753604

  7. Decreased abundance of type III secretion system-inducing signals in Arabidopsis mkp1 enhances resistance against Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Wan, Ying; Kim, Young-Mo; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Peck, Scott C.

    2014-04-21

    Many phytopathogenic bacteria use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject defense-suppressing effector proteins into host cells. Genes encoding the T3SS are induced at the start of infection, yet host signals that initiate T3SS gene expression are poorly understood. Here we identify several plant-derived metabolites that induce the T3SS in the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. In addition, we report that mkp1 (mapk phosphatase 1), an Arabidopsis mutant that is more resistant to bacterial infection, produces decreased levels of these T3SS-inducing metabolites. Consistent with the observed decrease in these metabolites, T3SS effector delivery by DC3000 was impaired in mkp1. Addition of the bioactive metabolites to the mkp1-DC3000 interaction fully restored T3SS effector delivery and suppressed enhanced resistance in mkp1. Together, these results demonstrate that DC3000 perceives multiple signals derived from plants to initiate their virulence program, and reveal a new layer of molecular communication between plants and these pathogenic bacteria.

  8. A multi-pronged search for a common structural motif in the secretion signal of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium type III effector proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Niemann, George; Baker, Erin Shammel; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.; McDermott, Jason E.

    2010-11-08

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into the host cell where they reprogram host defenses and facilitate pathogenesis. While it has been determined that the first 20 - 30 N-terminal residues usually contain the ‘secretion signal’ that targets effector proteins for translocation, the molecular basis for recognition of this signal is not understood. Recent machine-learning approaches, such as SVM-based Identification and Evaluation of Virulence Effectors (SIEVE), have improved the ability to identify effector proteins from genomics sequence information. While these methods all suggest that the T3SS secretion signal has a characteristic amino acid composition bias, it is still unclear if the amino acid pattern is important and if there are any unifying structural properties that direct recognition. To address these issues a peptide corresponding to the secretion signal for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium effector SseJ was synthesized (residues 1-30, SseJ) along with scrambled peptides of the same amino acid composition that produced high (SseJ-H) and low (SseJ-L) SIEVE scores. The secretion properties of these three peptides were tested using a secretion signal-CyaA fusion assay and their structures systematically probed using circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, and ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry. The signal-CyaA fusion assay showed that the native and SseJ-H fusion constructs were secreted into J774 macrophage at similar levels via the SPI-2 secretion pathway while secretion of the SseJ-L fusion construct was substantially retarded, suggesting that the SseJ secretion signal was sequence order dependent. The structural studies showed that the SseJ, SseJ-H, and SseJ-L peptides were intrinsically disordered in aqueous solution with only a small predisposition to adopt nascent helical structure in the presence of the powerful structure stabilizing agent, 1

  9. Sequence-Based Prediction of Type III Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Roland; Brandmaier, Stefan; Kleine, Frederick; Tischler, Patrick; Heinz, Eva; Behrens, Sebastian; Niinikoski, Antti; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a key mechanism for host cell interaction used by a variety of bacterial pathogens and symbionts of plants and animals including humans. The TTSS represents a molecular syringe with which the bacteria deliver effector proteins directly into the host cell cytosol. Despite the importance of the TTSS for bacterial pathogenesis, recognition and targeting of type III secreted proteins has up until now been poorly understood. Several hypotheses are discussed, including an mRNA-based signal, a chaperon-mediated process, or an N-terminal signal peptide. In this study, we systematically analyzed the amino acid composition and secondary structure of N-termini of 100 experimentally verified effector proteins. Based on this, we developed a machine-learning approach for the prediction of TTSS effector proteins, taking into account N-terminal sequence features such as frequencies of amino acids, short peptides, or residues with certain physico-chemical properties. The resulting computational model revealed a strong type III secretion signal in the N-terminus that can be used to detect effectors with sensitivity of ∼71% and selectivity of ∼85%. This signal seems to be taxonomically universal and conserved among animal pathogens and plant symbionts, since we could successfully detect effector proteins if the respective group was excluded from training. The application of our prediction approach to 739 complete bacterial and archaeal genome sequences resulted in the identification of between 0% and 12% putative TTSS effector proteins. Comparison of effector proteins with orthologs that are not secreted by the TTSS showed no clear pattern of signal acquisition by fusion, suggesting convergent evolutionary processes shaping the type III secretion signal. The newly developed program EffectiveT3 (http://www.chlamydiaedb.org) is the first universal in silico prediction program for the identification of novel TTSS effectors. Our findings will

  10. Application of a Short, Disordered N-Terminal Flagellin Segment, a Fully Functional Flagellar Type III Export Signal, to Expression of Secreted Proteins ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dobó, József; Varga, János; Sajó, Ráchel; Végh, Barbara M.; Gál, Péter; Závodszky, Péter; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that the 26-47 segment of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium flagellin is capable of mediating flagellar export. In order to reveal whether other parts of the N-terminal region have any significant influence on secretion, a series of plasmids were constructed containing the lac promoter followed by the 26-47, 2-65, or 2-192 portion of Salmonella flagellin, to which various heterologous proteins of different size were fused (18 constructs overall). Essentially, all three segments could drive protein export; however, the nature of the attached polypeptide also had a significant effect on secretion efficiency. When low export efficiency was observed, it was mainly caused by inclusion body formation. Our data provide strong support for the idea that a short segment within the disordered N-terminal region of axial proteins is recognized by the flagellar type III export machinery. The 26-47 segment of flagellin contains all of the necessary information to direct translocation of attached polypeptide chains. This short (positions 26 to 47) flagellin segment attached to recombinant proteins can be used for secreted protein expression. Certain fusion proteins that are easily degraded within the cells were found to be intact in the medium, implying a potential application of this expression system for proteins with high proteolytic susceptibility. PMID:20008166

  11. Computational prediction shines light on type III secretion origins

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard; Bromberg, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion system is a key bacterial symbiosis and pathogenicity mechanism responsible for a variety of infectious diseases, ranging from food-borne illnesses to the bubonic plague. In many Gram-negative bacteria, the type III secretion system transports effector proteins into host cells, converting resources to bacterial advantage. Here we introduce a computational method that identifies type III effectors by combining homology-based inference with de novo predictions, reaching up to 3-fold higher performance than existing tools. Our work reveals that signals for recognition and transport of effectors are distributed over the entire protein sequence instead of being confined to the N-terminus, as was previously thought. Our scan of hundreds of prokaryotic genomes identified previously unknown effectors, suggesting that type III secretion may have evolved prior to the archaea/bacteria split. Crucially, our method performs well for short sequence fragments, facilitating evaluation of microbial communities and rapid identification of bacterial pathogenicity – no genome assembly required. pEffect and its data sets are available at http://services.bromberglab.org/peffect. PMID:27713481

  12. General secretion signal for the mycobacterial type VII secretion pathway

    PubMed Central

    Daleke, Maria H.; Ummels, Roy; Bawono, Punto; Heringa, Jaap; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Luirink, Joen; Bitter, Wilbert

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterial pathogens use specialized type VII secretion (T7S) systems to transport crucial virulence factors across their unusual cell envelope into infected host cells. These virulence factors lack classical secretion signals and the mechanism of substrate recognition is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that the model T7S substrates PE25/PPE41, which form a heterodimer, are targeted to the T7S pathway ESX-5 by a signal located in the C terminus of PE25. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues within this C terminus resulted in the identification of a highly conserved motif, i.e., YxxxD/E, which is required for secretion. This motif was also essential for the secretion of LipY, another ESX-5 substrate. Pathogenic mycobacteria have several different T7S systems and we identified a PE protein that is secreted by the ESX-1 system, which allowed us to compare substrate recognition of these two T7S systems. Surprisingly, this ESX-1 substrate contained a C-terminal signal functionally equivalent to that of PE25. Exchange of these C-terminal secretion signals between the PE proteins restored secretion, but each PE protein remained secreted via its own ESX secretion system, indicating that an additional signal(s) provides system specificity. Remarkably, the YxxxD/E motif was also present in and required for efficient secretion of the ESX-1 substrates CFP-10 and EspB. Therefore, our data show that the YxxxD/E motif is a general secretion signal that is present in all known mycobacterial T7S substrates or substrate complexes. PMID:22733768

  13. Type III protein secretion systems in bacterial pathogens of animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Hueck, C J

    1998-06-01

    Various gram-negative animal and plant pathogens use a novel, sec-independent protein secretion system as a basic virulence mechanism. It is becoming increasingly clear that these so-called type III secretion systems inject (translocate) proteins into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, where the translocated proteins facilitate bacterial pathogenesis by specifically interfering with host cell signal transduction and other cellular processes. Accordingly, some type III secretion systems are activated by bacterial contact with host cell surfaces. Individual type III secretion systems direct the secretion and translocation of a variety of unrelated proteins, which account for species-specific pathogenesis phenotypes. In contrast to the secreted virulence factors, most of the 15 to 20 membrane-associated proteins which constitute the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among different pathogens. Most of the inner membrane components of the type III secretion apparatus show additional homologies to flagellar biosynthetic proteins, while a conserved outer membrane factor is similar to secretins from type II and other secretion pathways. Structurally conserved chaperones which specifically bind to individual secreted proteins play an important role in type III protein secretion, apparently by preventing premature interactions of the secreted factors with other proteins. The genes encoding type III secretion systems are clustered, and various pieces of evidence suggest that these systems have been acquired by horizontal genetic transfer during evolution. Expression of type III secretion systems is coordinately regulated in response to host environmental stimuli by networks of transcription factors. This review comprises a comparison of the structure, function, regulation, and impact on host cells of the type III secretion systems in the animal pathogens Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

  14. Type III Protein Secretion Systems in Bacterial Pathogens of Animals and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hueck, Christoph J.

    1998-01-01

    Various gram-negative animal and plant pathogens use a novel, sec-independent protein secretion system as a basic virulence mechanism. It is becoming increasingly clear that these so-called type III secretion systems inject (translocate) proteins into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, where the translocated proteins facilitate bacterial pathogenesis by specifically interfering with host cell signal transduction and other cellular processes. Accordingly, some type III secretion systems are activated by bacterial contact with host cell surfaces. Individual type III secretion systems direct the secretion and translocation of a variety of unrelated proteins, which account for species-specific pathogenesis phenotypes. In contrast to the secreted virulence factors, most of the 15 to 20 membrane-associated proteins which constitute the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among different pathogens. Most of the inner membrane components of the type III secretion apparatus show additional homologies to flagellar biosynthetic proteins, while a conserved outer membrane factor is similar to secretins from type II and other secretion pathways. Structurally conserved chaperones which specifically bind to individual secreted proteins play an important role in type III protein secretion, apparently by preventing premature interactions of the secreted factors with other proteins. The genes encoding type III secretion systems are clustered, and various pieces of evidence suggest that these systems have been acquired by horizontal genetic transfer during evolution. Expression of type III secretion systems is coordinately regulated in response to host environmental stimuli by networks of transcription factors. This review comprises a comparison of the structure, function, regulation, and impact on host cells of the type III secretion systems in the animal pathogens Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

  15. Crystal structure of the Yersinia type III secretion protein YscE

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Jason; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.

    2010-12-06

    The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis utilizes a contact-dependent (type III) secretion system (T3SS) to transport virulence factors from the bacterial cytosol directly into the interior of mammalian cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways that mediate phagocytosis and the inflammatory response. The type III secretion apparatus is composed of 20-25 different Yersinia secretion (Ysc) proteins. We report here the structure of YscE, the smallest Ysc protein, which is a dimer in solution. The probable mode of oligomerization is discussed.

  16. The Xanthomonas Hrp type III system secretes proteins from plant and mammalian bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rossier, Ombeline; Wengelnik, Kai; Hahn, Karoline; Bonas, Ulla

    1999-01-01

    Studies of essential pathogenicity determinants in Gram-negative bacteria have revealed the conservation of type III protein secretion systems that allow delivery of virulence factors into host cells from plant and animal pathogens. Ten of 21 Hrp proteins of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria have been suggested to be part of a type III machinery. Here, we report the hrp-dependent secretion of two avirulence proteins, AvrBs3 and AvrRxv, by X. campestris pv. vesicatoria strains that constitutively express hrp genes. Secretion occurred without leakage of a cytoplasmic marker in minimal medium containing BSA, at pH 5.4. Secretion was strictly hrp-dependent because a mutant carrying a deletion in hrcV, a conserved hrp gene, did not secrete AvrBs3 and AvrRxv. Moreover, the Hrp system of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria was able to secrete proteins from two other plant pathogens: PopA, a protein secreted via the Hrp system in Ralstonia solanacearum, and AvrB, an avirulence protein from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea. Interestingly, X. campestris pv. vesicatoria also secreted YopE, a type III-secreted cytotoxin of the mammalian pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in a hrp-dependent manner. YerA, a YopE-specific chaperone, was required for YopE stability but not for secretion in X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. Our results demonstrate the functional conservation of the type III system of X. campestris for secretion of proteins from both plant and mammalian pathogens and imply recognition of their respective secretion signals. PMID:10430949

  17. Computational prediction of type III and IV secreted effectors in Gram-negative bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Corrigan, Abigail L.; Peterson, Elena S.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Niemann, George; Cambronne, Eric; Sharp, Danna; Adkins, Joshua N.; Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the methods employed by four recent papers that described novel methods for computational prediction of secreted effectors from type III and IV secretion systems in Gram-negative bacteria. The results of the studies in terms of performance at accurately predicting secreted effectors and similarities found between secretion signals that may reflect biologically relevant features for recognition. We discuss the web-based tools for secreted effector prediction described in these studies and announce the availability of our tool, the SIEVEserver (http://www.biopilot.org). Finally, we assess the accuracy of the three type III effector prediction methods on a small set of proteins not known prior to the development of these tools that we have recently discovered and validated using both experimental and computational approaches. Our comparison shows that all methods use similar approaches and, in general arrive at similar conclusions. We discuss the possibility of an order-dependent motif in the secretion signal, which was a point of disagreement in the studies. Our results show that there may be classes of effectors in which the signal has a loosely defined motif, and others in which secretion is dependent only on compositional biases. Computational prediction of secreted effectors from protein sequences represents an important step toward better understanding the interaction between pathogens and hosts.

  18. Cell-secreted signals shape lymphoma identity.

    PubMed

    Gloghini, Annunziata; Bongarzone, Italia

    2015-10-01

    Sequencing data show that both specific genes and a number of signaling pathways are recurrently mutated in various types of lymphoma. DNA sequencing analyses of lymphoma have identified several aberrations that might affect the interaction between malignant cells and the tumor microenvironment. Microenvironmental functions are essential to lymphoma; they provide survival and proliferation signals and license immune evasion. It is plausible that interventions that aim to destroy tumor-microenvironment interactions may improve responses to therapeutics. Accordingly, the identification of extrinsic factors and their downstream intracellular signaling targets has led to much progress in understanding tumor-microenvironment interactions. Lymphoma cells are differently influenced by cells' interactions with components of their microenvironment; these cell extrinsic factors include soluble and immobilized factors, the extracellular matrix, and signals presented by neighboring cells. Soluble factors, which are often cell-secreted autocrine and paracrine factors, comprise a significant fraction of targetable molecules. To begin to understand how intercellular communication is conducted in lymphoma, a first order of study is deciphering the soluble factors secreted by malignant cells and microenvironmental cells. These soluble factors are shed into the interstitial fluid in lymphoma and can be conveniently explored using mass spectrometry. Protein components can be detected and quantified, thus enabling the routine navigation of the soluble part of the microenvironment. Elucidating functional and signaling states affords a new paradigm for understanding cancer biology and devising new therapies. This review summarizes knowledge in this field and discusses the utility of studying tumor-secreted factors.

  19. Translational regulation of Yersinia enterocolitica mRNA encoding a type III secretion substrate.

    PubMed

    Kopaskie, Karyl S; Ligtenberg, Katherine Given; Schneewind, Olaf

    2013-12-06

    Yersinia enterocolitica type III secretion machines transport YopQ and other Yop effectors into host immune cells. YopD and its chaperone LcrH are essential components of the Yersinia type III pathway, enabling effector translocation into host cells. YopD, LcrH, and YscM1 also regulate yop expression post-transcriptionally in response to environmental signals; however, the molecular mechanisms for this regulation and Yop secretion are unknown. We show here that YopD associates with 30 S ribosomal particles in a manner requiring LcrH. When added to ribosomes, YopD, LcrH, and YscM1 block the translation of yopQ mRNA. We propose a model whereby LcrH-dependent association of YopD with 30 S ribosomal particles enables YscM1 to block yopQ translation unless type III machines are induced to secrete the effector.

  20. Using Transcriptional Control To Increase Titers of Secreted Heterologous Proteins by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kevin J.; Finnerty, Casey; Azam, Anum; Valdivia, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded at the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) locus secretes protein directly from the cytosol to the culture media in a concerted, one-step process, bypassing the periplasm. While this approach is attractive for heterologous protein production, product titers are too low for many applications. In addition, the expression of the SPI-1 gene cluster is subject to native regulation, which requires culturing conditions that are not ideal for high-density growth. We used transcriptional control to increase the amount of protein that is secreted into the extracellular space by the T3SS of Salmonella enterica. The controlled expression of the gene encoding SPI-1 transcription factor HilA circumvents the requirement of endogenous induction conditions and allows for synthetic induction of the secretion system. This strategy increases the number of cells that express SPI-1 genes, as measured by promoter activity. In addition, protein secretion titer is sensitive to the time of addition and the concentration of inducer for the protein to be secreted and SPI-1 gene cluster. Overexpression of hilA increases secreted protein titer by >10-fold and enables recovery of up to 28 ± 9 mg/liter of secreted protein from an 8-h culture. We also demonstrate that the protein beta-lactamase is able to adopt an active conformation after secretion, and the increase in secreted titer from hilA overexpression also correlates to increased enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. PMID:25038096

  1. Type III Secretion: Building and Operating a Remarkable Nanomachine.

    PubMed

    Portaliou, Athina G; Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Loos, Maria S; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-02-01

    The Type III secretion system (T3SS) is a protein export pathway that is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and delivers effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells. At its core lie the injectisome (a sophisticated transmembrane secretion apparatus) and a complex network of specialized chaperones that target secretory proteins to the antechamber of the injectisome. The assembly of the system, and the subsequent secretion of proteins through it, undergo fine-tuned, hierarchical regulation. Here, we present the current understanding of the injectisome assembly process, secretion hierarchy, and the role of chaperones. We discuss these events in light of available structural and biochemical dissection and propose future directions essential to revealing mechanistic insight into this fascinating nanomachine.

  2. Characterization of Nops, nodulation outer proteins, secreted via the type III secretion system of NGR234.

    PubMed

    Marie, Corinne; Deakin, William J; Viprey, Virginie; Kopciñska, Joanna; Golinowski, Wladyslaw; Krishnan, Hari B; Perret, Xavier; Broughton, William J

    2003-09-01

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacterium Rhizobium species NGR234 secretes, via a type III secretion system (TTSS), proteins called Nops (nodulation outer proteins). Abolition of TTSS-dependent protein secretion has either no effect or leads to a change in the number of nodules on selected plants. More dramatically, Nops impair nodule development on Crotalaria juncea roots, resulting in the formation of nonfixing pseudonodules. A double mutation of nopX and nopL, which code for two previously identified secreted proteins, leads to a phenotype on Pachyrhizus tuberosus differing from that of a mutant in which the TTSS is not functional. Use of antibodies and a modification of the purification protocol revealed that NGR234 secretes additional proteins in a TTSS-dependent manner. One of them was identified as NopA, a small 7-kDa protein. Single mutations in nopX and nopL were also generated to assess the involvement of each Nop in protein secretion and nodule formation. Mutation of nopX had little effect on NopL and NopA secretion but greatly affected the interaction of NGR234 with many plant hosts tested. NopL was not necessary for the secretion of any Nops but was required for efficient nodulation of some plant species. NopL may thus act as an effector protein whose recognition is dependent upon the hosts' genetic background.

  3. Symbiotic implications of type III protein secretion machinery in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Viprey, V; Del Greco, A; Golinowski, W; Broughton, W J; Perret, X

    1998-06-01

    The symbiotic plasmid of Rhizobium sp. NGR234 carries a cluster of genes that encodes components of a bacterial type III secretion system (TTSS). In both animal and plant pathogens, the TTSS is an essential component of pathogenicity. Here, we show that secretion of at least two proteins (y4xL and NolX) is controlled by the TTSS of NGR234 and occurs after the induction with flavonoids. Polar mutations in two TTSS genes, rhcN and the nod-box controlled regulator of transcription y4xl, block the secretion of both proteins and strongly affect the ability of NGR234 to nodulate a variety of tropical legumes including Pachyrhizus tuberosus and Tephrosia vogelii.

  4. Assembly, structure, function and regulation of type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wanyin; Marshall, Natalie C; Rowland, Jennifer L; McCoy, James M; Worrall, Liam J; Santos, Andrew S; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Finlay, B Brett

    2017-04-10

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are protein transport nanomachines that are found in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and symbionts. Resembling molecular syringes, T3SSs form channels that cross the bacterial envelope and the host cell membrane, which enable bacteria to inject numerous effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm and establish trans-kingdom interactions with diverse hosts. Recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy and integrative imaging have provided unprecedented views of the architecture and structure of T3SSs. Furthermore, genetic and molecular analyses have elucidated the functions of many effectors and key regulators of T3SS assembly and secretion hierarchy, which is the sequential order by which the protein substrates are secreted. As essential virulence factors, T3SSs are attractive targets for vaccines and therapeutics. This Review summarizes our current knowledge of the structure and function of this important protein secretion machinery. A greater understanding of T3SSs should aid mechanism-based drug design and facilitate their manipulation for biotechnological applications.

  5. EffectiveDB—updates and novel features for a better annotation of bacterial secreted proteins and Type III, IV, VI secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Valerie; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Platzer, Alexander; Jehl, Marc-André; Arnold, Roland; Rattei, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Protein secretion systems play a key role in the interaction of bacteria and hosts. EffectiveDB (http://effectivedb.org) contains pre-calculated predictions of bacterial secreted proteins and of intact secretion systems. Here we describe a major update of the database, which was previously featured in the NAR Database Issue. EffectiveDB bundles various tools to recognize Type III secretion signals, conserved binding sites of Type III chaperones, Type IV secretion peptides, eukaryotic-like domains and subcellular targeting signals in the host. Beyond the analysis of arbitrary protein sequence collections, the new release of EffectiveDB also provides a ‘genome-mode’, in which protein sequences from nearly complete genomes or metagenomic bins can be screened for the presence of three important secretion systems (Type III, IV, VI). EffectiveDB contains pre-calculated predictions for currently 1677 bacterial genomes from the EggNOG 4.0 database and for additional bacterial genomes from NCBI RefSeq. The new, user-friendly and informative web portal offers a submission tool for running the EffectiveDB prediction tools on user-provided data. PMID:26590402

  6. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew M.; Calvo, Rebecca A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize. PMID:26244495

  7. Type III secretion systems: the bacterial flagellum and the injectisome

    PubMed Central

    Diepold, Andreas; Armitage, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    The flagellum and the injectisome are two of the most complex and fascinating bacterial nanomachines. At their core, they share a type III secretion system (T3SS), a transmembrane export complex that forms the extracellular appendages, the flagellar filament and the injectisome needle. Recent advances, combining structural biology, cryo-electron tomography, molecular genetics, in vivo imaging, bioinformatics and biophysics, have greatly increased our understanding of the T3SS, especially the structure of its transmembrane and cytosolic components, the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and functional regulation and the remarkable adaptivity of the system. This review aims to integrate these new findings into our current knowledge of the evolution, function, regulation and dynamics of the T3SS, and to highlight commonalities and differences between the two systems, as well as their potential applications. PMID:26370933

  8. Yersinia Type III Secretion System Master Regulator LcrF

    PubMed Central

    Schwiesow, Leah; Lam, Hanh

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens express a type III secretion (T3SS) system to enable growth and survival within a host. The three human-pathogenic Yersinia species, Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica, encode the Ysc T3SS, whose expression is controlled by an AraC-like master regulator called LcrF. In this review, we discuss LcrF structure and function as well as the environmental cues and pathways known to regulate LcrF expression. Similarities and differences in binding motifs and modes of action between LcrF and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa homolog ExsA are summarized. In addition, we present a new bioinformatics analysis that identifies putative LcrF binding sites within Yersinia target gene promoters. PMID:26644429

  9. The Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Notti, Ryan Q.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2015-01-01

    ARTICLE SUMMARY Type III secretion systems (T3SS) afford gram-negative bacteria a most intimate means of altering the biology of their eukaryotic hosts — the direct delivery of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to that of the eukaryote. This incredible biophysical feat is accomplished by nanosyringe “injectisomes,” which form a conduit across the three plasma membranes, peptidoglycan layer and extracellular space that form a barrier to the direct delivery of proteins from bacterium to host. The focus of this chapter is T3SS function at the structural level; we will summarize the core findings that have shaped our understanding of the structure and function of these systems and highlight recent developments in the field. In turn, we describe the T3SS secretory apparatus, consider its engagement with secretion substrates, and discuss the post-translational regulation of secretory function. Lastly, we close with a discussion of the future prospects for the interrogation of structure-function relationships in the T3SS. PMID:26999392

  10. Type-III secretion filaments as scaffolds for inorganic nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Anum; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured materials exhibit unique magnetic, electrical and catalytic properties. These characteristics are determined by the chemical composition, size and shape of the nanostructured components, which are challenging to modulate on such small size scales and to interface with living cells. To address this problem, we are using a self-assembling filament protein, PrgI, as a scaffold for bottom-up inorganic nanostructure synthesis. PrgI is a small protein (80 amino acids) that oligomerizes to form the type-III secretion system needle of Salmonella enterica. We demonstrate that purified PrgI monomers also spontaneously self-assemble into long filaments and that high-affinity peptide tags specific for attachment to functionalized particles can be integrated into the N-terminal region of PrgI. The resulting filaments selectively bind to gold, whether the filaments are assembled in vitro, sheared from cells or remain attached to live S. enterica cell membranes. Chemical reduction of the gold-modified PrgI variants results in structures that are several micrometres in length and which incorporate a contiguous gold surface. Mutant strains with genomically incorporated metal-binding tags retain the secretion phenotype. We anticipate that self-assembled, cell-tethered protein/metal filamentous structures have applications in sensing and energy transduction in vivo. PMID:26763334

  11. A Bacterial Pathogen uses Distinct Type III Secretion Systems to Alternate between Host Kingdom

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of eukaryotes often secrete proteins directly into host cells via a needle-like protein channel called a ‘type III secretion system’ (T3SS). Bacteria that are adapted to either animal or plant hosts use phylogenetically distinct T3SSs for secreting proteins. Here, ...

  12. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis.

  13. SecretEPDB: a comprehensive web-based resource for secreted effector proteins of the bacterial types III, IV and VI secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    An, Yi; Wang, Jiawei; Li, Chen; Revote, Jerico; Zhang, Yang; Naderer, Thomas; Hayashida, Morihiro; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Lithgow, Trevor; Song, Jiangning

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria translocate effector molecules to host cells through highly evolved secretion systems. By definition, the function of these effector proteins is to manipulate host cell biology and the sequence, structural and functional annotations of these effector proteins will provide a better understanding of how bacterial secretion systems promote bacterial survival and virulence. Here we developed a knowledgebase, termed SecretEPDB (Bacterial Secreted Effector Protein DataBase), for effector proteins of type III secretion system (T3SS), type IV secretion system (T4SS) and type VI secretion system (T6SS). SecretEPDB provides enriched annotations of the aforementioned three classes of effector proteins by manually extracting and integrating structural and functional information from currently available databases and the literature. The database is conservative and strictly curated to ensure that every effector protein entry is supported by experimental evidence that demonstrates it is secreted by a T3SS, T4SS or T6SS. The annotations of effector proteins documented in SecretEPDB are provided in terms of protein characteristics, protein function, protein secondary structure, Pfam domains, metabolic pathway and evolutionary details. It is our hope that this integrated knowledgebase will serve as a useful resource for biological investigation and the generation of new hypotheses for research efforts aimed at bacterial secretion systems. PMID:28112271

  14. Dissection of calcium signaling events in exocrine secretion.

    PubMed

    Ambudkar, Indu S

    2011-07-01

    The secretion of fluid and electrolytes by salivary gland acinar cells requires the coordinated regulation of multiple ion channel and transporter proteins, signaling components, and water transport. Importantly, neurotransmitter stimulated increase in the cytosolic free [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) is critical for the regulation of salivary gland secretion as it regulates several major ion fluxes that together establish the sustained osmotic gradient to drive fluid secretion. The mechanisms that act to modulate these increases in [Ca(2+)](i) are therefore central to the process of salivary fluid secretion. Such modulation involves membrane receptors for neurotransmitters, as well as mechanisms that mediate intracellular Ca(2+) release, and Ca(2+) entry, as well as those that maintain cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Together, these mechanisms determine the spatial and temporal aspects of the [Ca(2+)](i) signals that regulate fluid secretion. Molecular cloning of these transporters and channels as well as development of mice lacking these proteins has established the physiological significance of key components that are involved in regulating [Ca(2+)](i) in salivary glands. This review will discuss these important studies and the findings which have led to resolution of the Ca(2+) signaling mechanisms that determine salivary gland fluid secretion.

  15. SseK1 and SseK3 Type III Secretion System Effectors Inhibit NF-κB Signaling and Necroptotic Cell Death in Salmonella-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Günster, Regina A.; Matthews, Sophie A.; Holden, David W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Within host cells such as macrophages, Salmonella enterica translocates virulence (effector) proteins across its vacuolar membrane via the SPI-2 type III secretion system. Previously, it was shown that when expressed ectopically, the effectors SseK1 and SseK3 inhibit tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-induced NF-κB activation. In this study, we show that ectopically expressed SseK1, SseK2, and SseK3 suppress TNF-α-induced, but not Toll-like receptor 4- or interleukin-induced, NF-κB activation. Inhibition required a DXD motif in SseK1 and SseK3, which is essential for the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine to arginine residues (arginine-GlcNAcylation). During macrophage infection, SseK1 and SseK3 inhibited NF-κB activity in an additive manner. SseK3-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activation did not require the only known host-binding partner of this effector, the E3-ubiquitin ligase TRIM32. SseK proteins also inhibited TNF-α-induced cell death during macrophage infection. Despite SseK1 and SseK3 inhibiting TNF-α-induced apoptosis upon ectopic expression in HeLa cells, the percentage of infected macrophages undergoing apoptosis was SseK independent. Instead, SseK proteins inhibited necroptotic cell death during macrophage infection. SseK1 and SseK3 caused GlcNAcylation of different proteins in infected macrophages, suggesting that these effectors have distinct substrate specificities. Indeed, SseK1 caused the GlcNAcylation of the death domain-containing proteins FADD and TRADD, whereas SseK3 expression resulted in weak GlcNAcylation of TRADD but not FADD. Additional, as-yet-unidentified substrates are likely to explain the additive phenotype of a Salmonella strain lacking both SseK1 and SseK3. PMID:28069818

  16. Global impact of Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA on host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenal-Muñoz, Elena Gutiérrez, Gabriel Ramos-Morales, Francisco

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • We analyzed HeLa cells transcriptome in response to Salmonella SteA. • Significant differential expression was detected for 58 human genes. • They are involved in ECM organization and regulation of some signaling pathways. • Cell death, cell adhesion and cell migration were decreased in SteA-expressing cells. • These results contribute to understand the role of SteA during infections. - Abstract: Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes gastroenteritis, bacteremia and typhoid fever in several animal species including humans. Its virulence is greatly dependent on two type III secretion systems, encoded in pathogenicity islands 1 and 2. These systems translocate proteins called effectors into eukaryotic host cell. Effectors interfere with host signal transduction pathways to allow the internalization of pathogens and their survival and proliferation inside vacuoles. SteA is one of the few Salmonella effectors that are substrates of both type III secretion systems. Here, we used gene arrays and bioinformatics analysis to study the genetic response of human epithelial cells to SteA. We found that constitutive synthesis of SteA in HeLa cells leads to induction of genes related to extracellular matrix organization and regulation of cell proliferation and serine/threonine kinase signaling pathways. SteA also causes repression of genes related to immune processes and regulation of purine nucleotide synthesis and pathway-restricted SMAD protein phosphorylation. In addition, a cell biology approach revealed that epithelial cells expressing steA show altered cell morphology, and decreased cytotoxicity, cell–cell adhesion and migration.

  17. Microglial Microvesicle Secretion and Intercellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Turola, Elena; Furlan, Roberto; Bianco, Fabio; Matteoli, Michela; Verderio, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are released from almost all cell brain types into the microenvironment and are emerging as a novel way of cell-to-cell communication. This review focuses on MVs discharged by microglial cells, the brain resident myeloid cells, which comprise ∼10–12% of brain population. We summarize first evidence indicating that MV shedding is a process activated by the ATP receptor P2X7 and that shed MVs represent a secretory pathway for the inflammatory cytokine IL-β. We then discuss subsequent findings which clarify how IL-1 β can be locally processed and released from MVs into the extracellular environment. In addition, we describe the current understanding about the mechanism of P2X7-dependent MV formation and membrane abscission, which, by involving sphingomyelinase activity and ceramide formation, may share similarities with exosome biogenesis. Finally we report our recent results which show that microglia-derived MVs can stimulate neuronal activity and participate to the propagation of inflammatory signals, and suggest new areas for future investigation. PMID:22661954

  18. Secretion systems and signal exchange between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Matthew S.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots and/or stem of leguminous plants involves a complex signal exchange between both partners. Since many microorganisms are present in the soil, legumes and rhizobia must recognize and initiate communication with each other to establish symbioses. This results in the formation of nodules. Rhizobia within nodules exchange fixed nitrogen for carbon from the legume. Symbiotic relationships can become non-beneficial if one partner ceases to provide support to the other. As a result, complex signal exchange mechanisms have evolved to ensure continued, beneficial symbioses. Proper recognition and signal exchange is also the basis for host specificity. Nodule formation always provides a fitness benefit to rhizobia, but does not always provide a fitness benefit to legumes. Therefore, legumes have evolved a mechanism to regulate the number of nodules that are formed, this is called autoregulation of nodulation. Sequencing of many different rhizobia have revealed the presence of several secretion systems - and the Type III, Type IV, and Type VI secretion systems are known to be used by pathogens to transport effector proteins. These secretion systems are also known to have an effect on host specificity and are a determinant of overall nodule number on legumes. This review focuses on signal exchange between rhizobia and legumes, particularly focusing on the role of secretion systems involved in nodule formation and host specificity. PMID:26191069

  19. Secretion systems and signal exchange between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Matthew S; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots and/or stem of leguminous plants involves a complex signal exchange between both partners. Since many microorganisms are present in the soil, legumes and rhizobia must recognize and initiate communication with each other to establish symbioses. This results in the formation of nodules. Rhizobia within nodules exchange fixed nitrogen for carbon from the legume. Symbiotic relationships can become non-beneficial if one partner ceases to provide support to the other. As a result, complex signal exchange mechanisms have evolved to ensure continued, beneficial symbioses. Proper recognition and signal exchange is also the basis for host specificity. Nodule formation always provides a fitness benefit to rhizobia, but does not always provide a fitness benefit to legumes. Therefore, legumes have evolved a mechanism to regulate the number of nodules that are formed, this is called autoregulation of nodulation. Sequencing of many different rhizobia have revealed the presence of several secretion systems - and the Type III, Type IV, and Type VI secretion systems are known to be used by pathogens to transport effector proteins. These secretion systems are also known to have an effect on host specificity and are a determinant of overall nodule number on legumes. This review focuses on signal exchange between rhizobia and legumes, particularly focusing on the role of secretion systems involved in nodule formation and host specificity.

  20. Notch Signaling Pathway Regulates Progesterone Secretion in Murine Luteal Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Shuangmei; Peng, Lichao; Dong, Qiming; Bao, Riqiang; Lv, Qiulan; Tang, Min; Hu, Chuan; Li, Gang; Liang, Shangdong; Zhang, Chunping

    2015-10-01

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway, which involves in various cell life activities. Other studies and our report showed that the Notch signaling plays very important role in follicle development in mammalian ovaries. In luteal cells, Notch ligand, delta-like ligand 4, is involved in normal luteal vasculature. In this study, murine luteal cells were cultured in vitro and treated with Notch signaling inhibitors, L-658,458 and N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycinet-butyl ester (DAPT). We found that L-658,458 and DAPT treatment decrease basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated progesterone secretion. On the contrary, overexpression of intracellular domain of Notch3 increased basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone secretion. Further studies demonstrated that Notch signaling regulated the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11A, 2 key enzymes for progesterone synthesis. In conclusion, Notch signaling plays important role in regulating progesterone secretion in murine luteal cells.

  1. How nutritional status signalling coordinates metabolism and lignocellulolytic enzyme secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, Neil Andrew; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-11-01

    The utilisation of lignocellulosic plant biomass as an abundant, renewable feedstock for green chemistries and biofuel production is inhibited by its recalcitrant nature. In the environment, lignocellulolytic fungi are naturally capable of breaking down plant biomass into utilisable saccharides. Nonetheless, within the industrial context, inefficiencies in the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes impede the implementation of green technologies. One of the primary causes of such inefficiencies is the tight transcriptional control of lignocellulolytic enzymes via carbon catabolite repression. Fungi coordinate metabolism, protein biosynthesis and secretion with cellular energetic status through the detection of intra- and extra-cellular nutritional signals. An enhanced understanding of the signals and signalling pathways involved in regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of lignocellulolytic enzymes is therefore of great biotechnological interest. This comparative review describes how nutrient sensing pathways regulate carbon catabolite repression, metabolism and the utilisation of alternative carbon sources in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ascomycete fungi.

  2. Control of type III secretion activity and substrate specificity by the cytoplasmic regulator PcrG

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei-Chung; Zmina, Stephanie Elizabeth; Stopford, Charles Morgan; Toska, Jonida; Rietsch, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria use syringe-like type III secretion systems (T3SS) to inject effector proteins directly into targeted host cells. Effector secretion is triggered by host cell contact, and before contact is prevented by a set of conserved regulators. How these regulators interface with the T3SS apparatus to control secretion is unclear. We present evidence that the proton motive force (pmf) drives T3SS secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and that the cytoplasmic regulator PcrG interacts with distinct components of the T3SS apparatus to control two important aspects of effector secretion: (i) It coassembles with a second regulator (Pcr1) on the inner membrane T3SS component PcrD to prevent effectors from accessing the T3SS, and (ii) In conjunction with PscO, it controls protein secretion activity by modulating the ability of T3SS to convert pmf. PMID:24778208

  3. Nodulation genes and type III secretion systems in rhizobia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For establishment of symbiosis, rhizobia and legumes have to communicate. Specific signaling starts with the release of flavonoids by the plant. All rhizobia encode at least one NodD protein, which responds to the presence of specific flavonoids by activation of nodulation genes. In Bradyrhizobium j...

  4. A bacterial pathogen uses distinct type III secretion systems to alternate between host kingdoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss), the causative agent of Stewart’s bacterial wilt and...

  5. Contribution of Bordetella bronchiseptica Type III secretion system to respiratory disease in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The type III secretion system (TTSS) of gram negative bacteria allows injection of effector proteins directly into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that the B. bronchiseptica TTSS plays a role in the persistent bacterial colonization of the trachea of m...

  6. SOS Regulation of the Type III Secretion System of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Mellies, Jay L.; Haack, Kenneth R.; Galligan, Derek C.

    2007-01-01

    Genomes of bacterial pathogens contain and coordinately regulate virulence-associated genes in order to cause disease. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), a major cause of watery diarrhea in infants and a model gram-negative pathogen, expresses a type III secretion system (TTSS) that is encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) and is necessary for causing attaching and effacing intestinal lesions. Effector proteins encoded by the LEE and in cryptic prophage are injected into the host cell cytoplasm by the TTTS apparatus, ultimately leading to diarrhea. The LEE is comprised of multiple polycistronic operons, most of which are controlled by the global, positive regulator Ler. Here we demonstrated that the LEE2 and LEE3 operons also responded to SOS signaling and that this regulation was LexA dependent. As determined by a DNase I protection assay, purified LexA protein bound in vitro to a predicted SOS box located in the divergent, overlapping LEE2/LEE3 promoters. Expression of the lexA1 allele, encoding an uncleavable LexA protein in EPEC, resulted in reduced secretion, particularly in the absence of the Ler regulator. Finally, we obtained evidence that the cryptic phage-located nleA gene encoding an effector molecule is SOS regulated. Thus, we demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge, that genes encoding components of a TTSS are regulated by the SOS response, and our data might explain how a subset of EPEC effector proteins, encoded in cryptic prophages, are coordinately regulated with the LEE-encoded TTSS necessary for their translocation into host cells. PMID:17237173

  7. Establishment of an inducing medium for type III effector secretion in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Jiang, Bo-Le; Yang, Mei; Liu, San; Liu, Jiao; Liang, Xiao-Xia; Bai, Xian-Fang; Tang, Dong-Jie; Lu, Guang-Tao; He, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Di-Qiu; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the type III secretion system (T3SS) and type III (T3) effectors are essential for the pathogenicity of most bacterial phytopathogens and that the expression of T3SS and T3 effectors is suppressed in rich media but induced in minimal media and plants. To facilitate in-depth studies on T3SS and T3 effectors, it is crucial to establish a medium for T3 effector expression and secretion. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is a model bacterium for studying plant-pathogen interactions. To date no medium for Xcc T3 effector secretion has been defined. Here, we compared four minimal media (MME, MMX, XVM2, and XOM2) which are reported for T3 expression induction in Xanthomonas spp. and found that MME is most efficient for expression and secretion of Xcc T3 effectors. By optimization of carbon and nitrogen sources and pH value based on MME, we established XCM1 medium, which is about 3 times stronger than MME for Xcc T3 effectors secretion. We further optimized the concentration of phosphate, calcium, and magnesium in XCM1 and found that XCM1 with a lower concentration of magnesium (renamed as XCM2) is about 10 times as efficient as XCM1 (meanwhile, about 30 times stronger than MME). Thus, we established an inducing medium XCM2 which is preferred for T3 effector secretion in Xcc.

  8. A common assembly module in injectisome and flagellar type III secretion sorting platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notti, Ryan Q.; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Lilic, Mirjana; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2015-05-01

    Translocating proteins across the double membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, type III secretion systems (T3SS) occur in two evolutionarily related forms: injectisomes, delivering virulence factors into host cells, and the flagellar system, secreting the polymeric filament used for motility. While both systems share related elements of a cytoplasmic sorting platform that facilitates the hierarchical secretion of protein substrates, its assembly and regulation remain unclear. Here we describe a module mediating the assembly of the sorting platform in both secretion systems, and elucidate the structural basis for segregation of homologous components among these divergent T3SS subtypes sharing a common cytoplasmic milieu. These results provide a foundation for the subtype-specific assembly of T3SS sorting platforms and will support further mechanistic analysis and anti-virulence drug design.

  9. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R; Grishin, Nick V; Orth, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered that Vibrio parahaemolyticus VtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15718.001 PMID:27377244

  10. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N.; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R.; Grishin, Nick V.; Orth, Kim

    2016-07-05

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered thatVibrio parahaemolyticusVtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.

  11. Identification of type III secretion substrates of Chlamydia trachomatis using Yersinia enterocolitica as a heterologous system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular human pathogen causing ocular and urogenital infections that are a significant clinical and public health concern. This bacterium uses a type III secretion (T3S) system to manipulate host cells, through the delivery of effector proteins into their cytosol, membranes, and nucleus. In this work, we aimed to find previously unidentified C. trachomatis T3S substrates. Results We first analyzed the genome of C. trachomatis L2/434 strain for genes encoding mostly uncharacterized proteins that did not appear to possess a signal of the general secretory pathway and which had not been previously experimentally shown to be T3S substrates. We selected several genes with these characteristics and analyzed T3S of the encoding proteins using Yersinia enterocolitica as a heterologous system. We identified 23 C. trachomatis proteins whose first 20 amino acids were sufficient to drive T3S of the mature form of β-lactamase TEM-1 by Y. enterocolitica. We found that 10 of these 23 proteins were also type III secreted in their full-length versions by Y. enterocolitica, providing additional support that they are T3S substrates. Seven of these 10 likely T3S substrates of C. trachomatis were delivered by Y. enterocolitica into host cells, further suggesting that they could be effectors. Finally, real-time quantitative PCR analysis of expression of genes encoding the 10 likely T3S substrates of C. trachomatis showed that 9 of them were clearly expressed during infection of host cells. Conclusions Using Y. enterocolitica as a heterologous system, we identified 10 likely T3S substrates of C. trachomatis (CT053, CT105, CT142, CT143, CT144, CT161, CT338, CT429, CT656, and CT849) and could detect translocation into host cells of CT053, CT105, CT142, CT143, CT161, CT338, and CT429. Therefore, we revealed several C. trachomatis proteins that could be effectors subverting host cell processes. PMID:24533538

  12. Correlating levels of type III secretion and secreted proteins with fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) for secreting factors that enable Escherichia coli O157:H7 to produce attaching and effacing lesions (A/E) on epithelial cells. The importance of LEE-encoded proteins in intestinal colonization of cattle is well-stud...

  13. Identification of novel type III secretion effectors in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Ayako; Takaoka, Minako; Sanada, Harumi; Noguchi, Yukari; Oku, Takashi; Tsuno, Kazunori; Ochiai, Hirokazu; Tsuge, Seiji

    2009-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria secrete so-called effector proteins via a type III secretion (T3S) system. Through genome screening for genes encoding potential T3S effectors, 60 candidates were selected from rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae MAFF311018 using these criteria: i) homologs of known T3S effectors in plant-pathogenic bacteria, ii) genes with expression regulated by hrp regulatory protein HrpX, or iii) proteins with N-terminal amino acid patterns associated with T3S substrates of Pseudomonas syringae. Of effector candidates tested with the Bordetella pertussis calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase reporter for translocation into plant cells, 16 proteins were translocated in a T3S system-dependent manner. Of these 16 proteins, nine were homologs of known effectors in other plant-pathogenic bacteria and seven were not. Most of the effectors were widely conserved in Xanthomonas spp.; however, some were specific to X. oryzae. Interestingly, all these effectors were expressed in an HrpX-dependent manner, suggesting coregulation of effectors and the T3S system. In X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, HpaB and HpaC (HpaP in X. oryzae pv. oryzae) have a central role in recruiting T3S substrates to the secretion apparatus. Secretion of all but one effector was reduced in both HpaB() and HpaP() mutant strains, indicating that HpaB and HpaP are widely involved in efficient secretion of the effectors.

  14. In Situ Molecular Architecture of the Salmonella Type III Secretion Machine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Kong, Qingke; Galán, Jorge E; Liu, Jun

    2017-03-09

    Type III protein secretion systems have specifically evolved to deliver bacterially encoded proteins into target eukaryotic cells. The core elements of this multi-protein machine are the envelope-associated needle complex, the inner membrane export apparatus, and a large cytoplasmic sorting platform. Here, we report a high-resolution in situ structure of the Salmonella Typhimurium type III secretion machine obtained by high-throughput cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging. Through molecular modeling and comparative analysis of machines assembled with protein-tagged components or from different deletion mutants, we determined the molecular architecture of the secretion machine in situ and localized its structural components. We also show that docking of the sorting platform results in significant conformational changes in the needle complex to provide the symmetry adaptation required for the assembly of the entire secretion machine. These studies provide major insight into the structure and assembly of a broadly distributed protein secretion machine.

  15. Calcium and Iron Regulate Swarming and Type III Secretion in Vibrio parahaemolyticus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gode-Potratz, Cindy J.; Chodur, Daniel M.; McCarter, Linda L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we probe the response to calcium during growth on a surface and show that calcium influences the transcriptome and stimulates motility and virulence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Swarming (but not swimming) gene expression and motility were enhanced by calcium. Calcium also elevated transcription of one of the organism's two type III secretion systems (T3SS1 but not T3SS2) and heightened cytotoxicity toward host cells in coculture. Calcium stimulation of T3SS gene expression has not been reported before, although low calcium is an inducing signal for the T3SS of many organisms. EGTA was also found to increase T3SS1 gene expression and virulence; however, this was demonstrated to be the consequence of iron rather than calcium chelation. Ectopic expression of exsA, encoding the T3SS1 AraC-type regulator, was used to define the extent of the T3SS1 regulon and verify its coincident induction by calcium and EGTA. To begin to understand the regulatory mechanisms modulating the calcium response, a calcium-repressed, LysR-type transcription factor named CalR was identified and shown to repress swarming and T3SS1 gene expression. Swarming and T3SS1 gene expression were also demonstrated to be linked by LafK, a σ54-dependent regulator of swarming, and additionally connected by a negative-feedback loop on the swarming regulon propagated by ExsA. Thus, calcium and iron, two ions pertinent for a marine organism and pathogen, play a signaling role with global consequences on the regulation of gene sets that are relevant for surface colonization and infection. PMID:20851895

  16. Type III secretion chaperones of Pseudomonas syringae protect effectors from Lon-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana C; Hutcheson, Steven W

    2005-02-01

    The hrp type III secretion system (TTSS) of Pseudomonas syringae translocates effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. Proteolysis of HrpR by Lon has been shown to negatively regulate the hrp TTSS. The inability to bypass Lon-associated effects on the regulatory system by ectopic expression of the known regulators suggested a second site of action for Lon in TTSS-dependent effector secretion. In this study we report that TTSS-dependent effectors are subject to the proteolytic degradation that appears to be rate-limiting to secretion. The half-lives of the effectors AvrPto, AvrRpt2, HopPsyA, HopPsyB1, HopPtoB2, HopPsyV1, HopPtoG and HopPtoM were substantially higher in bacteria lacking Lon. TTSS-dependent secretion of several effectors was enhanced from Lon mutants. A primary role for chaperones appears to be protection of effectors from Lon-associated degradation prior to secretion. When coexpressed with their cognate chaperone, HopPsyB1, HopPsyV1 and HopPtoM were at least 10 times more stable in strains expressing Lon. Distinct Lon-targeting and chaperone-binding domains were identified in HopPtoM. The results imply that Lon is involved at two distinct levels in the regulation of the P. syringae TTSS: regulation of assembly of the secreton and modulation of effector secretion.

  17. [Advances in studies of the type III secretion system in Ralstonia solanacearum--A review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Muyuan; Luo, Feng

    2015-06-04

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most devastating plant diseases worldwide. The syringe-like type III secretion system (T3SS) plays a crucial role in its pathogenicity. R. solanacearum uses the T3SS to inject effector proteins (Type III effectors) into the cytoplasm of host cells, causing diseases in susceptible plants or triggering the hypersensitive response in resistant plants. In this article we review recent advances in studies of R. solanacearum T3SS and highlight their unique features.

  18. Secreted Wnt Signaling Inhibitors in Disuse-Induced Bone Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    approach for overcoming the bone loss that normally occurs with disuse. We are also investigating the efficacy of Dkk1 neutralization (and genetic...proposed to determine whether local, secreted regulators of Wnt/Lrp signaling (Sost,  Dkk1 ) modulate bone  loss in response to mechanical disuse...with muta ons in Wnt modulators (Sost‐/‐,  Dkk1 +/‐) and in wild‐type mice that are also treated with  neutralizing an body to  Dkk1  or Sost.  These

  19. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells.

  20. Structure of Salmonella FlhE, conserved member of a flagellar Type III secretion operon

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jaemin; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T.; ...

    2014-12-26

    In this paper, the bacterial flagellum is assembled by a multicomponent transport apparatus categorized as a type III secretion system. The secretion of proteins that assemble into the flagellum is driven by the proton motive force. The periplasmic protein FlhE is a member of the flhBAE operon in the majority of bacteria where FlhE is found. FlhA and FlhB are established components of the flagellar type III secretion system. The absence of FlhE results in a proton leak through the flagellar system, inappropriate secretion patterns, and cell death, indicating that FlhE regulates an important aspect of proper flagellar biosynthesis. Wemore » isolated FlhE from the periplasm of Salmonella and solved its structure to 1.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals a β-sandwich fold, with no close structural homologs. Finally, possible roles of FlhE, including that of a chaperone, are discussed.« less

  1. Bacterial type III secretion systems are ancient and evolved by multiple horizontal-transfer events.

    PubMed

    Gophna, Uri; Ron, Eliora Z; Graur, Dan

    2003-07-17

    Type III secretion systems (TTSS) are unique bacterial mechanisms that mediate elaborate interactions with their hosts. The fact that several of the TTSS proteins are closely related to flagellar export proteins has led to the suggestion that TTSS had evolved from flagella. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of four conserved type III secretion proteins and their phylogenetic relationships with flagellar paralogs. Our analysis indicates that the TTSS and the flagellar export mechanism share a common ancestor, but have evolved independently from one another. The suggestion that TTSS genes have evolved from genes encoding flagellar proteins is effectively refuted. A comparison of the species tree, as deduced from 16S rDNA sequences, to the protein phylogenetic trees has led to the identification of several major lateral transfer events involving clusters of TTSS genes. It is hypothesized that horizontal gene transfer has occurred much earlier and more frequently than previously inferred for TTSS genes and is, consequently, a major force shaping the evolution of species that harbor type III secretion systems.

  2. Role of Autocleavage in the Function of a Type III Secretion Specificity Switch Protein in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Monjarás Feria, Julia V.; Lefebre, Matthew D.; Stierhof, York-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein machines employed by many Gram-negative bacteria to inject bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to promote bacterial survival and colonization. The core unit of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins through the bacterial envelope. A distinct feature of the T3SS is that protein export occurs in a strictly hierarchical manner in which proteins destined to form the needle complex filament and associated structures are secreted first, followed by the secretion of effectors and the proteins that will facilitate their translocation through the target host cell membrane. The secretion hierarchy is established by complex mechanisms that involve several T3SS-associated components, including the “switch protein,” a highly conserved, inner membrane protease that undergoes autocatalytic cleavage. It has been proposed that the autocleavage of the switch protein is the trigger for substrate switching. We show here that autocleavage of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium switch protein SpaS is an unregulated process that occurs after its folding and before its incorporation into the needle complex. Needle complexes assembled with a precleaved form of SpaS function in a manner indistinguishable from that of the wild-type form. Furthermore, an engineered mutant of SpaS that is processed by an external protease also displays wild-type function. These results demonstrate that the cleavage event per se does not provide a signal for substrate switching but support the hypothesis that cleavage allows the proper conformation of SpaS to render it competent for its switching function. PMID:26463164

  3. Design and characterization of a polyamine derivative inhibiting the expression of type III secretion system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Xiaoling; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jianuan; Cui, Zining; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key virulence determinant for infection of eukaryotic hosts. Based on the findings that spermidine-mediated host-pathogen signalling is important for activation of type III secretion systems (TTSS), in this study, we designed, synthesized and evaluated a series of polyamine derivatives for their potentials in inhibiting the expression TTSS in P. aeruginosa. In vitro assay of 15 compounds synthesized in this study unveiled stringent structural requirements for TTSS-inhibitory activity. Among them, R101SPM, a conjugate between rhodamine 101 and spermine, showed a potent activity in inhibition of the TTSS gene expression and in attenuation of the TTSS-mediated cytotoxicity on human cells. In vivo analysis demonstrated that R101SPM could rescue mice from the lethal infection by P. aeruginosa. Moreover, genetic analysis showed that the full TTSS-inhibitory activity of R101SPM required a functional spermidine transporter. Taken together, our results present a new class of lead molecules for developing anti-virulence drugs and demonstrate that the spermidine transporter SpuDEGHF of P. aeruginosa is a promising drug target. PMID:27484745

  4. Functional and Computational Analysis of Amino Acid Patterns Predictive of Type III Secretion System Substrates in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Schechter, Lisa M.; Valenta, Joy C.; Schneider, David J.; Collmer, Alan; Sakk, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs) deliver proteins called effectors into eukaryotic cells. Although N-terminal amino acid sequences are required for translocation, the mechanism of substrate recognition by the T3SS is unknown. Almost all actively deployed T3SS substrates in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000 possess characteristic patterns, including (i) greater than 10% serine within the first 50 amino acids, (ii) an aliphatic residue or proline at position 3 or 4, and (iii) a lack of acidic amino acids within the first 12 residues. Here, the functional significance of the P. syringae T3SS substrate compositional patterns was tested. A mutant AvrPto effector protein lacking all three patterns was secreted into culture and translocated into plant cells, suggesting that the compositional characteristics are not absolutely required for T3SS targeting and that other recognition mechanisms exist. To further analyze the unique properties of T3SS targeting signals, we developed a computational algorithm called TEREE (Type III Effector Relative Entropy Evaluation) that distinguishes DC3000 T3SS substrates from other proteins with a high sensitivity and specificity. Although TEREE did not efficiently identify T3SS substrates in Salmonella enterica, it was effective in another P. syringae strain and Ralstonia solanacearum. Thus, the TEREE algorithm may be a useful tool for identifying new effector genes in plant pathogens. The nature of T3SS targeting signals was additionally investigated by analyzing the N-terminus of FtsX, a putative membrane protein that was classified as a T3SS substrate by TEREE. Although the first 50 amino acids of FtsX were unable to target a reporter protein to the T3SS, an AvrPto protein substituted with the first 12 amino acids of FtsX was translocated into plant cells. These results show that the T3SS targeting signals are highly mutable and that secretion may be directed by multiple features of

  5. Piericidin A1 Blocks Yersinia Ysc Type III Secretion System Needle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica M.; Duncan, Miles C.; Johnson, Kevin S.; Diepold, Andreas; Lam, Hanh; Dupzyk, Allison J.; Martin, Lexi R.; Wong, Weng Ruh; Linington, Roger G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a bacterial virulence factor expressed by dozens of Gram-negative pathogens but largely absent from commensals. The T3SS is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents that may disarm pathogenic bacteria while leaving commensal populations intact. We previously identified piericidin A1 as an inhibitor of the Ysc T3SS in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Piericidins were first discovered as inhibitors of complex I of the electron transport chain in mitochondria and some bacteria. However, we found that piericidin A1 did not alter Yersinia membrane potential or inhibit flagellar motility powered by the proton motive force, indicating that the piericidin mode of action against Yersinia type III secretion is independent of complex I. Instead, piericidin A1 reduced the number of T3SS needle complexes visible by fluorescence microscopy at the bacterial surface, preventing T3SS translocator and effector protein secretion. Furthermore, piericidin A1 decreased the abundance of higher-order YscF needle subunit complexes, suggesting that piericidin A1 blocks YscF needle assembly. While expression of T3SS components in Yersinia are positively regulated by active type III secretion, the block in secretion by piericidin A1 was not accompanied by a decrease in T3SS gene expression, indicating that piericidin A1 may target a T3SS regulatory circuit. However, piericidin A1 still inhibited effector protein secretion in the absence of the T3SS regulator YopK, YopD, or YopN. Surprisingly, while piericidin A1 also inhibited the Y. enterocolitica Ysc T3SS, it did not inhibit the SPI-1 family Ysa T3SS in Y. enterocolitica or the Ysc family T3SS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together, these data indicate that piericidin A1 specifically inhibits Yersinia Ysc T3SS needle assembly. IMPORTANCE The bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) is widely used by both human and animal pathogens to cause disease yet remains incompletely understood

  6. The use of a flagellar export signal for the secretion of recombinant proteins in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Vonderviszt, Ferenc; Sajó, Ráchel; Dobó, József; Závodszky, Péter

    2012-01-01

    The flagellum-specific export system is a specialized type III export machinery, which exports external flagellar proteins through the central channel of the flagellar filament. A number of evidence indicates that short segments within the disordered N-terminal region of flagellar axial proteins are recognized by the flagellum-specific export apparatus. Recently, we have demonstrated that the 26-47 segment of Salmonella typhimurium flagellin is capable of mediating flagellar export. N-terminal flagellin segments containing the export signal combined with a hexahistidine tag can be attached to heterologous proteins (preferentially in the size range of 9-40 kDa) facilitating their secreted expression and easy purification from the medium. Certain over-expressed proteins that are easily degraded within the cells are found intact in the medium implying a potential application of this expression system for proteins of high proteolytic susceptibility.

  7. Boreal feather mosses secrete chemical signals to gain nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Bay, Guillaume; Nahar, Nurun; Oubre, Matthieu; Whitehouse, Martin J; Wardle, David A; Zackrisson, Olle; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2013-10-01

    The mechanistic basis of feather moss-cyanobacteria associations, a main driver of nitrogen (N) input into boreal forests, remains unknown. Here, we studied colonization by Nostoc sp. on two feather mosses that form these associations (Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens) and two acrocarpous mosses that do not (Dicranum polysetum and Polytrichum commune). We also determined how N availability and moss reproductive stage affects colonization, and measured N transfer from cyanobacteria to mosses. The ability of mosses to induce differentiation of cyanobacterial hormogonia, and of hormogonia to then colonize mosses and re-establish a functional symbiosis was determined through microcosm experiments, microscopy and acetylene reduction assays. Nitrogen transfer between cyanobacteria and Pleurozium schreberi was monitored by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). All mosses induced hormogonia differentiation but only feather mosses were subsequently colonized. Colonization on Pleurozium schreberi was enhanced during the moss reproductive phase but impaired by elevated N. Transfer of N from cyanobacteria to their host moss was observed. Our results reveal that feather mosses likely secrete species-specific chemo-attractants when N-limited, which guide cyanobacteria towards them and from which they gain N. We conclude that this signalling is regulated by N demands of mosses, and serves as a control of N input into boreal forests.

  8. Diversifying selection drives the evolution of the type III secretion system pilus of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Guttman, David S; Gropp, Susan J; Morgan, Robyn L; Wang, Pauline W

    2006-12-01

    The plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae uses a type III secretion system to inject virulence proteins directly into the cytoplasm of its hosts. The P. syringae type III secretion apparatus is encoded, in part, by the HrpZ operon, which carries the hrpA gene encoding the pilin subunit of the pilus, various components of the structural apparatus, and the HrpZ harpin protein that is believed to produce pores in the host cell membrane. The pilus of the type III system comes into direct contact with the host cell and is, therefore, a likely target of the host's pathogen surveillance systems. We sequenced and analyzed 22 HrpZ operons from P. syringae strains spanning the diversity of the species. Selection analyses, including K(a)/K(s) tests and Tajima's D, revealed strong diversifying selection acting on the hrpA gene. This form of selection enables pathogens to maintain genetic diversity within their populations and is often driven by selection imposed by host defense systems. The HrpZ operon also revealed a single significant recombination event that dramatically changed the evolutionary relationships among P. syringae strains from 2 quite distinct phylogroups. This recombination event appears to have introduced genetic diversity into a clade of strains that may now be undergoing positive selection. The identification of diversifying selection acting on the Hrp pilus across the whole population sample and positive selection within one P. syringae lineage supports a trench warfare coevolutionary model between P. syringae and its plant hosts.

  9. RfaL Is Required for Yersinia pestis Type III Secretion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Houppert, Andrew S.; Bohman, Lesley; Merritt, Peter M.; Cole, Christopher B.; Caulfield, Adam J.; Lathem, Wyndham W.

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject cytotoxic Yop proteins directly into the cytosol of mammalian host cells. The T3SS can also be activated in vitro at 37°C in the absence of calcium. The chromosomal gene rfaL (waaL) was recently identified as a virulence factor required for proper function of the T3SS. RfaL functions as a ligase that adds the terminal N-acetylglucosamine to the lipooligosaccharide core of Y. pestis. We previously showed that deletion of rfaL prevents secretion of Yops in vitro. Here we show that the divalent cations calcium, strontium, and magnesium can partially or fully rescue Yop secretion in vitro, indicating that the secretion phenotype of the rfaL mutant may be due to structural changes in the outer membrane and the corresponding feedback inhibition on the T3SS. In support of this, we found that the defect can be overcome by deleting the regulatory gene lcrQ. Consistent with a defective T3SS, the rfaL mutant is less virulent than the wild type. We show here that the virulence defect of the mutant correlates with a decrease in both T3SS gene expression and ability to inject innate immune cells, combined with an increased sensitivity to cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:23357388

  10. Steps for Shigella Gatekeeper Protein MxiC Function in Hierarchical Type III Secretion Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Roehrich, A. Dorothea; Bordignon, Enrica; Mode, Selma; Shen, Da-Kang; Liu, Xia; Pain, Maria; Murillo, Isabel; Martinez-Argudo, Isabel; Sessions, Richard B.

    2017-01-01

    Type III secretion systems are complex nanomachines used for injection of proteins from Gram-negative bacteria into eukaryotic cells. Although they are assembled when the environmental conditions are appropriate, they only start secreting upon contact with a host cell. Secretion is hierarchical. First, the pore-forming translocators are released. Second, effector proteins are injected. Hierarchy between these protein classes is mediated by a conserved gatekeeper protein, MxiC, in Shigella. As its molecular mechanism of action is still poorly understood, we used its structure to guide site-directed mutagenesis and to dissect its function. We identified mutants predominantly affecting all known features of MxiC regulation as follows: secretion of translocators, MxiC and/or effectors. Using molecular genetics, we then mapped at which point in the regulatory cascade the mutants were affected. Analysis of some of these mutants led us to a set of electron paramagnetic resonance experiments that provide evidence that MxiC interacts directly with IpaD. We suggest how this interaction regulates a switch in its conformation that is key to its functions. PMID:27974466

  11. Structural and Functional Characterization of the Bacterial Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Matthias J.; Yan, Jun; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Schärfe, Charlotta; Grin, Iwan; Galán, Jorge E.; Macek, Boris; Marlovits, Thomas C.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type III protein secretion systems inject effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells in order to promote survival and colonization of Gram-negative pathogens and symbionts. Secretion across the bacterial cell envelope and injection into host cells is facilitated by a so-called injectisome. Its small hydrophobic export apparatus components SpaP and SpaR were shown to nucleate assembly of the needle complex and to form the central “cup” substructure of a Salmonella Typhimurium secretion system. However, the in vivo placement of these components in the needle complex and their function during the secretion process remained poorly defined. Here we present evidence that a SpaP pentamer forms a 15 Å wide pore and provide a detailed map of SpaP interactions with the export apparatus components SpaQ, SpaR, and SpaS. We further refine the current view of export apparatus assembly, consolidate transmembrane topology models for SpaP and SpaR, and present intimate interactions of the periplasmic domains of SpaP and SpaR with the inner rod protein PrgJ, indicating how export apparatus and needle filament are connected to create a continuous conduit for substrate translocation. PMID:27977800

  12. Targeting of plant pattern recognition receptor-triggered immunity by bacterial type-III secretion system effectors.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-02-01

    During infection, microbes are detected by surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to an innate immune response that prevents microbial ingress. Therefore, successful pathogens must evade or inhibit PRR-triggered immunity to cause disease. In the past decade, a number of type-III secretion system effector (T3Es) proteins from plant pathogenic bacteria have been shown to suppress this layer of innate immunity. More recently, the detailed mechanisms of action have been defined for several of these effectors. Interestingly, effectors display a wide array of virulence targets, being able to prevent activation of immune receptors and to hijack immune signaling pathways. Besides being a fascinating example of pathogen-host co-evolution, effectors have also emerged as valuable tools to dissect important biological processes in host cells.

  13. [Prevalence of type III secretion system genes in cholera vibrios from different serogroups].

    PubMed

    Eroshenko, G A; Kutyrev, V V; Fadeeva, A V; Shavina, N Iu; Stepanov, A V

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of vcs genes coding the type III secretion system (T3SS) in cholera vibrios of different serogroups isolated in Russia and neighboring countries was studied for the first time. Virulent strains of O1 and O139 serogroups as well as toxigenic Vibrio cholerae strains of other serogroups contained no T3SS genes. Unlike mentioned strains, 29.2% of atoxigenic non O1/non O139 cholera vibrios isolated from patients in Russia and neighboring countries contained the T3SS genes cluster, which might contribute to the pathogenic properties of these strains.

  14. Functional Characterization of Two Type III Secretion Systems of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwon-Sam; Ono, Takahiro; Rokuda, Mitsuhiro; Jang, Myoung-Ho; Okada, Kazuhisa; Iida, Tetsuya; Honda, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a gram-negative marine bacterium, is a worldwide cause of food-borne gastroenteritis. Recent genome sequencing of the clinical V. parahaemolyticus strain RIMD2210633 identified two sets of genes for the type III secretion system (TTSS), TTSS1 and TTSS2. Here, we constructed a series of mutant strains from RIMD2210633 to determine whether the two putative TTSS apparatus are functional. The cytotoxic activity of mutant strains having a deletion in one of the TTSS1 genes was significantly decreased compared with that of the parent and TTSS2-related mutant strains. In an enterotoxicity assay with the rabbit ileal loop test, intestinal fluid accumulation was diminished by deletion of the TTSS2-related genes while TTSS1-related mutants caused a level of fluid accumulation similar to that of the parent. VopD, a protein encoded in the proximity of the TTSS1 region and a homologue of the Yersinia YopD, was secreted in a TTSS1-dependent manner. In contrast, VopP, which is encoded by a pathogenicity island on chromosome 2 and is homologous to the Yersinia YopP, was secreted via the TTSS2 pathway. These results provide evidence that V. parahaemolyticus TTSSs function as secretion systems and may have a role in the pathogenicity of the organism. This is the first report of functional TTSSs in Vibrio species. The presence of TTSS apparatus gene homologues was demonstrated in other vibrios, such as Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio tubiashii, suggesting that some other vibrios also contain TTSS and that the TTSS has a role in protein secretion in those organisms during interaction with eukaryotic cells. PMID:15501799

  15. A Phytase-Based Reporter System for Identification of Functional Secretion Signals in Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Osswald, Annika; Westermann, Christina; Sun, Zhongke; Riedel, Christian U.

    2015-01-01

    Health-promoting effects have been attributed to a number of Bifidobacterium sp. strains. These effects as well as the ability to colonise the host depend on secreted proteins. Moreover, rational design of protein secretion systems bears the potential for the generation of novel probiotic bifidobacteria with improved health-promoting or therapeutic properties. To date, there is only very limited data on secretion signals of bifidobacteria available. Using in silico analysis, we demonstrate that all bifidobacteria encode the major components of Sec-dependent secretion machineries but only B. longum strains harbour Tat protein translocation systems. A reporter plasmid for secretion signals in bifidobacteria was established by fusing the coding sequence of the signal peptide of a sialidase of Bifidobacterium bifidum S17 to the phytase gene appA of E. coli. The recombinant strain showed increased phytase activity in spent culture supernatants and reduced phytase levels in crude extracts compared to the control indicating efficient phytase secretion. The reporter plasmid was used to screen seven predicted signal peptides in B. bifidum S17 and B. longum E18. The tested signal peptides differed substantially in their efficacy to mediate protein secretion in different host strains. An efficient signal peptide was used for expression and secretion of a therapeutically relevant protein in B. bifidum S17. Expression of a secreted cytosine deaminase led to a 100-fold reduced sensitivity of B. bifidum S17 to 5-fluorocytosine compared to the non-secreted cytosine deaminase suggesting efficient conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to the cytotoxic cancer drug 5-fluorouracil by cytosine deaminase occurred outside the bacterial cell. Selection of appropriate signal peptides for defined protein secretion might improve therapeutic efficacy as well as probiotic properties of bifidobacteria. PMID:26086721

  16. Complex Function for SicA, a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Type III Secretion-Associated Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Stephanie C.; Galán, Jorge E.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica encodes a type III secretion system within a pathogenicity island located at centisome 63 that is essential for virulence. All type III secretion systems require the function of a family of low-molecular-weight proteins that aid the secretion process by acting as partitioning factors and/or secretion pilots. One such protein is SicA, which is encoded immediately upstream of the type III secreted proteins SipB and SipC. We found that the absence of SicA results in the degradation of both SipB and SipC. Interestingly, in the absence of SipC, SipB was not only stable but also secreted at wild-type levels in a sicA mutant background, indicating that SicA is not required for SipB secretion. We also found that SicA is capable of binding both SipB and SipC. These results are consistent with a SicA role as a partitioning factor for SipB and SipC, thereby preventing their premature association and degradation. We also found that introduction of a sicA null mutation results in the lack of expression of SopE, another type III-secreted protein. Such an effect was shown to be transcriptional. Introduction of a loss-of-function sipC mutation into the sicA mutant background rescued sopE expression. These results indicate that the effect of sicA on sopE expression is indirect and most likely exerted through a regulatory factor(s) partitioned by SicA from SipC. These studies therefore describe a surprisingly complex function for the Salmonella enterica type III secretion-associated chaperone SicA. PMID:10735870

  17. Differential regulation of type III secretion and virulence genes in Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica by a secreted anti-σ factor

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Umesh; Shokeen, Bhumika; Cheng, Ning; Cho, Yeonjoo; Blum, Charles; Coppola, Giovanni; Miller, Jeff F.

    2016-01-01

    The BvgAS phosphorelay regulates ∼10% of the annotated genomes of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica and controls their infectious cycles. The hierarchical organization of the regulatory network allows the integration of contextual signals to control all or specific subsets of BvgAS-regulated genes. Here, we characterize a regulatory node involving a type III secretion system (T3SS)-exported protein, BtrA, and demonstrate its role in determining fundamental differences in T3SS phenotypes among Bordetella species. We show that BtrA binds and antagonizes BtrS, a BvgAS-regulated extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, to couple the secretory activity of the T3SS apparatus to gene expression. In B. bronchiseptica, a remarkable spectrum of expression states can be resolved by manipulating btrA, encompassing over 80 BtrA-activated loci that include genes encoding toxins, adhesins, and other cell surface proteins, and over 200 BtrA-repressed genes that encode T3SS apparatus components, secretion substrates, the BteA effector, and numerous additional factors. In B. pertussis, BtrA retains activity as a BtrS antagonist and exerts tight negative control over T3SS genes. Most importantly, deletion of btrA in B. pertussis revealed T3SS-mediated, BteA-dependent cytotoxicity, which had previously eluded detection. This effect was observed in laboratory strains and in clinical isolates from a recent California pertussis epidemic. We propose that the BtrA-BtrS regulatory node determines subspecies-specific differences in T3SS expression among Bordetella species and that B. pertussis is capable of expressing a full range of T3SS-dependent phenotypes in the presence of appropriate contextual cues. PMID:26884180

  18. Differential regulation of type III secretion and virulence genes in Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica by a secreted anti-σ factor.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Umesh; Shokeen, Bhumika; Cheng, Ning; Cho, Yeonjoo; Blum, Charles; Coppola, Giovanni; Miller, Jeff F

    2016-03-01

    The BvgAS phosphorelay regulates ∼10% of the annotated genomes of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica and controls their infectious cycles. The hierarchical organization of the regulatory network allows the integration of contextual signals to control all or specific subsets of BvgAS-regulated genes. Here, we characterize a regulatory node involving a type III secretion system (T3SS)-exported protein, BtrA, and demonstrate its role in determining fundamental differences in T3SS phenotypes among Bordetella species. We show that BtrA binds and antagonizes BtrS, a BvgAS-regulated extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, to couple the secretory activity of the T3SS apparatus to gene expression. In B. bronchiseptica, a remarkable spectrum of expression states can be resolved by manipulating btrA, encompassing over 80 BtrA-activated loci that include genes encoding toxins, adhesins, and other cell surface proteins, and over 200 BtrA-repressed genes that encode T3SS apparatus components, secretion substrates, the BteA effector, and numerous additional factors. In B. pertussis, BtrA retains activity as a BtrS antagonist and exerts tight negative control over T3SS genes. Most importantly, deletion of btrA in B. pertussis revealed T3SS-mediated, BteA-dependent cytotoxicity, which had previously eluded detection. This effect was observed in laboratory strains and in clinical isolates from a recent California pertussis epidemic. We propose that the BtrA-BtrS regulatory node determines subspecies-specific differences in T3SS expression among Bordetella species and that B. pertussis is capable of expressing a full range of T3SS-dependent phenotypes in the presence of appropriate contextual cues.

  19. Plant flavonoids target Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 flagella and type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Paola; Farias, Gabriela A; Nogales, Joaquina; Prada, Harold; Carvajal, Vivian; Barón, Matilde; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta; Olmedilla, Adela; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2013-12-01

    Flavonoids are among the most abundant plant secondary metabolites involved in plant protection against pathogens, but micro-organisms have developed resistance mechanisms to those compounds. We previously demonstrated that the MexAB-OprM efflux pump mediates resistance of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 to flavonoids, facilitating its survival and the colonization of the host. Here, we have shown that tomato plants respond to Pto infection producing flavonoids and other phenolic compounds. The effects of flavonoids on key traits of this model plant-pathogen bacterium have also been investigated observing that they reduce Pto swimming and swarming because of the loss of flagella, and also inhibited the expression and assembly of a functional type III secretion system. Those effects were more severe in a mutant lacking the MexAB-OprM pump. Our results suggest that flavonoids inhibit the function of the GacS/GacA two-component system, causing a depletion of rsmY RNA, therefore affecting the synthesis of two important virulence factors in Pto DC3000, flagella and the type III secretion system. These data provide new insights into the flavonoid role in the molecular dialog between host and pathogen.

  20. The insect endosymbiont Sodalis glossinidius utilizes a type III secretion system for cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Colin; Young, Simon A.; Haydon, Daniel T.; Welburn, Susan C.

    2001-01-01

    Sodalis glossinidius is a maternally transmitted secondary endosymbiont residing intracellularly in tissues of the tsetse flies, Glossina spp. In this study, we have used Tn5 mutagenesis and a negative selection procedure to derive a S. glossinidius mutant that is incapable of invading insect cells in vitro and is aposymbiotic when microinjected into tsetse. This mutant strain harbors Tn5 integrated into a chromosomal gene sharing high sequence identity with a type III secretion system invasion gene (invC) previously identified in Salmonella enterica. With the use of degenerate PCR, we have amplified a further six Sodalis inv/spa genes sharing high sequence identity with type III secretion system genes encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 1. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on the inv/spa genes of Sodalis and other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae have consistently identified a well-supported clade containing Sodalis and the enteric pathogens Shigella and Salmonella. These results suggest that Sodalis may have evolved from an ancestor with a parasitic intracellular lifestyle, possibly a latter-day entomopathogen. These observations lend credence to a hypothesis suggesting that vertically transmitted mutualistic endosymbionts evolve from horizontally transmitted parasites through a parasitism–mutualism continuum. PMID:11172045

  1. Pore-forming Activity of the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Protein EspD*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Caballero-Franco, Celia; Bakker, Dannika; Totten, Stephanie; Jardim, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is a causative agent of gastrointestinal and diarrheal diseases. Pathogenesis associated with enterohemorrhagic E. coli involves direct delivery of virulence factors from the bacteria into epithelial cell cytosol via a syringe-like organelle known as the type III secretion system. The type III secretion system protein EspD is a critical factor required for formation of a translocation pore on the host cell membrane. Here, we show that recombinant EspD spontaneously integrates into large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) lipid bilayers; however, pore formation required incorporation of anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine and an acidic pH. Leakage assays performed with fluorescent dextrans confirmed that EspD formed a structure with an inner diameter of ∼2.5 nm. Protease mapping indicated that the two transmembrane helical hairpin of EspD penetrated the lipid layer positioning the N- and C-terminal domains on the extralumenal surface of LUVs. Finally, a combination of glutaraldehyde cross-linking and rate zonal centrifugation suggested that EspD in LUV membranes forms an ∼280–320-kDa oligomeric structure consisting of ∼6–7 subunits. PMID:26324713

  2. The type III protein secretion system contributes to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several bacterial plant pathogens colonize their hosts through the secretion of effector proteins by a Type III protein secretion system (T3SS). The role of T3SS in bacterial pathogenesis is well established but whether this system is involved in multicellular processes, such as bacterial biofilm formation has not been elucidated. Here, the phytopathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (X. citri) was used as a model to gain further insights about the role of the T3SS in biofilm formation. Results The capacity of biofilm formation of different X. citri T3SS mutants was compared to the wild type strain and it was observed that this secretion system was necessary for this process. Moreover, the T3SS mutants adhered proficiently to leaf surfaces but were impaired in leaf-associated growth. A proteomic study of biofilm cells showed that the lack of the T3SS causes changes in the expression of proteins involved in metabolic processes, energy generation, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and bacterial motility as well as outer membrane proteins. Furthermore, EPS production and bacterial motility were also altered in the T3SS mutants. Conclusions Our results indicate a novel role for T3SS in X. citri in the modulation of biofilm formation. Since this process increases X. citri virulence, this study reveals new functions of T3SS in pathogenesis. PMID:24742141

  3. Edwardsiella tarda-Induced Cytotoxicity Depends on Its Type III Secretion System and Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hai-Xia; Lu, Jin-Fang; Rolhion, Nathalie; Holden, David W.; Zhou, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria utilize a type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate virulence proteins into host cells to cause diseases. In responding to infection, macrophages detect some of the translocated proteins to activate caspase-1-mediated cell death, called pyroptosis, and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines to control the infection. Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative enteric pathogen that causes hemorrhagic septicemia in fish and both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal infections in humans. In this study, we report that the T3SS of E. tarda facilitates its survival and replication in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, and E. tarda infection triggers pyroptosis of infected macrophages from mice and fish and increased secretion of the cytokine interleukin 1β in a T3SS-dependent manner. Deletion of the flagellin gene fliC of E. tarda results in decreased cytotoxicity for infected macrophages and does not attenuate its virulence in a fish model of infection, whereas upregulated expression of FliC in the fliC mutant strain reduces its virulence. We propose that the host controls E. tarda infection partially by detecting FliC translocated by the T3SS, whereas the bacteria downregulate the expression of FliC to evade innate immunity. PMID:24891103

  4. Hfq negatively regulates type III secretion in EHEC and several other pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Shakhnovich, Elizabeth A.; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Hfq is a conserved RNA-binding protein that regulates diverse cellular processes through post-transcriptional control of gene expression, often by functioning as a chaperone for regulatory sRNAs. Here, we explored the role of Hfq in enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), a group of non-invasive intestinal pathogens. EHEC virulence is dependent on a Type III secretion system encoded in the LEE pathogenicity island. The abundance of transcripts for all 41 LEE genes and more than half of confirmed non-LEE-encoded T3 effectors were elevated in an EHEC hfq deletion mutant. Thus, Hfq promotes coordinated expression of the LEE-encoded T3S apparatus and both LEE- and non-LEE-encoded effectors. Increased transcript levels led to the formation of functional secretion complexes capable of secreting high quantities of effectors into the supernatant. The increase in LEE-derived transcripts and proteins was dependent on Ler, the LEE-encoded transcriptional activator, and the ler transcript appears to be a direct target of Hfq-mediated negative regulation. Finally, we found that Hfq contributes to the negative regulation of T3SSs in several other pathogens, suggesting that Hfq, potentially along with species-specific sRNAs, underlies a common means to prevent unfettered expression of T3SSs. PMID:19703108

  5. Type III secretion system expression in oxygen-limited Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures is stimulated by isocitrate lyase activity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jade C. S.; Rzhepishevska, Olena; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Welch, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and a common cause of chronic infections in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Oxygen limitation was recently reported to regulate the expression of a major virulence determinant in P. aeruginosa, the type III secretion system (T3SS). Here, we show that expression of the T3SS in oxygen-limited growth conditions is strongly dependent on the glyoxylate shunt enzyme, isocitrate lyase (ICL; encoded by aceA), which was previously shown to be highly expressed in CF isolates. ICL-dependent regulation of the T3SS did not alter the expression level of the master transcriptional regulator, ExsA, but did affect expression of the T3 structural proteins, effectors and regulators (ExsC, ExsD and ExsE). An aceA mutant displayed enhanced biofilm formation during anaerobic growth, which suggested that AceA-dependent modulation of type III secretion might impinge upon the RetS/LadS signalling pathways. Indeed, our data suggest that RetS is able to mediate some of its effects through AceA, as expression of aceA in trans partially restored T3SS expression in a retS mutant. Our findings indicate that AceA is a key player in the metabolic regulation of T3SS expression during oxygen-limited growth of P. aeruginosa. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that the T3SS can be regulated by factors that do not affect ExsA expression levels. PMID:23363478

  6. Functional relatedness in the Inv/Mxi-Spa type III secretion system family.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jessica A; Dave, Biren M; Raphenya, Amogelang R; McArthur, Andrew G; Knodler, Leigh A

    2017-03-01

    Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs) are structurally conserved nanomachines that span the inner and outer bacterial membranes, and via a protruding needle complex contact host cell membranes and deliver type III effector proteins. T3SS are phylogenetically divided into several families based on structural basal body components. Here we have studied the evolutionary and functional conservation of four T3SS proteins from the Inv/Mxi-Spa family: a cytosolic chaperone, two hydrophobic translocators that form a plasma membrane-integral pore, and the hydrophilic 'tip complex' translocator that connects the T3SS needle to the translocon pore. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), a common cause of food-borne gastroenteritis, possesses two T3SSs, one belonging to the Inv/Mxi-Spa family. We used invasion-deficient S. Typhimurium mutants as surrogates for expression of translocator orthologs identified from an extensive phylogenetic analysis, and type III effector translocation and host cell invasion as a readout for complementation efficiency, and identified several Inv/Mxi-Spa orthologs that can functionally substitute for the S. Typhimurium chaperone and translocator proteins. Functional complementation correlates with amino acid sequence identity between orthologs, but varies considerably between the four proteins. This is the first in-depth survey of the functional interchangeability of Inv/Mxi-Spa T3SS proteins acting directly at the host-pathogen interface.

  7. The Type III Secretion System Effector SptP of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rebecca; Byrne, Alexander; Berger, Cedric N.; Klemm, Elizabeth; Crepin, Valerie F.; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Strains of the various Salmonella enterica serovars cause gastroenteritis or typhoid fever in humans, with virulence depending on the action of two type III secretion systems (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1] and SPI-2). SptP is a Salmonella SPI-1 effector, involved in mediating recovery of the host cytoskeleton postinfection. SptP requires a chaperone, SicP, for stability and secretion. SptP has 94% identity between S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. Typhi; direct comparison of the protein sequences revealed that S. Typhi SptP has numerous amino acid changes within its chaperone-binding domain. Subsequent comparison of ΔsptP S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium strains demonstrated that, unlike SptP in S. Typhimurium, SptP in S. Typhi was not involved in invasion or cytoskeletal recovery postinfection. Investigation of whether the observed amino acid changes within SptP of S. Typhi affected its function revealed that S. Typhi SptP was unable to complement S. Typhimurium ΔsptP due to an absence of secretion. We further demonstrated that while S. Typhimurium SptP is stable intracellularly within S. Typhi, S. Typhi SptP is unstable, although stability could be recovered following replacement of the chaperone-binding domain with that of S. Typhimurium. Direct assessment of the strength of the interaction between SptP and SicP of both serovars via bacterial two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that S. Typhi SptP has a significantly weaker interaction with SicP than the equivalent proteins in S. Typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest that changes within the chaperone-binding domain of SptP in S. Typhi hinder binding to its chaperone, resulting in instability, preventing translocation, and therefore restricting the intracellular activity of this effector. IMPORTANCE Studies investigating Salmonella pathogenesis typically rely on Salmonella Typhimurium, even though Salmonella Typhi causes the more severe disease in humans. As such, an understanding of

  8. Structure of the Yersinia pestis type III secretion chaperone SycH in complex with a stable fragment of YscM2

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Jason; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2010-11-16

    Pathogenic Yersinia species use a type III secretion system to inject cytotoxic effector proteins directly into the cytosol of mammalian cells, where they neutralize the innate immune response by interfering with the signal-transduction pathways that control phagocytosis and inflammation. To be exported efficiently, some effectors must transiently associate with cognate cytoplasmic secretion chaperones. SycH is the chaperone for YopH, a potent eukaryotic-like protein tyrosine phosphatase that is essential for virulence. SycH also binds two negative regulators of type III secretion, YscM1 and YscM2, both of which share significant sequence homology with the chaperone-binding domain of YopH. Here, the structure of a complex between SycH and a stable fragment of YscM2 that was designed on the basis of limited proteolysis experiments is presented. The overall fold of SycH is very similar to the structures of other homodimeric secretion chaperones that have been determined to date. YscM2 wraps around SycH in an extended fashion, with some secondary but no tertiary structure, assuming a conformation distinct from the globular fold that it is predicted to adopt in the absence of SycH.

  9. A Novel Periplasmic Protein, VrpA, Contributes to Efficient Protein Secretion by the Type III Secretion System in Xanthomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Hu, Xiufang; Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2015-02-01

    Efficient secretion of type III effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to host cell cytosol via a type III secretion system (T3SS) is crucial for virulence of plant-pathogenic bacterium. Our previous study revealed a conserved hypothetical protein, virulence-related periplasm protein A (VrpA), which was identified as a critical virulence factor for Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. In this study, we demonstrate that mutation of vrpA compromises X. citri subsp. citri virulence and hypersensitive response induction. This deficiency is also observed in the X. campestris pv. campestris strain, suggesting a functional conservation of VrpA in Xanthomonas spp. Our study indicates that VrpA is required for efficient protein secretion via T3SS, which is supported by multiple lines of evidence. A CyaA reporter assay shows that VrpA is involved in type III effector secretion; quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis suggests that the vrpA mutant fails to activate citrus-canker-susceptible gene CsLOB1, which is transcriptionally activated by transcription activator-like effector PthA4; in vitro secretion study reveals that VrpA plays an important role in secretion of T3SS pilus, translocon, and effector proteins. Our data also indicate that VrpA in X. citri subsp. citri localizes to bacterial periplasmic space and the periplasmic localization is required for full function of VrpA and X. citri subsp. citri virulence. Protein-protein interaction studies show that VrpA physically interacts with periplasmic T3SS components HrcJ and HrcC. However, the mutation of VrpA does not affect T3SS gene expression. Additionally, VrpA is involved in X. citri subsp. citri tolerance of oxidative stress. Our data contribute to the mechanical understanding of an important periplasmic protein VrpA in Xanthomonas spp.

  10. Bacterial flagella and Type III secretion: case studies in the evolution of complexity.

    PubMed

    Pallen, M J; Gophna, U

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial flagella at first sight appear uniquely sophisticated in structure, so much so that they have even been considered 'irreducibly complex' by the intelligent design movement. However, a more detailed analysis reveals that these remarkable pieces of molecular machinery are the product of processes that are fully compatible with Darwinian evolution. In this chapter we present evidence for such processes, based on a review of experimental studies, molecular phylogeny and microbial genomics. Several processes have played important roles in flagellar evolution: self-assembly of simple repeating subunits, gene duplication with subsequent divergence, recruitment of elements from other systems ('molecular bricolage'), and recombination. We also discuss additional tentative new assignments of homology (FliG with MgtE, FliO with YscJ). In conclusion, rather than providing evidence of intelligent design, flagellar and non-flagellar Type III secretion systems instead provide excellent case studies in the evolution of complex systems from simpler components.

  11. The type III secretion system as a source of novel antibacterial drug targets.

    PubMed

    Kline, Toni; Felise, Heather B; Sanowar, Sarah; Miller, Samuel I

    2012-03-01

    Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs) are highly organized multi-protein nanomachines which translocate effector proteins from the bacterial cytosol directly into host cells. These systems are required for the pathogenesis of a wide array of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, and thus have attracted attention as potential antibacterial drug targets. A decade of research has enabled the identification of natural products, conventional small molecule drug-like structures, and proteins that inhibit T3SSs. The mechanism(s) of action and molecular target(s) of the majority of these inhibitors remain to be determined. At the same time, structural biology methods are providing an increasingly detailed picture of the functional arrangement of the T3SS component proteins. The confluence of these two research areas may ultimately identify non-classical drug targets and facilitate the development of novel therapeutics.

  12. Computational Analysis and Binding Site Identification of Type III Secretion System ATPase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Dash, Raju; Hosen, S M Zahid; Sultana, Tasniha; Junaid, Md; Majumder, Mohuya; Ishat, Ismat Ara; Uddin, Mir Muhammad Nasir

    2016-12-01

    In many gram-negative bacteria, the type III secretion system (T3SS), as a virulence factor, is an attractive target for developing novel antibacterial. Regarding this, in our study, we aimed to identify the putative drug target for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, considering ATPase enzyme involved in the type III secretion system. Selective protein sequence of P. aeruginosa involved in the T3SS was retrieved from NCBI databases, and its homologues were subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Its association in T3SS was analyzed via STRING, and the 3D structure was determined by means of homology modeling followed by intensive optimization and validation. The binding site was predicted by 3DLigandSite and examined through molecular docking simulation by Autodock Vina with salicylidene acylhydrazide class of virulence-blocking compounds. PROCHECK analysis showed that 96.7 % of the residues were in the most favored regions, 1.9 % were in the additional allowed region, and 1.4 % were in the generously allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. The refined model yielded ERRAT scores of 88.124 and Verify3D value of 0.2, which indicates that the environmental profile of the model is good. The best binding affinity was observed by ME0055 compound, and ALA160, ALA161, GlY162, GLY163, GLY164, GLY165, SER166, THR167, TYR338, and PRO339 residues were found to be having complementary in the ligand-binding site. However, these findings should be further confirmed by wet lab studies for design a targeted therapeutic agent.

  13. Structural Analysis of a Specialized Type III Secretion System Peptidoglycan-cleaving Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Deng, Wanyin; Lameignère, Emilie; Wasney, Gregory A.; Zhu, Haizhong; Worrall, Liam J.; Finlay, B. Brett; Strynadka, Natalie C.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium enteropathogenic Escherichia coli uses a syringe-like type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence or “effector” proteins into the cytoplasm of host intestinal epithelial cells. To assemble, the T3SS must traverse both bacterial membranes, as well as the peptidoglycan layer. Peptidoglycan is made of repeating N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine disaccharides cross-linked by pentapeptides to form a tight mesh barrier. Assembly of many macromolecular machines requires a dedicated peptidoglycan lytic enzyme (PG-lytic enzyme) to locally clear peptidoglycan. Here we have solved the first structure of a T3SS-associated PG-lytic enzyme, EtgA from enteropathogenic E. coli. Unexpectedly, the active site of EtgA has features in common with both lytic transglycosylases and hen egg white lysozyme. Most notably, the β-hairpin region resembles that of lysozyme and contains an aspartate that aligns with lysozyme Asp-52 (a residue critical for catalysis), a conservation not observed in other previously characterized lytic transglycosylase families to which the conserved T3SS enzymes had been presumed to belong. Mutation of the EtgA catalytic glutamate, Glu-42, conserved across lytic transglycosylases and hen egg white lysozyme, and this differentiating aspartate diminishes type III secretion in vivo, supporting its essential role in clearing the peptidoglycan for T3SS assembly. Finally, we show that EtgA forms a 1:1 complex with the building block of the polymerized T3SS inner rod component, EscI, and that this interaction enhances PG-lytic activity of EtgA in vitro, collectively providing the necessary strict localization and regulation of the lytic activity to prevent overall cell lysis. PMID:25678709

  14. Expression patterns of Wnt signaling component, secreted frizzled‑related protein 3 in astrocytoma and glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Varošanec, Ana Maria; Marković, Leon; Krsnik, Željka; Njirić, Niko; Mrak, Goran

    2016-05-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (SFRP3) is a member of the family of soluble proteins, which modulate the Wnt signaling cascade. Novel research has identified aberrant expression of SFRPs in different types of cancer. In the present study the expression intensities and localizations of the SFRP3 protein across different histopathological grades of astrocytic brain tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry, digital scanning and image analysis. The results demonstrated that the differences between expression levels and malignancy grades were statistically significant. Tumors were classified into four malignancy grades according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Moderate (P=0.014) and strong (P=0.028) nuclear expression levels were significantly different in pilocytic (grade I) and diffuse (grade II) astrocytomas demonstrating higher expression values, as compared with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma (grade IV). When the sample was divided into two groups, the moderate and high cytoplasmic expression levels were observed to be significantly higher in glioblastomas than in the group comprising astrocytoma II and III. Furthermore, the results indicated that high grade tumors were associated with lower values of moderate (P=0.002) and strong (P=0.018) nuclear expression in comparison to low grade tumors. Analysis of cytoplasmic staining demonstrated that strong cytoplasmic expression was significantly higher in the astrocytoma III and IV group than in the astrocytoma I and II group (P=0.048). Furthermore, lower grade astrocytomas exhibited reduced membranous SFRP3 staining when compared with higher grade astrocytomas and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.036). The present results demonstrated that SFRP3 protein expression levels were decreased in the nucleus in higher grade astrocytoma (indicating the expected behavior of an antagonist of Wnt signaling), whereas when the SFRP3 was located in the

  15. Expression patterns of Wnt signaling component, secreted frizzled-related protein 3 in astrocytoma and glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    PEĆINA-ŠLAUS, NIVES; KAFKA, ANJA; VAROŠANEC, ANA MARIA; MARKOVIĆ, LEON; KRSNIK, ŽELJKA; NJIRIĆ, NIKO; MRAK, GORAN

    2016-01-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (SFRP3) is a member of the family of soluble proteins, which modulate the Wnt signaling cascade. Novel research has identified aberrant expression of SFRPs in different types of cancer. In the present study the expression intensities and localizations of the SFRP3 protein across different histopathological grades of astrocytic brain tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry, digital scanning and image analysis. The results demonstrated that the differences between expression levels and malignancy grades were statistically significant. Tumors were classified into four malignancy grades according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Moderate (P=0.014) and strong (P=0.028) nuclear expression levels were significantly different in pilocytic (grade I) and diffuse (grade II) astrocytomas demonstrating higher expression values, as compared with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma (grade IV). When the sample was divided into two groups, the moderate and high cytoplasmic expression levels were observed to be significantly higher in glioblastomas than in the group comprising astrocytoma II and III. Furthermore, the results indicated that high grade tumors were associated with lower values of moderate (P=0.002) and strong (P=0.018) nuclear expression in comparison to low grade tumors. Analysis of cytoplasmic staining demonstrated that strong cytoplasmic expression was significantly higher in the astrocytoma III and IV group than in the astrocytoma I and II group (P=0.048). Furthermore, lower grade astrocytomas exhibited reduced membranous SFRP3 staining when compared with higher grade astrocytomas and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.036). The present results demonstrated that SFRP3 protein expression levels were decreased in the nucleus in higher grade astrocytoma (indicating the expected behavior of an antagonist of Wnt signaling), whereas when the SFRP3 was located in the cytoplasm an

  16. Potassium transport of Salmonella is important for type III secretion and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yehao; Ho, Katharina Kim; Su, Jing; Gong, Hao; Chang, Alexander C; Lu, Sangwei

    2013-08-01

    Intracellular cations are essential for the physiology of all living organisms including bacteria. Cations such as potassium ion (K(+)), sodium ion (Na(+)) and proton (H(+)) are involved in nearly all aspects of bacterial growth and survival. K(+) is the most abundant cation and its homeostasis in Escherichia coli and Salmonella is regulated by three major K(+) transporters: high affinity transporter Kdp and low affinity transporters Kup and Trk. Previous studies have demonstrated the roles of cations and cation transport in the physiology of Escherichia coli; their roles in the virulence and physiology of pathogenic bacteria are not well characterized. We have previously reported that the Salmonella K(+) transporter Trk is important for the secretion of effector proteins of the type III secretion system (TTSS) of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Here we further explore the role of Salmonella cation transport in virulence in vitro and pathogenesis in animal models. Impairment of K(+) transport through deletion of K(+) transporters or exposure to the chemical modulators of cation transport, gramicidin and valinomycin, results in a severe defect in the TTSS of SPI-1, and this defect in the TTSS was not due to a failure to regulate intrabacterial pH or ATP. Our results also show that K(+) transporters are critical to the pathogenesis of Salmonella in mice and chicks and are involved in multiple growth and virulence characteristics in vitro, including protein secretion, motility and invasion of epithelial cells. These results suggest that cation transport of the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella, especially K(+) transport, contributes to its virulence in addition to previously characterized roles in maintaining homeostasis of bacteria.

  17. The Type III Secretion System Effector SptP of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca; Byrne, Alexander; Berger, Cedric N; Klemm, Elizabeth; Crepin, Valerie F; Dougan, Gordon; Frankel, Gad

    2017-02-15

    Strains of the various Salmonella enterica serovars cause gastroenteritis or typhoid fever in humans, with virulence depending on the action of two type III secretion systems (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1] and SPI-2). SptP is a Salmonella SPI-1 effector, involved in mediating recovery of the host cytoskeleton postinfection. SptP requires a chaperone, SicP, for stability and secretion. SptP has 94% identity between S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S Typhi; direct comparison of the protein sequences revealed that S Typhi SptP has numerous amino acid changes within its chaperone-binding domain. Subsequent comparison of ΔsptP S Typhi and S. Typhimurium strains demonstrated that, unlike SptP in S. Typhimurium, SptP in S Typhi was not involved in invasion or cytoskeletal recovery postinfection. Investigation of whether the observed amino acid changes within SptP of S Typhi affected its function revealed that S Typhi SptP was unable to complement S. Typhimurium ΔsptP due to an absence of secretion. We further demonstrated that while S. Typhimurium SptP is stable intracellularly within S Typhi, S Typhi SptP is unstable, although stability could be recovered following replacement of the chaperone-binding domain with that of S. Typhimurium. Direct assessment of the strength of the interaction between SptP and SicP of both serovars via bacterial two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that S Typhi SptP has a significantly weaker interaction with SicP than the equivalent proteins in S. Typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest that changes within the chaperone-binding domain of SptP in S Typhi hinder binding to its chaperone, resulting in instability, preventing translocation, and therefore restricting the intracellular activity of this effector.

  18. Modulation of Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Involvement of the PA4857 Gene Product

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Miao; Zhao, Jingru; Kang, Huaping; Kong, Weina; Zhao, Yuanyu; Wu, Min; Liang, Haihua

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious acute or chronic infections in humans. Acute infections typically involve the type III secretion systems (T3SSs) and bacterial motility, whereas chronic infections are often associated with biofilm formation and the type VI secretion system. To identify new genes required for pathogenesis, a transposon mutagenesis library was constructed and the gene PA4857, named tspR, was found to modulate T3SS gene expression. Deletion of P. aeruginosa tspR reduced the virulence in a mouse acute lung infection model and diminished cytotoxicity. Suppression of T3SS gene expression in the tspR mutant resulted from compromised translation of the T3SS master regulator ExsA. TspR negatively regulated two small RNAs, RsmY and RsmZ, which control RsmA. Our data demonstrated that defects in T3SS expression and biofilm formation in retS mutant could be partially restored by overexpression of tspR. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the newly identified retS-tspR pathway is coordinated with the retS-gacS system, which regulates the genes associated with acute and chronic infections and controls the lifestyle choice of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26858696

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses type III secretion system to kill biofilm-associated amoebae.

    PubMed

    Matz, Carsten; Moreno, Ana Maria; Alhede, Morten; Manefield, Mike; Hauser, Alan R; Givskov, Michael; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2008-08-01

    Bacteria and protozoa coexist in a wide range of biofilm communities of natural, technical and medical importance. Generally, this interaction is characterized by the extensive grazing activity of protozoa on bacterial prey populations. We hypothesized that the close spatial coexistence in biofilms should allow opportunistic pathogenic bacteria to utilize their eukaryote-targeting arsenal to attack and exploit protozoan host cells. Studying cocultures of the environmental pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, we found that P. aeruginosa rapidly colonized and killed biofilm-associated amoebae by a quorum-sensing independent mechanism. Analysis of the amoeba-induced transcriptome indicated the involvement of the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system (T3SS) in this interaction. A comparison of mutants with specific defects in the T3SS demonstrated the use of the secretion apparatus and the effectors ExoU, ExoS and ExoT in the killing process, of which ExoU had the greatest impact. T3SS-mediated virulence towards A. castellanii was found to be controlled by the global regulators RpoN and RpoS and through modulation of cAMP and alginate biosynthesis. Our findings suggest that conserved virulence pathways and specifically the T3SS play a central role in bacteria-protozoa interactions in biofilms and may be instrumental for the environmental persistence and evolution of opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

  20. a Computational Approach to Explore Protein Translocation Through Type III Secretion Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi; Im, Wonpil

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria initiate infections by injecting effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) that is comprised of a basal body, a needle, and a tip. The needle channel is formed by the assembly of a single needle protein. To explore the export mechanisms of MxiH needle protein through the needle of Shigella flexneri, an essential step during needle assembly, we have performed steered molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent. Interestingly, the electronegative channel interior creates an energy barrier for MxiH to enter the channel, while the same may facilitate the ejection of the effectors into host cells. Structurally-known basal regions and ATPase underneath the basal region have also such electronegative interior, while effector proteins have considerable electronegative patches on their surfaces. Based on these observations, we propose a repulsive electrostatic mechanism for protein translocation through the TTSA. This mechanism is supported by the suggestion that an ATPase is required for protein translocation through these nanomachines, which may provide the energy to overcome the initial electrostatic energy barrier. A similar mechanism may be applicable to macromolecular channels in other secretion systems or viruses through which proteins or nucleic acids are transported.

  1. The Salmonella Type III Secretion System Inner Rod Protein PrgJ Is Partially Folded*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Dalian; Lefebre, Matthew; Kaur, Kawaljit; McDowell, Melanie A.; Gdowski, Courtney; Jo, Sunhwan; Wang, Yu; Benedict, Stephen H.; Lea, Susan M.; Galan, Jorge E.; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2012-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential in the pathogenesis of many bacteria. The inner rod is important in the assembly of the T3SS needle complex. However, the atomic structure of the inner rod protein is currently unknown. Based on computational methods, others have suggested that the Salmonella inner rod protein PrgJ is highly helical, forming a folded 3 helix structure. Here we show by CD and NMR spectroscopy that the monomeric form of PrgJ lacks a tertiary structure, and the only well-structured part of PrgJ is a short α-helix at the C-terminal region from residues 65–82. Disruption of this helix by glycine or proline mutation resulted in defective assembly of the needle complex, rendering bacteria incapable of secreting effector proteins. Likewise, CD and NMR data for the Shigella inner rod protein MxiI indicate this protein lacks a tertiary structure as well. Our results reveal that the monomeric forms of the T3SS inner rod proteins are partially folded. PMID:22654099

  2. Pathogenic Lifestyles of E. coli Pathotypes in a Standardized Epithelial Cell Model Influence Inflammatory Signaling Pathways and Cytokines Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villamil, Javier; Tapia-Pastrana, Gabriela; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    cytokine regulation; and (iii) the intracellular bacteria that induce the highest pathways activation and cytokines secretion by using different activation mechanisms. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of how the different pathogenesis schemes of E. coli pathotypes manipulate inflammatory signaling pathways, which leads to a specific proinflammatory cytokine secretion in a cell model infection that reproduce the hallmarks of infection of each pathotype. PMID:27774437

  3. Secret Key Agreement by Soft-Decision of Signals in Gaussian Maurer's Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Masashi; Watanabe, Shun; Matsumoto, Ryutaroh; Uyematsu, Tomohiko

    We consider the problem of secret key agreement in Gaussian Maurer's Model. In Gaussian Maurer's model, legitimate receivers, Alice and Bob, and a wire-tapper, Eve, receive signals randomly generated by a satellite through three independent memoryless Gaussian channels respectively. Then Alice and Bob generate a common secret key from their received signals. In this model, we propose a protocol for generating a common secret key by using the result of soft-decision of Alice and Bob's received signals. Then, we calculate a lower bound on the secret key rate in our proposed protocol. As a result of comparison with the protocol that only uses hard-decision, we found that the higher rate is obtained by using our protocol.

  4. IscR Is Essential for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Type III Secretion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Halie K.; Kwuan, Laura; Schwiesow, Leah; Bernick, David L.; Mettert, Erin; Ramirez, Hector A.; Ragle, James M.; Chan, Patricia P.; Kiley, Patricia J.; Lowe, Todd M.; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are essential for virulence in dozens of pathogens, but are not required for growth outside the host. Therefore, the T3SS of many bacterial species are under tight regulatory control. To increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind T3SS regulation, we performed a transposon screen to identify genes important for T3SS function in the food-borne pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. We identified two unique transposon insertions in YPTB2860, a gene that displays 79% identity with the E. coli iron-sulfur cluster regulator, IscR. A Y. pseudotuberculosis iscR in-frame deletion mutant (ΔiscR) was deficient in secretion of Ysc T3SS effector proteins and in targeting macrophages through the T3SS. To determine the mechanism behind IscR control of the Ysc T3SS, we carried out transcriptome and bioinformatic analysis to identify Y. pseudotuberculosis genes regulated by IscR. We discovered a putative IscR binding motif upstream of the Y. pseudotuberculosis yscW-lcrF operon. As LcrF controls transcription of a number of critical T3SS genes in Yersinia, we hypothesized that Yersinia IscR may control the Ysc T3SS through LcrF. Indeed, purified IscR bound to the identified yscW-lcrF promoter motif and mRNA levels of lcrF and 24 other T3SS genes were reduced in Y. pseudotuberculosis in the absence of IscR. Importantly, mice orally infected with the Y. pseudotuberculosis ΔiscR mutant displayed decreased bacterial burden in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleens, and livers, indicating an essential role for IscR in Y. pseudotuberculosis virulence. This study presents the first characterization of Yersinia IscR and provides evidence that IscR is critical for virulence and type III secretion through direct regulation of the T3SS master regulator, LcrF. PMID:24945271

  5. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  6. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  7. Ca²⁺ signaling and regulation of fluid secretion in salivary gland acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Ambudkar, Indu S

    2014-06-01

    Neurotransmitter stimulation of plasma membrane receptors stimulates salivary gland fluid secretion via a complex process that is determined by coordinated temporal and spatial regulation of several Ca(2+) signaling processes as well as ion flux systems. Studies over the past four decades have demonstrated that Ca(2+) is a critical factor in the control of salivary gland function. Importantly, critical components of this process have now been identified, including plasma membrane receptors, calcium channels, and regulatory proteins. The key event in activation of fluid secretion is an increase in intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i) triggered by IP3-induced release of Ca(2+) from ER via the IP3R. This increase regulates the ion fluxes required to drive vectorial fluid secretion. IP3Rs determine the site of initiation and the pattern of [Ca(2+)]i signal in the cell. However, Ca(2+) entry into the cell is required to sustain the elevation of [Ca(2+)]i and fluid secretion. This Ca(2+) influx pathway, store-operated calcium influx pathway (SOCE), has been studied in great detail and the regulatory mechanisms as well as key molecular components have now been identified. Orai1, TRPC1, and STIM1 are critical components of SOCE and among these, Ca(2+) entry via TRPC1 is a major determinant of fluid secretion. The receptor-evoked Ca(2+) signal in salivary gland acinar cells is unique in that it starts at the apical pole and then rapidly increases across the cell. The basis for the polarized Ca(2+) signal can be ascribed to the polarized arrangement of the Ca(2+) channels, transporters, and signaling proteins. Distinct localization of these proteins in the cell suggests compartmentalization of Ca(2+) signals during regulation of fluid secretion. This chapter will discuss new concepts and findings regarding the polarization and control of Ca(2+) signals in the regulation of fluid secretion.

  8. Cell signalling in insulin secretion: the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea.

    PubMed

    Seino, S

    2012-08-01

    Clarification of the molecular mechanisms of insulin secretion is crucial for understanding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of diabetes and for development of novel therapeutic strategies for the disease. Insulin secretion is regulated by various intracellular signals generated by nutrients and hormonal and neural inputs. In addition, a variety of glucose-lowering drugs including sulfonylureas, glinide-derivatives, and incretin-related drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are used for glycaemic control by targeting beta cell signalling for improved insulin secretion. There has been a remarkable increase in our understanding of the basis of beta cell signalling over the past two decades following the application of molecular biology, gene technology, electrophysiology and bioimaging to beta cell research. This review discusses cell signalling in insulin secretion, focusing on the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea, an essential metabolic signal in glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS), a critical signal in the potentiation of GIIS, and the commonly used glucose-lowering drug, respectively.

  9. Optimal secretion of alkali-tolerant xylanase in Bacillus subtilis by signal peptide screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yang, Mingming; Yang, Yuedong; Zhan, Jian; Zhou, Yaoqi; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Xylanases are industrially important enzymes for xylan digestion. We experimentally screened over 114 Sec and 24 Tat pathway signal peptides, with two different promoters, for optimal production of an alkaline active xylanase (XynBYG) from Bacillus pumilus BYG in a Bacillus subtilis host. Though both promoters yielded highly consistent secretion levels (0.97 Pearson correlation coefficient), the Sec pathway was found to be more efficient than the Tat pathway for XynBYG secretion. Furthermore, the optimal signal peptide (phoB) for XynBYG secretion was found to be different from the optimal peptides for cutinase and esterase reported in previous studies. A partial least squares regression analysis further identified several statistically important variables: helical properties, amino acid composition bias, and the discrimination score in Signal P. These variables explain the observed 23 % variance in the secretion yield of XynBYG by the different signal peptides. The results also suggest that the helical propensity of a signal peptide plays a significant role in the beta-rich xylanase, but not in the helix-rich cutinase, suggesting a coupling of the conformations between the signal peptide and its cargo protein for optimal secretion.

  10. Die another day: molecular mechanisms of effector-triggered immunity elicited by type III secreted effector proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial pathogens inject type III secreted effector (T3SE) proteins into their hosts where they display dual roles depending on the host genotype. T3SEs promote bacterial virulence in susceptible hosts, and elicit immunity in resistant hosts. T3SEs are typically recognized when they modify a host ...

  11. Functional and computational analysis of amino acid patterns predictive of type III secretion system substrates in Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs) deliver proteins called effectors into eukaryotic cells. Although N-terminal amino acid sequences are required for translocation, the mechanism of substrate recognition by the T3SS is unknown. Almost all actively deployed T3SS substrates in the plant path...

  12. Genetic analysis of the Salmonella enterica type III secretion-associated ATPase InvC defines discrete functional domains.

    PubMed

    Akeda, Yukihiro; Galán, Jorge E

    2004-04-01

    An essential component of all type III secretion systems is a highly conserved ATPase that shares significant amino acid sequence similarity to the beta subunit of the F(0)F(1) ATPases and is thought to provide the energy for the secretion process. We have performed a genetic and functional analysis of InvC, the ATPase associated with the Salmonella enterica type III secretion system encoded within its pathogenicity island 1. Through a mutagenesis analysis, we have identified amino acid residues that are essential for specific activities of InvC, such as nucleotide hydrolysis and membrane binding. This has allowed us to define discrete domains of InvC that are specifically associated with different essential activities of this protein.

  13. Determination of the Stoichiometry of the Complete Bacterial Type III Secretion Needle Complex Using a Combined Quantitative Proteomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Zilkenat, Susann; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Galán, Jorge E; Macek, Boris; Wagner, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Precisely knowing the stoichiometry of their components is critical for investigating structure, assembly, and function of macromolecular machines. This has remained a technical challenge in particular for large, hydrophobic membrane-spanning protein complexes. Here, we determined the stoichiometry of a type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium using two complementary protocols of gentle complex purification combined with peptide concatenated standard and synthetic stable isotope-labeled peptide-based mass spectrometry. Bacterial type III secretion systems are cell envelope-spanning effector protein-delivery machines essential for colonization and survival of many Gram-negative pathogens and symbionts. The membrane-embedded core unit of these secretion systems, termed the needle complex, is composed of a base that anchors the machinery to the inner and outer membranes, a hollow filament formed by inner rod and needle subunits that serves as conduit for substrate proteins, and a membrane-embedded export apparatus facilitating substrate translocation. Structural analyses have revealed the stoichiometry of the components of the base, but the stoichiometry of the essential hydrophobic export apparatus components and of the inner rod protein remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the export apparatus of type III secretion systems contains five SpaP, one SpaQ, one SpaR, and one SpaS. We confirmed that the previously suggested stoichiometry of nine InvA is valid for assembled needle complexes and describe a loose association of InvA with other needle complex components that may reflect its function. Furthermore, we present evidence that not more than six PrgJ form the inner rod of the needle complex. Providing this structural information will facilitate efforts to obtain an atomic view of type III secretion systems and foster our understanding of the function of these and related flagellar machines. Given that other virulence

  14. Deployment of the Burkholderia glumae type III secretion system as an efficient tool for translocating pathogen effectors to monocot cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shailendra; Sharma, Shiveta; Hirabuchi, Akiko; Yoshida, Kentaro; Fujisaki, Koki; Ito, Akiko; Uemura, Aiko; Terauchi, Ryohei; Kamoun, Sophien; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D G; Saitoh, Hiromasa

    2013-05-01

    Genome sequences of plant fungal pathogens have enabled the identification of effectors that cooperatively modulate the cellular environment for successful fungal growth and suppress host defense. Identification and characterization of novel effector proteins are crucial for understanding pathogen virulence and host-plant defense mechanisms. Previous reports indicate that the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion system (T3SS) can be used to study how non-bacterial effectors manipulate dicot plant cell function using the effector detector vector (pEDV) system. Here we report a pEDV-based effector delivery system in which the T3SS of Burkholderia glumae, an emerging rice pathogen, is used to translocate the AVR-Pik and AVR-Pii effectors of the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae to rice cytoplasm. The translocated AVR-Pik and AVR-Pii showed avirulence activity when tested in rice cultivars containing the cognate R genes. AVR-Pik reduced and delayed the hypersensitive response triggered by B. glumae in the non-host plant Nicotiana benthamiana, indicative of an immunosuppressive virulence activity. AVR proteins fused with fluorescent protein and nuclear localization signal were delivered by B. glumae T3SS and observed in the nuclei of infected cells in rice, wheat, barley and N. benthamiana. Our bacterial T3SS-enabled eukaryotic effector delivery and subcellular localization assays provide a useful method for identifying and studying effector functions in monocot plants.

  15. BEAN 2.0: an integrated web resource for the identification and functional analysis of type III secreted effectors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaobao; Lu, Xiaotian; Zhang, Ziding

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria inject type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) into host cells to sabotage their immune signaling networks. Because T3SEs constitute a meeting-point of pathogen virulence and host defense, they are of keen interest to host-pathogen interaction research community. To accelerate the identification and functional understanding of T3SEs, we present BEAN 2.0 as an integrated web resource to predict, analyse and store T3SEs. BEAN 2.0 includes three major components. First, it provides an accurate T3SE predictor based on a hybrid approach. Using independent testing data, we show that BEAN 2.0 achieves a sensitivity of 86.05% and a specificity of 100%. Second, it integrates a set of online sequence analysis tools. Users can further perform functional analysis of putative T3SEs in a seamless way, such as subcellular location prediction, functional domain scan and disorder region annotation. Third, it compiles a database covering 1215 experimentally verified T3SEs and constructs two T3SE-related networks that can be used to explore the relationships among T3SEs. Taken together, by presenting a one-stop T3SE bioinformatics resource, we hope BEAN 2.0 can promote comprehensive understanding of the function and evolution of T3SEs.

  16. Harnessing Novel Secreted Inhibitors of EGF Receptor Signaling for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    and P372S mutants of Argos by secretion from baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells, and used Biacore to assess the binding of these mutated proteins to...generated and amplified according to the manufacturer’s instructions. For protein puri- fication, 1 liter of Sf9 cells were infected with each correspond...infected Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells, using the amino-terminal BiP signal sequence to direct 9 secretion of the protein into the medium. The

  17. Suppression of hedgehog signaling regulates hepatic stellate cell activation and collagen secretion.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Leng, Xi-Sheng; Zhu, Ji-Ye; Wang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play an important role in liver fibrosis. This study investigates the expression of hedgehog in HSC and the role of hedgehog signaling on activation and collagen secretion of HSC. Liver ex vivo perfusion with collagenase IV and density gradient centrifugation were used to isolate HSC. Expression of hedgehog signaling components Ihh, Smo, Ptc, Gli2 and Gli3 in HSC were detected by RT-PCR. Hedgehog siRNA vectors targeting Ihh, Smo and Gli2 were constructed and transfected into HSC respectively. Suppression of hedgehog signaling were detected by SYBR Green fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. Effects of hedgehog signaling inhibition on HSC activation and collagen I secretion were analyzed. Hedgehog signaling components Ihh, Smo, Ptc, Gli2 and Gli3 were expressed in HSC. siRNA vectors targeting Ihh, Smo and Gli2 were successfully constructed and decreased target gene expression. Suppression of hedgehog signaling significantly decreased the expression of α-SMA in HSC (P<0.01). Collagen type I secretion of HSC were also significantly decreased (P<0.01). In summary, HSC activation and collagen secretion can be regulated by hedgehog signaling. Hedgehog may play a role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis.

  18. Erwinia amylovora modifies phenolic profiles of susceptible and resistant apple through its type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Pontais, Isabelle; Treutter, Dieter; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2008-03-01

    Fire blight is a disease affecting Maloideae caused by the necrogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora, which requires the type III protein secretion system (TTSS) for pathogenicity. Profiles of methanol-extractable leaf phenolics of two apple (Malus x domestica) genotypes with contrasting susceptibility to this disease were analyzed by HPLC after infection. Some qualitative differences were recorded between the constitutive compositions of the two genotypes but in both of them dihydrochalcones accounted for more than 90% of total phenolics. Principal component analysis separated leaves inoculated with a virulent wild-type strain from those inoculated with a non-pathogenic TTSS-defective mutant or with water. The changes in levels of the various groups of phenolics in response to the virulent bacterium were similar between the two genotypes, with a significant decrease of dihydrochalcones and a significant increase of hydroxycinnamate derivatives. Differences between genotypes were, however, recorded in amplitude and kinetic of variation in these groups. Occurrence of oxidation and polymerization reactions is proposed, based on the browning process of infected tissues, but whether some by-products act in defense as toxic compounds remain to be tested. Among direct antibacterial constitutive compounds present in apple leaves, the dihydrochalcone phloretin only was found at levels close to lethal concentrations in both genotypes. However, E. amylovora exhibited the ability to stabilize this compound at sublethal levels even in the resistant apple, rejecting the hypothesis of its involvement in the resistance of this genotype.

  19. Phylogeny and Virulence of Naturally Occurring Type III Secretion System-Deficient Pectobacterium Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Sook; Ma, Bing; Perna, Nicole T.; Charkowski, Amy O.

    2009-01-01

    Pectobacterium species are enterobacterial plant-pathogenic bacteria that cause soft rot disease in diverse plant species. Previous epidemiological studies of Pectobacterium species have suffered from an inability to identify most isolates to the species or subspecies level. We used three previously described DNA-based methods, 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, to examine isolates from diseased stems and tubers and found that MLSA provided the most reliable classification of isolates. We found that strains belonging to at least two Pectobacterium clades were present in each field examined, although representatives of only three of five Pectobacterium clades were isolated. Hypersensitive response and DNA hybridization assays revealed that strains of both Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium wasabiae lack a type III secretion system (T3SS). Two of the T3SS-deficient strains assayed lack genes adjacent to the T3SS gene cluster, suggesting that multiple deletions occurred in Pectobacterium strains in this locus, and all strains appear to have only six rRNA operons instead of the seven operons typically found in Pectobacterium strains. The virulence of most of the T3SS-deficient strains was similar to that of T3SS-encoding strains in stems and tubers. PMID:19411432

  20. Phylogeny and virulence of naturally occurring type III secretion system-deficient Pectobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Sook; Ma, Bing; Perna, Nicole T; Charkowski, Amy O

    2009-07-01

    Pectobacterium species are enterobacterial plant-pathogenic bacteria that cause soft rot disease in diverse plant species. Previous epidemiological studies of Pectobacterium species have suffered from an inability to identify most isolates to the species or subspecies level. We used three previously described DNA-based methods, 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, to examine isolates from diseased stems and tubers and found that MLSA provided the most reliable classification of isolates. We found that strains belonging to at least two Pectobacterium clades were present in each field examined, although representatives of only three of five Pectobacterium clades were isolated. Hypersensitive response and DNA hybridization assays revealed that strains of both Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium wasabiae lack a type III secretion system (T3SS). Two of the T3SS-deficient strains assayed lack genes adjacent to the T3SS gene cluster, suggesting that multiple deletions occurred in Pectobacterium strains in this locus, and all strains appear to have only six rRNA operons instead of the seven operons typically found in Pectobacterium strains. The virulence of most of the T3SS-deficient strains was similar to that of T3SS-encoding strains in stems and tubers.

  1. Structure of a bacterial type III secretion system in contact with a host membrane in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nans, Andrea; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Saibil, Helen R.; Hayward, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    Many bacterial pathogens of animals and plants use a conserved type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells to subvert host functions. Contact with host membranes is critical for T3SS activation, yet little is known about T3SS architecture in this state or the conformational changes that drive effector translocation. Here we use cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging to derive the intact structure of the primordial Chlamydia trachomatis T3SS in the presence and absence of host membrane contact. Comparison of the averaged structures demonstrates a marked compaction of the basal body (4 nm) occurs when the needle tip contacts the host cell membrane. This compaction is coupled to a stabilization of the cytosolic sorting platform-ATPase. Our findings reveal the first structure of a bacterial T3SS from a major human pathogen engaged with a eukaryotic host, and reveal striking `pump-action' conformational changes that underpin effector injection.

  2. Type III Secretion-Dependent Sensitivity of Escherichia coli O157 to Specific Ketolides

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Brando, Romina J.; Yamaguchi, Nao; Tahoun, Amin; McAteer, Sean P.; Gillespie, Trudi; Wang, Dai; Argyle, Sally A.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to open up a conduit into eukaryotic cells in order to inject effector proteins. These modulate pathways to enhance bacterial colonization. In this study, we screened established bioactive compounds for any that could repress T3SS expression in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157. The ketolides telithromycin and, subsequently, solithromycin both demonstrated repressive effects on expression of the bacterial T3SS at sub-MICs, leading to significant reductions in bacterial binding and actin-rich pedestal formation on epithelial cells. Preincubation of epithelial cells with solithromycin resulted in significantly less attachment of E. coli O157. Moreover, bacteria expressing the T3SS were more susceptible to solithromycin, and there was significant preferential killing of E. coli O157 bacteria when they were added to epithelial cells that had been preexposed to the ketolide. This killing was dependent on expression of the T3SS. Taken together, this research indicates that the ketolide that has accumulated in epithelial cells may traffic back into the bacteria via the T3SS. Considering that neither ketolide induces the SOS response, nontoxic members of this class of antibiotics, such as solithromycin, should be considered for future testing and trials evaluating their use for treatment of EHEC infections. These antibiotics may also have broader significance for treating infections caused by other pathogenic bacteria, including intracellular bacteria, that express a T3SS. PMID:26525795

  3. A bacterial type III secretion-based protein delivery tool for broad applications in cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Ittig, Simon J.; Schmutz, Christoph; Kasper, Christoph A.; Amstutz, Marlise; Schmidt, Alexander; Sauteur, Loïc; Vigano, M. Alessandra; Low, Shyan Huey; Affolter, Markus; Cornelis, Guy R.; Nigg, Erich A.

    2015-01-01

    Methods enabling the delivery of proteins into eukaryotic cells are essential to address protein functions. Here we propose broad applications to cell biology for a protein delivery tool based on bacterial type III secretion (T3S). We show that bacterial, viral, and human proteins, fused to the N-terminal fragment of the Yersinia enterocolitica T3S substrate YopE, are effectively delivered into target cells in a fast and controllable manner via the injectisome of extracellular bacteria. This method enables functional interaction studies by the simultaneous injection of multiple proteins and allows the targeting of proteins to different subcellular locations by use of nanobody-fusion proteins. After delivery, proteins can be freed from the YopE fragment by a T3S-translocated viral protease or fusion to ubiquitin and cleavage by endogenous ubiquitin proteases. Finally, we show that this delivery tool is suitable to inject proteins in living animals and combine it with phosphoproteomics to characterize the systems-level impact of proapoptotic human truncated BID on the cellular network. PMID:26598622

  4. Hyperinvasiveness of Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis linked to hyperexpression of type III secretion systems in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-Yeh; Wang, Yi-Hsin; Chien, Kun-Yi; Janapatla, Rajendra Prasad; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Choleraesuis and Typhimurium are among the non-typhoid Salmonella serovars that are important zoonotic pathogens. In clinical observation, S. Typhimurium typically causes diarrheal diseases; however, S. Choleraesuis shows high predilection to cause bacteremia. The mechanism why S. Choleraesuis is more invasive to humans remains unknown. In this study, we compared the S. Typhimurium LT2 and S. Choleraesuis SC-B67 proteomes through stable isotope labeling of amino acid in cell culture (SILAC). In SILAC, the expression of many virulence proteins in two type III secretion systems (T3SSs) were significantly higher in S. Choleraesuis than in S. Typhimurium. Similar differences were also found at the transcriptional level. Compared to S. Typhimurium, S. Choleraesuis showed a higher penetration level to Caco-2 (>100-fold) and MDCK (>10-fold) monolayers. In mice after oral challenge, the invasion of spleen and liver was also higher in S. Choleraesuis than in S. Typhimurium. The transcription of hilD in S. Choleraesuis was increased in physiological (1 mM) or high (10 mM) concentrations of Mg2+, but not in low (8 μM) concentration. We conclude that S. Choleraesuis showed hyperinvasiveness in cellular as well as mouse models due to hyperexpression of T3SS genes. PMID:27886215

  5. Molecular Models for the Core Components of the Flagellar Type-III Secretion Complex

    PubMed Central

    Matthews-Palmer, Teige R. S.; Beeby, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    We show that by using a combination of computational methods, consistent three-dimensional molecular models can be proposed for the core proteins of the type-III secretion system. We employed a variety of approaches to reconcile disparate, and sometimes inconsistent, data sources into a coherent picture that for most of the proteins indicated a unique solution to the constraints. The range of difficulty spanned from the trivial (FliQ) to the difficult (FlhA and FliP). The uncertainties encountered with FlhA were largely the result of the greater number of helix packing possibilities allowed in a large protein, however, for FliP, there remains an uncertainty in how to reconcile the large displacement predicted between its two main helical hairpins and their ability to sit together happily across the bacterial membrane. As there is still no high resolution structural information on any of these proteins, we hope our predicted models may be of some use in aiding the interpretation of electron microscope images and in rationalising mutation data and experiments. PMID:27855178

  6. The inner rod protein controls substrate switching and needle length in a Salmonella type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Lefebre, Matthew D; Galán, Jorge E

    2014-01-14

    Type III secretion machines are essential for the biology of many bacteria that are pathogenic or symbiotic for animals, plants, or insects. They exert their function by delivering bacterial effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells. The core component of these machines is the needle complex, a multiprotein structure that spans the bacterial envelope and serves as a conduit for proteins that transit this secretion pathway. The needle complex is composed of a multiring base embedded in the bacterial envelope and a filament-like structure, the needle, that projects from the bacterial surface and is linked to the base by the inner rod. Assembly of the needle complex proceeds in a step-wise fashion that is initiated by the assembly of the base and is followed by the export of the building subunits for the needle and inner rod substructures. Once assembled, the needle complex reprograms its specificity and becomes competent for the secretion of effector proteins. Here through genetic, biochemical, and electron microscopy analyses of the Salmonella inner rod protein subunit PrgJ we present evidence that the assembly of the inner rod dictates the timing of substrate switching and needle length. Furthermore, the identification of mutations in PrgJ that specifically alter the hierarchy of protein secretion provides additional support for a complex role of the inner rod substructure in type III secretion.

  7. Identification and Characterization of Putative Translocated Effector Proteins of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Dubytska, Lidiya P.; Rogge, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Edwardsiella ictaluri, a major pathogen in channel catfish aquaculture, encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) that is essential for intracellular replication and virulence. Previous work identified three putative T3SS effectors in E. ictaluri, and in silico analysis of the E. ictaluri genome identified six additional putative effectors, all located on the chromosome outside the T3SS pathogenicity island. To establish active translocation by the T3SS, we constructed translational fusions of each effector to the amino-terminal adenylate cyclase (AC) domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin CyaA. When translocated through the membrane of the Edwardsiella-containing vacuole (ECV), the cyclic AMP produced by the AC domain in the presence of calmodulin in the host cell cytoplasm can be measured. Results showed that all nine effectors were translocated from E. ictaluri in the ECV to the cytoplasm of the host cells in the wild-type strain but not in a T3SS mutant, indicating that translocation is dependent on the T3SS machinery. This confirms that the E. ictaluri T3SS is similar to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS in that it translocates effectors through the membrane of the bacterial vacuole directly into the host cell cytoplasm. Additional work demonstrated that both initial acidification and subsequent neutralization of the ECV were necessary for effector translocation, except for two of them that did not require neutralization. Single-gene mutants constructed for seven of the individual effectors were all attenuated for replication in CCO cells, but only three were replication deficient in head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). IMPORTANCE The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), an economically significant disease of farm-raised channel catfish. Commercial catfish production accounts for the majority of the total fin fish aquaculture in the United States, with almost 300,000

  8. Secreted Wnt Signaling Inhibitors in Disuse-Induced Bone Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    regulators of Wnt/Lrp signaling (Sost,  Dkk1 ) modulate bone loss in response to mechanical  disuse. Furthermore, we proposed to test whether these...induced paralysis of the quadriceps, hamstrings, and soleus) in one hindlimb of a series of mice  with mutations in Wnt modulators (Sost‐/‐,  Dkk1 ...and in wild‐type mice that are also treated with  neutralizing antibody to  Dkk1  or Sost (or both).  These experiments have the potential to reveal new

  9. From ingestion to colonization: the influence of the host environment on regulation of the LEE encoded type III secretion system in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, James P. R.; Finlay, B. Brett; Roe, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) binds to host tissue and intimately attaches to intestinal cells using a dedicated type III secretion system (T3SS). This complex multi-protein organelle is encoded within a large pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which is subject to extensive regulatory control. Over the past 15 years we have gained a wealth of knowledge concerning how the LEE is regulated transcriptionally by specific, global and phage encoded regulators. More recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of how specific signals, including host or microbiota derived metabolic products and various nutrient sources, can affect how the LEE-encoded T3SS is regulated. In this review we discuss regulation of the LEE, focusing on how these physiologically relevant signals are sensed and how they affect the expression of this major virulence factor. The implications for understanding the disease process by specific regulatory mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:26097473

  10. Immunodominant regions of a Chlamydia trachomatis type III secretion effector protein, Tarp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yingqian; Yu, Ping; Zhong, Guangming

    2010-09-01

    We have previously shown that individuals infected with Chlamydia trachomatis can develop a robust antibody response to a Chlamydia type III secretion effector protein called Tarp and that immunization with Tarp induces protection against challenge infection in mice. The current study aimed to map the immunodominant regions of the Tarp protein by expressing 11 fragments of Tarp as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins and detecting the reactivity of these fusion proteins with antisera from patients infected with C. trachomatis in the urogenital tract or in the ocular tissue and from rabbits immunized with C. trachomatis organisms. A major immunodominant region was strongly recognized by all antibodies. This region covers amino acids 152 to 302, consisting of three repeats (amino acids 152 to 201, 202 to 251, and 252 to 302). Each of the repeats contains multiple tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by host cell kinases when Tarp is injected into host cells. Several other minor immunodominant regions were also identified, including those comprising amino acids 1 to 156, 310 to 431, and 582 to 682 (recognized by antisera from both humans and rabbits), that comprising amino acids 425 to 581 (recognized only by human antisera), and that comprising amino acids 683 to 847 (preferentially recognized by rabbit antisera). This immunodominance was also confirmed by the observations that six out of the nine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) bound to the major immunodominant region and that the other three each bound to one of the minor fragments, comprising amino acids 1 to 119, 120 to 151, and 310 to 431. The antigenicity analyses have provided important information for further understanding the structure and function of Tarp.

  11. Cross-Talk between the Aeromonas hydrophila Type III Secretion System and Lateral Flagella System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu-Hang; Shaw, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is responsible for aeromonad septicaemia in fish, and gastroenteritis and wound infections in humans. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is utilized by aeromonads to inject protein effectors directly into host cells. One of the major genetic regulators of the T3SS in several bacterial species is the AraC-like protein ExsA. Previous studies have suggested a link between T3SS regulation and lateral flagella expression. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic regulation of the T3SS and its potential interaction with the lateral flagella system in A. hydrophila. To investigate the genes encoding the T3SS regulatory components exsA, exsD, exsC, and exsE were mutated and the activities of the T3SS promoters were measured in wild type and mutant backgrounds demonstrating a regulatory network. The Exs proteins were shown to interact with each other by BACTH assay and Far-Western Blot. The findings suggested a regulatory cascade in which ExsE was bound to the chaperone protein ExsC. When ExsC was free it sequestered the anti-activator ExsD thus stopping the inhibition of the T3SS master regulator ExsA allowing T3SS expression. The T3SS regulatory components were also shown to affect the expression of the lateral flagella system. The activities of the lateral flagella promoters were shown to be repressed by the absence of ExsD and ExsE, suggesting that the T3SS master regulator ExsA was a negative regulator of the lateral flagella system. PMID:27656180

  12. Inhibition of a type III secretion system by the deletion of a short loop in one of its membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Kitao, Akio; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2013-05-01

    Crystal structures of the cytoplasmic domain of FlhB from S. typhimurium and A. aeolicus were solved at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. The deletion of a short loop in the cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella FlhB completely abolishes secretion by the type III secretion system. A molecular-dynamics simulation shows that the deletion of the loop affects the flexibility of a linker between the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system. It is composed of an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (FlhB{sub C}). Here, the crystal structures of FlhB{sub C} from Salmonella typhimurium and Aquifex aeolicus are described at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. These flagellar FlhB{sub C} structures are similar to those of paralogues from the needle type III secretion system, with the major difference being in a linker that connects the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. It was found that deletion of a short flexible loop in a globular part of Salmonella FlhB{sub C} leads to complete inhibition of secretion by the flagellar secretion system. Molecular-dynamics calculations demonstrate that the linker region is the most flexible part of FlhB{sub C} and that the deletion of the loop reduces this flexibility. These results are in good agreement with previous studies showing the importance of the linker in the function of FlhB and provide new insight into the relationship between the different parts of the FlhB{sub C} molecule.

  13. Structure of Salmonella FlhE, conserved member of a flagellar Type III secretion operon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaemin; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T.; Harshey, Rasika M.

    2014-12-26

    In this paper, the bacterial flagellum is assembled by a multicomponent transport apparatus categorized as a type III secretion system. The secretion of proteins that assemble into the flagellum is driven by the proton motive force. The periplasmic protein FlhE is a member of the flhBAE operon in the majority of bacteria where FlhE is found. FlhA and FlhB are established components of the flagellar type III secretion system. The absence of FlhE results in a proton leak through the flagellar system, inappropriate secretion patterns, and cell death, indicating that FlhE regulates an important aspect of proper flagellar biosynthesis. We isolated FlhE from the periplasm of Salmonella and solved its structure to 1.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals a β-sandwich fold, with no close structural homologs. Finally, possible roles of FlhE, including that of a chaperone, are discussed.

  14. Engineering NK Cells Modified With an EGFRvIII-specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor to Overexpress CXCR4 Improves Immunotherapy of CXCL12/SDF-1α-secreting Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Müller, Nadja; Michen, Susanne; Tietze, Stefanie; Töpfer, Katrin; Schulte, Alexander; Lamszus, Katrin; Schmitz, Marc; Schackert, Gabriele; Pastan, Ira; Temme, Achim

    2015-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are promising effector cells for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. So far, several preclinical studies have shown the feasibility of gene-engineered NK cells, which upon expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are redirected to otherwise NK cell-resistant tumors. Yet, we reasoned that the efficiency of an immunotherapy using CAR-modified NK cells critically relies on efficient migration to the tumor site and might be improved by the engraftment of a receptor specific for a chemokine released by the tumor. On the basis of the DNAX-activation protein 12 (DAP12), a signaling adapter molecule involved in signal transduction of activating NK cell receptors, we constructed an epidermal growth factor variant III (EGFRvIII)-CAR, designated MR1.1-DAP12 which confers specific cytotoxicity of NK cell towards EGFRvIII glioblastoma cells in vitro and to established subcutaneous U87-MG tumor xenografts. So far, infusion of NK cells with expression of MR1.1-DAP12 caused a moderate but significantly delayed tumor growth and increased median survival time when compared with NK cells transduced with an ITAM-defective CAR. Notably, the further genetic engineering of these EGFRvIII-specific NK cells with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 conferred a specific chemotaxis to CXCL12/SDF-1α secreting U87-MG glioblastoma cells. Moreover, the administration of such NK cells resulted in complete tumor remission in a number of mice and a significantly increased survival when compared with the treatment of xenografts with NK cells expressing only the EGFRvIII-specific CAR or mock control. We conclude that chemokine receptor-engineered NK cells with concomitant expression of a tumor-specific CAR are a promising tool to improve adoptive tumor immunotherapy.

  15. Cooperation between cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, T; Takahashi, T; Takahashi, H; Seino, S

    2014-09-01

    Although glucose is physiologically the most important regulator of insulin secretion, glucose-induced insulin secretion is modulated by hormonal and neural inputs to pancreatic β-cells. Most of the hormones and neurotransmitters evoke intracellular signals such as cAMP, Ca²⁺ , and phospholipid-derived molecules by activating G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In particular, cAMP is a key second messenger that amplifies insulin secretion in a glucose concentration-dependent manner. The action of cAMP on insulin secretion is mediated by both protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent and Epac2A-dependent mechanisms. Many of the proteins expressed in β-cells are phosphorylated by PKA in vitro, but only a few proteins in which PKA phosphorylation directly affects insulin secretion have been identified. On the other hand, Epac2A activates the Ras-like small G protein Rap in a cAMP-dependent manner. Epac2A is also directly activated by various sulfonylureas, except for gliclazide. 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analogue, and glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea, synergistically activate Epac2A and Rap1, whereas adrenaline, which suppresses cAMP production in pancreatic β-cells, blocks activation of Epac2A and Rap1 by glibenclamide. Thus, cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea cooperatively activate Epac2A and Rap1. This interaction could account, at least in part, for the synergistic effects of incretin-related drugs and sulfonylureas in insulin secretion. Accordingly, clarification of the mechanism of Epac2A activation may provide therapeutic strategies to improve insulin secretion in diabetes.

  16. Aip regulates cAMP signalling and GH secretion in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Formosa, R; Xuereb-Anastasi, A; Vassallo, J

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been linked to predisposition to pituitary adenomas. However, the mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. AIP interacts with a number of interesting proteins, including members of the cAMP signalling pathway that has been shown to be consistently altered in pituitary tumours. The functional role of Aip was investigated using both over-expression and knock down of Aip in GH3 cells. cAMP signalling and its downstream effectors, including GH secretion, were then investigated. cAMP signalling was analysed using cAMP assays, cAMP-response element-promoter luciferase reporter assays, real-time PCR and finally secreted GH quantification. Over-expression of wild-type (WT)-Aip reduced forskolin-induced cAMP signalling at the total cAMP level, luciferase reporter activity and target gene expression, when compared with empty vector and the non-functional R304X mutant. Additionally, GH secretion was reduced in WT-Aip over-expressing GH3 cells treated with forskolin. Knock down of endogenous Aip resulted in increased cAMP signalling but a decrease in GH secretion was also noted. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity using general and selective inhibitors did not completely ablate the effect of Aip on forskolin-augmented cAMP signalling. A mechanism by which Aip acts as a tumour suppressor, by maintaining a low cAMP signalling and concentration, is suggested. Mutations of Aip render the protein incapable of such activity. This effect appears not to be mediated by the AIP-PDE interaction, suggesting the involvement of other interacting partners in mediating this outcome.

  17. Negative Autogenous Control of the Master Type III Secretion System Regulator HrpL in Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Waite, Christopher; Schumacher, Jörg; Jovanovic, Milija; Bennett, Mark; Buck, Martin

    2017-01-24

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a principal virulence determinant of the model bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae T3SS effector proteins inhibit plant defense signaling pathways in susceptible hosts and elicit evolved immunity in resistant plants. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL coordinates the expression of most T3SS genes. Transcription of hrpL is dependent on sigma-54 and the codependent enhancer binding proteins HrpR and HrpS for hrpL promoter activation. hrpL is oriented adjacently to and divergently from the HrpL-dependent gene hrpJ, sharing an intergenic upstream regulatory region. We show that association of the RNA polymerase (RNAP)-HrpL complex with the hrpJ promoter element imposes negative autogenous control on hrpL transcription in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The hrpL promoter was upregulated in a ΔhrpL mutant and was repressed by plasmid-borne hrpL In a minimal Escherichia coli background, the activity of HrpL was sufficient to achieve repression of reconstituted hrpL transcription. This repression was relieved if both the HrpL DNA-binding function and the hrp-box sequence of the hrpJ promoter were compromised, implying dependence upon the hrpJ promoter. DNA-bound RNAP-HrpL entirely occluded the HrpRS and partially occluded the integration host factor (IHF) recognition elements of the hrpL promoter in vitro, implicating inhibition of DNA binding by these factors as a cause of negative autogenous control. A modest increase in the HrpL concentration caused hypersecretion of the HrpA1 pilus protein but intracellular accumulation of later T3SS substrates. We argue that negative feedback on HrpL activity fine-tunes expression of the T3SS regulon to minimize the elicitation of plant defenses.

  18. The Surface Sensor NlpE of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Contributes to Regulation of the Type III Secretion System and Flagella by the Cpx Response to Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Ichimura, Kimitoshi; Noda, Masatoshi

    2015-12-07

    Although the adhesion of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is central to the EHEC-host interaction during infection, it remains unclear how such adhesion regulates virulence factors. Adhesion to abiotic surfaces by E. coli has been reported to be an outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE-dependent activation cue of the Cpx pathway. Therefore, we investigated the role of NlpE in EHEC on the adhesion-mediated expression of virulence genes. NlpE in EHEC contributed to upregulation of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes encoded type III secretion system and to downregulated expression of the flagellin gene by activation of the Cpx pathway during adherence to hydrophobic glass beads and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, LysR homologue A (LrhA) in EHEC was involved in regulating the expression of the LEE genes and flagellin gene in response to adhesion. Gel mobility shift analysis revealed that response regulator CpxR bound to the lrhA promoter region and thereby regulated expressions of the LEE genes and flagellin gene via the transcriptional regulator LrhA in EHEC. Therefore, these results suggest that the sensing of adhesion signals via NlpE is important for regulation of the expression of the type III secretion system and flagella in EHEC during infection.

  19. The Erwinia amylovora PhoPQ system is involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptide and suppresses gene expression of two novel type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Nakka, Sridevi; Qi, Mingsheng; Zhao, Youfu

    2010-10-20

    The PhoPQ system is a pleiotropic two-component signal transduction system that controls many pathogenic properties in several mammalian and plant pathogens. Three different cues have been demonstrated to activate the PhoPQ system including a mild acidic pH, antimicrobial peptides, and low Mg(2+). In this study, our results showed that phoPQ mutants were more resistant to strong acidic conditions (pH 4.5 or 5) than that of the wild-type (WT) strain, suggesting that this system in Erwinia amylovora may negatively regulate acid resistance gene expression. Furthermore, the PhoPQ system negatively regulated gene expression of two novel type III secretion systems in E. amylovora. These results are in contrast to those reported for the PhoPQ system in Salmonella and Xanthomonas, where it positively regulates type III secretion system and acid resistance. In addition, survival of phoPQ mutants was about 10-fold lower than that of WT when treated with cecropin A at pH 5.5, suggesting that the PhoPQ system renders the pathogen more resistant to cecropin A.

  20. Use of a Novel Report Protein to Study the Secretion Signal of Flagellin in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangqiang; Xia, Yongjun; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Hui; Ai, Lianzhong

    2016-08-01

    Flagellin (also called Hag) is the main component of bacterial flagellum and is transported across the cytoplasmic membrane by flagellar secretion apparatus. Because flagella play an essential role in the pathogenesis of numerous pathogens, the flagellins of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Campylobacter jejuni, and Vibrio cholerae have been intensively studied; however, very few studies have focused on the flagellin of Bacillus subtilis, which is considered to be a model organism with which to study the secretion of bacteria and is used on an industrial scale for the secretion of proteins. The signal of B. subtilis flagellin is still debated. This study was performed to seek the export signals of flagellin from B. subtilis. The naturally nonsecretory, intrinsically disordered domain of nucleoskeletal-like protein (Nsp) was used as the reporter protein. Our results demonstrate that the export signal is contained within the first 50 amino acids of B. subtilis flagellin. Nsp is easily degraded inside the cell and can be exported into culture medium with the aid of the signal of flagellin. This method provides a new potential strategy for the expression of proteins with high proteolytic susceptibility via fusion to export signals.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae secretes and correctly processes human interferon hybrid proteins containing yeast invertase signal peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C N; Matteucci, M; Perry, L J; Wulf, J J; Chen, C Y; Hitzeman, R A

    1986-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides coding for the yeast invertase secretion signal peptide were fused to the gene for the mature form of human interferon (huIFN-alpha 2). Two plasmids (E3 and F2) were constructed. E3 contained the invertase signal codons in a reading frame with the mature huIFN-alpha 2 gene. F2 had a deletion of the codon for alanine at amino acid residue-5 in the invertase signal and an addition of a methionine codon located between the coding sequences for the invertase signal and mature huIFN-alpha 2. Both hybrid genes were located adjacent to the promoter from the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene on the multicopy yeast expression plasmid, YEp1PT. Yeast transformants containing these plasmids produced somewhat more IFN than did the same expression plasmid containing the IFN gene with its human secretion signal sequence. HuIFN-alpha 2, purified from the medium of yeast cells containing E3, was found to be processed at the correct site. The huIFN-alpha 2 made by plasmid F2 was found to be completely processed at the junction between the invertase signal (a variant) and the methionine of methionine-huIFN-alpha 2. These results strongly suggested that the invertase signal (or its variant) attached to huIFN was efficiently recognized by the presumed signal recognition particle and was cleaved by the signal peptidase in the yeast cells. These results also suggested that amino acid changes on the right side of the cleavage site did not necessarily prevent cleavage or secretion. Images PMID:3023906

  2. [Analysis of signal peptides of the secreted proteins in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58].

    PubMed

    Fan, Cheng-Ming; Li, Cheng-Yun; Zhao, Ming-Fu; He, Yue-Qiu

    2005-08-01

    The 4554 ORFs of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 Cereon were used for the prediction of signal peptides by the network tools, such as SignalP3.0, LipoP1.0, TMHMM2.0 and TargetP1.01. Total 203 signal peptides with conserved amino residues are found, among them, 158 are secretary types, 9 are RR-motif types, 28 are SignalPase II types and 8 are bacteriocin-pheromone types. However, only two signal peptides from the secreted proteins, AGR-C-1878p and AGR-C-1880p have the same amino sequences, showing the signal peptides of the strain are highly variable.

  3. Structural Characterization of the Yersinia pestis Type III Secretion System Needle Protein YscF in Complex with Its Heterodimeric Chaperone YscE/YscG

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Cherry, Scott; Waugh, David S.

    2008-05-03

    The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis utilizes a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins into mammalian cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways that mediate phagocytosis and the inflammatory response. Effector proteins are injected through a hollow needle structure composed of the protein YscF. YscG and YscE act as 'chaperones' to prevent premature polymerization of YscF in the cytosol of the bacterium prior to assembly of the needle. Here, we report the crystal structure of the YscEFG protein complex at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Overall, the structure is similar to that of the analogous PscEFG complex from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system, but there are noteworthy differences. The structure confirms that, like PscG, YscG is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat family of proteins. YscG binds tightly to the C-terminal half of YscF, implying that it is this region of YscF that controls its polymerization into the needle structure. YscE interacts with the N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat motif of YscG but makes very little direct contact with YscF. Its function may be to stabilize the structure of YscG and/or to participate in recruiting the complex to the secretion apparatus. No electron density could be observed for the 49 N-terminal residues of YscF. This and additional evidence suggest that the N-terminus of YscF is disordered in the complex with YscE and YscG. As expected, conserved residues in the C-terminal half of YscF mediate important intra- and intermolecular interactions in the complex. Moreover, the phenotypes of some previously characterized mutations in the C-terminal half of YscF can be rationalized in terms of the structure of the heterotrimeric YscEFG complex.

  4. Chlamydia trachomatis Slc1 is a type III secretion chaperone that enhances the translocation of its invasion effector substrate TARP.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Amanda J; Malcolm, Denise S; Pedrosa, António T; Roguska, Katarzyna; Shahbazian, Sevanna; Graham, James E; Hayward, Richard D; Carabeo, Rey A

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) chaperones pilot substrates to the export apparatus in a secretion-competent state, and are consequently central to the translocation of effectors into target cells. Chlamydia trachomatis is a genetically intractable obligate intracellular pathogen that utilizes T3SS effectors to trigger its entry into mammalian cells. The only well-characterized T3SS effector is TARP (translocated actin recruitment protein), but its chaperone is unknown. Here we exploited a known structural signature to screen for putative type III secretion chaperones encoded within the C. trachomatis genome. Using bacterial two-hybrid, co-precipitation, cross-linking and size exclusion chromatography we show that Slc1 (SycE-like chaperone 1; CT043) specifically interacts with a 200-amino-acid residue N-terminal region of TARP (TARP¹⁻²⁰⁰). Slc1 formed homodimers in vitro, as shown in cross-linking and gel filtration experiments. Biochemical analysis of an isolated Slc1-TARP¹⁻²⁰⁰ complex was consistent with a characteristic 2:1 chaperone-effector stoichiometry. Furthermore, Slc1 was co-immunoprecipitated with TARP from C. trachomatis elementary bodies. Also, coexpression of Slc1 specifically enhanced host cell translocation of TARP by a heterologous Yersinia enterocolitica T3SS. Taken together, we propose Slc1 as a chaperone of the C. trachomatis T3SS effector TARP.

  5. Persistent DNA damage signaling triggers senescence-associated inflammatory cytokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Francis; Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher K.; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke A. M.; Muñoz, Denise P.; Raza, Saba R.; Freund, Adam; Campeau, Eric; Davalos, Albert R.; Campisi, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by stably arresting the proliferation of damaged cells1. Paradoxically, senescent cells also secrete factors that alter tissue microenvironments2. The pathways regulating this secretion are unknown. We show that damaged human cells develop persistent chromatin lesions bearing hallmarks of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which initiate increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6). Cytokine secretion occurred only after establishment of persistent DNA damage signaling, usually associated with senescence, not after transient DNA damage responses (DDR). Initiation and maintenance of this cytokine response required the DDR proteins ATM, NBS1 and CHK2, but not the cell cycle arrest enforcers p53 and pRb. ATM was also essential for IL-6 secretion during oncogene-induced senescence and by damaged cells that bypass senescence. Further, DDR activity and IL-6 were elevated in human cancers, and ATM-depletion suppressed the ability of senescent cells to stimulate IL-6-dependent cancer cell invasiveness. Thus, in addition to orchestrating cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair, a novel and important role of the DDR is to allow damaged cells to communicate their compromised state to the surrounding tissue. PMID:19597488

  6. Shigella enterotoxin-2 is a type III effector that participates in Shigella-induced interleukin 8 secretion by epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Farfán, Mauricio J.; Toro, Cecilia S.; Barry, Eileen M.; Nataro, James P.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously described a protein termed Shigella enterotoxin 2 (ShET-2), which induces rises in short circuit current in rabbit ileum mounted in the Ussing chamber. Published reports have postulated that ShET-2 may be secreted by the Shigella type III secretion system (T3SS). In this study we show that ShET-2 secretion into the extracellular space requires the T3SS in S. flexneri 2a strain 2457T and a ShET-2-TEM fusion was translocated into epithelial cells in a T3SS-dependent manner. The ShET-2 gene, sen, is encoded downstream of the ospC1 gene of S. flexneri, and we show that sen is co-transcribed with this T3SS-secreted product. Considering that T3SS effectors have diverse roles in Shigella infection and that vaccine constructs lacking ShET-2 are attenuated in volunteers, we asked whether ShET-2 has a function other than its enterotoxic activity. We constructed a ShET-2 mutant in 2457T and tested its effect on epithelial cell invasion, plaque formation, guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis and interleukin 8 (IL-8) secretion from infected monolayers. Though other phenotypes were not different compared to the wild-type parent, we found that HEp-2 and T84 cells infected with the ShET-2 mutant exhibited significantly reduced IL-8 secretion into the basolateral compartment, suggesting that ShET-2 might participate in the Shigella-induced inflammation of epithelial cells. PMID:21219446

  7. Type III secretion as a generalizable strategy for the production of full-length biopolymer-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Azam, Anum; Li, Cheng; Metcalf, Kevin J; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-11-01

    Biopolymer-forming proteins are integral in the development of customizable biomaterials, but recombinant expression of these proteins is challenging. In particular, biopolymer-forming proteins have repetitive, glycine-rich domains and, like many heterologously expressed proteins, are prone to incomplete translation, aggregation, and proteolytic degradation in the production host. This necessitates tailored purification processes to isolate each full-length protein of interest from the truncated forms as well as other contaminating proteins; owing to the repetitive nature of these proteins, the truncated polypeptides can have very similar chemistry to the full-length form and are difficult to separate from the full-length protein. We hypothesized that bacterial expression and secretion would be a promising alternative option for biomaterials-forming proteins, simplifying isolation of the full-length target protein. By using a selective secretion system, truncated forms of the protein are not secreted and thus are not found in the culture harvest. We show that a synthetically upregulated type III secretion system leads to a general increase in secretion titer for each protein that we tested. Moreover, we observe a substantial enhancement in the homogeneity of full-length forms of pro-resilin, tropo-elastin crosslinking domains, and silk proteins produced in this manner, as compared with proteins purified from the cytosol. Secretion via the type III apparatus limits co-purification of truncated forms of the target protein and increases protein purity without extensive purification steps. Demonstrating the utility of such a system, we introduce several modifications to resilin-based peptides and use an un-optimized, single-column process to purify these proteins. The resulting materials are of sufficiently high quantity and yield for the production of antimicrobial hydrogels with highly reproducible rheological properties. The ease of this process and its

  8. Secretion of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins from a natural Pantoea agglomerans isolate by using PelB and HlyA secretion signals.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Dawn C; Lampe, David J

    2011-07-01

    The insect-vectored disease malaria is a major world health problem. New control strategies are needed to supplement the current use of insecticides and medications. A genetic approach can be used to inhibit development of malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) in the mosquito host. We hypothesized that Pantoea agglomerans, a bacterial symbiont of Anopheles mosquitoes, could be engineered to express and secrete anti-Plasmodium effector proteins, a strategy termed paratransgenesis. To this end, plasmids that include the pelB or hlyA secretion signals from the genes of related species (pectate lyase from Erwinia carotovora and hemolysin A from Escherichia coli, respectively) were created and tested for their efficacy in secreting known anti-Plasmodium effector proteins (SM1, anti-Pbs21, and PLA2) in P. agglomerans and E. coli. P. agglomerans successfully secreted HlyA fusions of anti-Pbs21 and PLA2, and these strains are under evaluation for anti-Plasmodium activity in infected mosquitoes. Varied expression and/or secretion of the effector proteins was observed, suggesting that the individual characteristics of a particular effector may require empirical testing of several secretion signals. Importantly, those strains that secreted efficiently grew as well as wild-type strains under laboratory conditions and, thus, may be expected to be competitive with the native microbiota in the environment of the mosquito midgut.

  9. OmpA signal peptide leads to heterogenous secretion of B. subtilis chitosanase enzyme from E. coli expression system.

    PubMed

    Pechsrichuang, Phornsiri; Songsiriritthigul, Chomphunuch; Haltrich, Dietmar; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Namvijtr, Peenida; Bonaparte, Napolean; Yamabhai, Montarop

    2016-01-01

    The production of secreted recombinant proteins from E. coli is pivotal to the biotechnological industry because it reduces the cost of downstream processing. Proteins destined for secretion contain an N-terminal signal peptide that is cleaved by secretion machinery in the plasma membrane. The resulting protein is released in an active mature form. In this study, Bacillus subtilis chitosanase (Csn) was used as a model protein to compare the effect of two signal peptides on the secretion of heterologous recombinant protein. The results showed that the E. coli secretion machinery could recognize both native bacillus and E. coli signal peptides. However, only the native bacillus signal peptide could generate the same N-terminal sequence as in the wild type bacteria. When the recombinant Csn constructs contained the E. coli OmpA signal peptide, the secreted enzymes were heterogeneous, comprising a mixed population of secreted enzymes with different N-terminal sequences. Nevertheless, the E. coli OmpA signal peptide was found to be more efficient for high expression and secretion of bacillus Csn. These findings may be used to help engineer other recombinant proteins for secretory production in E. coli.

  10. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to measurement of hemodynamic signals accompanying stimulated saliva secretion.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroki; Obata, Akiko N; Moda, Ichiro; Ozaki, Kazutaka; Yasuhara, Takaomi; Yamamoto, Yukari; Kiguchi, Masashi; Maki, Atsushi; Kubota, Kisou; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-04-01

    We aim to test the feasibility of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for indirect measurement of human saliva secretion in response to taste stimuli for potential application to organoleptic testing. We use an NIRS system to measure extracranial hemodynamics (Hb-signals around the temples) of healthy participants when taste stimuli are taken in their mouths. First, the Hb-signals and volume of expelled saliva (stimulated by distilled-water or sucrose-solution intake) are simultaneously measured and large Hb-signal changes in response to the taste stimuli (Hb-responses) are found. Statistical analysis show that both the Hb response and saliva volume are larger for the sucrose solution than for the distilled water with a significant correlation between them (r = 0.81). The effects of swallowing on the Hb-signals are investigated. Similar Hb responses, differing from the sucrose solution and distilled water, are obtained even though the participants swallow the mouth contents. Finally, functional magnetic resonance imaging is used to identify possible sources of the Hb signals corresponding to salivation. Statistical analysis indicates similar responses in the extracranial regions, mainly around the middle meningeal artery. In conclusion, the identified correlation between extracranial hemodynamics and the saliva volume suggests that NIRS is applicable to the measurement of hemodynamic signals accompanying stimulated saliva secretion.

  11. Influence of phenolic acids on indole acetic acid production and on the type III secretion system gene transcription in food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05.

    PubMed

    Myszka, Kamila; Schmidt, Marcin T; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka K; Leja, Katarzyna; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of these investigations was to evaluate the reduction capability of phenolic acids (ferulic, chlorogenic, gallic, and p-coumaric acids) on indole acetic acid synthesis by food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05. Specific genetic primer for the type III secretion system (TTSS) in P. fluorescens KM05 was designed and the influence of phenolic acids on its expression was investigated. In the work the ferulic and chlorogenic acids at the concentration of 0.02 and 0.04 μg/ml affected on bacterial growth pattern and the signal molecules production. The phenolic acids, that were appreciable effective against P. fluorescens KM05 indole acetic acid production, significantly suppressed TTSS gene.

  12. Perspective: emerging evidence for signaling roles of mitochondrial anaplerotic products in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Michael J; Fahien, Leonard A; Brown, Laura J; Hasan, Noaman M; Buss, Julian D; Kendrick, Mindy A

    2005-01-01

    The importance of mitochondrial biosynthesis in stimulus secretion coupling in the insulin-producing beta-cell probably equals that of ATP production. In glucose-induced insulin secretion, the rate of pyruvate carboxylation is very high and correlates more strongly with the glucose concentration the beta-cell is exposed to (and thus with insulin release) than does pyruvate decarboxylation, which produces acetyl-CoA for metabolism in the citric acid cycle to produce ATP. The carboxylation pathway can increase the levels of citric acid cycle intermediates, and this indicates that anaplerosis, the net synthesis of cycle intermediates, is important for insulin secretion. Increased cycle intermediates will alter mitochondrial processes, and, therefore, the synthesized intermediates must be exported from mitochondria to the cytosol (cataplerosis). This further suggests that these intermediates have roles in signaling insulin secretion. Although evidence is quite good that all physiological fuel secretagogues stimulate insulin secretion via anaplerosis, evidence is just emerging about the possible extramitochondrial roles of exported citric acid cycle intermediates. This article speculates on their potential roles as signaling molecules themselves and as exporters of equivalents of NADPH, acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, as well as alpha-ketoglutarate as a substrate for hydroxylases. We also discuss the "succinate mechanism," which hypothesizes that insulin secretagogues produce both NADPH and mevalonate. Finally, we discuss the role of mitochondria in causing oscillations in beta-cell citrate levels. These parallel oscillations in ATP and NAD(P)H. Oscillations in beta-cell plasma membrane electrical potential, ATP/ADP and NAD(P)/NAD(P)H ratios, and glycolytic flux are known to correlate with pulsatile insulin release. Citrate oscillations might synchronize oscillations of individual mitochondria with one another and mitochondrial oscillations with oscillations in glycolysis

  13. A highly efficient modified human serum albumin signal peptide to secrete proteins in cells derived from different mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Attallah, Carolina; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Oggero, Marcos

    2017-01-10

    Signal peptides (SPs) are key elements in the production of recombinant proteins; however, little information is available concerning different SP in mammalian cells other than CHO. In order to study the efficiency of different SPs to direct the traffic along the secretory pathway of the green fluorescence protein (GFP) and a scFv-Fc fusion protein; CHO-K1, HEK293 and NS0 cell lines were transfected in a transient and stable way. SP of human azurocidin (AZ), modified human albumin (mSA), modified Cricetulus griseus Ig kappa chain V III region MOPC 63 like (mIgκ C) and modified human Ig kappa chain V III region VG (mIgκ H) were evaluated. The efficiency of SPs to translocate a propeptide across the ER membrane was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry for the GFP inside the secretory pathway, and by antigen-specific indirect ELISA for the scFv-Fc outside the cell. The mSA SP was successful in directing the secretion of the active proteins in these different types of mammalian cells, regardless of the transgene copy number. The goal of this work was to demonstrate that a modified version of SA SP might be used in different mammalian cells employing the same expression vector.

  14. Intercellular signaling through secreted proteins induces free-energy gradient-directed cell movement

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Shin, Young Shik; Sutherland, Alex; Levine, R. D.; Heath, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell migration is important in tissue engineering and medicine. Cell motility depends on factors such as nutrient concentration gradients and soluble factor signaling. In particular, cell–cell signaling can depend on cell–cell separation distance and can influence cellular arrangements in bulk cultures. Here, we seek a physical-based approach, which identifies a potential governed by cell–cell signaling that induces a directed cell–cell motion. A single-cell barcode chip (SCBC) was used to experimentally interrogate secreted proteins in hundreds of isolated glioblastoma brain cancer cell pairs and to monitor their relative motions over time. We used these trajectories to identify a range of cell–cell separation distances where the signaling was most stable. We then used a thermodynamics-motivated analysis of secreted protein levels to characterize free-energy changes for different cell–cell distances. We show that glioblastoma cell–cell movement can be described as Brownian motion biased by cell–cell potential. To demonstrate that the free-energy potential as determined by the signaling is the driver of motion, we inhibited two proteins most involved in maintaining the free-energy gradient. Following inhibition, cell pairs showed an essentially random Brownian motion, similar to the case for untreated, isolated single cells. PMID:27140641

  15. Intercellular signaling through secreted proteins induces free-energy gradient-directed cell movement.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Shin, Young Shik; Sutherland, Alex; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2016-05-17

    Controlling cell migration is important in tissue engineering and medicine. Cell motility depends on factors such as nutrient concentration gradients and soluble factor signaling. In particular, cell-cell signaling can depend on cell-cell separation distance and can influence cellular arrangements in bulk cultures. Here, we seek a physical-based approach, which identifies a potential governed by cell-cell signaling that induces a directed cell-cell motion. A single-cell barcode chip (SCBC) was used to experimentally interrogate secreted proteins in hundreds of isolated glioblastoma brain cancer cell pairs and to monitor their relative motions over time. We used these trajectories to identify a range of cell-cell separation distances where the signaling was most stable. We then used a thermodynamics-motivated analysis of secreted protein levels to characterize free-energy changes for different cell-cell distances. We show that glioblastoma cell-cell movement can be described as Brownian motion biased by cell-cell potential. To demonstrate that the free-energy potential as determined by the signaling is the driver of motion, we inhibited two proteins most involved in maintaining the free-energy gradient. Following inhibition, cell pairs showed an essentially random Brownian motion, similar to the case for untreated, isolated single cells.

  16. Supramolecular Structure and Functional Analysis of the Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Qun; Liu, Xingzhong; Wei, Hai-Lei

    2016-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of plant and animal bacterial pathogens directs the secretion and injection of proteins into host cells. Some homologous genes of T3SS were found also in non-pathogenic bacteria, but the organization of its machinery and basic function are still unknown. In this study, we identified a T3SS gene cluster from the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 and isolated the corresponding T3SS apparatus. The T3SS gene cluster of strain 2P24 is similar organizationally to that of pathogenic P. syringae, except that it lacks the regulator hrpR and the hrpK1 and hrpH genes, which are involved in translocation of proteins. Electron microscopy revealed that the T3SS supramolecular structure of strain 2P24 was comprised of two distinctive substructures: a long extracellular, filamentous pilus, and a membrane-embedded base. We show that strain 2P24 deploys a harpin homolog protein, RspZ1, to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi leaves with protein that is partially purified, and by complementing the hrpZ1 mutation of pHIR11. The T3SS of strain 2P24 retained ability to secrete effectors, whereas its effector translocation activity appeared to be excessively lost. Mutation of the rscC gene from 2P24 T3SS abolished the secretion of effectors, but the general biocontrol properties were unaffected. Remarkably, strain 2P24 induced functional MAMP-triggered immunity that included a burst of reactive oxygen species, strong suppression of challenge cell death, and disease expansion, while it was not associated with the secretion functional T3SS. PMID:26779224

  17. Novel alpha1-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways: secreted factors and interactions with the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Papay, Robert; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Gaivin, Robert J; de la Motte, Carol A; Plow, Edward F; Perez, Dianne M

    2006-07-01

    alpha1-Adrenergic receptor (alpha1-ARs) subtypes (alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D) regulate multiple signal pathways, such as phospholipase C, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases. We employed oligonucleotide microarray technology to explore the effects of both short- (1 h) and long-term (18 h) activation of the alpha1A-AR to enable RNA changes to occur downstream of earlier well characterized signaling pathways, promoting novel couplings. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies confirmed that PKC was a critical regulator of alpha1A-AR-mediated gene expression, and secreted interleukin (IL)-6 also contributed to gene expression alterations. We next focused on two novel signaling pathways that might be mediated through alpha1A-AR stimulation because of the clustering of gene expression changes for cell adhesion/motility (syndecan-4 and tenascin-C) and hyaluronan (HA) signaling. We confirmed that alpha1-ARs induced adhesion in three cell types to vitronectin, an interaction that was also integrin-, FGF7-, and PKC-dependent. alpha1-AR activation also inhibited cell migration, which was integrin- and PKC-independent but still required secretion of FGF7. alpha1-AR activation also increased the expression and deposition of HA, a glycosaminoglycan, which displayed two distinct structures: pericellular coats and long cable structures, as well as increasing expression of the HA receptor, CD44. Long cable structures of HA can bind leukocytes, which this suggests that alpha1-ARs may be involved in proinflammatory responses. Our results indicate alpha1-ARs induce the secretion of factors that interact with the extracellular matrix to regulate cell adhesion, motility and proinflammatory responses through novel signaling pathways.

  18. A type III effector antagonises death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Wong, Tania; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare VL; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O’Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonise the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC), utilise a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonisation and interfere with antimicrobial host responses 1-3. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death domain containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death receptor induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-GlcNAc transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens antagonise death receptor induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response. PMID:24025841

  19. Negative Autogenous Control of the Master Type III Secretion System Regulator HrpL in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Christopher; Schumacher, Jörg; Jovanovic, Milija; Bennett, Mark

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a principal virulence determinant of the model bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. T3SS effector proteins inhibit plant defense signaling pathways in susceptible hosts and elicit evolved immunity in resistant plants. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL coordinates the expression of most T3SS genes. Transcription of hrpL is dependent on sigma-54 and the codependent enhancer binding proteins HrpR and HrpS for hrpL promoter activation. hrpL is oriented adjacently to and divergently from the HrpL-dependent gene hrpJ, sharing an intergenic upstream regulatory region. We show that association of the RNA polymerase (RNAP)-HrpL complex with the hrpJ promoter element imposes negative autogenous control on hrpL transcription in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The hrpL promoter was upregulated in a ΔhrpL mutant and was repressed by plasmid-borne hrpL. In a minimal Escherichia coli background, the activity of HrpL was sufficient to achieve repression of reconstituted hrpL transcription. This repression was relieved if both the HrpL DNA-binding function and the hrp-box sequence of the hrpJ promoter were compromised, implying dependence upon the hrpJ promoter. DNA-bound RNAP-HrpL entirely occluded the HrpRS and partially occluded the integration host factor (IHF) recognition elements of the hrpL promoter in vitro, implicating inhibition of DNA binding by these factors as a cause of negative autogenous control. A modest increase in the HrpL concentration caused hypersecretion of the HrpA1 pilus protein but intracellular accumulation of later T3SS substrates. We argue that negative feedback on HrpL activity fine-tunes expression of the T3SS regulon to minimize the elicitation of plant defenses. PMID:28119474

  20. Identification of a novel type III secretion-associated outer membrane-bound protein from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Li, Rui-Fang; Ming, Zhen-Hua; Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens employ the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic cells to overcome host defenses. To date, most of our knowledge about the T3SS molecular architecture comes from the studies on animal pathogens. In plant pathogens, nine Hrc proteins are believed to be structural components of the T3SS, of which HrcC and HrcJ form the outer and inner rings of the T3SS, respectively. Here, we demonstrated that a novel outer membrane-bound protein (HpaM) of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is critical for the type III secretion and is structurally and functionally conserved in phytopathogenic Xanthomonas spp. We showed that the C-terminus of HpaM extends into the periplasm to interact physically with HrcJ and the middle part of HpaM interacts physically with HrcC. It is clear that the outer and inner rings compose the main basal body of the T3SS apparatus in animal pathogens. Therefore, we presume that HpaM may act as a T3SS structural component, or play a role in assisting assembling or affecting the stability of the T3SS apparatus. HpaM is a highly prevalent and specific protein in Xanthomonas spp., suggesting that the T3SS of Xanthomonas is distinctive in some aspects from other pathogens. PMID:28198457

  1. Identification of a novel type III secretion-associated outer membrane-bound protein from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Li, Rui-Fang; Ming, Zhen-Hua; Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2017-02-15

    Many bacterial pathogens employ the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic cells to overcome host defenses. To date, most of our knowledge about the T3SS molecular architecture comes from the studies on animal pathogens. In plant pathogens, nine Hrc proteins are believed to be structural components of the T3SS, of which HrcC and HrcJ form the outer and inner rings of the T3SS, respectively. Here, we demonstrated that a novel outer membrane-bound protein (HpaM) of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is critical for the type III secretion and is structurally and functionally conserved in phytopathogenic Xanthomonas spp. We showed that the C-terminus of HpaM extends into the periplasm to interact physically with HrcJ and the middle part of HpaM interacts physically with HrcC. It is clear that the outer and inner rings compose the main basal body of the T3SS apparatus in animal pathogens. Therefore, we presume that HpaM may act as a T3SS structural component, or play a role in assisting assembling or affecting the stability of the T3SS apparatus. HpaM is a highly prevalent and specific protein in Xanthomonas spp., suggesting that the T3SS of Xanthomonas is distinctive in some aspects from other pathogens.

  2. Eukaryotic pathways targeted by the type III secretion system effector protein, BipC, involved in the intracellular lifecycle of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-Tyng; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiological agent for melioidosis, is known to secrete a type III secretion system (TTSS) protein into the host’s internal milieu. One of the TTSS effector protein, BipC, has been shown to play an important role in the B. pseudomallei pathogenesis. To identify the host response profile that was directly or indirectly regulated by this protein, genome-wide transcriptome approach was used to examine the gene expression profiles of infected mice. The transcriptome analysis of the liver and spleen revealed that a total of approximately 1,000 genes were transcriptionally affected by BipC. Genes involved in bacterial invasion, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and MAPK signalling pathway were over-expressed and may be specifically regulated by BipC in vivo. These results suggest that BipC mainly targets pathways related to the cellular processes which could modulate the cellular trafficking processes. The host transcriptional response exhibited remarkable differences with and without the presence of the BipC protein. Overall, the detailed picture of this study provides new insights that BipC may have evolved to efficiently manipulate host-cell pathways which is crucial in the intracellular lifecycle of B. pseudomallei. PMID:27634329

  3. The bacterium Pantoea stewartii uses two different type III secretion systems to colonize its plant host and insect vector.

    PubMed

    Correa, Valdir R; Majerczak, Doris R; Ammar, El-Desouky; Merighi, Massimo; Pratt, Richard C; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Coplin, David L; Redinbaugh, Margaret G

    2012-09-01

    Plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (herein referred to as P. stewartii), the causative agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt and leaf blight of maize, carries phylogenetically distinct T3SSs. In addition to an Hrc-Hrp T3SS, known to be essential for maize pathogenesis, P. stewartii has a second T3SS (Pantoea secretion island 2 [PSI-2]) that is required for persistence in its flea beetle vector, Chaetocnema pulicaria (Melsh). PSI-2 belongs to the Inv-Mxi-Spa T3SS family, typically found in animal pathogens. Mutagenesis of the PSI-2 psaN gene, which encodes an ATPase essential for secretion of T3SS effectors by the injectisome, greatly reduces both the persistence of P. stewartii in flea beetle guts and the beetle's ability to transmit P. stewartii to maize. Ectopic expression of the psaN gene complements these phenotypes. In addition, the PSI-2 psaN gene is not required for P. stewartii pathogenesis of maize and is transcriptionally upregulated in insects compared to maize tissues. Thus, the Hrp and PSI-2 T3SSs play different roles in the life cycle of P. stewartii as it alternates between its insect vector and plant host.

  4. The Bacterium Pantoea stewartii Uses Two Different Type III Secretion Systems To Colonize Its Plant Host and Insect Vector

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Valdir R.; Majerczak, Doris R.; Ammar, El-Desouky; Merighi, Massimo; Pratt, Richard C.; Hogenhout, Saskia A.; Coplin, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (herein referred to as P. stewartii), the causative agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt and leaf blight of maize, carries phylogenetically distinct T3SSs. In addition to an Hrc-Hrp T3SS, known to be essential for maize pathogenesis, P. stewartii has a second T3SS (Pantoea secretion island 2 [PSI-2]) that is required for persistence in its flea beetle vector, Chaetocnema pulicaria (Melsh). PSI-2 belongs to the Inv-Mxi-Spa T3SS family, typically found in animal pathogens. Mutagenesis of the PSI-2 psaN gene, which encodes an ATPase essential for secretion of T3SS effectors by the injectisome, greatly reduces both the persistence of P. stewartii in flea beetle guts and the beetle's ability to transmit P. stewartii to maize. Ectopic expression of the psaN gene complements these phenotypes. In addition, the PSI-2 psaN gene is not required for P. stewartii pathogenesis of maize and is transcriptionally upregulated in insects compared to maize tissues. Thus, the Hrp and PSI-2 T3SSs play different roles in the life cycle of P. stewartii as it alternates between its insect vector and plant host. PMID:22773631

  5. Characterization of the ysa pathogenicity locus in the chromosome of Yersinia enterocolitica and phylogeny analysis of type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Foultier, Boris; Troisfontaines, Paul; Müller, Simone; Opperdoes, Fred R; Cornelis, Guy R

    2002-07-01

    Several Gram negative bacteria use a complex system called "type III secretion system" (TTSS) to engage their host. The archetype of TTSS is the plasmid-encoded "Yop virulon" shared by the three species of pathogenic Yersinia (Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica). A second TTSS, called Ysa (for Yersinia secretion apparatus) was recently described in Y. enterocolitica 8081, a strain from serotype O:8. In this study, we describe the ysa locus from A127/90, another strain of serotype O:8, and we extend the sequence to several new genes encoding Ysp proteins which are the substrates of this secretion system, and a putative chaperone SycB. According to the deduced protein sequences, the ysa system from A127/90 is identical to that of 8081. It is different from the chromosome-encoded TTSS of Y. pestis but is instead closely related to the Mxi-Spa TTSS of Shigella and to the SPI-1 encoded TTSS of Salmonella enterica. We further demonstrated that the ysa locus is only present in biotype IB strains of Y. enterocolitica. Including this new Ysa system, a phylogenetic analysis of the 26 known TTSSs was carried out, based on the sequence analysis of three conserved proteins. All the TTSSs fall into five different clusters. The phylogenetic tree of these TTSSs is completely different from the evolutionary tree based on 16S RNA, indicating that TTSSs have been distributed by horizontal transfer.

  6. Specific activation, signalling and secretion profiles of human platelets following PAR-1 and PAR-4 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim Anh; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Laradi, Sandrine; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Blood platelets play a central haemostatic function; however, they also play a role in inflammation and are capable of secreting various cytokines, chemokines and related products. The purpose of this study was to identify subtle variations in platelet physiology using proteomics. We compared the levels of membrane proteins (n = 3), α and δ granule proteins (n = 18), and signalling proteins (n = 30) from unstimulated platelets with those of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1- and PAR-4-stimulated platelets (n = 10). The vast majority of these proteins responded similarly to PAR-1 or PAR-4 engagement. However, differences were observed within membrane CD40L expressed, and α granule GRO-α and MDC secreted proteins.

  7. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  8. Identification of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Yersinia pestis Type III Secretion System YscN ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Swietnicki, Wieslaw; Carmany, Daniel; Retford, Michael; Guelta, Mark; Dorsey, Russell; Bozue, Joel; Lee, Michael S.; Olson, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a Gram negative zoonotic pathogen responsible for causing bubonic and pneumonic plague in humans. The pathogen uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence factors directly from bacterium into host mammalian cells. The system contains a single ATPase, YscN, necessary for delivery of virulence factors. In this work, we show that deletion of the catalytic domain of the yscN gene in Y. pestis CO92 attenuated the strain over three million-fold in the Swiss-Webster mouse model of bubonic plague. The result validates the YscN protein as a therapeutic target for plague. The catalytic domain of the YscN protein was made using recombinant methods and its ATPase activity was characterized in vitro. To identify candidate therapeutics, we tested computationally selected small molecules for inhibition of YscN ATPase activity. The best inhibitors had measured IC50 values below 20 µM in an in vitro ATPase assay and were also found to inhibit the homologous BsaS protein from Burkholderia mallei animal-like T3SS at similar concentrations. Moreover, the compounds fully inhibited YopE secretion by attenuated Y. pestis in a bacterial cell culture and mammalian cells at µM concentrations. The data demonstrate the feasibility of targeting and inhibiting a critical protein transport ATPase of a bacterial virulence system. It is likely the same strategy could be applied to many other common human pathogens using type III secretion system, including enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei species. PMID:21611119

  9. Structural Features Reminiscent of ATP-Driven Protein Translocases Are Essential for the Function of a Type III Secretion-Associated ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Junya; Lefebre, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacterial pathogens and symbionts utilize type III secretion systems to interact with their hosts. These machines have evolved to deliver bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells to modulate a variety of cellular functions. One of the most conserved components of these systems is an ATPase, which plays an essential role in the recognition and unfolding of proteins destined for secretion by the type III pathway. Here we show that structural features reminiscent of other ATP-driven protein translocases are essential for the function of InvC, the ATPase associated with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium type III secretion system. Mutational and functional analyses showed that a two-helix-finger motif and a conserved loop located at the entrance of and within the predicted pore formed by the hexameric ATPase are essential for InvC function. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the function of this highly conserved component of type III secretion machines. IMPORTANCE Type III secretion machines are essential for the virulence or symbiotic relationships of many bacteria. These machines have evolved to deliver bacterial effector proteins into host cells to modulate cellular functions, thus facilitating bacterial colonization and replication. An essential component of these machines is a highly conserved ATPase, which is necessary for the recognition and secretion of proteins destined to be delivered by the type III secretion pathway. Using modeling and structure and function analyses, we have identified structural features of one of these ATPases from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that help to explain important aspects of its function. PMID:26170413

  10. HpaP modulates type III effector secretion in Ralstonia solanacearum and harbours a substrate specificity switch domain essential for virulence.

    PubMed

    Lohou, David; Turner, Marie; Lonjon, Fabien; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Peeters, Nemo; Genin, Stéphane; Vailleau, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria have evolved a type III secretion system (T3SS) to successfully invade their host. This extracellular apparatus allows the translocation of proteins, called type III effectors (T3Es), directly into the host cells. T3Es are virulence factors that have been shown to interfere with the host's immunity or to provide nutrients from the host to the bacteria. The Gram-negative bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum is a worldwide major crop pest whose virulence strongly relies on the T3SS. In R. solanacearum, transcriptional regulation has been extensively studied. However, very few data are available concerning the role played by type III-associated regulators, such as type III chaperones and T3SS control proteins. Here, we characterized HpaP, a putative type III secretion substrate specificity switch (T3S4) protein of R. solanacearum which is not secreted by the bacterium or translocated in the plant cells. HpaP self-interacts and interacts with the PopP1 T3E. HpaP modulates the secretion of early (HrpY pilin) and late (AvrA and PopP1 T3Es) type III substrates. HpaP is dispensable for the translocation of T3Es into the host cells. Finally, we identified two regions of five amino acids in the T3S4 domain that are essential for efficient PopP1 secretion and for HpaP's role in virulence on tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana, but not required for HpaP-HpaP and HpaP-PopP1 interactions. Taken together, our results indicate that HpaP is a putative R. solanacearum T3S4 protein important for full pathogenicity on several hosts, acting as a helper for PopP1 secretion, and repressing AvrA and HrpY secretion.

  11. Isocitrate-to-SENP1 signaling amplifies insulin secretion and rescues dysfunctional β cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferdaoussi, Mourad; Dai, Xiaoqing; Jensen, Mette V.; Wang, Runsheng; Peterson, Brett S.; Huang, Chao; Ilkayeva, Olga; Smith, Nancy; Miller, Nathanael; Hajmrle, Catherine; Spigelman, Aliya F.; Wright, Robert C.; Plummer, Gregory; Suzuki, Kunimasa; Mackay, James P.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Gloyn, Anna L.; Ryan, Terence E.; Norquay, Lisa D.; Brosnan, M. Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K.; Rolph, Timothy P.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E.; Colmers, William F.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Yeh, Edward T.H.; Newgard, Christopher B.; MacDonald, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin secretion from β cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans controls metabolic homeostasis and is impaired in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Increases in blood glucose trigger insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ channels, depolarizing β cells, and opening voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels to elicit insulin exocytosis. However, one or more additional pathway(s) amplify the secretory response, likely at the distal exocytotic site. The mitochondrial export of isocitrate and engagement with cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDc) may be one key pathway, but the mechanism linking this to insulin secretion and its role in T2D have not been defined. Here, we show that the ICDc-dependent generation of NADPH and subsequent glutathione (GSH) reduction contribute to the amplification of insulin exocytosis via sentrin/SUMO-specific protease-1 (SENP1). In human T2D and an in vitro model of human islet dysfunction, the glucose-dependent amplification of exocytosis was impaired and could be rescued by introduction of signaling intermediates from this pathway. Moreover, islet-specific Senp1 deletion in mice caused impaired glucose tolerance by reducing the amplification of insulin exocytosis. Together, our results identify a pathway that links glucose metabolism to the amplification of insulin secretion and demonstrate that restoration of this axis rescues β cell function in T2D. PMID:26389676

  12. Vertebrate Hedgehog is secreted on two types of extracellular vesicles with different signaling properties

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Neha; Walvekar, Ankita; Tate, Dhananjay; Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Bansal, Dhiru; Cicero, Alessandra Lo; Raposo, Graca; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a secreted morphogen that elicits differentiation and patterning in developing tissues. Multiple proposed mechanisms to regulate Hh dispersion includes lipoprotein particles and exosomes. Here we report that vertebrate Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is secreted on two types of extracellular-vesicles/exosomes, from human cell lines and primary chick notochord cells. Although largely overlapping in size as estimated from electron micrographs, the two exosomal fractions exhibited distinct protein and RNA composition. We have probed the functional properties of these vesicles using cell-based assays of Hh-elicited gene expression. Our results suggest that while both Shh-containing exo-vesicular fractions can activate an ectopic Gli-luciferase construct, only exosomes co-expressing Integrins can activate endogenous Shh target genes HNF3β and Olig2 during the differentiation of mouse ES cells to ventral neuronal progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that primary vertebrate cells secrete Shh in distinct vesicular forms, and support a model where packaging of Shh along with other signaling proteins such as Integrins on exosomes modulates target gene activation. The existence of distinct classes of Shh-containing exosomes also suggests a previously unappreciated complexity for fine-tuning of Shh-mediated gradients and pattern formation. PMID:25483805

  13. Vertebrate Hedgehog is secreted on two types of extracellular vesicles with different signaling properties.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Neha; Walvekar, Ankita; Tate, Dhananjay; Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Bansal, Dhiru; Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Raposo, Graca; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2014-12-08

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a secreted morphogen that elicits differentiation and patterning in developing tissues. Multiple proposed mechanisms to regulate Hh dispersion includes lipoprotein particles and exosomes. Here we report that vertebrate Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is secreted on two types of extracellular-vesicles/exosomes, from human cell lines and primary chick notochord cells. Although largely overlapping in size as estimated from electron micrographs, the two exosomal fractions exhibited distinct protein and RNA composition. We have probed the functional properties of these vesicles using cell-based assays of Hh-elicited gene expression. Our results suggest that while both Shh-containing exo-vesicular fractions can activate an ectopic Gli-luciferase construct, only exosomes co-expressing Integrins can activate endogenous Shh target genes HNF3β and Olig2 during the differentiation of mouse ES cells to ventral neuronal progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that primary vertebrate cells secrete Shh in distinct vesicular forms, and support a model where packaging of Shh along with other signaling proteins such as Integrins on exosomes modulates target gene activation. The existence of distinct classes of Shh-containing exosomes also suggests a previously unappreciated complexity for fine-tuning of Shh-mediated gradients and pattern formation.

  14. Structural Insights into Fibronectin Type III Domain Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Cui, Cai Bin; Siddiqui, Adnan; Howard-Williams, Escher L.; Sondek, John; Zuobi-Hasona, Kheir; Aukhil, Ikramuddin

    2007-01-01

    The alternatively spliced type-III extradomain B (EIIIB) of Fibronectin (FN) is only expressed during embryogenesis, wound healing and tumorigenesis. The biological function of this domain remains unclear. We describe here the first crystal structure of the interface between alternatively-spliced domain EIIIB and its adjacent FN type-III domain 8 (FN B-8). The opened CC′ loop of EIIIB and the rotation and tilt of EIIIB domain allows good access to the FG loop of FN-8 which is normally hindered by the CC′ loop of FN-7. In addition, the AGEGIP sequence of the CC′ loop of EIIIB replaces the NGQQGN sequence of the CC′ loop of FN-7. Finally, the CC” loop of EIIIB forms an acidic groove with FN-8. These structural findings warrant future studies directed at identifying potential binding partners for FN B-8 interface, linking EIIIB to skeletal and cartilagenous development, wound healing, and tumorigenesis, respectively. PMID:17261313

  15. Temperature-induced protein secretion by Leishmania mexicana modulates macrophage signalling and function.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Kasra; Antoniak, Elisabeth; Jardim, Armando; Olivier, Martin

    2011-05-03

    Protozoan parasites of genus Leishmania are the causative agents of leishmaniasis. These digenetic microorganisms undergo a marked environmental temperature shift (TS) during transmission from the sandfly vector (ambient temperature, 25-26°C) to the mammalian host (37°C). We have observed that this TS induces a rapid and dramatic increase in protein release from Leishmania mexicana (cutaneous leishmaniasis) within 4 h. Proteomic identification of the TS-induced secreted proteins revealed 72 proteins, the majority of which lack a signal peptide and are thus thought to be secreted via nonconventional mechanisms. Interestingly, this protein release is accompanied by alterations in parasite morphology including an augmentation in the budding of exovesicles from its surface. Here we show that the exoproteome of L. mexicana upon TS induces cleavage and activation of the host protein tyrosine phosphatases, specifically SHP-1 and PTP1-B, in a murine bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line. Furthermore, translocation of prominent inflammatory transcription factors, namely NF-κB and AP-1 is altered. The exoproteome also caused inhibition of nitric oxide production, a crucial leishmanicidal function of the macrophage. Overall, our results provide strong evidence that within early moments of interaction with the mammalian host, L. mexicana rapidly releases proteins and exovesicles that modulate signalling and function of the macrophage. These modulations can result in attenuation of the inflammatory response and deactivation of the macrophage aiding the parasite in the establishment of infection.

  16. Functional interaction between type III-secreted protein IncA of Chlamydophila psittaci and human G3BP1.

    PubMed

    Borth, Nicole; Litsche, Katrin; Franke, Claudia; Sachse, Konrad; Saluz, Hans Peter; Hänel, Frank

    2011-01-31

    Chlamydophila (Cp.) psittaci, the causative agent of psittacosis in birds and humans, is the most important zoonotic pathogen of the family Chlamydiaceae. These obligate intracellular bacteria are distinguished by a unique biphasic developmental cycle, which includes proliferation in a membrane-bound compartment termed inclusion. All Chlamydiaceae spp. possess a coding capacity for core components of a Type III secretion apparatus, which mediates specific delivery of anti-host effector proteins either into the chlamydial inclusion membrane or into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Here we describe the interaction between Type III-secreted protein IncA of Cp. psittaci and host protein G3BP1 in a yeast two-hybrid system. In GST-pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments both in vitro and in vivo interaction between full-length IncA and G3BP1 were shown. Using fluorescence microscopy, the localization of G3BP1 near the inclusion membrane of Cp. psittaci-infected Hep-2 cells was demonstrated. Notably, infection of Hep-2 cells with Cp. psittaci and overexpression of IncA in HEK293 cells led to a decrease in c-Myc protein concentration. This effect could be ascribed to the interaction between IncA and G3BP1 since overexpression of an IncA mutant construct disabled to interact with G3BP1 failed to reduce c-Myc concentration. We hypothesize that lowering the host cell c-Myc protein concentration may be part of a strategy employed by Cp. psittaci to avoid apoptosis and scale down host cell proliferation.

  17. Phylogenetic evidence for extensive horizontal gene transfer of type III secretion system genes among enterobacterial plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Naum, Marianna; Brown, Eric W; Mason-Gamer, Roberta J

    2009-10-01

    This study uses sequences from four genes, which are involved in the formation of the type III secretion apparatus, to determine the role of horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of virulence genes for the enterobacterial plant pathogens. Sequences of Erwinia, Brenneria, Pectobacterium, Dickeya and Pantoea were compared (a) with one another, (b) with sequences of enterobacterial animal pathogens, and (c) with sequences of plant pathogenic gamma and beta proteobacteria, to evaluate probable paths of lateral exchange leading to the current distribution of virulence determinants among these micro-organisms. Phylogenies were reconstructed based on hrcC, hrcR, hrcJ and hrcV gene sequences using parsimony and maximum-likelihood algorithms. Virulence gene phylogenies were also compared with several housekeeping gene loci in order to evaluate patterns of lateral versus vertical acquisition. The resulting phylogenies suggest that multiple horizontal gene transfer events have occurred both within and among the enterobacterial plant pathogens and plant pathogenic gamma and beta proteobacteria. hrcJ sequences are the most similar, exhibiting anywhere from 2 to 50 % variation at the nucleotide level, with the highest degree of variation present between plant and animal pathogen sequences. hrcV sequences are conserved among plant and animal pathogens at the N terminus. The C-terminal domain is conserved only among the enterobacterial plant pathogens, as are the hrcC and hrcR sequences. Additionally, hrcJ and hrcV sequence phylogenies suggest that at least some type III secretion system virulence genes from enterobacterial plant pathogens are related more closely to those of the genus Pseudomonas, a conclusion neither supported nor refuted by hrcC or hrcR.

  18. Functional Interaction between Type III-Secreted Protein IncA of Chlamydophila psittaci and Human G3BP1

    PubMed Central

    Borth, Nicole; Litsche, Katrin; Franke, Claudia; Sachse, Konrad; Saluz, Hans Peter; Hänel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydophila (Cp.) psittaci, the causative agent of psittacosis in birds and humans, is the most important zoonotic pathogen of the family Chlamydiaceae. These obligate intracellular bacteria are distinguished by a unique biphasic developmental cycle, which includes proliferation in a membrane-bound compartment termed inclusion. All Chlamydiaceae spp. possess a coding capacity for core components of a Type III secretion apparatus, which mediates specific delivery of anti-host effector proteins either into the chlamydial inclusion membrane or into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Here we describe the interaction between Type III-secreted protein IncA of Cp. psittaci and host protein G3BP1 in a yeast two-hybrid system. In GST-pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments both in vitro and in vivo interaction between full-length IncA and G3BP1 were shown. Using fluorescence microscopy, the localization of G3BP1 near the inclusion membrane of Cp. psittaci-infected Hep-2 cells was demonstrated. Notably, infection of Hep-2 cells with Cp. psittaci and overexpression of IncA in HEK293 cells led to a decrease in c-Myc protein concentration. This effect could be ascribed to the interaction between IncA and G3BP1 since overexpression of an IncA mutant construct disabled to interact with G3BP1 failed to reduce c-Myc concentration. We hypothesize that lowering the host cell c-Myc protein concentration may be part of a strategy employed by Cp. psittaci to avoid apoptosis and scale down host cell proliferation. PMID:21304914

  19. Understanding the sequential activation of Type III and Type VI Secretion Systems in Salmonella typhimurium using Boolean modeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Three pathogenicity islands, viz. SPI-1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1), SPI-2 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 2) and T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), present in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium have been implicated in the virulence of the pathogen. While the regulation of SPI-1 and SPI-2 (both encoding components of the Type III Secretion System - T3SS) are well understood, T6SS regulation is comparatively less studied. Interestingly, inter-connections among the regulatory elements of these three virulence determinants have also been suggested to be essential for successful infection. However, till date, an integrated view of gene regulation involving the regulators of these three secretion systems and their cross-talk is not available. Results In the current study, relevant regulatory information available from literature have been integrated into a single Boolean network, which portrays the dynamics of T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS mediated virulence. Some additional regulatory interactions involving a two-component system response regulator YfhA have also been predicted and included in the Boolean network. These predictions are aimed at deciphering the effects of osmolarity on T6SS regulation, an aspect that has been suggested in earlier studies, but the mechanism of which was hitherto unknown. Simulation of the regulatory network was able to recreate in silico the experimentally observed sequential activation of SPI-1, SPI-2 and T6SS. Conclusions The present study integrates relevant gene regulatory data (from literature and our prediction) into a single network, representing the cross-communication between T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS. This holistic view of regulatory interactions is expected to improve the current understanding of pathogenesis of S. typhimurium. PMID:24079299

  20. Characterization of the Ruler Protein Interaction Interface on the Substrate Specificity Switch Protein in the Yersinia Type III Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Ho, Oanh; Rogne, Per; Edgren, Tomas; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Login, Frédéric H; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2017-02-24

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria use the type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. In Yersinia, the switch to secretion of effector proteins is induced first after intimate contact between the bacterium and its eukaryotic target cell has been established, and the T3SS proteins YscP and YscU play a central role in this process. Here we identify the molecular details of the YscP binding site on YscU by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The binding interface is centered on the C-terminal domain of YscU. Disrupting the YscU-YscP interaction by introducing point mutations at the interaction interface significantly reduced the secretion of effector proteins and HeLa cell cytotoxicity. Interestingly, the binding of YscP to the slowly self-cleaving YscU variant P264A conferred significant protection against autoproteolysis. The YscP-mediated inhibition of YscU autoproteolysis suggests that the cleavage event may act as a timing switch in the regulation of early versus late T3SS substrates. We also show that YscUC binds to the inner rod protein YscI with a dissociation constant (Kd ) of 3.8 μm and with 1:1 stoichiometry. The significant similarity among different members of the YscU, YscP, and YscI families suggests that the protein-protein interactions discussed in this study are also relevant for other T3SS-containing Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. NMR characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A.; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2017-01-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologs are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by CD and NMR spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residues 16–41 and 55–76. NMR backbone dynamics data show that the helices in PcrG have semi-rigid flexibility and they tumble as a single entity with similar backbone dynamics. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from 9–76 is involved in binding to PcrV. Thus the PcrG family of T3SS chaperone proteins is essentially partially folded. PMID:26451841

  2. Angiogenic inhibitors delivered by the type III secretion system of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium safely shrink tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yu, Bin; Cai, Chun-Hui; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Despite of a growing number of bacterial species that apparently exhibit intrinsic tumor-targeting properties, no bacterium is able to inhibit tumor growth completely in the immunocompetent hosts, due to its poor dissemination inside the tumors. Oxygen and inflammatory reaction form two barriers and restrain the spread of the bacteria inside the tumors. Here, we engineered a Salmonella typhimurium strain named ST8 which is safe and has limited ability to spread beyond the anaerobic regions of tumors. When injected systemically to tumor-bearing immunocompetent mice, ST8 accumulated in tumors at levels at least 100-fold greater than parental obligate anaerobic strain ST4. ST8/pSEndo harboring therapeutic plasmids encoding Endostatin fused with a secreted protein SopA could target vasculature at the tumor periphery, can stably maintain and safely deliver a therapeutic vector, release angiogenic inhibitors through a type III secretion system (T3SS) to interfere with the pro-angiogenic action of growth factors in tumors. Mice with murine CT26 colon cancer that had been injected with ST8/pSEndo showed efficient tumor suppression by inducing more severe necrosis and inhibiting blooding vessel density within tumors. Our findings provide a therapeutic platform for indirectly acting therapeutic strategies such as anti-angiogenesis and immune therapy.

  3. InvB is a type III secretion-associated chaperone for the Salmonella enterica effector protein SopE.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ho; Galán, Jorge E

    2003-12-01

    SopE is a bacteriophage-encoded effector protein of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that is translocated into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells by a type III secretion system (TTSS) (W.-D. Hardt, H. Urlaub, and J. E. Galán, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:2574-2579, 1998; M. W. Wood, R. Rosqvist, P. B. Mullan, M. H. Edwards, and E. E. Galyov, Mol. Microbiol. 22:327-338, 1996). In this study, we provide evidence that an unlinked gene carried within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), invB (K. Eichelberg, C. Ginocchio, and J. E. Galán, J. Bacteriol. 176:4501-4510, 1994), is required for the secretion of SopE through the SPI-1 TTSS. Furthermore, far-Western blotting analysis shows that SopE directly interacts with InvB through a domain located at its amino terminus. We conclude that InvB is the TTSS-associated chaperone for SopE.

  4. The RNA Helicase DeaD Stimulates ExsA Translation To Promote Expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Intile, Peter J.; Balzer, Grant J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system (T3SS) is a primary virulence factor important for phagocytic avoidance, disruption of host cell signaling, and host cell cytotoxicity. ExsA is the master regulator of T3SS transcription. The expression, synthesis, and activity of ExsA is tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic regulation consists of the well-characterized ExsECDA partner-switching cascade, while extrinsic factors include global regulators that alter exsA transcription and/or translation. To identify novel extrinsic regulators of ExsA, we conducted a transposon mutagenesis screen in the absence of intrinsic control. Transposon disruptions within gene PA2840, which encodes a homolog of the Escherichia coli RNA-helicase DeaD, significantly reduced T3SS gene expression. Recent studies indicate that E. coli DeaD can promote translation by relieving inhibitory secondary structures within target mRNAs. We report here that PA2840, renamed DeaD, stimulates ExsA synthesis at the posttranscriptional level. Genetic experiments demonstrate that the activity of an exsA translational fusion is reduced in a deaD mutant. In addition, exsA expression in trans fails to restore T3SS gene expression in a deaD mutant. We hypothesized that DeaD relaxes mRNA secondary structure to promote exsA translation and found that altering the mRNA sequence of exsA or the native exsA Shine-Dalgarno sequence relieved the requirement for DeaD in vivo. Finally, we show that purified DeaD promotes ExsA synthesis using in vitro translation assays. Together, these data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for P. aeruginosa DeaD and add to the complexity of global regulation of T3SS. IMPORTANCE Although members of the DEAD box family of RNA helicases are appreciated for their roles in mRNA degradation and ribosome biogenesis, an additional role in gene regulation is now emerging in bacteria. By relaxing secondary structures in mRNAs, DEAD box

  5. Lytic Activity of LysH5 Endolysin Secreted by Lactococcus lactis Using the Secretion Signal Sequence of Bacteriocin Lcn972

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Gutiérrez, Dolores; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage endolysins have an interesting potential as antimicrobials. The endolysin LysH5, encoded by Staphylococcus aureus phage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88, was expressed and secreted in Lactococcus lactis using the signal peptide of bacteriocin lactococcin 972 and lactococcal constitutive and inducible promoters. Up to 80 U/mg of extracellular active endolysin was detected in culture supernatants, but most of the protein (up to 323 U/mg) remained in the cell extracts. PMID:22344638

  6. Evidence for the presence of a type III secretion system in diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC).

    PubMed

    Kyaw, C M; De Araujo, C R; Lima, M R; Gondim, E G S; Brígido, M M; Giugliano, L G

    2003-07-01

    Diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains (DAEC) represent a potential cause of diarrhoea in infants, and the detection of type three secretion system (TTSS) genes in DAEC would substantiate their pathogenic nature. In this work, four isolates of DAEC, recovered from stools of diarrhoeic children, were analysed by PCR, in order to detect the presence of TTSS genes. Primers targeted to the escC, escJ, escN and escV, some of the most conserved TTSS genes in enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC), were used in order to verify the occurrence of homologous genes in our DAEC isolates. By this approach, we were able to characterise DNA fragments corresponding to putative escJ and escN genes in all DAEC isolates. Furthermore, DNA fragments homologous to the escC and escV genes were also amplified from all isolates. Besides the similarity found among the DAEC esc homologues with EPEC and EHEC esc genes, the nucleotide sequence analysis of the flanking regions of the amplified DNA fragments suggests that the putative DAEC esc genes are organised in the same manner as observed in EPEC and in EHEC strains. The results described here provide strong evidence for the presence of a TTSS in the DAEC strains analysed, implicating a pathogenic nature of these isolates.

  7. Leukotriene B4 potentiates CpG signaling for enhanced cytokine secretion by human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Gosselin, Jean

    2009-08-15

    TLRs are known to be important in innate host defense against a variety of microbial infections. In particular, TLR9 has been associated with immune defense against different foreign organisms by recognition of unmethylated DNA sequences. In this report, we provide evidence that leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) has the capacity to modulate TLR9 expression on human neutrophils. The effect of LTB(4) was found to be specific, because related leukotrienes such as LTC(4) and LTD(4) or neutrophil agonists IL-8 and C5a failed to modulate TLR9 expression in neutrophils. Using fluorochrome-tagged CpG DNA, we observed that LTB(4) treatment also increased TLR9 ligand binding in neutrophils. Moreover, LTB(4) stimulation potentiates CpG-mediated signaling via an endosome-independent mechanism in human neutrophils, leading to enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. The increase in cytokine secretion by LTB(4) following CpG stimulation of neutrophils was associated with the activation of TGF-beta-activated kinase (TAK-1) as well as p38 and c-Jun (JNK) kinases. In contrast, in PBMC LTB(4) leads to an increase in cytokine secretion following CpG stimulation but via a MyD88- and endosome-dependent mechanism. As observed in neutrophils, PBMC stimulation with LTB(4) in the presence of CpG also results in enhanced TAK-1, p38, and JNK phosphorylation/activation. These data provide new evidence underlying the immunomodulatory properties of LTB(4) leading to antimicrobial defense.

  8. Effects of terbium (III) on signaling molecules in horseradish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Zhang, Xuanbo; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth elements, especially terbium (Tb), are high-valence heavy metal elements that accumulate in the environment, and they show toxic effects on plants. Signaling molecules regulate many physiological and biochemical processes in plants. How rare earth elements affect signaling molecules remains largely unknown. In the present study, the effects of Tb(3+) on some extracellular and intracellular signaling molecules (gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, auxin, H2O2, and Ca(2+)) in horseradish leaves were investigated by using high-performance liquid chromatography, X-ray energy spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy, and Tb(3+) was sprayed on the surface of leaves. Tb(3+) treatment decreased the auxin and gibberellic acid contents and increased the abscisic acid content. These changes in the contents of phytohormones (gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, and auxin) triggered excessive production of intracellular H2O2. Consequently, the increase in H2O2 content stimulated the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and the release of Ca(2+) from Ca(2+) stores, leading to Ca(2+) overload and the resulting inhibition of physiological and biochemical processes. The effects outlined above were more evident with increasing the concentration of Tb(3+) sprayed on horseradish leaves. Our data provide a possible underlying mechanism of Tb(3+) action on plants.

  9. New protein-protein interactions identified for the regulatory and structural components and substrates of the type III Secretion system of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis Pathovar citri.

    PubMed

    Alegria, Marcos C; Docena, Cassia; Khater, Leticia; Ramos, Carlos H I; da Silva, Ana C R; Farah, Chuck S

    2004-09-01

    We have initiated a project to identify protein-protein interactions involved in the pathogenicity of the bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. Using a yeast two-hybrid system based on Gal4 DNA-binding and activation domains, we have focused on identifying interactions involving subunits, regulators, and substrates of the type III secretion system coded by the hrp (for hypersensitive response and pathogenicity), hrc (for hrp conserved), and hpa (for hrp associated) genes. We have identified several previously uncharacterized interactions involving (i) HrpG, a two-component system response regulator responsible for the expression of X. axonopodis pv. citri hrp operons, and XAC0095, a previously uncharacterized protein encountered only in Xanthomonas spp.; (ii) HpaA, a protein secreted by the type III secretion system, HpaB, and the C-terminal domain of HrcV; (iii) HrpB1, HrpD6, and HrpW; and (iv) HrpB2 and HrcU. Homotropic interactions were also identified for the ATPase HrcN. These newly identified protein-protein interactions increase our understanding of the functional integration of phytopathogen-specific type III secretion system components and suggest new hypotheses regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying Xanthomonas pathogenicity.

  10. Deletions in the repertoire of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion effector genes reveal functional overlap among effectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many bacterial pathogens of plants and animals disarm and remodel host cells by injecting large repertoires of effectors via the type III secretion system (T3SS). The repertoires of individual strains appear to function as robust systems that can tolerate loss of individual effectors with little or ...

  11. Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000 Type III secretion effector polymutants reveal an interplay between hopAD1 and AvrPtoB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The model pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 suppresses the two-tiered innate immune system of plants by injecting a complex repertoire of effector proteins into host cells via the type III secretion system. The model effector AvrPtoB has multiple domains and plant protein interactors i...

  12. Further Characterization of a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) and of a New Effector Protein from a Clinical Isolate of Aeromonas Hydrophila - Part I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A type III secretion system (T3SS)-associated cytotoxin, AexT, with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa bifuncational toxins ExoT/S, was recently identified from a fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida. In this study, we reported the molecular cha...

  13. Vesicular Trafficking and Signaling for Cytokine and Chemokine Secretion in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Ulrich; Madera-Salcedo, Iris Karina; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Tiwari, Neeraj; Sánchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Ramírez-Valadez, Karla Alina; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Espinosa, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation mast cells (MCs) secrete numerous inflammatory compounds stored in their cytoplasmic secretory granules by a process called anaphylactic degranulation, which is responsible for type I hypersensitivity responses. Prestored mediators include histamine and MC proteases but also some cytokines and growth factors making them available within minutes for a maximal biological effect. Degranulation is followed by the de novo synthesis of lipid mediators such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes as well as a vast array of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, which are responsible for late phase inflammatory responses. While lipid mediators diffuse freely out of the cell through lipid bilayers, both anaphylactic degranulation and secretion of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors depends on highly regulated vesicular trafficking steps that occur along the secretory pathway starting with the translocation of proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. Vesicular trafficking in MCs also intersects with endocytic routes, notably to form specialized cytoplasmic granules called secretory lysosomes. Some of the mediators like histamine reach granules via specific vesicular monoamine transporters directly from the cytoplasm. In this review, we try to summarize the available data on granule biogenesis and signaling events that coordinate the complex steps that lead to the release of the inflammatory mediators from the various vesicular carriers in MCs. PMID:25295038

  14. Intracellular Ca2+ signals in human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cells (QGP-1N).

    PubMed

    Squires, P E; Amiranoff, B; Dunne, M J

    1994-10-01

    Single-cell microfluorimetry techniques have been used to examine the effects of acetylcholine (0.1-100 microM) on the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cell line, QGP-1N. When applied to the bath solution, acetylcholine was found to evoke a marked and rapid increase in [Ca2+]i at all concentrations tested. These responses were either sustained, or associated with the generation of complex patterns of [Ca2+]i transients. Overall, the pattern of response was concentration related. In general, 0.1-10 microM acetylcholine initiated a series of repetitive oscillations in cytoplasmic Ca2+, whilst at higher concentrations the responses consisted of a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i followed by a smaller more sustained increase. Without external Ca2+, 100 microM acetylcholine caused only a transient rise in [Ca2+]i, whereas lower concentrations of the agonist were able to initiate, but not maintain, [Ca2+]i oscillations. Acetylcholine-evoked Ca2+ signals were abolished by atropine (1-10 microM), verapamil (100 microM) and caffeine (20 mM). Nifedipine failed to have any significant effect upon agonist-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i, whilst 50 mM KCl, used to depolarise the cell membrane, only elicited a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Ryanodine (50-500 nM) and caffeine (1-20 mM) did not increase basal Ca2+ levels, but the Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors 2,5-di(tert-butyl)-hydroquinone (TBQ) and thapsigargin both elevated [Ca2+]i levels. These data demonstrate for the first time cytosolic Ca2+ signals in single isolated somatostatin-secreting cells of the pancreas. We have demonstrated that acetylcholine will evoke both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ mobilisation, and we have partially addressed the subcellular mechanism responsible for these events.

  15. Specific maceration and induction of PR-3 gene in potato tuber tissue by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atrosepticum type III secretion system mutants.

    PubMed

    Aghabozorgy, Sohrab; Niakan, Mohammad

    2009-12-15

    The exact function of type III secretion system in some phytopathogenes including Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atrosepticum (Pca) is not understood and is a matter of debate. The aim of this study were to determine specific effect of type III secretion system on potato tubers and to reveal the connection of this system with potato resistant genes such as PR-3. A Pca hrpW fragment was subcloned into a low-copy-number cloning vector (pZH448). The resulting plasmid (pAS19) was then conjugated into the wild-type and mutant strains of Pca by type III secretion system. The virulence property of different Pca strains was studied and the influence of over expression of hrpW on maceration activity was also investigated. Furthermore, the effect of mentioned mutation on the maceration of carrot-root was evaluated. Finally, using real-time PCR, the copy-number of PR-3 gene in potato tuber tissue was assessed. In conclusion, for type III secretion system mutant strains, in contrast with the wild-type, the maceration amount of potato tuber tissue decreased after over expression of hrpW while inoculation of tubers by mutants, increased this amount. In the case of potato, HrpN and DspE proteins appeared to be avirulent factors. Compared with the wild-type strains, Pca nominated mutants significantly reduced potato PR-3 expression thus, PR-3 expression level in potato tuber tissue in answer to infiltration by Pca, depends on functional type III secretion system in the bacterium.

  16. Enantiomeric NMR signal separation behavior and mechanism of samarium(III) and neodymium(III) complexes with (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinate.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sen-Ichi; Okano, Masaru; Kidani, Takahiro

    2017-04-12

    Enantiomeric (1) H and (13) C NMR signal separation behaviors of various α-amino acids and DL-tartarate were investigated by using the samarium(III) and neodymium(III) complexes with (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinate as chiral shift reagents. A relatively smaller concentration ratio of the lanthanide(III) complex to substrates was suitable for the neodymium(III) complex compared with the samarium(III) one, striking a balance between relatively greater signal separation and broadening. To clarify the difference in the signal separation behavior, the chemical shifts of β-protons for fully bound D- and L-alanine (δb (D) and δb (L)) and their adduct formation constants (Ks) were obtained for both metal complexes. Preference for D-alanine was similarly observed for both complexes, while it was revealed that the difference between the δb (D) and δb (L) values is the significant factor to determine the enantiomeric signal separation. The neodymium(III) and samarium(III) complexes can be used complementarily for higher and smaller concentration ranges of substrates, respectively, because the neodymium(III) complex gives the larger difference between the δb (D) and δb (L) values with greater signal broadening compared to the samarium(III) complex.

  17. Induction and Relaxation Dynamics of the Regulatory Network Controlling the Type III Secretion System encoded within Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1

    PubMed Central

    Temme, Karsten; Salis, Howard; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle; Levskaya, Anselm; Hong, Soon-Ho; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Bacterial pathogenesis requires the precise spatial and temporal control of gene expression, the dynamics of which are controlled by regulatory networks. A network encoded within Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 controls the expression of a type III protein secretion system involved in the invasion of host cells. The dynamics of this network are measured in single cells using promoter-green fluorescent protein (gfp) reporters and flow cytometry. During induction, there is a temporal order of gene expression, with transcriptional inputs turning on first, followed by structure, and effector genes. The promoters show varying stochastic properties, where graded inputs are converted into all-or-none and hybrid responses. The relaxation dynamics are measured by shifting cells from inducing into non-inducing conditions and measuring the fluorescence decay. The gfp expressed from promoters controlling the transcriptional inputs (hilC and hilD) and structural genes (prgH) decay exponentially with a characteristic time of 50–55 minutes. In contrast, the gfp expressed from a promoter controlling the expression of effectors (sicA) persists for 110 ± 9 minutes. This promoter is controlled by a genetic circuit formed by a transcription factor (InvF), chaperone (SicA) and secreted protein (SipC) that regulates effector expression in response to the secretion capacity of the cell. A mathematical model of this circuit demonstrates that the delay is due to a split positive feedback loop. This model is tested in a ΔsicA knockout where sicA is complemented with and without the feedback loop. The delay is eliminated when the feedback loop is deleted. Further, a robustness analysis of the model predicts that the delay time can be tuned by changing the affinity of SicA:InvF multimers to an operator in the sicA promoter. This prediction is used to construct a targeted library, which contains mutants with both longer and shorter delays. This combination of theory and

  18. Role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongming; Li, Juncong; Wang, Yihe; Hu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts. The secondary aim was to provide theoretical basis for the molecular mechanisms of scar formation induced by LPS. Methods: The normal skin fibroblasts cultured in vitro were randomly divided into four groups: 0.1 μg/mL LPS reference group, CD14 pretreatment + LPS, TLR4 pretreatment + LPS, CD14 and TLR4 pretreatment + LPS. The collagen DNA synthesis was assessed by 3H-proline incorporation method. Real-time Quantitative PCR was used to detect type I, type III collagen mRNA expression. Results: Similar results were revealed for mRNA expression levels. The immunofluorescence staining suggested that type I and type III collagen were expressed in all investigated groups and that the expression was differentially downregulated in groups B, C, D. ELISA demonstrated markedly decreased levels in secreting type I, type III collagens and hydroxyproline in groups B, C, D (P<0.05), and the lowest level was detected in group D (P<0.01). Conclusion: Pretreatment with CD14 or TLR4 alone or their combination can significantly reduce the levels of type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion, with the most notable reduction detected in case of CD14 and TLR4 combined. We could thus conclude that both CD14 and TLR4 are involved in type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced skin fibroblasts. PMID:25932184

  19. Glutamate acts as a key signal linking glucose metabolism to incretin/cAMP action to amplify insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Gheni, Ghupurjan; Ogura, Masahito; Iwasaki, Masahiro; Yokoi, Norihide; Minami, Kohtaro; Nakayama, Yasumune; Harada, Kazuo; Hastoy, Benoit; Wu, Xichen; Takahashi, Harumi; Kimura, Kazushi; Matsubara, Toshiya; Hoshikawa, Ritsuko; Hatano, Naoya; Sugawara, Kenji; Shibasaki, Tadao; Inagaki, Nobuya; Bamba, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Rorsman, Patrik; Seino, Susumu

    2014-10-23

    Incretins, hormones released by the gut after meal ingestion, are essential for maintaining systemic glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion. The effect of incretins on insulin secretion occurs only at elevated glucose concentrations and is mediated by cAMP signaling, but the mechanism linking glucose metabolism and cAMP action in insulin secretion is unknown. We show here, using a metabolomics-based approach, that cytosolic glutamate derived from the malate-aspartate shuttle upon glucose stimulation underlies the stimulatory effect of incretins and that glutamate uptake into insulin granules mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling amplifies insulin release. Glutamate production is diminished in an incretin-unresponsive, insulin-secreting β cell line and pancreatic islets of animal models of human diabetes and obesity. Conversely, a membrane-permeable glutamate precursor restores amplification of insulin secretion in these models. Thus, cytosolic glutamate represents the elusive link between glucose metabolism and cAMP action in incretin-induced insulin secretion.

  20. Efficient Secretion of Recombinant Proteins from Rice Suspension-Cultured Cells Modulated by the Choice of Signal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Fen; Tan, Chia-Chun; Yeh, Ju-Fang; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Yu-Kuo; Ho, Shin-Lon; Lu, Chung-An

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based expression systems have emerged as a competitive platform in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins. By adding a signal peptide, αAmy3sp, the desired recombinant proteins can be secreted outside transgenic rice cells, making them easy to harvest. In this work, to improve the secretion efficiency of recombinant proteins in rice expression systems, various signal peptides including αAmy3sp, CIN1sp, and 33KDsp have been fused to the N-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and introduced into rice cells to explore the efficiency of secretion of foreign proteins. 33KDsp had better efficiency than αAmy3sp and CIN1sp for the secretion of GFP from calli and suspension-cultured cells. 33KDsp was further applied for the secretion of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from transgenic rice suspension-cultured cells; approximately 76%–92% of total rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was detected in the culture medium. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60. The extracellular yield of rmGM-CSF reached 31.7 mg/L. Our study indicates that 33KDsp is better at promoting the secretion of recombinant proteins in rice suspension-cultured cell systems than the commonly used αAmy3sp. PMID:26473722

  1. Glutamate Acts as a Key Signal Linking Glucose Metabolism to Incretin/cAMP Action to Amplify Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gheni, Ghupurjan; Ogura, Masahito; Iwasaki, Masahiro; Yokoi, Norihide; Minami, Kohtaro; Nakayama, Yasumune; Harada, Kazuo; Hastoy, Benoit; Wu, Xichen; Takahashi, Harumi; Kimura, Kazushi; Matsubara, Toshiya; Hoshikawa, Ritsuko; Hatano, Naoya; Sugawara, Kenji; Shibasaki, Tadao; Inagaki, Nobuya; Bamba, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Rorsman, Patrik; Seino, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Summary Incretins, hormones released by the gut after meal ingestion, are essential for maintaining systemic glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion. The effect of incretins on insulin secretion occurs only at elevated glucose concentrations and is mediated by cAMP signaling, but the mechanism linking glucose metabolism and cAMP action in insulin secretion is unknown. We show here, using a metabolomics-based approach, that cytosolic glutamate derived from the malate-aspartate shuttle upon glucose stimulation underlies the stimulatory effect of incretins and that glutamate uptake into insulin granules mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling amplifies insulin release. Glutamate production is diminished in an incretin-unresponsive, insulin-secreting β cell line and pancreatic islets of animal models of human diabetes and obesity. Conversely, a membrane-permeable glutamate precursor restores amplification of insulin secretion in these models. Thus, cytosolic glutamate represents the elusive link between glucose metabolism and cAMP action in incretin-induced insulin secretion. PMID:25373904

  2. Kisspeptin Restores Pulsatile LH Secretion in Patients with Neurokinin B Signaling Deficiencies: Physiological, Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jacques; George, Jyothis T.; Tello, Javier A.; Francou, Bruno; Bouligand, Jerome; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Anderson, Richard A.; Millar, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is crucial to normal reproductive function and abnormalities in pulse frequency give rise to reproductive dysfunction. Kisspeptin and neurokinin B (NKB), neuropeptides secreted by the same neuronal population in the ventral hypothalamus, have emerged recently as critical central regulators of GnRH and thus gonadotropin secretion. Patients with mutations resulting in loss of signaling by either of these neuroendocrine peptides fail to advance through puberty but the mechanisms mediating this remain unresolved. We report here that continuous kisspeptin infusion restores gonadotropin pulsatility in patients with loss-of-function mutations in NKB (TAC3) or its receptor (TAC3R), indicating that kisspeptin on its own is sufficient to stimulate pulsatile GnRH secretion. Moreover, our findings suggest that NKB action is proximal to kisspeptin in the reproductive neuroendocrine cascade regulating GnRH secretion, and may act as an autocrine modulator of kisspeptin secretion. The ability of continuous kisspeptin infusion to induce pulsatile gonadotropin secretion further indicates that GnRH neurons are able to set up pulsatile secretion in the absence of pulsatile exogenous kisspeptin. PMID:22377698

  3. The Drosophila secreted protein Argos regulates signal transduction in the Ras/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Sawamoto, K; Okabe, M; Tanimura, T; Mikoshiba, K; Nishida, Y; Okano, H

    1996-08-25

    The Drosophila argos gene encodes a secreted protein with an EGF motif which acts as an inhibitor of cellular differentiation in multiple developmental processes. To investigate the cellular pathways regulated by Argos, we screened for mutations which could modify the phenotype caused by overexpression of argos. We show that the effects of argos overexpression on the eye and wing vein development are suppressed by gain-of-function mutations of the MAPKK/D-MEK gene (Dsor1/D-mek) and the MAPK/ERK-A gene (rolled) and were enhanced by loss-of-function mutations of Star. Loss-of-function mutations in components of the Ras/MAPK signaling cascade act as dominant suppressors of the phenotype caused by the argos null mutations. A loss-of-function argos mutation enhanced the overproduction of R7 neurons caused by gain-of-function alleles of Son of sevenless and Dsor1. Conversely, overexpression of argos inhibited formation of the extra R7 cells that was caused by high-level MAPK/ERK-A activity. A phenotype of the sev; argos double mutants revealed that sev is epistatic to argos. These results provide evidence that Argos negatively regulates signal transduction events in the Ras/MAPK cascade.

  4. Use of the usp45 lactococcal secretion signal sequence to drive the secretion and functional expression of enterococcal bacteriocins in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Juan; Jiménez, Juan J; Gútiez, Loreto; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M; Hernández, Pablo E

    2011-01-01

    Replacement of the signal peptide (SP) of the bacteriocins enterocin P (EntP) and hiracin JM79 (HirJM79), produced by Enterococcus faecium P13 and Enterococcus hirae DCH5, respectively, by the signal peptide of Usp45 (SP(usp45)), the major Sec-dependent protein secreted by Lactococcus lactis, permits the production, secretion, and functional expression of EntP and HirJM79 by L. lactis. Chimeric genes encoding the SP(usp45) fused to either mature EntP (entP), with or without the immunity gene (entiP) or to mature HirJM79 (hirJM79), with or without the immunity gene (hiriJM79), were cloned into the expression vector pMG36c, carrying the P(32) constitutive promoter, and into pNZ8048 under control of the inducible PnisA promoter. The production of EntP and HirJM79 by most of the L. lactis recombinant strains was 1.5- to 3.7-fold higher and up to 3.6-fold higher than by the E. faecium P13 and E. hirae DCH5 control strains, respectively. However, the specific antimicrobial activity of the recombinant EntP was 1.1- to 6.2-fold higher than that produced by E. faecium P13, while that of the HirJM79 was a 40% to an 89% of that produced by E. hirae DCH5. Chimeras of SP(usp45) fused to mature EntP or HirJM79 drive the production and secretion of these bacteriocins in L. lactis in the absence of specific immunity and secretion proteins. The supernatants of the recombinant L. lactis NZ9000 strains, producers of EntP, showed a much higher antimicrobial activity against Listeria spp. than that of the recombinant L. lactis NZ9000 derivatives, producers of HirJM79.

  5. YopN and TyeA Hydrophobic Contacts Required for Regulating Ysc-Yop Type III Secretion Activity by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Ayad A. A.; Gurung, Jyoti M.; Costa, Tiago R. D.; Ruuth, Kristina; Zavialov, Anton V.; Forsberg, Åke; Francis, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia bacteria target Yop effector toxins to the interior of host immune cells by the Ysc-Yop type III secretion system. A YopN-TyeA heterodimer is central to controlling Ysc-Yop targeting activity. A + 1 frameshift event in the 3-prime end of yopN can also produce a singular secreted YopN-TyeA polypeptide that retains some regulatory function even though the C-terminal coding sequence of this YopN differs greatly from wild type. Thus, this YopN C-terminal segment was analyzed for its role in type III secretion control. Bacteria producing YopN truncated after residue 278, or with altered sequence between residues 279 and 287, had lost type III secretion control and function. In contrast, YopN variants with manipulated sequence beyond residue 287 maintained full control and function. Scrutiny of the YopN-TyeA complex structure revealed that residue W279 functioned as a likely hydrophobic contact site with TyeA. Indeed, a YopNW279G mutant lost all ability to bind TyeA. The TyeA residue F8 was also critical for reciprocal YopN binding. Thus, we conclude that specific hydrophobic contacts between opposing YopN and TyeA termini establishes a complex needed for regulating Ysc-Yop activity. PMID:27446813

  6. The type III secretion system of biocontrol Pseudomonas fluorescens KD targets the phytopathogenic Chromista Pythium ultimum and promotes cucumber protection.

    PubMed

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Binder, Christian; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2005-09-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is used by Proteobacteria for pathogenic or symbiotic interaction with plant and animal hosts. Recently, TTSS genes thought to originate from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae were evidenced in Pseudomonas fluorescens KD, which protects cucumber from the oomycete Pythium ultimum (kingdom Chromista/Stramenopila). However, it is not known whether the TTSS contributes to plant protection by the bacterium and, if so, whether it targets the plant or the phytopathogen. Inactivation of TTSS gene hrcV following the insertion of an omega cassette strongly reduced the biocontrol activity of the pseudomonad against P. ultimum on cucumber when compared with the wild type, but had no effect on its root-colonization ability. Analysis of a plasmid-based transcriptional hrpJ'-inaZ reporter fusion revealed that expression in strain KD of the operon containing hrcV was strongly stimulated in vitro and in situ by the oomycete and not by the plant. In vitro, both strain KD and its hrcV mutant reduced the activity level of the pectinase polygalacturonase (a key pathogenicity factor) from P. ultimum, but the reduction was much stronger with the wild type. Together, these results show that the target range of bacterial TTSS is not restricted to plants and animals but also can include members of Chromista/Stramenopila, and suggest that virulence genes acquired horizontally from phytopathogenic bacteria were functionally recycled in biocontrol saprophytic Pseudomonas spp., resulting in enhanced plant protection by the latter.

  7. Mathematical Model for Length Control by the Timing of Substrate Switching in the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Nariya, Maulik K.; Israeli, Johnny; Shi, Jack J.; Deeds, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Type III Secretion Systems (T3SS) are complex bacterial structures that provide gram-negative pathogens with a unique virulence mechanism whereby they grow a needle-like structure in order to inject bacterial effector proteins into the cytoplasm of a host cell. Numerous experiments have been performed to understand the structural details of this nanomachine during the past decade. Despite the concerted efforts of molecular and structural biologists, several crucial aspects of the assembly of this structure, such as the regulation of the length of the needle itself, remain unclear. In this work, we used a combination of mathematical and computational techniques to better understand length control based on the timing of substrate switching, which is a possible mechanism for how bacteria ensure that the T3SS needles are neither too short nor too long. In particular, we predicted the form of the needle length distribution based on this mechanism, and found excellent agreement with available experimental data from Salmonella typhimurium with only a single free parameter. Although our findings provide preliminary evidence in support of the substrate switching model, they also make a set of quantitative predictions that, if tested experimentally, would assist in efforts to unambiguously characterize the regulatory mechanisms that control the growth of this crucial virulence factor. PMID:27078235

  8. Biophysical characterization of the type III secretion tip proteins and the tip proteins attached to bacterium-like particles.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Shyamal P; Chen, Xiaotong; Kim, Jae Hyun; Van Roosmalen, Maarten L; Greenwood, Jamie C; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Picking, William D; Leenhouts, Kees; Middaugh, C Russell; Picking, Wendy L

    2015-02-01

    Bacterium-like particles (BLPs), derived from Lactococcus lactis, offer a self-adjuvanting delivery vehicle for subunit protein vaccines. Proteins can be specifically loaded onto the BLPs via a peptidoglycan anchoring (PA) domain. In this study, the tip proteins IpaD, SipD, and LcrV belonging to type III secretion systems of Shigella flexneri, Salmonella enterica, and Yersinia enterocolitica, respectively, were fused to the PA and loaded onto the BLPs. Herein, we biophysically characterized these nine samples and condensed the spectroscopic results into three-index empirical phase diagrams (EPDs). The EPDs show distinctions between the IpaD/SipD and LcrV subfamilies of tip proteins, based on their physical stability, even upon addition of the PA. Upon attachment to the BLPs, the BLPs become defining moiety in the spectroscopic measurements, leaving the tip proteins to have a subtle yet modulating effect on the structural integrity of the tip proteins-BLPs binding. In summary, this work provides a comprehensive view of physical stability of the tip proteins and tip protein-BLPs and serves as a baseline for screening of excipients to increase the stability of the tip protein-BLPs for future vaccine formulation.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of Bordetella pertussis reveals requirement of RNA chaperone Hfq for Type III secretion system functionality.

    PubMed

    Bibova, Ilona; Hot, David; Keidel, Kristina; Amman, Fabian; Slupek, Stephanie; Cerny, Ondrej; Gross, Roy; Vecerek, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of human whooping cough (pertussis) produces a complex array of virulence factors in order to establish efficient infection in the host. The RNA chaperone Hfq and small regulatory RNAs are key players in posttranscriptional regulation in bacteria and have been shown to play an essential role in virulence of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. This study represents the first attempt to characterize the Hfq regulon of the human pathogen B. pertussis under laboratory conditions as well as upon passage in the host and indicates that loss of Hfq has a profound effect on gene expression in B. pertussis. Comparative transcriptional profiling revealed that Hfq is required for expression of several virulence factors in B. pertussis cells including the Type III secretion system (T3SS). In striking contrast to the wt strain, T3SS did not become operational in the hfq mutant passaged either through mice or macrophages thereby proving that Hfq is required for the functionality of the B. pertussis T3SS. Likewise, expression of virulence factors vag8 and tcfA encoding autotransporter and tracheal colonization factor, respectively, was strongly reduced in the hfq mutant. Importantly, for the first time we demonstrate that B. pertussis T3SS can be activated upon contact with macrophage cells in vitro.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilises its type III secretion system to kill the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Abd, Hadi; Wretlind, Bengt; Saeed, Amir; Idsund, Eva; Hultenby, Kjell; Sandström, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a free-living and common environmental bacterium. It is an opportunistic and nosocomial pathogen causing serious human health problems. To overcome its predators, such as macrophages and environmental phagocytes, it utilises different survival strategies, such as the formation of microcolonies and the production of toxins mediated by a type III secretion system (TTSS). The aim of this study was to examine interaction of TTSS effector proteins of P. aeruginosa PA103 with Acanthamoeba castellanii by co-cultivation, viable count, eosin staining, electron microscopy, apoptosis assay, and statistical analysis. The results showed that P. aeruginosa PA103 induced necrosis and apoptosis to kill A. castellanii by the effects of TTSS effector proteins ExoU, ExoS, ExoT, and ExoY. In comparison, Acanthamoeba cultured alone and co-cultured with P. aeruginosa PA103 lacking the known four TTSS effector proteins were not killed. The results are consistent with P. aeruginosa being a strict extracellular bacterium that needs TTSS to survive in the environment, because the TTSS effector proteins are able to kill its eukaryotic predators, such as Acanthamoeba.

  11. Pre-clinical pharmacokinetics and anti-chlamydial activity of salicylidene acylhydrazide inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion.

    PubMed

    Ur-Rehman, Tofeeq; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Chu, Hencelyn; Blomgren, Anders; Dahlgren, Markus K; Zetterström, Caroline E; Peterson, Ellena M; Elofsson, Mikael; Gylfe, Asa

    2012-08-01

    Salicylidene acylhydrazides belong to a class of compounds shown to inhibit bacterial type III secretion (T3S) in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. This class of compounds also inhibits growth and replication of Chlamydiae, strict intracellular bacteria that possess a T3S system. In this study a library of 58 salicylidene acylhydrazides was screened to identify inhibitors of Chlamydia growth. Compounds inhibiting growth of both Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydophila pneumoniae were tested for cell toxicity and seven compounds were selected for preliminary pharmacokinetic analysis in mice using cassette dosing. Two compounds, ME0177 and ME0192, were further investigated by individual pharmacokinetic analysis. Compound ME0177 had a relatively high peak plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under curve and therefore may be considered for systemic treatment of Chlamydia infections. The other compound, ME0192, had poor pharmacokinetic properties but the highest anti-chlamydial activity in vitro and therefore was tested for topical treatment in a mouse vaginal infection model. ME0192 administered vaginally significantly reduced the infectious burden of C. trachomatis and the number of infected mice.

  12. The outer membrane phospholipase A is essential for membrane integrity and type III secretion in Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Jiang, Feng; Zheng, Jianhua; Chen, Lihong; Dong, Jie; Sun, Lilian; Zhu, Yafang; Liu, Bo; Yang, Jian; Yang, Guowei; Jin, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Outer membrane phospholipase A (OMPLA) is an enzyme located in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. OMPLA exhibits broad substrate specificity, and some of its substrates are located in the cellular envelope. Generally, the enzymatic activity can only be induced by perturbation of the cell envelope integrity through diverse methods. Although OMPLA has been thoroughly studied as a membrane protein in Escherichia coli and is constitutively expressed in many other bacterial pathogens, little is known regarding the functions of OMPLA during the process of bacterial infection. In this study, the proteomic and transcriptomic data indicated that OMPLA in Shigella flexneri, termed PldA, both stabilizes the bacterial membrane and is involved in bacterial infection under ordinary culture conditions. A series of physiological assays substantiated the disorganization of the bacterial outer membrane and the periplasmic space in the ΔpldA mutant strain. Furthermore, the ΔpldA mutant strain showed decreased levels of type III secretion system expression, contributing to the reduced internalization efficiency in host cells. The results of this study support that PldA, which is widespread across Gram-negative bacteria, is an important factor for the bacterial life cycle, particularly in human pathogens.

  13. Ralstonia solanacearum type III secretion system effector Rip36 induces a hypersensitive response in the nonhost wild eggplant Solanum torvum.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Kamrun; Matsumoto, Iyo; Taguchi, Fumiko; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Yamamoto, Mikihiro; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki; Mukaihara, Takafumi

    2014-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a Gram-negative soil-borne bacterium that causes bacterial wilt disease in more than 200 plant species, including economically important Solanaceae species. In R. solanacearum, the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) type III secretion system is required for both the ability to induce the hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants and pathogenicity in host plants. Recently, 72 effector genes, called rip (Ralstonia protein injected into plant cells), have been identified in R. solanacearum RS1000. RS1002, a spontaneous nalixidic acid-resistant derivative of RS1000, induced strong HR in the nonhost wild eggplant Solanum torvum in an Hrp-dependent manner. An Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system revealed that Rip36, a putative Zn-dependent protease effector of R. solanacearum, induced HR in S. torvum. A mutation in the putative Zn-binding motif (E149A) completely abolished the ability to induce HR. In agreement with this result, the RS1002-derived Δrip36 and rip36E149A mutants lost the ability to induce HR in S. torvum. An E149A mutation had no effect on the translocation of Rip36 into plant cells. These results indicate that Rip36 is an avirulent factor that induces HR in S. torvum and that a putative Zn-dependent protease motif is essential for this activity.

  14. Small-molecule inhibitors suppress the expression of both type III secretion and amylovoran biosynthesis genes in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Elofsson, Michael; Sundin, George W; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran are two essential pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the serious bacterial disease fire blight. In this study, small molecules that inhibit T3SS gene expression in E. amylovora under hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing conditions were identified and characterized using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These compounds belong to salicylidene acylhydrazides and also inhibit amylovoran production. Microarray analysis of E. amylovora treated with compounds 3 and 9 identified a total of 588 significantly differentially expressed genes. Among them, 95 and 78 genes were activated and suppressed by both compounds, respectively, when compared with the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control. The expression of the majority of T3SS genes in E. amylovora, including hrpL and the avrRpt2 effector gene, was suppressed by both compounds. Compound 3 also suppressed the expression of amylovoran precursor and biosynthesis genes. However, both compounds induced significantly the expression of glycogen biosynthesis genes and siderophore biosynthesis, regulatory and transport genes. Furthermore, many membrane, lipoprotein and exported protein-encoding genes were also activated by both compounds. Similar expression patterns were observed for compounds 1, 2 and 4. Using crab apple flower as a model, compound 3 was capable of reducing disease development in pistils. These results suggest a common inhibition mechanism shared by salicylidene acylhydrazides and indicate that small-molecule inhibitors that disable T3SS function could be explored to control fire blight disease.

  15. Roles of the signal peptide and mature domains in the secretion and maturation of the neutral metalloprotease from Streptomyces cacaoi.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S C; Su, M H; Lee, Y H

    1997-01-01

    The neutral metalloprotease (Npr) of Streptomyces cacaoi is synthesized as a prepro-Npr precursor form consisting of a secretory signal peptide, a propeptide and the mature metalloprotease. The maturation of Npr occurs extracellularly via an autoproteolytic processing of the secreted pro-Npr. The integrity of the propeptide is essential for the formation of mature active Npr but not for its secretion [Chang, Chang and Lee (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 3548-3554]. In this study we investigated whether the secretion and maturation of Npr require the integrity of its signal peptide region and mature protease domain. Five signal peptide mutants were generated, including the substitution mutations at the positively charged region (mutant IR6LE), the central hydrophobic region (mutants GI19EL and G19N), the boundary of the hydrophobic core-cleavage region (mutant P30L) and at the residues adjacent to the signal peptidase cleavage site (mutant YA33SM). All these lesions delayed the export of Npr to the growth medium and also resulted in a 2-10-fold decrease in Npr export. The most severe effect was noted in mutants GI19EL and P30L. When these signal peptide mutations were fused separately with the propeptide lacking the Npr mature domain, the secretory defect on the propeptide was also observed, and this impairment was again more severely expressed in mutants GI19EL and P30L. Thus the Npr signal peptide seems to have more constraints on the hydrophobic core region and at the proline residue within the boundary of the hydrophobic core-cleavage site. Deletion mutations within the C-terminal mature protease domain that left its active site intact still blocked the proteolytic processing of mutant precursor forms of pro-Npr, although their secretions were unaffected. These results, together with our previous findings, strongly suggest that the signal peptide of Npr plays a pivotal role in the secretion of both Npr and the propeptide, but not in the maturation of Npr. On the

  16. Analysis of the Crystal Structure of the ExsC.ExsE Complex Reveals Distinctive Binding Interactions of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion Chaperone ExsC with ExsE and ExsD

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelaar, N.J.; Robinson, H.; Jing, X.; Schubot, F. D.

    2010-07-20

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, like many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, requires its type III secretion system (T3SS) to facilitate acute infections. In P. aeruginosa, the expression of all T3SS-related genes is regulated by the transcriptional activator ExsA. A signaling cascade involving ExsA and three additional proteins, ExsC, ExsD, and ExsE, directly ties the upregulation of ExsA-mediated transcription to the activation of the type III secretion apparatus. In order to characterize the events underlying the signaling process, the crystal structure of the T3SS chaperone ExsC in complex with its cognate effector ExsE has been determined. The structure reveals critical contacts that mediate the interactions between these two proteins. Particularly striking is the presence of two Arg-X-Val-X-Arg motifs in ExsE that form identical interactions along opposite sides of an ExsC dimer. The structure also provides insights into the interactions of ExsC with the antiactivator protein ExsD. It was shown that the amino-terminal 46 residues of ExsD are sufficient for ExsC binding. On the basis of these findings, a new model for the ExsC {center_dot} ExsD complex is proposed to explain its distinctive 2:2 stoichiometry and why ExsC displays a weaker affinity for ExsD than for ExsE.

  17. Rhb1 regulates the expression of secreted aspartic protease 2 through the TOR signaling pathway in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ting; Lin, Chia-Ying; Tsai, Pei-Wen; Yang, Cheng-Yao; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Lan, Chung-Yu

    2012-02-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen in humans. In C. albicans, secreted aspartyl protease 2 (Sap2) is the most highly expressed secreted aspartic protease in vitro and is a virulence factor. Recent research links the small GTPase Rhb1 to C. albicans target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling in response to nitrogen availability. The results of this study show that Rhb1 is related to cell growth through the control of SAP2 expression when protein is the major nitrogen source. This process involves various components of the TOR signaling pathway, including Tor1 kinase and its downstream effectors. TOR signaling not only controls SAP2 transcription but also affects Sap2 protein levels, possibly through general amino acid control. DNA microarray analysis identifies other target genes downstream of Rhb1 in addition to SAP2. These findings provide new insight into nutrients, Rhb1-TOR signaling, and expression of C. albicans virulence factor.

  18. Long-Chain Fatty Acid Sensor, PsrA, Modulates the Expression of rpoS and the Type III Secretion exsCEBA Operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Lunin, V. V.; Skarina, T.; Savchenko, A.; Schurr, M. J.; Hoang, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PsrA autorepressor has dual roles as a repressor of the fadBA5{beta}-oxidation operon and an activator of the stationary-phase sigma factor rpoS and exsCEBA operon of the type III secretion system (TTSS). Previously, we demonstrated that the repression of the fadBA5 operon by PsrA is relieved by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). However, the signal affecting the activation of rpoS and exsC via PsrA is unknown. In this study, microarray and gene fusion data suggested that LCFA (e.g. oleate) affected the expression of rpoS and exsC. DNA binding studies confirmed that PsrA binds to the rpoS and exsC promoter regions. This binding was inhibited by LCFA, indicating that LCFA directly affects the activation of these two genes through PsrA. LCFA decreased rpoS and exsC expression, resulting in increased N-(butyryl)-l-homoserine-lactone quorum sensing signal and decreased ExoS/T production respectively. Based on the crystal structure of PsrA, site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues, within the hydrophobic channel thought to accommodate LCFA, created two LCFA-non-responsive PsrA mutants. The binding and activation of rpoS and exsC by these PsrA mutants was no longer inhibited by LCFA. These data support a mechanistic model where LCFAs influence PsrA regulation to control LCFA metabolism and some virulence genes in P. aeruginosa.

  19. Ultrasensitive fluorescence polarization DNA detection by target assisted exonuclease III-catalyzed signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Guan, Yi-Meng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2011-03-28

    Single stranded DNA sequences can be detected by target assisted exonuclease III-catalyzed signal amplification fluorescence polarization (TAECA-FP). The method offers an impressive detection limit of 83 aM within one hour for DNA detection and exhibits high discrimination ability even against a single base mismatch.

  20. LcrV delivered via type III secretion system of live attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis enhances immunogenicity against pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Sanapala, Shilpa; Henderson, Jeremy C; Sam, Shandiin; Olinzock, Joseph; Trent, M Stephen; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-10-01

    Here, we constructed a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis mutant strain with arabinose-dependent regulated and delayed shutoff of crp expression (araC P(BAD) crp) and replacement of the msbB gene with the Escherichia coli msbB gene to attenuate it. Then, we inserted the asd mutation into this construction to form χ10057 [Δasd-206 ΔmsbB868::P(msbB) msbB(EC) ΔP(crp21)::TT araC P(BAD) crp] for use with a balanced-lethal Asd-positive (Asd(+)) plasmid to facilitate antigen synthesis. A hybrid protein composed of YopE (amino acids [aa]1 to 138) fused with full-length LcrV (YopE(Nt138)-LcrV) was synthesized in χ10057 harboring an Asd(+) plasmid (pYA5199, yopE(Nt138)-lcrV) and could be secreted through a type III secretion system (T3SS) in vitro and in vivo. Animal studies indicated that mice orally immunized with χ10057(pYA5199) developed titers of IgG response to whole-cell lysates of Y. pestis (YpL) and subunit LcrV similar to those seen with χ10057(pYA3332) (χ10057 plus an empty plasmid). However, only immunization of mice with χ10057(pYA5199) resulted in a significant secretory IgA response to LcrV. χ10057(pYA5199) induced a higher level of protection (80% survival) against intranasal (i.n.) challenge with ~240 median lethal doses (LD50) (2.4 × 10(4) CFU) of Y. pestis KIM6+(pCD1Ap) than χ10057(pYA3332) (40% survival). Splenocytes from mice vaccinated with χ10057(pYA5199) produced significant levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-17 (IL-17) after restimulation with LcrV and YpL antigens. Our results suggest that it is possible to use an attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis strain delivering the LcrV antigen via the T3SS as a potential vaccine candidate against pneumonic plague.

  1. Embryonic Dorsal-Ventral Signaling: Secreted Frizzled-Related Proteins as Inhibitors of Tolloid Proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojoon X.; Ambrosio, Andrea L.; Reversade, Bruno; De Robertis, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Here we report an unexpected role for the secreted Frizzled-related protein (sFRP) Sizzled/Ogon as an inhibitor of the extracellular proteolytic reaction that controls BMP signaling during Xenopus gastrulation. Microinjection experiments suggest that the Frizzled domain of Sizzled regulates the activity of Xolloid-related (Xlr), a metalloproteinase that degrades Chordin, through the following molecular pathway: Szl ┤ Xlr ┤ Chd ┤ BMP → P-Smad1 → Szl. In biochemical assays, the Xlr proteinase has similar affinities for its endogenous substrate Chordin and for its competitive inhibitor Sizzled, which is resistant to enzyme digestion. Extracellular levels of Sizzled and Chordin in the gastrula embryo and enzyme reaction constants were all in the 10−8 M range, consistent with a physiological role in the regulation of dorsal-ventral patterning. Sizzled is also a natural inhibitor of BMP1, a Tolloid metalloproteinase of medical interest. Furthermore, mouse sFRP2 inhibited Xlr, suggesting a wider role for this molecular mechanism. PMID:16413488

  2. Fucoidan Stimulates Monocyte Migration via ERK/p38 Signaling Pathways and MMP9 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Sapharikas, Elene; Lokajczyk, Anna; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2015-06-30

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) induces the secretion of paracrine signals, leading to monocyte recruitment and thereby contributing to the initiation of angiogenesis and tissue healing. We have previously demonstrated that fucoidan, an antithrombotic polysaccharide, promotes the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. We examined the effect of fucoidan on the capacity of peripheral blood monocytes to adhere and migrate. Monocytes negatively isolated with magnetic beads from peripheral blood of healthy donors were treated with fucoidan. Fucoidan induced a 1.5-fold increase in monocyte adhesion to gelatin (p < 0.05) and a five-fold increase in chemotaxis in Boyden chambers (p < 0.05). Fucoidan also enhanced migration 2.5-fold in a transmigration assay (p < 0.05). MMP9 activity in monocyte supernatants was significantly enhanced by fucoidan (p < 0.05). Finally, Western blot analysis of fucoidan-treated monocytes showed upregulation of ERK/p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK/p38 phosphorylation abrogated fucoidan enhancement of migration (p < 0.01). Fucoidan displays striking biological effects, notably promoting monocyte adhesion and migration. These effects involve the ERK and p38 pathways, and increased MMP9 activity. Fucoidan could improve critical limb ischemia by promoting monocyte recruitment.

  3. Deconvolution of non-stationary physical signals: a smooth variance model for insulin secretion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillonetto, Gianluigi; Bell, Bradley M.

    2004-04-01

    Deconvolution is the process of estimating a system's input using measurements of a causally related output where the relationship between the input and output is known and linear. Regularization parameters are used to balance smoothness of the estimated input with accuracy of the measurement values. In this paper we present a maximum marginal likelihood method for estimating unknown regularization (and other) parameters used during deconvolution of dynamical systems. Our computational approach uses techniques that were developed for Kalman filters and smoothers. As an example application we consider estimating insulin secretion rate (ISR) following an intravenous glucose stimulus. This procedure is referred to in the medical literature as an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). This estimation problem is difficult because ISR is a strongly non-stationary signal; it presents a fast peak in the first minutes of the experiment, followed by a smoother release. We use three regularization parameters to define a smooth model for ISR variance. This model takes into account the rapid variation of ISR during the beginning of an IVGTT and its slower variation as time progresses. Simulations are used to assess marginal likelihood estimation of these regularization parameters as well as of other parameters in the system. Simulations are also used to compare our model for ISR variance with other stochastic ISR models. In addition, we apply maximum marginal likelihood and our ISR variance model to real data that have previous ISR estimation results reported in the literature.

  4. TRPM channels phosphorylation as a potential bridge between old signals and novel regulatory mechanisms of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Garcia, Carlos Manlio; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Hiriart, Marcia

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential channels, especially the members of the melastatin family (TRPM), participate in insulin secretion. Some of them are substrates for protein kinases, which are involved in several neurotransmitter, incretin and hormonal signaling cascades in β cells. The functional relationships between protein kinases and TRPM channels in systems of heterologous expression and native tissues rise issues about novel regulation pathways of pancreatic β-cell excitability. The aim of the present work is to review the evidences about phosphorylation of TRPM channels in β cells and to discuss the perspectives on insulin secretion.

  5. Role of Epac2A/Rap1 signaling in interplay between incretin and sulfonylurea in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Harumi; Shibasaki, Tadao; Park, Jae-Hyung; Hidaka, Shihomi; Takahashi, Toshimasa; Ono, Aika; Song, Dae-Kyu; Seino, Susumu

    2015-04-01

    Incretin-related drugs and sulfonylureas are currently used worldwide for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We recently found that Epac2A, a cAMP binding protein having guanine nucleotide exchange activity toward Rap, is a target of both incretin and sulfonylurea. This suggests the possibility of interplay between incretin and sulfonylurea through Epac2A/Rap1 signaling in insulin secretion. In this study, we examined the combinatorial effects of incretin and various sulfonylureas on insulin secretion and activation of Epac2A/Rap1 signaling. A strong augmentation of insulin secretion by combination of GLP-1 and glibenclamide or glimepiride, which was found in Epac2A(+/+) mice, was markedly reduced in Epac2A(-/-) mice. In contrast, the combinatorial effect of GLP-1 and gliclazide was rather mild, and the effect was not altered by Epac2A ablation. Activation of Rap1 was enhanced by the combination of an Epac-selective cAMP analog with glibenclamide or glimepiride but not gliclazide. In diet-induced obese mice, ablation of Epac2A reduced the insulin secretory response to coadministration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide and glimepiride. These findings clarify the critical role of Epac2A/Rap1 signaling in the augmenting effect of incretin and sulfonylurea on insulin secretion and provide the basis for the effects of combination therapies of incretin-related drugs and sulfonylureas.

  6. Interactions between CdsD, CdsQ, and CdsL, Three Putative Chlamydophila pneumoniae Type III Secretion Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dustin L.; Stone, Chris B.; Mahony, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydophila pneumoniae is a gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes pneumonia and bronchitis and may contribute to atherosclerosis. The developmental cycle of C. pneumoniae includes a morphological transition from an infectious extracellular elementary body (EB) to a noninfectious intracellular reticulate body (RB) that divides by binary fission. The C. pneumoniae genome encodes a type III secretion (T3S) apparatus that may be used to infect eukaryotic cells and to evade the host immune response. In the present study, Cpn0712 (CdsD), Cpn0704 (CdsQ), and Cpn0826 (CdsL), three C. pneumoniae genes encoding yersiniae T3S YscD, YscQ, and YscL homologs, respectively, were cloned and expressed as histidine- and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant proteins were used to raise hyper-immune polyclonal antiserum and were used in GST pull-down and copurification assays to identify protein-protein interactions. CdsD was detected in both EB and RB lysates by Western blot analyses, and immunofluorescent staining demonstrated the presence of CdsD within inclusions. Triton X-114 solubilization and phase separation of chlamydial EB proteins indicated that CdsD partitions with cytoplasmic proteins, suggesting it is not an integral membrane protein. GST pull-down assays indicated that recombinant CdsD interacts with CdsQ and CdsL, and copurification assays with chlamydial lysates confirmed that native CdsD interacts with CdsQ and CdsL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating interactions between YscD, YscQ, and YscL homologs of bacterial T3S systems. These novel protein interactions may play important roles in the assembly or function of the chlamydial T3S apparatus. PMID:18281400

  7. Type III secretion and effectors shape the survival and growth pattern of Pseudomonas syringae on leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoung; Teitzel, Gail M; Munkvold, Kathy; del Pozo, Olga; Martin, Gregory B; Michelmore, Richard W; Greenberg, Jean T

    2012-04-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae B728a (PsyB728a) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject effector proteins into plant cells, a process that modulates the susceptibility of different plants to infection. Analysis of GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN-expressing PsyB728a after spray inoculation without additives under moderate relative humidity conditions permitted (1) a detailed analysis of this strain's survival and growth pattern on host (Nicotiana benthamiana) and nonhost (tomato [Solanum lycopersicum]) leaf surfaces, (2) an assessment of the role of plant defenses in affecting PsyB728a leaf surface (epiphytic) growth, and (3) the contribution of the T3SS and specific effectors to PsyB728a epiphytic survival and growth. On host leaf surfaces, PsyB728a cells initially persist without growing, and show an increased population only after 48 h, unless plants are pretreated with the defense-inducing chemical benzothiazole. During the persistence period, some PsyB728a cells induce a T3SS reporter, whereas a T3SS-deficient mutant shows reduced survival. By 72 h, rare invasion by PsyB728a to the mesophyll region of host leaves occurs, but endophytic and epiphytic bacterial growths are not correlated. The effectors HopZ3 and HopAA1 delay the onset of epiphytic growth of PsyB728a on N. benthamiana, whereas they promote epiphytic survival/growth on tomato. These effectors localize to distinct sites in plant cells and likely have different mechanisms of action. HopZ3 may enzymatically modify host targets, as it requires residues important for the catalytic activity of other proteins in its family of proteases. Thus, the T3SS, HopAA1, HopZ3, and plant defenses strongly influence epiphytic survival and/or growth of PsyB728a.

  8. Fitness Cost of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Differs by Type III Secretion Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Agnello, Melissa; Finkel, Steven E.; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is highly prevalent among clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, limiting treatment options. We have reported previously that highly virulent strains containing the exoU gene of the type III secretion system are more likely to be FQ-resistant than strains containing the exoS gene, as well as more likely to acquire resistance-conferring mutations in gyrA/B and parC/E. We hypothesize that FQ-resistance imposes a lower fitness cost on exoU compared to exoS strains, thus allowing for better adaptation to the FQ-rich clinical environment. We created isogenic mutants containing a common FQ-resistance conferring point mutation in parC from three exoU to three exoS clinical isolates and tested fitness in vitro using head-to-head competition assays. The mutation differentially affected fitness in the exoU and exoS strains tested. While the addition of the parC mutation dramatically increased fitness in one of the exoU strains leaving the other two unaffected, all three exoS strains displayed a general decrease in fitness. In addition, we found that exoU strains may be able to compensate for the fitness costs associated with the mutation through better regulation of supercoiling compared to the exoS strains. These results may provide a biological explanation for the observed predominance of the virulent exoU genotype in FQ-resistant clinical subpopulations and represent the first investigation into potential differences in fitness costs of FQ-resistance that are linked to the virulence genotype of P. aeruginosa. Understanding the fitness costs of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of compensation for these costs is essential for the rational development of strategies to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27757111

  9. Fitness Cost of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Differs by Type III Secretion Genotype.

    PubMed

    Agnello, Melissa; Finkel, Steven E; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is highly prevalent among clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, limiting treatment options. We have reported previously that highly virulent strains containing the exoU gene of the type III secretion system are more likely to be FQ-resistant than strains containing the exoS gene, as well as more likely to acquire resistance-conferring mutations in gyrA/B and parC/E. We hypothesize that FQ-resistance imposes a lower fitness cost on exoU compared to exoS strains, thus allowing for better adaptation to the FQ-rich clinical environment. We created isogenic mutants containing a common FQ-resistance conferring point mutation in parC from three exoU to three exoS clinical isolates and tested fitness in vitro using head-to-head competition assays. The mutation differentially affected fitness in the exoU and exoS strains tested. While the addition of the parC mutation dramatically increased fitness in one of the exoU strains leaving the other two unaffected, all three exoS strains displayed a general decrease in fitness. In addition, we found that exoU strains may be able to compensate for the fitness costs associated with the mutation through better regulation of supercoiling compared to the exoS strains. These results may provide a biological explanation for the observed predominance of the virulent exoU genotype in FQ-resistant clinical subpopulations and represent the first investigation into potential differences in fitness costs of FQ-resistance that are linked to the virulence genotype of P. aeruginosa. Understanding the fitness costs of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of compensation for these costs is essential for the rational development of strategies to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance.

  10. Solving the supply of resveratrol tetramers from Papua New Guinean rainforest anisoptera species that inhibit bacterial type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Davis, Rohan A; Beattie, Karren D; Xu, Min; Yang, Xinzhou; Yin, Sheng; Holla, Harish; Healy, Peter C; Sykes, Melissa; Shelper, Todd; Avery, Vicky M; Elofsson, Mikael; Sundin, Charlotta; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-12-26

    The supply of (-)-hopeaphenol (1) was achieved via enzymatic biotransformation in order to provide material for preclinical investigation. High-throughput screening of a prefractionated natural product library aimed to identify compounds that inhibit the bacterial virulence type III secretion system (T3SS) identified several fractions derived from two Papua New Guinean Anisoptera species, showing activity against Yersinia pseudotuberculosis outer proteins E and H (YopE and YopH). Bioassay-directed isolation from the leaves of A. thurifera, and similarly A. polyandra, resulted in three known resveratrol tetramers, (-)-hopeaphenol (1), vatalbinoside A (2), and vaticanol B (3). Compounds 1-3 displayed IC50 values of 8.8, 12.5, and 9.9 μM in a luminescent reporter-gene assay (YopE) and IC50 values of 2.9, 4.5, and 3.3 μM in an enzyme-based YopH assay, respectively, which suggested that they could potentially act against the T3SS in Yersinia. The structures of 1-3 were confirmed through a combination of spectrometric, chemical methods, and single-crystal X-ray structure determinations of the natural product 1 and the permethyl ether analogue of 3. The enzymatic hydrolysis of the β-glycoside 2 to the aglycone 1 was achieved through biotransformation using the endogenous leaf enzymes. This significantly enhanced the yield of the target bioactive natural product from 0.08% to 1.3% and facilitates ADMET studies of (-)-hopeaphenol (1).

  11. The importance of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system in epithelium traversal depends upon conditions of host susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Aaron B; Tam, K P Connie; Metruccio, Matteo M E; Evans, David J; Fleiszig, Suzanne M J

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is invasive or cytotoxic to host cells, depending on the type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors encoded. While the T3SS is known to be involved in disease in vivo, how it participates remains to be clarified. Here, mouse models of superficial epithelial injury (tissue paper blotting with EGTA treatment) and immunocompromise (MyD88 deficiency) were used to study the contribution of the T3SS transcriptional activator ExsA to epithelial traversal. Corneas of excised eyeballs were inoculated with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing PAO1 or isogenic exsA mutants for 6 h ex vivo before bacterial traversal and epithelial thickness were quantified by using imaging. In the blotting-EGTA model, exsA mutants were defective in capacity for traversal. Accordingly, an ∼16-fold variability in exsA expression among PAO1 isolates from three sources correlated with epithelial loss. In contrast, MyD88-/- epithelia remained susceptible to P. aeruginosa traversal despite exsA mutation. Epithelial lysates from MyD88-/- mice had reduced antimicrobial activity compared to those from wild-type mice with and without prior antigen challenge, particularly 30- to 100-kDa fractions, for which mass spectrometry revealed multiple differences, including (i) lower baseline levels of histones, tubulin, and lumican and (ii) reduced glutathione S-transferase, annexin, and dermatopontin, after antigen challenge. Thus, the importance of ExsA in epithelial traversal by invasive P. aeruginosa depends on the compromise enabling susceptibility, suggesting that strategies for preventing infection will need to extend beyond targeting the T3SS. The data also highlight the importance of mimicking conditions allowing susceptibility in animal models and the need to monitor variability among bacterial isolates from different sources, even for the same strain.

  12. Vaccination with a single CD4 T cell peptide epitope from a Salmonella type III-secreted effector protein provides protection against lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Jonathan R; Petersen, Hailey E; Frederick, Daniel R; Morici, Lisa A; McLachlan, James B

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella infections affect millions worldwide and remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. It is known from mouse studies that CD4 T cells are essential mediators of immunity against Salmonella infection, yet it is not clear whether targeting CD4 T cell responses directly with peptide vaccines against Salmonella can be effective in combating infection. Additionally, it is not known whether T cell responses elicited against Salmonella secreted effector proteins can provide protective immunity against infection. In this study, we investigated both of these possibilities using prime-boost immunization of susceptible mice with a single CD4 T cell peptide epitope from Salmonella secreted effector protein I (SseI), a component of the Salmonella type III secretion system. This immunization conferred significant protection against lethal oral infection, equivalent to that conferred by whole heat-killed Salmonella bacteria. Surprisingly, a well-characterized T cell epitope from the flagellar protein FliC afforded no protection compared to immunization with an irrelevant control peptide. The protective response appeared to be most associated with polyfunctional CD4 T cells raised against the SseI peptide, since no antibodies were produced against any of the peptides and very little CD8 T cell response was observed. Overall, this study demonstrates that eliciting CD4 T cell responses against components of the Salmonella type III secretion system can contribute to protection against infection and should be considered in the design of future Salmonella subunit vaccines.

  13. Transcriptome Wide Annotation of Eukaryotic RNase III Reactivity and Degradation Signals

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Jules; Lavoie, Mathieu; Catala, Mathieu; Malenfant, Francis; Elela, Sherif Abou

    2015-01-01

    Detection and validation of the RNA degradation signals controlling transcriptome stability are essential steps for understanding how cells regulate gene expression. Here we present complete genomic and biochemical annotations of the signals required for RNA degradation by the dsRNA specific ribonuclease III (Rnt1p) and examine its impact on transcriptome expression. Rnt1p cleavage signals are randomly distributed in the yeast genome, and encompass a wide variety of sequences, indicating that transcriptome stability is not determined by the recurrence of a fixed cleavage motif. Instead, RNA reactivity is defined by the sequence and structural context in which the cleavage sites are located. Reactive signals are often associated with transiently expressed genes, and their impact on RNA expression is linked to growth conditions. Together, the data suggest that Rnt1p reactivity is triggered by malleable RNA degradation signals that permit dynamic response to changes in growth conditions. PMID:25680180

  14. Expressing anti-HIV VRC01 antibody using the murine IgG1 secretion signal in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Aw, Rochelle; McKay, Paul F; Shattock, Robin J; Polizzi, Karen M

    2017-12-01

    The use of the recombinant expression platform Pichia pastoris to produce pharmaceutically important proteins has been investigated over the past 30 years. Compared to mammalian cultures, expression in P. pastoris is cheaper and faster, potentially leading to decreased costs and process development times. Product yields depend on a number of factors including the secretion signal chosen for expression, which can influence the host cell response to recombinant protein production. VRC01, a broadly neutralising anti-HIV antibody, was expressed in P. pastoris, using the methanol inducible AOX1 promoter for both the heavy and light chains. Titre reached up to 3.05 μg mL(-1) in small scale expression. VRC01 was expressed using both the α-mating factor signal peptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the murine IgG1 signal peptide. Surprisingly, using the murine IgG1 signal peptide resulted in higher yield of antibody capable of binding gp140 antigen. Furthermore, we evaluated levels of secretory stress compared to the untransformed wild-type strain and show a reduced level of secretory stress in the murine IgG1 signal peptide strains versus those containing the α-MF signal peptide. As bottlenecks in the secretory pathway are often the limiting factor in protein secretion, reduced levels of secretory stress and the higher yield of functional antibody suggest the murine IgG1 signal peptide may lead to better protein folding and secretion. This work indicates the possibilities for utilising the murine IgG1 signal peptide for a range of antibodies, resulting in high yields and reduced cellular stress.

  15. The Type III Secretion System Effector SeoC of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and S. enterica subsp. arizonae ADP-Ribosylates Src and Inhibits Opsonophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Dominic J; Young, Joanna C; Covarelli, Valentina; Herrera-León, Silvia; Connor, Thomas R; Fookes, Maria; Walker, Danielle; Echeita, Aurora; Thomson, Nicholas R; Berger, Cedric N; Frankel, Gad

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella species utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to translocate effectors into the cytosol of mammalian host cells, subverting cell signaling and facilitating the onset of gastroenteritis. In this study, we compared a draft genome assembly of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae strain 3588/07 against the genomes of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 and Salmonella bongori strain 12419. S. enterica subsp. salamae encodes the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), SPI-2, and the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) T3SSs. Though several key S Typhimurium effector genes are missing (e.g., avrA, sopB, and sseL), S. enterica subsp. salamae invades HeLa cells and contains homologues of S. bongori sboK and sboC, which we named seoC SboC and SeoC are homologues of EspJ from enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively), which inhibit Src kinase-dependent phagocytosis by ADP-ribosylation. By screening 73 clinical and environmental Salmonella isolates, we identified EspJ homologues in S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae The β-lactamase TEM-1 reporter system showed that SeoC is translocated by the SPI-1 T3SS. All the Salmonella SeoC/SboC homologues ADP-ribosylate Src E310 in vitro Ectopic expression of SeoC/SboC inhibited phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized beads into Cos-7 cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FcγRIIa. Concurrently, S. enterica subsp. salamae infection of J774.A1 macrophages inhibited phagocytosis of beads, in a seoC-dependent manner. These results show that S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and S. enterica subsp. arizonae share features of the infection strategy of extracellular pathogens EPEC and EHEC and shed light on the complexities of the T3SS effector repertoires of Enterobacteriaceae.

  16. Effects of Lutein and Zeaxanthin on LPS-Induced Secretion of IL-8 by Uveal Melanocytes and Relevant Signal Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chao, Shih-Chun; Vagaggini, Tommaso; Nien, Chan-Wei; Huang, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lutein and zeaxanthin on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced secretion of IL-8 by uveal melanocytes (UM) were tested in cultured human UM. MTT assay revealed that LPS (0.01-1 μg/mL) and lutein and zeaxanthin (1-10 μM) did not influence the cell viability of cultured UM. LPS caused a dose-dependent increase of secretion of IL-8 by cultured UM. Lutein and zeaxanthin did not affect the constitutive secretion of IL-8. However, lutein and zeaxanthin decreased LPS-induced secretion of IL-8 in cultured UM in a dose-dependent manner. LPS significantly increased NF-κB levels in cell nuclear extracts and p-JNK levels in the cell lysates from UM, but not p-p38 MAPK and p-ERG. Lutein or zeaxanthin significantly reduced LPS-induced increase of NF-κB and p-JNK levels, but not p38 MAPK and ERG levels. The present study demonstrated that lutein and zeaxanthin inhibited LPS-induced secretion of IL-8 in cultured UM via JNK and NF-κB signal pathways. The anti-inflammatory effects of lutein and zeaxanthin might be explored as a therapeutic approach in the management of uveitis and other inflammatory diseases of the eye.

  17. Effects of Lutein and Zeaxanthin on LPS-Induced Secretion of IL-8 by Uveal Melanocytes and Relevant Signal Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shih-Chun; Vagaggini, Tommaso; Nien, Chan-Wei; Huang, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lutein and zeaxanthin on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced secretion of IL-8 by uveal melanocytes (UM) were tested in cultured human UM. MTT assay revealed that LPS (0.01–1 μg/mL) and lutein and zeaxanthin (1–10 μM) did not influence the cell viability of cultured UM. LPS caused a dose-dependent increase of secretion of IL-8 by cultured UM. Lutein and zeaxanthin did not affect the constitutive secretion of IL-8. However, lutein and zeaxanthin decreased LPS-induced secretion of IL-8 in cultured UM in a dose-dependent manner. LPS significantly increased NF-κB levels in cell nuclear extracts and p-JNK levels in the cell lysates from UM, but not p-p38 MAPK and p-ERG. Lutein or zeaxanthin significantly reduced LPS-induced increase of NF-κB and p-JNK levels, but not p38 MAPK and ERG levels. The present study demonstrated that lutein and zeaxanthin inhibited LPS-induced secretion of IL-8 in cultured UM via JNK and NF-κB signal pathways. The anti-inflammatory effects of lutein and zeaxanthin might be explored as a therapeutic approach in the management of uveitis and other inflammatory diseases of the eye. PMID:26609426

  18. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion from monocytes/macrophages through suppression of intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Chao, Louis Kuoping; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Cheng, Sen-Sung; Lin, I-Fan; Chen, Chia-Jung; Chen, Shui-Tein; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of Cinnamaldehyde, a cytokine production inhibitor isolated from an essential oil produced from the leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kaneh, and its mechanism of action. Although Cinnamaldehyde has been reported to have contact sensitizing properties at high concentration (mM), we found that low concentration of Cinnamaldehyde (muM) inhibited the secretion of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha within lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) stimulated murine J774A.1 macrophages. Cinnamaldehyde also suppressed the production of these cytokines from LPS stimulated human blood monocytes derived primary macrophages and human THP-1 monocytes. Furthermore, Cinnamaldehyde also inhibited the production of prointerleukin-1beta within LPS or LTA stimulated human THP-1 monocytes. Reactive oxygen species release from LPS stimulated J774A.1 macrophages was reduced by Cinnamaldehyde. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 induced by LPS was also inhibited by Cinnamaldehyde; however, Cinnamaldehyde neither antagonize the binding of LPS to the cells nor alter the cell surface expression of toll-like receptor 4 and CD14. In addition, we also noted that Cinnamaldehyde appeared to elicit no cytotoxic effect upon J774A.1 macrophages under our experimental conditions, although Cinnamaldehyde reduced J774A.1 macrophages proliferation as analysed by MTT assay. Our current results have demonstrated the anti-oxidation and anti-inflammatory properties of Cinnamaldehyde that could provide the possibility for Cinnamaldehyde's future pharmaceutical application in the realm of immuno-modulation.

  19. The Ruler Protein EscP of the Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Is Involved in Calcium Sensing and Secretion Hierarchy Regulation by Interacting with the Gatekeeper Protein SepL

    PubMed Central

    Shaulov, Lihi; Gershberg, Jenia; Deng, Wanyin; Finlay, B. Brett

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a multiprotein complex that plays a central role in the virulence of many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. To ensure that effector proteins are efficiently translocated into the host cell, bacteria must be able to sense their contact with the host cell. In this study, we found that EscP, which was previously shown to function as the ruler protein of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli T3SS, is also involved in the switch from the secretion of translocator proteins to the secretion of effector proteins. In addition, we demonstrated that EscP can interact with the gatekeeper protein SepL and that the EscP-SepL complex dissociates upon a calcium concentration drop. We suggest a model in which bacterial contact with the host cell is accompanied by a drop in the calcium concentration that causes SepL-EscP complex dissociation and triggers the secretion of effector proteins. PMID:28049143

  20. Evaluation of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Secretion in E. coli using the L-asparaginase II Signal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Mozhdeh; Nezafat, Navid; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the recent years, there has been an increasing interest in secretory production of recombinant proteins, due to its various advantages compared with intracellular expression. Signal peptides play a critical role in prosperous secretion of recombinant proteins. Accordingly, different signal peptides have been assessed for their ability to produce secretory proteins by trial-and-error experiments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of L-asparaginase II signal peptide on the recombinant human Growth Hormone (hGH) protein secretion in the Escherichia coli (E. coli) host. Methods: Cloning and expression of a synthetic hGH gene, containing L-asparaginase II signal sequence was performed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) using 0.1mM IPTG as an inducer at 23°C overnight. Periplasmic protein extraction was performed using three methods, including osmotic shock, osmotic shock in the presence of glycine and combined Lysozyme/EDTA osmotic shock. Afterwards, the hGH expression was determined by SDS-PAGE. Results: Based on experimentally obtained results, hGH protein is expressed as inclusion body even in the presence of L-asparaginase II signal peptide. Conclusion: Therefore, this signal peptide is not effective for secretory production of the recombinant hGH. PMID:27920886

  1. Feedback regulation of PRL secretion is mediated by the transcription factor, signal transducer, and activator of transcription 5b.

    PubMed

    Grattan, D R; Xu, J; McLachlan, M J; Kokay, I C; Bunn, S J; Hovey, R C; Davey, H W

    2001-09-01

    PRL secretion from the anterior pituitary gland is inhibited by dopamine produced in the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons of the hypothalamus. The activity of tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons is stimulated by PRL; thus, PRL regulates its own secretion by a negative feedback mechanism. PRL receptors are expressed on tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons, but the intracellular signaling pathway is not known. We have observed that mice with a disrupted signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b gene have grossly elevated serum PRL concentrations. Despite this hyperprolactinemia, mRNA levels and immunoreactivity of tyrosine hydroxylase, the key enzyme in dopamine synthesis, were significantly lower in the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons of these signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b-deficient mice. Concentrations of the dopamine metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the median eminence were also significantly lower in signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b-deficient mice than in wild-type mice. No changes were observed in nonhypothalamic dopaminergic neuronal populations, indicating that the effects were selective to tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons. These data indicate that in the absence of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b, PRL signal transduction in tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons is impaired, and they demonstrate that this transcription factor plays an obligatory and nonredundant role in mediating the negative feedback action of PRL on tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons.

  2. Ehrlichia secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mingqun; Liu, Hongyan; Xiong, Qingming; Niu, Hua; Cheng, Zhihui; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that causes a potentially fatal emerging zoonosis, human monocytic ehrlichiosis. E. chaffeensis has a limited capacity for biosynthesis and metabolism and thus depends mostly on host-synthesized nutrients for growth. Although the host cell cytoplasm is rich with these nutrients, as E. chaffeensis is confined within the early endosome-like membrane-bound compartment, only host nutrients that enter the compartment can be used by this bacterium. How this occurs is unknown. We found that ehrlichial replication depended on autophagy induction involving class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) activity, BECN1 (Beclin 1), and ATG5 (autophagy-related 5). Ehrlichia acquired host cell preincorporated amino acids in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner and ehrlichial growth was enhanced by treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy inducer. Moreover, ATG5 and RAB5A/B/C were routed to ehrlichial inclusions. RAB5A/B/C siRNA knockdown, or overexpression of a RAB5-specific GTPase-activating protein or dominant-negative RAB5A inhibited ehrlichial infection, indicating the critical role of GTP-bound RAB5 during infection. Both native and ectopically expressed ehrlichial type IV secretion effector protein, Etf-1, bound RAB5 and the autophagy-initiating class III PtdIns3K complex, PIK3C3/VPS34, and BECN1, and homed to ehrlichial inclusions. Ectopically expressed Etf-1 activated class III PtdIns3K as in E. chaffeensis infection and induced autophagosome formation, cleared an aggregation-prone mutant huntingtin protein in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner, and enhanced ehrlichial proliferation. These data support the notion that E. chaffeensis secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy to repurpose the host cytoplasm and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III PtdIns3K, while avoiding autolysosomal killing. PMID:27541856

  3. Ehrlichia secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingqun; Liu, Hongyan; Xiong, Qingming; Niu, Hua; Cheng, Zhihui; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2016-11-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that causes a potentially fatal emerging zoonosis, human monocytic ehrlichiosis. E. chaffeensis has a limited capacity for biosynthesis and metabolism and thus depends mostly on host-synthesized nutrients for growth. Although the host cell cytoplasm is rich with these nutrients, as E. chaffeensis is confined within the early endosome-like membrane-bound compartment, only host nutrients that enter the compartment can be used by this bacterium. How this occurs is unknown. We found that ehrlichial replication depended on autophagy induction involving class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) activity, BECN1 (Beclin 1), and ATG5 (autophagy-related 5). Ehrlichia acquired host cell preincorporated amino acids in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner and ehrlichial growth was enhanced by treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy inducer. Moreover, ATG5 and RAB5A/B/C were routed to ehrlichial inclusions. RAB5A/B/C siRNA knockdown, or overexpression of a RAB5-specific GTPase-activating protein or dominant-negative RAB5A inhibited ehrlichial infection, indicating the critical role of GTP-bound RAB5 during infection. Both native and ectopically expressed ehrlichial type IV secretion effector protein, Etf-1, bound RAB5 and the autophagy-initiating class III PtdIns3K complex, PIK3C3/VPS34, and BECN1, and homed to ehrlichial inclusions. Ectopically expressed Etf-1 activated class III PtdIns3K as in E. chaffeensis infection and induced autophagosome formation, cleared an aggregation-prone mutant huntingtin protein in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner, and enhanced ehrlichial proliferation. These data support the notion that E. chaffeensis secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy to repurpose the host cytoplasm and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III PtdIns3K, while avoiding autolysosomal killing.

  4. Vectorial secretion of interleukin-8 mediates autocrine signalling in intestinal epithelial cells via apically located CXCR1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the intestinal mucosa, several adaptations of TLR signalling have evolved to avoid chronic inflammatory responses to the presence of commensal microbes. Here we investigated whether polarized monolayers of intestinal epithelial cells might regulate inflammatory responses by secreting IL-8 in a vectorial fashion (i.e. apical versus basolateral) depending on the location of the TLR stimulus. Results In the Caco-2 BBE model of polarized villus-like epithelium, apical stimulation with TLR2 and TLR5 ligands resulted in the apical secretion of IL-8. The CXCR1 receptor for IL-8 was expressed only on the apical membrane of Caco-2 BBE cells and differentiated epithelial cells in the human small intestine and colon. Transcriptome analyses revealed that Caco-2 BBE cells respond to stimulation with IL-8 supporting the hypothesis that IL-8 induces G protein-coupled receptor signalling. Conclusions These results show that IL-8 induces autocrine signalling via an apical CXCR1 in Caco-2 BBE intestinal epithelial cells and that this receptor is also expressed on the apical surface of differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells in vivo, suggesting an autocrine function for IL-8 secreted in the lumen. PMID:24164922

  5. A conserved domain in type III secretion links the cytoplasmic domain of InvA to elements of the basal body

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic, Mirjana; Quezada, Cindy M.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2010-06-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella InvA shares homology to a recurring scaffold in the membrane-spanning components of the type II and type III secretion systems. Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events.

  6. The type III secreted effector DspE is required early in Solanum tuberosum leaf infection by Pectobacterium carotovorum to elicit cell death, and requires Wx(3-6)D/E motifs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pectobacterium species are enterobacterial plant-pathogens that cause soft rot disease in diverse plant species. Unlike hemi-biotrophic plant pathogenic bacteria, the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (P. carotovorum) appears to secrete only one effect...

  7. Role of EscP (Orf16) in Injectisome Biogenesis and Regulation of Type III Protein Secretion in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Monjarás Feria, Julia; García-Gómez, Elizabeth; Espinosa, Norma; Minamino, Tohru; Namba, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli employs a type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate virulence effector proteins directly into enterocyte host cells, leading to diarrheal disease. The T3SS is encoded within the chromosomal locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). The function of some of the LEE-encoded proteins remains unknown. Here we investigated the role of the Orf16 protein in T3SS biogenesis and function. An orf16 deletion mutant showed translocator and effector protein secretion profiles different from those of wild-type cells. The orf16 null strain produced T3S structures with abnormally long needles and filaments that caused weak hemolysis of red blood cells. Furthermore, the number of fully assembled T3SSs was also reduced in the orf16 mutant, indicating that Orf16, though not essential, is required for efficient T3SS assembly. Analysis of protein secretion revealed that Orf16 is a T3SS-secreted substrate and regulates the secretion of the inner rod component EscI. Both pulldown and yeast two-hybrid assays showed that Orf16 interacts with the C-terminal domain of an inner membrane component of the secretion apparatus, EscU; the inner rod protein EscI; the needle protein EscF; and the multieffector chaperone CesT. These results suggest that Orf16 regulates needle length and, along with EscU, participates in a substrate specificity switch from early substrates to translocators. Taken together, our results suggest that Orf16 acts as a molecular measuring device in a way similar to that of members of the Yersinia YscP and flagellar FliK protein family. Therefore, we propose that this protein be renamed EscP. PMID:22923600

  8. EscC is a chaperone for the Edwardsiella tarda type III secretion system putative translocon components EseB and EseD.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Nan; Tan, Yuen Peng; Sivaraman, J; Mok, Yu-Keung; Mo, Zhao Lan; Leung, Ka Yin

    2007-06-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative enteric pathogen that causes disease in both humans and animals. Recently, a type III secretion system (T3SS) has been found to contribute to Ed. tarda pathogenesis. EseB, EseC and EseD were shown to be secreted by the T3SS and to be the major components of the extracellular proteins (ECPs). Based on sequence similarity, they have been proposed to function as the 'translocon' of the T3SS needle structure. In this study, it was shown that EseB, EseC and EseD formed a protein complex after secretion, which is consistent with their possible roles as translocon components. The secretion of EseB and EseD was dependent on EscC (previously named Orf2). EscC has the characteristics of a chaperone; it is a small protein (13 kDa), located next to the translocators in the T3SS gene cluster, and has a coiled-coil structure at the N-terminal region as predicted by coils. An in-frame deletion of escC abolished the secretion of EseB and EseD, and complementation of DeltaescC restored the export of EseB and EseD into the culture supernatant. Further studies showed that EscC is not a secreted protein and is located on the membrane and in the cytoplasm. Mutation of escC did not affect the transcription of eseB but reduced the amount of EseB as measured by using an EseB-LacZ fusion protein in Ed. tarda. Co-purification studies demonstrated that EscC formed complexes with EseB and EseD. The results suggest that EscC functions as a T3SS chaperone for the putative translocon components EseB and EseD in Ed. tarda.

  9. The mechanisms of insulin secretion and calcium signaling in pancreatic β-cells exposed to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Bito, Motoki; Tomita, Takashi; Komori, Mika; Taogoshi, Takanori; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Kihira, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones reportedly induce hypoglycemia through stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells via inhibition of K(ATP) channels and activation of L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. In physiological condition, the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) is also regulated by release of Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of insulin secretion induced by fluoroquinolones, with respect to intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Even where the absence of supplemental extracellular Ca(2+), insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)](c) were increased by gatifloxacin, levofloxacin or tolbutamide. Insulin secretion and the rise of [Ca(2+)](c) induced by fluoroquinolones were reduced by depleting of Ca(2+) in endoplasmic reticumum (ER) by thapsigargin, and inhibiting ryanodine receptor of ER by dantrolene. Inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor of ER by xestospongin C suppressed insulin secretion induced by fluoroquinolones, whereas it did not affect [Ca(2+)](c). Destruction of acidic Ca(2+) stores such as lysosome and lysosome-related organelles by glycyl-L-phenylalanine-2-nephthylamide (GPN) did not affect insulin secretion and the rise of [Ca(2+)](c) induced by fluoroquinolones. The increase in insulin and [Ca(2+)](c) induced by tolbutamide were reduced by thapsigargin, dantrolene, and GPN but not by xestospongin C. In conclusion, fluoroquinolones induces Ca(2+) release from ER mediated by the ryanodine receptor, and the reaction might involve in insulin secretion. Sulfonylureas induce Ca(2+) release from GPN-sensitive acidic Ca(2+) stores, but fluoroquinolones did not.

  10. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of Fe(III) and Al(III) using orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares calibration method after solidified floating organic drop microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohani Moghadam, Masoud; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh

    2015-01-01

    A solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) procedure was developed for the simultaneous extraction and preconcentration of Fe(III) and Al(III) from water samples. The method was based on the formation of cationic complexes between Fe(III) and Al(III) and 3,5,7,2‧,4‧-pentahydroxyflavone (morin) which were extracted into 1-undecanol as ion pairs with perchlorate ions. The absorbance of the extracted complexes was then measured in the wavelength range of 300-450 nm. Finally, the concentration of each metal ion was determined by the use of the orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares (OSC-PLS) calibration method. Several experimental parameters that may be affected on the extraction process such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, pH of the aqueous solution, morin and perchlorate concentration and extraction time were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, Fe(III) and Al(III) were determined in the ranges of 0.83-27.00 μg L-1 (R2 = 0.9985) and 1.00-32.00 μg L-1 (R2 = 0.9979) of Fe(III) and Al(III), respectively. The relative standard deviations (n = 6) at 12.80 μg L-1 of Fe(III) and 17.00 μg L-1 of Al(III) were 3.2% and 3.5%, respectively. An enhancement factors of 102 and 96 were obtained for Fe(III) and Al(III) ions, respectively. The procedure was successfully applied to determination of iron and aluminum in steam and water samples of thermal power plant; and the accuracy was assessed through the recovery experiments and independent analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS).

  11. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of Fe(III) and Al(III) using orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares calibration method after solidified floating organic drop microextraction.

    PubMed

    Rohani Moghadam, Masoud; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh

    2015-01-25

    A solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) procedure was developed for the simultaneous extraction and preconcentration of Fe(III) and Al(III) from water samples. The method was based on the formation of cationic complexes between Fe(III) and Al(III) and 3,5,7,2',4'-pentahydroxyflavone (morin) which were extracted into 1-undecanol as ion pairs with perchlorate ions. The absorbance of the extracted complexes was then measured in the wavelength range of 300-450 nm. Finally, the concentration of each metal ion was determined by the use of the orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares (OSC-PLS) calibration method. Several experimental parameters that may be affected on the extraction process such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, pH of the aqueous solution, morin and perchlorate concentration and extraction time were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, Fe(III) and Al(III) were determined in the ranges of 0.83-27.00 μg L(-1) (R(2)=0.9985) and 1.00-32.00 μg L(-1) (R(2)=0.9979) of Fe(III) and Al(III), respectively. The relative standard deviations (n=6) at 12.80 μg L(-1) of Fe(III) and 17.00 μg L(-)(1) of Al(III) were 3.2% and 3.5%, respectively. An enhancement factors of 102 and 96 were obtained for Fe(III) and Al(III) ions, respectively. The procedure was successfully applied to determination of iron and aluminum in steam and water samples of thermal power plant; and the accuracy was assessed through the recovery experiments and independent analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS).

  12. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Type III Secretion System from Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Joe, Anna; Mavrodi, Olga V.; Hassan, Karl A.; Weller, David M.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Loper, Joyce E.; Alfano, James R.; Thomashow, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96 represents a group of rhizosphere strains responsible for the suppressiveness of agricultural soils to take-all disease of wheat. It produces the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and aggressively colonizes the roots of cereal crops. In this study, we analyzed the genome of Q8r1-96 and identified a type III protein secretion system (T3SS) gene cluster that has overall organization similar to that of the T3SS gene cluster of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. We also screened a collection of 30 closely related P. fluorescens strains and detected the T3SS genes in all but one of them. The Q8r1-96 genome contained ropAA and ropM type III effector genes, which are orthologs of the P. syringae effector genes hopAA1-1 and hopM1, as well as a novel type III effector gene designated ropB. These type III effector genes encoded proteins that were secreted in culture and injected into plant cells by both P. syringae and Q8r1-96 T3SSs. The Q8r1-96 T3SS was expressed in the rhizosphere, but mutants lacking a functional T3SS were not altered in their rhizosphere competence. The Q8r1-96 type III effectors RopAA, RopB, and RopM were capable of suppressing the hypersensitive response and production of reactive oxygen species, two plant immune responses. PMID:20971913

  13. Increased adrenergic signaling is responsible for decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the chronically hyperinsulinemic ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Sasha E; Brown, Laura D; Thorn, Stephanie R; Limesand, Sean W; Davis, Melissa; Hay, William W; Rozance, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin may stimulate its own insulin secretion and is a potent growth factor for the pancreatic β-cell. Complications of pregnancy, such as diabetes and intrauterine growth restriction, are associated with changes in fetal insulin concentrations, secretion, and β-cell mass. However, glucose concentrations are also abnormal in these conditions. The direct effect of chronic fetal hyperinsulinemia with euglycemia on fetal insulin secretion and β-cell mass has not been tested. We hypothesized that chronic fetal hyperinsulinemia with euglycemia would increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and β-cell mass in the ovine fetus. Singleton ovine fetuses were infused with iv insulin to produce high physiological insulin concentrations, or saline for 7-10 days. The hyperinsulinemic animals also received a direct glucose infusion to maintain euglycemia. GSIS, measured at 133 ± 1 days of gestation, was significantly attenuated in the hyperinsulinemic fetuses (P < .05). There was no change in β-cell mass. The hyperinsulinemic fetuses also had decreased oxygen (P < .05) and higher norepinephrine (1160 ± 438 vs 522 ± 106 pg/mL; P < .005). Acute pharmacologic adrenergic blockade restored GSIS in the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic fetuses, demonstrating that increased adrenergic signaling mediates decreased GSIS in these fetuses.

  14. Construction of a novel secretion expression system guided by native signal peptide of PhoD in Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; He, Ming-Xiong; Feng, Hong; Shui, Zong-Xia; Tang, Xiao-Yu; Hu, Qi-Chun; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, three native signal peptides (SPs) from PhoC, PhoD, and ZMO0331were investigated and compared to construct novel secretion expression systems in Zymomonas mobilis. The secretion expression of target protein, α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAA), guided by PhoD's SP resulted in more hydrolysis of starch than that by the other two SPs. Extracellular and intracellular α-amylase activities of the strain containing PhoD's SP were also higher than the other two strains containing PhoC or ZMO0331's SP. In addition, the evidence by alcohol dehydrogenase activity assay further confirmed that the starch hydrolysis was resulted from the secretion expression of BAA rather than the breakage of cells. Our results indicated that the SP of PhoD is able to serve as a promising candidate to assist secretion expression of heterogeneous genes in Z. mobilis. This will contribute to development of engineered Z. mobilis strains converting starch into ethanol.

  15. Defining the enzyme binding domain of a ribonuclease III processing signal. Ethylation interference and hydroxyl radical footprinting using catalytically inactive RNase III mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Nicholson, A W

    1996-01-01

    Ethylation interference and hydroxyl radical footprinting were used to identify substrate ribose-phosphate backbone sites that interact with the Escherichia coli RNA processing enzyme, ribonuclease III. Two RNase III mutants were employed, which bind substrate in vitro similarly as wild-type enzyme, but lack detectable phosphodiesterase activity. Specifically, altering glutamic acid at position 117 to lysine or alanine uncouples substrate binding from cleavage. The two substrates examined are based on the bacteriophage T7 R1.1 RNase III processing signal. One substrate, R1.1 RNA, undergoes accurate single cleavage at the canonical site, while a close variant, R1.1[WC-L] RNA, undergoes coordinate double cleavage. The interference and footprinting patterns for each substrate (i) overlap, (ii) exhibit symmetry and (iii) extend approximately one helical turn in each direction from the RNase III cleavage sites. Divalent metal ions (Mg2+, Ca2+) significantly enhance substrate binding, and confer stronger protection from hydroxyl radicals, but do not significantly affect the interference pattern. The footprinting and interference patterns indicate that (i) RNase III contacts the sugar-phosphate backbone; (ii) the RNase III-substrate interaction spans two turns of the A-form helix; and (iii) divalent metal ion does not play an essential role in binding specificity. These results rationalize the conserved two-turn helix motif seen in most RNase III processing signals, and which is necessary for optimal processing reactivity. In addition, the specific differences in the footprint and interference patterns of the two substrates suggest why RNase III catalyzes the coordinate double cleavage of R1.1[WC-L] RNA, and dsRNA in general, while catalyzing only single cleavage of R1.1 RNA and related substrates in which the scissle bond is within an asymmetric internal loop. Images PMID:8635475

  16. DsbA directs efficient expression of outer membrane secretin EscC of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli type III secretion apparatus.

    PubMed

    Miki, Tsuyoshi; Okada, Nobuhiko; Kim, Yeongsuk; Abe, Akio; Danbara, Hirofumi

    2008-02-01

    The formation of disulfide bond is essential for the folding, activity, and stability of many secreted proteins of Gram-negative bacteria. The disulfide oxidoreductase, DsbA, introduces disulfide bonds into exported proteins from the cytoplasm. In pathogenic bacteria, DsbA is required to process virulence determinants for their folding and assembly. In this study, we investigated the role of DsbA in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. Here, we show that the DsbA is required for stable expression of outer membrane secretin EscC. DsbA has no effect on LEE transcription as measured with LEE-lacZ fusions. Replacement of either cysteine residue 136 or 155 of EscC with a serine resulted in reduced level of EscC, similar to the effect of the dsbA mutation. These results demonstrate the role of DsbA in assembly of the type III secretion apparatus.

  17. Structure-Function Analysis of the HrpB2-HrcU Interaction in the Xanthomonas citri Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Paola A.; dos Santos, Rafael Freitas; do Amaral, Alexandre M.; Homem, Rafael Augusto; dos Santos Souza, Thaís; Machado, Marcos A.; Farah, Chuck S.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion systems deliver protein virulence factors to host cells. Here we characterize the interaction between HrpB2, a small protein secreted by the Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri type III secretion system, and the cytosolic domain of the inner membrane protein HrcU, a paralog of the flagellar protein FlhB. We show that a recombinant fragment corresponding to the C-terminal cytosolic domain of HrcU produced in E. coli suffers cleavage within a conserved Asn264-Pro265-Thr266-His267 (NPTH) sequence. A recombinant HrcU cytosolic domain with N264A, P265A, T266A mutations at the cleavage site (HrcUAAAH) was not cleaved and interacted with HrpB2. Furthermore, a polypeptide corresponding to the sequence following the NPTH cleavage site also interacted with HrpB2 indicating that the site for interaction is located after the NPTH site. Non-polar deletion mutants of the hrcU and hrpB2 genes resulted in a total loss of pathogenicity in susceptible citrus plants and disease symptoms could be recovered by expression of HrpB2 and HrcU from extrachromossomal plasmids. Complementation of the ΔhrcU mutant with HrcUAAAH produced canker lesions similar to those observed when complemented with wild-type HrcU. HrpB2 secretion however, was significantly reduced in the ΔhrcU mutant complemented with HrcUAAAH, suggesting that an intact and cleavable NPTH site in HrcU is necessary for total functionally of T3SS in X. citri subsp. citri. Complementation of the ΔhrpB2 X. citri subsp. citri strain with a series of hrpB2 gene mutants revealed that the highly conserved HrpB2 C-terminus is essential for T3SS-dependent development of citrus canker symptoms in planta. PMID:21408079

  18. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) is a Determinant for Rice-Endophyte Colonization by Non-Photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium.

    PubMed

    Piromyou, Pongdet; Songwattana, Pongpan; Greetatorn, Teerana; Okubo, Takashi; Kakizaki, Kaori Chiba; Prakamhang, Janpen; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Teaumroong, Neung; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    Plant associations by bradyrhizobia have been detected not only in leguminous plants, but also in non-leguminous species including rice. Bradyrhizobium sp. SUTN9-2 was isolated from Aeschynomene americana L., which is a leguminous weed found in the rice fields of Thailand. This strain promoted the highest total rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivar Pathum Thani 1) dry weight among the endophytic bradyrhizobial strains tested, and was, thus, employed for the further characterization of rice-Bradyrhizobium interactions. Some known bacterial genes involved in bacteria-plant interactions were selected. The expression of the type III secretion component (rhcJ), type IV secretion component (virD4), and pectinesterase (peces) genes of the bacterium were up-regulated when the rice root exudate was added to the culture. When SUTN9-2 was inoculated into rice seedlings, the peces, rhcJ, virD4, and exopolysaccharide production (fliP) genes were strongly expressed in the bacterium 6-24 h after the inoculation. The gene for glutathione-S-transferase (gst) was slightly expressed 12 h after the inoculation. In order to determine whether type III secretion system (T3SS) is involved in bradyrhizobial infections in rice plants, wild-type SUTN9-2 and T3SS mutant strains were inoculated into the original host plant (A. americana) and a rice plant (cultivar Pathum Thani 1). The ability of T3SS mutants to invade rice tissues was weaker than that of the wild-type strain; however, their phenotypes in A. americana were not changed by T3SS mutations. These results suggest that T3SS is one of the important determinants modulating rice infection; however, type IV secretion system and peces may also be responsible for the early steps of rice infection.

  19. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) is a Determinant for Rice-Endophyte Colonization by Non-Photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium

    PubMed Central

    Piromyou, Pongdet; Songwattana, Pongpan; Greetatorn, Teerana; Okubo, Takashi; Kakizaki, Kaori Chiba; Prakamhang, Janpen; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Teaumroong, Neung; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    Plant associations by bradyrhizobia have been detected not only in leguminous plants, but also in non-leguminous species including rice. Bradyrhizobium sp. SUTN9-2 was isolated from Aeschynomene americana L., which is a leguminous weed found in the rice fields of Thailand. This strain promoted the highest total rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivar Pathum Thani 1) dry weight among the endophytic bradyrhizobial strains tested, and was, thus, employed for the further characterization of rice-Bradyrhizobium interactions. Some known bacterial genes involved in bacteria-plant interactions were selected. The expression of the type III secretion component (rhcJ), type IV secretion component (virD4), and pectinesterase (peces) genes of the bacterium were up-regulated when the rice root exudate was added to the culture. When SUTN9-2 was inoculated into rice seedlings, the peces, rhcJ, virD4, and exopolysaccharide production (fliP) genes were strongly expressed in the bacterium 6–24 h after the inoculation. The gene for glutathione-S-transferase (gst) was slightly expressed 12 h after the inoculation. In order to determine whether type III secretion system (T3SS) is involved in bradyrhizobial infections in rice plants, wild-type SUTN9-2 and T3SS mutant strains were inoculated into the original host plant (A. americana) and a rice plant (cultivar Pathum Thani 1). The ability of T3SS mutants to invade rice tissues was weaker than that of the wild-type strain; however, their phenotypes in A. americana were not changed by T3SS mutations. These results suggest that T3SS is one of the important determinants modulating rice infection; however, type IV secretion system and peces may also be responsible for the early steps of rice infection. PMID:26582551

  20. Anoctamins support calcium-dependent chloride secretion by facilitating calcium signaling in adult mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Rainer; Faria, Diana; Skryabin, Boris V; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Rock, Jason R; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal epithelial electrolyte secretion is activated by increase in intracellular cAMP or Ca(2+) and opening of apical Cl(-) channels. In infants and young animals, but not in adults, Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels may cause secretory diarrhea during rotavirus infection. While detailed knowledge exists concerning the contribution of cAMP-activated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels, analysis of the role of Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels became possible through identification of the anoctamin (TMEM16) family of proteins. We demonstrate expression of several anoctamin paralogues in mouse small and large intestines. Using intestinal-specific mouse knockout models for anoctamin 1 (Ano1) and anoctamin 10 (Ano10) and a conventional knockout model for anoctamin 6 (Ano6), we demonstrate the role of anoctamins for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion induced by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCH). Ano1 is preferentially expressed in the ileum and large intestine, where it supports Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) secretion. In contrast, Ano10 is essential for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in jejunum, where expression of Ano1 was not detected. Although broadly expressed, Ano6 has no role in intestinal cholinergic Cl(-) secretion. Ano1 is located in a basolateral compartment/membrane rather than in the apical membrane, where it supports CCH-induced Ca(2+) increase, while the essential and possibly only apical Cl(-) channel is CFTR. These results define a new role of Ano1 for intestinal Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion and demonstrate for the first time a contribution of Ano10 to intestinal transport.

  1. The Animal Pathogen-Like Type III Secretion System is Required for the Intracellular Survival of Burkholderia mallei within J774.2 Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-30

    E -mail: Ricky.Ulrich @AMEDD.ARMY.MIL. 4349 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...counterbioterrorism. The Humana Press, Inc., Totowa, N.J. 4. DeShazer, D., D. M. Waag, D. L. Fritz, and D. E . Woods. 2001. Identification of a Burkholderia...Microb. Pathog. 30:253–269. 5. Galan, J. E . 2001. Salmonella interactions with host cells: type III secretion at work. Annu. Rev. Cell Dev. Biol. 17:53

  2. Signal pathways regulating hyaluronan secretion into static and cycled synovial joints of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ingram, K R; Wann, A K T; Wingate, R M; Coleman, P J; McHale, N; Levick, J R

    2009-09-01

    Joint lubrication, synovial fluid conservation and many pathophysiological processes depend on hyaluronan (HA). Intra-articular HA injection and exercise, which stimulates articular HA production, ameliorate osteoarthritis. We therefore investigated the pathways regulating movement-stimulated articular HA secretion rate ( ) in vivo. Endogenous HA was removed from the knee joint cavity of anaesthetised rabbits by washout. Joints were then cycled passively or remained static for 5 h, with/without intra-articular agonist/inhibitor, after which newly secreted HA was harvested for analysis. Movement almost doubled . Similar or larger increases were elicited in static joints by the intra-articular Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin, prostaglandin E(2), cAMP-raising agents, serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). PKC-stimulated secretion was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I and inhibitors of the downstream kinases MEK-ERK (U0126, PD98059). These agents inhibited movement-stimulated secretion of HA (MSHA) only when the parallel p38 kinase path was simultaneously inhibited by SB203580 (ineffective alone). The phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 almost fully blocked MSHA (P = 0.001, n = 10), without affecting static . The ENaC channel blocker amiloride inhibited MSHA, whereas other inhibitors of stretch-activated channels (Gd(3+), ruthenium red, SKF96365) did not. It is proposed that MSHA may be mediated by PLC activation, leading to activation of parallel PKC-MEK-ERK and p38 kinase pathways.

  3. The Type III Secretion System Effector SeoC of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and S. enterica subsp. arizonae ADP-Ribosylates Src and Inhibits Opsonophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Dominic J.; Young, Joanna C.; Covarelli, Valentina; Herrera-León, Silvia; Connor, Thomas R.; Fookes, Maria; Walker, Danielle; Echeita, Aurora; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Berger, Cedric N.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella species utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to translocate effectors into the cytosol of mammalian host cells, subverting cell signaling and facilitating the onset of gastroenteritis. In this study, we compared a draft genome assembly of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae strain 3588/07 against the genomes of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 and Salmonella bongori strain 12419. S. enterica subsp. salamae encodes the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), SPI-2, and the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) T3SSs. Though several key S. Typhimurium effector genes are missing (e.g., avrA, sopB, and sseL), S. enterica subsp. salamae invades HeLa cells and contains homologues of S. bongori sboK and sboC, which we named seoC. SboC and SeoC are homologues of EspJ from enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively), which inhibit Src kinase-dependent phagocytosis by ADP-ribosylation. By screening 73 clinical and environmental Salmonella isolates, we identified EspJ homologues in S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae. The β-lactamase TEM-1 reporter system showed that SeoC is translocated by the SPI-1 T3SS. All the Salmonella SeoC/SboC homologues ADP-ribosylate Src E310 in vitro. Ectopic expression of SeoC/SboC inhibited phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized beads into Cos-7 cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FcγRIIa. Concurrently, S. enterica subsp. salamae infection of J774.A1 macrophages inhibited phagocytosis of beads, in a seoC-dependent manner. These results show that S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and S. enterica subsp. arizonae share features of the infection strategy of extracellular pathogens EPEC and EHEC and shed light on the complexities of the T3SS effector repertoires of Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27736780

  4. Signal Perception by the Secretion Stress-Responsive CssRS Two-Component System in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Botella, Eric; Butler, Clodagh; Hansen, Annette; Jende, Inga; Devine, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    The CssRS two-component system responds to heat and secretion stresses in Bacillus subtilis by controlling expression of HtrA and HtrB chaperone-type proteases and positively autoregulating its own expression. Here we report on the features of the CssS extracellular loop domain that are involved in signal perception and on CssS subcellular localization. Individual regions of the CssS extracellular loop domain contribute differently to signal perception and activation. The conserved hydrophilic 26-amino-acid segment juxtaposed to transmembrane helix 1 is involved in the switch between the deactivated and activated states, while the conserved 19-amino-acid hydrophobic segment juxtaposed to transmembrane 2 is required for signal perception and/or transduction. Perturbing the size of the extracellular loop domain increases CssS kinase activity and makes it unresponsive to secretion stress. CssS is localized primarily at the septum but is also found in a punctate pattern with lower intensity throughout the cell cylinder. Moreover, the CssRS-controlled HtrA and HtrB proteases are randomly distributed in foci throughout the cell surface, with more HtrB than HtrA foci in unstressed cells. PMID:22307758

  5. Harnessing Novel Secreted Inhibitors of EGF Receptor Signaling for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    of EGF Receptor Signaling for Breast Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mark A. Lemmon, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...Receptor Signaling for Breast Cancer Treatment INTRODUCTION The aim of this research project is to develop novel inhibitors of signaling through receptors...related proteins), thus providing the essential groundwork for developing an innovative approach for breast cancer treatment that will attack the

  6. Transcriptional regulation and signal-peptide-dependent secretion of exolevanase (LsdB) in the endophyte Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Carmen; Banguela, Alexander; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hernández, Lázaro

    2009-03-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus utilizes plant sucrose with a constitutively expressed levansucrase (LsdA), producing extracellular levan, which may be degraded under energetically unfavored conditions. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that lsdA and the downstream exolevanase gene (lsdB) form an operon. lsdB transcription was induced during growth with low fructose concentrations (0.44 to 33 mM) and repressed by glucose. Transport of LsdB to the periplasm involved N-terminal signal peptide cleavage. Type II secretion mutants failed to transfer LsdB across the outer membrane, impeding levan hydrolysis.

  7. Transcriptional Regulation and Signal-Peptide-Dependent Secretion of Exolevanase (LsdB) in the Endophyte Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus▿

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez, Carmen; Banguela, Alexander; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hernández, Lázaro

    2009-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus utilizes plant sucrose with a constitutively expressed levansucrase (LsdA), producing extracellular levan, which may be degraded under energetically unfavored conditions. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that lsdA and the downstream exolevanase gene (lsdB) form an operon. lsdB transcription was induced during growth with low fructose concentrations (0.44 to 33 mM) and repressed by glucose. Transport of LsdB to the periplasm involved N-terminal signal peptide cleavage. Type II secretion mutants failed to transfer LsdB across the outer membrane, impeding levan hydrolysis. PMID:19139238

  8. Intracellular Signaling Mechanisms Pharmacological Action of Jasminum amplexicaule Buch.-Ham. (Oleaceae) on Gastrointestinal Secretion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenhua; Yin, Junqiang; Xie, Xiaolin; Long, Hanwu; Qi, Xiang; Lin, Changhu; Wu, Liangcai

    2014-01-01

    Jasminum amplexicaule Buch-Ham. (Oleaceae) has been commonly used in the traditional medicine in dysentery, diarrhoea and bellyache in China. In the present work, the methanol extract of Jasminum amplexicaule (JME) was examined for pharmacology on human colonic epithelial cell line T84 by the short-circuit current technique. The results showed that pretreatment of T84 cells with JME produced a concentration-dependent (0-1000 μg/mL. EC50 = 0.055 mg/ mL) inhibition effect on adrenalin (Adr.)-induced Cl- secretion. The maximal response was observed at 200 μg/mL. It has been demonstrated that JME has a direct effect on the enterocyte. Our results also demonstrated that the JME exerted inhibitory effect on gastrointestinal Cl(-)secretion that effected by acting on basolateral β-adrenoreceptors. These results suggested that the Chinese traditional medicine of JME can be used for the treatment of acute diarrhea and bellyache.

  9. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of SrcA, a Multi-cargo Type III Secretion Chaperone in Salmonella Required for Pathogenic Association with a Host

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.; Zhang, K; Andres, S; Fnag, Y; Kaniuk, N; Hannemann, M; Brumell, J; Foster, L; Junop, M; Coombes, B

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS) that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2) is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2) and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  10. An extensive repertoire of type III secretion effectors in Escherichia coli O157 and the role of lambdoid phages in their dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Toru; Beatson, Scott A.; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Abe, Hiroyuki; Bailey, Christopher M.; Fivian, Amanda; Younis, Rasha; Matthews, Sophie; Marches, Olivier; Frankel, Gad; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Pallen, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    Several pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli exploit type III secretion to inject “effector proteins” into human cells, which then subvert eukaryotic cell biology to the bacterium's advantage. We have exploited bioinformatics and experimental approaches to establish that the effector repertoire in the Sakai strain of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is much larger than previously thought. Homology searches led to the identification of >60 putative effector genes. Thirteen of these were judged to be likely pseudogenes, whereas 49 were judged to be potentially functional. In total, 39 proteins were confirmed experimentally as effectors: 31 through proteomics and 28 through translocation assays. At the protein level, the EHEC effector sequences fall into >20 families. The largest family, the NleG family, contains 14 members in the Sakai strain alone. EHEC also harbors functional homologs of effectors from plant pathogens (HopPtoH, HopW, AvrA) and from Shigella (OspD, OspE, OspG), and two additional members of the Map/IpgB family. Genes encoding proven or predicted effectors occur in >20 exchangeable effector loci scattered throughout the chromosome. Crucially, the majority of functional effector genes are encoded by nine exchangeable effector loci that lie within lambdoid prophages. Thus, type III secretion in E. coli is linked to a vast phage “metagenome,” acting as a crucible for the evolution of pathogenicity. PMID:16990433

  11. PACAP stimulation of maturational gonadotropin secretion in goldfish involves extracellular signal-regulated kinase, but not nitric oxide or guanylate cyclase, signaling.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Mitchell, Gabriel; Uretsky, Aubrey D; Kwong, Patrick; Grey, Caleb L; Meints, Amanda N; Booth, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    In goldfish, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity is present in gonadotropes and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) mediates GnRH stimulation of gonadotropin release and synthesis. In this study, we tested the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and ERK in mediating PACAP-stimulated maturational gonadotropin (GTH-II) release from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. In static incubation experiments, PACAP-induced GTH-II release was unaffected by two inhibitors of NOS synthase, AGH and 1400W; whereas addition of a NO donor, SNAP, elevated GTH-II secretion. In perifusion experiments, neither NOS inhibitors (AGH, 1400W and 7-Ni) nor NO scavengers (PTIO and rutin hydrate) attenuated the GTH-II response to pulse applications of PACAP. In addition, the GTH-II responses to PACAP and the NO donor SNP were additive while PTIO blocked SNP action. Although dibutyryl cGMP increased GTH-II secretion in static incubation, inhibition of guanylate cyclase (GC), a known down-stream target for NO signaling, did not reduce the GTH-II response to pulse application of PACAP. On the other hand, GTH-II responses to PACAP in perifusion were attenuated in the presence of two inhibitors of ERK kinase (MEK), U 0126 and PD 98059. These results suggest that although increased availability of NO and cGMP can lead to increased GTH-II secretion, MEK/ERK signaling, rather than NOS/NO/GC activation, mediates PACAP action on GTH-II release in goldfish.

  12. The YscU/FlhB homologue HrcU from Xanthomonas controls type III secretion and translocation of early and late substrates.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Jens; Büttner, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    The majority of Gram-negative plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria employ a type III secretion (T3S) system to deliver effector proteins to eukaryotic cells. Members of the YscU protein family are essential components of the T3S system and consist of a transmembrane and a cytoplasmic region that is autocatalytically cleaved at a conserved NPTH motif. YscU homologues interact with T3S substrate specificity switch (T3S4) proteins that alter the substrate specificity of the T3S system after assembly of the secretion apparatus. We previously showed that the YscU homologue HrcU from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria interacts with the T3S4 protein HpaC and is required for the secretion of translocon and effector proteins. In the present study, analysis of HrcU deletion, insertion and point mutant derivatives led to the identification of amino acid residues in the cytoplasmic region of HrcU (HrcUC) that control T3S and translocation of the predicted inner rod protein HrpB2, the translocon protein HrpF and the effector protein AvrBs3. Mutations in the vicinity of the NPTH motif interfered with HrcU cleavage and/or the interaction of HrcUC with HrpB2 and the T3S4 protein HpaC. However, HrcU function was not completely abolished, suggesting that HrcU cleavage is not crucial for pathogenicity and T3S. Given that mutations in HrcU differentially affected T3S and translocation of HrpB2 and effector proteins, we propose that HrcU controls the secretion of different T3S substrate classes by independent mechanisms.

  13. EGFR signaling downstream of EGF regulates migration, invasion, and MMP secretion of immortalized cells derived from human ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Marina Rolo Pinheiro; Falcão, Aline Semblano Carreira; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; da Silva Kataoka, Maria Sueli; Ribeiro, André L R; Boccardo, Enrique; de Siqueira, Adriane Sousa; Jaeger, Ruy G; de Jesus Viana Pinheiro, João; de Melo Alves Júnior, Sérgio

    2014-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic tumor characterized by local invasiveness and frequent recurrence. The surrounding stroma, composed of different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM), may influence ameloblastoma invasive behavior. Furthermore, tumor and stromal cells secrete matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), which, in turn, can modulate the matrix and promote the release of ECM-bound growth factors. Among these growth factors, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor, EGFR, have already been shown to stimulate MMP synthesis, suggesting that an interdependent mechanism, involving MMP activity and growth factors release, may contribute to tumor invasiveness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the EGF/EGFR signaling pathway on migration, invasion, and MMP activity, in a primary cell line derived from human ameloblastoma. We established and characterized a primary cell line (AME-1) from a human ameloblastoma sample. This cell line was transduced with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6/E7 oncogenes, generating the AME-HPV continuous cell line. EGF, MMP2, and MMP9 expression in ameloblastoma biopsies and in the AME-HPV cell line was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, respectively. Migratory activity of EGF-treated AME-HPV cells was investigated using monolayer wound assays and Transwell chambers. EGF-induced invasion was assessed in Boyden chambers coated with Matrigel. Conditioned medium from EGF-treated cells was subjected to zymography. EGFR expression in AME-HPV cells was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA), to verify the relationship between this receptor and MMP secretion. Ameloblastoma samples and AME-HPV cells expressed EGF, EGFR, MMP2, and MMP9. AME-HPV cells treated with EGF showed increased rates of migration and invasion, as well as enhanced MMP2 and MMP9 activity. EGFR knockdown decreased MMP2 and MMP9 levels in AME-HPV cells. EGFR signaling downstream of EGF probably regulates migration, invasion

  14. cAMP induction by ouabain promotes endothelin-1 secretion via MAPK/ERK signaling in beating rabbit atria.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li-Qun; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qiu-Li; Hong, Lan; Liu, Li-Ping; Cui, Xun; Cui, Bai-Ri

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) participates in the regulation of numerous cellular functions, including the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (sodium pump). Ouabain, used in the treatment of several heart diseases, is known to increase cAMP levels but its effects on the atrium are not understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of ouabain on the regulation of atrial cAMP production and its roles in atrial endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion in isolated perfused beating rabbit atria. Our results showed that ouabain (3.0 µmol/L) significantly increased atrial dynamics and cAMP levels during recovery period. The ouabain-increased atrial dynamics was blocked by KB-R7943 (3.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor for reverse mode of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers (NCX), but did not by L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine (1.0 µmol/L) or protein kinase A (PKA) selective inhibitor H-89 (3.0 µmol/L). Ouabain also enhanced atrial intracellular cAMP production in response to forskolin and theophyline (100.0 µmol/L), an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase, potentiated the ouabain-induced increase in cAMP. Ouabain and 8-Bromo-cAMP (0.5 µmol/L) markedly increased atrial ET-1 secretion, which was blocked by H-89 and by PD98059 (30 µmol/L), an inhibitor of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) without changing ouabain-induced atrial dynamics. Our results demonstrated that ouabain increases atrial cAMP levels and promotes atrial ET-1 secretion via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway. These findings may explain the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to digitalis-like compounds.

  15. The dipeptide Pro-Asp promotes IGF-1 secretion and expression in hepatocytes by enhancing JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songbo; Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Mengyuan; Zhuang, Lu; Wan, Xiaojuan; Xu, Jingren; Wang, Lina; Zhu, Xiaotong; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-11-15

    It has been implicated that IGF-1 secretion can be regulated by dietary protein. However, whether the dipeptides, one of digested products of dietary protein, have influence on IGF-1 secretion remain largely unknown. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of the dipeptide Pro-Asp on IGF-1 secretion and expression in hepatocytes and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms. Our findings demonstrated that Pro-Asp promoted the secretion and gene expression of IGF-1 in HepG2 cells and primary porcine hepatocytes. Meanwhile, Pro-Asp activated the ERK and Akt signaling pathways, downstream of IGF-1. In addition, Pro-Asp enhanced GH-mediated JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway, while inhibition of JAK2/STAT5 blocked the promotive effect of Pro-Asp on IGF-1 secretion and expression. Moreover, acute injection of Pro-Asp stimulated IGF-1 expression and activated JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway in mice liver. Together, these results suggested that the dipeptide Pro-Asp promoted IGF-1 secretion and expression in hepatocytes by enhancing GH-mediated JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway.

  16. Secreted Frizzled-related protein-2 (sFRP2) augments canonical Wnt3a-induced signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Marschall, Zofia von; Fisher, Larry W.

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} sFRP2 enhances the Wnt3a-induced {beta}-catenin stabilization and its nuclear translocation. {yields} sFRP2 enhances LRP6 phosphorylation and Wnt3a/{beta}-catenin transcriptional reporter activity. {yields} Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) fully antagonizes both Wnt3a/sFRP2-induced LRP6 phosphorylation and transcriptional activity. {yields} sFRP2 enhances expression of genes known to be regulated by Wnt3a signaling. -- Abstract: Secreted Frizzled-related proteins (sFRP) are involved in embryonic development as well as pathological conditions including bone and myocardial disorders and cancer. Because of their sequence homology with the Wnt-binding domain of Frizzled, they have generally been considered antagonists of canonical Wnt signaling. However, additional activities of various sFRPs including both synergism and mimicry of Wnt signaling as well as functions other than modulation of Wnt signaling have been reported. Using human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293A), we found that sFRP2 enhanced Wnt3a-dependent phosphorylation of LRP6 as well as both cytosolic {beta}-catenin levels and its nuclear translocation. While addition of recombinant sFRP2 had no activity by itself, Top/Fop luciferase reporter assays showed a dose-dependent increase of Wnt3a-mediated transcriptional activity. sFRP2 enhancement of Wnt3a signaling was abolished by treatment with the Wnt antagonist, Dickkopf-1 (DKK1). Wnt-signaling pathway qPCR arrays showed that sFRP2 enhanced the Wnt3a-mediated transcriptional up-regulation of several genes regulated by Wnt3a including its antagonists, DKK1, and Naked cuticle-1 homolog (NKD1). These results support sFRP2's role as an enhancer of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, a result with biological impact for both normal development and diverse pathologies such as tumorigenesis.

  17. ASKtheta, a group-III Arabidopsis GSK3, functions in the brassinosteroid signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rozhon, Wilfried; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Petutschnig, Elena; Fujioka, Shozo; Jonak, Claudia

    2010-04-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant hormones that regulate many processes including cell elongation, leaf development, pollen tube growth and xylem differentiation. GSK3/shaggy-like kinases (GSK) are critical regulators of intracellular signalling initiated by the binding of BR to the BRI1 receptor complex. Three GSKs have already been shown to relay BR responses, including phosphorylation of the transcriptional regulator BES1. However, recent studies indicate that one or more yet unidentified protein kinases are involved in BR signalling. Here, we show that the in vivo protein kinase activity of the group-III GSK, ASKtheta, was negatively regulated by BRI1. Arabidopsis thaliana plants with enhanced ASKtheta activity displayed a bri1-like phenotype. ASKtheta overexpressors accumulated high levels of brassinolide, castasterone and typhasterol, and were insensitive to BR. ASKtheta localized to the nucleus and directly phosphorylated BES1 and BZR1. Moreover, the BES1/BZR1-like transcription factor BEH2 was isolated as an ASKtheta interaction partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen. ASKtheta phosphorylated BEH2 both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, these data provide strong evidence that ASKtheta is a novel component of the BR signalling cascade, targeting the transcription factors BES1, BZR1 and BEH2.

  18. Neurotransmitters act as paracrine signals to regulate insulin secretion from the human pancreatic islet.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Menegaz, Danusa; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2014-08-15

    In this symposium review we discuss the role of neurotransmitters as paracrine signals that regulate pancreatic islet function. A large number of neurotransmitters and their receptors has been identified in the islet, but relatively little is known about their involvement in islet biology. Interestingly, neurotransmitters initially thought to be present in autonomic axons innervating the islet are also present in endocrine cells of the human islet. These neurotransmitters can thus be released as paracrine signals to help control hormone release. Here we propose that the role of neurotransmitters may extend beyond controlling endocrine cell function to work as signals modulating vascular flow and immune responses within the islet.

  19. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A.; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M.; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G.; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Olszewski, Neil E.; Sun, Tai-ping

    2016-01-01

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein–protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors—PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)—that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development. PMID:26773002

  20. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Olszewski, Neil E; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2016-01-15

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein-protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors-PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)-that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development.

  1. Amphipathic helical ordering of the flagellar secretion signal of Salmonella flagellin.

    PubMed

    Tőke, Orsolya; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2016-08-05

    Export of external flagellar proteins requires a signal located within their N-terminal disordered part, however, these regions do not share any significant sequence similarity suggesting that the secondary/tertiary structure might be important for recognition by the export gate. NMR experiments were performed to reveal the conformational properties of the flagellin signal sequence in vitro. It assumed a largely disordered fluctuating structure in aqueous environment, but acquired a folded structure containing an amphipathic helical portion in 50% MeOH or upon addition of SDS micelles which are known to promote hydrophobic interactions. Our observations raise the possibility that the signal sequence may partially undergo amphipathic helical ordering upon interaction with the recognition unit of the flagellar export machinery in a similar way as revealed for protein import into intracellular eukaryotic organelles mediated by targeting signals of high diversity.

  2. High level heterologous protein production in Lactococcus and Lactobacillus using a new secretion system based on the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer signals.

    PubMed

    Savijoki, K; Kahala, M; Palva, A

    1997-02-28

    A secretion cassette, based on the expression and secretion signals of a S-layer protein (SlpA) from Lactobacillus brevis, was constructed. E. coli beta-lactamase (Bla) was used as the reporter protein to determine the functionality of the S-layer signals for heterologous expression and secretion in Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus casei using a low-copy-number plasmid derived from pGK12. In all hosts tested, the bla gene was expressed under the slpA signals and all Bla activity was secreted to the culture medium. The Lb. brevis S-layer promoters were very efficiently recognized in L. lactis, Lb. brevis and Lb. plantarum, whereas in Lb. gasseri the slpA promoter region appeared to be recognized at a lower level and in Lb. casei the level of transcripts was below the detection limit. The production of Bla was mainly restricted to the exponential phase of growth. The highest yield of Bla was obtained with L. lactis and Lb. brevis. Without pH control, substantial degradation of Bla occurred during prolonged cultivations with all lactic acid bacteria (LAB) tested. When growing L. lactis and Lb. brevis under pH control, the Bla activity could be stabilized also at the stationary phase. L. lactis produced up to 80 mg/l of Bla which to our knowledge represents the highest amount of a heterologous protein secreted by LAB so far. The short production phase implied a very high rate of secretion with a calculated value of 5 x 10(5) Bla molecules/cell per h. Such a high rate was also observed with Lb. plantarum, whereas in Lb. brevis the competition between the wild type slpA gene and the secretion construct probably lowered the rate of Bla production. The results obtained indicate wide applicability of the Lb. brevis slpA signals for efficient protein production and secretion in LAB.

  3. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; ...

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  4. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Tainer, John A.

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  5. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245 gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates. PMID:23441204

  6. HrpG and HrpV proteins from the Type III secretion system of Erwinia amylovora form a stable heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Gazi, Anastasia D; Charova, Spyridoula; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Panopoulos, Nicholas J; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are specialized multicomponent nanomachines that mediate the transport of proteins either to extracellular locations or directly into eukaryotic host cell cytoplasm. Erwinia amylovora, the main agent of rosaceous plants fireblight disease, employs an Hrp/Hrc1 T3SS to accomplish its pathogenesis. The regulatory network that controls the activation of this T3SS is largely unknown in E. amylovora. However, in Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the HrpG/HrpV complex has been shown to directly regulate the activity of transcription factor HrpS and consequently the upregulation of the Hrp/Hrc1 T3SS related genes. In this work, we report the successful recombinant production and purification of a stable E. amylovora HrpG/HrpV complex, using pPROpET, a bicistronic expression vector. Furthermore, we present the first solution structure of this complex based on small-angle X-ray scattering data.

  7. Regulation of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System by pH and Phosphate Concentration through EsrA, EsrB, and EsrC ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rogge, Matthew L.; Thune, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    A recently described Edwardsiella ictaluri type III secretion system (T3SS) with functional similarity to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS is required for replication in channel catfish head-kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM) and virulence in channel catfish. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting identified low pH and phosphate limitation as conducive to expression of the E. ictaluri T3SS, growth conditions that mimic the phagosomal environment. Mutagenesis studies demonstrated that expression is under the control of the EsrAB two-component regulatory system. EsrB also induces upregulation of the AraC-type regulatory protein EsrC, which enhances expression of the EscB/EseG chaperone/effector operon in concert with EsrB and induces expression of the pEI1-encoded effector, EseH. EsrC also induces expression of a putative type VI secretion system translocon protein, EvpC, which is secreted under the same low-pH conditions as the T3SS translocon proteins. The pEI2-encoded effector, EseI, was upregulated under low-pH and low-phosphate conditions but not in an EsrB- or EsrC-dependent manner. Mutations of EsrA and EsrB both resulted in loss of the ability to replicate in HKDM and full attenuation in the channel catfish host. Mutation of EsrC did not affect intracellular replication but did result in attenuation in catfish. Although EsrB is the primary transcriptional regulator for E. ictaluri genes within the T3SS pathogenicity island, EsrC regulates expression of the plasmid-carried effector eseH and appears to mediate coordinated expression of the T6SS with the T3SS. PMID:21551284

  8. T346Hunter: a novel web-based tool for the prediction of type III, type IV and type VI secretion systems in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Pedro Manuel; Ramos, Cayo; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    T346Hunter (Type Three, Four and Six secretion system Hunter) is a web-based tool for the identification and localisation of type III, type IV and type VI secretion systems (T3SS, T4SS and T6SS, respectively) clusters in bacterial genomes. Non-flagellar T3SS (NF-T3SS) and T6SS are complex molecular machines that deliver effector proteins from bacterial cells into the environment or into other eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells, with significant implications for pathogenesis of the strains encoding them. Meanwhile, T4SS is a more functionally diverse system, which is involved in not only effector translocation but also conjugation and DNA uptake/release. Development of control strategies against bacterial-mediated diseases requires genomic identification of the virulence arsenal of pathogenic bacteria, with T3SS, T4SS and T6SS being major determinants in this regard. Therefore, computational methods for systematic identification of these specialised machines are of particular interest. With the aim of facilitating this task, T346Hunter provides a user-friendly web-based tool for the prediction of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS clusters in newly sequenced bacterial genomes. After inspection of the available scientific literature, we constructed a database of hidden Markov model (HMM) protein profiles and sequences representing the various components of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS. T346Hunter performs searches of such a database against user-supplied bacterial sequences and localises enriched regions in any of these three types of secretion systems. Moreover, through the T346Hunter server, users can visualise the predicted clusters obtained for approximately 1700 bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. T346Hunter offers great help to researchers in advancing their understanding of the biological mechanisms in which these sophisticated molecular machines are involved. T346Hunter is freely available at http://bacterial-virulence-factors.cbgp.upm.es/T346Hunter.

  9. Type III secretion system 1 genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus are positively regulated by ExsA and negatively regulated by ExsD

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohui; Shah, Devendra H; Konkel, Michael E; Call, Douglas R

    2008-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus harbours two distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2). A subset of 10 T3SS1 genes are transcribed when V. parahaemolyticus is grown in tissue culture medium [Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)], while transcription of these genes (except exsD) is minimal upon growth in Luria–Bertani-Salt (LB-S). Transcription of T3SS1 genes and cytotoxicity towards HeLa cells was prevented by deletion of exsA while complementation with exsA restored these traits. Overexpression of ExsA in the wild-type strain, NY-4, activated the transcription of T3SS1 genes when bacteria were grown in LB-S. Thus, ExsA is necessary and sufficient to induce the transcription of T3SS1 genes. Deletion of the exsD permitted the transcription of T3SS1 genes when bacteria were grown in the LB-S medium and complementation with the wild-type exsD gene-blocked transcription of T3SS1 genes. Overexpression of ExsD in NY-4 prevented the transcription of T3SS1 gene when bacteria were grown in DMEM. A gel mobility shift assay demonstrated that purified ExsA protein binds a novel motif in the upstream region of vp1668 and vp1687, indicating that ExsA interacts directly with the promoter sequences of T3SS1 genes. ExsA positively regulates the expression and secretion of Vp1656 while ExsD negatively regulates the expression and secretion of Vp1656. PMID:18554322

  10. Characterization of HrpB2 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria identifies protein regions that are essential for type III secretion pilus formation.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Nadine; Schulz, Steve; Lorenz, Christian; Fraas, Simone; Hause, Gerd; Büttner, Daniela

    2012-05-01

    The Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria employs a type III secretion (T3S) system to translocate effector proteins into plant cells. T3S depends on HrpB2, which is essential for assembly of the extracellular T3S pilus and is itself weakly secreted. To characterize the role of HrpB2, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach, which led to the insertion of pentapeptide-encoding sequences into hrpB2. Complementation studies with HrpB2 mutant derivatives revealed that the N-terminal region of HrpB2 tolerates pentapeptide insertions, whereas insertions in the regions spanning amino acids 60-74 and 93-130, respectively, resulted in a loss of bacterial pathogenicity and T3S, including secretion of HrpB2 itself. The C-terminal region (amino acids 93-130) of HrpB2 contains a conserved VxTLxK amino acid motif that is also present in predicted inner rod proteins from animal-pathogenic bacteria and is required for the contribution of HrpB2 to pilus assembly and T3S. Electron microscopy and fractionation studies revealed that HrpB2 is not a component of the extracellular pilus structure but localizes to the bacterial periplasm and the outer membrane. We therefore propose that the essential contribution of HrpB2 to T3S and pilus assembly is linked to its possible function as a periplasmic component of the T3S system at the base of the pilus.

  11. Pleiotrophin promotes microglia proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors by activating extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jiayin; Ding, Minghui; Zhang, Aiwu; Xiao, Zijian; Qi, Weiwei; Luo, Ning; Di, Wei; Tao, Yuqian; Fang, Yannan

    2012-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an effective neuroprotective factor and its expression is strikingly increased in microglia after ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, whether PTN could provide neurotrophic support to neurons by regulating microglia function is not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of PTN was induced in microglia after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion. PTN promoted the proliferation of microglia by enhancing the G1 to S phase transition. PTN also stimulated the secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in microglia, but did not upregulate the expression of proinflammatory factors such as TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS. Mechanistically, we found that PTN increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in microglia in both concentration-dependent and time-dependent manners. In addition, ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 abolished the proliferation and G1 to S phase transition of microglia stimulated by PTN, and inhibited the production of BDNF, CNTF and NGF induced by PTN. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that PTN-ERK1/2 pathway plays important role in regulating microglia growth and secretion of neurotrophic factors. These findings provide new insight into the neuroprotective role of PTN and suggest that PTN is a new target for therapeutic intervention of stroke.

  12. A Conserved Domain in Type III Secretion Links the Cytoplasmic Domain of InvA to Elements of the Basal Body

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic, M.; Quezada, C; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events.

  13. The Dickeya dadantii biofilm matrix consists of cellulose nanofibres, and is an emergent property dependent upon the type III secretion system and the cellulose synthesis operon.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Courtney E; Selimi, Dija A; Barak, Jeri D; Charkowski, Amy O

    2011-10-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a plant-pathogenic bacterium that produces cellulose-containing biofilms, called pellicles, at the air-liquid interface of liquid cultures. D. dadantii pellicle formation appears to be an emergent property dependent upon at least three gene clusters, including cellulose synthesis, type III secretion system (T3SS) and flagellar genes. The D. dadantii cellulose synthesis operon is homologous to that of Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which is used for industrial cellulose production, and the cellulose nanofibres produced by D. dadantii were similar in diameter and branching pattern to those produced by G. xylinus. Salmonella enterica, an enterobacterium closely related to D. dadantii, encodes a second type of cellulose synthesis operon, and it produced biofilm strands that differed in width and branching pattern from those of D. dadantii and G. xylinus. Unlike any previously described cellulose fibre, the D. dadantii cellulose nanofibres were decorated with bead-like structures. Mutation of the cellulose synthesis operon genes resulted in loss of cellulose synthesis and production of a cellulase-resistant biofilm. Mutation of other genes required for pellicle formation, including those encoding FliA (a sigma factor that regulates flagella production), HrpL (a sigma factor that regulates the T3SS), and AdrA, a GGDEF protein, affected both biofilm and cell morphology. Mutation of the cellulose synthase bcsA or of bcsC resulted in decreased accumulation of the T3SS-secreted protein HrpN.

  14. Influence of Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum pathogenicity island 2 on type III secretion system effector gene expression in chicken macrophage HD11 cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Junlei; Chen, Yun; Xie, Xiaolei; Xia, Jie; Li, Qiuchun; Geng, Shizhong; Jiao, Xinan

    2017-04-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) can encode type III secretion system 2 (T3SS2) which plays an important role in systemic disease development through delivering different effector proteins into host cells. Here, the influence of Salmonella Pullorum pathogenicity island 2 on T3SS2 effector gene expression was studied using qRT-PCR in chicken macrophage HD11 cells. Our results showed that all the detected genes (including pseudogenes sifB, sspH2 and steC) can express in HD11 cells of S. Pullorum infection; deletion of SPI2 of S. Pullorum did not significantly affect the expression of genes cigR, gtgA, slrP, sopD, sseK1, steB and steC, but had a significant effect on the expression of genes pipB2, sifB, sopD2, sseJ, sseL, sspH2, steD, sifA, pipB and steA at different degrees. These results suggest that SPI2 can significantly affect the expression of some T3SS2 effector genes. Some effectors may have secretion pathways other than T3SS2 and pseudogenes may play roles in the process of S. Pullorum infection.

  15. Type III phosphatidylinositol 4 kinases: structure, function, regulation, signalling and involvement in disease.

    PubMed

    Dornan, Gillian L; McPhail, Jacob A; Burke, John E

    2016-02-01

    Many important cellular functions are regulated by the selective recruitment of proteins to intracellular membranes mediated by specific interactions with lipid phosphoinositides. The enzymes that generate lipid phosphoinositides therefore must be properly positioned and regulated at their correct cellular locations. Phosphatidylinositol 4 kinases (PI4Ks) are key lipid signalling enzymes, and they generate the lipid species phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), which plays important roles in regulating physiological processes including membrane trafficking, cytokinesis and organelle identity. PI4P also acts as the substrate for the generation of the signalling phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). PI4Ks also play critical roles in a number of pathological processes including mediating replication of a number of pathogenic RNA viruses, and in the development of the parasite responsible for malaria. Key to the regulation of PI4Ks is their regulation by a variety of both host and viral protein-binding partners. We review herein our current understanding of the structure, regulatory interactions and role in disease of the type III PI4Ks.

  16. Importance of secondary structure in the signal sequence for protein secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Emr, S D; Silhavy, T J

    1983-01-01

    Mutant Escherichia coli strains in which export of the LamB protein (coded for by the lamB gene) to the outer membrane of the cell is prevented have been described previously. One of these mutant strains contains a small (12-base pair) deletion mutation within the region of the lamB gene that codes for the NH2-terminal signal sequence. In this mutant strain, export but not synthesis of the LamB protein is blocked. We have isolated pseudorevertants that restore export of functional LamB protein to the outer membrane. DNA sequence analysis showed that two of the revertants contain a point mutation in addition to the original deletion. These point mutations lead to amino acid substitutions within the signal sequence. Our results indicate that these secondary mutations efficiently suppress the export defect caused by the deletion mutation. Analysis of the secondary structure of the wild-type, mutant, and pseudorevertant LamB signal sequences suggests that the secondary mutations restore export by allowing the formation of a stable alpha-helical conformation in the central, hydrophobic region of the signal sequence. Images PMID:6224220

  17. The Role of the Francisella Tularensis Pathogenicity Island in Type VI Secretion, Intracellular Survival, and Modulation of Host Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bröms, Jeanette E.; Sjöstedt, Anders; Lavander, Moa

    2010-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the zoonotic disease tularemia. Essential for its virulence is the ability to multiply within host cells, in particular monocytic cells. The bacterium has developed intricate means to subvert host immune mechanisms and thereby facilitate its intracellular survival by preventing phagolysosomal fusion followed by escape into the cytosol, where it multiplies. Moreover, it targets and manipulates numerous host cell signaling pathways, thereby ameliorating the otherwise bactericidal capacity. Many of the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unknown but key elements, directly or indirectly responsible for many of the aforementioned mechanisms, rely on the expression of proteins encoded by the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI), suggested to constitute a type VI secretion system. We here describe the current knowledge regarding the components of the FPI and the roles that have been ascribed to them. PMID:21687753

  18. Insulin secretion and signaling in response to dietary restriction and subsequent re-alimentation in cattle.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Kate; Kenny, David A; Kelly, Alan K; Waters, Sinéad M

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine systemic insulin response to a glucose tolerance test (GTT) and transcript abundance of genes of the insulin signaling pathway in skeletal muscle, during both dietary restriction and re-alimentation-induced compensatory growth. Holstein Friesian bulls were blocked to one of two groups: 1) restricted feed allowance for 125 days (period 1) (RES, n = 15) followed by ad libitum feeding for 55 days (period 2) or 2) ad libitum access to feed throughout (periods 1 and 2) (ADLIB, n = 15). On days 90 and 36 of periods 1 and 2, respectively, a GTT was performed. M. longissimus dorsi biopsies were harvested from all bulls on days 120 and 15 of periods 1 and 2, respectively, and RNA-Seq analysis was performed. RES displayed a lower growth rate during period 1 (RES: 0.6 kg/day, ADLIB: 1.9 kg/day; P < 0.001), subsequently gaining more during re-alimentation (RES: 2.5 kg/day, ADLIB: 1.4 kg/day; P < 0.001). Systemic insulin response to glucose administration was lower in RES in period 1 (P < 0.001) with no difference observed during period 2. The insulin signaling pathway in M. longissimus dorsi was enriched (P < 0.05) in response to dietary restriction but not during re-alimentation (P > 0.05). Genes differentially expressed in the insulin signaling pathway suggested a greater sensitivity to insulin in skeletal muscle, with pleiotropic effects of insulin signaling interrupted during dietary restriction. Collectively, these results indicate increased sensitivity to glucose clearance and skeletal muscle insulin signaling during dietary restriction; however, no overall role for insulin was apparent in expressing compensatory growth.

  19. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Secretes Compounds That Mimic Bacterial Signals and Interfere with Quorum Sensing Regulation in Bacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Teplitski, Max; Chen, Hancai; Rajamani, Sathish; Gao, Mengsheng; Merighi, Massimo; Sayre, Richard T.; Robinson, Jayne B.; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2004-01-01

    The unicellular soil-freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to secrete substances that mimic the activity of the N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules used by many bacteria for quorum sensing regulation of gene expression. More than a dozen chemically separable but unidentified substances capable of specifically stimulating the LasR or CepR but not the LuxR, AhyR, or CviR AHL bacterial quorum sensing reporter strains were detected in ethyl acetate extracts of C. reinhardtii culture filtrates. Colonies of C. reinhardtii and Chlorella spp. stimulated quorum sensing-dependent luminescence in Vibrio harveyi, indicating that these algae may produce compounds that affect the AI-2 furanosyl borate diester-mediated quorum sensing system of Vibrio spp. Treatment of the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti with a partially purified LasR mimic from C. reinhardtii affected the accumulation of 16 of the 25 proteins that were altered in response to the bacterium's own AHL signals, providing evidence that the algal mimic affected quorum sensing-regulated functions in this wild-type bacterium. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified 32 proteins affected by the bacterium's AHLs or the purified algal mimic, including GroEL chaperonins, the nitrogen regulatory protein PII, and a GTP-binding protein. The algal mimic was able to cancel the stimulatory effects of bacterial AHLs on the accumulation of seven of these proteins, providing evidence that the secretion of AHL mimics by the alga could be effective in disruption of quorum sensing in naturally encountered bacteria. PMID:14671013

  20. Phylogenetic and Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analyses Identify Nonpathogenic Xanthomonas arboricola Lineages Lacking the Canonical Type III Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Essakhi, Salwa; Cesbron, Sophie; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Bonneau, Sophie; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Manceau, Charles

    2015-08-15

    Xanthomonas arboricola is conventionally known as a taxon of plant-pathogenic bacteria that includes seven pathovars. This study showed that X. arboricola also encompasses nonpathogenic bacteria that cause no apparent disease symptoms on their hosts. The aim of this study was to assess the X. arboricola population structure associated with walnut, including nonpathogenic strains, in order to gain a better understanding of the role of nonpathogenic xanthomonads in walnut microbiota. A multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) was performed on a collection of 100 X. arboricola strains, including 27 nonpathogenic strains isolated from walnut. Nonpathogenic strains grouped outside clusters defined by pathovars and formed separate genetic lineages. A multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) conducted on a collection of X. arboricola strains isolated from walnut showed that nonpathogenic strains clustered separately from clonal complexes containing Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis strains. Some nonpathogenic strains of X. arboricola did not contain the canonical type III secretion system (T3SS) and harbored only one to three type III effector (T3E) genes. In the nonpathogenic strains CFBP 7640 and CFBP 7653, neither T3SS genes nor any of the analyzed T3E genes were detected. This finding raises a question about the origin of nonpathogenic strains and the evolution of plant pathogenicity in X. arboricola. T3E genes that were not detected in any nonpathogenic isolates studied represent excellent candidates to be those responsible for pathogenicity in X. arboricola.

  1. Phylogenetic and Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analyses Identify Nonpathogenic Xanthomonas arboricola Lineages Lacking the Canonical Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Essakhi, Salwa; Cesbron, Sophie; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Bonneau, Sophie; Jacques, Marie-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas arboricola is conventionally known as a taxon of plant-pathogenic bacteria that includes seven pathovars. This study showed that X. arboricola also encompasses nonpathogenic bacteria that cause no apparent disease symptoms on their hosts. The aim of this study was to assess the X. arboricola population structure associated with walnut, including nonpathogenic strains, in order to gain a better understanding of the role of nonpathogenic xanthomonads in walnut microbiota. A multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) was performed on a collection of 100 X. arboricola strains, including 27 nonpathogenic strains isolated from walnut. Nonpathogenic strains grouped outside clusters defined by pathovars and formed separate genetic lineages. A multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) conducted on a collection of X. arboricola strains isolated from walnut showed that nonpathogenic strains clustered separately from clonal complexes containing Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis strains. Some nonpathogenic strains of X. arboricola did not contain the canonical type III secretion system (T3SS) and harbored only one to three type III effector (T3E) genes. In the nonpathogenic strains CFBP 7640 and CFBP 7653, neither T3SS genes nor any of the analyzed T3E genes were detected. This finding raises a question about the origin of nonpathogenic strains and the evolution of plant pathogenicity in X. arboricola. T3E genes that were not detected in any nonpathogenic isolates studied represent excellent candidates to be those responsible for pathogenicity in X. arboricola. PMID:26048944

  2. Identification of a system required for the functional surface localization of sugar binding proteins with class III signal peptides in Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Zolghadr, Behnam; Weber, Stefan; Szabó, Zalán; Driessen, Arnold J M; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2007-05-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus contains an unusual large number of sugar binding proteins that are synthesized as precursors with a class III signal peptide. Such signal peptides are commonly used to direct archaeal flagellin subunits or bacterial (pseudo)pilins into extracellular macromolecular surface appendages. Likewise, S. solfataricus binding proteins have been suggested to assemble in higher ordered surface structures as well, tentatively termed the bindosome. Here we show that S. solfataricus contains a specific system that is needed for the functional surface localization of sugar binding proteins. This system, encoded by the bas (bindosome assembly system) operon, is composed of five proteins: basABC, three homologues of so-called bacterial (pseudo)pilins; BasE, a cytoplasmic ATPase; and BasF, an integral membrane protein. Deletion of either the three (pseudo)pilin genes or the basEF genes resulted in a severe defect of the cells to grow on substrates which are transported by sugar binding proteins containing class III signal peptides, while growth on glucose and maltose was restored when the corresponding genes were reintroduced in these cells. Concomitantly, DeltabasABC and DeltabasEF cells were severely impaired in glucose uptake even though the sugar binding proteins were normally secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane. These data underline the hypothesis that the bas operon is involved in the functional localization of sugar binding proteins at the cell surface of S. solfataricus. In contrast to surface structure assembly systems of Gram-negative bacteria, the bas operon seems to resemble an ancestral simplified form of these machineries.

  3. SOX9: a stem cell transcriptional regulator of secreted niche signaling factors.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Keyes, Brice E; Lin, Mingyan; Pasolli, H Amalia; Genander, Maria; Polak, Lisa; Stokes, Nicole; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-02-15

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cyclical periods of growth, which are fueled by stem cells (SCs) at the base of the resting follicle. HF-SC formation occurs during HF development and requires transcription factor SOX9. Whether and how SOX9 functions in HF-SC maintenance remain unknown. By conditionally targeting Sox9 in adult HF-SCs, we show that SOX9 is essential for maintaining them. SOX9-deficient HF-SCs still transition from quiescence to proliferation and launch the subsequent hair cycle. However, once activated, bulge HF-SCs begin to differentiate into epidermal cells, which naturally lack SOX9. In addition, as HF-SC numbers dwindle, outer root sheath production is not sustained, and HF downgrowth arrests prematurely. Probing the mechanism, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify SOX9-dependent transcriptional changes and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify SOX9-bound genes in HF-SCs. Intriguingly, a large cohort of SOX9-sensitive targets encode extracellular factors, most notably enhancers of Activin/pSMAD2 signaling. Moreover, compromising Activin signaling recapitulates SOX9-dependent defects, and Activin partially rescues them. Overall, our findings reveal roles for SOX9 in regulating adult HF-SC maintenance and suppressing epidermal differentiation in the niche. In addition, our studies expose a role for SCs in coordinating their own behavior in part through non-cell-autonomous signaling within the niche.

  4. Mucin-like glycoprotein secretion is mediated by cyclic-AMP and protein kinase C signal transduction pathways in rat corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Endo, K; Nakata, K

    1998-05-01

    Ocular surface mucin is secreted from both goblet cells in the conjunctival epithelium and corneal epithelial cells. To clarify its mechanism of secretion in corneal epithelial cells, a rat cornea organ culture system was used to evaluate the second messenger roles of cyclic-AMP (cAMP), cyclic-GMP (cGMP) and protein kinase C (PKC) in modulating mucin-like glycoprotein secretion. Rat cornea sections (3 mm diameter) were cultured in TC-199 medium, and radiolabeled with sodium sulfate for 18 hr. After washing, the corneas were treated with various second messenger modulating agents for 30 min. The culture media were reacted with Dolichos biflorus (DBA)-lectin, and mucin-like glycoprotein was isolated. Then the radioactivity of DBA-binding mucin-like glycoprotein was isolated. Then the radioactivity of DBA-binding mucin-like glycoprotein was measured. There was a time-dependent increase in mucin-like glycoprotein was measured. There was a time-dependent increase in mucin-like glycoprotein secretion, whereas after corneal epithelial debridement the secretion was markedly inhibited by 81%. Mucin-like glycoprotein secretion was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner following elevation of cAMP levels by exposure to either forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Concomitant exposure to the cAMP dependent protein kinase inhibitor, KT5720 completely inhibited their stimulatory effects. Neither exposure to dibutyryl cGMP nor nitroprusside affected mucin-like glycoprotein secretion. Stimulation by PKC, phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) also increased mucin-like glycoprotein secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. The PKC inhibitor, calphostin C completely inhibited the stimulation by PDBu of mucine-like glycoprotein secretion. These results demonstrate that corneal epithelial cells secrete mucin-like glycoprotein, which is mediated by cAMP and PKC signal transduction pathways.

  5. Effects of nonylphenol on the calcium signal and catecholamine secretion coupled with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Shan; Liu, Ging-Hui; Chao, Wei-Liang

    2008-02-03

    Nonylphenol (NP) is the most critical metabolite of alkylphenol polyethoxylate detergents. NP is known as an endocrine disruptor with estrogenic activities and as an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase. Estrogen has modulatory roles on ligand-gated ion channels, such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors can modulate the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)]) and thus can affect the calcium signaling coupled with nAChRs. Therefore, NP is predicted to have complex effects on the Ca(2+) signaling and secretion coupled with nAChRs. This study investigated these effects using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. The results show that NP suppressed the Ca(2+) signaling coupled with nAChRs and voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels in a dose-dependent manner, with IC(50)s of 1 and 5.9 microM, respectively. Estradiol exhibits similar suppression but much lower inhibitory potencies. NP alone induced a transient rise in [Ca(2+)](c) in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium. Thapsigargin, an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor, partially suppressed the [Ca(2+)](c) rise induced by NP, but NP totally blocked the [Ca(2+)](c) rise induced by thapsigargin. This illustrates that NP can cause Ca(2+) release from thapsigargin-insensitive pools. Thapsigargin suppressed the Ca(2+) signaling coupled with nAChRs but increased that coupled with voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. We propose that three routes are responsible for the effects of NP on nAChRs: named receptor channels, voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, and Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Three routes are related to the characteristics of NP as steroid-like compounds and Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor.

  6. Unveiling the "secret" of play in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris): Asymmetry and signals.

    PubMed

    Cordoni, Giada; Nicotra, Velia; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    Due to their playful propensity, dogs are a good model to test some hypotheses about play dynamics (length, asymmetry, features of players) and communication (play bow [PBOW]; relaxed open-mouth [ROM] display). We video-recorded 203 play sessions between dogs in an off-leash dog park in Palermo, Italy. Contrary to the expectation, play asymmetry (particularly high in this species) did not differ between stranger and familiar dogs, thus suggesting the limited role of play in forming dominance relationships. Asymmetry negatively affected the duration of the session, whereas the increasing number of players was positively linked to the duration of playful interactions. The number of PBOWs exchanged by players may exert a certain influence on the session length as well. PBOWs were performed independently from the kind of play (locomotor vs. contact) the dogs were engaging in. Conversely, ROMs were preferentially emitted during contact play when "face-to-face" interactions were more likely. Body closeness is also required in case opening the mouth has not a signal function but only preludes a bite. However, in the 82% of cases play bites did not follow a ROM, thus suggesting that dogs place ROMs in the appropriate context to optimize signal detectability. In conclusion, 2 tactics may concur in coping with the asymmetry and unpredictability of play sessions in dogs. First, whenever the asymmetry increases dogs shorten the duration of their sessions thus limiting the risk of possible escalation. Second, dogs make use of a good communicative system based on the reciprocal exchange of playful signals. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Enhancing heterologous protein expression and secretion in HEK293 cells by means of combination of CMV promoter and IFNα2 signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Román, Ramón; Miret, Joan; Scalia, Federica; Casablancas, Antoni; Lecina, Martí; Cairó, Jordi J

    2016-12-10

    Efficient production and secretion of recombinant proteins in mammalian cell lines relies in a combination of genetic, metabolic and culture strategy factors. The present work assesses the influence of two key genetic components of expression vectors (promoter and signal peptide) on protein production and secretion effciency in HEK293 cells expressing eGFP as a reporter protein. Firstly, the strength of 3 different promoters was evaluated using transient expression methods. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the highest level of intracellular protein expression was found when eGFP was under the control of CMV promoter, being 3-times higher in comparison to the rest of the promoters tested. Secondly, 5 different signal peptides were assessed in stable transfected cell lines. Spectrofluorometry was used to determine intra- and extracellular protein expression levels in terms of fluorescence, and the results were further confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The highest secretion efficiency was found for human IFNα2 signal peptide, achieving up to 2-fold increase in the amount of secreted protein compared to other signal peptides. The results showed that the combination of CMV promoter and IFNα2 signal peptide resulted highly efficient for recombinant protein production in HEK293 cells.

  8. KISS1R Signals Independently of Gαq/11 and Triggers LH Secretion via the β-Arrestin Pathway in the Male Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ahow, Maryse; Min, Le; Pampillo, Macarena; Nash, Connor; Wen, Junping; Soltis, Kathleen; Carroll, Rona S.; Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Tobet, Stuart A.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic GnRH is the master regulator of the neuroendocrine reproductive axis, and its secretion is regulated by many factors. Among these is kisspeptin (Kp), a potent trigger of GnRH secretion. Kp signals via the Kp receptor (KISS1R), a Gαq/11-coupled 7-transmembrane–spanning receptor. Until this study, it was understood that KISS1R mediates GnRH secretion via the Gαq/11-coupled pathway in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. We recently demonstrated that KISS1R also signals independently of Gαq/11 via β-arrestin and that this pathway also mediates ERK1/2 activation. Because GnRH secretion is ERK1/2-dependent, we hypothesized that KISS1R regulates GnRH secretion via both the Gαq/11- and β-arrestin–coupled pathways. To test this hypothesis, we measured LH secretion, a surrogate marker of GnRH secretion, in mice lacking either β-arrestin-1 or β-arrestin-2. Results revealed that Kp-dependent LH secretion was significantly diminished relative to wild-type mice (P < .001), thus supporting that β-arrestin mediates Kp-induced GnRH secretion. Based on this, we hypothesized that Gαq/11-uncoupled KISS1R mutants, like L148S, will display Gαq/11-independent signaling. To test this hypothesis, L148S was expressed in HEK 293 cells. and results confirmed that, although strongly uncoupled from Gαq/11, L148S retained the ability to trigger significant Kp-dependent ERK1/2 phosphorylation (P < .05). Furthermore, using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking β-arrestin-1 and -2, we demonstrated that L148S-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation is β-arrestin–dependent. Overall, we conclude that KISS1R signals via Gαq/11 and β-arrestin to regulate GnRH secretion. This novel and important finding could explain why patients bearing some types of Gαq/11-uncoupled KISS1R mutants display partial gonadotropic deficiency and even a reversal of the condition, idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:25147978

  9. The Secret Life of NAD+: An Old Metabolite Controlling New Metabolic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Cantó, Carles; Wanders, Ronald J.; Auwerx, Johan

    2010-01-01

    A century after the identification of a coenzymatic activity for NAD+, NAD+ metabolism has come into the spotlight again due to the potential therapeutic relevance of a set of enzymes whose activity is tightly regulated by the balance between the oxidized and reduced forms of this metabolite. In fact, the actions of NAD+ have been extended from being an oxidoreductase cofactor for single enzymatic activities to acting as substrate for a wide range of proteins. These include NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, and transcription factors that affect a large array of cellular functions. Through these effects, NAD+ provides a direct link between the cellular redox status and the control of signaling and transcriptional events. Of particular interest within the metabolic/endocrine arena are the recent results, which indicate that the regulation of these NAD+-dependent pathways may have a major contribution to oxidative metabolism and life span extension. In this review, we will provide an integrated view on: 1) the pathways that control NAD+ production and cycling, as well as its cellular compartmentalization; 2) the signaling and transcriptional pathways controlled by NAD+; and 3) novel data that show how modulation of NAD+-producing and -consuming pathways have a major physiological impact and hold promise for the prevention and treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:20007326

  10. Secrets of the code: do vascular endothelial cells use ion channels to decipher complex flow signals?

    PubMed

    Barakat, Abdul I; Lieu, Deborah K; Gojova, Andrea

    2006-02-01

    The ability of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) to respond to changes in blood flow is essential for both vasoregulation and arterial wall remodelling, while abnormalities in endothelial responsiveness to flow play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial flow responses also have important implications for the field of vascular tissue engineering. In response to changes in fluid dynamic shear stress, ECs exhibit humoral, metabolic, and structural responses. Significantly, ECs respond differently to different types of shear stress. For instance, steady shear stress elicits a profile of responses that differs drastically from oscillatory shear stress. Although our understanding of flow-induced signaling has advanced greatly over the past two decades, how ECs sense shear forces remains to be established. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which ECs discriminate among different flow waveforms are unknown. Activation of flow-sensitive ion channels is one of the most rapid known responses to flow in ECs. In this paper, we argue in favor of an important role for ion channels in shear stress sensing in ECs and propose that these channels may endow ECs with the ability to resolve components of a complex flow signal and hence distinguish among different types of flow.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii HrpY, a Conserved Response Regulator of the Hrp Type III Secretion System, and its Interaction with the hrpS Promoter†

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Massimo; Majerczak, Doris R.; Zianni, Michael; Tessanne, Kimberly; Coplin, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii is a bacterial pathogen of corn. Its pathogenicity depends on the translocation of effector proteins into host cells by the Hrp type III secretion system. We previously showed by genetic analysis that the HrpX sensor kinase and the HrpY response regulator are at the head of a complex cascade of regulators controlling hrp/hrc secretion and wts effector genes. This cascade also includes the HrpS response regulator and the HrpL alternative sigma factor. These regulators are shared among many important plant pathogens in the genera Pantoea, Erwinia, and Pseudomonas. In this study, we dissect the regulatory elements in the hrpS promoter region, using genetic and biochemical approaches, and show how it integrates various environmental signals, only some of which are dependent on phosphorylation of HrpY. Primer extension located the transcriptional start site of hrpS at a σ70 promoter 601 bp upstream of the open reading frame. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting analysis demonstrated that HrpY binds to conserved regulatory elements immediately adjacent to this promoter, and its binding affinity was increased by phosphorylation at D57. A consensus sequence for the two direct repeats bound by HrpY is proposed. Deletion analysis of the promoter region revealed that both the HrpY binding site and additional sequences farther upstream, including a putative integration host factor binding site, are required for hrpS expression. This finding suggests that other unknown regulatory proteins may act cooperatively with HrpY. PMID:16816181

  12. Characterization of CLL exosomes reveals a distinct microRNA signature and enhanced secretion by activation of BCR signaling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Lehman, Amy M; Maddocks, Kami; Yu, Lianbo; Johnson, Amy J; Byrd, John C

    2015-05-21

    Multiple studies show that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are heavily dependent on their microenvironment for survival. Communication between CLL cells and the microenvironment is mediated through direct cell contact, soluble factors, and extracellular vesicles. Exosomes are small particles enclosed with lipids, proteins, and small RNAs that can convey biological materials to surrounding cells. Our data herein demonstrate that CLL cells release significant amounts of exosomes in plasma that exhibit abundant CD37, CD9, and CD63 expression. Our work also pinpoints the regulation of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in the release of CLL exosomes: BCR activation by α-immunoglobulin (Ig)M induces exosome secretion, whereas BCR inactivation via ibrutinib impedes α-IgM-stimulated exosome release. Moreover, analysis of serial plasma samples collected from CLL patients on an ibrutinib clinical trial revealed that exosome plasma concentration was significantly decreased following ibrutinib therapy. Furthermore, microRNA (miR) profiling of plasma-derived exosomes identified a distinct exosome microRNA signature, including miR-29 family, miR-150, miR-155, and miR-223 that have been associated with CLL disease. Interestingly, expression of exosome miR-150 and miR-155 increases with BCR activation. In all, this study successfully characterized CLL exosomes, demonstrated the control of BCR signaling in the release of CLL exosomes, and uncovered a disease-relevant exosome microRNA profile.

  13. Characterization of CLL exosomes reveals a distinct microRNA signature and enhanced secretion by activation of BCR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Lehman, Amy M.; Maddocks, Kami; Yu, Lianbo; Byrd, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies show that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are heavily dependent on their microenvironment for survival. Communication between CLL cells and the microenvironment is mediated through direct cell contact, soluble factors, and extracellular vesicles. Exosomes are small particles enclosed with lipids, proteins, and small RNAs that can convey biological materials to surrounding cells. Our data herein demonstrate that CLL cells release significant amounts of exosomes in plasma that exhibit abundant CD37, CD9, and CD63 expression. Our work also pinpoints the regulation of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in the release of CLL exosomes: BCR activation by α-immunoglobulin (Ig)M induces exosome secretion, whereas BCR inactivation via ibrutinib impedes α-IgM-stimulated exosome release. Moreover, analysis of serial plasma samples collected from CLL patients on an ibrutinib clinical trial revealed that exosome plasma concentration was significantly decreased following ibrutinib therapy. Furthermore, microRNA (miR) profiling of plasma-derived exosomes identified a distinct exosome microRNA signature, including miR-29 family, miR-150, miR-155, and miR-223 that have been associated with CLL disease. Interestingly, expression of exosome miR-150 and miR-155 increases with BCR activation. In all, this study successfully characterized CLL exosomes, demonstrated the control of BCR signaling in the release of CLL exosomes, and uncovered a disease-relevant exosome microRNA profile. PMID:25833959

  14. The thyroxine inactivating gene, type III deiodinase, suppresses multiple signaling centers in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi Prakash; Dhakshinamoorthy, Ranjani; Jaiswal, Pundrik; Schmidt, Stefanie; Thewes, Sascha; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2014-12-15

    Thyroxine deiodinases, the enzymes that regulate thyroxine metabolism, are essential for vertebrate growth and development. In the genome of Dictyostelium discoideum, a single intronless gene (dio3) encoding type III thyroxine 5' deiodinase is present. The amino acid sequence of D. discoideum Dio3 shares 37% identity with human T4 deiodinase and is a member of the thioredoxin reductase superfamily. dio3 is expressed throughout growth and development and by generating a knockout of dio3, we have examined the role of thyroxine 5' deiodinase in D. discoideum. dio3(-) had multiple defects that affected growth, timing of development, aggregate size, cell streaming, and cell-type differentiation. A prominent phenotype of dio3(-) was the breaking of late aggregates into small signaling centers, each forming a fruiting body of its own. cAMP levels, its relay, photo- and chemo-taxis were also defective in dio3(-). Quantitative RT-PCR analyses suggested that expression levels of genes encoding adenylyl cyclase A (acaA), cAMP-receptor A (carA) and cAMP-phosphodiesterases were reduced. There was a significant reduction in the expression of CadA and CsaA, which are involved in cell-cell adhesion. The dio3(-) slugs had prestalk identity, with pronounced prestalk marker ecmA expression. Thus, Dio3 seems to have roles in mediating cAMP synthesis/relay, cell-cell adhesion and slug patterning. The phenotype of dio3(-) suggests that Dio3 may prevent the formation of multiple signaling centers during D. discoideum development. This is the first report of a gene involved in thyroxine metabolism that is also involved in growth and development in a lower eukaryote.

  15. Vibrio parahaemolyticus ExsE is requisite for initial adhesion and subsequent type III secretion system 1-dependent autophagy in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, Daniel P.; Nydam, Seth D.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus pandemic serotype O3 : K6 causes acute gastroenteritis, wound infections and septicaemia in humans. This organism encodes two type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2); host-cell cytotoxicity has been attributed to T3SS1. Synthesis and secretion of T3SS1 proteins is positively regulated by ExsA, which is presumptively regulated by the ExsCDE pathway, similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Herein we deleted the putative exsE from V. parahaemolyticus and found constitutive expression of the T3SS1 in broth culture as expected. More importantly, however, in a cell culture model, the ΔexsE strain was unable to induce cytotoxicity, as measured by release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), or autophagy, as measured by LC3 conversion. This is markedly different from P. aeruginosa, where deletion of exsE has no effect on host-cell cytolysis. Swarming and cytoadhesion were reduced for the deletion mutant and could be recovered along with T3SS1-induced HeLa cell cytotoxicity by in cis expression of exsE in the ΔexsE strain. Loss of adhesion and swarming motility was associated with the loss of flagella biogenesis in the exsE-deficient strain. Mouse mortality was unaffected by the deletion of exsE compared with a wild-type control, suggesting that additional adhesins are important for intoxication in vivo. Based on these data, we conclude that ExsE contributes to the negative regulation of T3SS1 and, in addition, contributes to regulation of an adherence phenotype that is requisite for translocation of effector proteins into HeLa cells. PMID:22767546

  16. Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secreted protein BipC: role in actin modulation and translocation activities required for the bacterial intracellular lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen Tyng; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2016-01-01

    Melioidosis, an infection caused by the facultative intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, has been classified as an emerging disease with the number of patients steadily increasing at an alarming rate. B. pseudomalleipossess various virulence determinants that allow them to invade the host and evade the host immune response, such as the type III secretion systems (TTSS). The products of this specialized secretion system are particularly important for the B. pseudomallei infection. Lacking in one or more components of the TTSS demonstrated different degrees of defects in the intracellular lifecycle of B. pseudomallei. Further understanding the functional roles of proteins involved in B. pseudomallei TTSS will enable us to dissect the enigma of B. pseudomallei-host cell interaction. In this study, BipC (a translocator), which was previously reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei, was further characterized using the bioinformatics and molecular approaches. The bipCgene, coding for a putative invasive protein, was first PCR amplified from B. pseudomallei K96243 genomic DNA and cloned into an expression vector for overexpression in Escherichia coli. The soluble protein was subsequently purified and assayed for actin polymerization and depolymerization. BipC was verified to subvert the host actin dynamics as demonstrated by the capability to polymerize actin in vitro. Homology modeling was also attempted to predict the structure of BipC. Overall, our findings identified that the protein encoded by the bipC gene plays a role as an effector involved in the actin binding activity to facilitate internalization of B. pseudomalleiinto the host cells. PMID:28028452

  17. Type III Secretion System and Virulence Markers Highlight Similarities and Differences between Human- and Plant-Associated Pseudomonads Related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida

    PubMed Central

    Mazurier, Sylvie; Merieau, Annabelle; Bergeau, Dorian; Decoin, Victorien; Sperandio, Daniel; Crépin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Jeannot, Katy; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is commonly considered a saprophytic rhizobacterium devoid of pathogenic potential. Nevertheless, the recurrent isolation of strains from clinical human cases could indicate the emergence of novel strains originating from the rhizosphere reservoir, which could be particularly resistant to the immune system and clinical treatment. The importance of type three secretion systems (T3SSs) in the related Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial species and the occurrence of this secretion system in plant-associated P. fluorescens raise the question of whether clinical isolates may also harbor T3SSs. In this study, isolates associated with clinical infections and identified in hospitals as belonging to P. fluorescens were compared with fluorescent pseudomonads harboring T3SSs isolated from plants. Bacterial isolates were tested for (i) their genetic relationships based on their 16S rRNA phylogeny, (ii) the presence of T3SS genes by PCR, and (iii) their infectious potential on animals and plants under environmental or physiological temperature conditions. Two groups of bacteria were delineated among the clinical isolates. The first group encompassed thermotolerant (41°C) isolates from patients suffering from blood infections; these isolates were finally found to not belong to P. fluorescens but were closely related and harbored highly conserved T3SS genes belonging to the Ysc-T3SS family, like the T3SSs from P. aeruginosa. The second group encompassed isolates from patients suffering from cystic fibrosis; these isolates belonged to P. fluorescens and harbored T3SS genes belonging to the Hrp1-T3SS family found commonly in plant-associated P. fluorescens. PMID:25636837

  18. Antibodies Directed against Shiga-Toxin Producing Escherichia coli Serotype O103 Type III Secreted Proteins Block Adherence of Heterologous STEC Serotypes to HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Desin, Taseen S.; Townsend, Hugh G.; Potter, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O103 is a zoonotic pathogen that is capable of causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. The main animal reservoir for STEC is ruminants and hence reducing the levels of this pathogen in cattle could ultimately lower the risk of STEC infection in humans. During the process of infection, STECO103 uses a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) to secrete effector proteins (T3SPs) that result in the formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions. Vaccination of cattle with STEC serotype O157 T3SPs has previously been shown to be effective in reducing shedding of STECO157 in a serotype-specific manner. In this study, we tested the ability of rabbit polyclonal sera against individual STECO103 T3SPs to block adherence of the organism to HEp-2 cells. Our results demonstrate that pooled sera against EspA, EspB, EspF, NleA and Tir significantly lowered the adherence of STECO103 relative to pre-immune sera. Likewise, pooled anti-STECO103 sera were also able to block adherence by STECO157. Vaccination of mice with STECO103 recombinant proteins induced strong IgG antibody responses against EspA, EspB, NleA and Tir but not against EspF. However, the vaccine did not affect fecal shedding of STECO103 compared to the PBS vaccinated group over the duration of the experiment. Cross reactivity studies using sera against STECO103 recombinant proteins revealed a high degree of cross reactivity with STECO26 and STECO111 proteins implying that sera against STECO103 proteins could potentially provide neutralization of attachment to epithelial cells by heterologous STEC serotypes. PMID:26451946

  19. A Rab escort protein integrates the secretion system with TOR signaling and ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspal; Tyers, Mike

    2009-08-15

    The coupling of environmental conditions to cell growth and division is integral to cell fitness. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Sfp1 couples nutrient status to cell growth rate by controlling the expression of ribosome biogenesis (Ribi) and ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Sfp1 is localized to the nucleus in rich nutrients, but upon nutrient limitation or target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway inhibition by rapamycin, Sfp1 rapidly exits the nucleus, leading to repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. Through systematic cell-based screens we found that many components of the secretory system influence Sfp1 localization. Notably, the essential Rab escort protein Mrs6 exhibited a nutrient-sensitive interaction with Sfp1. Overexpression of Mrs6 prevented nuclear localization of Sfp1 in rich nutrients, whereas loss of Mrs6 resulted in nuclear Sfp1 localization in poor nutrients. These effects were specific to Sfp1 and independent of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, suggesting that Mrs6 lies in a distinct branch of TOR and ribosome biogenesis regulation. Rapamycin-resistant alleles of MRS6 were defective in the cytoplasmic retention of Sfp1, the control of cell size, and in the repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. The Sfp1-Mrs6 interaction is a nexus for growth regulation that links the secretory system and TOR-dependent nutrient signaling to ribosome biogenesis.

  20. Comparative analysis of the XopD type III secretion (T3S) effector family in plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Gun; Taylor, Kyle W; Mudgett, Mary Beth

    2011-10-01

    XopD is a type III effector protein that is required for Xanthomonas campestris pathovar vesicatoria (Xcv) growth in tomato. It is a modular protein consisting of an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, two ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) transcriptional repressor motifs and a C-terminal small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) protease. In tomato, XopD functions as a transcriptional repressor, resulting in the suppression of defence responses at late stages of infection. A survey of available genome sequences for phytopathogenic bacteria revealed that XopD homologues are limited to species within three genera of Proteobacteria--Xanthomonas, Acidovorax and Pseudomonas. Although the EAR motif(s) and SUMO protease domain are conserved in all XopD-like proteins, variation exists in the length and sequence identity of the N-terminal domains. Comparative analysis of the DNA sequences surrounding xopD and xopD-like genes led to revised annotation of the xopD gene. Edman degradation sequence analysis and functional complementation studies confirmed that the xopD gene from Xcv encodes a 760-amino-acid protein with a longer N-terminal domain than previously predicted. None of the XopD-like proteins studied complemented Xcv ΔxopD mutant phenotypes in tomato leaves, suggesting that the N-terminus of XopD defines functional specificity. Xcv ΔxopD strains expressing chimeric fusion proteins containing the N-terminus of XopD fused to the EAR motif(s) and SUMO protease domain of the XopD-like protein from X. campestris pathovar campestris strain B100 were fully virulent in tomato, demonstrating that the N-terminus of XopD controls specificity in tomato.

  1. T346Hunter: A Novel Web-Based Tool for the Prediction of Type III, Type IV and Type VI Secretion Systems in Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Pedro Manuel; Ramos, Cayo; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    T346Hunter (Type Three, Four and Six secretion system Hunter) is a web-based tool for the identification and localisation of type III, type IV and type VI secretion systems (T3SS, T4SS and T6SS, respectively) clusters in bacterial genomes. Non-flagellar T3SS (NF-T3SS) and T6SS are complex molecular machines that deliver effector proteins from bacterial cells into the environment or into other eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells, with significant implications for pathogenesis of the strains encoding them. Meanwhile, T4SS is a more functionally diverse system, which is involved in not only effector translocation but also conjugation and DNA uptake/release. Development of control strategies against bacterial-mediated diseases requires genomic identification of the virulence arsenal of pathogenic bacteria, with T3SS, T4SS and T6SS being major determinants in this regard. Therefore, computational methods for systematic identification of these specialised machines are of particular interest. With the aim of facilitating this task, T346Hunter provides a user-friendly web-based tool for the prediction of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS clusters in newly sequenced bacterial genomes. After inspection of the available scientific literature, we constructed a database of hidden Markov model (HMM) protein profiles and sequences representing the various components of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS. T346Hunter performs searches of such a database against user-supplied bacterial sequences and localises enriched regions in any of these three types of secretion systems. Moreover, through the T346Hunter server, users can visualise the predicted clusters obtained for approximately 1700 bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. T346Hunter offers great help to researchers in advancing their understanding of the biological mechanisms in which these sophisticated molecular machines are involved. T346Hunter is freely available at http://bacterial-virulence-factors.cbgp.upm.es/T346Hunter. PMID:25867189

  2. Class III PI3K regulates organismal glucose homeostasis by providing negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Nemazanyy, Ivan; Montagnac, Guillaume; Russell, Ryan C.; Morzyglod, Lucille; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Guan, Kun-Liang; Pende, Mario; Panasyuk, Ganna

    2015-01-01

    Defective hepatic insulin receptor (IR) signalling is a pathogenic manifestation of metabolic disorders including obesity and diabetes. The endo/lysosomal trafficking system may coordinate insulin action and nutrient homeostasis by endocytosis of IR and the autophagic control of intracellular nutrient levels. Here we show that class III PI3K—a master regulator of endocytosis, endosomal sorting and autophagy—provides negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling. The ultraviolet radiation resistance-associated gene protein (UVRAG)-associated class III PI3K complex interacts with IR and is stimulated by insulin treatment. Acute and chronic depletion of hepatic Vps15, the regulatory subunit of class III PI3K, increases insulin sensitivity and Akt signalling, an effect that requires functional IR. This is reflected by FoxO1-dependent transcriptional defects and blunted gluconeogenesis in Vps15 mutant cells. On depletion of Vps15, the metabolic syndrome in genetic and diet-induced models of insulin resistance and diabetes is alleviated. Thus, feedback regulation of IR trafficking and function by class III PI3K may be a therapeutic target in metabolic conditions of insulin resistance. PMID:26387534

  3. Inhibition of Plasmodium berghei Development in Mosquitoes by Effector Proteins Secreted from Asaia sp. Bacteria Using a Novel Native Secretion Signal.

    PubMed

    Bongio, Nicholas J; Lampe, David J

    2015-01-01

    Novel interventions are needed to prevent the transmission of the Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria. One possible method is to supply mosquitoes with antiplasmodial effector proteins from bacteria by paratransgenesis. Mosquitoes have a diverse complement of midgut microbiota including the Gram-negative bacteria Asaia bogorensis. This study presents the first use of Asaia sp. bacteria for paratransgenesis against P. berghei. We identified putative secreted proteins from A. bogorensis by a genetic screen using alkaline phosphatase gene fusions. Two were secreted efficiently: a siderophore receptor protein and a YVTN beta-propeller repeat protein. The siderophore receptor gene was fused with antiplasmodial effector genes including the scorpine antimicrobial peptide and an anti-Pbs21 scFv-Shiva1 immunotoxin. Asaia SF2.1 secreting these fusion proteins were fed to mosquitoes and challenged with Plasmodium berghei-infected blood. With each of these effector constructs, significant inhibition of parasite development was observed. These results provide a novel and promising intervention against malaria transmission.

  4. Inhibition of Plasmodium berghei Development in Mosquitoes by Effector Proteins Secreted from Asaia sp. Bacteria Using a Novel Native Secretion Signal

    PubMed Central

    Bongio, Nicholas J.; Lampe, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Novel interventions are needed to prevent the transmission of the Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria. One possible method is to supply mosquitoes with antiplasmodial effector proteins from bacteria by paratransgenesis. Mosquitoes have a diverse complement of midgut microbiota including the Gram-negative bacteria Asaia bogorensis. This study presents the first use of Asaia sp. bacteria for paratransgenesis against P. berghei. We identified putative secreted proteins from A. bogorensis by a genetic screen using alkaline phosphatase gene fusions. Two were secreted efficiently: a siderophore receptor protein and a YVTN beta-propeller repeat protein. The siderophore receptor gene was fused with antiplasmodial effector genes including the scorpine antimicrobial peptide and an anti-Pbs21 scFv-Shiva1 immunotoxin. Asaia SF2.1 secreting these fusion proteins were fed to mosquitoes and challenged with Plasmodium berghei-infected blood. With each of these effector constructs, significant inhibition of parasite development was observed. These results provide a novel and promising intervention against malaria transmission. PMID:26636338

  5. AvrRxo1 Is a Bifunctional Type III Secreted Effector and Toxin-Antitoxin System Component with Homologs in Diverse Environmental Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Lindsay R.; Shidore, Teja; Long, John; Miao, Jiamin; Wu, Shuchi; Han, Qian; Zhou, Changhe; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Li, Jianyong; Zhao, Bingyu; Leach, Jan E.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are ubiquitous bacterial systems that may function in genome maintenance and metabolic stress management, but are also thought to play a role in virulence by helping pathogens survive stress. We previously demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola protein AvrRxo1 is a type III-secreted virulence factor that has structural similarities to the zeta family of TA toxins, and is toxic to plants and bacteria in the absence of its predicted chaperone Arc1. In this work, we confirm that AvrRxo1 and its binding partner Arc1 function as a TA system when expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequences of avrRxo1 homologs were culled from published and newly generated phytopathogen genomes, revealing that avrRxo1:arc1 modules are rare or frequently inactivated in some species and highly conserved in others. Cloning and functional analysis of avrRxo1 from Acidovorax avenae, A. citrulli, Burkholderia andropogonis, Xanthomonas translucens, and Xanthomonas euvesicatoria showed that some AvrRxo1 homologs share the bacteriostatic and Rxo1-mediated cell death triggering activities of AvrRxo1 from X. oryzae. Additional distant putative homologs of avrRxo1 and arc1 were identified in genomic or metagenomic sequence of environmental bacteria with no known pathogenic role. One of these distant homologs was cloned from the filamentous soil bacterium Cystobacter fuscus. avrRxo1 from C. fuscus caused watersoaking and triggered Rxo1-dependent cell collapse in Nicotiana benthamiana, but no growth suppression in E. coli was observed. This work confirms that a type III effector can function as a TA system toxin, and illustrates the potential of microbiome data to reveal new environmental origins or reservoirs of pathogen virulence factors. PMID:27391081

  6. Use of dominant-negative HrpA mutants to dissect Hrp pilus assembly and type III secretion in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Hoon; Kolade, Olatomirin O; Nomura, Kinya; Arvidson, Dennis N; He, Sheng Yang

    2005-06-03

    The Hrp pilus plays an essential role in the long-distance type III translocation of effector proteins from bacteria into plant cells. HrpA is the structural subunit of the Hrp pilus in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Little is known about the molecular features in the HrpA protein for pilus assembly or for transporting effector proteins. From previous collections of nonfunctional HrpA derivatives that carry random pentapeptide insertions or single amino acid mutations, we identified several dominant-negative mutants that blocked the ability of wild-type Pst DC3000 to elicit host responses. The dominant-negative phenotype was correlated with the disappearance of the Hrp pilus in culture and inhibition of wild-type HrpA protein self-assembly in vitro. Dominant-negative HrpA mutants can be grouped into two functional classes: one class exerted a strong dominant-negative effect on the secretion of effector proteins AvrPto and HopPtoM in culture, and the other did not. The two classes of mutant HrpA proteins carry pentapeptide insertions in discrete regions, which are interrupted by insertions without a dominant-negative effect. These results enable prediction of possible subunit-subunit interaction sites in the assembly of the Hrp pilus and suggest the usefulness of dominant-negative mutants in dissection of the role of the wild-type HrpA protein in various stages of type III translocation: protein exit across the bacterial cell wall, the assembly and/or stabilization of the Hrp pilus in the extracellular space, and Hrp pilus-mediated long-distance transport beyond the bacterial cell wall.

  7. PI3K p110α/Akt signaling negatively regulates secretion of the intestinal peptide neurotensin through interference of granule transport.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Song, Jun; Cassidy, Margaret G; Rychahou, Piotr; Starr, Marlene E; Liu, Jianyu; Li, Xin; Epperly, Garretson; Weiss, Heidi L; Townsend, Courtney M; Gao, Tianyan; Evers, B Mark

    2012-08-01

    Neurotensin (NT), an intestinal peptide secreted from N cells in the small bowel, regulates a variety of physiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including secretion, gut motility, and intestinal growth. The class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) family, which comprised of p110 catalytic (α, β and δ) and p85 regulatory subunits, has been implicated in the regulation of hormone secretion from endocrine cells. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In particular, the role of PI3K in intestinal peptide secretion is not known. Here, we show that PI3K catalytic subunit, p110α, negatively regulates NT secretion in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that inhibition of p110α, but not p110β, induces NT release in BON, a human endocrine cell line, which expresses NT mRNA and produces NT peptide in a manner analogous to N cells, and QGP-1, a pancreatic endocrine cell line that produces NT peptide. In contrast, overexpression of p110α decreases NT secretion. Consistently, p110α-inhibition increases plasma NT levels in mice. To further delineate the mechanisms contributing to this effect, we demonstrate that inhibition of p110α increases NT granule trafficking by up-regulating α-tubulin acetylation; NT secretion is prevented by overexpression of HDAC6, an α-tubulin deacetylase. Moreover, ras-related protein Rab27A (a small G protein) and kinase D-interacting substrate of 220 kDa (Kidins220), which are associated with NT granules, play a negative and positive role, respectively, in p110α-inhibition-induced NT secretion. Our findings identify the critical role and novel mechanisms for the PI3K signaling pathway in the control of intestinal hormone granule transport and release.

  8. PI3K p110α/Akt Signaling Negatively Regulates Secretion of the Intestinal Peptide Neurotensin Through Interference of Granule Transport

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Song, Jun; Cassidy, Margaret G.; Rychahou, Piotr; Starr, Marlene E.; Liu, Jianyu; Li, Xin; Epperly, Garretson; Weiss, Heidi L.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Gao, Tianyan

    2012-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT), an intestinal peptide secreted from N cells in the small bowel, regulates a variety of physiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including secretion, gut motility, and intestinal growth. The class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) family, which comprised of p110 catalytic (α, β and δ) and p85 regulatory subunits, has been implicated in the regulation of hormone secretion from endocrine cells. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In particular, the role of PI3K in intestinal peptide secretion is not known. Here, we show that PI3K catalytic subunit, p110α, negatively regulates NT secretion in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that inhibition of p110α, but not p110β, induces NT release in BON, a human endocrine cell line, which expresses NT mRNA and produces NT peptide in a manner analogous to N cells, and QGP-1, a pancreatic endocrine cell line that produces NT peptide. In contrast, overexpression of p110α decreases NT secretion. Consistently, p110α-inhibition increases plasma NT levels in mice. To further delineate the mechanisms contributing to this effect, we demonstrate that inhibition of p110α increases NT granule trafficking by up-regulating α-tubulin acetylation; NT secretion is prevented by overexpression of HDAC6, an α-tubulin deacetylase. Moreover, ras-related protein Rab27A (a small G protein) and kinase D-interacting substrate of 220 kDa (Kidins220), which are associated with NT granules, play a negative and positive role, respectively, in p110α-inhibition-induced NT secretion. Our findings identify the critical role and novel mechanisms for the PI3K signaling pathway in the control of intestinal hormone granule transport and release. PMID:22700584

  9. Pseudomonas syringae strains naturally lacking the classical P. syringae hrp/hrc Locus are common leaf colonizers equipped with an atypical type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher R; Cai, Rongman; Studholme, David J; Guttman, David S; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is best known as a plant pathogen that causes disease by translocating immune-suppressing effector proteins into plant cells through a type III secretion system (T3SS). However, P. syringae strains belonging to a newly described phylogenetic subgroup (group 2c) are missing the canonical P. syringae hrp/hrc cluster coding for a T3SS, flanking effector loci, and any close orthologue of known P. syringae effectors. Nonetheless, P. syringae group 2c strains are common leaf colonizers and grow on some tested plant species to population densities higher than those obtained by other P. syringae strains on nonhost species. Moreover, group 2c strains have genes necessary for the production of phytotoxins, have an ice nucleation gene, and, most interestingly, contain a novel hrp/hrc cluster, which is only distantly related to the canonical P. syringae hrp/hrc cluster. This hrp/hrc cluster appears to encode a functional T3SS although the genes hrpK and hrpS, present in the classical P. syringae hrp/hrc cluster, are missing. The genome sequence of a representative group 2c strain also revealed distant orthologues of the P. syringae effector genes avrE1 and hopM1 and the P. aeruginosa effector genes exoU and exoY. A putative life cycle for group 2c P. syringae is discussed.

  10. Low oxygen induces the type III secretion system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa via modulation of the small RNAs rsmZ and rsmY.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Julie; Reen, F Jerry; Adams, Claire; O'Gara, Fergal

    2011-12-01

    A steep oxygen gradient within the mucus of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung combined with the biofilm mode of bacterial growth forces respiratory pathogens to adapt to varying oxygen availability. This study presents the novel finding that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa response to limiting oxygen stress includes induction of its type III secretion system (T3SS), which subsequently contributes towards host cell cytotoxicity. In P. aeruginosa, the global anaerobic response regulator Anr perceives low oxygen and subsequently triggers gene expression of a range of target genes, including the response regulator narL. Here we demonstrate that microaerobic induction of the T3SS is dependent on Anr, and that this is mediated through direct NarL transcriptional repression of the sRNAs rsmY and rsmZ, allowing free RsmA protein to positively regulate the T3SS. This study reveals a novel interplay between the Anr-NarL and RsmAYZ regulatory circuits, and introduces RsmA as an important regulator during P. aeruginosa adaptation to a low-oxygen environment.

  11. Interplay among Pseudomonas syringae HrpR, HrpS and HrpV proteins for regulation of the type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Milija; Lawton, Edward; Schumacher, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, a plant pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, employs the type III secretion system (T3SS) to cause disease in tomato and Arabidopsis and to induce the hypersensitive response in nonhost plants. The expression of T3SS is regulated by the HrpL extracytoplasmic sigma factor. Expression of HrpL is controlled by transcriptional activators HrpR and HrpS and negative regulator HrpV. In this study, we analysed the organization of HrpRS and HrpV regulatory proteins and interplay between them. We identified one key residue I26 in HrpS required for repression by HrpV. Substitution of I26 in HrpS abolishes its interaction with HrpV and impairs interactions between HrpS and HrpR and the self-association of HrpS. We show that HrpS self-associates and can associate simultaneously with HrpR and HrpV. We now propose that HrpS has a central role in the assembly of the regulatory HrpRSV complex. Deletion analysis of HrpR and HrpS proteins showed that C-terminal parts of HrpR and HrpS confer determinants indispensable for their self-assembly. PMID:24863420

  12. HigB of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Enhances Killing of Phagocytes by Up-Regulating the Type III Secretion System in Ciprofloxacin Induced Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Long, Yuqing; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yang; Chen, Ronghao; Shi, Jing; Zhang, Lu; Jin, Yongxin; Yang, Liang; Bai, Fang; Jin, Shouguang; Cheng, Zhihui; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are dormant and highly tolerant to lethal antibiotics, which are believed to be the major cause of recurring and chronic infections. Activation of toxins of bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems inhibits bacterial growth and plays an important role in persister formation. However, little is known about the overall gene expression profile upon toxin activation. More importantly, how the dormant bacterial persisters evade host immune clearance remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin-antitoxin system HigB-HigA is required for the ciprofloxacin induced persister formation. Transcriptome analysis of a higA::Tn mutant revealed up regulation of type III secretion systems (T3SS) genes. Overexpression of HigB increased the expression of T3SS genes as well as bacterial cytotoxicity. We further demonstrate that wild type bacteria that survived ciprofloxacin treatment contain higher levels of T3SS proteins and display increased cytotoxicity to macrophage compared to vegetative bacterial cells. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa accumulates T3SS proteins during persister formation, which can protect the persister cells from host clearance by efficiently killing host immune cells. PMID:27790409

  13. The Bordetella type III secretion system effector BteA contains a conserved N-terminal motif that guides bacterial virulence factors to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    French, Christopher T; Panina, Ekaterina M; Yeh, Sylvia H; Griffith, Natasha; Arambula, Diego G; Miller, Jeff F

    2009-12-01

    The Bordetella type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein BteA is necessary and sufficient for rapid cytotoxicity in a wide range of mammalian cells. We show that BteA is highly conserved and functionally interchangeable between Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. The identification of BteA sequences required for cytotoxicity allowed the construction of non-cytotoxic mutants for localization studies. BteA derivatives were targeted to lipid rafts and showed clear colocalization with cortical actin, ezrin and the lipid raft marker GM1. We hypothesized that BteA associates with the cytoplasmic face of lipid rafts to locally modulate host cell responses to Bordetella attachment. B. bronchiseptica adhered to host cells almost exclusively to GM1-enriched lipid raft microdomains and BteA colocalized to these same sites following T3SS-mediated translocation. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin protected cells from T3SS-induced cytotoxicity. Localization to lipid rafts was mediated by a 130-amino-acid lipid raft targeting domain at the N-terminus of BteA, and homologous domains were identified in virulence factors from other bacterial species. Lipid raft targeting sequences from a T3SS effector (Plu4750) and an RTX-type toxin (Plu3217) from Photorhabdus luminescens directed fusion proteins to lipid rafts in a manner identical to the N-terminus of BteA.

  14. High-resolution structure of a Shigella type III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state NMR (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the Type-III Secretion System (T3SS) needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent dataset of 691 ssNMR constraints and STEM measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N-terminus, that occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation. PMID:25264107

  15. NMR Identification of the Binding Surfaces Involved in the Salmonella and Shigella Type III Secretion Tip-Translocon Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    McShan, Andrew C.; Kaur, Kawaljit; Chatterjee, Srirupa; Knight, Kevin M.; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2017-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for the pathogenesis of many bacteria including Salmonella and Shigella, which together are responsible for millions of deaths worldwide each year. The structural component of the T3SS consists of the needle apparatus, which is assembled in part by the protein-protein interaction between the tip and the translocon. The atomic detail of the interaction between the tip and the translocon proteins is currently unknown. Here, we used NMR methods to identify that the N-terminal domain of the Salmonella SipB translocon protein interacts with the SipD tip protein at a surface at the distal region of the tip formed by the mixed α/β domain and a portion of its coiled-coil domain. Likewise, the Shigella IpaB translocon protein and the IpaD tip protein interact with each other using similar surfaces identified for the Salmonella homologs. Furthermore, removal of the extreme N-terminal residues of the translocon protein, previously thought to be important for the interaction, had little change on the binding surface. Finally, mutations at the binding surface of SipD reduced invasion of Salmonella into human intestinal epithelial cells. Together, these results reveal the binding surfaces involved in the tip-translocon protein-protein interaction and advance our understanding of the assembly of the T3SS needle apparatus. PMID:27093649

  16. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  17. A Putative Type III Secretion System Effector Encoded by the MA20_12780 Gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 Causes Incompatibility with Rj4 Genotype Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Syougo; Okizaki, Kouhei; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Takeo

    2015-09-01

    The nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 is restricted by Rj4 genotype soybeans (Glycine max). To identify the genes responsible for this incompatibility, Tn5 mutants of B. japonicum Is-34 that were able to overcome this nodulation restriction were obtained. Analysis of the Tn5 mutants revealed that Tn5 was inserted into a region containing the MA20_12780 gene. In addition, direct disruption of this gene using marker exchange overcame the nodulation restriction by Rj4 genotype soybeans. The MA20_12780 gene has a tts box motif in its upstream region, indicating a possibility that this gene encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein. Bioinformatic characterization revealed that the MA20_12780 protein contains the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease domain of the C48 peptidase (ubiquitin-like protease 1 [Ulp1]) family. The results of the present study indicate that a putative T3SS effector encoded by the MA20_12780 gene causes the incompatibility with Rj4 genotype soybeans, and they suggest the possibility that the nodulation restriction of B. japonicum Is-34 may be due to Rj4 genotype soybeans recognizing the putative T3SS effector (MA20_12780 protein) as a virulence factor.

  18. Discovery of Plant Phenolic Compounds That Act as Type III Secretion System Inhibitors or Inducers of the Fire Blight Pathogen, Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Khokhani, Devanshi; Zhang, Chengfang; Li, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Quan; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hutchins, William; Zhou, Shan-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes a devastating disease called fire blight in rosaceous plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is one of the important virulence factors utilized by E. amylovora in order to successfully infect its hosts. By using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct combined with a high-throughput flow cytometry assay, a library of phenolic compounds and their derivatives was studied for their ability to alter the expression of the T3SS. Based on the effectiveness of the compounds on the expression of the T3SS pilus, the T3SS inhibitors 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid (TMCA) and benzoic acid (BA) and one T3SS inducer, trans-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethenylsulfonate (EHPES), were chosen for further study. Both the T3SS inhibitors (TMCA and BA) and the T3SS inducer (EHPES) were found to alter the expression of T3SS through the HrpS-HrpL pathway. Additionally, TMCA altered T3SS expression through the rsmBEa-RsmAEa system. Finally, we found that TMCA and BA weakened the hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco by suppressing the T3SS of E. amylovora. In our study, we identified phenolic compounds that specifically targeted the T3SS. The T3SS inhibitor may offer an alternative approach to antimicrobial therapy by targeting virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. PMID:23770912

  19. Discovery of plant phenolic compounds that act as type III secretion system inhibitors or inducers of the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Khokhani, Devanshi; Zhang, Chengfang; Li, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Quan; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hutchins, William; Zhou, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xin; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2013-09-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes a devastating disease called fire blight in rosaceous plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is one of the important virulence factors utilized by E. amylovora in order to successfully infect its hosts. By using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct combined with a high-throughput flow cytometry assay, a library of phenolic compounds and their derivatives was studied for their ability to alter the expression of the T3SS. Based on the effectiveness of the compounds on the expression of the T3SS pilus, the T3SS inhibitors 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid (TMCA) and benzoic acid (BA) and one T3SS inducer, trans-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethenylsulfonate (EHPES), were chosen for further study. Both the T3SS inhibitors (TMCA and BA) and the T3SS inducer (EHPES) were found to alter the expression of T3SS through the HrpS-HrpL pathway. Additionally, TMCA altered T3SS expression through the rsmBEa-RsmAEa system. Finally, we found that TMCA and BA weakened the hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco by suppressing the T3SS of E. amylovora. In our study, we identified phenolic compounds that specifically targeted the T3SS. The T3SS inhibitor may offer an alternative approach to antimicrobial therapy by targeting virulence factors of bacterial pathogens.

  20. Characterization of the Effects of Salicylidene Acylhydrazide Compounds on Type III Secretion in Escherichia coli O157:H7 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tree, Jai J.; Wang, Dai; McInally, Carol; Mahajan, Arvind; Layton, Abigail; Houghton, Irene; Elofsson, Mikael; Stevens, Mark P.; Gally, David L.; Roe, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent work has highlighted a number of compounds that target bacterial virulence by affecting gene regulation. In this work, we show that small-molecule inhibitors affect the expression of the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in liquid culture and when this bacterium is attached to bovine epithelial cells. Inhibition of T3SS expression resulted in a reduction in the capacity of the bacteria to form attaching and effacing lesions. Our results show that there is marked variation in the abilities of four structurally related compounds to inhibit the T3SS of a panel of isolates. Using transcriptomics, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the conserved and inhibitor-specific transcriptional responses to these four compounds. These analyses of gene expression show that numerous virulence genes, located on horizontally acquired DNA elements, are affected by the compounds, but the number of genes significantly affected varied markedly for the different compounds. Overall, we highlight the importance of assessing the effect of such “antivirulence” agents on a range of isolates and discuss the possible mechanisms which may lead to the coordinate downregulation of horizontally acquired virulence genes. PMID:19635828

  1. Structure of GrlR and the Implication of its EDED Motif in Mediating the Regulation of Type III Secretion System in EHEC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobichen,C.; Li, M.; Yerushalmi, G.; Tan, Y.; Mok, Y.; Rosenshine, I.; Leung, K.; Sivaraman, J.

    2007-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a common cause of severe hemorrhagic colitis. EHEC's virulence is dependent upon a type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded by 41 genes. These genes are organized in several operons clustered in the locus of enterocyte effacement. Most of the locus of enterocyte effacement genes, including grlA and grlR, are positively regulated by Ler, and Ler expression is positively and negatively modulated by GrlA and GrlR, respectively. However, the molecular basis for the GrlA and GrlR activity is still elusive. We have determined the crystal structure of GrlR at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. It consists of a typical {beta}-barrel fold with eight {beta}-strands containing an internal hydrophobic cavity and a plug-like loop on one side of the barrel. Strong hydrophobic interactions between the two {beta}-barrels maintain the dimeric architecture of GrlR. Furthermore, a unique surface-exposed EDED (Glu-Asp-Glu-Asp) motif is identified to be critical for GrlA-GrlR interaction and for the repressive activity of GrlR. This study contributes a novel molecular insight into the mechanism of GrlR function.

  2. Functional insight from the tetratricopeptide repeat-like motifs of the type III secretion chaperone SicA in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Bae-Hoon; Jang, Jung Im; Eom, Jeong Seon; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Bang, Iel Soo; Park, Yong Keun

    2014-01-01

    SicA functions both as a class II chaperone for SipB and SipC of the type III secretion system (T3SS)-1 and as a transcriptional cofactor for the AraC-type transcription factor InvF in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Bioinformatic analysis has predicted that SicA possesses three tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like motifs, which are important for protein-protein interactions and serve as multiprotein complex mediators. To investigate whether the TPR-like motifs in SicA are critical for its transcriptional cofactor function, the canonical residues in these motifs were mutated to glutamate (SicAA44E , SicAA78E , and SicAG112E ). None of these mutants except SicAA44E were able to activate the expression of the sipB and sigD genes. SicAA44E still has a capacity to interact with InvF in vitro, and despite its instability in cell, it could activate the sigDE operon. This suggests that TPR motifs are important for the transcriptional cofactor function of the SicA chaperone.

  3. Inhibition of Nuclear Transport of NF-ĸB p65 by the Salmonella Type III Secretion System Effector SpvD

    PubMed Central

    Rolhion, Nathalie; Furniss, R. Christopher D.; Grabe, Grzegorz; Ryan, Aindrias; Liu, Mei; Matthews, Sophie A.; Holden, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica replicates in macrophages through the action of effector proteins translocated across the vacuolar membrane by a type III secretion system (T3SS). Here we show that the SPI-2 T3SS effector SpvD suppresses proinflammatory immune responses. SpvD prevented activation of an NF-ĸB-dependent promoter and caused nuclear accumulation of importin-α, which is required for nuclear import of p65. SpvD interacted specifically with the exportin Xpo2, which mediates nuclear-cytoplasmic recycling of importins. We propose that interaction between SpvD and Xpo2 disrupts the normal recycling of importin-α from the nucleus, leading to a defect in nuclear translocation of p65 and inhibition of activation of NF-ĸB regulated promoters. SpvD down-regulated pro-inflammatory responses and contributed to systemic growth of bacteria in mice. This work shows that a bacterial pathogen can manipulate host cell immune responses by interfering with the nuclear transport machinery. PMID:27232334

  4. Chromobacterium pathogenicity island 1 type III secretion system is a major virulence determinant for Chromobacterium violaceum-induced cell death in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Miki, Tsuyoshi; Iguchi, Mirei; Akiba, Kinari; Hosono, Masato; Sobue, Tomoyoshi; Danbara, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2010-08-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes fatal septicaemia in humans and animals. C. violaceum ATCC 12472 possesses genes associated with two distinct type III secretion systems (T3SSs). One of these systems is encoded by Chromobacterium pathogenicity islands 1 and 1a (Cpi-1/-1a), another is encoded by Chromobacterium pathogenicity island 2 (Cpi-2). Here we show that C. violaceum causes fulminant hepatitis in a mouse infection model, and Cpi-1/-1a-encoded T3SS is required for its virulence. In addition, using C. violaceum strains with defined mutations in the genes that encode the Cpi-1/-1a or Cpi-2 locus in combination with cultured mammalian cell lines, we found that C. violaceum is able to induce cytotoxicity in a Cpi-1/-1a-dependent manner. Characterization of Chromobacterium-induced cytotoxicity revealed that cell lysis by C. violaceum infection involves the formation of pore structures on the host cell membrane, as demonstrated by protection by cytotoxicity in the presence of osmoprotectants. Finally, we demonstrated that CipB, a Cpi-1/-1a effector, is implicated in translocator-mediated pore formation and the ability of CipB to form a pore is essential for Chromobacterium-induced cytotoxicity. These results strongly suggest that Cpi-1/-1a-encoded T3SS is a virulence determinant that causes fatal infection by the induction of cell death in hepatocytes.

  5. ExsB Is Required for Correct Assembly of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion Apparatus in the Bacterial Membrane and Full Virulence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Perdu, Caroline; Huber, Philippe; Bouillot, Stéphanie; Blocker, Ariel; Elsen, Sylvie; Attrée, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for high-morbidity infections of cystic fibrosis patients and is a major agent of nosocomial infections. One of its most potent virulence factors is a type III secretion system (T3SS) that injects toxins directly into the host cell cytoplasm. ExsB, a lipoprotein localized in the bacterial outer membrane, is one of the components of this machinery, of which the function remained elusive until now. The localization of the exsB gene within the exsCEBA regulatory gene operon suggested an implication in the T3SS regulation, while its similarity with yscW from Yersinia spp. argued in favor of a role in machinery assembly. The present work shows that ExsB is necessary for full in vivo virulence of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the requirement of ExsB for optimal T3SS assembly and activity is demonstrated using eukaryotic cell infection and in vitro assays. In particular, ExsB promotes the assembly of the T3SS secretin in the bacterial outer membrane, highlighting the molecular role of ExsB as a pilotin. This involvement in the regulation of the T3S apparatus assembly may explain the localization of the ExsB-encoding gene within the regulatory gene operon. PMID:25690097

  6. Type IV Secretion and Signal Transduction of Helicobacter pylori CagA through Interactions with Host Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Backert, Steffen; Tegtmeyer, Nicole

    2017-03-24

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful human bacterium, which is exceptionally equipped to persistently inhabit the human stomach. Colonization by this pathogen is associated with gastric disorders ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to cancer. Highly virulent H. pylori strains express the well-established adhesins BabA/B, SabA, AlpA/B, OipA, and HopQ, and a type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). The adhesins ascertain intimate bacterial contact to gastric epithelial cells, while the T4SS represents an extracellular pilus-like structure for the translocation of the effector protein CagA. Numerous T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY, and CagA have been shown to target the integrin-β₁ receptor followed by translocation of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine and CagA-containing outer membrane vesicles may also play a role in the delivery process. Translocated CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation in C-terminal EPIYA-repeat motifs by oncogenic Src and Abl kinases. CagA then interacts with an array of host signaling proteins followed by their activation or inactivation in phosphorylation-dependent and phosphorylation-independent fashions. We now count about 25 host cell binding partners of intracellular CagA, which represent the highest quantity of all currently known virulence-associated effector proteins in the microbial world. Here we review the research progress in characterizing interactions of CagA with multiple host cell receptors in the gastric epithelium, including integrin-β₁, EGFR, c-Met, CD44, E-cadherin, and gp130. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization, signal transduction, and gastric pathogenesis is discussed.

  7. A bipartite signal mediates the transfer of type IV secretion substrates of Bartonella henselae into human cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulein, Ralf; Guye, Patrick; Rhomberg, Thomas A.; Schmid, Michael C.; Schröder, Gunnar; Vergunst, Annette C.; Carena, Ilaria; Dehio, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial type IV secretion (T4S) systems mediate the transfer of macromolecular substrates into various target cells, e.g., the conjugative transfer of DNA into bacteria or the transfer of virulence proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The T4S apparatus VirB of the vascular tumor-inducing pathogen Bartonella henselae causes subversion of human endothelial cell (HEC) function. Here we report the identification of multiple protein substrates of VirB, which, upon translocation into HEC, mediate all known VirB-dependent cellular changes. These Bartonella-translocated effector proteins (Beps) A-G are encoded together with the VirB system and the T4S coupling protein VirD4 on a Bartonella-specific pathogenicity island. The Beps display a modular architecture, suggesting an evolution by extensive domain duplication and reshuffling. The C terminus of each Bep harbors at least one copy of the Bep-intracellular delivery domain and a short positively charged tail sequence. This biparte C terminus constitutes a transfer signal that is sufficient to mediate VirB/VirD4-dependent intracellular delivery of reporter protein fusions. The Bep-intracellular delivery domain is also present in conjugative relaxases of bacterial conjugation systems. We exemplarily show that the C terminus of such a conjugative relaxase mediates protein transfer through the Bartonella henselae VirB/VirD4 system into HEC. Conjugative relaxases may thus represent the evolutionary origin of the here defined T4S signal for protein transfer into human cells. PMID:15642951

  8. A bipartite signal mediates the transfer of type IV secretion substrates of Bartonella henselae into human cells.

    PubMed

    Schulein, Ralf; Guye, Patrick; Rhomberg, Thomas A; Schmid, Michael C; Schröder, Gunnar; Vergunst, Annette C; Carena, Ilaria; Dehio, Christoph

    2005-01-18

    Bacterial type IV secretion (T4S) systems mediate the transfer of macromolecular substrates into various target cells, e.g., the conjugative transfer of DNA into bacteria or the transfer of virulence proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The T4S apparatus VirB of the vascular tumor-inducing pathogen Bartonella henselae causes subversion of human endothelial cell (HEC) function. Here we report the identification of multiple protein substrates of VirB, which, upon translocation into HEC, mediate all known VirB-dependent cellular changes. These Bartonella-translocated effector proteins (Beps) A-G are encoded together with the VirB system and the T4S coupling protein VirD4 on a Bartonella-specific pathogenicity island. The Beps display a modular architecture, suggesting an evolution by extensive domain duplication and reshuffling. The C terminus of each Bep harbors at least one copy of the Bep-intracellular delivery domain and a short positively charged tail sequence. This biparte C terminus constitutes a transfer signal that is sufficient to mediate VirB/VirD4-dependent intracellular delivery of reporter protein fusions. The Bep-intracellular delivery domain is also present in conjugative relaxases of bacterial conjugation systems. We exemplarily show that the C terminus of such a conjugative relaxase mediates protein transfer through the Bartonella henselae VirB/VirD4 system into HEC. Conjugative relaxases may thus represent the evolutionary origin of the here defined T4S signal for protein transfer into human cells.

  9. Signal Factors Secreted by 2D and Spheroid Mesenchymal Stem Cells and by Cocultures of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived Microvesicles and Retinal Photoreceptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Zhou, Liang

    2017-01-01

    We aim to identify levels of signal factors secreted by MSCs cultured in 2D monolayers (2D-MSCs), spheroids (spheroids MSCs), and cocultures of microvesicles (MVs) derived from 2D-MSCs or spheroid MSCs and retinal photoreceptor neurons. We seeded 2D-MSCs, spheroid MSCs, and cells derived from spheroids MSCs at equal numbers. MVs isolated from all 3 culture conditions were incubated with 661W cells. Levels of 51 signal factors in conditioned medium from those cultured conditions were quantified with bead-based assay. We found that IL-8, IL-6, and GROα were the top three most abundant signal factors. Moreover, compared to 2D-MSCs, levels of 11 cytokines and IL-2Rα were significantly increased in conditioned medium from spheroid MSCs. Finally, to test if enhanced expression of these factors reflects altered immunomodulating activities, we assessed the effect of 2D-MSC-MVs and 3D-MSC-MVs on CD14+ cell chemoattraction. Compared to 2D-MSC-MVs, 3D-MSC-MVs significantly decreased the chemotactic index of CD14+ cells. Our results suggest that spheroid culture conditions improve the ability of MSCs to selectively secrete signal factors. Moreover, 3D-MSC-MVs also possessed an enhanced capability to promote signal factors secretion compared to 2D-MSC-MVs and may possess enhanced immunomodulating activities and might be a better regenerative therapy for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:28194184

  10. Calcineurin/NFAT Signaling Represses Genes Vamp1 and Vamp2 via PMCA-Dependent Mechanism during Dopamine Secretion by Pheochromocytoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kosiorek, Michalina; Zylinska, Ludmila; Zablocki, Krzysztof; Pikula, Slawomir

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPases (PMCA) extrude Ca2+ ions out of the cell and contribute to generation of calcium oscillations. Calcium signaling is crucial for transcriptional regulation of dopamine secretion by neuroendocrine PC12 cells. Low resting [Ca2+]c in PC12 cells is maintained mainly by two Ca2+-ATPases, PMCA2 and PMCA3. Recently, we found that Ca2+ dependent phosphatase calcineurin was excessively activated under conditions of experimental downregulation of PMCA2 or PMCA3. Thus, the aim of this study was to explain if, via modulation of the Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway, PMCA2 and PMCA3 affect intracellular signaling in pheochromocytoma/neuronal cells/PC12 cells. Secondly, we tested whether this might influence dopamine secretion by PC12 cells. Results PMCA2- and PMCA3-deficient cells displayed profound decrease in dopamine secretion accompanied by a permanent increase in [Ca2+]c. Reduction in secretion might result from changes in NFAT signaling, following altered PMCA pattern. Consequently, activation of NFAT1 and NFAT3 transcription factors was observed in PMCA2- or PMCA3-deficient cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that NFATs could be involved in repression of Vamp genes encoding vesicle associated membrane proteins (VAMP). Conclusions PMCA2 and PMCA3 are crucial for dopamine secretion in PC12 cells. Reduction in PMCA2 or PMCA3 led to calcium-dependent activation of calcineurin/NFAT signaling and, in consequence, to repression of the Vamp gene and deterioration of the SNARE complex formation in PC12 cells. PMID:24667359

  11. Secretory expression of thermostable alkaline protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus FI by using native signal peptide and α-factor secretion signal in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Latiffi, Amaliawati Ahmad; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya; Basri, Mahiran

    2013-01-01

    The thermostable alkaline protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus F1 has high potential for industrial applications, and attempt to produce the enzyme in yeast for higher yield was undertaken. Secretory expression of F1 protease through yeast system could improve enzyme's capability, thus simplifying the purification steps. Mature and full genes of F1 protease were cloned into Pichia pastoris expression vectors (pGAPZαB and pPICZαB) and transformed into P. pastoris strains (GS115 and SMD1168H) via electroporation method. Recombinant F1 protease under regulation constitutive GAP promoter revealed that the highest expression was achieved after 72 h cultivation. While inducible AOX promoter showed that 0.5% (v/v) methanol was the best to induce expression. It was proven that constitutive expression strategy was better than inducible system. The α-secretion signal from the plasmid demonstrated higher secretory expression level of F1 protease as compared to native Open Reading Frame (ORF) in GS115 strain (GE6GS). Production medium YPTD was found to be the best for F1 protease expression with the highest yield of 4.13 U/mL. The protein was expressed as His-tagged fusion protein with a size about 34 kDa.

  12. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Güler-Gane, Gülin; Kidd, Sara; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Vaughan, Tristan J.; Wilkinson, Trevor C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine), and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine). When proteins that naturally contain these “undesirable” residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that have so far

  13. Alkaline pH Is a signal for optimal production and secretion of the heat labile toxin, LT in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Lucia; Ali, Zahra Bagher; Nygren, Erik; Wang, Zhiyun; Karlsson, Stefan; Zhu, Baoli; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Sjöling, Åsa

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause secretory diarrhea in children and travelers to endemic areas. ETEC spreads through the fecal-oral route. After ingestion, ETEC passes through the stomach and duodenum before it colonizes the lower part of the small intestine, exposing bacteria to a wide range of pH and environmental conditions. This study aimed to determine the impact of external pH and activity of the Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) on the regulation of production and secretion of heat labile (LT) enterotoxin. ETEC strain E2863wt and its isogenic mutant E2863ΔCRP were grown in LBK media buffered to pH 5, 7 and 9. GM1 ELISA, cDNA and cAMP analyses were carried out on bacterial pellet and supernatant samples derived from 3 and 5 hours growth and from overnight cultures. We confirm that CRP is a repressor of LT transcription and production as has been shown before but we show for the first time that CRP is a positive regulator of LT secretion both in vitro and in vivo. LT secretion increased at neutral to alkaline pH compared to acidic pH 5 where secretion was completely inhibited. At pH 9 secretion of LT was optimal resulting in 600 percent increase of secreted LT compared to unbuffered LBK media. This effect was not due to membrane leakage since the bacteria were viable at pH 9. The results indicate that the transition to the alkaline duodenum and/or exposure to high pH close to the epithelium as well as activation of the global transcription factor CRP are signals that induce secretion of the LT toxin in ETEC.

  14. HMGB1 promotes the secretion of multiple cytokines and potentiates the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Xue, Deting; Chen, Erman; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Xiang; Yu, Jiawei; Feng, Yadong; Pan, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has been previously been detected in the inflammatory microenvironment of bone fractures. It is well known that HMGB1 acts as a chemoattractant to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, the effects of HMGB1 on cytokine secretion from MSCs were determined, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects of HMGB1 on osteogenic differentiation were elucidated. To detect cytokine secretion, antibody array assays were performed, which demonstrated that HGMB1 induced the differential secretion of cytokines that are predominantly associated with cell development, regulation of growth and cell migration, stress responses, and immune system functions. Moreover, the secretion of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was significantly upregulated by HMGB1. The EGFR-activated Ras/MAPK pathway regulates the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. These results suggested that HMGB1 enhances the secretion of various cytokines by MSCs and promotes osteogenic differentiation via the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. The present study may provide a theoretical basis for the development of novel techniques for the treatment of bone fractures in the future. PMID:28105126

  15. GnRH-Induced Ca2+ Signaling Patterns and Gonadotropin Secretion in Pituitary Gonadotrophs. Functional Adaptations to Both Ordinary and Extraordinary Physiological Demands

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Pastén, Maria Luisa; Fiordelisio, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary gonadotrophs are a small fraction of the anterior pituitary population, yet they synthesize gonadotropins: luteinizing (LH) and follicle-stimulating (FSH), essential for gametogenesis and steroidogenesis. LH is secreted via a regulated pathway while FSH release is mostly constitutive and controlled by synthesis. Although gonadotrophs fire action potentials spontaneously, the intracellular Ca2+ rises produced do not influence secretion, which is mainly driven by Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH), a decapeptide synthesized in the hypothalamus and released in a pulsatile manner into the hypophyseal portal circulation. GnRH binding to G-protein-coupled receptors triggers Ca2+ mobilization from InsP3-sensitive intracellular pools, generating the global Ca2+ elevations necessary for secretion. Ca2+ signaling responses to increasing (GnRH) vary in stereotyped fashion from subthreshold to baseline spiking (oscillatory), to biphasic (spike-oscillatory or spike-plateau). This progression varies somewhat in gonadotrophs from different species and biological preparations. Both baseline spiking and biphasic GnRH-induced Ca2+ signals control LH/FSH synthesis and exocytosis. Estradiol and testosterone regulate gonadotropin secretion through feedback mechanisms, while FSH synthesis and release are influenced by activin, inhibin, and follistatin. Adaptation to physiological events like the estrous cycle, involves changes in GnRH sensitivity and LH/FSH synthesis: in proestrus, estradiol feedback regulation abruptly changes from negative to positive, causing the pre-ovulatory LH surge. Similarly, when testosterone levels drop after orquiectomy the lack of negative feedback on pituitary and hypothalamus boosts both GnRH and LH secretion, gonadotrophs GnRH sensitivity increases, and Ca2+ signaling patterns change. In addition, gonadotrophs proliferate and grow. These plastic changes denote a more vigorous functional adaptation in response to an extraordinary functional

  16. GnRH-Induced Ca(2+) Signaling Patterns and Gonadotropin Secretion in Pituitary Gonadotrophs. Functional Adaptations to Both Ordinary and Extraordinary Physiological Demands.

    PubMed

    Durán-Pastén, Maria Luisa; Fiordelisio, Tatiana

    2013-09-30

    PITUITARY GONADOTROPHS ARE A SMALL FRACTION OF THE ANTERIOR PITUITARY POPULATION, YET THEY SYNTHESIZE GONADOTROPINS: luteinizing (LH) and follicle-stimulating (FSH), essential for gametogenesis and steroidogenesis. LH is secreted via a regulated pathway while FSH release is mostly constitutive and controlled by synthesis. Although gonadotrophs fire action potentials spontaneously, the intracellular Ca(2+) rises produced do not influence secretion, which is mainly driven by Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH), a decapeptide synthesized in the hypothalamus and released in a pulsatile manner into the hypophyseal portal circulation. GnRH binding to G-protein-coupled receptors triggers Ca(2+) mobilization from InsP3-sensitive intracellular pools, generating the global Ca(2+) elevations necessary for secretion. Ca(2+) signaling responses to increasing (GnRH) vary in stereotyped fashion from subthreshold to baseline spiking (oscillatory), to biphasic (spike-oscillatory or spike-plateau). This progression varies somewhat in gonadotrophs from different species and biological preparations. Both baseline spiking and biphasic GnRH-induced Ca(2+) signals control LH/FSH synthesis and exocytosis. Estradiol and testosterone regulate gonadotropin secretion through feedback mechanisms, while FSH synthesis and release are influenced by activin, inhibin, and follistatin. Adaptation to physiological events like the estrous cycle, involves changes in GnRH sensitivity and LH/FSH synthesis: in proestrus, estradiol feedback regulation abruptly changes from negative to positive, causing the pre-ovulatory LH surge. Similarly, when testosterone levels drop after orquiectomy the lack of negative feedback on pituitary and hypothalamus boosts both GnRH and LH secretion, gonadotrophs GnRH sensitivity increases, and Ca(2+) signaling patterns change. In addition, gonadotrophs proliferate and grow. These plastic changes denote a more vigorous functional adaptation in response to an extraordinary

  17. "Store-operated" cAMP signaling contributes to Ca2+-activated Cl- secretion in T84 colonic cells.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Jonathan M; Maiellaro, Isabella; Abi-Jaoude, Joanne; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2015-10-15

    Apical cAMP-dependent CFTR Cl(-) channels are essential for efficient vectorial movement of ions and fluid into the lumen of the colon. It is well known that Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists also stimulate colonic anion secretion. However, CFTR is apparently not activated directly by Ca(2+), and the existence of apical Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels in the native colonic epithelium is controversial, leaving the identity of the Ca(2+)-activated component unresolved. We recently showed that decreasing free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen elicits a rise in intracellular cAMP. This process, which we termed "store-operated cAMP signaling" (SOcAMPS), requires the luminal ER Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and does not depend on changes in cytosolic Ca(2+). Here we assessed the degree to which SOcAMPS participates in Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) transport as measured by transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) in polarized T84 monolayers in parallel with imaging of cAMP and PKA activity using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based reporters in single cells. In Ca(2+)-free conditions, the Ca(2+)-releasing agonist carbachol and Ca(2+) ionophore increased Isc, cAMP, and PKA activity. These responses persisted in cells loaded with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM. The effect on Isc was enhanced in the presence of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), inhibited by the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172 and the PKA inhibitor H-89, and unaffected by Ba(2+) or flufenamic acid. We propose that a discrete component of the "Ca(2+)-dependent" secretory activity in the colon derives from cAMP generated through SOcAMPS. This alternative mode of cAMP production could contribute to the actions of diverse xenobiotic agents that disrupt ER Ca(2+) homeostasis, leading to diarrhea.

  18. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    DOEpatents

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  19. Adiponectin regulate growth hormone secretion via adiponectin receptor mediated Ca(2+) signalling in rat somatotrophs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F J; Boehme, F; Vargas, E; Wang, K; Parkington, H C; Rao, J R; Chen, C

    2009-08-01

    Obesity is associated with reduced levels of growth hormone (GH) and the disruption of pulsatile GH secretion. This results in relative GH deficiency. It is likely that a regulatory relationship between GH secretion and adipose tissue exists as the secretion of GH recovers to normal levels after a reduction in body weight. This report characterise the expression and interaction of adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) and adiponectin, respectively, in regulating the activity of GH secreting cells. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of the GH3 cell line, rat anterior pituitary gland and isolated somatotroph cells from transgenic GFP expressing mice confirmed the expression of both AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 in GH secretory cells. Because GH cells expressed both receptors, it is likely that the measured increase in GH secretion, observed in primary cultured rat pituitary cells after 30 min of incubation with full-length murine adiponectin, was mediated by a direct receptor regulated process. Adiponectin induced an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) through both the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and the release of intracellular Ca(2+) stores resulting in the secretion of GH. Furthermore, results confirm that this increase in GH secretion depended mainly on an increase in Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels. It is concluded that adiponectin directly regulates GH secretion from somatotrophs by binding to either adiponectin receptor, and that this is mediated via a similar process observed after the stimulation of GH secretion by GH-releasing hormone.

  20. The Type III secretion system of Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans is involved in the phyllosphere colonization process and in transmission to seeds of susceptible beans.

    PubMed

    Darsonval, A; Darrasse, A; Meyer, D; Demarty, M; Durand, K; Bureau, C; Manceau, C; Jacques, M-A

    2008-05-01

    Understanding the survival, multiplication, and transmission to seeds of plant pathogenic bacteria is central to study their pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the type III secretion system (T3SS), encoded by hrp genes, could have a role in host colonization by plant pathogenic bacteria. The seed-borne pathogen Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans causes common bacterial blight of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Directed mutagenesis in strain CFBP4834-R of X. fuscans subsp. fuscans and bacterial population density monitoring on bean leaves showed that strains with mutations in the hrp regulatory genes, hrpG and hrpX, were impaired in their phyllospheric growth, as in the null interaction with Escherichia coli C600 and bean. In the compatible interaction, CFBP4834-R reached high phyllospheric population densities and was transmitted to seeds at high frequencies with high densities. Strains with mutations in structural hrp genes maintained the same constant epiphytic population densities (1 x 10(5) CFU g(-1) of fresh weight) as in the incompatible interaction with Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 and the bean. Low frequencies of transmission to seeds and low bacterial concentrations were recorded for CFBP4834-R hrp mutants and for ATCC 33913, whereas E. coli C600 was not transmitted. Moreover, unlike the wild-type strain, strains with mutations in hrp genes were not transmitted to seeds by vascular pathway. Transmission to seeds by floral structures remained possible for both. This study revealed the involvement of the X. fuscans subsp. fuscans T3SS in phyllospheric multiplication and systemic colonization of bean, leading to transmission to seeds. Our findings suggest a major contribution of hrp regulatory genes in host colonization processes.

  1. The distal ExsA-binding site in Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system promoters is the primary determinant for promoter-specific properties.

    PubMed

    Brutinel, Evan D; King, Jessica M; Marsden, Anne E; Yahr, Timothy L

    2012-05-01

    Transcription of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system is controlled by ExsA, a member of the AraC/XylS family of regulators. Each ExsA-dependent promoter contains two adjacent binding sites for monomeric ExsA. The promoter-proximal site (binding site 1) consists of highly conserved GnC and TGnnA sequences that are individually recognized by the two helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding motifs of an ExsA monomer. While the GnC and TGnnA sequences are important for binding to site 1, the promoter-distal binding sites (site 2) lack obvious similarity among themselves or with binding site 1. In the present study, we demonstrate that site 2 in the P(exsC) promoter region contains a GnC sequence that is functionally equivalent to the GnC in site 1 and recognized by the first HTH motif of an ExsA monomer. Likewise, the second HTH interacts with an adenine residue in binding site 2. Although several candidate GnC sequences are also present in site 2 of the P(exsD), P(exoT), and P(pcrG) promoters, the GnC sequences were not required for ExsA-dependent transcription or ExsA binding. A comparison of hybrid promoters composed of binding site 2 from one promoter fused to binding site 1 derived from another promoter indicates that ExsA-binding affinity, promoter strength, and the degree of promoter bending are properties that are largely determined by binding site 2. Based on these data, we propose that the manner in which ExsA interacts with binding site 2 at the P(exsC) promoter is distinct from the interactions occurring at other promoters.

  2. The N terminus of type III secretion needle protein YscF from Yersinia pestis functions to modulate innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Jessen Condry, Danielle L; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S; Nilles, Matthew L

    2015-04-01

    The type III secretion system is employed by many pathogens, including the genera Yersinia, Shigella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella, to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The injectisome needle is formed by the polymerization of a single protein, e.g., YscF (Yersinia pestis), PscF (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), PrgI (Salmonella enterica SPI-1), SsaG (Salmonella enterica SPI-2), or MxiH (Shigella flexneri). In this study, we demonstrated that the N termini of some needle proteins, particularly the N terminus of YscF from Yersinia pestis, influences host immune responses. The N termini of several needle proteins were truncated and tested for the ability to induce inflammatory responses in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells). Truncated needle proteins induced proinflammatory cytokines to different magnitudes than the corresponding wild-type proteins, except SsaG. Notably, N-terminally truncated YscF induced significantly higher activation of NF-κB and/or AP-1 and higher induction of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that a function of the N terminus of YscF is interference with host sensing of YscF, consistent with Y. pestis pathogenesis. To directly test the ability of the N terminus of YscF to suppress cytokine induction, a YscF-SsaG chimera with 15 N-terminal amino acids from YscF added to SsaG was constructed. The chimeric YscF-SsaG induced lower levels of cytokines than wild-type SsaG. However, the addition of 15 random amino acids to SsaG had no effect on NF-κB/AP-1 activation. These results suggest that the N terminus of YscF can function to decrease cytokine induction, perhaps contributing to a favorable immune environment leading to survival of Y. pestis within the eukaryotic host.

  3. The N Terminus of Type III Secretion Needle Protein YscF from Yersinia pestis Functions To Modulate Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Jessen Condry, Danielle L.; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system is employed by many pathogens, including the genera Yersinia, Shigella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella, to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The injectisome needle is formed by the polymerization of a single protein, e.g., YscF (Yersinia pestis), PscF (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), PrgI (Salmonella enterica SPI-1), SsaG (Salmonella enterica SPI-2), or MxiH (Shigella flexneri). In this study, we demonstrated that the N termini of some needle proteins, particularly the N terminus of YscF from Yersinia pestis, influences host immune responses. The N termini of several needle proteins were truncated and tested for the ability to induce inflammatory responses in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells). Truncated needle proteins induced proinflammatory cytokines to different magnitudes than the corresponding wild-type proteins, except SsaG. Notably, N-terminally truncated YscF induced significantly higher activation of NF-κB and/or AP-1 and higher induction of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that a function of the N terminus of YscF is interference with host sensing of YscF, consistent with Y. pestis pathogenesis. To directly test the ability of the N terminus of YscF to suppress cytokine induction, a YscF-SsaG chimera with 15 N-terminal amino acids from YscF added to SsaG was constructed. The chimeric YscF-SsaG induced lower levels of cytokines than wild-type SsaG. However, the addition of 15 random amino acids to SsaG had no effect on NF-κB/AP-1 activation. These results suggest that the N terminus of YscF can function to decrease cytokine induction, perhaps contributing to a favorable immune environment leading to survival of Y. pestis within the eukaryotic host. PMID:25644012

  4. The iron-sulfur cluster sensor IscR is a negative regulator of Spi1 type III secretion system in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Vergnes, Alexandra; Viala, Julie P M; Ouadah-Tsabet, Rabah; Pocachard, Bérengère; Loiseau, Laurent; Méresse, Stéphane; Barras, Frédéric; Aussel, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S)-containing proteins contribute to various biological processes, including redox reactions or regulation of gene expression. Living organisms have evolved by developing distinct biosynthetic pathways to assemble these clusters, including iron sulfur cluster (ISC) and sulfur mobilization (SUF). Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an intracellular pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, from gastroenteritis to severe systemic diseases. Salmonella possesses all known prokaryotic systems to assemble Fe-S clusters, including ISC and SUF. Because iron starvation and oxidative stress are detrimental for Fe-S enzyme biogenesis and because such environments are often met by Salmonella during its intracellular life, we investigated the role of the ISC and SUF machineries during the course of the infection. The iscU mutant, which is predicted to have no ISC system functioning, was found to be defective for epithelial cell invasion and for mice infection, whereas the sufBC mutant, which is predicted to have no SUF system functioning, did not present any defect. Moreover, the iscU mutant was highly impaired in the expression of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (Spi1) type III secretion system that is essential for the first stage of Salmonella infection. The Fe-S cluster sensor IscR, a transcriptional regulator matured by the ISC machinery, was shown to bind the promoter of hilD, which encodes the master regulator of Spi1. IscR was also demonstrated to repress hilD and subsequently Spi1 gene expression, consistent with the observation that an IscR mutant is hyper-invasive in epithelial cells. Collectively, our findings indicate that the ISC machinery plays a central role in Salmonella virulence through the ability of IscR to down-regulate Spi1 gene expression. At a broader level, this model illustrates an adaptive mechanism used by bacterial pathogens to modulate their infectivity according to iron and oxygen availability.

  5. Stochastic simulation model comparing distributions of STEC O157 faecal shedding prevalence between cattle vaccinated with type III secreted protein vaccines and non-vaccinated cattle.

    PubMed

    Vogstad, A R; Moxley, R A; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Smith, D R

    2014-06-01

    Pens of cattle with high Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157) prevalence at harvest may present a greater risk to food safety than pens of lower prevalence. Vaccination of live cattle against STEC O157 has been proposed as an approach to reduce STEC O157 prevalence in live cattle. Our objective was to create a stochastic simulation model to evaluate the effectiveness of pre-harvest interventions. We used the model to compare STEC O157 prevalence distributions for summer- and winter-fed cattle to summer-fed cattle immunized with a type III secreted protein (TTSP) vaccine. Model inputs were an estimate of vaccine efficacy, observed frequency distributions for number of animals within a pen, and pen-level faecal shedding prevalence for summer and winter. Uncertainty about vaccine efficacy was simulated using a log-normal distribution (mean = 58%, SE = 0.14). Model outputs were distributions of STEC O157 faecal pen prevalence of summer-fed cattle unvaccinated and vaccinated, and winter-fed cattle unvaccinated. The simulation was performed 5000 times. Summer faecal prevalence ranged from 0% to 80% (average = 30%). Thirty-six per cent of summer-fed pens had STEC O157 prevalence >40%. Winter faecal prevalence ranged from 0% to 60% (average = 10%). Seven per cent of winter-fed pens had STEC O157 prevalence >40%. Faecal prevalence for summer-fed pens vaccinated with a 58% efficacious vaccine product ranged from 0% to 52% (average = 13%). Less than one per cent of vaccinated pens had STEC O157 prevalence >40%. In this simulation, vaccination mitigated the risk of STEC O157 faecal shedding to levels comparable to winter, with the major effects being reduced average shedding prevalence, reduced variability in prevalence distribution, and a reduction in the occurrence of the highest prevalence pens. Food safety decision-makers may find this modelling approach useful for evaluating the value of pre-harvest interventions.

  6. Burkholderia pseudomallei Type III Secretion System Cluster 3 ATPase BsaS, a Chemotherapeutic Target for Small-Molecule ATPase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lan; Lai, Shu-Chin; Treerat, Puthayalai; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is an infectious disease of high mortality for humans and other animal species; it is prevalent in tropical regions worldwide. The pathogenesis of melioidosis depends on the ability of its causative agent, the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, to enter and survive in host cells. B. pseudomallei can escape from the phagosome into the cytosol of phagocytic cells where it replicates and acquires actin-mediated motility, avoiding killing by the autophagy-dependent process, LC3 (microtubule-associated protein light chain 3)-associated phagocytosis (LAP). The type III secretion system cluster 3 (TTSS3) facilitates bacterial escape from phagosomes, although the mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Given the recent identification of small-molecule inhibitors of the TTSS ATPase, we sought to determine the potential of the predicted TTSS3 ATPase, encoded by bsaS, as a target for chemotherapeutic treatment of infection. A B. pseudomallei bsaS deletion mutant was generated and used as a control against which to assess the effect of inhibitor treatment. Infection of RAW 264.7 cells with wild-type bacteria and subsequent treatment with the ATPase inhibitor compound 939 resulted in reduced intracellular bacterial survival, reduced escape from phagosomes, and increased colocalization with both LC3 and the lysosomal marker LAMP1 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 1). These changes were similar to those observed for infection of RAW 264.7 cells with the bsaS deletion mutant. We propose that treatment with the ATPase inhibitor compound 939 decreased intracellular bacterial survival through a reduced ability of bacteria to escape from phagosomes and increased killing via LAP. Therefore, small-molecule inhibitors of the TTSS3 ATPase have potential as therapeutic treatments against melioidosis. PMID:25605762

  7. A chlamydial type III-secreted effector protein (Tarp) is predominantly recognized by antibodies from humans infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and induces protective immunity against upper genital tract pathologies in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Lili; Chen, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yingqian; Baseman, Joel; Perdue, Sondra; Yeh, I-Tien; Shain, Rochelle; Holland, Martin; Bailey, Robin; Mabey, David; Yu, Ping; Zhong, Guangming

    2009-05-14

    Chlamydia trachomatis genome is predicted to encode a type III secretion system consisting of more than 40 open reading frames (ORFs). To test whether these ORFs are expressed and immunogenic during chlamydial infection in humans, we expressed 55 chlamydial ORFs covering all putative type III secretion components plus control molecules as fusion proteins and measured the reactivity of these fusion proteins with antibodies from patients infected with C. trachomatis in the urogenital tract (24 antisera) or in the ocular tissue (8 antisera). Forty-five of the 55 proteins were recognized by at least 1 of the 32 human antisera, suggesting that these proteins are both expressed and immunogenic during chlamydial infection in humans. Tarp, a putative type III secretion effector protein, was identified as a novel immunodominant antigen due to its reactivity with the human antisera at high frequency and titer. The expression and immunogenicity of Tarp were confirmed in cell culture and mouse systems. Tarp was mainly associated with the infectious form of chlamydial organisms and became undetectable between 13 and 24 h during the infection cycle in cell culture. Mice intravaginally infected with C. muridarum developed Tarp-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. More importantly, immunization of mice with Tarp induced Th1-dominant immunity that significantly reduced the shedding of live organisms from the lower genital tract and attenuated inflammatory pathologies in the fallopian tube tissues. These observations have demonstrated that Tarp, an immunodominant antigen identified by human antisera, can induce protective immunity against chlamydial infection and pathology in mice.

  8. A signal peptide secretion screen in Fucus distichus embryos reveals expression of glucanase, EGF domain-containing, and LRR receptor kinase-like polypeptides during asymmetric cell growth.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Kenneth D; Wyman, Aaron J; Sudol, Michelle N; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Quatrano, Ralph S

    2003-10-01

    Zygotes of the brown alga Fucus distichus (L.) Powell develop polarity prior to the first embryonic cell division and retain a pattern of asymmetric growth during early embryogenesis. In order to identify F. distichus polypeptides secreted during asymmetric cell growth, we used a functional assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to screen a cDNA library generated from asymmetrically growing Fucus embryos for sequences encoding polypeptides that function as signal peptides for secretion. We isolated and sequenced 222 plasmids containing Fucus cDNAs encoding signal peptide activity. The cDNA inserts from these plasmids were translated in silico into 244 potential polypeptide sequences, 169 of which are predicted to contain signal peptides. BlastP analysis of the Fucus sequences revealed similarity between many Fucus proteins and cell surface proteins that function in development in other eukaryotes, including epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeat-containing proteins, plant leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-receptor kinases, and algal beta-1, 3-exoglucanase. However, most of the isolated Fucus polypeptides lack similarity to known proteins. The isolation of cDNAs encoding secreted Fucus proteins provides an important step toward characterizing cell surface proteins important for asymmetric organization and growth in fucoid embryos.

  9. Influenza induces IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion by human alveolar epithelial cells through HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoko; Correll, Kelly; Zemans, Rachel L; Leslie, Christina C; Murphy, Robert C; Mason, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The most severe complication of influenza is viral pneumonia, which can lead to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) are the first cells that influenza virus encounters upon entering the alveolus. Infected epithelial cells produce cytokines that attract and activate neutrophils and macrophages, which in turn induce damage to the epithelial-endothelial barrier. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α)/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are well known to regulate repair of damaged alveolar epithelium by stimulating cell migration and proliferation. Recently, TGF-α/EGFR signaling has also been shown to regulate innate immune responses in bronchial epithelial cells. However, little is known about whether HGF/c-Met signaling alters the innate immune responses and whether the innate immune responses in AECs are regulated by HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR. We hypothesized that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR would regulate innate immune responses to influenza A virus infection in human AECs. We found that recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) and rhTGF-α stimulated primary human AECs to secrete IL-8 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) strongly and IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 moderately. Influenza infection stimulated the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF by AECs plated on rat-tail collagen through EGFR activation likely by TGF-α released from AECs and through c-Met activated by HGF secreted from lung fibroblasts. HGF secretion by fibroblasts was stimulated by AEC production of prostaglandin E2 during influenza infection. We conclude that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling enhances the innate immune responses by human AECs during influenza infections.

  10. Physiological concentrations of interleukin-6 directly promote insulin secretion, signal transduction, nitric oxide release, and redox status in a clonal pancreatic β-cell line and mouse islets.

    PubMed

    da Silva Krause, Mauricio; Bittencourt, Aline; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo; McClenaghan, Neville H; Flatt, Peter R; Murphy, Colin; Newsholme, Philip

    2012-09-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) has recently been reported to promote insulin secretion in a glucagon-like peptide-1-dependent manner. Herein, the direct effects of IL6 (at various concentrations from 0 to 1000 pg/ml) on pancreatic β-cell metabolism, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, insulin secretion, nitrite release, and redox status in a rat clonal β-cell line and mouse islets are reported. Chronic insulin secretion (in μg/mg protein per 24  h) was increased from 128·7±7·3 (no IL6) to 178·4±7·7 (at 100  pg/ml IL6) in clonal β-cells and increased significantly in islets incubated in the presence of 5·5  mM glucose for 2  h, from 0·148 to 0·167±0·003  ng/islet. Pretreatment with IL6 also induced a twofold increase in basal and nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in subsequent 20 min static incubations. IL6 enhanced both glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulphide (GSSG) by nearly 20% without changing intracellular redox status (GSSG/GSH). IL6 dramatically increased iNOS expression (by ca. 100-fold) with an accompanying tenfold rise in nitrite release in clonal β-cells. Phosphorylated AMPK levels were elevated approximately twofold in clonal β-cells and mouse islet cells. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase levels (CaMKK), an upstream kinase activator of AMPK, were also increased by 50% after IL6 exposure (in β-cells and islets). Our data have demonstrated that IL6 can stimulate β-cell-dependent insulin secretion via direct cell-based mechanisms. AMPK, CaMKK (an upstream kinase activator of AMPK), and the synthesis of nitric oxide appear to alter cell metabolism to benefit insulin secretion. In summary, IL6 exerts positive effects on β-cell signaling, metabolism, antioxidant status, and insulin secretion.

  11. Prostaglandin E2 induces chloride secretion through crosstalk between cAMP and calcium signaling in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Thomas, Sheela V; Kathpalia, Paru P; Chen, Yu; Pao, Alan C

    2014-02-01

    Under conditions of high dietary salt intake, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production is increased in the collecting duct and promotes urinary sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion; however, the molecular mechanisms by which PGE2 increases NaCl excretion in this context have not been clearly defined. We used the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-K2 cell line to characterize mechanisms underlying PGE2-regulated NaCl transport. When epithelial Na(+) channels were inhibited, PGE2 exclusively stimulated basolateral EP4 receptors to increase short-circuit current (Isc(PGE2)). We found that Isc(PGE2) was sensitive to inhibition by H-89 and CFTR-172, indicating that EP4 receptors signal through protein kinase A to induce Cl(-) secretion via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Unexpectedly, we also found that Isc(PGE2) was sensitive to inhibition by BAPTA-AM (Ca(2+) chelator), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) (inositol triphosphate receptor blocker), and flufenamic acid (FFA) [Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel (CACC) inhibitor], suggesting that EP4 receptors also signal through Ca(2+) to induce Cl(-) secretion via CACC. Additionally, we observed that PGE2 stimulated an increase in Isc through crosstalk between cAMP and Ca(2+) signaling; BAPTA-AM or 2-APB inhibited a component of Isc(PGE2) that was sensitive to CFTR-172 inhibition; H-89 inhibited a component of Isc(PGE2) that was sensitive to FFA inhibition. Together, our findings indicate that PGE2 activates basolateral EP4 receptors and signals through both cAMP and Ca(2+) to stimulate Cl(-) secretion in IMCD-K2 cells. We propose that these signaling pathways, and the crosstalk between them, may provide a concerted mechanism for enhancing urinary NaCl excretion under conditions of high dietary NaCl intake.

  12. Prostaglandin E2 induces chloride secretion through crosstalk between cAMP and calcium signaling in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Thomas, Sheela V.; Kathpalia, Paru P.; Chen, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Under conditions of high dietary salt intake, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production is increased in the collecting duct and promotes urinary sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion; however, the molecular mechanisms by which PGE2 increases NaCl excretion in this context have not been clearly defined. We used the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-K2 cell line to characterize mechanisms underlying PGE2-regulated NaCl transport. When epithelial Na+ channels were inhibited, PGE2 exclusively stimulated basolateral EP4 receptors to increase short-circuit current (IscPGE2). We found that IscPGE2 was sensitive to inhibition by H-89 and CFTR-172, indicating that EP4 receptors signal through protein kinase A to induce Cl− secretion via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Unexpectedly, we also found that IscPGE2 was sensitive to inhibition by BAPTA-AM (Ca2+ chelator), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) (inositol triphosphate receptor blocker), and flufenamic acid (FFA) [Ca2+-activated Cl− channel (CACC) inhibitor], suggesting that EP4 receptors also signal through Ca2+ to induce Cl− secretion via CACC. Additionally, we observed that PGE2 stimulated an increase in Isc through crosstalk between cAMP and Ca2+ signaling; BAPTA-AM or 2-APB inhibited a component of IscPGE2 that was sensitive to CFTR-172 inhibition; H-89 inhibited a component of IscPGE2 that was sensitive to FFA inhibition. Together, our findings indicate that PGE2 activates basolateral EP4 receptors and signals through both cAMP and Ca2+ to stimulate Cl− secretion in IMCD-K2 cells. We propose that these signaling pathways, and the crosstalk between them, may provide a concerted mechanism for enhancing urinary NaCl excretion under conditions of high dietary NaCl intake. PMID:24284792

  13. A draft genome sequence and functional screen reveals the repertoire of type III secreted proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tabaci 11528

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, David J; Ibanez, Selena Gimenez; MacLean, Daniel; Dangl, Jeffery L; Chang, Jeff H; Rathjen, John P

    2009-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial pathogen that causes disease on a broad range of economically important plant species. Pathogenicity of P. syringae strains is dependent on the type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of up to about thirty virulence 'effector' proteins into the host cytoplasm where they subvert the eukaryotic cell physiology and disrupt host defences. P. syringae pathovar tabaci naturally causes disease on wild tobacco, the model member of the Solanaceae, a family that includes many crop species as well as on soybean. Results We used the 'next-generation' Illumina sequencing platform and the Velvet short-read assembly program to generate a 145X deep 6,077,921 nucleotide draft genome sequence for P. syringae pathovar tabaci strain 11528. From our draft assembly, we predicted 5,300 potential genes encoding proteins of at least 100 amino acids long, of which 303 (5.72%) had no significant sequence similarity to those encoded by the three previously fully sequenced P. syringae genomes. Of the core set of Hrp Outer Proteins that are conserved in three previously fully sequenced P. syringae strains, most were also conserved in strain 11528, including AvrE1, HopAH2, HopAJ2, HopAK1, HopAN1, HopI, HopJ1, HopX1, HrpK1 and HrpW1. However, the hrpZ1 gene is partially deleted and hopAF1 is completely absent in 11528. The draft genome of strain 11528 also encodes close homologues of HopO1, HopT1, HopAH1, HopR1, HopV1, HopAG1, HopAS1, HopAE1, HopAR1, HopF1, and HopW1 and a degenerate HopM1'. Using a functional screen, we confirmed that hopO1, hopT1, hopAH1, hopM1', hopAE1, hopAR1, and hopAI1' are part of the virulence-associated HrpL regulon, though the hopAI1' and hopM1' sequences were degenerate with premature stop codons. We also discovered two additional HrpL-regulated effector candidates and an HrpL-regulated distant homologue of avrPto1. Conclusion The draft genome sequence facilitates the continued development of P

  14. The Yersinia Type III secretion effector YopM Is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that induced necrotic cell death by targeting NLRP3

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Congwen; Wang, Ying; Du, Zongmin; Guan, Kai; Cao, Ye; Yang, Huiying; Zhou, Pengyu; Wu, Feixiang; Chen, Jiankang; Wang, Penghao; Zheng, Zirui; Zhang, Pingping; Zhang, Yanhong; Ma, Shengli; Yang, Ruifu; Zhong, Hui; He, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis uses type III effector proteins to target eukaryotic signaling systems. The Yersinia outer protein (Yop) M effector from the Y. pestis strain is a critical virulence determinant; however, its role in Y. pestis pathogenesis is just beginning to emerge. Here we first identify YopM as the structural mimic of the bacterial IpaH E3 ligase family in vitro, and establish that the conserved CLD motif in its N-terminal is responsible for the E3 ligase function. Furthermore, we show that NLRP3 is a novel target of the YopM protein. Specially, YopM associates with NLRP3, and its CLD ligase motif mediates the activating K63-linked ubiquitylation of NLRP3; as a result, YopM modulates NLRP3-mediated cell necrosis. Mutation of YopM E3 ligase motif dramatically reduces the ability of Y. pestis to induce HMGB1 release and cell necrosis, which ultimately contributes to bacterial virulence. In conclusion, this study has identified a previously unrecognized role for YopM E3 ligase activity in the regulation of host cell necrosis and plague pathogenesis. PMID:27929533

  15. Erwinia carotovora DsbA mutants: evidence for a periplasmic-stress signal transduction system affecting transcription of genes encoding secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Sealy, L V; Thomas, J D; Commander, P; Salmond, G P

    1999-08-01

    The dsbA genes, which encode major periplasmic disulfide-bond-forming proteins, were isolated from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca), and the dsbC gene, encoding another periplasmic disulfide oxidoreductase was isolated from Ecc. All three genes were sequenced and mutants deficient in these genes were created by marker exchange mutagenesis. The Ecc mutants were severely affected in activity and secretion of pectate lyase, probably due to the absence of functional PelC, which is predicted to require disulfide bond formation to achieve its correct conformation prior to secretion across the outer membrane. Similarly, endopolygalacturonase, also predicted to possess disulfide bonds, displayed reduced activity. The major Ecc cellulase (CelV) does not contain cysteine residues and was still secreted in dsbA-deficient strains. This observation demonstrated unequivocally that the localization and activity of the individual components of the Out apparatus are independent of disulfide bond formation. Surprisingly, cellulase activity was shown to be increased approximately two- to threefold in the DsbA mutant. This phenomenon resulted from transcriptional up-regulation of celV gene expression. In contrast, transcription of both pelC and peh were down-regulated in dsbA-deficient strains when compared to the wild-type. Protease (Prt) activity and secretion were unaffected in the Ecc dsbA mutant. Prt activity was considerably reduced in the double dsbA dsbC mutant. However Prt was secreted normally in this strain. The Eca dsbA mutant was found to be non-motile, suggesting that disulfide bond formation is essential for motility in this strain. All of the dsb mutants showed reduced tissue maceration in planta. These results suggest that a feedback regulation system operates in Ecc. In this system, defects in periplasmic disulfide bond formation act as a signal which is relayed to the transcription machinery regulating gene

  16. gamma-Tocotrienol modulates the paracrine secretion of VEGF induced by cobalt(II) chloride via ERK signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cell line.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Liu, Jia-Ren; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Liu, Hui-Kun; Yan, Ya-Geng; Chen, Bing-Qing; Sun, Wen-Guang

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic feature of solid tumors, and carcinoma cells are known to secrete many growth factors. These growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), play a major role in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, the effect of gamma-tocotrienol, a natural product commonly found in palm oil and rice bran, on the accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein and the paracrine secretion of VEGF in human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC-7901 cell line induced by cobalt(II) chloride (as a hypoxia mimic) was investigated. These results showed that cobalt(II) chloride induced the high expression of VEGF in SGC-7901 cells at dose of 150 micromol/L for 24h. Both basal level and cobalt(II) chloride-induced HIF-1alpha protein accumulation and VEGF paracrine secretion were inhibited in SGC-7901 cells treated with gamma-tocotrienol at 60 micromol/L treatment for 24 h. U0126, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, decreased the expression of HIF-1alpha protein and the paracrine secretion of VEGF under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In this study, gamma-tocotrienol also significantly inhibited the hypoxia-stimulated expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2). The mechanism seems to involve in inhibiting hypoxia-mediated activation of p-ERK1/2, it leads to a marked decrease in hypoxia-induced HIF-1alpha protein accumulation and VEGF secretion. These data suggest that HIF-1alpha/VEGF could be a promising target for gamma-tocotrienol in an effective method of chemoprevention and chemotherapy in human gastric cancer.

  17. Structure of macrophage colony stimulating factor bound to FMS: Diverse signaling assemblies of class III receptor tyrosine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; He, Xiaolin

    2009-06-12

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), through binding to its receptor FMS, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), regulates the development and function of mononuclear phagocytes, and plays important roles in innate immunity, cancer and inflammation. We report a 2.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of M-CSF bound to the first 3 domains (D1-D3) of FMS. The ligand binding mode of FMS is surprisingly different from KIT, another class III RTK, in which the major ligand-binding domain of FMS, D2, uses the CD and EF loops, but not the {beta}-sheet on the opposite side of the Ig domain as in KIT, to bind ligand. Calorimetric data indicate that M-CSF cannot dimerize FMS without receptor-receptor interactions mediated by FMS domains D4 and D5. Consistently, the structure contains only 1 FMS-D1-D3 molecule bound to a M-CSF dimer, due to a weak, hydrophilic M-CSF:FMS interface, and probably a conformational change of the M-CSF dimer in which binding to the second site is rendered unfavorable by FMS binding at the first site. The partial, intermediate complex suggests that FMS may be activated in two steps, with the initial engagement step distinct from the subsequent dimerization/activation step. Hence, the formation of signaling class III RTK complexes can be diverse, engaging various modes of ligand recognition and various mechanistic steps for dimerizing and activating receptors.

  18. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 promotes proliferation and insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells via activating Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suijun; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Ying; Li, Quanzhong; Su, Yong; Wang, Yanfang; Zhang, Yun; Man, Hua; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Failure of pancreatic β-cells is closely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), an intractable disease affecting numerous patients. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) is a potential modulator of insulin secretion in β-cells. This study aims at revealing roles and possible mechanisms of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells. Mouse pancreatic β-cell line NIT-1 was used for high glucose treatment and PKM2 overexpression by its specific expression vector. Cell proliferation by Thiazolyl blue assay, cell apoptosis by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/prodium iodide staining and insulin secretion assay by ELISA were performed in each group. The mRNA and protein levels of related factors were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot. Results showed that Pkm2 was inhibited under high glucose conditions compared to the untreated cells (P < 0.01). Its overexpression significantly suppressed NIT-1 cell apoptosis (P < 0.01), and induced cell proliferation (P < 0.05) and insulin secretion (P < 0.05). Related factors showed consistent mRNA expression changes. Protein levels of β-catenin (CTNNB1), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 were all promoted by PKM2 overexpression (P < 0.01), indicating the activated Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling. These results indicated the inductive roles of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cell NIT-1, including promoting cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and inhibiting cell apoptosis, which might be achieved via activating the Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling and downstream factors. This study offers basic information on the role and mechanism of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells, and lays the foundation for using PKM2 as a potential therapeutic target in T2DM. PMID:26823761

  19. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 promotes proliferation and insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells via activating Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suijun; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Ying; Li, Quanzhong; Su, Yong; Wang, Yanfang; Zhang, Yun; Man, Hua; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Failure of pancreatic β-cells is closely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), an intractable disease affecting numerous patients. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) is a potential modulator of insulin secretion in β-cells. This study aims at revealing roles and possible mechanisms of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells. Mouse pancreatic β-cell line NIT-1 was used for high glucose treatment and PKM2 overexpression by its specific expression vector. Cell proliferation by Thiazolyl blue assay, cell apoptosis by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/prodium iodide staining and insulin secretion assay by ELISA were performed in each group. The mRNA and protein levels of related factors were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot. Results showed that Pkm2 was inhibited under high glucose conditions compared to the untreated cells (P < 0.01). Its overexpression significantly suppressed NIT-1 cell apoptosis (P < 0.01), and induced cell proliferation (P < 0.05) and insulin secretion (P < 0.05). Related factors showed consistent mRNA expression changes. Protein levels of β-catenin (CTNNB1), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 were all promoted by PKM2 overexpression (P < 0.01), indicating the activated Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling. These results indicated the inductive roles of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cell NIT-1, including promoting cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and inhibiting cell apoptosis, which might be achieved via activating the Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling and downstream factors. This study offers basic information on the role and mechanism of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells, and lays the foundation for using PKM2 as a potential therapeutic target in T2DM.

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Interferes with the Amplification of IFNα Secretion by Activating Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 in Primary Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, François; Coulombe, François; Gaudreault, Eric; Paquet-Bouchard, Carine; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek; Gosselin, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus is recognized to cause lymphoproliferative disorders and is also associated with cancer. Evidence suggests that monocytes are likely to be involved in EBV pathogenesis, especially due to a number of cellular functions altered in EBV-infected monocytes, a process that may affect efficient host defense. Because type I interferons (IFNs) are crucial mediators of host defense against viruses, we investigated the effect of EBV infection on the IFNα pathway in primary human monocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Infection of monocytes with EBV induced IFNα secretion but inhibited the positive feedback loop for the amplification of IFNα. We showed that EBV infection induced the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) and, to a lesser extent, SOCS1, two proteins known to interfere with the amplification of IFNα secretion mediated by the JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway. EBV infection correlated with a blockage in the activation of JAK/STAT pathway members and affected the level of phosphorylated IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7). Depletion of SOCS3, but not SOCS1, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) abrogated the inhibitory effect of EBV on JAK/STAT pathway activation and significantly restored IFNα secretion. Finally, transfection of monocytes with the viral protein Zta caused the upregulation of SOCS3, an event that could not be recapitulated with mutated Zta. Conclusions/Significance We propose that EBV protein Zta activates SOCS3 protein as an immune escape mechanism that both suppresses optimal IFNα secretion by human monocytes and favors a state of type I IFN irresponsiveness in these cells. This immunomodulatory effect is important to better understand the aspects of the immune response to EBV. PMID:20689596

  1. Secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from PC12 cells in response to oxidative stress requires autocrine dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Yuan, Guoxiang; Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Boswell, Mark; Katz, David M

    2006-02-01

    Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is sensitive to changes in oxygen availability, suggesting that BDNF may be involved in adaptive responses to oxidative stress. However, it is unknown whether or not oxidative stress actually increases availability of BDNF by stimulating BDNF secretion. To approach this issue we examined BDNF release from PC12 cells, a well-established model of neurosecretion, in response to hypoxic stimuli. BDNF secretion from neuronally differentiated PC12 cells was strongly stimulated by exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH). This response was inhibited by N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a potent scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mimicked by exogenous ROS. IH-induced BDNF release requires activation of tetrodotoxin sensitive Na+ channels and Ca2+ influx through N- and L-type channels, as well as mobilization of internal Ca2+ stores. These results demonstrate that oxidative stress can stimulate BDNF release and that underlying mechanisms are similar to those previously described for activity-dependent BDNF secretion from neurons. Surprisingly, we also found that IH-induced secretion of BDNF was blocked by dopamine D2 receptor antagonists or by inhibition of dopamine synthesis with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. These data indicate that oxidative stress can stimulate BDNF release through an autocrine or paracrine loop that requires dopamine receptor activation.

  2. Receptor dimerization is not a factor in the signalling activity of a transforming variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII).

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C T; Everiss, K D; Wikstrand, C J; Batra, S K; Kung, H J; Bigner, D D

    1997-01-01

    The type-III deletion variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) is frequently found in glioblastomas and other malignant human tumours. Although EGFRvIII confers ligand-independent oncogenic transformation of cell lines, the mechanism by which it promotes aberrant cellular proliferation is unknown. Using cell lines expressing comparable numbers of either wild-type receptor (EGFRwt) or EGFRvIII, we compared several parameters of receptor activation: dimerization, tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of intracellular signalling proteins. Like activated EGFRwt, EGFRvIII was phosphorylated and bound constitutively to the Shc adapter protein. Indeed, EGFRvIII-associated Shc had a higher phosphotyrosine content than Shc associated with stimulated EGFRwt. EGFRwt dimerized in response to either EGF or transforming growth factor alpha. Higher cross-linker concentrations and incubation at higher temperatures (37 degrees C) allowed detection of EGFRwt dimers even in the absence of exogenous ligand. In contrast, EGFRvIII failed to dimerize under any conditions studied. Moreover, neither mitogen-activated protein kinase nor phospholipase Cgamma were phosphorylated in EGFRvIII-expressing cells. We conclude that the deletion of 267 amino acids from the 621-amino-acid N-terminal domain of EGFR does not result simply in a constitutively activated receptor, but alters the spectrum of signalling cascades utilized. Furthermore the ligand-independent transforming activity of EGFRvIII is independent of receptor dimerization. PMID:9210410

  3. Hypercapnia modulates cAMP signalling and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator‐dependent anion and fluid secretion in airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Mark J.; Saint‐Criq, Vinciane; Patel, Waseema; Ibrahim, Salam H.; Verdon, Bernard; Ward, Christopher; Garnett, James P.; Tarran, Robert; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Key points Raised arterial blood CO2 (hypercapnia) is a feature of many lung diseases.CO2 has been shown to act as a cell signalling molecule in human cells, notably by influencing the levels of cell signalling second messengers: cAMP and Ca2+.Hypercapnia reduced cAMP‐stimulated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator‐dependent anion and fluid transport in Calu‐3 cells and primary human airway epithelia but did not affect cAMP‐regulated HCO3 − transport via pendrin or Na+/HCO3 − cotransporters.These results further support the role of CO2 as a cell signalling molecule and suggests CO2‐induced reductions in airway anion and fluid transport may impair innate defence mechanisms of the lungs. Abstract Hypercapnia is clinically defined as an arterial blood partial pressure of CO2 of above 40 mmHg and is a feature of chronic lung disease. In previous studies we have demonstrated that hypercapnia modulates agonist‐stimulated cAMP levels through effects on transmembrane adenylyl cyclase activity. In the airways, cAMP is known to regulate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)‐mediated anion and fluid secretion, which contributes to airway surface liquid homeostasis. The aim of the current work was to investigate if hypercapnia could modulate cAMP‐regulated ion and fluid transport in human airway epithelial cells. We found that acute exposure to hypercapnia significantly reduced forskolin‐stimulated elevations in intracellular cAMP as well as both adenosine‐ and forskolin‐stimulated increases in CFTR‐dependent transepithelial short‐circuit current, in polarised cultures of Calu‐3 human airway cells. This CO2‐induced reduction in anion secretion was not due to a decrease in HCO3 − transport given that neither a change in CFTR‐dependent HCO3 − efflux nor Na+/HCO3 − cotransporter‐dependent HCO3 − influx were CO2‐sensitive. Hypercapnia also reduced the volume of forskolin‐stimulated fluid

  4. Neuronal merlin influences ERBB2 receptor expression on Schwann cells through neuregulin 1 type III signalling

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Alexander; Kyselyova, Anna; Baader, Stephan L.; Jung, Marie Juliane; Zoch, Ansgar; Mautner, Victor-Felix

    2014-01-01

    Axonal surface proteins encompass a group of heterogeneous molecules, which exert a variety of different functions in the highly interdependent relationship between axons and Schwann cells. We recently revealed that the tumour suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumour syndrome neurofibromatosis type 2, impacts significantly on axon structure maintenance in the peripheral nervous system. We now report on a role of neuronal merlin in the regulation of the axonal surface protein neuregulin 1 important for modulating Schwann cell differentiation and myelination. Specifically, neuregulin 1 type III expression is reduced in sciatic nerve tissue of neuron-specific knockout animals as well as in biopsies from seven patients with neurofibromatosis type 2. In vitro experiments performed on both the P19 neuronal cell line and primary dorsal root ganglion cells demonstrate the influence of merlin on neuregulin 1 type III expression. Moreover, expression of ERBB2, a Schwann cell receptor for neuregulin 1 ligands is increased in nerve tissue of both neuron-specific merlin knockout animals and patients with neurofibromatosis type 2, demonstrating for the first time that axonal merlin indirectly regulates Schwann cell behaviour. Collectively, we have identified that neuronally expressed merlin can influence Schwann cell activity in a cell-extrinsic manner. PMID:24309211

  5. Programmable ion-sensitive transistor interfaces. III. Design considerations, signal generation, and sensitivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayant, Krishna; Auluck, Kshitij; Rodriguez, Sergio; Cao, Yingqiu; Kan, Edwin C.

    2014-05-01

    We report on factors that affect DNA hybridization detection using ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Signal generation at the interface between the transistor and immobilized biomolecules is widely ascribed to unscreened molecular charges causing a shift in surface potential and hence the transistor output current. Traditionally, the interaction between DNA and the dielectric or metal sensing interface is modeled by treating the molecular layer as a sheet charge and the ionic profile with a Poisson-Boltzmann distribution. The surface potential under this scenario is described by the Graham equation. This approximation, however, often fails to explain large hybridization signals on the order of tens of mV. More realistic descriptions of the DNA-transistor interface which include factors such as ion permeation, exclusion, and packing constraints have been proposed with little or no corroboration against experimental findings. In this study, we examine such physical models by their assumptions, range of validity, and limitations. We compare simulations against experiments performed on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor capacitors and foundry-ready floating-gate ISFETs. We find that with weakly charged interfaces (i.e., low intrinsic interface charge), pertinent to the surfaces used in this study, the best agreement between theory and experiment exists when ions are completely excluded from the DNA layer. The influence of various factors such as bulk pH, background salinity, chemical reactivity of surface groups, target molecule concentration, and surface coatings on signal generation is studied. Furthermore, in order to overcome Debye screening limited detection, we suggest two signal enhancement strategies. We first describe frequency domain biosensing, highlighting the ability to sort short DNA strands based on molecular length, and then describe DNA biosensing in multielectrolytes comprising trace amounts of higher-valency salt in a background of

  6. Evidence of the receptor-mediated influence of melatonin on pancreatic glucagon secretion via the Gαq protein-coupled and PI3K signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bähr, Ina; Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Albrecht, Elke; Peschke, Elmar

    2012-11-01

    Melatonin has been shown to modulate glucose metabolism by influencing insulin secretion. Recent investigations have also indicated a regulatory function of melatonin on the pancreatic α-cells. The present in vitro and in vivo studies evaluated whether melatonin mediates its effects via melatonin receptors and which signaling cascade is involved. Incubation experiments using the glucagon-producing mouse pancreatic α-cell line αTC1 clone 9 (αTC1.9) as well as isolated pancreatic islets of rats and mice revealed that melatonin increases glucagon secretion. Preincubation of αTC1.9 cells with the melatonin receptor antagonists luzindole and 4P-PDOT abolished the glucagon-stimulatory effect of melatonin. In addition, glucagon secretion was lower in the pancreatic islets of melatonin receptor knockout mice than in the islets of the wild-type (WT) control animals. Investigations of melatonin receptor knockout mice revealed decreased plasma glucagon concentrations and elevated mRNA expression levels of the hepatic glucagon receptor when compared to WT mice. Furthermore, studies using pertussis toxin, as well as measurements of cAMP concentrations, ruled out the involvement of Gαi- and Gαs-coupled signaling cascades in mediating the glucagon increase induced by melatonin. In contrast, inhibition of phospholipase C in αTC1.9 cells prevented the melatonin-induced effect, indicating the physiological relevance of the Gαq-coupled pathway. Our data point to the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling cascade in mediating melatonin effects in pancreatic α-cells. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that the glucagon-stimulatory effect of melatonin in pancreatic α-cells is melatonin receptor mediated, thus supporting the concept of melatonin-modulated and diurnal glucagon release.

  7. PDGF-driven proliferation, migration, and IL8 chemokine secretion in human corneal fibroblasts involve JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay; Thakkar, Mahesh; Sinha, Sunilima; Mohan, Rajiv R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is associated with corneal fibroblast migration and proliferation and plays an important role in corneal wound healing. However, the intracellular mechanisms of PDGF-mediated functions in corneal fibroblasts are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that PDGF functional activities in the cornea involve the Janus kinase-2/signal transducers and activators of transcription-3 (JAK2-STAT3) signaling pathway and whether PDGF induces the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), belonging to the novel family of feedback regulators of cytokine and growth factor activities. Methods Human corneal fibroblast (HSF) cultures were used as an in vitro model for functional analysis. Real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to quantify gene expression. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting techniques were used to measure protein expression. Cell growth, migration, and ELISA assays were used for functional validation. Results Low endogenous levels of STAT3 and SOCS3 mRNA and protein expression were noted in HSFs. PDGF treatment of HSF significantly induced SOCS3 mRNA (3.0–4.5 fold) and protein (1.5–2.5 fold) expression in a time-dependent manner. Similarly, PDGF treatment of HSF significantly increased STAT3 protein expression at two tested time points (2.5–2.96 fold). Cultures exposed to vehicle (control) did not show any change in SOCS3 and STAT3 mRNA or protein expression. An addition of AG-490, a selective inhibitor of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway, significantly inhibited PDGF-mediated STAT3 induction and cell growth and migration in HSF. We also observed that PDGF induced interleukin-8 (IL8) chemokine secretion (2 fold) and AG-490 inhibited IL8 secretion. Conclusions Our data showed that PDGF induced STAT3, SOCS3, and IL8 chemokine secretion in human corneal fibroblasts. Further, PDGF-induced cell growth, migration, and IL8 secretion in corneal fibroblast involve the JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway

  8. A label-free signal amplification assay for DNA detection based on exonuclease III and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Aihua; Luo, Ming; Xiang, Dongshan; Xiang, Xia; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2013-09-30

    We have developed a new fluorescence method for specific single-stranded DNA sequences with exonuclease III (Exo III) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I. It is demonstrated by a reverse transcription oligonucleotide sequence (target DNA, 27 bases) of RNA fragment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a model system. In the absence of the target DNA, the hairpin-probe is in the stem-closed structure, the fluorescence of SYBR Green I is very strong. In the presence of the target DNA, the hairpin-probe hybridizes with the target DNA to form double-stranded structure with a blunt 3'-terminus. Thus, in the presence of Exo III, only the 3'-terminus of probe is subjected to digestion. Exo III catalyzes the stepwise removal of mononucleotides from this terminus, releasing the target DNA. The released target DNA then hybridizes with another probe, whence the cycle starts anew. The signal of SYBR Green I decreases greatly. This system provides a detection limit of 160 pM, which is comparable to the existing signal amplification methods that utilized Exo III as a signal amplification nuclease. Due to the unique property of Exo III, this method shows excellent detection selectivity for single-base discrimination. More importantly, superiors to other methods based on Exo III, these probes have the advantages of easier to design, synthesize, purify and thus are much cheaper and more applicable. This new approach could be widely applied to sensitive and selective nucleic acids detection.

  9. In vitro and in vivo study of effects of fermented soybean product (chungkookjang) on NGF secretion ability and NGF receptor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Ju; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kwak, Moon-Hwa; Go, Jun; Son, Hong-Joo; Kim, Dong-Seob

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of a fermented soybean product (Chungkookjang, CKJ) on nerve growth factor (NGF) metabolism, NGF secretion ability and its related signaling pathway were analyzed in B35 neuronal cells and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In B35 cells, the concentration of NGF significantly increased upon treatment with Taegwang (TG)-CKJ and Shinhwa (SH)-CKJ extracts compared with vehicle. Further, a significant increase in PC12 cell length as well as the phsophorylation levels of TrkA and Akt, which are members of a high affinity NGF receptor signaling pathway, were observed after treatment with TG-CKJ and SH-CKJ conditional medium (CM). On the other hand, there was no difference in activation of the NGF receptor p75NTR signaling pathway between vehicle and all CKJ treated groups. In Tg2576 mice showing early stage of AD, the concentrations of NGF in the serum and brain were reduced compared with those in Non-Tg mice. Treatment of Tg2576 mice with SH-CKJ, which contains high concentrations of total flavonoids and phenolic compounds, for 8 weeks dramatically recovered the NGF level to that of Non-Tg mice. Furthermore, the low phosphorylation levels of TrkA and Erk in the NGF receptor TrkA signaling pathway were rapidly recovered to those of Non-Tg mice after SH-CKJ treatment in vehicle treated Tg2576 mice, whereas the phosphorylation level of Akt was maintained at a constant level. These results suggest that CKJ may stimulate NGF secretion ability as well as the NGF receptor TrkA signaling pathway in PC12 cells and Tg2576 mice. PMID:23825484

  10. CD45-mediated signaling pathway is involved in Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL)-induced proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion in human PBMC

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Radha; Eligar, Sachin M.; Kumar, Natesh; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Inamdar, Shashikala R.; Swamy, Bale M.; Shastry, Padma

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL, a potent mitogenic and complex N-glycan specific lectin binds to CD45 on PBMC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL triggers CD45-mediated signaling involved in activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of CD45 PTPase signaling blocks RBL-induced ZAP70 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL-CD45 mediated signaling is crucial for RBL-induced immunodulatory activities. -- Abstract: We earlier reported the mitogenic and immunostimulatory activities of Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), purified from phytopathogenic fungus R. bataticola in human PBMC. The lectin demonstrates specificity towards glycoproteins containing complex N-glycans. Since CD45-protein tyrosine phosphatase that abundantly expresses N-glycans is important in T-cell signaling, the study aimed to investigate the involvement of CD45 in the immunomodulatory activities of RBL. Flowcytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that RBL exhibited binding to PBMC and colocalized with CD45. The binding was comparable in cells expressing different CD45 isoforms-RA, -RB and -RO. CD45 blocking antibody reduced the binding and proliferation of PBMC induced by RBL. CD45-PTPase inhibitor dephostatin inhibited RBL-induced proliferation, expression of CD25 and pZAP-70. RBL-induced secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines were significantly inhibited in presence of dephostatin. Also, dephostatin blocked phosphorylation of p38MAPK and STAT-5 that was crucial for the biological functions of RBL. The study demonstrates the involvement of CD45-mediated signaling in RBL-induced PBMC proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5.

  11. The CELF1 RNA-Binding Protein Regulates Decay of Signal Recognition Particle mRNAs and Limits Secretion in Mouse Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Joseph; Lee, Jerome E.; López, Carolina M.; Anderson, John; Nguyen, Thuy-mi P.; Heck, Adam M.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    We previously identified several mRNAs encoding components of the secretory pathway, including signal recognition particle (SRP) subunit mRNAs, among transcripts associated with the RNA-binding protein CELF1. Through immunoprecipitation of RNAs crosslinked to CELF1 in myoblasts and in vitro binding assays using recombinant CELF1, we now provide evidence that CELF1 directly binds the mRNAs encoding each of the subunits of the SRP. Furthermore, we determined the half-lives of the Srp transcripts in control and CELF1 knockdown myoblasts. Our results indicate CELF1 is a destabilizer of at least five of the six Srp transcripts and that the relative abundance of the SRP proteins is out of balance when CELF1 is depleted. CELF1 knockdown myoblasts exhibit altered secretion of a luciferase reporter protein and are impaired in their ability to migrate and close a wound, consistent with a defect in the secreted extracellular matrix. Importantly, similar defects in wound healing are observed when SRP subunit imbalance is induced by over-expression of SRP68. Our studies support the existence of an RNA regulon containing Srp mRNAs that is controlled by CELF1. One implication is that altered function of CELF1 in myotonic dystrophy may contribute to changes in the extracellular matrix of affected muscle through defects in secretion. PMID:28129347

  12. The outer-membrane export signal of Porphyromonas gingivalis type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a conserved C-terminal β-sandwich domain

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Iñaki; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Koneru, Lahari; Golik, Przemyslaw; Szmigielski, Borys; Nowak, Magdalena; Nowakowska, Zuzanna; Potempa, Barbara; Houston, John A.; Enghild, Jan J.; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Gao, Jinlong; Kwan, Ann H.; Trewhella, Jill; Dubin, Grzegorz; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the recently characterized Type IX Secretion System (T9SS), the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) in secreted proteins functions as an outer membrane translocation signal for export of virulence factors to the cell surface in the Gram-negative Bacteroidetes phylum. In the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, the CTD is cleaved off by PorU sortase in a sequence-independent manner, and anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) is attached to many translocated proteins, thus anchoring them to the bacterial surface. Here, we solved the atomic structure of the CTD of gingipain B (RgpB) from P. gingivalis, alone and together with a preceding immunoglobulin-superfamily domain (IgSF). The CTD was found to possess a typical Ig-like fold encompassing seven antiparallel β-strands organized in two β-sheets, packed into a β-sandwich structure that can spontaneously dimerise through C-terminal strand swapping. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed no fixed orientation of the CTD with respect to the IgSF. By introducing insertion or substitution of residues within the inter-domain linker in the native protein, we were able to show that despite the region being unstructured, it nevertheless is resistant to general proteolysis. These data suggest structural motifs located in the two adjacent Ig-like domains dictate the processing of CTDs by the T9SS secretion pathway. PMID:27005013

  13. BMP2 signals loss of epithelial character in epicardial cells but requires the Type III TGFβ receptor to promote invasion.

    PubMed

    Hill, Cynthia R; Sanchez, Nora S; Love, Joseph D; Arrieta, Julian A; Hong, Charles C; Brown, Christopher B; Austin, Anita F; Barnett, Joey V

    2012-05-01

    Coronary vessel development depends on a subpopulation of epicardial cells that undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT) and invade the subepicardial space and myocardium. These cells form the smooth muscle of the vessels and fibroblasts, but the mechanisms that regulate these processes are poorly understood. Mice lacking the Type III Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor (TGFβR3) die by E14.5 due to failed coronary vessel development accompanied by reduced epicardial cell invasion. BMP2 signals via TGFβR3 emphasizing the importance of determining the relative contributions of the canonical BMP signaling pathway and TGFβR3-dependent signaling to BMP2 responsiveness. Here we examined the role of TGFβR3 in BMP2 signaling in epicardial cells. Whereas TGFβ induced loss of epithelial character and smooth muscle differentiation, BMP2 induced an ALK3-dependent loss of epithelial character and modestly inhibited TGFβ-stimulated differentiation. Tgfbr3(-/-) cells respond to BMP2 indicating that TGFβR3 is not required. However, Tgfbr3(-/-) cells show decreased invasion in response to BMP2 and overexpression of TGFβR3 in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells rescued invasion. Invasion was dependent on ALK5, ALK2, ALK3, and Smad4. Expression of TGFβR3 lacking the 3 C-terminal amino acids required to interact with the scaffolding protein GIPC (GAIP-interacting protein, C terminus) did not rescue. Knockdown of GIPC in Tgfbr3(+/+) or Tgfbr3(-/-) cells rescued with TGFβR3 decreased BMP2-stimulated invasion confirming a requirement for TGFβR3/GIPC interaction. Our results reveal the relative roles of TGFβR3-dependent and TGFβR3-independent signaling in the actions of BMP2 on epicardial cell behavior and demonstrate the critical role of TGFβR3 in mediating BMP2-stimulated invasion.

  14. The type III effector EspF coordinates membrane trafficking by the spatiotemporal activation of two eukaryotic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Alto, Neal M.; Weflen, Andrew W.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Yarar, Defne; Lazar, Cheri S.; Tonikian, Raffi; Koller, Antonius; Taylor, Susan S.; Boone, Charles; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Schmid, Sandra L.; Hecht, Gail A.; Dixon, Jack E.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins and effector proteins hijack eukaryotic enzymes that are spatially localized and display rapid signaling kinetics. However, the molecular mechanisms by which virulence factors engage highly dynamic substrates in the host cell environment are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) type III effector protein EspF nucleates a multiprotein signaling complex composed of eukaryotic sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) and neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP). We demonstrate that a specific and high affinity association between EspF and SNX9 induces membrane remodeling in host cells. These membrane-remodeling events are directly coupled to N-WASP/Arp2/3–mediated actin nucleation. In addition to providing a biochemical mechanism of EspF function, we find that EspF dynamically localizes to membrane-trafficking organelles in a spatiotemporal pattern that correlates with SNX9 and N-WASP activity in living cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the EspF-dependent assembly of SNX9 and N-WASP represents a novel form of signaling mimicry used to promote EPEC pathogenesis and gastrointestinal disease. PMID:17893247

  15. Apocrine secretion--fact or artifact?

    PubMed

    Aumüller, G; Wilhelm, B; Seitz, J

    1999-09-01

    In this review, the history of apocrine secretion and the essential categories are briefly mentioned and fused into a more generally applicable terminology. Using the coagulating gland of the male rat as a model, the mechanisms of apocrine secretion, the participation of the cytoskeleton in the formation of the apocrine blebs ("aposomes") and the structure of the secretory proteins, as well as the hormonal regulation of their biosynthesis are described. Apocrine secreted proteins share the following peculiarities: (i) Their biosynthesis and post-translational modification (including an unusual form of glycosylation) take place in the cytoplasm. (ii) Intracellular transport proceeds without participation of the endomembrane system, the Golgi apparatus and secretion granules. (iii) Blood serum derived transsudated albumin entering the secretory cells functions as a carrier of the apocrine-released proteins. Some common molecular features are specific for the apocrine-synthesized proteins studied so far by our group: (a) Their primary sequence is synthesized without a signal peptide. (b) Their N-terminus is blocked by acetylation. (c) The substituting glycanes are neither O- nor N-linked. (d) At least one of the apocrine-synthesized proteins (secretory transglutaminase) contains a glycerol-phosphoinositol (GPI-) anchor. There are a number of still open questions in apocrine secretion, pertaining to (I) the intracellular transport and targeting of the proteins, (II) the coordination of simultaneously occurring apocrine and merocrine secretion in several of the apocrine glands, (III) the biosynthesis of the apical membrane proteins surrounding the aposomes and (IV) the repair mechanisms of the apical cell pole following the release of the aposomes. In conclusion, apocrine release is not an artifact but rather an alternative extrusion mechanism of soluble and membrane-associated proteins, usually linked with sex- or reproductive-related glands, such as the prostate, the

  16. B-cell surface antigen B7 provides a costimulatory signal that induces T cells to proliferate and secrete interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Gimmi, C D; Freeman, G J; Gribben, J G; Sugita, K; Freedman, A S; Morimoto, C; Nadler, L M

    1991-01-01

    Occupancy of the T-cell receptor complex does not appear to be a sufficient stimulus to induce a T-cell-mediated immune response. Increasing evidence suggests that cognate cell-cell interaction between an activated T cell and an antigen-presenting cell may provide such a stimulus. A candidate T-cell surface molecule for this costimulatory signal is the T-cell-restricted CD28 antigen. Following crosslinking with anti-CD28 mAb, suboptimally stimulated CD28+ T cells show increased proliferation and markedly increased secretion of a subset of lymphokines. Recently, the B-cell surface activation antigen B7 was shown to be a natural ligand for the CD28 molecule, and both B7 and CD28 are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Here we report that B7-transfected CHO cells can induce suboptimally activated CD28+ T cells to proliferate and secrete high levels of interleukin 2. The response is identical whether T cells are submitogenically stimulated with either phorbol myristate acetate or anti-CD3 to activate the T cells. This response is specific and can be totally abrogated with anti-B7 monoclonal antibody. As has previously been observed for anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody, B7 ligation induced secretion of interleukin 2 but not interleukin 4. We have previously demonstrated that B7 expression is restricted to activated B lymphocytes and interferon gamma-activated monocytes. Since these two cellular populations are involved in antigen presentation as well as cognate interaction with T lymphocytes, B7 is likely to represent a central constimulatory signal that is capable of amplifying an immune response. PMID:1650475

  17. Mandibular gland secretions of meliponine worker bees: further evidence for their role in interspecific and intraspecific defence and aggression and against their role in food source signalling.

    PubMed

    Schorkopf, Dirk Louis P; Hrncir, Michael; Mateus, Sidnei; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Schmidt, Veronika M; Barth, Friedrich G

    2009-04-01

    Like ants and termites some species of stingless bees (Meliponini), which are very important pollinators in the tropics, use pheromone trails to communicate the location of a food source. We present data on the communicative role of mandibular gland secretions of Meliponini that resolve a recent controversy about their importance in the laying of such trails. Volatile constituents of the mandibular glands have been erroneously thought both to elicit aggressive/defensive behaviour and to signal food source location. We studied Trigona spinipes and Scaptotrigona aff. depilis ('postica'), two sympatric species to which this hypothesis was applied. Using extracts of carefully dissected glands instead of crude cephalic extracts we analysed the substances contained in the mandibular glands of worker bees. Major components of the extracts were 2-heptanol (both species), nonanal (T. spinipes), benzaldehyde and 2-tridecanone (S. aff. depilis). The effect of mandibular gland extracts and of individual components thereof on the behaviour of worker bees near their nest and at highly profitable food sources was consistent. Independent of the amount of mandibular gland extract applied, the bees overwhelmingly reacted with defensive behaviour and were never attracted to feeders scented with mandibular gland extract or any of the synthetic chemicals tested. Both bee species are capable of using mandibular gland secretions for intra- and interspecific communication of defence and aggression and share 2-heptanol as a major pheromone compound. While confirming the role of the mandibular glands in nest defence, our experiments provide strong evidence against their role in food source signalling.

  18. DACH1, a zona glomerulosa selective gene in the human adrenal, activates transforming growth factor-β signaling and suppresses aldosterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhua; Shaikh, Lalarukh Haris; Neogi, Sudeshna G; McFarlane, Ian; Zhao, Wanfeng; Figg, Nichola; Brighton, Cheryl A; Maniero, Carmela; Teo, Ada E D; Azizan, Elena A B; Brown, Morris J

    2015-05-01

    Common somatic mutations in CACNAID and ATP1A1 may define a subgroup of smaller, zona glomerulosa (ZG)-like aldosterone-producing adenomas. We have therefore sought signature ZG genes, which may provide insight into the frequency and pathogenesis of ZG-like aldosterone-producing adenomas. Twenty-one pairs of zona fasciculata and ZG and 14 paired aldosterone-producing adenomas from 14 patients with Conn's syndrome and 7 patients with pheochromocytoma were assayed by the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array. Validation by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed on genes >10-fold upregulated in ZG (compared with zona fasciculata) and >10-fold upregulated in aldosterone-producing adenomas (compared with ZG). DACH1, a gene associated with tumor progression, was further analyzed. The role of DACH1 on steroidogenesis, transforming growth factor-β, and Wnt signaling activity was assessed in the human adrenocortical cell line, H295R. Immunohistochemistry confirmed selective expression of DACH1 in human ZG. Silencing of DACH1 in H295R cells increased CYP11B2 mRNA levels and aldosterone production, whereas overexpression of DACH1 decreased aldosterone production. Overexpression of DACH1 in H295R cells activated the transforming growth factor-β and canonical Wnt signaling pathways but inhibited the noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway. Stimulation of primary human adrenal cells with angiotensin II decreased DACH1 mRNA expression. Interestingly, there was little overlap between our top ZG genes and those in rodent ZG. In conclusion, (1) the transcriptome profile of human ZG differs from rodent ZG, (2) DACH1 inhibits aldosterone secretion in human adrenals, and (3) transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway is activated in DACH1 overexpressed cells and may mediate inhibition of aldosterone secretion in human adrenals.

  19. PI3K regulates endocytosis after insulin secretion by mediating signaling crosstalk between Arf6 and Rab27a.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ando, Tomomi; Terabayashi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhiro; Takei, Masahiro; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Matsunaga, Kohichi; Ishizaki, Ray; Izumi, Tetsuro; Niki, Ichiro; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2016-02-01

    In secretory cells, endocytosis is coupled to exocytosis to enable proper secretion. Although endocytosis is crucial to maintain cellular homeostasis before and after secretion, knowledge about secretagogue-induced endocytosis in secretory cells is still limited. Here, we searched for proteins that interacted with the Rab27a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) EPI64 (also known as TBC1D10A) and identified the Arf6 guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) ARNO (also known as CYTH2) in pancreatic β-cells. We found that the insulin secretagogue glucose promotes phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) generation through phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), thereby recruiting ARNO to the intracellular side of the plasma membrane. Peripheral ARNO promotes clathrin assembly through its GEF activity for Arf6 and regulates the early stage of endocytosis. We also found that peripheral ARNO recruits EPI64 to the same area and that the interaction requires glucose-induced endocytosis in pancreatic β-cells. Given that GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate exocytosis and the late stage of endocytosis, our results indicate that the glucose-induced activation of PI3K plays a pivotal role in exocytosis-endocytosis coupling, and that ARNO and EPI64 regulate endocytosis at distinct stages.

  20. TSG-6 secreted by human umbilical cord-MSCs attenuates severe burn-induced excessive inflammation via inhibiting activations of P38 and JNK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingying; Song, Huifeng; Duan, Hongjie; Chai, Jiake; Yang, Jing; Li, Xiao; Yu, Yonghui; Zhang, Xulong; Hu, Xiaohong; Xiao, Mengjing; Feng, Rui; Yin, Huinan; Hu, Quan; Yang, Longlong; Du, Jundong; Li, Tianran

    2016-01-01

    The hMSCs have become a promising approach for inflammation treatment in acute phase. Our previous study has demonstrated that human umbilical cord-MSCs could alleviate the inflammatory reaction of severely burned wound. In this study, we further investigated the potential role and mechanism of the MSCs on severe burn-induced excessive inflammation. Wistar rats were randomly divided into following groups: Sham, Burn, Burn+MSCs, Burn+MAPKs inhibitors, and Burn, Burn+MSCs, Burn+Vehicle, Burn+siTSG-6, Burn+rhTSG-6 in the both experiments. It was found that MSCs could only down-regulate P38 and JNK signaling, but had no effect on ERK in peritoneal macrophages of severe burn rats. Furthermore, suppression of P38 and JNK activations significantly reduced the excessive inflammation induced by severe burn. TSG-6 was secreted by MSCs using different inflammatory mediators. TSG-6 from MSCs and recombinant human (rh)TSG-6 all significantly reduced activations of P38 and JNK signaling induced by severe burn and then attenuated excessive inflammations. On the contrary, knockdown TSG-6 in the cells significantly increased phosphorylation of P38 and JNK signaling and reduced therapeutic effect of the MSCs on excessive inflammation. Taken together, this study suggested TSG-6 from MSCs attenuated severe burn-induced excessive inflammation via inhibiting activation of P38 and JNK signaling. PMID:27444207

  1. Targeting the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway in the Retina With a Gene-Delivered Secretable and Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ildefonso, Cristhian J.; Jaime, Henrique; Brown, Emily E.; Iwata, Ryo L.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Massengill, Michael T.; Biswal, Manas R.; Boye, Shannon E.; Hauswirth, William W.; Ash, John D.; Li, Qiuhong; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress has been linked to several ocular diseases, initiating an inflammatory response that increases tissue injury. The Nrf2 transcription factor regulates expression of antioxidant genes and is tightly regulated by Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1 (Keap-1). We evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector delivering an Nrf2-derived peptide that binds Keap-1. Methods The sequence of the Nrf2 peptide was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (Tat-peptide) sequence (TatNrf2mer). The effects of lentiviral-delivered TatNrf2mer were studied in vitro. Transcript (quantitative [q] RT-PCR) and protein levels (ELISA and immunofluorescence) were quantified. Cell viability was measured by MTT and Cell Titer assays. The AAV vectors were packaged with the TatNrf2mer fused to secretable green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the small chicken β actin promoter. The protective effects of this vector were evaluated in a model of RPE oxidative injury and in a mouse model of uveitis after intravitreal injection. Results Expression of TatNrf2mer peptide induced antioxidant gene expression, blocked IL-1β secretion, and protected cells from oxidative injury. In mice, TatNrf2mer expression partially protected photoreceptor function based on ERG responses and optical coherence tomography measurements in the sodium iodate (NaIO3) model. Furthermore, sGFP-TatNrf2mer expression decreased IL-1β and IL-6 in the NaIO3-treated mice, and resulted in a 54% decrease in the number of inflammatory cells in the vitreous body of the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model. Conclusions The intravitreally delivered AAV-TatNrf2mer has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in widely-used models of ocular injury, suggesting it also could be useful in ocular diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammasome activation. PMID:26842755

  2. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  3. NopB, a type III secreted protein of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, is associated with pilus-like surface appendages.

    PubMed

    Saad, Maged M; Kobayashi, Hajime; Marie, Corinne; Brown, Ian R; Mansfield, John W; Broughton, William J; Deakin, William J

    2005-02-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 possesses a functional type three secretion system (TTSS), through which a number of proteins, called nodulation outer proteins (Nops), are delivered to the outside of the cell. A major constraint to the identification of Nops is their low abundance in the supernatants of NGR234 strains grown in culture. To overcome this limitation, a more sensitive proteomics-based strategy was developed. Secreted proteins from wild-type NGR234 were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and the gel was compared to similar gels containing the proteins from a TTSS mutant (NGROmegarhcN). To identify the proteins, spots unique to the NGR234 gels were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and the data were compared to the sequence of the symbiotic plasmid of NGR234. A nonpolar mutant of one of these proteins was generated called NopB. NopB is required for Nop secretion but inhibits the interaction with Pachyrhizus tuberosus and augments nodulation of Tephrosia vogelii. Flavonoids and a functional TTSS are required for the formation of some surface appendages on NGR234. In situ immunogold labeling and isolation of these pili showed that they contain NopB.

  4. Linoleic acid and stearic acid elicit opposite effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent signaling pathways in immortalized hypothalamic N38 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songbo; Xiang, Nana; Yang, Liusong; Zhu, Canjun; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of food intake is a promising way to combat obesity. It has been implicated that various fatty acids exert different effects on food intake and body weight. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) on agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression and secretion in immortalized mouse hypothalamic N38 cells and to explore the likely underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that LA inhibited, while SA stimulated AgRP expression and secretion of N38 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LA suppressed the protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylation levels of JNK and IKKα/β, suggesting the inhibition of TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway. However, the above mentioned inhibitory effects of LA were eliminated by TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, SA promoted TLR4 protein expression and activated TLR4-dependent inflammation pathway, with elevated ratio of p-JNK/JNK. While TLR4 siRNA reversed the stimulatory effects of SA on AgRP expression and TLR4-dependent inflammation. Moreover, we found that TLR4 was also involved in LA-enhanced and SA-impaired leptin/insulin signal pathways in N38 cells. In conclusion, our findings indicated that LA elicited inhibitory while SA exerted stimulatory effects on AgRP expression and secretion via TLR4-dependent inflammation and leptin/insulin pathways in N38 cells. These data provided a better understanding of the mechanism underlying fatty acids-regulated food intake and suggested the potential role of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids such as LA in reducing food intake and treating obesity.

  5. The MDM2–p53–pyruvate carboxylase signalling axis couples mitochondrial metabolism to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomu; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Liu, Zhuohao; Yang, Jin-Kui; Wang, Baile; Jiang, Xue; Zhou, Yawen; Hallenborg, Philip; Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Lam, Karen S. L.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Gao, Xin; Xu, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is pivotal for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic β-cells. However, little is known about the molecular machinery that controls the homeostasis of intermediary metabolites in mitochondria. Here we show that the activation of p53 in β-cells, by genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of its negative regulator MDM2, impairs GSIS, leading to glucose intolerance in mice. Mechanistically, p53 activation represses the expression of the mitochondrial enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC), resulting in diminished production of the TCA cycle intermediates oxaloacetate and NADPH, and impaired oxygen consumption. The defective GSIS and mitochondrial metabolism in MDM2-null islets can be rescued by restoring PC expression. Under diabetogenic conditions, MDM2 and p53 are upregulated, whereas PC is reduced in mouse β-cells. Pharmacological inhibition of p53 alleviates defective GSIS in diabetic islets by restoring PC expression. Thus, the MDM2–p53–PC signalling axis links mitochondrial metabolism to insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis, and could represent a therapeutic target in diabetes. PMID:27265727

  6. Glioma Stem Cells but Not Bulk Glioma Cells Upregulate IL-6 Secretion in Microglia/Brain Macrophages via Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Hu, Feng; Derkow, Katja; Haage, Verena; Euskirchen, Philipp; Harms, Christoph; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral macrophages and resident microglia constitute the dominant glioma-infiltrating cells. The tumor induces an immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive phenotype in these glioma-associated microglia/brain macrophages (GAMs). A subpopulation of glioma cells acts as glioma stem cells (GSCs). We explored the interaction between GSCs and GAMs. Using CD133 as a marker of stemness, we enriched for or deprived the mouse glioma cell line GL261 of GSCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Over the same period of time, 100 CD133(+ )GSCs had the capacity to form a tumor of comparable size to the ones formed by 10,000 CD133(-) GL261 cells. In IL-6(-/-) mice, only tumors formed by CD133(+ )cells were smaller compared with wild type. After stimulation of primary cultured microglia with medium from CD133-enriched GL261 glioma cells, we observed an selective upregulation in microglial IL-6 secretion dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Our results show that GSCs, but not the bulk glioma cells, initiate microglial IL-6 secretion via TLR4 signaling and that IL-6 regulates glioma growth by supporting GSCs. Using human glioma tissue, we could confirm the finding that GAMs are the major source of IL-6 in the tumor context.

  7. The Hierarchical Process of Differentiation of Long-Lived Antibody-Secreting Cells Is Dependent on Integrated Signals Derived from Antigen and IL-17A

    PubMed Central

    Grund, Lidiane Zito; Lopes-Ferreira, Monica; Lima, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Switched CD19-positive memory B cells purified from mice with chronic immune response against Thalassophrynenattereri venom proteins were cultured with venom or cytokines. Our results confirm the existence of a hierarchic process of differentiation: activated memory B cells progressively acquire increasing levels of CD138 and decreasing levels of CD45R/B220 to finally arrive at ASC with B220neg phenotype, which are IgG1-secreting cells. Only Bmem from peritoneal cavity or bone marrow of VTn immunized mice presented the capacity to generate ASC functionally active. IL-17A or IL-21/IL-23/IL-33 improves the ability of venom to induce intracellular IgG of peritoneal derived-ASC. Cognate stimulation with venom and IL-17A is sufficient to down-regulate the expression of CD45R/B220. BAFF-R is up-regulated in splenic or medullar derived-ASC stimulated by venom, CpG or cytokines. Only splenic derived-ASC up-regulate Bcl-2 expression after CpG or the combination of IL-21/IL-23/IL-33 stimulation. Finally, the activation of ASC for IgG1 secretion is triggered by venom proteins in peritoneal cavity and by IL-17A in medullar niche. These results show the importance of the integration of signals downstream of BCR and IL17-A receptors in modulating ASC differentiation, focusing in the microenvironment niche of their generation. PMID:24058589

  8. A novel lectin from Artocarpus lingnanensis induces proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through CD45 signaling pathway in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bo; Li, Lu; Zeng, Qiyan; Lin, Faquan; Yin, Lijun; Liao, Liejun; Huang, Min; Wang, Jingping

    2017-04-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins and have been used for purification and characterization of glycoproteins. In this study, a novel 58.9-kDa tetrameric lectin from Artocarpus lingnanensis seeds was purified, characterized, and its mitogenic potential was evaluated. The hemagglutination inhibition assay indicated that Artocarpus lingnanensis lectin (ALL) showed specificity toward galactose. ALL was effectively purified in a single-step using affinity chromatography on a galactose-Sepharose column. ALL showed pH optima between 5.0 and 9.0, and optimal temperature between 20 and 40 °C. ALL triggered proliferation and activation of human T lymphocytes (e.g., CD4(+) T lymphocytes). Flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed binding of ALL to T cells and colocalized with CD45. Affinity chromatography and Western blot suggested that CD45 isolated from human T cell membrane fraction may be the major receptor of ALL. CD45 blocking antibody attenuated the binding and proliferation of T cells induced by ALL. CD45-PTPase inhibitor dephostatin reduced ALL-induced T cells proliferation and expression of CD25 and pZAP-70. Furthermore, secretion of ALL-induced Th1/Th2 cytokines was blocked with dephostatin. Also, dephostatin inhibited phosphorylation of ALL-mediated activation of ERK and p38MAPK. This study demonstrates the involvement of CD45-mediated signaling in ALL-induced T lymphocyte proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through activation of p38 and ERK.

  9. The Myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus Can Sense and Respond to the Quorum Signals Secreted by Potential Prey Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Daniel G.; Whitworth, David E.

    2017-01-01

    The myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus is a predatory member of the soil microfauna, able to consume bacteria (Gram-negative, Gram-positive), archaea, and fungi. Many potential prey of M. xanthus communicate amongst themselves using acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum signals. M. xanthus cannot itself produce AHLs, but could potentially benefit by responding to exogenous AHLs produced during signaling between proximal prey. Four AHLs of different side chain length were tested and all found to delay sporulation of M. xanthus vegetative cells, and to stimulate germination of myxospores, increasing the proportion of predatory vegetative cells in the population. The predatory activity and expansion rates of M. xanthus colonies were also found to be stimulated by AHLs. Thermally inactivated AHLs had no effect on M. xanthus cells, and the response to AHLs depended (non-linearly) on the length of AHL side chain, suggesting that the effect of AHLs was mediated by specific signaling within M. xanthus, rather than being a consequence of the chemical or physical properties of AHLs. Therefore, it seems that the presence of xenic quorum signaling molecules enhances the predatory activity of M. xanthus. AHLs increase the proportion of the population capable of predation, and stimulate the motility and predatory activity of vegetative cells. We therefore propose that in the wild, M. xanthus uses AHLs as markers of nearby prey, potentially eavesdropping on the conversations between prey organisms. PMID:28352265

  10. Amplitude-dependent spike-broadening and enhanced Ca(2+) signaling in GnRH-secreting neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Van Goor, F; LeBeau, A P; Krsmanovic, L Z; Sherman, A; Catt, K J; Stojilkovic, S S

    2000-01-01

    In GnRH-secreting (GT1) neurons, activation of Ca(2+)-mobilizing receptors induces a sustained membrane depolarization that shifts the profile of the action potential (AP) waveform from sharp, high-amplitude to broad, low-amplitude spikes. Here we characterize this shift in the firing pattern and its impact on Ca(2+) influx experimentally by using prerecorded sharp and broad APs as the voltage-clamp command pulse. As a quantitative test of the experimental data, a mathematical model based on the membrane and ionic current properties of GT1 neurons was also used. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that inactivation of the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels by sustained depolarization accounted for a reduction in the amplitude of the spike upstroke. The ensuing decrease in tetraethylammonium-sensitive K(+) current activation slowed membrane repolarization, leading to AP broadening. This change in firing pattern increased the total L-type Ca(2+) current and facilitated AP-driven Ca(2+) entry. The leftward shift in the current-voltage relation of the L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed in GT1 cells allowed the depolarization-induced AP broadening to facilitate Ca(2+) entry despite a decrease in spike amplitude. Thus the gating properties of the L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed in GT1 neurons are suitable for promoting AP-driven Ca(2+) influx in receptor- and non-receptor-depolarized cells. PMID:10968994

  11. Amplitude-dependent spike-broadening and enhanced Ca(2+) signaling in GnRH-secreting neurons.

    PubMed

    Van Goor, F; LeBeau, A P; Krsmanovic, L Z; Sherman, A; Catt, K J; Stojilkovic, S S

    2000-09-01

    In GnRH-secreting (GT1) neurons, activation of Ca(2+)-mobilizing receptors induces a sustained membrane depolarization that shifts the profile of the action potential (AP) waveform from sharp, high-amplitude to broad, low-amplitude spikes. Here we characterize this shift in the firing pattern and its impact on Ca(2+) influx experimentally by using prerecorded sharp and broad APs as the voltage-clamp command pulse. As a quantitative test of the experimental data, a mathematical model based on the membrane and ionic current properties of GT1 neurons was also used. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that inactivation of the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels by sustained depolarization accounted for a reduction in the amplitude of the spike upstroke. The ensuing decrease in tetraethylammonium-sensitive K(+) current activation slowed membrane repolarization, leading to AP broadening. This change in firing pattern increased the total L-type Ca(2+) current and facilitated AP-driven Ca(2+) entry. The leftward shift in the current-voltage relation of the L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed in GT1 cells allowed the depolarization-induced AP broadening to facilitate Ca(2+) entry despite a decrease in spike amplitude. Thus the gating properties of the L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed in GT1 neurons are suitable for promoting AP-driven Ca(2+) influx in receptor- and non-receptor-depolarized cells.

  12. Olfactory receptor responding to gut microbiota-derived signals plays a role in renin secretion and blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Pluznick, Jennifer L; Protzko, Ryan J; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Peterlin, Zita; Sipos, Arnold; Han, Jinah; Brunet, Isabelle; Wan, La-Xiang; Rey, Federico; Wang, Tong; Firestein, Stuart J; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Eichmann, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Caplan, Michael J

    2013-03-12

    Olfactory receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that mediate olfactory chemosensation and serve as chemosensors in other tissues. We find that Olfr78, an olfactory receptor expressed in the kidney, responds to short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Olfr78 is expressed in the renal juxtaglomerular apparatus, where it mediates renin secretion in response to SCFAs. In addition, both Olfr78 and G protein-coupled receptor 41 (Gpr41), another SCFA receptor, are expressed in smooth muscle cells of small resistance vessels. Propionate, a SCFA shown to induce vasodilation ex vivo, produces an acute hypotensive response in wild-type mice. This effect is differentially modulated by disruption of Olfr78 and Gpr41 expression. SCFAs are end products of fermentation by the gut microbiota and are absorbed into the circulation. Antibiotic treatment reduces the biomass of the gut microbiota and elevates blood pressure in Olfr78 knockout mice. We conclude that SCFAs produced by the gut microbiota modulate blood pressure via Olfr78 and Gpr41.

  13. Olfactory receptor responding to gut microbiota-derived signals plays a role in renin secretion and blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pluznick, Jennifer L.; Protzko, Ryan J.; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Peterlin, Zita; Sipos, Arnold; Han, Jinah; Brunet, Isabelle; Wan, La-Xiang; Rey, Federico; Wang, Tong; Firestein, Stuart J.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Eichmann, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Caplan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that mediate olfactory chemosensation and serve as chemosensors in other tissues. We find that Olfr78, an olfactory receptor expressed in the kidney, responds to short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Olfr78 is expressed in the renal juxtaglomerular apparatus, where it mediates renin secretion in response to SCFAs. In addition, both Olfr78 and G protein-coupled receptor 41 (Gpr41), another SCFA receptor, are expressed in smooth muscle cells of small resistance vessels. Propionate, a SCFA shown to induce vasodilation ex vivo, produces an acute hypotensive response in wild-type mice. This effect is differentially modulated by disruption of Olfr78 and Gpr41 expression. SCFAs are end products of fermentation by the gut microbiota and are absorbed into the circulation. Antibiotic treatment reduces the biomass of the gut microbiota and elevates blood pressure in Olfr78 knockout mice. We conclude that SCFAs produced by the gut microbiota modulate blood pressure via Olfr78 and Gpr41. PMID:23401498

  14. The Type II Secretion System of Legionella pneumophila Dampens the MyD88 and Toll-Like Receptor 2 Signaling Pathway in Infected Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mallama, Celeste A; McCoy-Simandle, Kessler; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2017-04-01

    Previously, we reported that mutants of Legionella pneumophila lacking a type II secretion (T2S) system elicit higher levels of cytokines (e.g., interleukin-6 [IL-6]) following infection of U937 cells, a human macrophage-like cell line. We now show that this effect of T2S is also manifest upon infection of human THP-1 macrophages and peripheral blood monocytes but does not occur during infection of murine macrophages. Supporting the hypothesis that T2S acts to dampen the triggering of an innate immune response, we observed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways are more highly stimulated upon infection with the T2S mutant than upon infection with the wild type. By using short hairpin RNA to deplete proteins involved in specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) recognition pathways, we determined that the dampening effect of the T2S system was not dependent on nucleotide binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible protein I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase receptor (PKR), or TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon beta (TRIF) signaling or an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC)- or caspase-4-dependent inflammasome. However, the dampening effect of T2S on IL-6 production was significantly reduced upon gene knockdown of myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1), or Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). These data indicate that the L. pneumophila T2S system dampens the signaling of the TLR2 pathway in infected human macrophages. We also document the importance of PKR, TRIF, and TBK1 in cytokine secretion during L. pneumophila infection of macrophages.

  15. Induction of CXC chemokines in human mesenchymal stem cells by stimulation with secreted frizzled-related proteins through non-canonical Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, David S; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Makhijani, Nalini S; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs) on CXC chemokine expression in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). METHODS: CXC chemokines such as CXCL5 and CXCL8 are induced in hMSCs during differentiation with osteogenic differentiation medium (OGM) and may be involved in angiogenic stimulation during bone repair. hMSCs were treated with conditioned medium (CM) from L-cells expressing non-canonical Wnt5a protein, or with control CM from wild type L-cells, or directly with sFRPs for up to 10 d in culture. mRNA expression levels of both CXCL5 and CXCL8 were quantitated by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and secreted protein levels of these proteins determined by ELISA. Dose- (0-500 ng/mL) and time-response curves were generated for treatment with sFRP1. Signal transduction pathways were explored by western blot analysis with pan- or phosphorylation-specific antibodies, through use of specific pathway inhibitors, and through use of siRNAs targeting specific frizzled receptors (Fzd)-2 and 5 or the receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-2 (RoR2) prior to treatment with sFRPs. RESULTS: CM from L-cells expressing Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt, stimulated an increase in CXCL5 mRNA expression and protein secretion in comparison to control L-cell CM. sFRP1, which should inhibit both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling, surprisingly enhanced the expression of CXCL5 at 7 and 10 d. Dickkopf1, an inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling prevented the sFRP-stimulated induction of CXCL5 and actually inhibited basal levels of CXCL5 expression at 7 but not at 10 d post treatment. In addition, all four sFRPs isoforms induced CXCL8 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner with maximum expression at 7 d with treatment at 150 ng/mL. The largest increases in CXCL5 expression were seen from stimulation with sFRP1 or sFRP2. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in the presence of OGM showed s

  16. Ultrasensitive sensing platform for platelet-derived growth factor BB detection based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene composites and Exonuclease III assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Shuai, Hong-Lei; Zhang, Ji-Zong

    2016-03-15

    A highly sensitive and ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) detection is fabricated based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene (MoSe2-Gr) composites and Exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided signal amplification. MoSe2-Gr is prepared by a simple hydrothermal method and used as a promising sensing platform. Exo III has a specifical exo-deoxyribonuclease activity for duplex DNAs in the direction from 3' to 5' terminus, however its activity is limited on the duplex DNAs with more than 4 mismatched terminal bases at 3' ends. Herein, aptamer and complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences are designed with four thymine bases on 3' ends. In the presence of target protein, the aptamer associates with it and facilitates the formation of duplex DNA between cDNA and signal DNA. The duplex DNA then is digested by Exo III and releases cDNA, which hybridizes with signal DNA to perform a new cleavage process. Nevertheless, in the absence of target protein, the aptamer hybridizes with cDNA will inhibit the Exo III-assisted nucleotides cleavage. The signal DNA then hybridizes with capture DNA on the electrode. Subsequently, horse radish peroxidase is fixed on electrode by avidin-biotin reaction and then catalyzes hydrogen peroxide and hydroquinone to produce electrochemical response. Therefore, a bridge can be established between the concentration of target protein and the degree of the attenuation of the obtained signal, providing a quantitative measure of target protein with a broad detection range of 0.0001-1 nM and a detection limit of 20 fM.

  17. “Store-operated” cAMP signaling contributes to Ca2+-activated Cl− secretion in T84 colonic cells

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Jonathan M.; Maiellaro, Isabella; Abi-Jaoude, Joanne; Curci, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Apical cAMP-dependent CFTR Cl− channels are essential for efficient vectorial movement of ions and fluid into the lumen of the colon. It is well known that Ca2+-mobilizing agonists also stimulate colonic anion secretion. However, CFTR is apparently not activated directly by Ca2+, and the existence of apical Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels in the native colonic epithelium is controversial, leaving the identity of the Ca2+-activated component unresolved. We recently showed that decreasing free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen elicits a rise in intracellular cAMP. This process, which we termed “store-operated cAMP signaling” (SOcAMPS), requires the luminal ER Ca2+ sensor STIM1 and does not depend on changes in cytosolic Ca2+. Here we assessed the degree to which SOcAMPS participates in Ca2+-activated Cl− transport as measured by transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) in polarized T84 monolayers in parallel with imaging of cAMP and PKA activity using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based reporters in single cells. In Ca2+-free conditions, the Ca2+-releasing agonist carbachol and Ca2+ ionophore increased Isc, cAMP, and PKA activity. These responses persisted in cells loaded with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. The effect on Isc was enhanced in the presence of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), inhibited by the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172 and the PKA inhibitor H-89, and unaffected by Ba2+ or flufenamic acid. We propose that a discrete component of the “Ca2+-dependent” secretory activity in the colon derives from cAMP generated through SOcAMPS. This alternative mode of cAMP production could contribute to the actions of diverse xenobiotic agents that disrupt ER Ca2+ homeostasis, leading to diarrhea. PMID:26316590

  18. Homology-based modeling of the Erwinia amylovora type III secretion chaperone DspF used to identify amino acids required for virulence and interaction with the effector DspE.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Lindsay R; Wedemeyer, William J; Sundin, George W

    2010-09-01

    The structure of DspF, a type III secretion system (T3SS) chaperone required for virulence of the fruit tree pathogen Erwinia amylovora, was modeled based on predicted structural homology to characterized T3SS chaperones. This model guided the selection of 11 amino acid residues that were individually mutated to alanine via site-directed mutagenesis. Each mutant was assessed for its effect on virulence complementation, dimerization and interaction with the N-terminal chaperone-binding site of DspE. Four amino acid residues were identified that did not complement the virulence defect of a dspF knockout mutant, and three of these residues were required for interaction with the N-terminus of DspE. This study supports the significance of the predicted beta-sheet helix-binding groove in DspF chaperone function.

  19. Methylated trivalent arsenicals are potent inhibitors of glucose stimulated insulin secretion by murine pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Douillet, Christelle; Currier, Jenna; Saunders, Jesse; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Matoušek, Tomáš; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2013-02-15

    Epidemiologic evidence has linked chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) with an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Laboratory studies have identified several mechanisms by which iAs can impair glucose homeostasis. We have previously shown that micromolar concentrations of arsenite (iAs{sup III}) or its methylated trivalent metabolites, methylarsonite (MAs{sup III}) and dimethylarsinite (DMAs{sup III}), inhibit the insulin-activated signal transduction pathway, resulting in insulin resistance in adipocytes. Our present study examined effects of the trivalent arsenicals on insulin secretion by intact pancreatic islets isolated from C57BL/6 mice. We found that 48-hour exposures to low subtoxic concentrations of iAs{sup III}, MAs{sup III} or DMAs{sup III} inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), but not basal insulin secretion. MAs{sup III} and DMAs{sup III} were more potent than iAs{sup III} as GSIS inhibitors with estimated IC{sub 50} ≤ 0.1 μM. The exposures had little or no effects on insulin content of the islets or on insulin expression, suggesting that trivalent arsenicals interfere with mechanisms regulating packaging of the insulin transport vesicles or with translocation of these vesicles to the plasma membrane. Notably, the inhibition of GSIS by iAs{sup III}, MAs{sup III} or DMAs{sup III} could be reversed by a 24-hour incubation of the islets in arsenic-free medium. These results suggest that the insulin producing pancreatic β-cells are among the targets for iAs exposure and that the inhibition of GSIS by low concentrations of the methylated metabolites of iAs may be the key mechanism of iAs-induced diabetes. - Highlights: ► Trivalent arsenicals inhibit glucose stimulated insulin secretion by pancreatic islets. ► MAs{sup III} and DMAs{sup III} are more potent inhibitors than arsenite with IC{sub 50} ∼ 0.1 μM. ► The arsenicals have little or no effects on insulin expression in pancreatic islets. ► The inhibition of

  20. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. PMID:25968649

  1. Isoorientin induces apoptosis, decreases invasiveness, and downregulates VEGF secretion by activating AMPK signaling in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tingting; Su, Jiadong; Huang, Chaohao; Yu, Dinglai; Dai, Shengjie; Huang, Xince; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Isoorientin (or homoorientin) is a flavone, which is a chemical flavonoid-like compound, and a 6-C-glucoside of luteolin. Isoorientin has been demonstrated to have anti-cancer activities against various tumors, but its effects on pancreatic cancer (PC) have not been studied in detail. In this study, we aim to investigate whether isoorientin has potential anti-PC effects and its underlying mechanism. In PC, isoorientin strongly inhibited the survival of the cells, induced cell apoptosis, and decreased its malignancy by reversing the expression of epithelial–mesenchymal transition and matrix metalloproteinase and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Meanwhile, we investigated the activity of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway after isoorientin treatment, which was forcefully activated by isoorientin, as expected. In addition, in the PC cells that were transfected with lentivirus to interfere with the expression of the gene PRKAA1, there were no differences in the apoptosis rate and the expression of malignancy biomarkers in the tumors of the isoorientin-treated and untreated groups. Thus, we demonstrated that isoorientin has potential antitumor effects via the AMPK signaling pathway, and isoorientin merits further investigation. PMID:28003763

  2. Elucidation of the Regulon and cis-Acting Regulatory Element of HrpB, the AraC-Type Regulator of a Plant Pathogen-Like Type III Secretion System in Burkholderia pseudomallei▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Lyla; Schell, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei possesses multiple type III secretion system (T3SS) gene clusters. One of these, the B. pseudomallei T3SS2 (T3SS2bp) gene cluster, which apparently plays no role in animal virulence, is also found in six additional Burkholderia spp. and is very similar to T3SSs found in phytopathogenic Xanthomonas spp. and Ralstonia solanacearum. The T3SS2bp gene cluster also encodes an AraC-type regulatory protein (HrpBbp) that is an ortholog of HrpB, the master regulator of the R. solanacearum T3SS (T3SSrso) and its secreted effectors. Transcriptome analysis showed that HrpBbp activates the expression of T3SS2bp genes, as well as their orthologs in R. solanacearum. In addition to activating T3SS2bp, HrpBbp also upregulates the expression of ∼30 additional B. pseudomallei genes, including some that may confer production of adhesive pili, a polyketide toxin, several putative T3SS2bp-secreted effectors, and components of a regulatory cascade. T3SS2bp promoter regions were found to contain a conserved DNA motif (p2bp box) identical in sequence and position to the hrpII box required for HrpB-dependent T3SSrso transcription activation. The p2bp box is also present in the promoter regions of the essentially identical T3SS found in the very closely related species Burkholderia thailandensis (T3SS2bt). Analysis of p2bp box mutants showed that it is essential for HrpBbp-mediated transcription activation in both species. Although it has been suggested that T3SS2bp and T3SS2bt may function in phytopathogenicity, we were unable to demonstrate a phytopathogenic phenotype for B. thailandensis in three different plant hosts. PMID:21335458

  3. HrcT is a key component of the type III secretion system in Xanthomonas spp. and also regulates the expression of the key hrp transcriptional activator HrpX.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Yang; Zou, Li-Fang; Xue, Xiao-Bo; Cai, Lu-Lu; Ma, Wen-Xiu; Xiong, Li; Ji, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Gong-You

    2014-07-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS), encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes in Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria, delivers repertoires of T3SS effectors (T3SEs) into plant cells to trigger the hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost or resistant-host plants and promote pathogenicity in susceptible plants. The expression of hrp genes in Xanthomonas is regulated by two key regulatory proteins, HrpG and HrpX. However, the interactions between hrp gene products in directing T3SE secretion are largely unknown. Here we demonstrated that HrcT of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola functions as a T3SS component and positively regulates the expression of hrpX. Transcription of hrcT occurs via two distinct promoters; one (T1) is with the hrpB operon and the second (T3) within hrpB7 Via either promoter T1 or T3, the defect in Hrp phenotype by hrcT deletion was corrected in the presence of hrcT only from Xanthomonas species but not from other phytopathogenic bacteria. An N-terminally truncated HrcT was able to bind the hrpX promoter and activate the expression of hrpX, supporting that HrcT is a positive regulator of hrpX. A revised model showing the regulatory interactions between HrcT, HrpX, and HrpG is proposed.

  4. NolX of Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257, a Type III-Secreted Protein Involved in Host Range Determination, Is Localized in the Infection Threads of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp) and Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Hari B.

    2002-01-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257 forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) in a cultivar-specific manner. This strain forms nodules on primitive soybean cultivars but fails to nodulate agronomically improved North American cultivars. Soybean cultivar specificity is regulated by the nolXWBTUV locus, which encodes part of a type III secretion system (TTSS). NolX, a soybean cultivar specificity protein, is secreted by TTSS and shows homology to HrpF of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. It is not known whether NolX functions at the bacterium-plant interface or acts inside the host cell. Antibodies raised against S. fredii USDA257 NolX were used in immunocytochemical studies to investigate the subcellular localization of this protein. Immunostaining of paraffin-embedded sections of developing soybean and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp) nodules revealed localization of NolX in the infection threads. Protein A-gold immunocytochemical localization studies utilizing affinity-purified NolX antibodies revealed specific deposition of gold particles in the fibrillar material inside infection threads. Similar immunogold localization studies failed to detect NolX in thin sections of mature soybean and cowpea nodules. The results from this study indicate that NolX is expressed in planta only during the early stages of nodule development. PMID:11790754

  5. The effect of ROCK on TNF-α-induced CXCL8 secretion by intestinal epithelial cell lines is mediated through MKK4 and JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Perey, Aaron C; Weishaar, Isabelle M; McGee, Dennis W

    2015-02-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) play a role in mucosal inflammatory responses by producing important chemokines like CXCL8 when stimulated by TNF-α. Previously, we found that IEC cell lines required the Rho-associated kinase, ROCK, for CXCL8 responses after IL-1 stimulation. This study extends these findings by showing that inhibiting ROCK suppressed TNF-α-induced CXCL8 secretion by Caco-2 and DLD1 colonic epithelial cell lines and CXCL8 mRNA levels in Caco-2 cells. RNAi knockdown experiments indicated that the inhibitory effect was mediated by ROCK2, and not ROCK1. Inhibiting ROCK had no effect on TNF-stimulated IκBα phosphorylation and degradation or p38 MAPK phosphorylation indicating that ROCK plays no role in these signaling pathways. However, inhibiting ROCK suppressed TNF-induced phosphorylation of the p54 JNK isoform and phosphorylation of the upstream MKK4 kinase. These results suggest that ROCK is required for CXCL8 responses by TNF-stimulated IEC by affecting intracellular signaling through MKK4 and JNK.

  6. Herpes simplex virus-1 infection causes the secretion of a type I interferon-antagonizing protein and inhibits signaling at or before Jak-1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Karen E.; Knipe, David M.

    2010-01-05

    Host cells respond to viral infection by the production of type I interferons (IFNs), which induce the expression of antiviral genes. Herpes simplex virus I (HSV-1) encodes many mechanisms that inhibit the type I IFN response, including the ICP27-dependent inhibition of type I IFN signaling. Here we show inhibition of Stat-1 nuclear accumulation in cells that express ICP27. ICP27 expression also induces the secretion of a small, heat-stable type I IFN antagonizing protein that inhibits Stat-1 nuclear accumulation. We show that the inhibition of IFN-induced Stat-1 phosphorylation occurs at or upstream of Jak-1 phosphorylation. Finally, we show that ISG15 expression is induced after IFNalpha treatment in mock-infected cells, but not cells infected with WT HSV-1 or ICP27{sup -} HSV-1. These data suggest that HSV-1 has evolved multiple mechanisms to inhibit IFN signaling not only in infected cells, but also in neighboring cells, thereby allowing for increased viral replication and spread.

  7. Ambroxol inhalation ameliorates LPS-induced airway inflammation and mucus secretion through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shui-juan; Jiang, Juan-xia; Ren, Qian-qian; Jia, Yong-liang; Shen, Jian; Shen, Hui-juan; Lin, Xi-xi; Lu, Hong; Xie, Qiang-min

    2016-03-15

    Ambroxol, a metabolite of bromhexine, is shown to exert several pharmacological activities, including secretolytic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions. Oral and intravenous administration of ambroxol is useful for the airway inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about its potential in inhalation therapy for lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mucous hypersecretion and inflammatory response. In the present study, we compared the pharmacological effects of ambroxol by inhalation with intravenous administration and preliminarily explored its mechanism of action. Our results demonstrated that ambroxol administered by inhalation inhibited MUC5AC expression, reduced glycosaminoglycan levels, enhanced the function of mucociliary clearance and promoted sputum excretion, suggesting that ambroxol increases expectoration of sputum by reducing its viscosity. Moreover, ambroxol significantly alleviated LPS-induced the influx of inflammatory cells and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk 1/2) expression in lung tissues, and inhibited increases in the mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, CCL-2 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1), KC (keratinocyte cell protein) and interleukin (IL)-1β in lung tissues. The secretolytic and anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled ambroxol at a dose of 7.5 mg/ml was comparable to that of ambroxol at 20 mg/ml i.v. and dexamethasone at 0.5 mg/kg i.p. In addition, we found that ambroxol dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced increases in the mRNA expression of MUC5AC, TNF-α, and IL-1β in human bronchial epithelial cell (NCI-H292) by inhibiting the Erk signaling pathway. These results demonstrate the beneficial effects of ambroxol in inhalation therapy for the airway inflammatory diseases.

  8. Phagocytosed Clofazimine Biocrystals can Modulate Innate Immune Signaling by Inhibiting TNFα and Boosting IL-1RA Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gi S.; Sud, Sudha; Keswani, Rahul K.; Baik, Jason; Standiford, Theodore J.; Stringer, Kathleen A.; Rosania, Gus R.

    2015-01-01

    Clofazimine (CFZ) is an FDA-approved leprostatic and anti-inflammatory drug that massively accumulates in macrophages, forming insoluble, intracellular crystal-like drug inclusions (CLDIs) during long-term oral dosing. Interestingly, when added to cells in vitro, soluble CFZ is cytotoxic because it depolarizes mitochondria and induces apoptosis. Accordingly, we hypothesized that in vivo, macrophages detoxify CFZ by sequestering it in CLDIs. To test this hypothesis, CLDIs of CFZ-treated mice were biochemically isolated, and then incubated with macrophages in vitro. The cell biological effects of phagocytosed CLDIs were compared to those of soluble CFZ. Unlike soluble CFZ, phagocytosis of CLDIs did not lead to mitochondrial destabilization or apoptosis. Rather, CLDIs altered immune signaling response pathways downstream of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligation, leading to enhanced interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) production, dampened NF-κB activation and tissue necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) production, and ultimately decreased TLR expression levels. In aggregate, our results constitute evidence that macrophages detoxify soluble CFZ by sequestering it in a biocompatible, insoluble form. The altered cellular response to TLR ligation suggests that CLDI formation may also underlie CFZ’s anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25909959

  9. A protein secreted by the respiratory pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae impairs IL-17 signalling via interaction with human Act1.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Katerina; Plano, Gregory V; Fields, Kenneth A

    2009-05-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen that has been associated with a variety of chronic diseases including asthma and atherosclerosis. Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular parasites that primarily infect epithelial cells where they develop within a membrane-bound vacuole, termed an inclusion. Interactions between the microorganism and eukaryotic cell can be mediated by chlamydial proteins inserted into the inclusion membrane. We describe here a novel C. pneumoniae-specific inclusion membrane protein (Inc) CP0236, which contains domains exposed to the host cytoplasm. We demonstrate that, in a yeast two-hybrid screen, CP0236 interacts with the NFκB activator 1 (Act1) and this interaction was confirmed in HeLa 229 cells where ectopically expressed CP0236 was co-immunoprecipitated with endogenous Act1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Act1 displays an altered distribution in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells infected with C. pneumoniae where it associates with the chlamydial inclusion membrane. This sequestration of Act1 by chlamydiae inhibited recruitment of the protein to the interleukin-17 (IL-17) receptor upon stimulation of C. pneumoniae-infected cells with IL-17A. Such inhibition of the IL-17 signalling pathway led to protection of Chlamydia-infected cells from NFκB activation in IL-17-stimulated cells. We describe here a unique strategy employed by C. pneumoniae to achieve inhibition of NFκB activation via interaction of CP0236 with mammalian Act1.

  10. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling down-regulates N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III expression: the implications of two mutually exclusive pathways for regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingsong; Akama, Ryota; Isaji, Tomoya; Lu, Yingying; Hashimoto, Hirokazu; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Du, Yuguang; Gu, Jianguo

    2011-02-11

    In previous studies, we reported that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III) activity and the enzyme product, bisected N-glycans, both were induced in cells cultured under dense conditions in an E-cadherin-dependent manner (Iijima, J., Zhao, Y., Isaji, T., Kameyama, A., Nakaya, S., Wang, X., Ihara, H., Cheng, X., Nakagawa, T., Miyoshi, E., Kondo, A., Narimatsu, H., Taniguchi, N., and Gu, J. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 13038-13046). Furthermore, we found that α-catenin, a component of the E-cadherin-catenin complex, was also required for this induction (Akama, R., Sato, Y., Kariya, Y., Isaji, T., Fukuda, T., Lu, L., Taniguchi, N., Ozawa, M., and Gu, J. (2008) Proteomics 8, 3221-3228). To further explore the molecular mechanism of this regulation, the roles of β-catenin, an essential molecule in both cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and canonical Wnt signaling, were investigated. Unexpectedly, shRNA knockdown of β-catenin resulted in a dramatic increase in GnT-III expression and its product, the bisected N-glycans, which was confirmed by RT-PCR and GnT-III activity and by E4-PHA lectin blot analysis. The induction of GnT-III expression increased bisecting GlcNAc residues on β1 integrin, which led to down-regulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion and cell migration. Immunostaining showed that nuclear localization of β-catenin was greatly suppressed; intriguingly, the knockdown of β-catenin in the nuclei was more effective than that in cell-cell contacts in the knockdown cells, which was also confirmed by Western blot analysis. Stimulation of the Wnt signaling pathway by the addition of exogenous Wnt3a or BIO, a GSK-3β inhibitor, consistently and significantly inhibited GnT-III expression and its products. Conversely, the inhibition of β-catenin translocation into the nuclei increased GnT-III activation. Taken together, the results of the present study are the first to clearly demonstrate that GnT-III expression may be precisely regulated by the

  11. WNT1-induced Secreted Protein-1 (WISP1), a Novel Regulator of Bone Turnover and Wnt Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Azusa; Ono, Mitsuaki; Holmbeck, Kenn; Li, Li; Kilts, Tina M.; Kram, Vardit; Noonan, Megan L.; Yoshioka, Yuya; McNerny, Erin M. B.; Tantillo, Margaret A.; Kohn, David H.; Lyons, Karen M.; Robey, Pamela G.; Young, Marian F.

    2015-01-01

    WISP1/CCN4 (hereafter referred to as WISP1), a member of the CCN family, is found in mineralized tissues and is produced by osteoblasts and their precursors. In this study, Wisp1-deficient (Wisp1−/−) mice were generated. Using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, we showed that by 3 months, the total bone mineral density of Wisp1−/− mice was significantly lower than that of WT mice. Further investigation by micro-computed tomography showed that female Wisp1−/− mice had decreased trabecular bone volume/total volume and that both male and female Wisp1−/− mice had decreased cortical bone thickness accompanied by diminished biomechanical strength. The molecular basis for decreased bone mass in Wisp1−/− mice arises from reduced bone formation likely caused by osteogenic progenitors that differentiate poorly compared with WT cells. Osteoclast precursors from Wisp1−/− mice developed more tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells in vitro and in transplants, suggesting that WISP1 is also a negative regulator of osteoclast differentiation. When bone turnover (formation and resorption) was induced by ovariectomy, Wisp1−/− mice had lower bone mineral density compared WT mice, confirming the potential for multiple roles for WISP1 in controlling bone homeostasis. Wisp1−/− bone marrow stromal cells had reduced expression of β-catenin and its target genes, potentially caused by WISP1 inhibition of SOST binding to LRP6. Taken together, our data suggest that the decreased bone mass found in Wisp1−/− mice could potentially be caused by an insufficiency in the osteodifferentiation capacity of bone marrow stromal cells arising from diminished Wnt signaling, ultimately leading to altered bone turnover and weaker biomechanically compromised bones. PMID:25864198

  12. WNT1-induced Secreted Protein-1 (WISP1), a Novel Regulator of Bone Turnover and Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Azusa; Ono, Mitsuaki; Holmbeck, Kenn; Li, Li; Kilts, Tina M; Kram, Vardit; Noonan, Megan L; Yoshioka, Yuya; McNerny, Erin M B; Tantillo, Margaret A; Kohn, David H; Lyons, Karen M; Robey, Pamela G; Young, Marian F

    2015-05-29

    WISP1/CCN4 (hereafter referred to as WISP1), a member of the CCN family, is found in mineralized tissues and is produced by osteoblasts and their precursors. In this study, Wisp1-deficient (Wisp1(-/-)) mice were generated. Using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, we showed that by 3 months, the total bone mineral density of Wisp1(-/-) mice was significantly lower than that of WT mice. Further investigation by micro-computed tomography showed that female Wisp1(-/-) mice had decreased trabecular bone volume/total volume and that both male and female Wisp1(-/-) mice had decreased cortical bone thickness accompanied by diminished biomechanical strength. The molecular basis for