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Sample records for ileostomy

  1. Ileostomy Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Playing sports and staying active with an ileostomy Traveling when you have an ileostomy For parents of children with ileostomies Getting help, information, and support To learn more More In Treatment & Support Understanding Your Diagnosis ...

  2. Children with Ileostomies (for Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is an ileostomy? How your digestive system works Types of ileostomies Managing your ileostomy Choosing an ... Eating and digestion with a ileostomy Returning to work after getting an ileostomy Intimacy and sexuality when ...

  3. Total proctocolectomy with ileostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammatory bowel disease. This includes ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease . This surgery may also be done if you ... if you have a chronic condition, such as: Crohn disease Ulcerative colitis References Araghizadeh F. Ileostomy, colostomy, and ...

  4. Types of ileostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... an opening called a stoma in your belly. Waste will pass through the stoma into a pouch that collects ... ileostomy is thin or thick liquid. It is not solid like the stool that came from your rectum. ...

  5. Spontaneous ileostomy closure

    PubMed Central

    Alyami, Mohammad S.; Lundberg, Peter W.; Cotte, Eddy G.; Glehen, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ileostomies are routinely placed during colorectal surgery for the diversion of intestinal contents to permit healing of the distal anastomosis prior to elective reversal. We present an interesting case of spontaneous closure of a diverting ileostomy without any adverse effects to the patient. A 65-year-old woman, positive for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer type-I, with locally invasive cancer of the distal colon underwent en-bloc total colectomy, hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingoophorectomy with creation of a proximal loop ileostomy. The ostomy temporarily closed without reoperation at 10 weeks, after spontaneously reopening, it definitively closed, again without surgical intervention at 18 weeks following the original surgery. This rare phenomenon has occurred following variable colorectal pathology and is poorly understood, particularly in patients with aggressive disease and adjunct perioperative interventions. PMID:27279518

  6. Living with your ileostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... after your operation. Ask your provider for a letter you can give to your employer that explains why you need time off work. It is a good idea to tell your employer, and maybe even a friend at work, about your ileostomy. Heavy ...

  7. Ileostomy - caring for your stoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... proctocolectomy - discharge Types of ileostomy Ulcerative colitis - discharge Review Date 5/11/2016 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  8. Return to work following ileostomy.

    PubMed

    Whates, P D; Irving, M

    1984-08-01

    The experiences of 1033 members of the 51 English divisions of the Ileostomy Association of Great Britain and Ireland have been analysed in respect of their return to work after construction of an ileostomy. Although there was a fall in the number of patients returning to work after operation this was often for reasons unrelated to surgery. The majority of those returning to work resumed work with the same employer and usually in the same post. Fifty-nine (5.7 per cent) patients began work for the first time after operation, including 33 (3.2 per cent) who were previously inactive although of working age. Analysis of occupational class shows that, although a number of patients initially resumed work within a lower class, once established in employment successful career advancement was possible. Problems in the gaining or resumption of employment were reported by 56 (5.4 per cent) patients. In 22 (2.1 per cent) patients, almost all approaching or above retirement age, successful surgery resulted in a decision not to return to employment. An ileostomy is no barrier to successful return to work in nearly all occupations, and is accomplished by the majority of patients without major difficulty.

  9. Ileostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some are: Inflammatory bowel disease ( ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease ). This is the most common reason for this ... If you have a chronic condition, such as Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis, you may need ongoing medical ...

  10. Defunctioning Ileostomy Reversal Rates and Reasons for Delayed Reversal: Does Delay Impact on Complications of Ileostomy Reversal? A Study of 170 Defunctioning Ileostomies

    PubMed Central

    Waterland, Peter; Goonetilleke, Kolitha; Naumann, David N.; Sutcliff, Mathew; Soliman, Faris

    2015-01-01

    Background Temporary defunctioning ileostomy can reduce the consequences of anastomotic leak following low anterior resection. However, some patients never have their ileostomy reversed and in other cases the time to reversal of ileostomy can be delayed. The aim of this study was to identify the ileostomy closure rate following anterior resection, time to closure of ileostomy, reasons for delay in reversal and whether delay was associated with an increased complication rate. Methods Data were collected retrospectively on consecutive patients undergoing defunctioning ileostomy following anterior resection for rectal cancer, between January 2009 and August 2013. Data were collected on reversal of ileostomy rates, time to reversal, reasons for delayed reversal (defined as > 6 months) and complications following reversal. Results One hundred seventy patients were studied (median age 69 years, range 41 - 90 years), of whom 117 (69%) were male. One hundred twenty-seven (75%) patients had their ileostomies reversed. Median time to reversal was 6 months (range 1 - 42). In 63 patients who had delayed reversal, reasons were adjuvant chemotherapy (22, 35%), medical illness (14, 22%), anastomotic leak (9, 14%), and others (4, 7%). Postoperative complications occurred in 33 patients (26%). There was no postoperative mortality. Univariate analysis showed that delayed reversal was associated with an increased rate of complications and longer length of hospital stay following reversal (P < 0.05). Conclusions One in four defunctioning ileostomies are not closed following anterior resection in our unit. Of those that are closed, approximately 50% have delayed closure beyond 6 months which is associated with increased risk of complications following their ileostomy reversal. PMID:26251682

  11. Trace mineral absorption status in infants with ileostomies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infants with ileostomies are often supplemented with zinc and limited in copper, because of potential increased bilious zinc loss and increased cholestasis due to reduced copper excretion. However, no data exist on zinc or copper balance in infants with ileostomies. To determine the effect of an ile...

  12. Impairment of 'ileostomy adaptation' in patients after ileal resection.

    PubMed

    Hill, G L; Mair, W S; Goligher, J C

    1974-12-01

    Ileostomists claim that in the months following the establishment of an ileostomy, the faecal output decreases in volume and becomes less fluid. It is claimed that this ;ileostomy adaptation' does not occur in those patients who have had an ileal resection. To determine whether ileostomy adaptation does occur and to examine its physiological mechanisms, 10 ileostomy patients were studied. Five had had ileal resection and five had not. The output of fluid, sodium, and potassium from the ileostomy was studied in each patient for the first 11 days after ileostomy and again at six months. Those patients in whom the terminal ileum was preserved had small faecal outputs of fluid and sodium from the outset, and the water content of the effluent was significantly less at six months. After rapid expansion of the extracellular fluid by intravenous saline, there was a marked increase in faecal volume and sodium output. In those patients with an ileal resection, the faecal volume and sodium output were more than two and a half times greater than those for the non-resected group. At six months there was no change in either the volume or chemistry of the effluent. After intravenous saline, no faecal response was observed. It is therefore concluded that ileostomy adaptation does occur and it is a response of the intestine to conserve body salt. This response is lacking in ileostomists who have had an ileal resection.

  13. Percutaneous transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy in a porcine survival model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Chen, Su-Yu; Wang, Yong-Guang; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Cai, He-Li; Lin, Kai; Xie, Zhao-Fei; Dong, Fen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To introduce natural orifice transgastric endoscopic surgery (NOTES) tube ileostomy using pelvis-directed submucosal tunneling endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopic tube ileostomy. METHODS Six live pigs (three each in the non-survival and survival groups) were used. A double-channeled therapeutic endoscope was introduced perorally into the stomach. A gastrostomy was made using a 2-cm transversal mucosal incision following the creation of a 5-cm longitudinal pelvis-directed submucosal tunnel. The pneumoperitoneum was established via the endoscope. In the initial three operations of the series, a laparoscope was transumbilically inserted for guiding the tunnel direction, intraperitoneal spatial orientation and distal ileum identification. Endoscopic tube ileostomy was conducted by adopting an introducer method and using a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Catheter Kit equipped with the Loop Fixture. The distal tip of the 15 Fr catheter was placed toward the proximal limb of the ileum to optimize intestinal content drainage. Finally, the tunnel entrance of the gastrostomy was closed using nylon endoloops with the aid of a twin grasper. The gross and histopathological integrity of gastrostomy closure and the abdominal wall-ileum stoma tract formation were assessed 1 wk after the operation. RESULTS Transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy was successful in all six pigs, without major bleeding. The mean operating time was 71 min (range: 60-110 min). There were no intraoperative complications or hemodynamic instability. The post-mortem, which was conducted 1-wk postoperatively, showed complete healing of the gastrostomy and adequate stoma tract formation of ileostomy. CONCLUSION Transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy is technically feasible and reproducible in an animal model, and this technique is worthy of further improvement. PMID:27729743

  14. Primary Adenocarcinoma of an Ileostomy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Meena A.; Lo, Amy; Bellaguarda, Emanuelle; Strong, Scott; Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Although Crohn's disease has been associated with an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma, primary adenocarcinoma arising from an ileostomy is a complication that has been rarely documented in Crohn's disease. Chronic small bowel inflammation may lead to development of malignancy through the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. We report a case of a 61-year-old woman with Crohn's ileocolitis diagnosed with a primary adenocarcinoma at the ileostomy with metastases to the liver 47 years after proctocolectomy, and review the literature. PMID:27622191

  15. Adenocarcinoma arising at ileostomy sites: Two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Procaccino, Lauren; Rehman, Sameer; Abdurakhmanov, Alexander; McWhorter, Peter; La Gamma, Nicholas; Bhaskaran, Madhu C; Maurer, James; Grimaldi, Gregory M; Rilo, Horacio; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene; Molmenti, Ernesto P; Procaccino, John

    2015-06-27

    Total colectomy with ileostomy placement is a treatment for patients with inflammatory bowel disease or familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). A rare and late complication of this treatment is carcinoma arising at the ileostomy site. We describe two such cases: a 78-year-old male 30 years after subtotal colectomy and ileostomy for FAP, and an 85-year-old male 50 years after colectomy and ileostomy for ulcerative colitis. The long latency period between creation of the ileostomies and development of carcinoma suggests a chronic metaplasia due to an irritating/inflammatory causative factor. Surgical excision of the mass and relocation of the stoma is the mainstay of therapy, with possible benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy. Newly developed lesions at stoma sites should be biopsied to rule out the possibility of this rare ileostomy complication.

  16. Pregnancy after jejuno-ileostomy because of obesity.

    PubMed

    Olow, B; Akesson, B A; Dencker, H; Gréen, A; Norryd, C

    1976-01-01

    In four cases of pregnancy after jejuno-ileostomy because of massive obesity intestinal absorption was adequate for the nutrition of both the baby and the mother. It appears that such an operation because of obestiy does not contraindicate later pregnancy; In one case postoperative loss of body weight probably made pregnancy possible. In extremely adipose women who are for some unknown reason infertile and wish to have a child a shunt operation might perhaps be offered.

  17. Feasibility and Outcome of Proximal Catheter Ileostomy – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Maulana M.; Ahmad, Shakeel; Hasan, Syed H.; Haleem, Shahla

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Loop ileostomy has high complication rates and causes much patient inconvenience. This study was carried out to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of a proximal catheter ileostomy in place of loop ileostomy in patients treated by intestinal repair and/or resection-anastomosis.Design: Prospective study.Setting: J. N. Medical College Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. Patients and Methods: From November 2006 to November 2009, in all patients treated surgically by primary repair and/or resection-anastomosis of small and/or large bowel, we constructed a catheter ileostomy when a defunctioning proximal protective loop ileostomy was considered advisable. Catheter ileostomy was constructed in the fashion of catheter jejunostomy, with postoperative saline irrigation. Results: Catheter ileostomy was performed in 20 patients in the 3-year period. The mean age of the subjects was 28.6 years and the male: female ratio was 1.86:1. Four patients died of septicemia and multiple organ failure unrelated to catheter ileostomy in the immediate postoperative period. Catheter ileostomy started functioning within 48 hours of the operation, and twice-daily irrigation was found sufficient in 81.25% of the surviving patients. Only one patient developed peritubal leak with mild skin excoriation that cleared within 5 days. Another patient with Koch's abdomen underwent conversion to loop colostomy on re-exploration for postoperative adhesive obstruction. There was no instance of intestinal leak. Ileostomy wounds closed spontaneously within 7–14 days of catheter removal, and none required formal closure. Hospital stay ranged from 12–35 days (mean: 23 days). Conclusions: Catheter ileostomy is effective in protecting intestinal anastomosis/repair; there is minimal morbidity and no catheter-related leak/mortality, and we recommend the procedure. PMID:21727735

  18. Considerations for diagnosis and management of ileostomy-related malignancy: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex; Davis, Bradley; Snyder, Jon; Pulskamp, Sara; Nestok, Blake; Rafferty, Janice; Marcello, Peter; Paquette, Ian M

    2014-05-01

    Malignancy associated with a long-standing ileostomy is a rare occurrence reported as early as 3 years after ileostomy placement. Patients most commonly present first to their ostomy care nurse with peristomal skin changes unresponsive to conservative measures. To elucidate presentation and management, two cases of male patients with ileostomy-related with malignancy (one lymphoma and one squamous cell carcinoma) are discussed. Both patients had undergone proctocolectomy with end ileostomy decades prior. Symptoms in the lymphoma patient included complaints of skin irritation, stoma mucosa changes and friability, and a persistent rash around the ostomy; he was found to have small bowel friability and a peristomal mass arising from the terminal ileum that was resected en bloc with the ileostomy, the surrounding skin, and associated abdominal wall musculature. The patient with squamous cell carcinoma had developed a gray-tan skin lesion around his ileostomy site; he underwent exploratory laparotomy with wide local excision of the abdominal wall including ileostomy site, distal ileum, and squamous cell carcinoma, and resiting of the ileostomy to the contralateral abdominal wall. Ostomy care providers should be aware of the clinical presentation of ostomy-associated malignancy to ensure thorough evaluation and prompt referral for surgical management are provided.

  19. Elemental diets role in treatment of high ileostomy output and other gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Kamran; Al Dulaimi, David

    2015-01-01

    Elemental diet (ED) has been used widely in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders, especially with the management of Crohn's disease. This modality of diets provides all essential nutrients, and contains protein in the form of free amino acids that are theoretically easily absorbed. High output ileostomies are a rare but important complications of stoma formation following bowel surgery. Treatments could be challenging and include anti-diarrhoeals, octreotide and proton pump inhibitors. There is very little research regarding the use of elemental diets in the treatment of patients with post-operative high ileostomy outputs. Adequate management of high output ileostomies might prevent significant morbidity. In this case report, we describe a patient who underwent a subtotal colectomy for ulcerative colitis complicated by refractory high ileostomy output despite maximal standard medical therapy for years. The ileostomy output was dramatically reduced following the introduction of an elemental diet. This case suggests a possible role for the introduction of an elemental diet in the management of high output ileostomies. Besides presenting this case with high output ileostomy, we reviewed the role of ED in other gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25584179

  20. Ileostomy Complications in Infants less than 1500 grams – Frequent but Manageable

    PubMed Central

    Kargl, Simon; Wagner, Oliver; Pumberger, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Background: In very low birth weight infants abdominal emergency surgery may result in ileostomy formation. We observed a frequent stoma complications in these patients. This retrospective analysis put light on ileostomy-related problems and complications in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Materials and Methods: In a seven-year retrospective chart review (2008 - 2014) infants with ileostomy formation weighing less than 1500 grams at time of operation were identified and reviewed. Data analysis included demographic data, complications and short term outcomes. Results: Thirty patients were included. Ileostomy was formed for spontaneous intestinal perforation (SIP) (n=17), meconium obstruction of prematurity (MOP) (n=6), midgut volvulus (MV) (n=5), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) (n=1) and Hirschsprung’s disease (HD) (n=1). Three patients died before ileostomy reversal was considered. In seven patients planned ileostomy reversal was done. Twenty infants had stoma related complications (stoma prolapse, prestomal obstruction, stoma retraction, high output stoma, peristomal skin excoriation, and stomal ischemia). Complications did not correlate with underlying diseases. Stomal complications necessitated earlier stoma reversal (mean 62 days). Postoperative complications after stoma reversal occurred in three children (wound dehiscence, adhesion ileus, anastomotic stricture). Conclusions: Although ileostomy related complications are frequent in very low birth weight infants, mortality is low. Morbidity is manageable. PMID:28083490

  1. Diet and health of people with an ileostomy. 1. Dietary assessment.

    PubMed

    Bingham, S; Cummings, J H; McNeil, N I

    1982-05-01

    1. People with an ileostomy experience digestive problems with some foods. Why those foods are avoided is not known nor is it certain whether this interferes with the nutritional adequacy of their diet. 2. A detailed dietary assessment has therefore been made of thirty-seven subjects with ileostomies and a similar number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All food and drink eaten over 1 week was weighed and recorded. In addition. A larger group of seventy-nine ileostomy subjects and seventy matched controls answered a questionnaire designed to identify foods which upset them and which they avoided. 3. Total nutrient and energy intakes were similar in the two groups but the subjects with an ileostomy ate less dietary fibre (g/d; mean + SD: ileostomy subjects 18.0 +/- 5.9, controls 20.9 +/- 5.5; P less than 0.05) mainly due to lower fruit and vegetable intakes. Iron and vitamins A and C intakes were also less. 4. A majority of ileostomy subjects had a pattern of food intake different from the controls, taking more of their energy in the morning and less at night. A variety of food items upset more than half of them including nuts, pips, seeds, skins, onions, beetroot, lettuce, raw cabbage and carrot, peas, sweetcorn, mushrooms and dried fruit. 5. On the basis of the results it is possible to formulate general dietary advice for people with an ileostomy.

  2. Temporary Diverting Ileostomy via the Umbilicus: a Small Case Series.

    PubMed

    Mushaya, C D; Chandra, Raaj; Sansom, Wendy; Keck, James

    2015-03-01

    The umbilicus, a natural orifice, which is used as an access port during laparoscopic surgery, can be used as a stoma site with potential superior cosmetic results as one less incision is then required. Our objective was to assess the efficacy and safety of the umbilical stoma in a selected group of patients. This is a prospective case series in hospital patients admitted as emergency or elective. Patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery with a planned ileostomy at Box Hill Hospital were approached and invited to participate in the study, with the stoma being fashioned on the umbilicus. Outcomes of interest included demographics, the details regarding the original indication for operation, operative and hospital related outcomes, postoperative bowel related complications, and other surgical and medical complications. Outcomes of a total of 10 (5 males) patients who underwent umbilical covering ileostomy during the study period were analyzed. Two patients with ulcerative colitis had the second stage of their operation converting their end stomas to loop stoma. These were counted twice, totaling 12 stomas in 10 patients. Three patients had their umbistomas after receiving neoadjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. The median period patients have had umbistomas is 113 days. Overall morbidity during the initial operation was low, except for 1 patient who had a small bowel injury. There was no mortality. Minor peristomal skin changes were the most common postoperative complication. Three patients had their stomas reversed with excellent cosmesis. Umbistomas appear to be a safe and effective way to fashion covering stomas post laparoscopic surgery and save the patient an added incision with excellent cosmetic results.

  3. Temporary Diverting Ileostomy via the Umbilicus: a Small Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Mushaya, C. D.; Chandra, Raaj; Sansom, Wendy; Keck, James

    2015-01-01

    The umbilicus, a natural orifice, which is used as an access port during laparoscopic surgery, can be used as a stoma site with potential superior cosmetic results as one less incision is then required. Our objective was to assess the efficacy and safety of the umbilical stoma in a selected group of patients. This is a prospective case series in hospital patients admitted as emergency or elective. Patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery with a planned ileostomy at Box Hill Hospital were approached and invited to participate in the study, with the stoma being fashioned on the umbilicus. Outcomes of interest included demographics, the details regarding the original indication for operation, operative and hospital related outcomes, postoperative bowel related complications, and other surgical and medical complications. Outcomes of a total of 10 (5 males) patients who underwent umbilical covering ileostomy during the study period were analyzed. Two patients with ulcerative colitis had the second stage of their operation converting their end stomas to loop stoma. These were counted twice, totaling 12 stomas in 10 patients. Three patients had their umbistomas after receiving neoadjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. The median period patients have had umbistomas is 113 days. Overall morbidity during the initial operation was low, except for 1 patient who had a small bowel injury. There was no mortality. Minor peristomal skin changes were the most common postoperative complication. Three patients had their stomas reversed with excellent cosmesis. Umbistomas appear to be a safe and effective way to fashion covering stomas post laparoscopic surgery and save the patient an added incision with excellent cosmetic results. PMID:25785324

  4. Use of Ozone to Treat Ileostomy Dermatitis in an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Biçer, Şenol; Sayar, İlyas; Gürsul, Cebrail; Işık, Arda; Aydın, Merve; Peker, Kemal; Demiryilmaz, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Background Dermatitis associated with ileostomy is an important problem that affects many people, especially children. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of ozone on dermatitis due to ileostomy, and to develop an alternative treatment option. Material/Methods A total of 28 rats were divided into 4 groups: control, ileostomy, ozone, and zinc oxide. Ileostomy was performed in all rats except the control group. After a 1-week waiting time, the ozone group was administered ozone therapy and the zinc oxide group was administered zinc oxide cream locally once a day for a total of 7 days. All rats were sacrificed at the end of this period. The efficacy of treatment was examined by biochemical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical parameters. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), total glutathione (tGSH), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and total oxidant status (TOS) were measured from tissue. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were examined immunohistochemically. Results Dermatitis occurred pathologically in all rats that underwent ileostomy surgery. The lowest dermatitis score was in the ozone treatment group (p<0.05). Ileostomy dermatitis caused increased levels of MDA and TOS. Ozone treatment resulted in reduced MDA and TOS levels, while the levels of tGSH and TAC were increased (p<0.05). Both VEGF and PCNA immunostaining were augmented in the ozone treatment group (p<0.05). Conclusions Local ozone application may be a good alternative compared to the conventional treatment methods for the prevention of skin lesions that develop after ileostomy. PMID:26947591

  5. The Impact of Ileostomy-Related Complications on the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Uma R.; Kao, Lillian S.; You, Y. Nancy; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Skibber, John M.; Feig, Barry W.; Nguyen, Sa; Chang, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radical resection is the primary treatment for rectal cancer. When anastomosis is possible, a temporary ileostomy is used to decrease morbidity from a poorly healed anastomosis. However, ileostomies are associated with complications, dehydration, and need for a second operation. Our purpose was to evaluate the impact of ileostomy related complications on the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent sphincter preserving surgery between January 2005 and December 2010 at a tertiary cancer center. The primary outcome was the overall rate of ileostomy related complications. Secondary outcomes included complications related to ileostomy status, ileostomy closure, anastomotic complications at primary resection, rate of stoma closure, and completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. Statistical analyses were performed with STATA 12. Results A total of 294 patients were analyzed, 32% (n=95) were women. Two hundred seventy-one (92%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The median tumor distance from the anal verge was 7 centimeters (interquartile range 5-10). Two hundred eighty-one (96%) underwent stoma closure at a median 7 months (interquartile range 5.4 – 8.3). The most common complication related to readmission was dehydration (n=32, 11%). Readmission within 60 days of primary resection was associated with delay in initiating adjuvant chemotherapy (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.42-6.38, p=0.004). Conclusion Diverting ileostomies created during surgical treatment of rectal cancers are associated with morbidity; however this is balanced against the risk of anastomosis-related morbidity at rectal resection. Given the potential benefit of fecal diversion, patient-oriented interventions to improve ostomy management, particularly during adjuvant chemotherapy, can be expected to yield marked benefits. PMID:24085329

  6. Increased postoperative complications after protective ileostomy closure delay: An institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Perez, Ines; Leon, Miguel; Pastor, Daniel; Diaz Dominguez, Joaquin; Cantero, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the morbidity and complications associated to ileostomy reversal in colorectal surgery patients, and if these are related to the time of closure. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 93 patients, who had undergone elective ileostomy closure between 2009 and 2013 was performed. Demographic, clinical and surgical variables were reviewed for analysis. All complications were recorded, and classified according to the Clavien-Dindo Classification. Statistical univariate and multivariate analysis was performed, setting a P value of 0.05 for significance. RESULTS: The patients had a mean age of 60.3 years, 58% male. The main procedure for ileostomy creation was rectal cancer (56%), and 37% had received preoperative chemo-radiotherapy. The average delay from creation to closure of the ileostomy was 10.3 mo. Postoperative complications occurred in 40% of the patients, with 1% mortality. The most frequent were ileus (13%) and wound infection (13%). Pseudomembranous colitis appeared in 4%. Increased postoperative complications were associated with delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.041). Male patients had more complications (P = 0.042), mainly wound infections (P = 0.007). Pseudomembranous colitis was also associated with the delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.003). End-to-end intestinal anastomosis without resection was significantly associated with postoperative ileus (P = 0.037). CONCLUSION: Although closure of a protective ileostomy is a fairly common surgical procedure, it has a high rate of complications, and this must be taken into account when the indication is made. The delay in stoma closure can increase the rate of complications in general, and specifically wound infections and colitis. PMID:25276286

  7. Complications after Loop Ileostomy Closure: A Retrospective Analysis of 132 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Poskus, Eligijus; Kildusis, Edvinas; Smolskas, Edgaras; Ambrazevicius, Marijus; Strupas, Kestutis

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Closure of a loop ileostomy is a relatively simple procedure although many studies have demonstrated high morbidity rates following it. Methods to reduce the number of complications, such as timing of closure or different surgical closure techniques, are investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experience of the Abdominal Surgery Center at Vilnius University Hospital (VUH) ‘Santariskiu klinikos’ to review the complications after closure of loop ileostomy and to identify potential risk factors for postoperative complications. Methods Data from 132 patients who underwent closure of loop ileostomy from 2003 to 2013 at the Abdominal Surgery Center of VUH were collected, including demographics, causes of ileostomy formation, additional diseases, time from creation to closure of ileostomy, anastomotic technique, duration of the operation, postoperative complications, and hospital stay after surgery. The operations were performed by 15 surgeons with varying experience assisted by surgical residents. Experience in ileostomy closure was defined by the number of procedures performed. Results Complications occurred in 24 patients (18.2%), with 20 of them having surgical complications: bowel obstruction (9 (6.8%)), wound infection (4 (3.0%)), peritonitis due to anastomotic leak (3 (2.3%)), intra-abdominal abscess (2 (1.5%)), anastomotic leak with enterocutaneous fistula (1 (0.76%)), and bleeding (1 (0.76%)). 4 patients had non-surgical complications: postoperative diarrhea (2 (1.5%)), urinary retention (1 (0.76%)), and deep vein thrombosis (1 (0.76%)). Most complications were classified as group II according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. 2 patients died (1.5%). The anastomotic technique used did not affect the outcome. The experience of the surgeon as judged by the frequency of the procedure was the main factor affecting postoperative morbidity significantly (p = 0.03). Conclusion Our study revealed that the rate of postoperative

  8. Ileostomy for Non-Traumatic Ileal Perforations: Is this the Beginning of the End?

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Rajashekara Gangappa; Chowdary, Prashanth Basappa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ileal perforations are a common place of occurrence in emergency operation rooms around India. They are also significant contributors to mortality in our country. They are very distressing for patients because of the high morbidity of a laparotomy and in certain cases a stoma if its necessity is felt by the operating surgeon. The nature of the disease itself predisposes to a number of complications including wound infections, faecal fistulas and complications associated with a stoma. Aim To evaluate the role of ileostomy in patients with non-traumatic ileal perforation. Materials and Methods A total of 192 cases of ileal perforation, diagnosed per-operatively, were prospectively studied between June 2012 and July 2014. Cases were treated according to standard resuscitation protocols and underwent repair of the ileal perforation either as primary closure or as a bowel resection and anastomosis with or without a proximal diversion ileostomy. Cases were followed up for a period of six months and immediate and late complications and outcomes were noted. Results A total of 192 patients were studied during the given study period out of which 170 (88.5%) were males. The disease was treated primarily without diversion stoma in 176 patients and in 16 patients a proximal diversion ileostomy was performed. The overall mortality was 15 (7.8%) that was noted to be not significantly different in patients with respect to the performance of a stoma. Enterocutaneous fistula was a complication seen exclusively in the non-ileostomy group whereas stomal complications were expectedly noted only in the stoma group. Conclusion The authors found that though conventional ileostomy diversion may appear a safe option in patients with ileal perforations, it has its own additional morbidity, which at times can be very difficult to manage. An ileostomy is of use in a very small group of patients that is diminishing as better facilities and equipment are obtained to manage this

  9. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors Associated With the Nonreversal Ileostomy Following Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Gil Jae; Park, Sung Won; Lee, Won-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A loop ileostomy is used to protect an anastomosis after anal sphincter-preserving surgery, especially in patients with low rectal cancer, but little information is available concerning risk factors associated with a nonreversal ileostomy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors of ileostomy nonreversibility after a sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. Methods Six hundred seventy-nine (679) patients with rectal cancer who underwent sphincter-preserving surgery between January 2004 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 679, 135 (19.9%) underwent a defunctioning loop ileostomy of temporary intent, and these patients were divided into two groups, that is, a reversal group (RG, 112 patients) and a nonreversal group (NRG, 23 patients) according to the reversibility of the ileostomy. Results In 23 of the 135 rectal cancer patients (17.0%) that underwent a diverting ileostomy, stoma reversal was not possible for the following reasons; stage IV rectal cancer (11, 47.8%), poor tone of the anal sphincter (4, 17.4%), local recurrence (2, 8.7%), anastomotic leakage (1, 4.3%), radiation proctitis (1, 4.3%), and patient refusal (4, 17.4%). The independent risk factors of the nonreversal group were anastomotic leakage or fistula, stage IV cancer, local recurrence, and comorbidity. Conclusion Postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage or fistula, advanced primary disease (stage IV), local recurrence and comorbidity were identified as risk factors of a nonreversal ileostomy. These factors should be considered when drafting prudential guidelines for ileostomy closure. PMID:26161377

  10. Cost Effectiveness of a Novel Attempt to Reduce Readmission after Ileostomy Creation

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Ahsan; Huang, Emina; Goldstein, Lindsey; Hughes, Steven J.; Tan, Sanda A.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Dehydration is a common complication after ileostomy creation and is the most frequent reason for postoperative readmission to the hospital. We sought to determine the clinical and economic impact of an outpatient intervention to decrease readmissions for dehydration after ileostomy creation. Methods: All new ileostomates from 09/2011 through 10/2012 at the University of Florida were enrolled to receive an ileostomy education and management protocol and a daily telephone call for 3 weeks after discharge. Counseling and medication adjustments were provided, with a satisfaction survey at the end. Outcomes of these patients were compared to those in a historical control cohort. A cost analysis was conducted to calculate the savings to the hospital. Results: Thirty-eight patients were enrolled. All patients required telephone counseling, and the mean satisfaction score rating was 4.69, on a scale of 1 to 5. The readmission rate for dehydration within 30 days of discharge decreased significantly from 65% before intervention to 16% (5/32 patients) after intervention (P = .002). The length of readmission hospital stay decreased from a mean of 4.2 days before the introduction of the intervention to 3 days after. Cost analysis revealed that the actual total hospital cost of dehydration-specific readmission decreased from $88,858 to $25,037, a saving of $63,821. Conclusion: A standardized ileostomy pathway with comprehensive patient education and outpatient telephone follow-up is cost effective, has a positive influence on patient satisfaction, and reduces dehydration-related readmission rates. PMID:28144122

  11. Postoperative management after loop ileostomy closure: are we keeping patients in hospital too long?

    PubMed Central

    Baraza, W; Wild, J; Barber, W; Brown, S

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Recent studies have shown that closure of loop ileostomy can be performed in the day-case setting, reducing the length and cost of hospitalisation. By analysing our patients who have undergone reversal, we aimed to determine the length of hospital stay and potential factors behind stays beyond 24 h. PATIENTS AND METHODS A database of patients undergoing closure of loop ileostomy at one colorectal unit was examined. The times taken to discharge, morbidity and re-admission rates were recorded. RESULTS Eighty patients underwent reversal of ileostomy between January 2001 and January 2006. Median age was 63 years (range, 22–81 years). The median length of stay was 4 days (range, 2–32 days). The median length of stay in patients without complications was 4 days. Many appeared able to be discharged earlier. Seventy-two patients (90%) were able to tolerate a solid diet within 48 h and 54 (67.5%) had bowel function within 3 days. Six patients went home before bowel function; none of these were re-admitted. Twenty patients (25%) developed complications, which included wound infection (8%), small bowel obstruction/ileus (6%), enterocutaneous fistula (1%), anastomotic leak (1%), and late abdominal wall abscess (1%). Of the patients, 16% stayed longer than 5 days despite having no postoperative complications. CONCLUSIONS The majority of patients undergoing loop ileostomy reversal at our institution can be discharged earlier than they are at present. Support in the community and the implementation of modified UK day-case surgery protocols are suggested to help shorten patients' length of stay. PMID:20056062

  12. Prospective analysis of indications and early complications of emergency temporary loop ileostomies for perforation peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Poras; Nabi, Ishaq; Ranjan, Gyan; Tiwari, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Kapur, Arun; Arora, Mohinder P.

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the indications, nature, and rate of early complications of temporary loop ileostomy created in emergency for benign diseases, their management, and to find out the associated risk factors. Methods A total of 630 patients undergoing temporary loop ileostomy for benign diseases were studied prospectively over a period of 6 years. Stoma-related early complications occurring within 6-8 weeks were analyzed. Only emergency cases were included in this study. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data and statistical significance was evaluated by applying the Pearson’s chi-square test. Results Typhoid perforation (n=402) was the most commonpathology, followed by tuberculosis (n=106); trauma (n=81); and intestinal obstruction with gangrenous bowel (n=41). 299 patients had no stoma-related complications. Skin excoriation was the most commonstoma-related complication. Age more than 50 years; shock at presentation; delay in presentation; delay in surgery; presence of comorbidities; and surgery done out of working hours, were associated with increased complications. Conclusion Temporary loop ileostomy for perforation peritonitis due to benign systemic diseases like typhoid fever and tuberculosis confers a very high morbidity. PMID:25609137

  13. Comparing methods of ileostomy closure constructed in colorectal surgery in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Nurettin; Ciyiltepe, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stoma construction is a life saver method for emergent and elective operations in colorectal surgery. However, they are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Aim To compare the operative findings, early postoperative complications, and costs of stapled and hand-sewn closures in loop ileostomies that are constructed in emergent and elective colorectal surgery. Material and methods The data of 68 patients requiring loop ileostomies during colorectal surgery were retrospectively evaluated. SPSS (version 20) was used for data analysis. Results The study group consisted of 44 men and 24 women with a mean age of 55.5 years. The ileostomy closures were performed with hand-sewn method in 36 patients (group 1) and stapled method in 32 patients (group 2). The mean operation time was 75.4 min in group 1 and 46.7 min in group 2 (p < 0.001). Early postoperative complications were wound infection (8.8%), small bowel obstruction (6.06%), and anastomotic leakage (2.9%). Total costs, flatulence and faeces outlet time, oral feeding starting time, time of hospital stay, and early postoperative complications were lower in the stapled group. Conclusions Morbidity and mortality rates of stoma construction and its closure are still considerable. Lower anastomotic leakage rate, complication rate, and costs and shorter operative times in the stapled group make this method preferable. PMID:25396004

  14. Fortune of temporary ileostomies in patients treated with laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haksal, Mustafa; Okkabaz, Nuri; Atici, Ali Emre; Civil, Osman; Ozdenkaya, Yasar; Erdemir, Ayhan; Aksakal, Nihat

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The current study aims to analyze the risk factors for the failure of ileostomy reversal after laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Methods All patients who underwent a laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer with a diverting ileostomy between 2007 and 2014 were abstracted. The patients who underwent and did not undergo a diverting ileostomy procedure were compared regarding patient, tumor, treatment related parameters, and survival. Results Among 160 (103 males [64.4%], mean [± standard deviation] age was 58.1 ± 11.9 years) patients, stoma reversal was achieved in 136 cases (85%). Anastomotic stricture (n = 13, 52.4%) was the most common reason for stoma reversal. These were the risk factors for the failure of stoma reversal: Male sex (P = 0.035), having complications (P = 0.01), particularly an anastomotic leak (P < 0.001), or surgical site infection (P = 0.019) especially evisceration (P = 0.011), requirement for reoperation (P = 0.003) and longer hospital stay (P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis revealed that male sex (odds ratio [OR], 7.82; P = 0.022) and additional organ resection (OR, 6.71; P = 0.027) were the risk factors. Five-year survival rates were similar (P = 0.143). Conclusion Fifteen percent of patients cannot receive a stoma reversal after laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Anastomotic stricture is the most common reason for the failure of stoma takedown. Having complications, particularly an anastomotic leak and the necessity of reoperation, limits the stoma closure rate. Male sex and additional organ resection are the risk factors for the failure in multivariate analyses. These patients require a longer hospitalization period, but have similar survival rates as those who receive stoma closure procedure. PMID:28090504

  15. [Enteropathic acrodermatitis in a patient with high-out-put ileostomy].

    PubMed

    Junquera Bañares, Sonia; Oria Mundín, Eugenio; Botella-Carretero, José Ignacio

    2014-02-01

    Zinc deficiency is relatively common in certain pathologies, although its clinical manifestation is uncommon. We present the case of a patient who was admitted presenting hyponatremic dehydration and pre-renal failure secondary to high-output ileostomy and oral intolerance. Although the ileostomy output was normalized within 3 days of admission and initial zinc plasma levels were normal, after being fed with TPN supplemented with 13 mg/day of zinc, he suffered a severe zinc deficit with enteropathic acrodermatitis that was completely resolved after one week with 26.5 mg/day. However, plasma levels did not return to normal until one month on therapy with high doses of zinc. Zinc plasma levels are not a good indicator of zinc stores in the body and many times their changes are a late indicator of zinc deficit. There is not a correlation between the clinical improvement and normalization of zinc levels, being common the clinical resolution within few days of the supplementation without observing an increase of zinc plasma levels.

  16. Purse-String Versus Linear Conventional Skin Wound Closure of an Ileostomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Alvandipour, Mina; Gharedaghi, Babak; Khodabakhsh, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Infection is one of the most frequent complications that can occur after ileostomy closure. The incidence of wound infection depends on the skin closure technique, but there is no agreement on the perfect closure method for an ileostomy wound. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of infection, the patient's approval, and the patient's pain between purse-string closure (PSC) and the usual linear closure (LC) of a stoma wound. Methods This randomized clinical trial enrolled 66 patients who underwent a stoma closure from February 2015 to May 2015 in Sari Emam Khomeini Hospital. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the stoma closing method: the PSC group (n = 34) and the LC group (n = 32). The incidences of infection for the 2 groups were compared, and the patients' satisfaction and pain with the stoma were determined by using a questionnaire. Results Infection occurred in 1 of 34 PSC patients (2.9%) and in 7 of 32 LC patients (21.8%), and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.021). Patients in the PSC group were more satisfied with the resulting wound scar and its cosmetic appearance at one month and three months after surgery (P = 0.043). Conclusion After stoma closure, PSC was associated with a significantly lower incidence of wound infection and greater patient satisfaction compared to LC. However, the healing period for patients who underwent PSC was longer than it was for those who underwent LC. PMID:27626025

  17. Protective effects of terminal ileostomy against bacterial translocation in a rat model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhi-Liang; Yu, Wen-Kui; Tan, Shan-Jun; Duan, Kai-Peng; Dong, Yi; Bai, Xiao-Wu; Xu, Lin; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of terminal ileostomy on bacterial translocation (BT) and systemic inflammation after intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. METHODS: Thirty-two rats were assigned to either the sham-operated group, I/R group, I/R + resection and anastomosis group, or the I/R + ileostomy group. The superior mesenteric artery was occluded for 60 min. After 4 h, tissue samples were collected for analysis. BT was assessed by bacteriologic cultures, intestinal permeability and serum levels of endotoxin; systemic inflammation was assessed by serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, as well as by the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and by intestinal histopathology. RESULTS: Intestinal I/R injury not only caused morphologic damage to ileal mucosa, but also induced BT, increased MPO activity and promoted the release of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in serum. BT and ileal mucosa injuries were significantly improved and levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in serum were decreased in the I/R + ileostomy group compared with the I/R + resection and anastomosis group. CONCLUSION: Terminal ileostomy can prevent the detrimental effects of intestinal I/R injury on BT, intestinal tissue, and inflammation. PMID:25548488

  18. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  19. Absorption, metabolism, and excretion of cider dihydrochalcones in healthy humans and subjects with an ileostomy.

    PubMed

    Marks, Serena C; Mullen, William; Borges, Gina; Crozier, Alan

    2009-03-11

    The phloretin-O-glycosides, phloretin-2'-O-glucoside and phloretin-2'-O-(2''-O-xylosyl)glucoside, are thought to be unique to apples and apple products. To investigate the metabolism and bioavailability of these compounds, nine healthy and five ileostomy human subjects consumed 500 mL of Thatchers Redstreak apple cider containing 46 micromol of phloretin-O-glycosides. Over the ensuing 24 h period, plasma, urine, and ileal fluid were collected prior to analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The sole metabolite present in quantifiable amounts in plasma was phloretin-2'-O-glucuronide, which reached a peak concentration (C(max)) of 73 nmol/L and 0.6 h after ingestion (T(max)) with the healthy subjects, and statistically similar values were obtained with the ileostomy volunteers. Phloretin-2'-O-glucuronide was also detected in urine along with two additional phloretin-O-glucuronides and a phloretin-O-glucuronide-O-sulfate. The quantity of phloretin metabolites excreted in urine represented 5.0 + or - 0.9% of intake in healthy volunteers and 5.5 + or - 0.6% in ileostomy volunteers. The similarity in the excretion levels of the two groups and the rapid plasma T(max) indicate absorption of the dihydrochalcones in the small intestine. Of the two major phloretin-O-glycosides in cider, only phloretin-2'-O-(2''-O-xylosyl)glucoside was recovered in ileal fluid in quantities corresponding to 22% of intake. The absence of phloretin-2'-O-glucoside in ileal fluid suggests that it is more readily absorbed than phloretin-2'-O-(2''-O-xylosyl)glucoside. Phloretin-2'-O-glucuronide, two other phloretin-O-glucuronides, one phloretin-O-glucuronide-O-sulfate, two phloretin-O-sulfates, and the aglycone phloretin were also detected in the ileal fluid. This implies that the wall of the small intestine contains beta-glycosidase, sulfuryltransferase, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activities and that, as well as being absorbed, sizable amounts of the

  20. Ileostomy obstruction by ingested apricot stone with clinical-radiological-pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    George, A J; Fallaize, R C; Bennett, J; Shabbir, J

    2015-09-15

    Patients with stomas often present with bowel obstruction, often secondary to adhesions. This case describes the presentation, investigation and management of a 62-year-old woman with an end ileostomy, who presented to hospital with acute abdominal pain and subacute bowel obstruction. Further questioning revealed the recent ingestion of an apricot stone and this was identified by multimodality imaging as the cause of the luminal obstruction in the distal ileum, just proximal to the stoma. After a failed period of conservative management, examination under anaesthesia was performed and digital extraction attempted, but this was unsuccessful. Rather than surgical stoma revision, endoscopic removal was achieved. The patient improved and was discharged the following day. However, her small bowel obstruction relapsed within 48 h. She was readmitted and underwent stoma revision with no further problems.

  1. Development and validation of a quality of life questionnaire for patients with colostomy or ileostomy

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Luis; Thorsen, Hanne; Juul, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    Background Quality of life of stoma patients is increasingly being addressed in clinical trials. However, the instruments used in the majority of these studies have not been validated specifically for stoma patients. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and validation of a quality-of-life instrument, "Stoma-QOL", specifically for patients with colostomy or ileostomy. Methods Potential items were formulated in English on the basis of the results of a series of semi-structured interviews with 169 adult stoma patients. The process resulted in a preliminary 37-item version, which was translated into French, German, Spanish and Danish, and administered repeatedly to 182 patients with colostomy or ileostomy. A psychometric selection of items was performed through Rasch Analysis. The measurement properties of the final questionnaire version were subsequently tested. Results The 20 items in the final questionnaire covered four domains – sleep, sexual activity, relations to family and close friends, and social relations to other than family and close friends. These items were found to define a unidimensional variable according to Rasch specifications (Infit MNSQ < 1.3). Internal consistency reliability calculated as Cronbach's alpha was 0.92, i.e., highly reliable. Spearman's correlation coefficients of scores across times of administration was >0.88 (p < 0.01), indicating a high test-retest reliability. Item calibrations by country calculated as ICC were 0.81 (0.67–0.91 95% CI), confirming cross-cultural comparability across the European countries included in the study. Conclusion Given the adequacy of the metric properties of the Stoma-QOL suggested by the psychometric analyses, this study confirms the suitability of the instrument in clinical practice and in clinical research. PMID:16219109

  2. Systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials comparing purse-string vs conventional linear closure of the wound following ileostomy (stoma) closure

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Muhammad Shafique; Bhatti, Muhammad I.; Miles, William FA.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this article is to systematically analyse the randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of purse-string closure (PSC) of an ileostomy wound with conventional linear closure (CLC). Methods: Randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of purse-string closure vs conventional linear closure (CLC) of ileostomy wound in patients undergoing ileostomy closure were analysed using RevMan®, and the combined outcomes were expressed as risk ratio (RR) and standardized mean difference (SMD). Results: Three randomized, controlled trials, recruiting 206 patients, were retrieved from medical electronic databases. There were 105 patients in the PSC group and 101 patients in the CLC group. There was no heterogeneity among included trials. Duration of operation (SMD: −0.18; 95% CI: −0.45, 0.09; z = 1.28; P < 0.20) and length of hospital stay (SMD: 0.01; 95% CI: −0.26, 0.28; z = 0.07; P < 0.95) was statistically similar following both approaches of ileostomy wound closure. The risk of surgical site infection (OR, 0.10; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.33; z = 3.78; P < 0.0001) was significantly reduced when ileostomy wound was closed using PSC technique. Conclusion: PSC technique for ileostomy wound is associated with a reduced risk of surgical site infection apparently without influencing the duration of operation and length of hospital stay. PMID:25011379

  3. Ileostomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden increase of very watery output. Drinking hot tea and other liquids may flush any foods that ... Pedialyte contain electrolytes. Drinking soda, milk, juice, or tea will help you get enough liquids. Try to ...

  4. Should routine contrast study be a norm before stoma reversal? A retrospective study of patients with temporary ileostomy.

    PubMed

    Saini, Pradeep; Gupta, Praanjal; Sharma, Ashish; Agarwal, Nitin; Kaur, Navneet; Gupta, Arun

    2013-04-01

    In the developed nations, temporary ileostomies are usually made in order to protect a distal anastomosis after cancer surgery. However, in India and the neighbouring countries ileal perforation is the most common indication for creating a temporary ileostomy after emergency laparotomy. It seems logical to perform a contrast study when a stoma that was made to protect a bowel anastomosis is being reversed in order to check for anastomosis healing, leak or stenosis. Although we do not know precisely when and why we started this practice, it is customary at our institute to do a contrast study before reversal of a temporary ileostomy. At some institutes a routine contrast study is never done. The utility of this practice has not previously been studied at our institute. This study tries to correlate the surgeon's clinical and operative findings with the contrast study report in order to see if it may be reasonable to reverse the stoma without a routine contrast study in selected patients where the surgeon has clearly documented absence of any gross disease in the distal bowel and who have had an uneventful post-operative period. To our knowledge this appears to be the first such attempt from our country.

  5. Split ileostomy and ileocolostomy for Crohn's disease of the colon and ulcerative colitis: a 20 year survey.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, P H; Truelove, S C; Lee, E C; Kettlewell, M G; Jewell, D P

    1983-01-01

    The clinical course of 140 patients who have had a split ileostomy for ulcerative colitis or colonic Crohn's disease over a 20 year period is reported. In 37 patients with ulcerative colitis there was no sustained improvement. In the 102 patients with Crohn's disease there was an immediate clinical improvement in 95, which was sustained in 65. Thirty patients have subsequently required a proctocolectomy for persistent inflammation, and 28 are still defunctioned. Bowel continuity was restored after 61 split ileostomies and in 44 patients intestinal continuity remains intact at the present time (mean follow up since closure = 62.5 months, range 0-231 months). It is concluded that a split ileostomy is a safe conservative operation producing at least temporary improvement in severely ill and malnourished patients with Crohn's colitis, and that if a subsequent resection becomes necessary it may be less extensive than was thought applicable at the initial operation. In 27 patients a resection has not been required. PMID:6852621

  6. A Modified Spontaneously Closed Defunctioning Tube Ileostomy After Anterior Resection of the Rectum for Rectal Cancer with a Low Colorectal Anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qin-Song; Hua, Han-Ju; Cheng, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Wei-Bing; Chen, Wen-Bin; Xu, Jia-He; Lin, Jian-Jiang

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a new technique of modified spontaneously closed defunctioning tube ileostomy after anterior resection of the rectum for rectal cancer with a low colorectal anastomosis. Patients with rectal cancer who underwent anterior resection of rectum with a low colorectal anastomosis and chose a modified defunctioning tube ileostomy between March 2012 and August 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Data on the success of the operation procedures, post-operative hospital stay, and post-operative tube ileostomy-related complications were analyzed. One hundred fifty-two patients (87 males and 65 females; 57.1 ± 17.4 years) undergoing the modified defunctioning tube ileostomy after anterior resection for rectal cancer were included. The post-operative hospital stay was 11.9 ± 3.2 days. The tube was removed on days 22.6 ± 4.1 after operation and the ileostomy wound closed spontaneously within 13.1 ± 1.9 days. Twenty-five patients felt tube-associated pain or discomfort, which was relieved after a period of adaptation and appropriate tube adjustment. Nine patients suffered from tube blockage and were treated successfully with saline irrigation. Two patients had intestinal obstruction, which was resolved with conservative treatment. Three patients developed leakage of the distal anastomosis: two were successfully treated with conservative measures and the other completely recovered after reoperation. The modified spontaneously closed defunctioning tube ileostomy appears efficacious and safe. This technique may be used to protect the distal anastomosis and simultaneously decrease the ileostomy complications, and minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with stoma takedown.

  7. Protection of low rectal anastomosis with a new tube ileostomy using a biofragmentable anastomosis ring

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liming; Huang, Qi; Wang, Jialiang; Chen, Quanning; Lin, Rui; Ge, Bujun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A temporarily defunctioning stoma, while effective at reducing symptomatic anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection (LAR) of rectal cancer, and its subsequent closure, is associated with significant morbidity. Here, we devised a new tube ileostomy using a biofragmentable anastomosis ring (TIB) with no need for reversal. This is a retrospective cohort study. From June 2011 to March 2015, TIBs were performed on 31 consecutive patients with mid- or low-rectal cancer who underwent elective laparoscopic LARs. From January 2008 to May 2011, 25 similarly diseased patients underwent elective laparoscopic LARs and conventional loop ileostomy (LI) and were included as controls. All of the anastomotic sites were within 6 cm of the anal verge. Demographic, clinical feature, and operative data were recorded. The demographic features of both groups were similar. The TIB mean surgical duration was significantly lower than in the LI group (215 ± 28 vs 245 ± 54 min, P = 0.010). Because of readmission for stoma closure, the total hospital stay of the LI group was longer than that of the TIB group (38.1 ± 26.5 vs 19.1 ± 7.9 days, respectively, P = 0.002). Ileal content was completely diverted by TIB for 13.7 ± 2.1 (range, 10–19) days postoperatively. The drainage tube was removed on postoperative day 27.8 ± 6.9 (range, 20–44), and the mean continued duration of the discharge tract, before fistula healing, was 4.5 ± 1.9 (range, 2–10) days. Postoperative complications of the 2 modalities were not significant. In the TIB group, 1 rectovaginal fistula occurred 30 days postsurgery. In the LI group, 1 rectovaginal fistula occurred 3 months after stoma closure. Both complications were treated with transverse colostomy. No major TIB associated complications were observed in the present study. TIB is a safe, feasible, effective, but time-limited diversion technique, which may reduce symptomatic anastomosis leakage after LAR

  8. Bioavailability of chlorogenic acids following acute ingestion of coffee by humans with an ileostomy.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Angélique; Steiling, Heike; Williamson, Gary; Crozier, Alan

    2010-09-01

    The intestinal absorption and metabolism of 385 micromol chlorogenic acids following a single intake of 200 mL of instant coffee by human volunteers with an ileostomy was investigated. HPLC-MS(3) analysis of 0-24h post-ingestion ileal effluent revealed the presence of 274+/-28 micromol of chlorogenic acids and their metabolites accounting for 71+/-7% of intake. Of the compounds recovered, 78% comprised parent compounds initially present in the coffee, and 22% were metabolites including free and sulfated caffeic and ferulic acids. Over a 24h period after ingestion of the coffee, excretion of chlorogenic acid metabolites in urine accounted for 8+/-1% of intake, the main compounds being ferulic acid-4-O-sulfate, caffeic acid-3-O-sulfate, isoferulic acid-3-O-glucuronide and dihydrocaffeic acid-3-O-sulfate. In contrast, after drinking a similar coffee, urinary excretion by humans with an intact colon corresponded to 29+/-4% of chlorogenic acid intake. This difference was due to the excretion of higher levels of dihydroferulic acid and feruloylglycine together with sulfate and glucuronide conjugates of dihydrocaffeic and dihydroferulic acids. This highlights the importance of colonic metabolism. Comparison of the data obtained in the current study with that of Stalmach et al. facilitated elucidation of the pathways involved in post-ingestion metabolism of chlorogenic acids and also helped distinguish between compounds absorbed in the small and the large intestine.

  9. Surgical Audit of Patients with Ileal Perforations Requiring Ileostomy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Hemkant; Pandey, Siddharth; Sheoran, Kapil Dev; Marwah, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Ileal perforation peritonitis is a frequently encountered surgical emergency in the developing countries. The choice of a procedure for source control depends on the patient condition as well as the surgeon preference. Material and Methods. This was a prospective observational study including 41 patients presenting with perforation peritonitis due to ileal perforation and managed with ileostomy. Demographic profile and operative findings in terms of number of perforations, site, and size of perforation along with histopathological findings of all the cases were recorded. Results. The majority of patients were male. Pain abdomen and fever were the most common presenting complaints. Body mass index of the patients was in the range of 15.4–25.3 while comorbidities were present in 43% cases. Mean duration of preoperative resuscitation was 14.73 + 13.77 hours. Operative findings showed that 78% patients had a single perforation; most perforations were 0.6–1 cm in size and within 15 cm proximal to ileocecal junction. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in 29.2% patients. On histopathological examination, nonspecific perforations followed by typhoid and tubercular perforations respectively were the most common. Conclusion. Patients with ileal perforations are routinely seen in surgical emergencies and their demography, clinical profile, and intraoperative findings may guide the choice of procedure to be performed. PMID:26247059

  10. Can Postoperative Nutrition be Favourably Maintained by Oral Diet in Patients with Emergency Temporary Ileostomy? A Tertiary Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Debabrata; Dey, Ramprasad; Choudhury, Krishnangshu Bhanja; Das, Gautam; Bhattacharya, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Temporary ileostomy is an emergency procedure performed in cases having septic peritonitis in presence of perforation or obstruction or gangrene of small intestine. These patients usually suffer from gross malnutrition following surgery. Aim To measure nutritional status of patients with emergency temporary ileostomy and to determine whether their postoperative nutrition can be favourably maintained by oral diet alone. Materials and Methods Sixty patients were enrolled for the study on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria during the study period from January 2012 to December 2013. Oral feeding was started as soon as ileostomy started functioning and patients expressed hunger, about 48-72 hours postoperatively. An individualized diet chart was formulated for each patient using Harris Benedict Equation. Nutritional assessment was done on 1) 1st day of oral feeding, 2) After 7 days of oral feeding, 3). After three months of oral feeding. Nutritional parameters (anthropometric, biochemical) employed were tabulated and statistically analysed with SPSS v 17, Chicago. Results Out of 60 patients, 36 males and 24 females were enrolled in the study. The patients were in the age group of 20-60 years with a mean age of 45 years. After 7 days of oral nutrition the nutritional status deteriorated with a significant decrease in body weight (p<0.001) and serum haemoglobin (p <0.001). However, at the end of the study, the patients had their nutritional status restored satisfactorily with normalization of basic parameters like bodyweight, haemoglobin and serum albumin (p<0.001). Conclusion Proper dietary advice and oral nutrition were found to be sufficient for gradual restoration and maintenance of satisfactory nutritional status in the postoperative period. PMID:26816941

  11. Primary adenocarcinoma in the ileostomy of a woman with familial adenomatous polyposis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Ileal adenomas associated with familial adenomatous polyposis are a common finding. Many recent studies following panproctocolectomy for familial adenomatous polyposis have confirmed the presence of multiple ileal adenomas and an increase in ileal mucosal proliferation. In this study, we present a case of invasive adenocarcinoma arising in a severely dysplastic tubulovillous adenoma in the ileostomy of a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis; also, we present a literature review. To the best of our knowledge, only very few cases have been reported in the literature. Case presentation A 59-year-old Caucasian woman developed a primary adenocarcinoma in her ileostomy, complicating the stoma 31 years after its formation. Conclusions Primary adenocarcinoma following panproctocolectomy for familial adenomatous polyposis is a very rare clinical entity. The risk of developing adenocarcinoma in those patients increases with time. Patient education and medical examination of the stoma are of paramount importance and should be implemented early with the need of designing a surveillance protocol for early detection and management of ileal adenomas, especially in longstanding stomas. PMID:22129430

  12. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Liver Resection for Colorectal Metastasis through Stoma Site at Time of Reversal of Diversion Ileostomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Røsok, Bård I.; Edwin, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques for liver tumors are gaining increased acceptance as an alternative to traditional resections by laparotomy. In this article we describe a laparoscopic liver resection of a metastatic lesion in a patient primarily operated for colorectal cancer. The resection was conducted as a single port procedure through the stoma aperture at time of reversal of the diversion ileostomy. Sigle incision liver resections may be less traumatic than conventional laparoscopy and could be applied in selected patients with both benign and malignant liver tumors. PMID:22091359

  13. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Liver Resection for Colorectal Metastasis through Stoma Site at Time of Reversal of Diversion Ileostomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Røsok, Bård I; Edwin, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques for liver tumors are gaining increased acceptance as an alternative to traditional resections by laparotomy. In this article we describe a laparoscopic liver resection of a metastatic lesion in a patient primarily operated for colorectal cancer. The resection was conducted as a single port procedure through the stoma aperture at time of reversal of the diversion ileostomy. Sigle incision liver resections may be less traumatic than conventional laparoscopy and could be applied in selected patients with both benign and malignant liver tumors.

  14. Vitamin A equivalency and apparent absorption of beta-carotene in ileostomy subjects using a dual-isotope dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Van Loo-Bouwman, Carolien A; Naber, Ton H J; van Breemen, Richard B; Zhu, Dongwei; Dicke, Heleen; Siebelink, Els; Hulshof, Paul J M; Russel, Frans G M; Schaafsma, Gertjan; West, Clive E

    2010-06-01

    The objective was to quantify the vitamin A equivalency of beta-carotene in two diets using a dual-isotope dilution technique and the apparent beta-carotene absorption as measured by the oral-faecal balance technique. Seventeen healthy adults with an ileostomy completed the 4-week diet-controlled, cross-over intervention study. Each subject followed both diets for 2 weeks: a diet containing vegetables low in beta-carotene content with supplemental beta-carotene in salad dressing oil ('oil diet'; mean beta-carotene intake 3.1 mg/d) and a diet containing vegetables and fruits high in beta-carotene content ('mixed diet'; mean beta-carotene intake 7.6 mg/d). Daily each subject consumed a mean of 190 microg [13C10]beta-carotene and 195 microg [13C10]retinyl palmitate in oil capsules. The vitamin A equivalency of beta-carotene was calculated as the dose-corrected ratio of [13C5]retinol to [13C10]retinol in serum. Apparent absorption of beta-carotene was determined with oral-faecal balance. Isotopic data quantified a vitamin A equivalency of [13C10]beta-carotene in oil of 3.6:1 (95 % CI 2.8, 4.6) regardless of dietary matrices differences. The apparent absorption of (labelled and dietary) beta-carotene from the 'oil diet' (30 %) was 1.9-fold higher than from the 'mixed diet' (16 %). This extrinsic labelling technique can measure precisely the vitamin A equivalency of beta-carotene in oil capsules, but it does not represent the effect of different dietary matrices.

  15. Ileostomy - changing your pouch

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pouch. Push the skin away from the seal. DO NOT pull the ostomy away from your skin. Wash your stoma and the skin around it carefully with soapy water. Use mild soap, such as Ivory, Safeguard, or ...

  16. Ileostomy and your diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... eat certain foods. Some of these foods are onions, garlic, broccoli, asparagus, cabbage, fish, some cheeses, eggs, ... medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- ...

  17. Ileostomy and your child

    MedlinePlus

    ... embarrassment. You may see some changes in your child's behavior at first. Sometimes teenagers have a harder time ... You being open and natural will help your child's behavior stay positive. Help your child learn how to ...

  18. Correction of vitamin D deficiency using sublingually administered vitamin D2 in a Crohn's disease patient with mal-absorption and a new ileostomy.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Patrick; Heaney, Robert

    2016-12-31

    Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to be associated with many adverse health problems. Studies have shown that patients with Crohn's disease who have low vitamin D levels have a poorer quality of life than those with more adequate levels. It has also been shown that patients with mal-absorption problems have a difficult time achieving normal vitamin D levels in spite of aggressive supplementation, and that exposure to UVB radiation may be the most effective treatment option for these patients. We present a case in which 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were normalized within 2 weeks in a severely vitamin D deficient patient with Crohn's disease with mal-absorption and a new ileostomy, utilizing sublingually administered vitamin D2. A 58 year-old white female was admitted with a new ileostomy following partial bowel resection due to complications from Crohn's disease. She was found to be severely vitamin D deficient at the time of admission, with a level of 6.1ng/ml on hospital day 3. Her treatment with vitamin D was delayed for a few days. She was initially treated with 5000 units of vitamin D3 orally twice a day for 3days (days 7-10). After discussion with the patient and obtaining her consent, vitamin D3 was stopped, and she was then treated with a total of 8 doses of 50,000 units of vitamin D2 administered sublingually. She was given the first 3 doses on alternating days (days 11, 13, 15), and then 5 more doses on consecutive days (days 17-21). The rise in her 25-hydroxyvitamin D level in response to treatment with sublingual vitamin D2 was significant. On day 10, after receiving 3days of orally administered vitamin D3, her level was 9.8ng/ml. One week later, after receiving 3 sublingual doses of vitamin D2, it rose to 20.3ng/ml. It was then measured on alternating days twice over the next 4days, and it rose to 45.5ng/ml, and then to 47.4ng/ml on the day of discharge to home. The major finding of this study is that sublingual administration of vitamin D2 appears to

  19. Comparison of surgical techniques for stoma closure: A retrospective study of purse-string skin closure versus conventional skin closure following ileostomy and colostomy reversal

    PubMed Central

    WADA, YUMA; MIYOSHI, NORIKATSU; OHUE, MASAYUKI; NOURA, SHINGO; FUJINO, SHIKI; SUGIMURA, KEIJIROU; AKITA, HIROFUMI; MOTOORI, MASAAKI; GOTOH, KUNIHITO; TAKAHASHI, HIDENORI; KOBAYASHI, SHOGO; OHMORI, TAKESHI; FUJIWARA, YOSHIYUKI; YANO, MASAHIKO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of postoperative complications, including superficial incisional surgical site infection (SSI) following purse-string skin closure (PS) and conventional skin closure with a drainage tube (CD) following stoma closure. A total of 55 consecutive patients who underwent loop colostomy and loop ileostomy closures in our hospital between October, 2011 and September, 2014 were retrospectively assessed. The patients were divided into two groups, namely the PS group (26 patients) and the CD group (29 patients). There were no significant differences in the characteristics of the patients between the two groups. The baseline and operative characteristics also did not differ significantly between the two groups. However the incidence of superficial incisional SSI was lower in the PS group compared to that in the CD group (0 vs. 13.8%, respectively; P=0.049). The overall incidence of complications did not differ significantly between the two groups (P=0.313). The duration of postoperative hospital stay in the PS group was shorter compared to that in the CD group. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that PS may an effective technique to reduce the incidence of superficial incisional SSI. This technique appears to be superior to the conventional technique, allowing for better cosmesis. PMID:26137277

  20. Comparison of surgical techniques for stoma closure: A retrospective study of purse-string skin closure versus conventional skin closure following ileostomy and colostomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuma; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fujino, Shiki; Sugimura, Keijirou; Akita, Hirofumi; Motoori, Masaaki; Gotoh, Kunihito; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Shogo; Ohmori, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of postoperative complications, including superficial incisional surgical site infection (SSI) following purse-string skin closure (PS) and conventional skin closure with a drainage tube (CD) following stoma closure. A total of 55 consecutive patients who underwent loop colostomy and loop ileostomy closures in our hospital between October, 2011 and September, 2014 were retrospectively assessed. The patients were divided into two groups, namely the PS group (26 patients) and the CD group (29 patients). There were no significant differences in the characteristics of the patients between the two groups. The baseline and operative characteristics also did not differ significantly between the two groups. However the incidence of superficial incisional SSI was lower in the PS group compared to that in the CD group (0 vs. 13.8%, respectively; P=0.049). The overall incidence of complications did not differ significantly between the two groups (P=0.313). The duration of postoperative hospital stay in the PS group was shorter compared to that in the CD group. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that PS may an effective technique to reduce the incidence of superficial incisional SSI. This technique appears to be superior to the conventional technique, allowing for better cosmesis.

  1. Meta-analysis of elective surgical complications related to defunctioning loop ileostomy compared with loop colostomy after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hong Zhi; Nasier, Dilidan; Liu, Bing; Gao, Hua; Xu, Yi Ke

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Defunctioning loop ileostomy (LI) and loop colostomy (LC) are used widely to protect/treat anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. However, it is not known which surgical approach has a lower prevalence of surgical complications after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma (LARRC). Methods We conducted a literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases to identify studies published between 1966 and 2013 focusing on elective surgical complications related to defunctioning LI and LC undertaken to protect a distal rectal anastomosis after LARRC. Results Five studies (two randomized controlled trials, one prospective non-randomized trial, and two retrospective trials) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Outcomes of 1,025 patients (652 LI and 373 LC) were analyzed. After the construction of a LI or LC, there was a significantly lower prevalence of sepsis (p=0.04), prolapse (p=0.03), and parastomal hernia (p=0.02) in LI patients than in LC patients. Also, the prevalence of overall complications was significantly lower in those who received LIs compared with those who received LCs (p<0.0001). After closure of defunctioning loops, there were significantly fewer wound infections (p=0.006) and incisional hernias (p=0.007) in LI patients than in LC patients, but there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of overall complications. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that a defunctioning LI may be superior to LC with respect to a lower prevalence of surgical complications after LARRC.

  2. Meta-analysis of elective surgical complications related to defunctioning loop ileostomy compared with loop colostomy after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Hong Zhi; Nasier, Dilidan; Liu, Bing; Gao, Hua; Xu, Yi Ke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Defunctioning loop ileostomy (LI) and loop colostomy (LC) are used widely to protect/treat anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. However, it is not known which surgical approach has a lower prevalence of surgical complications after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma (LARRC). Methods We conducted a literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases to identify studies published between 1966 and 2013 focusing on elective surgical complications related to defunctioning LI and LC undertaken to protect a distal rectal anastomosis after LARRC. Results Five studies (two randomized controlled trials, one prospective non-randomized trial, and two retrospective trials) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Outcomes of 1,025 patients (652 LI and 373 LC) were analyzed. After the construction of a LI or LC, there was a significantly lower prevalence of sepsis (p=0.04), prolapse (p=0.03), and parastomal hernia (p=0.02) in LI patients than in LC patients. Also, the prevalence of overall complications was significantly lower in those who received LIs compared with those who received LCs (p<0.0001). After closure of defunctioning loops, there were significantly fewer wound infections (p=0.006) and incisional hernias (p=0.007) in LI patients than in LC patients, but there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of overall complications. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that a defunctioning LI may be superior to LC with respect to a lower prevalence of surgical complications after LARRC. PMID:26274752

  3. Manipulation of starch bioaccessibility in wheat endosperm to regulate starch digestion, postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and gut hormone responses: a randomized controlled trial in healthy ileostomy participants12

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Cathrina H; Grundy, Myriam ML; Grassby, Terri; Vasilopoulou, Dafni; Frost, Gary S; Butterworth, Peter J; Berry, Sarah EE; Sanderson, Jeremy; Ellis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cereal crops, particularly wheat, are a major dietary source of starch, and the bioaccessibility of starch has implications for postprandial glycemia. The structure and properties of plant foods have been identified as critical factors in influencing nutrient bioaccessibility; however, the physical and biochemical disassembly of cereal food during digestion has not been widely studied. Objectives: The aims of this study were to compare the effects of 2 porridge meals prepared from wheat endosperm with different degrees of starch bioaccessibility on postprandial metabolism (e.g., glycemia) and to gain insight into the structural and biochemical breakdown of the test meals during gastroileal transit. Design: A randomized crossover trial in 9 healthy ileostomy participants was designed to compare the effects of 55 g starch, provided as coarse (2-mm particles) or smooth (<0.2-mm particles) wheat porridge, on postprandial changes in blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, lipids, and gut hormones and on the resistant starch (RS) content of ileal effluent. Undigested food in the ileal output was examined microscopically to identify cell walls and encapsulated starch. Results: Blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide concentrations were significantly lower (i.e., 33%, 43%, 40%, and 50% lower 120-min incremental AUC, respectively) after consumption of the coarse porridge than after the smooth porridge (P < 0.01). In vitro, starch digestion was slower in the coarse porridge than in the smooth porridge (33% less starch digested at 90 min, P < 0.05, paired t test). In vivo, the structural integrity of coarse particles (∼2 mm) of wheat endosperm was retained during gastroileal transit. Microscopic examination revealed a progressive loss of starch from the periphery toward the particle core. The structure of the test meal had no effect on the amount or pattern of RS output. Conclusion: The structural integrity of wheat

  4. Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... often should I clean it? What types of tape, creams, or paste can I use on the stoma? Does insurance cover the cost of ostomy supplies? What should I do if there is bleeding from the stoma, if it appears red or swollen, or if there is a sore ...

  5. Ostomy: Adapting to Life After Colostomy, Ileostomy or Urostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... from traveling. If you'll be traveling by airplane, bring extra ostomy supplies and pack them in ... opportunities Reprint Permissions A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. " ...

  6. Usefulness of ileostomy defunctioning stoma after anterior resection of rectum on prevention of anastomotic leakage A retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Giuseppe; Licari, Leo; Agrusa, Antonino; Romano, Giorgio; Cocorullo, Gianfranco; Falco, Nicolò; Tutino, Roberta; Gulotta, Gaspare

    2016-01-01

    Una delle principali e più temute complicanze della resezione anteriore di retto è stata ed è la deiscenza anastomotica. Solitamente, sia essa una scelta di principio od a discrezione del chirurgo operatore, viene confezionata una ileostomia laterale di sicurezza con lo scopo di prevenire tale circostanza. Scopo di tale studio è stato quello di investigare circa la utilità della stomia laterale di sicurezza quale strumento di prevenzione della deiscenza anastomotica, mettendo a paragone il decorso post-operatorio dei paziente con e senza stomia laterale. Le evidenze hanno portato alla conclusione che il confezionamento della stomia laterale di sicurezza è fattore di protezione non tanto dell’evento deiscenza anastomotica in senso stretto, quanto delle complicanze e della evoluzione clinica della stessa, vedasi ad esempio tasso di ricorrenza di deiscenza/quadro clinico in corso di deiscenza/ tempi di degenza, pur rendendosi necessario sottolineare l’assenza di significatività statistica nel tasso di mortalità nei due gruppi in studio. Cosi detto appare dunque sinottico affermare che il confezionamento di ileostomia laterale di sicurezza in corso di resezione anteriore di retto non determina una diretta azione sull’evento “deiscenza anastomotica” né “morte”, purtuttavia modifica certamente in positivo il decorso clinico ed evolutivo dell’evento “deiscenza anastomotica”.

  7. Low zinc status and absorption exist in infants with jejunostomies or ileostomies which persists after intestinal repair

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is very little data regarding trace mineral nutrition in infants with small intestinal ostomies. Here we evaluated 14 infants with jejunal or ileal ostomies to measure their zinc absorption and retention and biochemical zinc and copper status. Zinc absorption was measured using a dual-tracer s...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5900 - Ostomy pouch and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... collection of fecal material or urine following an ileostomy, colostomy, or ureterostomy (a surgically... colostomy appliance, ostomy collector, colostomy pouch, urinary ileostomy bag, urine collecting...

  9. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An external operative opening from the ileum. (d) Incontinence. An inability to retain urine or feces....

  10. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An external operative opening from the ileum. (d) Incontinence. An inability to retain urine or feces....

  11. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An external operative opening from the ileum. (d) Incontinence. An inability to retain urine or feces....

  12. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An external operative opening from the ileum. (d) Incontinence. An inability to retain urine or feces....

  13. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... USE MISCELLANEOUS INTERNAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Deodorant Drug Products for... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An external operative opening from the ileum. (d) Incontinence. An inability to retain urine or feces....

  14. Loperamide

    MedlinePlus

    ... with ileostomies (surgery to create an opening for waste to leave the body through the abdomen). Loperamide ... it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).Unneeded medications ...

  15. Intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... ileostomy. This may be short-term or permanent. Peritonitis is common in these cases. People who have ... More Adhesion Blood clots Hardening of the arteries Peritonitis Sepsis Review Date 1/28/2016 Updated by: ...

  16. [Protective ileostoma versus protective transverse stoma. What evidence is available?].

    PubMed

    Klink, C D; Willis, S; Neumann, U P; Jansen, M

    2010-11-01

    The clinical outcome of anastomotic leakage in colorectal and coloanal anastomoses necessitates a loop stoma for fecal diversion. Controversy remains of the most suitable position of the stoma. In this respect a loop ileostomy or loop colostomy can be performed. The aim of this study was to determine the advantages and disadvantages of both surgical strategies from the literature and to derive possible recommendations. Both methods provide a good operative outcome with low complication rates. Overall there is a trend towards ileostomy because of lower complication rates after stoma creation and the incidence of sepsis and stoma prolapse in particular is significantly reduced after ileostomy. Concerning stoma reversal both methods seem to be equivalent. As long as no large evidenced-based, randomized studies are available loop ileostomy seems to be the most appropriate surgical procedure.

  17. Nutrition for people with stomas 1: overview of issues.

    PubMed

    Burch, Jennie

    This is the first in a two-part unit examining nutrition for people with stomas. It outlines the three main types of stomas--colostomy, ileostomy and urostomy--and the principles of a healthy diet in general.

  18. Ulcerative colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... proctocolectomy - discharge Types of ileostomy Ulcerative colitis - discharge Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist at Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Internal review and ...

  19. Ulcerative colitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube Living with your ileostomy Low-fiber diet Review Date 12/2/2014 Updated by: Jenifer K. ... Frankford-Torresdale Hospital, Aria Health System, Philadelphia, PA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  20. Total colectomy or proctocolectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016:chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Ileostomy Intestinal obstruction Total abdominal colectomy Total proctocolectomy and ileal - anal ... Diseases Colorectal Cancer Crohn's Disease Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis Intestinal Obstruction Ulcerative Colitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  1. The reversal of a protective stoma is feasible before the complete healing of a colorectal anastomotic leak.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Silvia; Piccinni, Giuseppe; Casagranda, Biagio; Balani, Alessandro; de Manzini, Nicolò

    2011-12-01

    A proximal diverting stoma is recommended in "high-risk" conditions after total mesorectal excision. The aim of the study is to assess whether, after checking the anastomosis by using a water-soluble contrast enema (WCE), the closure of the ileostomy is feasible and safe, even in the presence of a persistent radiological leak. From 2003 to 2010, 210 colorectal anastomoses were performed. Ileostomy was carried out in "high-risk" anastomosis. A radiological control was performed 2 weeks later. If a leakage was present, conservative therapy controlled by serial WCEs was prescribed. Ileostomy closure was performed in the absence of leakage or with persistent leakage without clinical signs of pelvic infections. Seventy patients (33.3%) had a protective ileostomy. Fifty-eight of these (82.9%) had an uneventful course, whereas 12 (17.1%) had clinical leakage. All 70 patients were submitted to WCE after 2 weeks. Nine of 58 patients (15.5%) and eight of 12 patients with clinical anastomotic leakage showed a leakage at radiology. All these patients were scheduled another WCE 2 months later. It showed that the anastomosis had been healed in seven patients, whereas the 10 patients with leaks remained with ostomy until the third enema 1 month later. For all these patients, closure of the ileostomy was planned despite persistent radiological and subclinical leakage. A radiological study using WCE before closure of the stoma is essential and stoma closure, in the presence of a persistent leakage, is possible in selected patients.

  2. Complications of the ileal pouch: is the pouchogram a useful predictor?

    PubMed

    Malcolm, P N; Bhagat, K K; Chapman, M A; Davies, S G; Williams, N S; Murfitt, J B

    1995-09-01

    A series of ileal pouchograms from 25 consecutive patients has been analysed retrospectively. Ileal pouchography may demonstrate abnormalities which delay closure of the covering ileostomy. The aim was to determine whether disruption of the ileoanal anastomosis and/or leak at pouchography correlated with pelvic sepsis after ileostomy closure. Disruption of the stapled ileoanal anastomosis is a sensitive (88%) but not specific predictor (57%) for subsequent pelvic sepsis. The predictive value of a negative test is high (89%). Leak of contrast from the anastomosis is specific (81%) but not sensitive (56%) for pelvic sepsis. No significant relationship was demonstrated between width of the presacral space and the presence of pelvic sepsis. No significant relationship was demonstrated between diameter of the ileoanal anastomosis and symptoms of stricture. The presence of anastomotic disruption or leak at pouchography prior to ileostomy closure are useful predictors of potential pelvic sepsis.

  3. Spontaneous closure of stoma.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Narendra; Singh, Harjeet; Kumar, Hemanth; Gupta, Rajesh; Verma, G R

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal loop stoma is a common surgical procedure performed for various benign and malignant abdominal problems, but it rarely undergoes spontaneous closure, without surgical intervention. Two male patients presented to our emergency surgical department with acute abdominal pain. One of them was diagnosed as having rectosigmoid perforation and underwent diversion sigmoid loop colostomy after primary closure of the perforation. The other was a known case of carcinoma of the rectum who had already undergone low anterior resection with covering loop ileostomy; the patient underwent second loop ileostomy, this time for complicated intestinal obstruction. To our surprise, both the loop colostomy and ileostomy closed spontaneously at 8 weeks and 6 weeks, respectively, without any consequences. Spontaneous stoma closure is a rare and interesting event. The exact etiology for spontaneous closure remains unknown, but it may be hypothesized to result from slow retraction of the stoma, added to the concept of a tendency towards spontaneous closure of enterocutaneous fistula.

  4. Elective and emergent operative management of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Amanda M

    2007-06-01

    Surgical therapy of ulcerative colitis is effective, safe, and provides an improved quality of life in those whose disease cannot be managed medically. In the elective setting, widespread acceptance of restorative proctocolectomy has made surgical therapy an attractive option in the overall management of ulcerative colitis. Enthusiasm for this procedure should be tempered by the acknowledgment of the significant incidence of pouchitis in the long term, however. Proctocolectomy with ileostomy remains a good surgical option for patients who are unsuitable for restorative procedures. The standard therapy for fulminant colitis or toxic megacolon remains subtotal colectomy with ileostomy. Patients undergoing subtotal colectomy are candidates for conversion to restorative procedures.

  5. The Ostomy: Part One of Two Parts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Rosemary C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Teaches nurses to identify four common indications for fecal diversion surgery: list three types of colostomies; distinguish a colostomy from an ileostomy; describe the two basic methods of colostomy management; and identify factors that influence the choice of method of colostomy care. (CT)

  6. Specialized Health Care Procedures in the Schools: Training and Service Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Fredrick, Laura D.; Best, Sherwood; Dykes, Mary Kay; Cohen, Elisabeth Tucker

    2000-01-01

    A study involving 342 nonmedical personnel found that although the teachers and paraprofessionals regularly performed health care procedures for students with disabilities, only about half reported being very knowledgeable about them. Procedures most commonly performed solely by teachers and paraprofessionals were colostomy/ileostomy care, tube…

  7. Is STEP the future for patients requiring proctocolectomy? A new therapeutic proposal from pediatric experience

    PubMed Central

    Mangray, Hansraj; Ghimenton, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a pediatric case of medically unmanageable juvenile colonic polyposis, initially treated with subtotal colectomy and an ileostomy followed by a proctectomy, ileal-J-pouch and serial transverse enteroplasties (STEP) of the distal ileum. The STEP procedure in an adequate length was able to control stooling of our patient. PMID:26273442

  8. Is STEP the future for patients requiring proctocolectomy? A new therapeutic proposal from pediatric experience.

    PubMed

    Mangray, Hansraj; Ghimenton, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    We present a pediatric case of medically unmanageable juvenile colonic polyposis, initially treated with subtotal colectomy and an ileostomy followed by a proctectomy, ileal-J-pouch and serial transverse enteroplasties (STEP) of the distal ileum. The STEP procedure in an adequate length was able to control stooling of our patient.

  9. Restorative proctocolectomy with a three-loop ileal reservoir for ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis. Clinical results in 66 patients followed for up to 6 years.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, J; Pescatori, M; Motson, R W; Pezim, M E

    1984-01-01

    The results of restorative proctocolectomy with a three-loop ileal reservoir were reviewed. Of 66 patients treated between 1976 and 1982, 52 had ulcerative colitis and 14 had familial adenomatous polyposis. The temporary ileostomy was closed between 2 and 78 months previously in 63 cases. Of these, three patients had had the reservoir removed and two were lost to follow-up. One other patient was subsequently found to have Crohn's disease. Function was assessed in 55 patients who had undergone closure of the ileostomy more than 8 weeks previously. Mean frequency of defecation was 3.7 per 24 hours (range 1-9.5) and 11 patients (20%) were taking antidiarrheal medication. Spontaneous defecation occurred in 22 patients (40%) while 29 (52.7%) had to use a catheter passed per anum. Four patients defecated spontaneously but sometimes used a catheter. Continence was normal in 36 (65.4%) and minor leakage once every 2 to 3 days occurred at night in 16 (29.1%). Three patients (5.4%) had some soiling during day and night. Troublesome perianal soreness (five patients, 9.1%) necessitated a defunctioning ileostomy in one. Fifty-four of the 55 patients assessed preferred their quality of life to that with an ileostomy. PMID:6712311

  10. Save the skin and improve the scar: a simple technique to minimize the scar from a temporary stoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, John; Kelly, Erica Whineray; Hunt, Ian

    2003-10-01

    Reversal of a loop ileostomy is not infrequently associated with wound infection and delayed wound healing. This in turn may lead to a disappointing scar. A simple modification to the technique of stoma construction simplifies wound closure, reduces the rate of wound morbidity, and improves the cosmetic result.

  11. Benign colonic metaplasia at a previous stoma site in a patient without adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Prouty, Megan; Patrawala, Samit; Vogt, Adam; Kelleher, Michael; Lee, Michael; Parker, Douglas C

    2016-03-01

    There are few reported cases of cutaneous intestinal metaplasia or primary adenocarcinoma arising at the ileostomy site following panproctocolectomy. These complications have been seen almost exclusively in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, benign intraepidermal colonic mucosa at a reversed ileostomy site in a patient without familial adenomatous polyposis or IBD has not been documented. We report a case of a 51-year-old female with a history of colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with pruritic, erythematous, scaly plaques on the right lower abdomen, present since reversal of her ileostomy in 2007. Skin biopsy revealed benign foci of colonic epithelium with no evidence of adenomatous change. Benign intraepidermal colonic mucosa was diagnosed based on histopathologic findings and immunohistochemistry. To our knowledge, this is the first case of intraepidermal benign colonic metaplasia forming in a patient following ostomy reversal. The case emphasizes the importance of patient education and physical examination of the stoma or stoma remnants for detection of unusual or changing lesions due to the risk for malignant transformation. It also demonstrates that benign colonic mucosa should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating lesions near ileostomy sites, regardless of whether the patient has a history of familial adenomatous polyposis or IBD.

  12. Nutrition for people with stomas. 2: An overview of dietary advice.

    PubMed

    Burch, Jennie

    This two-part unit examines nutrition for people with stomas. Part 1 outlined the three types of stomas--colostomy, ileostomy and urostomy--and diet in general. This part focuses on postoperative and long-term dietary needs. It includes advice on diet related to enhanced recovery and specific to types of stoma.

  13. Predictors of Fecal Incontinence and Related Quality of Life After a Total Mesorectal Excision With Primary Anastomosis for Patients With Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kornmann, Verena N. N.; Boerma, Djamila; de Roos, Marnix A. J.; van Westreenen, Henderik L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose After total mesorectal excision (TME) with primary anastomosis for patients with rectal cancer, the quality of life (QoL) may be decreased due to fecal incontinence. This study aimed to identify predictors of fecal incontinence and related QoL. Methods Patients who underwent TME with primary anastomosis for rectal cancer between December 2008 and June 2012 completed the fecal incontinence quality of life scale (FIQoL) and Wexner incontinence score. Factors associated with these scores were identified using a linear regression analysis. Results A total of 80 patients were included. Multivariate analysis identified a diverting ileostomy (n = 58) as an independent predictor of an unfavorable outcome on the FIQoL subscale coping/behavior (P = 0.041). Ileostomy closure within and after 3 months resulted in median Wexner scores of 5.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 2.5-8.0) and 10.5 (IQR, 6.0-13.8), respectively (P < 0.001). The median FIQoL score was 15.0 (IQR, 13.1-16.0) for stoma closure within 3 months versus 12.0 (IQR, 10.5-13.9) for closure after 3 months (P = 0.001). Conclusion A diverting ileostomy is a predictor for an impaired FIQoL after a TME for rectal cancer. Stoma reversal within 3 months showed better outcomes than reversal after 3 months. Patients with a diverting ileostomy should be informed about the impaired QoL, even after stoma closure. PMID:25745623

  14. Using quality of life scores to help determine treatment: is restoring bowel continuity better than an ostomy?

    PubMed

    Ko, C. Y.; Rusin, L. C.; Schoetz, D. J.; Coller, J. A.; Murray, J. J.; Roberts, P. L.; Moreau, L.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In colorectal surgery, evaluation of heath-related quality of life (HRQL) has been relatively minimal when compared to other medical specialties. Would the performance of such HRQL evaluations change our decision-making in patient care? In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), procedures that restore bowel continuity (i.e. Ileorectal anastomosis or ileal pouch anal anastomosis) are routinely preferred to ileostomy because of the perceived, but unproven, better HRQL. This study evaluates FAP patients who underwent prophylactic colectomy with either permanent ileostomy or 'restored bowel continuity' reconstruction. The functional outcomes of both groups are reported, and the HRQL assessments are compared. METHODS: All FAP patients who underwent (procto) colectomy resection with reconstruction, either restored bowel continuity (BC) or permanent ileostomy (OST), between 1980 and 1998 were studied. Functional data were obtained by questionnaire and medical record review. HRQL was assessed by 2 validated instruments - the SF-36 Physical and Mental Health Summary Scales and the SF-36 Health Survey - which measure physical summary (PSF) and mental summary functioning (MSF) as well as eight separate health quality dimensions including health perception (HP), physical (PF) and social functioning (SF), physical (PR) and emotional role limitations (ER), mental health (MH), bodily pain (BP), and energy level (E). RESULTS: Results were obtained in 54 patients; bowel continuity (44), ileostomy (10). Mean patient age was 39 years, mean follow up time was 10.5 years. Mean patient age at operation was 28 years. Functional results for BC included number of bowel movements/day (6.7), leakage (30%), having to wear a pad (11%), perianal skin problems (25%), food avoidance (68%), and inability to distinguish gas (27%). Functional results for OST were routinely excellent. Results of the HRQL surveys reveal no significant differences for BC vs OST (HP: 67 +/- 28 vs 79 +/- 39; PF

  15. The Appendix and Aganglionosis. A Note of Caution—How the Histology Can Mislead the Surgeon in Total Colonic Hirschsprung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Victoria Alison; Levitt, Marc A.; Baker, Peter; Minneci, Peter; Deans, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a child with presumed total colonic Hirschsprung disease (HD) to highlight the problems the surgeon is likely to encounter if he/she relies on the appendix alone for histopathologic diagnosis. A newborn male infant, who was presumed to have total colonic aganglionosis when the appendix was found to be aganglionic at the time of initial exploratory laparoscopy, was managed with an ileostomy in the newborn period; however, at the time of his planned pull-through procedure, the rectal biopsy revealed normal ganglion cells. The child was subsequently managed with ileostomy closure and observed for normal feeding and stooling prior to discharge home. We discuss the histopathologic findings of the appendix in separate cases of confirmed total colonic HD seen in our center, and review the normal histopathologic findings of the appendix. PMID:26171305

  16. [A Case of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis with a Desmoid Tumor Probably Communicating to the Intestinal Lumen That Was Successfully Treated with Non-Surgical Therapy].

    PubMed

    Ito, Tetsuya; Chika, Noriyasu; Yamamoto, Azusa; Ogura, Toshiro; Amano, Kunihiko; Ishiguro, Toru; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kumagai, Youichi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Okazaki, Yasushi; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2016-11-01

    A 44-year-old man with familial adenomatous polyposis underwent laparoscopic-assistedtotal proctocolectomy with ilealpouch anal anastomosis(IPAA). Computed tomography conducted 21 months after IPAA demonstrated bilateral hydronephrosis andan intra-abdominal mass with a maximal diameter of 22 cm, leading to a diagnosis of stage IV desmoid disease, according to the classification by Church and associates. Six courses of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin plus dacarbazine were administered. Computed tomography after chemotherapy demonstrated marked shrinkage of the desmoidtumor with intraabdominal air andfluidcollection extending just below the skin of the ileostomy closure site. Stoollike fluidoverflowedspontaneously through the site of the ileostomy closure andthe abscess cavity was successfully drained. The patient was discharged 30 days after the start of drainage. The patient is doing well 10 months after the drainage without regrowth of the desmoid tumor, even though a cavity-like lesion encapsulatedby a thick wall remains.

  17. [Treatment of a severe Clostridium difficile infection with colonic lavages. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Quezada, Felipe; Castillo, Richard; Villalón, Constanza; Zúñiga, José Miguel; Manterola, Carla; Molina, María Elena; Bellolio, Felipe; Urrejola, Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    A loop ileostomy with intraoperative anterograde colonic lavage has been described as an alternative to colectomy in the management of cases of Clostridium difficile infection refractory to medical treatment. We report a 69 years old diabetic women admitted with a septic shock. An abdominal CAT scan showed a pan-colitis that seemed to be infectious. A polymerase chain reaction was positive for Clostridium Difficile. Due to the failure to improve after full medical treatment, a derivative loop ileostomy and intra-operatory colonic lavage were performed, leaving a Foley catheter in the proximal colon. In the postoperative period, anterograde colonic instillations of Vancomycin flushes through the catheter were performed every 6 hours. Forty eight hours after surgery, the patient improved. A colonoscopy prior to discharge showed resolution of the pseudomembranous colitis.

  18. [A serious complication in colorectal surgery: anastomotic leakage. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Petitti, T; Lippolis, G; Ferrozzi, L

    2005-10-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a severe complication in colorectal surgery with a lot of generic and specific risk factors. There are still controversies about the possibility to prevent it or to limit its severity with the use of faecal diversions. We report our experience on 189 patients operated in five years on colon-rectum, in election and emergency, with manual or mechanical anastomoses in the last 20 cm from the anal verge. We have had 21 anastomotic leakages (11%), symptomatic in 10 cases (5.5%), and 5 deaths (2.6%), 3 directly correlated to the leakage. In the patients (n 98) with loop-ileostomy there wasn't anastomotic leakages reduction, but only of clinical impact. We prefer loop-ileostomy in cases of extraperitoneal anastomoses, always in emergency and in anastomoses at risk.

  19. Bilio-intestinal shunt. A method and a pilot study for treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, D; Holmgren, U

    1979-01-01

    Diarrhea is a drawback in all types of small intestinal bypass operations for the treatment of morbid obesity. One of the causes of diarrhea is excessive amounts of bile acids in the colon. Therefore in five obese subjects, we complemented the usual jejuno-ileostomy end to side procedure with an anastomosis between the proximal end of the excluded blind loop and the gallbladder (bilio-intestinal shunt). In this way the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids is assumed to be preserved. The patients, subjected to this new methods, were compared to matched patients (age, sex, height, preoperative body-weight, Brocas index and total small intestinal length) following four other types of jejuno-ileostomies. The frequency of diarrhea in the subjects with the bilio-intestinal shunt was significantly less than in the other groups. Other parameters, such as rate and magnitude of weight reduction, changes in blood cholesterol and triglycerides, were the same in the control groups.

  20. Ostomy care and management: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Recalla, Stacy; English, Kim; Nazarali, Rishma; Mayo, Samantha; Miller, Debbie; Gray, Mikel

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of ostomy surgery in Canada is not known, but it is estimated that approximately 13,000 ostomy surgeries are performed annually in Canada. This systematic review incorporates evidence for the assessment and management of colostomies, ileostomies, and urostomies, as well as the peristomal skin. The review was completed as part of a best practice guideline document generated by a task force appointed by the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario.

  1. Ultra-Low Anterior Resection with Coloanal Anastomosis for Recurrent Rectal Prolapse in a Young Woman with Colitis Cystica Profunda

    PubMed Central

    Hompes, R; Arnold, S; Venkatasubramaniam, A

    2015-01-01

    This case demonstrates the successful treatment of a young female patient with colitis cystica profunda causing rectal prolapse, after primary treatment with a Delorme procedure had failed. An ultra-low anterior resection with a temporary defunctioning ileostomy was carried out with good postoperative results. This case illustrates the possibility of carrying out sphincter preserving surgery rather than an abdominoperineal resection in the treatment of this condition, which may be preferable for patients. PMID:25723681

  2. Ileoproctostomy is preferred over ileoanal pull-through in patients with indeterminate colitis.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, J H; Klein, S N; Priest, S G

    1995-07-01

    A 15-year retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the operative outcomes of patients with indeterminate colitis who were referred for rectal-sparing operations. Review of 95 consecutive patients operated for ulcerative colitis (UC) or indeterminate colitis (IC) revealed characteristics of IC in 13 patients. In the group as a whole, there were 45 females and 50 males; the average age was 33. A total of 64 patients had ileoanal pull-through (IAA). Analysis revealed that four of these patients had IC revealed by findings before operation in three patients and following the first stage of operation in one patient. Three of these four patients have subsequently required permanent ileostomy. Six patients who underwent IAA have subsequently demonstrated signs and symptoms of Crohn's disease (CD). All six have subsequently required ileostomy. Overall 10 patients with CD underwent IAA, and nine have required permanent ileostomy. Fourteen patients had ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) for UC or IC. IRA was performed for patients with IC in nine cases, and five patients with UC elected this operative option. Indications for IRA in patients with UC included obesity, 2; mental retardation, 1; advanced age, 1; and patient preference, 1. Of the patients with IC who underwent IRA, two have subsequently shown signs and symptoms of Crohn's disease. Overall, 14 of 14 patients who had IRA still have functioning IRA. None has required ileostomy. The poor results in patients with UC or IC subsequently shown to have CD have caused us to change our operative approach in patients with any question in the diagnosis of UC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Mucosal proctectomy and ileoanal pull-through technique and functional results in 23 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, J H; Kestenberg, W; Kaufmann, R; Dean, K

    1987-07-01

    Mucosal proctectomy with ileoanal pull-through in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and familial polyposis provides a technique for the preservation of the anal sphincters and relatively normal mechanisms of continence. Five patients had straight ileoanal anastomosis while 18 had the construction of a J-pouch. A two-team approach was used for simultaneous abdominal and perineal procedures to facilitate a shortened operating time. A loop ileostomy was routinely used in the postoperative period and was closed an average of 4.5 months (range: 2-16 months) later without complication. Prolonged preoperative hospitalization was rarely necessary and outpatient steroid enema preparation was routinely used. There were no deaths. Nineteen patients with functioning pull-through procedures have been followed an average of 23 months (range: 3-42 months). Two other patients have not had ileostomy closure because of complications. The two remaining patients had intractable diarrhea and have since undergone conversion to a permanent ileostomy. The 19 patients are continent, having three to nine bowel movements each day. Nearly all wear a perineal sanitary pad because of rare, unpredictable leakage of small amounts of fluid, especially at night. Complications were significant in this group of patients. Intestinal obstruction was a frequent problem, occurring in 52 per cent of the entire series and necessitating reoperation in 22 per cent. Anal stricture was a problem in another five patients. A variety of other minor problems occurred and most were treated nonoperatively. In spite of moderate diarrhea and occasional leakage of stool, all patients with functioning pull-through procedures prefer their current status to life with an ileostomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Orazipone, a locally acting immunomodulator, ameliorates intestinal radiation injury: A preclinical study in a novel rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Richter, Konrad K.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intestinal radiation injury (radiation enteropathy) is relevant to cancer treatment, as well as to radiation accidents and radiation terrorism scenarios. This study assessed the protective efficacy of orazipone, a locally-acting small molecule immunomodulator. Methods and Materials: Male rats were orchiectomized, a 4-cm segment of small bowel was sutured to the inside of the scrotum, a proximal anteperistaltic ileostomy was created for intraluminal drug administration, and intestinal continuity was re-established by end-to-side anastomosis. After three weeks postoperative recovery, the intestine in the 'scrotal hernia' was exposed locally to single-dose or fractionated X-radiation. Orazipone (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered daily through the ileostomy, either during and after irradiation, or only after irradiation. Structural, cellular, and molecular aspects of intestinal radiation toxicity were assessed two weeks after irradiation. Results: Orazipone significantly ameliorated histologic injury and transforming growth factor-{beta} immunoreactivity levels, both after single-dose and fractionated irradiation. Intestinal wall thickness was significantly reduced after single-dose and nonsignificantly after fractionated irradiation. Mucosal surface area and numbers of mast cells were partially restored by orazipone after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This work (1) demonstrates the utility of the ileostomy rat model for intraluminal administration of response modifiers in single-dose and fractionated radiation studies; (2) shows that mucosal immunomodulation during and/or after irradiation ameliorates intestinal toxicity; and (3) highlights important differences between single-dose and fractionated radiation regimens.

  5. Clostridium difficile disease: Diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment update.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Lena M; Edmiston, Charles E

    2017-03-03

    Clostridium difficile infections are the leading cause of health care-associated infectious diarrhea, posing a significant risk for both medical and surgical patients. Because of the significant morbidity and mortality associated with C difficile infections, knowledge of the epidemiology of C difficile in combination with a high index of suspicion and susceptible patient populations (including surgical, postcolectomy, and inflammatory bowel disease patients) is warranted. C difficile infections present with a wide spectrum of disease, ranging from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis or small bowel enteritis and recurrent C difficile infections. Early implementation of medical and operative treatment strategies for C difficile infections is imperative for optimal patient outcomes. National and international guidelines recommend early operative consultation and total abdominal colectomy with end ileostomy and preservation of rectum. Diverting loop ileostomy and colonic lavage followed by intravenous metronidazole and intracolonic vancomycin administered via the efferent limb of the ileostomy should be considered as an alternative to total colectomy in selected patients. New and emerging strategies for C difficile infection treatment include monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, probiotics, biotherapeutics, and new antibiotics. A successful C difficile prevention and eradication program requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes early disease recognition, implementation of guidelines for monitoring adherence to environmental control, judicious hand hygiene, evidence-based treatment and management strategies, and a focused antibiotic stewardship program. Surgeons are an important part of the clinical team in the management of C difficile infection prevention and treatment.

  6. Primary Enterolith in a Patient with Intestinal Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Mohd. Habib; Finan, RafiulImad; Akhtar, Sadik; Ahmad, Manzoor

    2016-01-01

    Primary enterolithiasis is a rare surgical ailment. The underlying cause is intestinal stasis. Numerous anatomical and micro environmental factors such as enteritis, incarcerated hernia, malignancy, diverticula, blind loops, and enteroenterostomy predispose to clinically significant concretions. Enterolithiasis in tuberculosis can be due to the presence of strictures, intestinal bands, or interbowel/parietal adhesions, leading to intestinal stasis. Secondary enterolithiasis is generally caused by gallstones or renal stones migrating to the gastrointestinal tract due to fistula formation. During stasis, food particles act as a nidus and calcium salts are deposited over the food particles, leading to stone formation. A 57-year-old male patient presented to the Emergency Department of Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, with features of intestinal obstruction. The patient underwent emergency laparotomy, revealing 2 strictures in the distal ileum with 15.24cm of the bowel between them containing a 2×2 cm enterolith. The strictured segment was resected, and end ileostomy and mucus fistula were created. The patient’s postoperative recovery was fine, and he wasdischarged with ileostomy on antitubercular treatment (after histopathologicalconfirmation). Ileostomy closure wasplanned after 6 weeks. The incidence and prevalence of enterolithiasis has been on the rise recently because of advancement in radiological imaging studies. Endoscopic and surgical stone removal along with the treatment of the underlying pathology is recommended. PMID:27853338

  7. Inter-subject variability in intestinal drug solubility.

    PubMed

    Rabbie, Sarit Cohen; Flanagan, Talia; Martin, Paul D; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-05-15

    Variability in oral drug absorption is a well-known phenomenon, but it is often overlooked for its potential effects in oral drug delivery. Understanding the mechanisms behind absorption variability is crucial to understanding and predicting drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, the solubility of furosemide and dipyridamole - drugs known to have highly variable oral bioavailabilities - was investigated in individual ileostomy fluids from 10 subjects with ulcerative colitis. For comparison, drug solubility was also determined in pooled upper gastrointestinal fluids from healthy human subjects and simulated intestinal fluids. Ileostomy fluid characterization revealed high variability in buffer capacity and to a lesser degree for pH. Drug solubility in ileostomy fluids showed high variability. Correlation analysis revealed that dipyridamole solubility in these fluids is pH-dependent, whereas furosemide solubility was highly correlated to buffer capacity and pH. The implications of these results might partly explain the high variability in bioavailability in vivo, assuming that most of the observed variability is due to the absorption, and not the elimination, process.

  8. Relationship between diversion colitis and quality of life in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dong Nyoung; Choi, Dong Jin; Woo, Si Uk; Kim, Jin; Keom, Bo Ra; Kim, Chul Hwan; Baek, Se Jin; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigated the incidence of diversion colitis (DC) and impact of DC symptoms on quality of life (QoL) after ileostomy reversal in rectal cancer. METHODS: We performed a prospective study with 30 patients who underwent low anterior resection and the creation of a temporary ileostomy for the rectal cancer between January 2008 and July 2009 at the Department of Surgery, Korea University Anam Hospital. The participants totally underwent two rounds of the examinations. At first examination, endoscopies, tissue biopsies, and questionnaire survey about the symptom were performed 3-4 mo after the ileostomy creations. At second examination, endoscopies, tissue biopsies, and questionnaire survey about the symptom and QoL were performed 5-6 mo after the ileostomy reversals. Clinicopathological data were based on the histopathological reports and clinical records of the patients. RESULTS: At the first examination, all of the patients presented with inflammation, which was mild in 15 (50%) patients, moderate in 11 (36.7%) and severe in 4 (13.3%) by endoscopy and mild in 14 (46.7%) and moderate in 16 (53.3%) by histology. At the second examination, only 11 (36.7%) and 17 (56.7%) patients had mild inflammation by endoscopy and histology, respectively. There was no significant difference in DC grade between the endoscopic and the histological findings at first or second examination. The symptoms detected on the first and second questionnaires were mucous discharge in 12 (40%) and 5 (17%) patients, bloody discharge in 5 (17%) and 3 (10%) patients, abdominal pain in 4 (13%) and 2 (7%) patients and tenesmus in 9 (30%) and 5 (17%) patients, respectively. We found no correlation between the endoscopic or histological findings and the symptoms such as mucous discharge, bleeding, abdominal pain and tenesmus in both time points. Diarrhea was detected in 9 patients at the second examination; this number correlated with the severity of DC (0%, 0%, 66.7%, 33.3% vs 0%, 71.4%, 23

  9. Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation II Score and its Correlation with Three Surgical Strategies for Management of Ileal Perforations

    PubMed Central

    Munghate, Anand; Kumar, Ashwani; Mittal, Sushil; Singh, Harnam; Sharma, Jyoti; Yadav, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ileal perforation peritonitis is a common surgical emergency in the Indian subcontinent and in tropical countries. It is reported to constitute the fifth common cause of abdominal emergencies due to high incidence of enteric fever and tuberculosis in these management based on Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score. Methods: The following study was conducted in the Department of General Surgery, Government Medical College, Patiala. A total of 57 patients were studied and divided in to Group I, II, and III. APACHE II score accessed and score between 10 and 19 were blindly randomized into three procedures primary closure, resection-anastomosis, and ileostomy. The outcome was compared. Results: Ileal perforations were most commonly observed in the third and fourth decade of life with male dominance. APACHE II score was accessed and out of total 57 patients, 6 patients had APACHE II score of 0–9, 48 patients had APACHE II score of 10–19, and 3 patients had APACHE II score of ≥20. In APACHE II score 10–19, 15 patients underwent primary closure, 16 patients underwent resection-anastomosis, and 17 patients underwent ileostomy. Discussion and Conclusion: Primary closure of perforation is advocated in patients with single, small perforation (<1 cm) with APACHE II score 10–19 irrespective of duration of perforation. Ileostomy is advocated in APACHE II score 10–19, where the terminal ileum is grossly inflamed with multiple perforations, large perforations (>1 cm), fecal peritonitis, matted bowel loops, intraoperative evidence of caseating lymph nodes, strictures, and an unhealthy gut due to edema. PMID:27512550

  10. Step-up approach and video assisted retroperitoneal debridement in infected necrotizing pancreatitis: A case complicated by retroperitoneal bleeding and colonic fistula

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eugene; Sundaraamoorthy, R.S.; Tan, David; Teh, Hui-Seong; Tan, Tzu-Jen; Cheng, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis carries a high mortality and necessitates intervention to achieve sepsis control. The surgical strategy for proven infected necrosis has evolved, with abandonment of open necrosectomy to a step-up approach consisting of percutaneous drains and Video-assisted retroperitoneal debridement (VARD). We present a case that underwent VARD complicated by bleeding and colonic perforation and describe its management. Presentation of case A 38 year-old male with acute pancreatitis developed infected necrotizing pancreatitis. Initial treatment was by percutaneous drainage under radiological guidance and intravenous antibiotics. The infected retroperitoneal necrosis was then debrided using gasless laparoscopy through a mini-incision. Post-operatively, he developed peripancreatic bleeding which was controlled with angioembolisation. He also developed a descending colon fistula which was treated with laparotomy and defunctioning loop ileostomy. He recovered and subsequently had his ileostomy closed twelve months later. The colonic fistula recurred and was treated with endoscopic clips and histoacryl glue injection and finally closed. Discussion Step-up approach consists of the 3 D's: Delay, drain and debride. VARD is recommended as it is replicable in general surgical units using standard laparoscopic instruments. Bleeding and colon perforation are potential complications which must have multi-disciplinary input, aggressive resuscitation and timely radiologic intervention. Defunctioning ileostomy is recommended to control sepsis in colonic fistulation. Novel fistula closing methods using endoscopic clips and histoacryl glue are potential treatment options. Conclusion Step-up approach and VARD is the new paradigm to treat necrotizing pancreatitis. Complications of bleeding and colon fistula are uncommon and require multi-disciplinary management. PMID:26587229

  11. The Reversal of Stoma Following Open Abdomen Management.

    PubMed

    Yetişir, Fahri; Şarer, AkgünEbru; Acar, H Zafer; Çiftciler, Erdinç

    2016-06-01

    Bowel stoma formation is very often required during open abdomen (OA) management; we aim to report our stoma reversal series following OA management retrospectively. A retrospective analysis of 31 patients who underwent the reversal of the stoma created during OA management between January 2008 and September 2014 was performed. Twenty-eight of these 31 patients were included in this study. The stoma-related complications are more common after OA management during waiting time interval for reversal. At this time interval, patients with jejunostomy had more stoma-related complications than patients with ileostomy (p = 0.008) and colostomy. (p = 0.001). Waiting time interval was shorter for reversal of jejunostomy than reversal of ileostomy (p = 0.014) and colostomy (p = 0.001). Operation time for jejunostomy (p = 0.016) and colostomy reversal (p = 0.001) were significantly longer than the ileostomy reversal. There was no difference between early and late reversal of stoma regarding morbidity and mortality. The stoma-related complications are more common following OA management during waiting time interval for stoma reversal. The reversal time is more critical for this kind of patients especially with life-threatening complicated jejunostomy. For loop stoma created during OA management, the reversal may be performed after average 50 days without increasing morbidity and mortality. The reversal of end stoma created during OA management has high morbidity. If it is possible, loop stoma should be preferred during OA management.

  12. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-07-01

    In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease.We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index < 17.5) or at high risk of nutrition-related problems (modified nutritional risk index < 83.5) were regarded as having a poor nutritional status. Preliminary remnant small bowel length cut-offs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Variables associated with poor nutritional status were assessed retrospectively using Student t tests, chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression analyses.The mean follow-up period was 52.9 months and the mean patient ages at the time of the last bowel surgery and last follow-up were 31.2 and 35.7 years, respectively. The mean remnant small bowel length was 331.8 cm. Forty-three patients (10.9%) underwent ileostomy, 309 (78.4%) underwent combined small bowel and colon resection, 111 (28.2%) had currently active disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P < 0.001), ileostomy (odds ratio: 4.70, P < 0.001), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.16, P < 0.001). The independent factors affecting high nutritional risk were remnant small bowel length ≤230 cm (odds ratio: 2.84, P = 0.012), presence of ileostomy (odds ratio: 3.36, P = 0.025), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P < 0.001).Currently active disease, ileostomy, and remnant small

  13. Skin Problems After Ostomy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Katharina

    1978-01-01

    For many years people with colostomies, ileostomies and urinary diversions have had to live in a shadow due to ill-fitting appliances. This has lead to odor problems, skin excoriation, depression, and even withdrawal from society. Dr. Rupert Turnbull from the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio saw the need for an enterostomal therapy service some ten years ago. Patients rehabilitated in self-care by an enterostomal therapist, pre and post-operatively, now rarely have any skin problems. During the last ten years new and better appliances have been developed, and with a well constructed stoma in a suitable site, any ostomate can return to a normal life. PMID:21301501

  14. Spontaneous Rupture of Adenocarcinoma of Meckel’s Diverticulum- A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Meckel’s diverticulum is a true diverticulum from remnant of vitelline duct. It is most common congenital anomaly of intestine. It is associated with intestinal atresia and anorectal anomalies. It contains heterotrophic epithelium. Most common heterotrophic mucosa is gastric followed by pancreatic tissue. Adenocarcinoma arising from Meckel’s diverticulum is very rare. Spontaneous perforation of adenocarcinoma rarely reported. Most of perforation reported in Meckel’s diverticulum diagnosed during intraoperative period. This is a case report of spontaneous rupture of adenocarcinoma of Meckel’s diverticulum, which was managed with primary resection and ileostomy. PMID:26672729

  15. [Animal experimental and clinical experiences with carbon polymer stomas].

    PubMed

    Harzmann, R; Bichler, K H; Kieninger, G; Haumer, M; Ideler, V

    1978-07-01

    Biocarbon implants consist of 99.9% pure carbon and are characterized by chemical inactivity and good tissue compatibility. Biocarbon was used for subfascial implantations, as well as coecostomies, ileostomies and cystostomie on mongrel dogs. The most important clinical results was the good healing over of the material without adverse reaction. The cystostomies showed only a very slight tendency to form incrustations. Drainage was watertight without signs of leakage. The satisfying results with two patients who were provided with a cystostoma are reported and further uses of the procedure, such as ureterocutaneostomy, iliac and colonic conduit, are discussed.

  16. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  17. Pneumatosis Coli in Complex Neurodisability: An Increasingly Problematic Disease Spectrum and Proposed Management.

    PubMed

    West, Rebecca; Dass, Dipanker; Mordekar, Santosh; Campbell, David; Lindley, Richard

    2017-02-01

    This case series describes our experience in managing 4 children with complex neurodisability, feed intolerance, and pneumatosis coli. In all of the 4 patients, symptoms and feed tolerance were substantially improved by the formation of a laparoscopically assisted defunctioning ileostomy. We describe our present management strategy and believe this is a promising treatment for those patients who can reduce long-term dependence on parenteral nutrition, although we acknowledge that there is a long-term risk of disuse colitits in the defunctioned bowel.

  18. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease. We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index < 17.5) or at high risk of nutrition-related problems (modified nutritional risk index < 83.5) were regarded as having a poor nutritional status. Preliminary remnant small bowel length cut-offs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Variables associated with poor nutritional status were assessed retrospectively using Student t tests, chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression analyses. The mean follow-up period was 52.9 months and the mean patient ages at the time of the last bowel surgery and last follow-up were 31.2 and 35.7 years, respectively. The mean remnant small bowel length was 331.8 cm. Forty-three patients (10.9%) underwent ileostomy, 309 (78.4%) underwent combined small bowel and colon resection, 111 (28.2%) had currently active disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P < 0.001), ileostomy (odds ratio: 4.70, P < 0.001), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.16, P < 0.001). The independent factors affecting high nutritional risk were remnant small bowel length ≤230 cm (odds ratio: 2.84, P = 0.012), presence of ileostomy (odds ratio: 3.36, P = 0.025), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P < 0.001). Currently active disease, ileostomy, and

  19. Helping Patients Cope with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Professional Developmen AFIT. Wright-Patterson AFB OH I6. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side it necessary and Identify by block number) 2). ABSTRAc r (Continue...on reverse lde if neceaary, and Identity by block numbei.) ATTACHED .... I I 7 1473 EDITION OF I NOV6 5sS OBSOLETE UNCLASS 84 09 13.03 1 SECURITY...IBD because of life threatening 4q .,.-"- 5 complications. Surgery may include bowel resection, colostomy or ileostomy. Tbough considered a cure for

  20. Diagnosis and Management of Nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Ingimarsson, Johann P; Krambeck, Amy E; Pais, Vernon M

    2016-06-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common affliction, affecting approximately 10% of adults. Potentially presenting with acute abdominal or flank pain, nausea, or emesis, it may pose as a general surgical condition. Therefore, recognition, diagnosis, and management concerns are pertinent to the general surgeon. Furthermore, the risk of nephrolithiasis is increased in common general surgical conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, hyperparathyroidism, and short gut. Nephrolithiasis may be induced as a result of general surgical interventions, including gastric bypass and bowel resection with ileostomy. An understanding of this common disease will improve coordination of patient care between urologists and general surgeons.

  1. The Kock pouch reconsidered: an alternative surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Alison; Williams, Julia; Woodhouse, Fran

    The psychological impact stoma surgery can have on an individual is well documented within the literature (White and Hunt, 1997; Borwell, 2009; Williams, 2005; Brown, 2005). For many years, surgeons have explored and developed innovations in surgical techniques, in particular restorative procedures with a view of preventing permanent stoma formation; ileal anal pouch (IAP) now being the surgical procedure of choice for treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). However, high morbidity rates are associated with pouch longevity (Castillo et al 2005; Nessar and Wu, 2012) and once removed can lead to a high-output ileostomy with risks of electrolyte imbalance and malabsorption. This then creates the dilemma of whether the Kock pouch (KP) should be offered as a surgical option. This article offers a historical perspective of the KP and its place in the surgical management of UC and FAP. This article also presents results from a recent audit funded by the Ileostomy Association (IA), highlighting how patients manage their KP and the importance of maintaining bowel control and being free of an incontinent stoma as a means of coming to terms with their condition.

  2. Use of T-Tube Enterostomy in Neonatal Gastro-intestinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaiem, Maher; Al-Garni, Abdulhai F; Al-Maghrebi, Abdulrahman; Asghar, Asim A

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the results of the use of the T-tube ileostomy in neonatal intestinal surgery cases. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of sixty two neonates underwent intestinal obstruction surgery by using T-tube ileostomy was conducted between January 1990 and January 2013.The pathologies of the intestinal obstruction were; thirty four of jejunoileal atresia cases, thirteen case meconium ileus, eight cases perforated necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), three cases meconium peritonitis, three cases with bowel resection due to intestinal volvulus, and one case of gastroschisis. Results: Mean duration of T-tube placement was 13 days (range9-20days) and the sites of T-tube insertion closed spontaneously in 2 days (range 1-4 days). The mean duration for starting oral intake postoperatively in these patients was 9 days (6-16 days). All patients well tolerated the procedure and there were no serious complications related to the T-tube insertion. However, four patients died due to other reasons like sepsis, respiratory failure and prematurity. Conclusion: T-tube enterostomy is an effective and safe technique for treatment of selected cases of neonatal intestinal surgery. It showed less morbidity and mortality rates than the conventional stoma. Therefore, it is considered a helpful approach in cases where there is danger of hypoperistaltic dilated bowel proximal to the anastomosis.

  3. Acute Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction with Feeding Intolerance in Critically Ill Patients: A Study according to Gut Wall Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenyan; Xie, Tingbin; Li, Jun; Cheng, Minhua; Shi, Jialiang; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Shen, Juanhong; Cao, Chun

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare the differences between acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO) with and without acute gut wall thickening. Methods. ACPO patients with feeding tolerance were divided into ACPO with no obvious gut wall thickening (ACPO-NT) group and ACPO with obvious acute gut wall thickening (ACPO-T) group according to computed tomography and abdominal radiographs. Patients' condition, responses to supportive measures, pharmacologic therapy, endoscopic decompression, and surgeries and outcomes were compared. Results. Patients in ACPO-T group had a significantly higher APACHE II (11.82 versus 8.25, p = 0.008) and SOFA scores (6.47 versus 3.54, p < 0.001) and a significantly higher 28-day mortality (17.78% versus 4.16%, p = 0.032) and longer intensive care unit stage (4 versus 16 d, p < 0.001). Patients in ACPO-NT group were more likely to be responsive to supportive treatment (62.50% versus 24.44%, p < 0.001), neostigmine (77.78% versus 17.64%, p < 0.001), and colonoscopic decompression (75% versus 42.86%, p = 0.318) than those in ACPO-T group. Of the patients who underwent ileostomy, 81.25% gained benefits. Conclusions. ACPO patients with gut wall thickening are more severe and are less likely to be responsive to nonsurgical treatment. Ileostomy may be a good option for ACPO patients with gut wall thickening who are irresponsive to nonsurgical treatment. PMID:28386273

  4. Liver Cirrhosis/Severe Fibrosis Is a Risk Factor for Anastomotic Leakage after Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Irina; Willi, Niels; Stickel, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Liver cirrhosis associated with high perioperative morbidity/mortality. This retrospective study determines whether liver cirrhosis represents a risk factor for anastomotic leakage after colonic anastomosis or not. Methods. Based on a prospective database with all consecutive colorectal resections performed at the authors' institution from 07/2002 to 07/2012 (n = 2104) all colonic and rectal anastomoses were identified (n = 1875). A temporary loop ileostomy was constructed in 257 cases (13.7%) either due to Mannheimer Peritonitis-Index > 29 or rectal anastomosis below 6 cm from the anal verge. More than one-third of the patients (n = 691) had postoperative contrast enema, either at the occasion of another study or prior to closure of ileostomy. The presence of liver cirrhosis and the development of anastomotic leakage were assessed by chart review. Results. The overall anastomotic leakage rate was 2.7% (50/1875). In patients with cirrhosis/severe fibrosis, the anastomotic leakage rate was 12.5% (3/24), while it was only 2.5% (47/1851) in those without (p = 0.024). The difference remained statistically significant after correction for confounding factors by multivariate analysis. Conclusion. Patients with liver cirrhosis/severe fibrosis have an increased risk of leakage after colonic anastomosis. PMID:28105046

  5. Risk factors causing structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage in mid to low rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Woong Bae; Kwak, Jung Myun; Kim, Jin; Um, Jun Won; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk factors causing structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage in patients with mid to low rectal cancer. METHODS: Prospectively collected data of consecutive subjects who had anastomotic leakage after surgical resection for rectal cancer from March 2006 to May 2013 at Korea University Anam Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Two subgroup analyses were performed. The patients were initially divided into the sequelae (stricture, fistula, or sinus) and no sequelae groups and then divided into the permanent stoma (PS) and no PS groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors of structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage. RESULTS: Structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage were identified in 29 patients (39.7%). Multivariate analysis revealed that diversion ileostomy at the first operation increases the risk of structural sequelae [odds ratio (OR) = 6.741; P = 0.017]. Fourteen patients (17.7%) had permanent stoma during the follow-up period (median, 37 mo). Multivariate analysis showed that the tumor level from the dentate line was associated with the risk of permanent stoma (OR = 0.751; P = 0.045). CONCLUSION: Diversion ileostomy at the first operation increased the risk of structural sequelae of the anastomosis, while lower tumor location was associated with the risk of permanent stoma in the management of anastomotic leakage. PMID:26019455

  6. Simultaneously Diagnosed and Successfully Treated Rectovaginal and Vesicovaginal Fistulae after Low Anterior Resection with Concomitant Resection of Female Genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Chisato; Baba, Hideo; Yamafuji, Kazuo; Asami, Atsunori; Takeshima, Kaoru; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Takahashi, Hidena; Kubochi, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Rectovaginal fistula (RVF) and vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) are infrequent but distressing complications after pelvic surgery. However, their adequate treatment is not well described. Here, we simultaneously encountered and successfully treated RVF and VVF after radical surgery for rectal cancer. A 70-year-old woman underwent low anterior resection (LAR) combined with resection of the uterus, the bilateral adnexa, and the upper side of the vagina, as well as diverted ileostomy for rectal cancer. A month after the surgery, she developed urinary incontinence and underwent medical treatment, but her symptoms did not improve. Evaluation with contrast enema before stoma closure revealed the presence of RVF and VVF. We repaired the VVF and RVF via transabdominal and transperineal approaches. After 6 months, ileostomy was closed and the patient had no recurrence of cancer and fistula. In LAR with hysterectomy and resection of the vaginal wall, there is a risk of RVF and VVF. The excision and closure of the fistula tract and omental flap can be effective to treat both fistulae. PMID:28203133

  7. The continent ileal reservoir--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Meijer, D W

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes new concepts pertaining to the continent ileostomy. The aim of the study was twofold: to counter valve desinvagination and to simplify pouch construction. In Chapter 1 a survey is given of the history, the present situation of the technique and the complications of the continent ileostomy. It appears that on the one hand the operation improves the quality of the patient's life, but on the other hand the operation gives rise to many complications. The number of complications quoted in the literature varies and has been reported to be as high as 43%. Most of the time this led to repeat surgery, with equally uncertain results. This is the reason why the operation is not very frequently performed. Most of the time the complications concern the valve system and to a lesser degree the reservoir. In order to obtain a better insight into the origin of and possible gain better control over these complications an investigation was carried out on laboratory animals. This investigation involved: the complications of the valve system, the effect of the suturing method on the function of the reservoir and the simplification of the construction of the reservoir. In Chapter 2 the aim of the investigation was formulated in three questions. 1. Is it possible to diminish the chance of complications of the valve system of the continent ileostomy? 2. Does the method of suturing influence the function of the reservoir? 3. Is it possible to simplify the construction of the reservoir, so that the duration of the operation can be shortened? Chapter 3 is the general materials and methods section. Chapter 4 is about the research on the valve system. Up to now, no method of suturing the valve has consistently produced results good enough to make subsequent re-operations unnecessary. In this study two types of valve experiments have been carried out. First the feasibility of circumventing the problems of the nonpermanent form of the valve was investigated combining a

  8. Ileal J-Pouch Perforation: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dogan, U; Dogan, B; Habibi, M; Erol, M K; Mayir, B; Aslaner, A; Bulbuller, N

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old male patient who had undergone total colectomy and J-pouch ileanal anastomosis subsequent to diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis five years previously was admitted to the emergency room with complaints of severe abdominal pain of a four-day duration. Physical examination revealed widespread tenderness throughout the abdomen, especially in the lower quadrant. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed fluid between intestinal loops and computed tomography revealed free air and fluid in the abdomen. During laparotomy to expand the ileal J-pouch to approximately 12 cm in diameter, a 2-mm perforation was detected in the blind end of the ileal J-pouch. The perforation was repaired primarily and protective ileostomy was performed. During postoperative endoscopy, neither obstruction nor stasis was observed, but pouchitis was observed in the ileal J-pouch. The patient was postoperatively discharged on the 20th day and followed endoscopically. The endoscopic findings were normal in the sixth month postsurgery.

  9. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to intestinal neuronal dysplasia type B (IND B), concerning one case].

    PubMed

    Junquera Bañares, S; Oria Mundín, E; Córdoba Iturriagagoitia, A; Botella-Carretero, J J

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal neuronal dysplasia type B (IND B) is an infrequent disease due to hyperplasia of the parasympathetic submucous plexus which causes alteration of intestinal motility, giving rise to symptoms of constipation and subocclusive manifestations. The disease is difficult to diagnose. It requires high clinical suspicion and should include differential diagnosis of patients with repeated subocclusive manifestations in order to make an early and correct diagnosis and avoid complications derived from unnecessary surgery that worsens the prognosis. We present the case of a 33-year-old Moroccan male who was admitted to our hospital on 2 occasions in 11 months, requiring total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for five months. The immunohistochemical analysis of the ileostomy and colostomy stoma led to a diagnosis of IND B. Eighteen months later, the patients is leading a normal life and has recovered the 25 kilos lost following the dietary indications and with the enzymatic supplements.

  10. [Therapy of complicated Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Scharl, Michael; Barthel, Christiane; Rogler, Gerhard

    2014-03-12

    During their disease course, the majority of Crohn's disease patients will develop a complicated disease which is characterized by the occurrence of fistulas and/or stenosis. Symptomatic, perianal fistulas should be surgically drained before anti-inflammatory therapy will be initiated. Antibiotics, such as metronidazole, improve disease symptomatic however, they are not sufficient to induce continuous fistula closure. For this purpose, azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine as well as anti-TNF antibodies are useful when administered continuously. Surgical options include seton drainage, fistula excision, fistula plugs and mucosa flaps. As ultima ratio, temporary ileostomy and proctectomy are to be discussed. Non-perianal fistulas often require surgical approaches. Symptomatic strictures or stenosis can be treated by anti-inflammatory medications (only if they are cause by inflammation), endoscopic balloon dilatation or surgery.

  11. Nutrition considerations surrounding restorative proctocolectomy.

    PubMed

    Buckman, Sara A; Heise, Charles P

    2010-06-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has become the surgical treatment of choice for patients with ulcerative colitis and familial polyposis coli syndromes. Pouch construction uses the distal 30-40 cm of ileum, and there exists a potential for postoperative nutrition consequences. These include vitamin B(12) deficiency, iron deficiency, bile acid malabsorption, and abnormalities of trace elements, fluids, and electrolytes. Patients who have undergone an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis procedure often describe specific food sensitivities that may require diet alteration, even more so than do patients with permanent ileostomy. There may be roles for postoperative probiotic supplementation in an attempt to decrease the rate of "pouchitis" and appropriate preoperative nutrition support to minimize the risk of perioperative complications.

  12. Evidence for loss of tritium from 3 beta-tritiated deoxycholic acid during enterohepatic cycling in man

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, S.N.; Heaton, K.W.

    1988-06-01

    A double-label single-intubation isotope technique was assessed for studying deoxycholic acid metabolism by simultaneous IV administration of (3 beta-/sup 3/H)deoxycholic acid and (24-/sup 14/C)deoxycholic acid to five healthy subjects. The /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio in duodenal bile fell progressively in all subjects, the mean reduction on day four being 48.8%. When the same labeled bile acids were administered to three ileostomy subjects, again the ratio fell with a mean reduction of 44.4% on day four. This fall more likely was due to hepatic exchange of tritium for hydrogen, rather than to colonic bacterial oxidation. (3 beta-/sup 3/H)Deoxycholic acid should not be used to study the kinetics and metabolism of deoxycholic acid.

  13. Deferasirox pharmacokinetics evaluation in a woman with hereditary haemochromatosis and heterozygous β-thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Sarah; De Francia, Silvia; Longo, Filomena; Massano, Davide; Cusato, Jessica; Arduino, Arianna; Pirro, Elisa; Piga, Antonio; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    We present the deferasirox pharmacokinetics evaluation of a female patient on iron chelation, for the interesting findings from her genetic background (hereditary haemochromatosis and heterozygous β-thalassaemia) and clinical history (ileostomy; iron overload from transfusions). Drug plasma concentrations were measured by an HPLC-UV validated method, before and after ileum resection. Area under deferasirox concentration curve over 24h (AUC) values were determined by the mixed log-linear rule, using Kinetica software. AUC was low also with high deferasirox dose as well as tolerability. Non invasive tissue iron quantification by magnetic resonance imaging or superconducting quantum interference device were prevented by a metal hip replacement. Good efficacy and normalisation of iron markers was obtained on long term. Therapeutic drug monitoring in patient in critical conditions may help to understand reasons for non response and set individualised treatment.

  14. Considering the benefits of a new stoma appliance: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Trine Møller; Størling, Zenia Marian

    2015-12-10

    For people living with a stoma, leakage is one of the main problems compromising quality of life. The right choice of stoma appliance is therefore of utmost importance. This randomised, controlled clinical trial investigated the benefits of a new stoma appliance, SenSura Mio Convex Soft, specifically for people who experience leakage using a flat stoma appliance. The degree of leakage under the baseplate was measured using a new objective method. The study included 38 participants with an ileostomy or colostomy. Results showed that while being flexible and comfortable, the new appliance reduced leakage significantly and provided a better feeling of security when compared with the participants' own flat stoma appliance. The product was the preferred of the convex stoma appliances in the study. This study demonstrated that it may be a solution for people with a stoma challenged by leakage using flat stoma appliances.

  15. [High output stoma: detection and approach].

    PubMed

    Arenas Villafranca, Jose Javier; Abilés, Jimena; Moreno, Gloria; Tortajada Goitia, Begoña; Utrilla Navarro, Pilar; Gándara Adán, Norberto

    2014-12-01

    High output stoma is a frequent complication in patients with ileostomies that is not well identified and is not often properly addressed by clinicians. It has not been described properly, and can vary between debits of 2.000ml in 24 h to 1.500 ml in 3-5 days, according to different authors. Frequently presents both short-term and long-term negative implications for patients and is associated with readmissions. We present a review of published literature focusing in surgical resection-related factors that influence a later appearance of this complication, causes involved in its development, the need to establish a clear and objective concept of high ouput as well as the negative implications it presents. Also we develop how should we the management of these patients regarding treatment and nutritional approach.

  16. [Volvulus of the small bowel due to ascaris lumbricoides package: about a case].

    PubMed

    Diouf, Cheikh; Kane, Ahmed; Ndoye, Ndeye Aby; Ndour, Oumar; Faye-Fall, Aimé Lakh; Fall, Mbaye; Alumeti, Désiré Munyali; Ngom, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We report an exceptional case of a 7 year-old patient with necrotic small bowel volvulus due to adult ascaris lumbricoides. At the admission, the child had intestinal obstruction evolving since two days with alteration of general state. Abdominal radiography without preparation showed small bowel air-fluid levels and tiger-stripe appearance evoking the diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction associated with abdominal mass. After resuscitation, the surgical treatment consisted of laparotomy which showed necrotic volvulus of the terminal ileum containing adult ascaris lumbricoides. The patient underwent small bowel resection, approximately one meter of affected section was removed and then an ileostomy was performed. The evolution was favorable. The patient underwent ileorectal anastomosis four weeks later. After a 2 year follow-up period the child had no symptoms.

  17. Management of necrotising appendicitis associated with widespread necrotising enterocolitis of the small and large bowel and perforated duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vaibhav; Zani, Augusto; Jackson, Paul; Singh, Shailinder

    2015-06-08

    A 7-year-old boy presented in septic shock secondary to appendicitis with generalised peritonitis. Following crystalloid resuscitation, he underwent surgery. Faecopurulent contamination and free air were found. This was secondary to a perforated and gangrenous appendix, multiple large and small bowel segments with perforations, patches of necrosis, interspersed with healthy bowel and segments of questionable viability. There was also a perforated duodenal ulcer. Necrotic segments were resected using a 'clip-and-drop' technique to shorten operative duration and guide resection to preserve bowel length. After six laparotomies and multiple bowel resections, the child was discharged home with an ileostomy that was subsequently reversed. He is currently on a normal diet and pursuing all activities appropriate for his age. Perforated appendicitis can be associated with widespread bowel necrosis and multiple perforations. A conservative damage limitation approach using the 'clip-and-drop' technique and relook laparotomies is useful in the management of extensive bowel necrosis in children.

  18. Duodenocolic fistula diagnosed by endoscopy: a rare complication of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Timbol, Aeden Bernice G; Co, Vanessa Charlene O; Djajakusuma, Angela V; Banez, Virgilio P

    2017-02-07

    Duodenocolic fistula (DCF) is a rare complication of colon cancer with only 70 cases reported since its first description in 1862. Owing to its rarity, current knowledge on DCF still relies on single case reports. We present 2 cases of DCF from a hepatic flexure adenocarcinoma demonstrated initially by endoscopy. 2 adult male patients were admitted due to a 2-3-month history of right-upper quadrant pain, vomiting, diarrhoea and a palpable right upper quadrant mass. In both cases, a circumferential, friable mass was noted on upper endoscopy at the second portion of the duodenum, leading to the ascending colon. A similar-looking lesion was also noted on colonoscopy. Biopsies in both cases confirmed colonic adenocarcinoma. Owing to the advanced nature of the disease, en bloc resection was not achieved. Instead, tube jejunostomy and loop ileostomy were created. Both patients were discharged tolerating feeding with improvement in symptoms.

  19. Ulcerative colitis: a challenge to surgeons.

    PubMed

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Mohd L; Malik, Ajaz A; Wani, Shadab N; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease that specifically affects the mucosa of the rectum and colon. Although the etiology of this recurring inflammatory disorder remains essentially unknown, there have been significant advances in identifying the likely genetic and environmental factors that contribute to its pathogenesis. The clinical course of the disease typically manifests with remissions and exacerbations characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea. Since ulcerative colitis most commonly affects patients in their youth or early middle age, the disease can have serious long-term local and systemic consequences. There is no specific medical therapy that is curative. Although medical therapy can ameliorate the inflammatory process and control most symptomatic flares, it provides no definitive treatment for the disease. Proctocolectomy or total removal of the colon and rectum provides the only complete cure; however, innovative surgical alternatives have eliminated the need for a permanent ileostomy. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed account of the surgical management of ulcerative colitis.

  20. Blowhole Colostomy for Clostridium difficile-Associated Toxic Megacolon

    PubMed Central

    Kerstens, Jeroen; de Gheldere, Charles; Vanclooster, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 58-year-old man who underwent urgent blowhole colostomy for toxic megacolon (TM) secondary to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). This infection occurred under antibiotic coverage with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, four days after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in our hospital. Although prospective clinical research regarding the surgical management of TM is lacking, decompressive procedures like blowhole colostomy are reported to carry a high risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality and are widely regarded as obsolete. Subtotal or total colectomy with end ileostomy is currently considered the procedure of choice. After presenting our case, we discuss the literature available on the subject to argue that the scarce evidence on the optimal surgical treatment for TM is primarily based on TM associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and that there might be a rationale for considering minimally invasive procedures like blowhole colostomy for CDI-associated TM. PMID:28097034

  1. [Synchronous diverticulitis: a case report.].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Argáiz, R; Rodríguez-Zentner, H A; Tapia, H; González-Contreras, Q H

    2010-01-01

    Diverticular colonic disease is not as common in developing nations as in western and industrialized societies, accounting for approximately 130 000 hospitalizations per year in the United States, being diverticulitis the most frequent complication. Synchronous presentation of this complication is very rare, with only one case reported in literature. We present a patient who presented with diffuse abdominal pain. Colonoscopy was performed identifying a mass in the sigmoid colon and a perforation in the cecum. Patient underwent total abdominal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis and protective loop ileostomy. Histopathologic examination revealed synchronous complicated diverticular disease of the sigmoid and cecum. In this report we disclose this type of atypical presentation of diverticular disease and establish that the approach taken is safe and feasible.

  2. [Caesarean section for ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Unda-Franco, Eduardo; Ramírez-Avilés, Eva María; Moreno-de Gante, Leonardo; González, Quintín Héctor

    2011-02-01

    We present a case of a 35-year-old patient with diagnosis of ulcerative colitis that presented failure and complications associated with medical treatment; with a report of a colonoscopy and biopsy of pancolitis with severe activity. The patient was submitted to laparoscopic restorative total proctocolectomy with ileal "J" pouch anal anastomosis. Two months later the ileostomy was reversed. The patient received progesterone at the same time she was receiving immunosuppressive drugs. This was suspended two months after the second colon surgery. The patient did not require treatment with ovulation induction to achieve pregnancy. At the fourth month of gestation, the patient developed a perianal abscess, which was successfully drained. After multidisciplinary assessment in week 38 of gestation, it was decided to perform cesarean birth as a way to not affect the ileal pouch and the anastomosis of the digestive tract. At present time, the patient has had no further complications.

  3. Ulcerative colitis associated with the herbal weight loss supplement Hydroxycut

    PubMed Central

    Sivarajah, Vernon; Abdul, Quddus; Pardoe, Helen; Lunniss, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A 25-year-old Iranian gentleman was admitted to hospital with severe bloody diarrhoea and abdominal pain. He had similar episodes in the past. On each occasion his symptoms developed following the consumption of the herbal weight loss supplement Hydroxycut Hardcore X. On this admission, a (CT) scan demonstrated bowel wall thickening and peri-colonic fat stranding in the sigmoid colon. On flexible sigmoidoscopy, a continuous length of congested mucosa with multiple small ulcers was seen extending up to the mid-transverse colon, in keeping with ulcerative colitis. Histological analysis of biopsies was taken at the time and confirmed this. He was started on steroids early during his admission but this only provided a transient clinical improvement. The addition of cyclosporine, which was later changed to azathioprine, did not improve his condition either. He therefore underwent an open subtotal colectomy with end ileostomy. He made a slow but steady recovery and was discharged 3 weeks later. PMID:23291814

  4. Infliximab for the treatment of pouchitis

    PubMed Central

    Zippi, Maddalena; Cassieri, Claudio; Avallone, Eleonora Veronica; Pica, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    Pouchitis is not a rare complication that develops after an ileal-pouch anastomosis, performed after colectomy in patients refractory to treatment or with complicated ulcerative colitis. This condition may become chronic and unresponsive to medical therapies, including corticosteroids, antibiotics and probiotics. The advent of biological therapies (tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors) has changed the course of these complications. In particular, in these cases, infliximab (IFX) may represent a safe and effective therapy in order to avoid the subsequent operation for a permanent ileostomy. This article reviews the therapeutic effects of one of the most widely used anti-tumor necrosis factor-α molecules, IFX, for the treatment of complicated pouchitis (refractory to conventional treatment and/or fistulizing). PMID:24303499

  5. Rationale and early experience with prophylactic placement of mesh to prevent parastomal hernia formation after ileal conduit urinary diversion and cystectomy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.; Cha, Eugene K.; Bochner, Bernard H.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernias represent a clinically significant problem for many patients after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion. The prevalence may be as high as 60% and in some series, up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to the complications of pain, poor fit of an ostomy appliance, leakage, urinary obstruction, and bowel obstruction or strangulation. Due to the potential morbidity associated with PH repair, there have been efforts to prevent PH development at the time of the index surgery. Four randomized trials of prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have demonstrated significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication rates. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors behind its development, and the rationale behind prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion. Additionally, we report our experience with prophylactic mesh placed at radical cystectomy at our institution. PMID:26757903

  6. Colovesical fistula presenting as Listeria monocytogenes bacteraemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of colovesical fistula presenting with a clinical syndrome of urosepsis subsequently demonstrated to be due to Listeria monocytogenes bacteraemia. The patient had a history of previous rectal cancer with a low anterior resection and a covering ileostomy that had been reversed 6 months prior to this presentation. L. monocytogenes was also isolated among mixed enteric organisms on urine culture. There were no symptoms or signs of acute gastrointestinal listeriosis or meningoencephalitis. This unusual scenario prompted concern regarding the possibility of communication between bowel and bladder, which was subsequently confirmed with CT and a contrast enema. The patient recovered well with intravenous amoxicillin and to date has declined surgical management of his colovesical fistula. This case illustrates the importance of considering bowel pathology when enteric organisms such as Listeria are isolated from unusual sites. PMID:25827919

  7. [A rare case of digestive tract hemorrhage of extraluminal origin after total gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Caprino, Paola; Alfieri, Sergio; Rotondi, Fabio; Di Miceli, Dario; Sofo, Luigi; Pacelli, Fabio; Battista Doglietto, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    The authors report on a case of digestive bleeding (melaena and enterorrhagia) in a patient undergoing total gastrectomy for gastric cancer and later splenectomy for subcapsular haematoma in a different hospital. The source of bleeding was not intraluminal; the bleeding arose from double erosion of the gastroduodenal artery in the tract above the anterior surface of the pancreas, close to the dehiscent duodenal stump. The blood flowed mainly into the enteric district through the open stump thus causing the clinical signs described. The diagnosis was made during an emergency surgical operation for haemorrhagic shock. The patient underwent haemostasis with two stitches on the gastroduodenal artery, external drainage of the duodenum with a Petzer tube, laparostomy of the infected area and ileostomy. After three months he had completely recovered.

  8. Ulcerative colitis associated with the herbal weight loss supplement Hydroxycut.

    PubMed

    Sivarajah, Vernon; Abdul, Quddus; Pardoe, Helen; Lunniss, Peter

    2013-01-03

    A 25-year-old Iranian gentleman was admitted to hospital with severe bloody diarrhoea and abdominal pain. He had similar episodes in the past. On each occasion his symptoms developed following the consumption of the herbal weight loss supplement Hydroxycut Hardcore X. On this admission, a (CT) scan demonstrated bowel wall thickening and peri-colonic fat stranding in the sigmoid colon. On flexible sigmoidoscopy, a continuous length of congested mucosa with multiple small ulcers was seen extending up to the mid-transverse colon, in keeping with ulcerative colitis. Histological analysis of biopsies was taken at the time and confirmed this. He was started on steroids early during his admission but this only provided a transient clinical improvement. The addition of cyclosporine, which was later changed to azathioprine, did not improve his condition either. He therefore underwent an open subtotal colectomy with end ileostomy. He made a slow but steady recovery and was discharged 3 weeks later.

  9. Single-Site Laparoscopic Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bedros, Nicole; Hakiman, Hekmat; Araghizadeh, Farshid Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgery has been firmly established; however, few reports addressing this technique in the inflammatory bowel disease population exist. Methods: We conducted a case-matched retrospective review of 20 patients who underwent single-site laparoscopic procedures for inflammatory bowel disease compared with 20 matched patients undergoing multiport laparoscopic procedures. Data regarding these patients were tabulated in the following categories: demographic characteristics, operative parameters, and perioperative outcomes. Results: A wide range of cases were completed: 9 ileocolic resections, 7 cases of proctocolectomy with end ileostomy or ileal pouch anal anastomosis, 2 cases of proctectomy with ileal pouch anal anastomosis, and 2 total abdominal colectomies with end ileostomy were all matched to equivalent multiport laparoscopic cases. No single-incision cases were converted to multiport laparoscopy, and 2 single-incision cases (10%) were converted to an open approach. For single-incision cases, the mean length of stay was 7.7 days, the mean time to oral intake was 3.3 days, and the mean period of intravenous analgesic use was 5.0 days. There were no statistically significant differences between single-site and multiport cases. Conclusions: Single-site laparoscopic surgery is technically feasible in inflammatory bowel disease. The length of stay and period of intravenous analgesic use (in days) appear to be higher than those in comparable series examining outcomes of single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgery, and the outcomes are comparable with those of multiport laparoscopy. This may be because of the nature of inflammatory bowel disease, limiting the benefits of a single-site approach in this population. PMID:24960490

  10. Effect of Human Amniotic Membrane on Prevention of Colorectal Anastomosis Leakage in Cases with Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy: An Experimental Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Sam; Joraghi, Sajjad Ahmadi; Roshanravan, Reza; Ghahramani, Leila; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Hosseinzadeh, Masood; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Hussein, Ahmed Mohammed Ali; Najibpour, Neda; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy is one of the most important factors which results in negative effects on wound healing and increases anastomosis leakage. Diverting loop ileostomy has been usually performed after colorectal anastomosis in cases of colorectal cancer with a history of neoadjuvant radiotherapy to decrease the chance of leakage. Considering the side effects of diverting loop ileostomy, the objective of the present study is to investigate the effect of human amniotic membrane (HAM) on colorectal anastomosis leakage after neo-adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: In this experimental animal study, 20 crossbreed rabbits were randomly divided into two groups (case group: 13 rabbits, control group: 7 rabbits) after receiving an equal dose of external beam radiation. Four weeks after irradiation, resection of 4 cm of colorectal segment and end-to-end single layer anastomosis were conducted. In the case group, a 2×2 cm wrap of HAM applied around the site of anastomosis. Eight weeks later, all the survived rabbits were sacrificed. A segment of anastomotic sites was resected in all expired and survived rabbits and sent for pathological evaluation. Mann-Whitney U Test (SPSS for Windows, Ver. 16, Chicago, IL) was applied to analyze healing scores between the two groups. Results: Due to anastomosis dehiscence, 5 rabbits expired in the control group, but all the 13 rabbits (case group) survived after 8 weeks and showed no leakage. In addition, pathological evaluation revealed significant epithelialization and neovascularization in the case group. Statistically, healing score was higher in the case group rather than the control group (P<0.001). Conclusion: To prevent post irradiation colorectal anastomosis leakage, the use of HAM might play a significant role and a feasible technical approach. PMID:27853330

  11. Laser ablation of complex perianal fistulas preserves continence and is a rectum-sparing alternative in Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, J H

    1998-07-01

    A 20-year review of the inflammatory bowel disease surgical database of the author was analyzed for Crohn's disease (CD) patients who had a surgical approach to perianal fistula disease (PAD). Of 333 patients with CD operated between July 1977 and February 1997, 51 had procedures for PAD (15.3%), and 7 of these patients had laser ablation of severe, debilitating complex PAD (13.7%). These patients have traditionally been treated by diverting ileostomy or proctectomy with permanent diversion. Others have advocated conservative management with long-term antibiotics, staged operations, and insertion of multiple loose setons to promote drainage. This technique was adapted from the laser procedure now advocated for severe hydradenitis suppurativa. The hand-held CO2 laser was used to unroof all fistulas external to the external sphincter. Fistulas were identified by probing. Infected granulation tissue was removed by laser ablation until normal fat or muscle was revealed. Intersphincteric abscesses were unroofed, and a single seton was placed around the external sphincter for all but submucous fistulas. Patients were usually operated as outpatients with pain control effected with oral and transnasal agents. A laparoscopically performed temporary diverting ileostomy was used in one early patient in the series. Patients were followed, and progress was documented by physical examination and photographs. Quality of life was assessed. All patients improved remarkably from their preoperative state. The 4 patients in the group operated more than 1 year before this review have all demonstrated complete healing. The three more recent patients are in various stages of healing. Continence was preserved in 7 of 7 patients. No patient has required rectal excision. Recurrence thought to be related to associated hydradenitis has occurred in 1 patient. Laser ablation is a valuable technique in the management of patients with severe, debilitating complex PAD complicating CD. It

  12. Interpretation of the breath hydrogen profile obtained after ingesting a solid meal containing unabsorbable carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Read, N W; Al-Janabi, M N; Bates, T E; Holgate, A M; Cann, P A; Kinsman, R I; McFarlane, A; Brown, C

    1985-08-01

    The extent to which monitoring breath hydrogen excretion provides information concerning the entry of the residues of a solid test meal into the colon was investigated in 89 normal subjects, and 11 patients with the irritable bowel syndrome. The profile of breath hydrogen concentration showed an early peak, that occurred soon after ingesting the test meal in 89% subjects. This was followed by a later more prolonged rise in breath hydrogen concentration. The early peak occurred well before a radioactive marker, incorporated in the test meal, reached the caecum and the data suggest it was predominantly caused by the emptying of the remnants of the previous meal from the ileum into the colon. This hypothesis was supported by direct measurements of the rate of delivery of ileostomy effluent in 12 subjects with terminal ileostomies. Fermentation of carbohydrate in the mouth may, however, contribute to the initial peak, but this contribution may be avoided by collecting gas samples from the nares. The secondary rise in breath hydrogen excretion was closely correlated with the arrival of the radioactive marker in the caecum (r = 0.91), p less than 0.001), though the time, at which the secondary peak of breath hydrogen excretion occurred was poorly correlated with the time that all the radioactive test meal had entered the colon. When lactulose was infused directly into the colon, as little as 0.5 g produced a discernible hydrogen response, which occurred within two minutes of the infusion. Increasing the rate of colonic infusion of a 50 ml solution of 10% lactulose from 0.02 to 0.15 g/min in five subjects significantly increased the breath hydrogen concentration. At infusion rates below 0.075 g lactulose/minute, the peak breath hydrogen response preceded the end ot the infusion, while at higher rates of infusion, the peak hydrogen response occurred after the end of the infusion. Although these results confirmed that monitoring breath hydrogen concentration usefully

  13. Use of Valtrac™-Secured Intracolonic Bypass in Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Danyang; Lin, Jianjiang; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of anastomotic leakage (AL) remains a major concern in the early postoperative stage. Because of the relatively high morbidity and mortality of AL in patients with laparoscopic low rectal cancer who receive an anterior resection, a fecal diverting method is usually introduced. The Valtrac™-secured intracolonic bypass (VIB) was used in open rectal resection, and played a role of protecting the anastomotic site. This study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the VIB in protecting laparoscopic low rectal anastomosis and to compare the efficacy and complications of VIB with those of loop ileostomy (LI). Medical records of the 43 patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective laparoscopic low anterior resection and received VIB procedure or LI between May 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including the patients’ demographics, clinical features, and operative data. Twenty-four patients received a VIB and 19 patients a LI procedure. Most of the demographics and clinical features of the groups, including Dukes stages, were similar. However, the median distance of the tumor edge from the anus verge in the VIB group was significantly longer (7.5 cm; inter-quartile range [IQR] 7.0–9.5 cm) than that of the L1 group (6.0 cm; IQR 6.0–7.0 cm). None of the patients developed clinical AL. The comparisons between the LI and the VIB groups were adjusted for the significant differences in the tumor level of the groups. After adjustment, the LI group experienced longer overall postoperative hospital stay (14.0 days, IQR: 12.0, 16.0 days; P < 0.001) and incurred higher costs ($6300 (IQR: $5900, $6600)) than the VIB group (7.0 days, $4800; P < 0.05). Stoma-related complications in the ileostomy group included dermatitis (n = 2), stoma bleeding (n = 1), and wound infection after closure (n = 2). No BAR-related complications occurred. The mean time to Valtrac™ ring loosening was 14.1 ± 3

  14. Rare case of a strangulated intercostal flank hernia following open nephrectomy: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O.; Jones, Frank; Turner, Jacquelyn; Cason, Frederick; Clark, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flank incisions may be associated with incisional flank hernias, which may progress to incarceration and strangulation. Compromised integrity of the abdominal and intercostal musculature due to previous surgery may be associated with herniation of abdominal contents into the intercostal space. There have been six previously reported cases of herniation into the intercostal space after a flank incision for a surgical procedure. This case highlights the clinical picture associated with an emergent strangulated hernia and highlights the critical steps in its management. Presentation of case We present a case of a 79-year-old adult man with multiple comorbidities presenting with a strangulated flank hernia secondary to an intercostal incision for a right-sided open nephrectomy. The strangulated hernia required emergent intervention including right-sided hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and mucous fistula. Discussion Abdominal incisional hernias are rare and therefore easily overlooked, but may result in significant morbidity or even death in the patient.. The diagnosis can be made with a thorough clinical examination and ultrasound or computed topographical investigation. Once a hernia has become incarcerated, emergent surgical management is necessary to avoid strangulation and small bowel obstruction. Conclusion Urgent diagnosis and treatment of this extremely rare hernia is paramount especially in the setting of strangulation. PMID:26629848

  15. Lactococcus lactis spp lactis infection in infants with chronic diarrhea: two cases report and literature review in children.

    PubMed

    Karaaslan, Ayse; Soysal, Ahmet; Kepenekli Kadayifci, Eda; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Akkoc, Gulsen; Atici, Serkan; Sarmis, Abdurrahman; Ulger Toprak, Nurver; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-03-31

    Lactococcus lactis is a gram-positive, facultative anaerobic coccus that is occasionally isolated from human mucocutaneous surfaces such as the intestines. It is used in the dairy industry for milk acidification and is mostly nonpathogenic in immunocompetent humans, however a number of cases of infection with L. lactis have been reported in recent years. In this article, we describe two cases of infection due to L. lactis in patients with chronic diarrhea. The first case is a five-month-old boy who was operated on for volvulus on his first day of life and had ileostomy with subsequent diagnosis of chronic diarrhea and bacteremia due to L. Lactis. The second case is a six-month-old girl with the diagnosis of chronic diarrhea that developed after a catheter-related bloodstream infection. Both of the infections due to L. Lactis spp lactis were successfully treated with intravenous vancomycin therapy. Although Lactococcus species is mostly known as nonpathogenic, it should be kept in mind as a potential pathogen, especially in patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

  16. Mechanisms and efficacy of dietary FODMAP restriction in IBS.

    PubMed

    Staudacher, Heidi M; Irving, Peter M; Lomer, Miranda C E; Whelan, Kevin

    2014-04-01

    IBS is a debilitating condition that markedly affects quality of life. The chronic nature, high prevalence and associated comorbidities contribute to the considerable economic burden of IBS. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood and evidence to guide management is variable. Interest in dietary intervention continues to grow rapidly. Ileostomy and MRI studies have demonstrated that some fermentable carbohydrates increase ileal luminal water content and breath hydrogen testing studies have demonstrated that some carbohydrates also increase colonic hydrogen production. The effects of fermentable carbohydrates on gastrointestinal symptoms have also been well described in blinded, controlled trials. Dietary restriction of fermentable carbohydrates (popularly termed the 'low FODMAP diet') has received considerable attention. An emerging body of research now demonstrates the efficacy of fermentable carbohydrate restriction in IBS; however, limitations still exist with this approach owing to a limited number of randomized trials, in part due to the fundamental difficulty of placebo control in dietary trials. Evidence also indicates that the diet can influence the gut microbiota and nutrient intake. Fermentable carbohydrate restriction in people with IBS is promising, but the effects on gastrointestinal health require further investigation.

  17. Endoscopic Evaluation of Surgically Altered Bowel in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sinh, Preetika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often undergo surgical procedures for medically refractory disease or colitis associated dysplasia. Endoscopic evaluation of the surgically altered bowel is often needed to assess for disease recurrence, its severity, and for therapy. It is important to obtain and review the operative report and abdominal imaging before performing the endoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can be safely performed in most patients with inflammatory bowel disease with altered bowel anatomy under conscious sedation without fluoroscopy. Carefully planned stricture therapy with balloon dilation or needle knife stricturotomy can be performed for simple, short, and fibrotic strictures. A multidisciplinary approach involving a team of endoscopist, endoscopy nurse, colorectal surgeon, gastrointestinal pathologist, and gastrointestinal radiologist is important for a safe and effective endoscopy. We attempt to review the aspects that need consideration before the endoscopy, the technique of endoscopy, and briefly the therapies that can be performed during endoscopy of the bowel through an ileostomy, a colostomy, in the diverted large bowel or ileal pouch, and small bowel after stricturoplasty and bowel bypass surgery in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25806847

  18. [Interintestinal anastomoses formation using permanent magnet in surgical treatment of children with intestinal stomas].

    PubMed

    Gatkin, E Ya; Razumovsky, A Yu; Korsunsky, A A; Konovalov, A K; Sergeev, A V; Vinogradov, A Ya; Sein, V A

    2015-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of treatment of 48 children aged from 1 month to 14 years. In these observations by the 6th - 7th days after doubleintestinalstoma formation magnetic dies with inductance from 300 to 360 mTl and energy force at least 255 kJ/m3 were introduced into lumen of afferent and efferent intestinal loops. Attractive or compression force between dies was 600 g, i.e. force per 1 cm2 was 200 g according to dies' surface 1.12.83.0 cm. Magnets are not only surgical instruments but also physiotherapeutic devices improving microcirculation and stimulating regeneration in the area of anastomosis. Interintestinal anastomosis has been completely formed for 5-7 days. Thereafter magnetic dies have been removed. Stool was normalized in 45 of 48 observations after surgery (1-3 times daily). Intestinal discharge from ileostomy reduced to minimal amount. In 2 patients irregular bowel movements was observed due to adhesive stenosis of interintestinal anastomosis. Magnetic dies can't be established in 1 case due to adhesive process. Hospital stay was from 10 to 25 days in 41 children. 7 patients were discharged for outpatient treatment later. All children were under observation for the period 2-4 months after discharge. Signs of hypotrophy including body weight deficit within 10% of age norm were diagnosed only in 3 children with prematurity degree I-II. Hereafter children were repeatedly hospitalized; intestinal stomas were surgically removed using conventional technique. Thus complete convalescence was obtained.

  19. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: treatment and long term follow up of 44 patients

    PubMed Central

    Heneyke, S; Smith, V; Spitz, L; Milla, P

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To document the long term course of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndrome (CIIPS) in children with defined enteric neuromuscular disease, and the place and type of surgery used in their management; in addition, to identify prognostic factors.
METHODS—Children with CIIPS were investigated and treated prospectively.
RESULTS—Twenty four children presented congenitally, eight during the 1st year of life, and 10 later. Twenty two had myopathy and 16 neuropathy (11 familial). Malrotation was present in 16 patients, 10 had short small intestine, six had non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, and 16 had urinary tract involvement. Thirty two patients needed long term parenteral nutrition (TPN): for less than six months in 19 and for more than six months in 13, 10 of whom are TPN dependent; 14 are now enteral feeding. Prokinetic treatment improved six of 22. Intestinal decompression stomas were used in 36, colostomy relieved symptoms in five of 11, and ileostomy in 16 of 31. A poor outcome (death (14) or TPN dependence (10)) was seen with malrotation (13 of 16), short small bowel (eight of nine), urinary tract involvement (12 of 16), and myopathic histology (15 of 22).
CONCLUSIONS—In CIIPS drugs are not helpful but decompression stomas are. Outcome was poor in 24 of 44 children (15 muscle disorder, 10nerve disease).

 PMID:10373127

  20. Early manifestations of cystic fibrosis in a premature patient with complex meconium ileus at birth

    PubMed Central

    Del Ciampo, Ieda Regina Lopes; Oliveira, Tainara Queiroz; Del Ciampo, Luiz Antonio; Sawamura, Regina; Torres, Lidia Alice Gomes Monteiro Marin; Augustin, Albin Eugenio; Fernandes, Maria Inez Machado

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of a preterm infant with complex meconium ileus at birth and cystic fibrosis. CASE DESCRIPTION: A male infant was born by vaginal delivery at 33 weeks and 5 days of gestational age with respiratory distress and severe abdominal distension. The exploratory laparotomy in the first day of life identified meconium ileus and secondary peritonitis. Ileal resection and ileostomy were performed, followed by reconstruction of the bowel transit at 20 days of life. At 11 days of life, the first immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) was 154 ng/mL (reference value = 70), and oral pancreatic enzymes replacement therapy was started. After 23 days, the second IRT was 172ng/mL (reference value = 70). At 35 days of age he was discharged with referrals to primary care and to a special clinic for CF for the determination of sweat chloride. He was received in the outpatient clinic for neonatal screening for CF at 65 days of life presenting malnutrition and respiratory distress. The sweat chloride test was performed, with a positive result (126mEq/L). COMMENTS: This case illustrates the rapid evolution of CF in a premature patient with complex meconium ileus as the first clinical manifestation. PMID:25887928

  1. Clinical approach to severe Clostridium difficile infection: update for the hospital practitioner.

    PubMed

    Pant, Chaitanya; Sferra, Thomas J; Deshpande, Abhishek; Minocha, Anil

    2011-12-01

    The rising incidence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection or CDI is now a problem of pandemic proportions. The NAP1 hypervirulent strain of C. difficile is responsible for a majority of recent epidemics and the widespread use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics may have facilitated the selective proliferation of this strain. The NAP1 strain also is more likely to cause severe and fulminant colitis characterized by marked leukocytosis, renal failure, hemodynamic instability, and toxic megacolon. No single test suffices to diagnose severe CDI, instead; the clinician must rely on a combination of clinical acumen, laboratory testing, and radiologic and endoscopic modalities. Although oral vancomycin and metronidazole are considered standard therapies in the medical management of CDI, recently it has been demonstrated that vancomycin is the more effective antibiotic in cases of severe disease. Moreover, early surgical consultation is necessary in patients who do not respond to medical therapy or who demonstrate rising white blood cell counts or hemodynamic instability indicative of fulminant colitis. Subtotal colectomy with end ileostomy is the procedure of choice for fulminant colitis. When applied to select patients in a judicious and timely fashion, surgery can be a life-saving intervention. In addition to these therapeutic approaches, several investigational treatments including novel antibiotics, fecal bacteriotherapy and immunotherapy have shown promise in the care of patients with severe CDI.

  2. Intestinal, portal, and peripheral profiles of daikenchuto (TU-100)'s active ingredients after oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Junko; Kaifuchi, Noriko; Kushida, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Takashi; Fukutake, Miwako; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru

    2015-01-01

    A pharmaceutical grade Japanese traditional medicine, daikenchuto (TU-100), consisting of Japanese pepper, processed ginger, and ginseng, has been widely used for various intestinal disorders in Japan and now under development as a new therapeutic drug in the US. It is suggested that TU-100 ingredients exert pharmacological effects on intestines via two routes, from the luminal side before absorption and the peripheral blood stream after absorption. Therefore, in order to fully understand the pharmacological actions of TU-100, it is critically important to know the intraluminal amounts and forms of ingested TU-100 ingredients. In the present study, after administrating TU-100 to rats, the concentrations of TU-100 ingredients and their conjugates in the peripheral and portal blood and ileal contents were determined by LC-MS/MS. Next, TU-100 was administered to patients with ileostomy bags, but whose small intestines are diagnosed as healthy, and the ingredients/conjugates in the ileal effluent were analyzed. The results suggest that: (1) Pepper ingredients hydroxysanshools are rapidly absorbed and enter systemic circulation, (2) Ginseng ingredients ginsenosides are transported to the colon with the least absorption, (3) Ginger ingredients gingerols are absorbed and some conjugated in the small intestine and transported via the portal vein. While only a small amount of gingerols/gingerol conjugates enter systemic circulation, considerable amounts reappear in the small intestine. Thus, the effect of TU-100 on the intestines is believed to be a composite of multiple actions by multiple compounds supplied via multiple routes. PMID:26516578

  3. A reappraisal of the ileo-rectal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Myrelid, Pär; Øresland, Tom

    2015-06-01

    Colectomy is still frequently required in the care of ulcerative colitis. The most common indications are either non-responding colitis in the emergency setting, chronic active disease, steroid-dependent disease or neoplastic change like dysplasia or cancer. The use of the ileal pouch anal anastomosis has internationally been the gold standard, substituting the rectum with a pouch. Recently the use of the ileorectal anastomosis has increased in frequency as reconstructive method after subtotal colectomy. Data from centres using ileorectal anastomosis have shown the method to be safe, with functionality and risk of failure comparable to the ileal pouch anal anastomosis. The methods have different advantages as well as disadvantages, depending on a number of patient factors and where in life the patient is at time of reconstruction. The ileorectal anastomosis could, together with the Kock continent ileostomy, in selected cases be a complement to the ileal pouch anal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis and should be discussed with the patient before deciding on reconstructive method.

  4. Fat-reduced diet in the symptomatic treatment of small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, H.; Isaksson, B.; Sjögren, B.

    1974-01-01

    Thirteen patients suffering from Crohn's disease or subjected to small bowel resection were studied under metabolic ward conditions for an average of 32 days. Most of these patients had chronic, severe diarrhoea and varying degrees of steatorrhoea. All were studied at two levels of fat intake, 100 g and 40 g daily. After the introduction of the low-fat diet, there was a marked reduction in the faecal excretion of water and sodium in most patients and 10 of them passed solid faeces. Two other subjects improved only after the addition of cholestyramine. In one patient with an ileostomy, no improvement occurred. On the low-fat diet, there was a positive balance of nitrogen and potassium in many cases. Faecal fat excretion decreased, but there was no change in the fractional absorption of fat. The most gratifying improvement was seen in patients with a functioning gallbladder. Previous resection of the colon seemed to limit the reduction of faecal water and sodium excretion which followed the reduction in fat intake. A fat-reduced diet is recommended in the symptomatic therapy of chronic diarrhoea in patients suffering from diseases of the ileum. PMID:18668843

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Bevacizumab Plus Erlotinib for Patients with Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, and Fallopian Tube Cancer: A Trial of the Chicago, PMH, and California Phase II Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Nimeiri, Halla S.; Oza, Amit M.; Morgan, Robert J.; Friberg, Gregory; Kasza, Kristen; Faoro, Leonardo; Salgia, Ravi; Stadler, Walter M.; Vokes, Everett E.; Fleming, Gini F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this phase II trial were to assess the activity and tolerability of the combination of bevacizumab and erlotinib in patients with recurrent ovarian, primary peritoneal or fallopian tube cancer. Methods This was a single arm, multicenter phase II trial with overall objective response as the primary endpoint. Eligible patients had two or fewer prior chemotherapy regimens for recurrent or refractory disease and no prior anti-VEGF or anti- EGFR agents. Bevacizumab, 15 mg/kg, was administered intravenously every 21 days and erlotinib, 150 mg orally, was given daily. Results Between July and October 2005, 13 patients were enrolled. There were two major objective responses, one complete response of 16+ months duration and one partial response of 11 months duration, for a response rate of 15% (95% CI 1.9% to 45.4%). Seven patients had a best response of stable disease. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities included anemia (n=1), nausea (n=2), vomiting (n=1), hypertension (n=1), and diarrhea (n=2). One patient with an ileostomy was removed from the study secondary to grade 3 diarrhea. Two patients had fatal gastrointestinal perforations. Conclusion There was no strong suggestion that this combination was superior to single agent bevacizumab, and the rate of gastrointestinal perforation was of concern. The study was therefore stopped. Identification of risk factors for gastrointestinal perforation will be of importance for the use of bevacizumab in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:18423560

  6. Effect of radiation and radioprotection on small intestinal function in canines

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, J.L.; Vigneulle, R.M.; Gage, T.; MacVittie, T.J.; Nold, J.B.; Dubois, A.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation with doses >7.5 Gy damages the canine intestinal mucosa, and pretreatment with WR2721 reduces this damage. However, the effects of radiation and of WR2721 on in vivo intestinal transport are unclear. Therefore, we determined canine survival, intestinal transport, and mucosal histology following unilateral abdominal irradiation. Isoperistaltic ileostomies were prepared in 23 dogs under general anesthesia and aseptic conditions. After a three-week recovery period, animals were given either placebo or WR2721, 150 mg/kg intravenously, 30 min prior to 10 Gy cobalt-60 abdominal irradiation. Ileal transport and histology were determined in both groups before exposure and one, four, and seven days after irradiation. Seven-day survival was significantly improved by pretreatment with WR2721 (91% vs 33%, P < 0.02). On day 4, both mucosal integrity and net intestinal absorption were significantly better (P < 0.05) after WR2721 than after placebo. Thus, radiation-induced damage to the ileal mucosa is accompanied by a reduction in net ileal absorption of water and electrolytes in vivo. In addition, pretreatment with WR2721 improves animal survival while reducing ileal damage and improving intestinal absorption.

  7. Distal third rectal cancer: intersphincteric anterior resection with manual anastomosis using the techniques of Parks or Turnbull-Cutait.

    PubMed

    Biondo, Sebastiano; Trenti, Loris; Kreisler, Esther

    2014-03-01

    Rectal ultralow, intersphincteric anterior resection (RIE) can be used in selected cases with the intention of improving the quality of life of patients avoiding permanent colostomy. RIE is indicated for tumors that are located from 1-2 cm above the anorectal ring to the top of the internal anal sphincter without involvement of the pelvic floor, puborrectalis muscle or external anal sphincter. RIE aims to get a free distal margin tumour not less than 1cm. Correct preoperative staging and anatomical tumour location and relation with adjacent structures and organs is fundamental. Intestinal transit reconstruction can be performed manually with a coloanal anastomosis according with Parks and with a lateral ileostomy or, alternatively, by a two-stage coloanal anastomosis technique as Turnbull-Cutait avoiding the stoma protection. Postoperative morbidity and mortality and the rate of local recurrence and overall disease-free survival at 5 years after RIE are comparable to those observed in standard ultra low anterior resection. Postoperative functional alterations of the RIE can affect the quality of life of patients regardless of reconstructive technique. Published studies do not provide sufficient data to establish the most efficient reconstruction method in terms of functional outcomes.

  8. Long-term outcomes of living-related small intestinal transplantation in children: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Garcia Aroz, Sandra; Tzvetanov, Ivo; Hetterman, Elizabeth Anne; Jeon, Hoonbae; Oberholzer, Jose; Testa, Giuliano; John, Eunice; Benedetti, Enrico

    2017-03-12

    Pediatric patients with irreversible intestinal failure present a significant challenge to meet the nutritional needs that promote growth. From 2002 to 2013, 13 living-related small intestinal transplantations were performed in 10 children, with a median age of 18 months. Grafts included isolated living-related intestinal transplantation (n=7), and living-related liver and small intestine (n=6). The immunosuppression protocol consisted of induction with thymoglobulin and maintenance therapy with tacrolimus and steroids. Seven of 10 children are currently alive with a functioning graft and good quality of life. Six of the seven children who are alive have a follow-up longer than 10 years. The average time to initiation of oral diet was 32 days (range, 13-202 days). The median day for ileostomy takedown was 77 (range, 18-224 days). Seven children are on an oral diet, and one of them is on supplements at night through a g-tube. We observed an improvement in growth during the first 3 years post-transplant and progressive weight gain throughout the first year post-transplantation. Growth catch-up and weight gain plateaued after these time periods. We concluded that living donor intestinal transplantation potentially offers a feasible, alternative strategy for long-term treatment of irreversible intestinal failure in children.

  9. Left-sided transmesocolic herniation of small bowel in an otherwise unaffected abdomen.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Akshay Anand; Sonkar, Abhinav Arun; Singh, Kul Ranjan; Rai, Anurag

    2015-05-15

    Transmesocolic hernia is an uncommon type of internal hernia with incidence ranging from approximately 5-10%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a transmesocolic hernia through a gap within the descending mesocolon presenting clinically as an intestinal obstruction. A 75-year-old man was admitted with clinical features of intestinal obstruction. An abdominal X-ray showed multiple small bowel loops with air fluid levels. Contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen revealed small bowel obstruction not only on the right, but also on the left side of the collapsed descending colon. Emergency surgery was performed. Strangulated bowel loops with gangrenous changes were resected and double-barrel ileostomy was carried out. The postoperative period was uneventful. Restoration of bowel was performed after 6 weeks. Preoperative diagnosis of bowel obstruction caused by a transmesocolic hernia remains difficult despite the currently available imaging techniques. Prompt surgery can prevent serious complications such as peritonitis and sepsis.

  10. Fecal stream diversion and mucosal cytokine levels in collagenous colitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Daferera, Niki; Kumawat, Ashok Kumar; Hultgren-Hörnquist, Elisabeth; Ignatova, Simone; Ström, Magnus; Münch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we examined the levels of cytokines expressed before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored in a patient with collagenous colitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with chronic, active collagenous colitis who either failed to achieve clinical remission or experienced adverse effects with the following drugs: loperamide, cholestyramine, budesonide, methotrexate and adalimumab. Due to the intractable nature of the disease and because the patient was having up to 15 watery bowel movements per day, she underwent a temporary ileostomy. Colonic biopsies were analyzed for mucosal cytokine protein levels before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored. Mucosal protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 A, IL-23, TNF, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 were all higher during active disease and decreased to non-detectable or considerably lower levels during fecal stream diversion. One month after the restoration of bowel continuity, when the patient experienced a relapse of symptoms, IL-2, IL-23 and IL-21 levels were again increased. Our results indicate that fecal stream diversion in this patient suppressed the levels of all cytokines analyzed in colonic biopsies. With the recurrence of clinical symptoms and histological changes after bowel reconstruction, the levels of primarily proinflammatory cytokines increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that a luminal factor triggers the inflammation observed in collagenous colitis. PMID:26019474

  11. [Long-term results of ileo-rectal anastomosis in familial polyposis].

    PubMed

    Sváb, J; Pesková, M; Jirásek, V; Fried, M; Krska, Z

    1999-04-01

    The authors present their experience with 93 patients operated at the First Surgical Clinic of the General Faculty Hospital and First Medical Faculty, Charles University Prague on account of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) assembled during 36 year starting in 1962. They analyze 91 patients followed up in collaboration with the First Medical Clinic of the General Faculty Hospital and First Medical Clinic Charles University Prague. Seventy-two of the patients were operated and in 55 of them an ileorectoanastomosis was made following subtotal colectomy. Two important findings were made. From the group of 91 patients incl. primary patients who suffered already from advanced malignant disease of the large bowel a total of 38.5% died. In the rectal stump after ileorectoanastomosis on average within 16 years after operation in 16.4% of the patients a malignant tumour was found. This leads to the belief that patients should be recommended colectomy with ileoanoanastomosis with an ileal reservoir. This operation was performed during the last five years in nine patients with this condition, using a one-stage or two-stage procedure with temporary ileostomy.

  12. Synchronous quintuple primary gastrointestinal tract malignancies: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Hong; Park, Byung-Soo; Kim, Hyun Sung; Kim, Jae Hun

    2017-01-01

    Multiple primary malignancy is defined as two or more malignancies detected in an individual person. In particular, synchronous quintuple primary malignancy is extremely rare. A 52-year-old male with anal pain and intermittent blood-tinged stool was diagnosed with malignancies in the stomach, jejunum, ascending colon, transverse colon and rectum. He underwent a subtotal gastrectomy, segmental resection of the jejunum and total protocolectomy with end ileostomy. The postoperative pathologic findings were moderate differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma (pT1bN0M0, pStageIA), combined adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma of the jejunum (pT3N0M0, pStageIIA), three mucinous adenocarcinoma of the ascending colon (pT3N0M0, pStageIIA), transverse colon (pT1N0M0, pStageI) and rectum (pT3N1aM0, pStageIIIB). The tumors did not lack MLH-1 and MSH-2 expression, as the markers (bat26, D5S346, bat25, D2S123) suggest MSI-H presence. Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy was started according to regimen, FOLFOX 4 for advanced rectal cancer. Six years post-operation, the patient is currently attending regular follow-ups without recurrence or metastasis. PMID:28104993

  13. Development of fatty acid calcium stone ileus after initiation of human milk fortifier.

    PubMed

    Murase, Masahiko; Miyazawa, Tokuo; Taki, Motohiro; Sakurai, Motoichiro; Miura, Fumihiro; Mizuno, Katsumi; Itabashi, Kazuo; Toki, Akira

    2013-02-01

    We report a case who was born with extremely low birth weight infant and had experienced abdominal operation for necrotizing enterocolitis, eventually developed ileus due to fatty acid calcium stones after giving human milk fortifier. He had developed necrotizing enterocolitis on day 30 of his age, such that we performed enterectomy and ileostomy. He could not tolerate enteral feeding fully, because intestinal fistula infection was repeated. Although we administered hindmilk, he grew up slowly and he suffered cholestasis as well. We performed end-to-end anastomosis to prevent fistula infections on day 87. After this operation, breast milk feeding volume was increased easily. However, we started to add HMF of half-strength on day 124, because his body weight gain remained very poor. And we confirmed to intensify the ratio of HMF full-strength on day 128. After that his abdomen had distended on day 131. As there is no effect of conservative therapy to occlusive ileus, we did emergency laparotomy on day 139. Intestinal calculi were impacted at anastomic portion. Although all stones were removed, he died on 144 days due to disseminated intravascular coagulation and renal failure. Calculi analysis revealed that all of them were fatty acid calcium stones. There is no report about like our case. We speculate that the construction of fatty acid calcium result from either high concentration of calcium/phosphorus or rapid increase in the fortification. We could have prevented this case happened by slower increment of fortification.

  14. Changes of CFTR functional measurements and clinical improvements in cystic fibrosis patients with non p.Gly551Asp gating mutations treated with ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Mesbahi, Myriam; Shteinberg, Michal; Wilschanski, Michael; Hatton, Aurelie; Nguyen-Khoa, Thao; Friedman, Hannah; Cohen, Michael; Escabasse, Virginie; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Lucidi, Vicenzina; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Bassinet, Laurence; Livnat, Galit

    2017-01-01

    Ivacaftor, a CFTR potentiator, has been found to improve CFTR function and clinical outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) gating mutations. We investigated the effects of ivacaftor on CFTR functional measurement in CF patients carrying gating mutations other than p.Gly551Asp. Two siblings aged 13 and 12 carrying the p.Ser549Asn mutation, two sisters (45 and 43years old) compound heterozygotes for p.Asp1152His and p.Gly1244Glu, a 37year old man homozygous for the p.Gly1244Glu mutation, and a 7year old girl with p.Arg352Gln and p.Gly1244Glu mutations commenced treatment with ivacaftor. NPD was performed in all the patients and approached normal for four patients who had also clinical improvement (p.Ser549Asn compound heterozygotes, and p.Asp1152His/p.Gly1244Glu siblings). Beta-adrenergic sweat chloride secretion performed in thep.Asp1152His/p.Gly1244Glu patients improved significantly. The p.Gly1244Glu mutation homozygous patient, who had undergone an ileal resection with ileostomy and enterocutaneous fistula, did not respond clinically to ivacaftor and did not modify his sweat test. These results highlight the importance of different CFTR activity measurements to explore CFTR modulator efficacy.

  15. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro digestion on polyphenol composition in lingonberries: potential impact on colonic health.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emma M; Nitecki, Sonja; Pereira-Caro, Gema; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Rowland, Ian; Crozier, Alan; Gill, Chris I R

    2014-01-01

    The composition of polyphenols in ileal fluid samples obtained from an ileostomy subject after lingonberry intake was compared with lingonberry extracts obtained after simulated in vitro digestion (IVDL) and subsequent faecal fermentation (IVFL). HPLC-PDA-MS/MS analysis confirmed similar patterns of lingonberry (poly)phenolic metabolism after the in vivo and in vitro digestion, with reduced recovery of anthocyanins and a similar pattern of recovery for proanthocyanidins observed for both methods of digestion. On the other hand, the IVFL sample contained none of the original (poly)phenolic components but was enriched in simple aromatic components. Digested and fermented extracts exhibited significant (P < 0.05) anti-genotoxic (Comet assay), anti-mutagenic (Mutation Frequency assay), and anti-invasive (Matrigel Invasion assay) effects in human cell culture models of colorectal cancer at physiologically-relevant doses (0-50 μg/mL gallic acid equivalents). The ileal fluid induced significant anti-genotoxic activity (P < 0.05), but at a higher concentration (200 μg/mL gallic acid equivalents) than the IVDL. Despite extensive structural modification following digestion and fermentation, lingonberry extracts retained their bioactivity in vitro. This reinforces the need for studies to consider the impact of digestion when investigating bioactivity of dietary phytochemicals.

  16. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points.

  17. Delayed endoluminal vacuum therapy for rectal anastomotic leaks after rectal resection in a swine model: a new treatment option.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Shada, Amber; Ritter, Lane A; Mauro, David M; Mentrikoski, Mark J; Feldman, Sanford H; Kleiner, Daniel E

    2014-04-01

    Anastomotic leaks are a dreaded surgical complication following colorectal operations. Creation of a temporary proximal diverting ileostomy is used in high-risk anastomoses, however, additional surgical risk is accumulated with its creation and reversal. Endoluminal vacuum therapy has been shown to seal anastomotic defects in the prophylactic setting in a pig model and we hypothesized it could be utilized in a delayed fashion to rescue subjects with an active anastomotic leak. Yorkshire pigs underwent rectal resection, intentional leak confirmed by fluoroscopy, and endoluminal vacuum therapy device placement to low continuous suction. Following treatment, a contrast enema and necropsy was performed for gross and histopathology. Pigs underwent 2 (or 5) days of free intraperitoneal leak prior to device placement and 5 (or 7) subsequent days of endoluminal vacuum therapy. Six of seven early-treated pigs sealed their anastomotic defect, while two of the four treated pigs in this extended group sealed the defect. Endoluminal vacuum therapy is feasible and well tolerated in a pig model, and it has been shown to seal a significant number of freely leaking anastomoses in the early period (86%). This technology warrants further study as it may provide a noninvasive means to treatment of anastomotic leaks.

  18. Intestinal, portal, and peripheral profiles of daikenchuto (TU-100)'s active ingredients after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Junko; Kaifuchi, Noriko; Kushida, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Takashi; Fukutake, Miwako; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru

    2015-10-01

    A pharmaceutical grade Japanese traditional medicine, daikenchuto (TU-100), consisting of Japanese pepper, processed ginger, and ginseng, has been widely used for various intestinal disorders in Japan and now under development as a new therapeutic drug in the US. It is suggested that TU-100 ingredients exert pharmacological effects on intestines via two routes, from the luminal side before absorption and the peripheral blood stream after absorption. Therefore, in order to fully understand the pharmacological actions of TU-100, it is critically important to know the intraluminal amounts and forms of ingested TU-100 ingredients. In the present study, after administrating TU-100 to rats, the concentrations of TU-100 ingredients and their conjugates in the peripheral and portal blood and ileal contents were determined by LC-MS/MS. Next, TU-100 was administered to patients with ileostomy bags, but whose small intestines are diagnosed as healthy, and the ingredients/conjugates in the ileal effluent were analyzed. The results suggest that: (1) Pepper ingredients hydroxysanshools are rapidly absorbed and enter systemic circulation, (2) Ginseng ingredients ginsenosides are transported to the colon with the least absorption, (3) Ginger ingredients gingerols are absorbed and some conjugated in the small intestine and transported via the portal vein. While only a small amount of gingerols/gingerol conjugates enter systemic circulation, considerable amounts reappear in the small intestine. Thus, the effect of TU-100 on the intestines is believed to be a composite of multiple actions by multiple compounds supplied via multiple routes.

  19. Successful Treatment of a Large Pelvic Abscess Using Intraluminal VAC: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Aras, Abbas; Celik, Sebahattin; Kiziltan, Remzi; Yilmaz, Özkan; Kotan, Çetin

    2016-04-01

    The most feared complication of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is anastomotic leakage, which is related to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Here, we present a patient who could not be treated with surgical drainage but treated by intraluminal Vacuum Associated Closure (VAC). A 34-year-old male patient was treated for rectal cancer by low anterior resection, colorectal anastomosis, and diverting ileostomy following neoadjuvant CRT. The patient reported with a postoperative anastomotic disruption and a large pelvic abscess. Due to the continuation of foul-smell drainage inspite of perianal incision and drainage, intraluminal VAC was applied and the pelvic abscess and the foul-smell were successfully treated. The presence of an adequate anal sphincter tonus is a disadvantage in anastomotic leakage, since it prevents the emptying of the intestinal content and also precludes the drainage of the pelvic abscess. The endoluminal application of VAC, similar to the results of application of VAC in open wounds, has been demonstrated to decrease fibrin and necrotic tissue in the pelvic cavity and increase granulation tissue. VAC, which has long been used in the treatment of open wounds, is a promising method in the treatment of large pelvic abscesses due to anastomotic leakage following rectum resection.

  20. Dieulafoy lesion of the gallbladder presenting with bleeding and a pseudo-mirizzi syndrome: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Stanes, Aaron; Mackay, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal bleeding can have significant morbidity and mortality. Pathological processes that cause it are diverse, and timely investigation and management are vital. Dieulafoy lesions are a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and here we describe a case of a gallbladder dieulafoy lesion causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Presentation of case Recently discharged from hospital following an open anterior resection and loop ileostomy for diverticular disease, an 84-year-old female re-presented with lower abdominal pain associated with jaundice and lymphocytosis. Imaging demonstrated two possible rectal stump collections (treated with antibiotics), and heterogeneous material in the gallbladder. The patient deteriorated, developing melena, coffee ground vomitus and right upper quadrant pain. Investigation sourced the bleeding to the gallbladder that resolved following cholecystectomy, and histopathology was consistent with a dieulafoy lesion. The patient made a full recovery. Discussion Dieulafoy lesions have rarely been reported in the gallbladder, and as such can be an occult source of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. It should be considered where gastrointestinal bleeding accompanies jaundice and abdominal pain. Conclusion This case highlights that dieulafoy lesions can occur in the gallbladder. Massive gastrointestinal bleeding can occur within the gallbladder, and a gallbladder dieulafoy lesion should be considered as a potential cause of such, especially when a source has not been identified on endoscopy. It also demonstrates the effectiveness of cholecystectomy as a definitive management strategy. PMID:26878358

  1. Ulcerative Colitis: A Challenge to Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Mohd L; Malik, Ajaz A; Wani, Shadab N; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease that specifically affects the mucosa of the rectum and colon. Although the etiology of this recurring inflammatory disorder remains essentially unknown, there have been significant advances in identifying the likely genetic and environmental factors that contribute to its pathogenesis. The clinical course of the disease typically manifests with remissions and exacerbations characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea. Since ulcerative colitis most commonly affects patients in their youth or early middle age, the disease can have serious long-term local and systemic consequences. There is no specific medical therapy that is curative. Although medical therapy can ameliorate the inflammatory process and control most symptomatic flares, it provides no definitive treatment for the disease. Proctocolectomy or total removal of the colon and rectum provides the only complete cure; however, innovative surgical alternatives have eliminated the need for a permanent ileostomy. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed account of the surgical management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23189226

  2. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-12-27

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented.

  3. Ostomy Closures in Children: Variations in Perioperative Care Do Not Change the Outcome.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Yusuf Hakan; Karaman, Ayşe; Afşarlar, Çağatay Evrim; Karaman, İbrahim; Erdoğan, Derya; Özgüner, İsmet Faruk

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate ostomy closure applications and outcomes and determine the effect of personal differences among surgeons on patient postoperative course. Ninety-eight patients who underwent elective ostomy (ileostomy and colostomy) closure for 8 years at a pediatric surgery training department were investigated. Postoperative complications included superficial surgical site infection (SSI; 9.4 %), organ/cavity infection (1 %), small bowel adhesions (8.2 %), and incisional hernia (1 %). SSI and postoperative complications were not affected by the preoperative antibiotic regimen used. Operation duration, pre- and postoperative antibiotic use durations, postoperative inpatient period, ostomy type, primary diagnosis, performance of abdominal exploration, SSI, and postoperative complications were not significantly different. However, the time of nasogastric (NG) tube withdrawal, time to oral feeding initiation, abdominal closure method used, and preoperative antibiotic regimen were significantly different among different surgeons. We conclude that while surgeons used different preoperative antibiotic regimens and abdominal closure methods and stipulated different times for NG tube withdrawal and oral feeding initiation, the postoperative course and prognosis were unaffected Thus, the pre- and postoperative inpatient period and antibiotic use duration can be decreased in children by procedure standardization using practice guidelines; the procedures can also be performed with a more aesthetic, acceptable incision.

  4. Study of peristomal skin disorders in patients with permanent stomas.

    PubMed

    Herlufsen, P; Olsen, A G; Carlsen, B; Nybaek, H; Karlsmark, T; Laursen, T N; Jemec, G B E

    The aim of this article was to investigate the frequency, severity and diversity of peristomal skin disorders among individuals with a permanent stoma in a community population. All individuals with a permanent stoma (n=630) in a Danish community population were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. A total of 202 individuals (101 men; 101 women) agreed to participate. Data were collected through questionnaires and clinical examinations. It was found that peristomal skin disorders were higher for participants with an ileostomy (57%) and urostomy (48%) than in those with a colostomy (35%). Of the diagnoses of skin disorders, 77% could be related to contact with stoma effluent. Only 38% of diagnosed participants agreed that they had a skin disorder and more than 80% did not seek professional health care. The study revealed a high frequency of peristomal skin disorders. Participants frequently failed to perceive that they had a skin irritation and did not seek help. This suggests that more education and perhaps regular, annual follow-up visits at local stoma care clinics are needed.

  5. Management of Septic Open Abdomen in a Morbid Obese Patient with Enteroatmospheric Fistula by Using Standard Abdominal Negative Pressure Therapy in Conjunction with Intrarectal One

    PubMed Central

    Yetisir, Fahri; Salman, A. Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Özer, Mehmet; Aygar, Muhittin; Osmanoglu, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Management of open abdomen (OA) with enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) in morbid obese patient with comorbid disease is challenging. We would like to report the management of septic OA in morbid obese patient with EAF which developed after strangulated recurrent giant incisional hernia repair. We would also like to emphasize, in this case, the conversion of EAF to ileostomy by the help of second Negative Pressure Therapy (NPT) on ostomy side, and the chance of new EAF occurrence was reduced with intrarectal NPT. Case Presentation. 62-year-old morbid obese woman became an OA patient with EAF after strangulated recurrent giant hernia. EAF was converted to ostomy with pezzer drain by the help of second NPT on ostomy. Colonic distention was reduced with the third NPT application via rectum. Abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) system was used for delayed abdominal closure. Conclusions. Using the 2nd NPT on ostomy side may help in the maturation of the ostomy created in a difficult condition in an open abdomen. Using the 3rd NPT through rectum may decrease the chance of EAF formation by reducing the pressure difference between intraluminal pressure and extraluminal pressure in hollow viscera. PMID:26779360

  6. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%–76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  7. Usefulness of Anorectal Manometry for Diagnosing Continence Problems After a Low Anterior Resection

    PubMed Central

    Samalavicius, Narimantas E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose For several decades, the low anterior resection (LAR) with total mesorectal excision (TME) has been the gold standard for treating patients with rectal cancer. Up to 90% of patients undergoing sphincter-preserving surgery will have changes in bowel habits, so-called 'anterior resection syndrome.' This study examined patients' continence after a LAR for the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods This prospective study was performed between September 2014 and August 2015 at the National Cancer Institute and included 30 patients who underwent anorectal manometry preoperatively and at 3 and 4 months after a LAR, but 10 were excluded from further evaluation for various reasons. Wexner score was recorded preoperatively and 4 months after LAR (1 month after ileostomy repair). Results Postoperatively, 70% of patients complained of some degree of soiling (incontinence to liquid stool), and 30% experienced urgent defecation. Four months after surgery, these symptoms had somewhat abated. The anal resting pressure and the maximum squeezing pressure did not change significantly. Rectal capacity and compliance were reduced in all patients. The majority of patients demonstrated manometric anorectal changes and clinical anorectal function disorders during the first 4 months after surgery. The Wexner scores and the manometric findings showed no correlation. Conclusion Many patients undergoing a LAR with TME for the treatment of rectal cancer experience some degree of incontinence postoperatively. Anorectal manometry may be used as an additional tool for evaluating problems with continence after a LAR. No correlation between the Wexner score and the manometric findings was observed. PMID:27437391

  8. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann’s procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented. PMID:26730283

  9. Anastomotic salvage after rectal cancer resection using the Turnbull–Cutait delayed anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Hallet, Julie; Bouchard, Alexandre; Drolet, Sébastien; Milot, Hélène; Desrosiers, Emilie; Lebrun, Aude; Grégoire, Roger Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Turnbull–Cutait abdominoperineal pull-through followed by delayed coloanal anastomosis (DCA) was first described in 1961. Studies have described its use for challenging colorectal conditions. We reviewed our experience with Turnbull–Cutait DCA as a salvage procedure for complex failure of colorectal anastomosis. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study from October 2010 to September 2011, with analysis of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Results Seven DCAs were performed for anastomotic complications (3 chronic leaks, 2 rectovaginal fistulas, 1 colovesical fistula, 1 colonic ischemia) following surgery for rectal cancer. Six patients had a diverting ileostomy constructed as part of previous treatment for anastomotic complications before the salvage procedure. No anastomotic leaks were observed. All procedures but 1 were completed successfully. One patient who underwent DCA subsequently required an abdominoperineal resection and a permanent colostomy for postoperative extensive colonic ischemia. No 30-day mortality occurred. Conclusion Salvage Turnbull–Cutait DCA appears to be a safe procedure and could be offered to patients with complex anastomotic complications. This procedure could be added to the surgeon’s armamentarium as an alternative to the creation of a permanent stoma. PMID:25421083

  10. Happily hopeless: Adaptation to a permanent, but not to a temporary, disability

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dylan M.; Loewenstein, George; Jankovich, Aleksandra; Ubel, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We tracked patients with either irreversible or reversible colostomies over a six month period, beginning a week after the procedure, to examine how they adapted hedonically over time. Based on prior research and theorizing, we hypothesized that, paradoxically, those with irreversible colostomies would adapt more fully, and become happier, than would those with colostomies that were potentially reversible. Design: We contacted 107 patients who had recently received either a colostomy or ileostomy. The initial interviews were conducted while patients were still in the hospital recovering from their surgery. Consenting participants were mailed surveys at three time points: 1 week after release from the hospital, one month after release, and six months after release. Main Outcome Measures: The surveys included measures of life satisfaction and perceived quality of life. Results: As predicted, overall life satisfaction and quality of life increased with time for patients with permanent, but not temporary, ostomies.. Conclusion: These findings suggest that knowing an adverse situation is temporary can interfere with adaptation, leading to a paradoxical situation in which people who are better off objectively are worse off subjectively. PMID:19916648

  11. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Total Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Oluwatosin J.; Carne, David; Guyton, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To present our experience with a single-incision laparoscopic total colectomy, along with a literature review of all published cases on single-incision laparoscopic total colectomy. Methods: A total of 22 cases were published between 2010 and 2011, with our patient being case 23. These procedures were performed in the United States and United Kingdom. Surgical procedures included total colectomy with end ileostomy, proctocolectomy with ileorectal anastomosis, and total proctocolectomy with ileopouch-anal anastomosis. Intraoperative and postoperative data are analyzed. Results: Twenty-two of the 23 cases were performed for benign cases including Crohns, ulcerative colitis, and familial adenomatous polyposis. One case was performed for adenocarcinoma of the cecum. The mean age was 35.3 years (range, 13 to 64), the mean body mass index was 20.1 (range, 19 to 25), mean operative time was 175.9 minutes (range, 139 to 216), mean blood loss was 95.3mL (range, 59 to 200), mean incision length was 2.61cm (range, 2 to 3). Average follow-up was 4.6 months with 2 reported complications. Conclusions: Single-incision laparoscopic total colectomy is feasible and safe in the hands of an experienced surgeon. It has been performed for both benign and malignant cases. It is comparable to the conventional multi-port laparoscopic total colectomy. PMID:22906326

  12. [A Case of Double Cancer of Initially Unresectable Sigmoid Colon Cancer and Advanced Gastric Cancer Treated with Curative Resection after mFOLFOX6 Therapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Toru; Aoki, Kazunori; Mitsuhashi, Yuto; Tomiura, Satoko; Suto, Akiko; Miura, Takuya; Ikenaga, Shojirokazunori; Shibasaki, Itaru; Endo, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a complaint of blood in stool. He was diagnosed with advanced colon and gastric cancers. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a sigmoid tumor with invasion to the bladder, a metastatic tumor in the lateral segmental branch of the left hepatic lobe, and ascites. He was diagnosed with initially unresectable double cancer. Ileostomy was performed immediately, and he was treated with modified (m) FOLFOX6 regimen (oxaliplatin in combination with infusional 5-fluorouracil/Leucovorin). After 6 courses of the mFOLFOX6 regimen, CT revealed that the primary lesion of the sigmoid colon and liver metastasis had reduced in size, and the ascites had disappeared. Gastroscopy revealed that the gastric cancer had disappeared. Biopsy results were negative. Accordingly, his gastric cancer was diagnosed as treatment effect Grade 3. After 8 courses of mFOLFOX6 therapy, sigmoidectomy, partial resection of the bladder, and partial resection of the liver were performed. Gastric cancer was not resected in accordance with his will. Although 40 months has passed after the radical resection, neither the sigmoid colon cancer nor the gastric cancer recurred.

  13. The appearance of free-air in the abdomen with related pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis: Three case reports and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Aziret, Mehmet; Erdem, Hasan; Ülgen, Yiğit; Kahramanca, Şahin; Çetinkünar, Süleyman; Bozkurt, Hilmi; Bali, İlhan; İrkörücü, Oktay

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pneumatosis sistoides intestinalis (PSI) is a rare condition with unknown origin, defined as the appearance of gas-filled cysts in the intestinal wall. It usually occurs due to respiratory infections, tumor or collagen disease, traumas, immunosuppression. PRESENTATION OF CASE Three patients with PSI were examined that followed up and treated in our clinic. The first patient was hospitalized for emergency treatment of previously diagnosed free-air under the diaphragm. He had a defense on physical examination and free-air was detected in X-ray and abdomen CT. We decided to laparatomy and peroperatively, stenotic pylorus with an abnormally increased stomach and gas-filled cysts were seen in the terminal ileum. Antrectomy and gastrojejunostomy with partial ileum and cecum resection and end ileostomy were performed. The second patient underwent laparatomy because of intraperitoneal free-air and acute abdomen. Partial ileum and cecum resection and ileotransversostomy were performed. The third patient with intraperitoneal free-air was treated with antibiotics, oxygen treatment and bowel rest. DISCUSSION PSI is usually asymptomatic. Plain radiographs, USG, CT, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy can use for diagnosis. Treatment of PSI depends on the underlying cause; include elemental diet, antibiotics, steroids, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and surgery. CONCLUSION In patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic PSI are different treat. Symptomatic PSI can be safely treated antrectomy and gastrojejunostomy with partial ileum and cecum resection. PMID:25460434

  14. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    conceptually, it is worth attempting and certainly so in patients with associated pelvic floor dyssynergia. Subtotal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis is often effective in those patients with colonic inertia, normal anorectal function, and lack of evidence of generalized intestinal dysmotility. However, morbidity is significant both early and late in the disease process and must be balanced against current disability. Ileostomy is preferred in the presence of anorectal dysfunction or with associated impairment of continence mechanisms. Similar considerations apply to the patient with disabling functional megacolon. An alternative approach is ileostomy with disconnection of the colon, which is more acceptable to some patients who may hope for future reconnection if recovery occurs. An additional alternative approach for patients with colonic inertia or megacolon who are not good surgical risks is tube cecostomy (or in children, use of the appendix as a conduit to the cecum). This permits either decompression (in megacolon) or antegrade enemas (in colonic inertia). Our surgeons are not enthusiastic about this approach, and I have little experience with it. In general, the use of partial resections of the colon should be discouraged, because marker studies do not define pathophysiology in patients with slow transit constipation.

  15. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Debast, S B; Bauer, M P; Kuijper, E J

    2014-03-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was published. The guideline has been applied widely in clinical practice. In this document an update and review on the comparative effectiveness of the currently available treatment modalities of CDI is given, thereby providing evidence-based recommendations on this issue. A computerized literature search was carried out to investigate randomized and non-randomized trials investigating the effect of an intervention on the clinical outcome of CDI. The Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to grade the strength of our recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The ESCMID and an international team of experts from 11 European countries supported the process. To improve clinical guidance in the treatment of CDI, recommendations are specified for various patient groups, e.g. initial non-severe disease, severe CDI, first recurrence or risk for recurrent disease, multiple recurrences and treatment of CDI when oral administration is not possible. Treatment options that are reviewed include: antibiotics, toxin-binding resins and polymers, immunotherapy, probiotics, and faecal or bacterial intestinal transplantation. Except for very mild CDI that is clearly induced by antibiotic usage antibiotic treatment is advised. The main antibiotics that are recommended are metronidazole, vancomycin and fidaxomicin. Faecal transplantation is strongly recommended for multiple recurrent CDI. In case of perforation of the colon and/or systemic inflammation and deteriorating clinical condition despite antibiotic therapy, total abdominal colectomy or diverting loop ileostomy combined with colonic lavage is recommended.

  16. Colonic catabolism of dietary phenolic and polyphenolic compounds from Concord grape juice.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Angelique; Edwards, Christine A; Wightman, Jolynne D; Crozier, Alan

    2013-01-01

    After acute ingestion of 350 ml of Concord grape juice, containing 528 μmol of (poly)phenolic compounds, by healthy volunteers, a wide array of phase I and II metabolites were detected in the circulation and excreted in urine. Ingestion of the juice by ileostomists resulted in 40% of compounds being recovered intact in ileal effluent. The current study investigated the fate of these undigested (poly)phenolic compounds on reaching the colon. This was achieved through incubation of the juice using an in vitro model of colonic fermentation and through quantification of catabolites produced after colonic degradation and their subsequent absorption prior to urinary excretion by healthy subjects and ileostomy volunteers. A total of 16 aromatic and phenolic compounds derived from colonic metabolism of Concord grape juice (poly)phenolic compounds were identified by GC-MS in the faecal incubation samples. Thirteen urinary phenolic acids and aromatic compounds were excreted in significantly increased amounts after intake of the juice by healthy volunteers, whereas only two of these compounds were excreted in elevated amounts by ileostomists. The production of phenolic acids and aromatic compounds by colonic catabolism contributed to the bioavailability of Concord grape (poly)phenolic compounds to a much greater extent than phase I and II metabolites originating from absorption in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Catabolic pathways are proposed, highlighting the impact of colonic microbiota and subsequent phase II metabolism prior to excretion of phenolic compounds derived from (poly)phenolic compounds in Concord grape juice, which pass from the small to the large intestine.

  17. Asbestos-induced peritoneal mesothelioma in a construction worker.

    PubMed Central

    Fonte, Rodolfo; Gambettino, Salvatore; Melazzini, Mario; Scelsi, Mario; Zanon, Claudio; Candura, Stefano M

    2004-01-01

    Occupational and environmental asbestos exposure continues to represent a public health problem, despite increasingly restrictive laws adopted by most industrialized countries. Peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive asbestos-related malignancy. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who developed recurrent ascites after having been exposed to asbestos in the building industry for > 40 years. Liver function and histology were normal. Abdominal computed tomography initially excluded the presence of expansive processes, and no abnormal cells were found in the ascitic fluid. Laparoscopy showed diffuse neoplastic infiltration of the peritoneum. Histopathology of bioptic samples revealed epithelioid neoplastic proliferation with a tubulopapillary pattern, falsely suggesting metastatic adenocarcinomatosis. In consideration of the occupational history, and after further diagnostic procedures had failed to identify the hypothetical primitive tumor, immunostaining of the neoplastic tissue was performed. Results were negative for carcinoembrionary antigen and the epithelial glycoprotein Ber-EP4, whereas results were positive for the mesothelial markers cytokeratins, calretinin, epithelial membrane antigen, and HBME-1, thus leading to the correct diagnosis of peritoneal epithelial mesothelioma. The Italian Workers' Compensation Authority recognized the occupational origin of the disease. Cytoreductive surgery associated with continuous hyperthermic peritoneal perfusion (cisplatin at 42 degrees C, for 1 hr) was performed. The disease relapsed after 4 months and was later complicated by a bowel obstruction requiring palliative ileostomy. The patient died 23 months after diagnosis. This case illustrates the insidious diagnostic problems posed by peritoneal mesothelioma, a tumor which often simulates other malignancies (e.g., metastatic carcinomas) at routine histopathological examination. Occupational history and immunohistochemistry are helpful for the correct

  18. Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision of low rectal cancer with preservation of anal sphincter: A report of 82 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zong-Guang; Wang, Zhao; Yu, Yong-Yang; Shu, Ye; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Li; Lei, Wen-Zhang; Wang, Tian-Cai

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (LTME) of low rectal cancer with preservation of anal sphincter. METHODS: From June 2001 to June 2003, 82 patients with low rectal cancer underwent laparoscopic total mesorectal excision with preservation of anal sphincter. The lowest edge of tumors was below peritoneal reflection and 1.5-7 cm from the dentate line (1.5-5 cm in 48 cases, 5-7 cm in 34 cases). RESULTS: LTME with anal sphincter preservation was performed on 82 randomized patients with low rectal cancer, and 100% sphincter preservation rate was achieved. There were 30 patients with laparoscopic low anterior resection (LLAR) at the level of the anastomosis below peritoneal reflection and 2 cm above from the dentate line; 27 patients with laparoscopic ultralow anterior resection (LULAR) at the level of anastomoses 2 cm below from the dentate line; and 25 patients with laparoscopic coloanal anastomoses (LCAA) at the level of the anastomoses at or below the dentate line. No defunctioning ileostomy was created in any case. The mean operating time was 120 min (ranged from 110-220 min), and the mean operative blood loss was 20 mL (ranged from 5-120 mL). Bowel function was restored and diet was resumed on day 1 or 2 after operation. The mean hospital stay was 8 d (ranged from 5-14). Postoperative analgesics were used in 45 patients. After surgery, 2 patients had urinary retention, one had anastomotic leakage, and another 2 patients had local recurrence one year later. No interoperative complication was observed. CONCLUSION: LTME with preservation of anal sphincter is a feasible, safe and minimally invasive technique with less postoperative pain and rapid recovery, and importantly, it has preserved the function of the sphincter. PMID:12854145

  19. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt with a rare twist: small-bowel ischemia and necrosis secondary to knotting of peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Kasliwal, Manish K; Moftakhar, Roham; Munoz, Lorenzo F

    2014-09-01

    Small-bowel ischemia and necrosis due to knotting of the peritoneal catheter is an extremely rare complication related to a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS). A 3-month-old girl, with a history of Chiari II malformation and myelomeningocele (MM) after undergoing right occipital VPS insertion and MM repair at birth, presented to the emergency department with a high-grade fever. Examination of a CSF sample obtained via shunt tap raised suspicion for the presence of infection. Antibiotic therapy was initiated, and subsequently the VPS was removed and an external ventricular drain was placed. Intraoperatively, as attempts at pulling the distal catheter from the scalp incision were met with resistance, the distal catheter was cut and left in the abdomen while the remainder of the shunt system was successfully removed. While the patient was awaiting definitive shunt revision surgery to replace the VPS, she developed abdominal distension due to small-bowel obstruction. An emergency exploratory laparotomy revealed a knot in the distal catheter looping around and strangulating the distal ileum, causing small-bowel ischemia and necrosis in addition to the obstruction. A small-bowel resection with ileostomy was performed, with subsequent placement of ventriculoatrial shunt for treatment of hydrocephalus. The authors report this exceedingly rare clinical scenario to highlight the fact that any retained distal catheter must be carefully managed with immediate abdominal exploration to remove the distal catheter to avoid bowel necrosis as pulling of a knotted peritoneal catheter may strangulate the bowel and cause ischemia, with significant clinical morbidity and possible mortality.

  20. The effect of haem in red and processed meat on the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lunn, J C; Kuhnle, G; Mai, V; Frankenfeld, C; Shuker, D E G; Glen, R C; Goodman, J M; Pollock, J R A; Bingham, S A

    2007-03-01

    Red and processed meat (PM) consumption increases the risk of large bowel cancer and it has been demonstrated that haem in red meat (RM) stimulates the endogenous production of N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) within the human intestine. To investigate whether N-nitrosation occurs in the upper gastrointestinal tract, 27 ileostomists were fed diets containing no meat, or 240 g RM or 240 g PM in a randomly assigned crossover intervention design carried out in a volunteer suite. Endogenous NOC were assessed as apparent total N-nitroso compounds (ATNC) in the ileostomy output. ATNC concentration in the diets was 22 microg ATNC/kg (RM) and 37 microg ATNC/kg (PM), and 9 microg ATNC/kg in the no meat diet. Levels significantly increased to 1175 microg ATNC/kg SEM = 226 microg ATNC/kg) following the RM (P=0.001) and 1832 microg ATNC/kg (SEM=294 microg ATNC/kg) following PM (P<0.001) compared to the no meat diet (283 microg ATNC/kg, SEM=74 microg ATNC/kg). ATNC concentrations in the ileal output were equivalent to those measured in faeces in similarly designed feeding studies. Supplementation with either 1 g ascorbic acid or 400 IU alpha-tocopherol had no effect on the concentration of ATNC detected in the ileal output. In in vitro experiments, N-nitrosomorpholine (NMor) was formed in the presence of nitrosated haemoglobin, at pH 6.8 but not in the absence of nitrosated haemoglobin. These findings demonstrate that haem may facilitate the formation of NOC in the absence of colonic flora in the upper human gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Oxidoreduction of different hydroxyl groups in bile acids during their enterohepatic circulation in man

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerkhem, I.L.; Liljeqvist, L.; Nilsell, K.; Einarsson, K.

    1986-02-01

    The extent of oxidoreduction of the 3 alpha-, 7 alpha- and 12 alpha-hydroxyl groups in bile acids during the enterohepatic circulation in man was studied with the use of (3 beta-/sup 3/H)-labeled deoxycholic acid and cholic acid, (7 beta-/sup 3/H)-labeled cholic acid, and (12 beta-/sup 3/H)-labeled deoxycholic acid and cholic acid. Each (/sup 3/H)-labeled bile acid was given per os to healthy volunteers, together with the corresponding (24-/sup 14/C)-labeled bile acid. The rate of oxidoreduction was calculated from the decrease in the ratio between /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C in the respective bile acid isolated from duodenal contents collected at different time intervals after administration of the labeled bile acids. The mean fractional conversion rate was found to be 0.29 day-1 for the 3 alpha-hydroxyl group in deoxycholic acid (n = 2), 0.18 day-1 for the 12 alpha-hydroxyl group in deoxycholic acid (n = 6), 0.09 day-1 for the 3 alpha-hydroxyl group in cholic acid (n = 3), 0.05 day-1 for the 7 alpha-hydroxyl group in cholic acid (n = 2), and 0.03 day-1 for the 12 alpha-hydroxyl group in cholic acid (n = 2). The extent of oxidoreduction of the 12 alpha-hydroxyl group in (12 beta-/sup 3/H)-labeled deoxycholic acid given to two patients operated with subtotal colectomy and ileostomy was markedly reduced (less than 20% of normal).

  2. Novel findings on the metabolic effects of the low glycaemic carbohydrate isomaltulose (Palatinose).

    PubMed

    Holub, Ines; Gostner, Andrea; Theis, Stephan; Nosek, Leszek; Kudlich, Theodor; Melcher, Ralph; Scheppach, W

    2010-06-01

    The slow digestible disaccharide isomaltulose (iso; Palatinose) is available as novel functional carbohydrate ingredient for manufacturing of low glycaemic foods and beverages. Although basically characterised, various information on physiological effects of iso are still lacking. Thus, the objective of the present study was to expand scientific knowledge of physiological characteristics of iso by a set of three human intervention trials. Using an ileostomy model, iso was found to be essentially absorbed, irrespective of the nature of food (beverage and solid food). Apparent digestibility of 50 g iso from two different meals was 95.5 and 98.8 %; apparent absorption was 93.6 and 96.1 %, respectively. In healthy volunteers, a single dose intake of iso resulted in lower postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses than did sucrose (suc), while showing prolonged blood glucose delivery over 3 h test. In a 4-week trial with hyperlipidaemic individuals, regular consumption of 50 g/d iso within a Western-type diet was well tolerated and did not affect blood lipids. Fasting blood glucose and insulin resistance were lower after the 4-week iso intervention compared with baseline. This would be consistent with possible beneficial metabolic effects as a consequence of the lower and prolonged glycaemic response and lower insulinaemic burden. However, there was no significant difference at 4 weeks after iso compared with suc. In conclusion, the study shows that iso is completely available from the small intestine, irrespective of food matrix, leading to a prolonged delivery of blood glucose. Regular iso consumption is well tolerated also in subjects with increased risk for vascular diseases.

  3. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision With Single-Incision Laparoscopy for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Dominic Chi-chung; Choi, Hok Kwok; Wei, Rockson; Yip, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There has been great enthusiasm for the technique of transanal total mesorectal excision. Coupled with this procedure, we performed single-incision laparoscopic surgery for left colon mobilization. This is a description of our initial experience with the combined approach. Methods: Patients with distal or mid rectal cancer were included. The operation was performed by 2 teams: one team performed the single-incision mobilization of the left colon via the right lower quadrant ileostomy site, and the other team performed the total mesorectal excision with a transanal platform. Results: During the study period, 10 patients (5 men) with cancer of the rectum underwent the surgery. The mean age was 62.2 ± 11.1 years, and the mean body mass index was 23.4 ± 3.2 kg/m2. The tumor's mean distance from the anal verge was 5.1 ± 2.5 cm. The median operating time was 247.5 minutes (range, 188–462 minutes). The mean estimated blood loss was 124 ± 126 mL (range, 10–188 mL). Conversion to multiport laparoscopy was needed in one case (10%). Postoperative pain, as reflected by the pain score, was minimal. The mean number of lymph nodes harvested was 15.6 ± 3.8. All specimens had clear distal and circumferential radial margins. The overall complication rate was 10%. Conclusion: Our experience showed transanal total mesorectal excision with single-incision laparoscopy to be a feasible option for rectal cancer. Patients reported minimal postoperative pain. Further studies on the long-term outcome are warranted. PMID:27186068

  4. Nitrogen losses from the human small bowel: obligatory losses and the effect of physical form of food.

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, A; Cummings, J H

    1988-01-01

    The amount and form of nitrogen lost from the human small intestine and the dietary factors which influence it have been studied in six ileostomists. Over a six day period the subjects were fed a series of diets including low nitrogen (LND) 0.17 g N/day, LND + soya beans (5.87 g N/day) and a high fibre diet (HFD) (10.6 g N/day). The soya beans were fed either whole or pureed to test the effect of physical form of food. Total N, protein, amino acids, urea, and ammonia were measured in ileostomy effluent which was collected throughout the study. Total N excretion was LND 0.91 (0.04) (SE) g/day; LND + whole soya beans (WSB) 2.26 (0.15) g/day; LND + pureed soya beans (PSB) 1.42 (0.12) g/day (WSB v PSB, p less than 0.001); and HFD 2.17 (0.11) g/day (HFD v PSB, p less than 0.001, HFD v WSB, NS). N losses as urea, ammonia, and free amino acids were less than 10-15% of total N, the remainder being protein (48-51%) and (by difference) peptides (20-30%). Eighty to 85% of effluent N was in the insoluble (pellet) fraction except on the low N diet where it was 66%. The physical form of food clearly influenced N digestibility in the soya beans whilst changes in dietary fibre seem not to have a significant effect. PMID:2838402

  5. Metabolism of green tea catechins by the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Markus; Erk, Thomas; Richling, Elke

    2010-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown that green tea polyphenols can be degraded in the colon, and there is abundant knowledge about the metabolites of these substances that appear in urine and plasma after green tea ingestion. However, there is very little information on the extent and nature of intestinal degradation of green tea catechins in humans. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine in detail the microbial metabolism and chemical stability of these polyphenols in the small intestine using a well-established ex vivo model. For this purpose, fresh ileostomy fluids from two probands were incubated for 24 h under anaerobic conditions with (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin 3-O-gallate (ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epigallocatchin 3-O-gallate (EGCG) and gallic acid (GA). After lyophilisation and extraction, metabolites were separated, identified and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and HPLC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of EC and C (3', 4', 5'-trihydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactone and 3', 4'-dihydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactone) were identified. In addition, 3', 4', 5'-trihydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactone was detected as a metabolite of EGC, and (after 24-h incubation) pyrogallol as a degradation product of GA. Cleavage of the GA esters of EGCG and ECG was also observed, with variations dependent on the sources (probands) of the ileal fluids, which differed substantially microbiotically. The results provide new information about the degradation of green tea catechins in the gastrointestinal tract, notably that microbiota-dependent liberation of GA esters may occur before these compounds reach the colon.

  6. Development and Validation of an in vitro Experimental GastroIntestinal Dialysis Model with Colon Phase to Study the Availability and Colonic Metabolisation of Polyphenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Breynaert, Annelies; Bosscher, Douwina; Kahnt, Ariane; Claeys, Magda; Cos, Paul; Pieters, Luc; Hermans, Nina

    2015-08-01

    The biological effects of polyphenols depend on their mechanism of action in the body. This is affected by bioconversion by colon microbiota and absorption of colonic metabolites. We developed and validated an in vitro continuous flow dialysis model with colon phase (GastroIntestinal dialysis model with colon phase) to study the gastrointestinal metabolism and absorption of phenolic food constituents. Chlorogenic acid was used as model compound. The physiological conditions during gastrointestinal digestion were mimicked. A continuous flow dialysis system simulated the one-way absorption by passive diffusion from lumen to mucosa. The colon phase was developed using pooled faecal suspensions. Several methodological aspects including implementation of an anaerobic environment, adapted Wilkins Chalgren broth medium, 1.10(8) CFU/mL bacteria suspension as inoculum, pH adaptation to 5.8 and implementation of the dialysis system were conducted. Validation of the GastroIntestinal dialysis model with colon phase system showed a good recovery and precision (CV < 16 %). Availability of chlorogenic acid in the small intestinal phase (37 ± 3 %) of the GastroIntestinal dialysis model with colon phase is comparable with in vivo studies on ileostomy patients. In the colon phase, the human faecal microbiota deconjugated chlorogenic acid to caffeic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl propionic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3- or 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol and 3-phenylpropionic acid. The GastroIntestinal dialysis model with colon phase is a new, reliable gastrointestinal simulation system. It permits a fast and easy way to predict the availability of complex secondary metabolites, and to detect metabolites in an early stage after digestion. Isolation and identification of these metabolites may be used as references for in vivo bioavailability experiments and for investigating their bioactivity in in vitro experiments.

  7. Introduction of percutaneous-tunneled transfontanellar external ventricular drainage in the management of hydrocephalus in extremely low-birth-weight infants.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Mino; Lefosse, Mariella; Corvaglia, Luigi; Martini, Silvia; Sandri, Fabrizio; Soffritti, Silvia; Ancora, Gina; Mammoliti, Palma; Gargano, Giancarlo; Galassi, Ercole

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Hydrocephalus treatment in extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants still represents a challenge for the pediatric neurosurgeon, particularly when the patient weighs far less than 1000 g. In such cases, the benefits in terms of neurological outcome following early treatment do not always outweigh the surgical risks, especially considering the great difference in the surgical risk before patient weight increases. To assess the efficacy and reliability of a percutaneous-tunneled, transfontanellar external ventricular drain (PTTEVD) in ELBW infants, the authors started a new protocol for the early surgical treatment of hydrocephalus. METHODS Ten cases of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) in ELBW infants (5 cases < 700 g, range for all cases 550-1000 g) were treated with a PTTEVD that was implanted at bedside as the first measure in a stepwise approach. RESULTS The average duration of the procedure was 7 minutes, and there was no blood loss. The drain remained in place for an average of 24 days (range 8-45 days). In all cases early control of the hydrocephalus was achieved. One patient had a single episode of CSF leakage (due to insufficient CSF removal). In another patient Enterococcus in the CSF sample was detected the day after abdominal surgery with ileostomy (infection resolved with intrathecal vancomycin). One patient died of Streptococcus sepsis, a systemic infection existing prior to drain placement that never resolved. One patient had Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis prior to drain insertion; a PTTEVD was implanted, the infection resolved, and the hydrocephalus was treated in the same way as with a traditional EVD, while the advantages of a quick, minimally invasive, bedside procedure were maintained. Once a patient reached 1 kg in weight, when necessary, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was implanted and the PTTEVD was removed. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of PTTEVD placement in our standard protocol for the management of PHH has proved to be a wise

  8. The Oral β-Lactamase SYN-004 (Ribaxamase) Degrades Ceftriaxone Excreted into the Intestine in Phase 2a Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Tracey; Coughlin, Olivia; Sicard, Eric; Rufiange, Marianne; Fedorak, Richard; Carter, Christian; Adams, Marijke H.; Longstreth, James; Whalen, Heidi; Sliman, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT SYN-004 (ribaxamase) is a β-lactamase designed to be orally administered concurrently with intravenous β-lactam antibiotics, including most penicillins and cephalosporins. Ribaxamase's anticipated mechanism of action is to degrade excess β-lactam antibiotic that is excreted into the small intestine. This enzymatic inactivation of excreted antibiotic is expected to protect the gut microbiome from disruption and thus prevent undesirable side effects, including secondary infections such as Clostridium difficile infections, as well as other antibiotic-associated diarrheas. In phase 1 clinical studies, ribaxamase was well tolerated compared to a placebo group and displayed negligible systemic absorption. The two phase 2a clinical studies described here were performed to confirm the mechanism of action of ribaxamase, degradation of β-lactam antibiotics in the human intestine, and were therefore conducted in subjects with functioning ileostomies to allow serial sampling of their intestinal chyme. Ribaxamase fully degraded ceftriaxone to below the level of quantitation in the intestines of all subjects in both studies. Coadministration of oral ribaxamase with intravenous ceftriaxone was also well tolerated, and the plasma pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone were unchanged by ribaxamase administration. Since ribaxamase is formulated as a pH-dependent, delayed-release formulation, the activity of ribaxamase in the presence of the proton pump inhibitor esomeprazole was examined in the second study; coadministration of these drugs did not adversely affect ribaxamase's ability to degrade ceftriaxone excreted into the intestine. These studies have confirmed the in vivo mechanism of action of ribaxamase, degradation of β-lactam antibiotics in the human intestine (registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under NCT02419001 and NCT02473640). PMID:28052855

  9. Novel findings on the metabolic effects of the low glycaemic carbohydrate isomaltulose (Palatinose™)

    PubMed Central

    Holub, Ines; Gostner, Andrea; Theis, Stephan; Nosek, Leszek; Kudlich, Theodor; Melcher, Ralph; Scheppach, W.

    2010-01-01

    The slow digestible disaccharide isomaltulose (iso; Palatinose™) is available as novel functional carbohydrate ingredient for manufacturing of low glycaemic foods and beverages. Although basically characterised, various information on physiological effects of iso are still lacking. Thus, the objective of the present study was to expand scientific knowledge of physiological characteristics of iso by a set of three human intervention trials. Using an ileostomy model, iso was found to be essentially absorbed, irrespective of the nature of food (beverage and solid food). Apparent digestibility of 50 g iso from two different meals was 95·5 and 98·8 %; apparent absorption was 93·6 and 96·1 %, respectively. In healthy volunteers, a single dose intake of iso resulted in lower postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses than did sucrose (suc), while showing prolonged blood glucose delivery over 3 h test. In a 4-week trial with hyperlipidaemic individuals, regular consumption of 50 g/d iso within a Western-type diet was well tolerated and did not affect blood lipids. Fasting blood glucose and insulin resistance were lower after the 4-week iso intervention compared with baseline. This would be consistent with possible beneficial metabolic effects as a consequence of the lower and prolonged glycaemic response and lower insulinaemic burden. However, there was no significant difference at 4 weeks after iso compared with suc. In conclusion, the study shows that iso is completely available from the small intestine, irrespective of food matrix, leading to a prolonged delivery of blood glucose. Regular iso consumption is well tolerated also in subjects with increased risk for vascular diseases. PMID:20211041

  10. New minimally invasive technique of parastomal hernia repair – methods and review

    PubMed Central

    Skoneczny, Paweł; Przywózka, Alicja; Czyżewski, Piotr; Bury, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parastomal hernia is described as the most common complication in patients with ostomy. It is reported that its incidence varies from 3% to 39% for colostomies and 0 to 6% for ileostomies. Surgical repair remains the treatment of choice. There are three types of surgical treatment – fascial repair, stoma relocation and repair using prosthetic mesh via a laparoscopic or open approach. Recently there have been several meta-analyses and systematic reviews aiming to compare the results of surgical treatment, and the authors agreed that the quality of evidence precludes firm conclusions. Aim To describe the novel concept of parastomal hernia repair – HyPER/SPHR technique (hybrid parastomal endoscopic re-do/Szczepkowski parastomal hernia repair) and its early results in 12 consecutive cases. Material and methods Twelve consecutive patients were operated on due to parastomal hernia using the new HyPER hybrid technique between June 2013 and May 2014. The patients’ condition was evaluated during the perioperative period, 6 weeks and then every 3 months after surgery. Results After 6 weeks of follow-up we have not observed any mesh-related complications. All 12 patients were examined 3 months and 6 months after repair surgery for evaluation. No recurrence, stoma site infection or stoma-related problems were found. None of the patients complained of pain and none of them needed to be hospitalized again. Reported quality of life on a 0–10 scale after 6 weeks of follow-up was 8 (range: 7–10). Conclusions The HyPER procedure for treatment of parastomal hernias proposed by the authors is a safe and feasible surgical technique with a high patient satisfaction rate and a low number of complications. The hybrid procedure seems to be a promising method for parastomal hernia repair. PMID:25960785

  11. Confusing untypical intestinal Behcet’s disease: Skip ulcers with severe lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Kai; Shi, Hui; Wang, Shao-Dong; Liu, Jiong; Zhu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Miao-Fang; Liu, Chan; Lu, Heng; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a rare and life-long disorder characterized by inflammation of blood vessels throughout the body. BD was originally described in 1937 as a syndrome involving oral and genital ulceration in addition to ocular inflammation. Intestinal BD refers to colonic ulcerative lesions documented by objective measures in patients with BD. Many studies have shown that over 40% of BD patients have gastrointestinal complaints. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, anorexia and abdominal distension. Although gastrointestinal symptoms are common, the demonstration of gastrointestinal ulcers is rare. This so-called intestinal BD accounts for approximately 1% of cases. There is no specific test for BD, and the diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. The manifestations of intestinal BD are similar to those of other colitis conditions such as Crohn’s disease or intestinal tuberculosis, thus, it is challenging for gastroenterologists to accurately diagnose intestinal BD in patients with ileo-colonic ulcers. However, giant ulcers distributed in the esophagus and ileocecal junction with gastrointestinal hemorrhage are rare in intestinal BD. Here, we present a case of untypical intestinal BD. The patient had recurrent aphthous ulceration of the oral mucosa, and esophageal and ileo-colonic ulceration, but no typical extra-intestinal symptoms. During examination, the patient had massive acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent ileostomy after an emergency right hemicolectomy and partial ileectomy, and was subsequently diagnosed with incomplete-type intestinal BD by pathology. The literature on the evaluation and management of this condition is reviewed. PMID:24527178

  12. [Hypotension from endocrine origin].

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Douillard, Claire; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Hypotension is defined by a low blood pressure either permanently or only in upright posture (orthostatic hypotension). In contrast to hypertension, there is no threshold defining hypotension. The occurrence of symptoms for systolic and diastolic measurements respectively below 90 and 60 mm Hg establishes the diagnosis. Every acute hypotensive event should suggest shock, adrenal failure or an iatrogenic cause. Chronic hypotension from endocrine origin may be linked to adrenal failure from adrenal or central origin, isolated hypoaldosteronism, pseudohypoaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, neuro-endocrine tumors (carcinoïd syndrome) or diabetic dysautonomia. Hypotension related to hypoaldosteronism associates low blood sodium and above all high blood potassium levels. They are generally classified according to their primary (hyperreninism) or secondary (hyporeninism) adrenal origin. Isolated primary hypoaldosteronisms are rare in adults (intensive care unit, selective injury of the glomerulosa area) and in children (aldosterone synthase deficiency). Isolated secondary hypoaldosteronism is related to mellitus diabetes complicated with dysautonomia, kidney failure, age, iatrogenic factors, and HIV infections. In both cases, they can be associated to glucocorticoid insufficiency from primary adrenal origin (adrenal failure of various origins with hyperreninism, among which congenital 21 hydroxylase deficiency with salt loss) or from central origin (hypopituitarism with hypo-reninism). Pseudohypoaldosteronisms are linked to congenital (type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism) or acquired states of resistance to aldosterone. Acquired salt losses from enteric (total colectomy with ileostomy) or renal (interstitial nephropathy, Bartter and Gitelman syndromes…) origin might be responsible for hypotension and are associated with hyperreninism-hyperaldosteronism. Hypotension is a rare manifestation of pheochromocytomas, especially during surgical removal when the patient has not been

  13. Stoma Creation and Reversal After Cytoreductive Surgery with Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Doud, Andrea N.; Levine, Edward A.; Fino, Nora F.; Stewart, John H.; Shen, Perry; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cytoreductive surgery with heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC) often includes stoma creation. We evaluated the indications, morbidity, and mortality associated with stoma creation and reversal after CRS/HIPEC. Methods Retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 1149 CRS–HIPEC procedures was performed. Patient demographics, type of malignancy, comorbidities, Claviengraded morbidity, mortality, indications for stoma creation, and outcomes of subsequent reversal were abstracted. Results Sixteen percent (186/1149) of CRS/HIPEC procedures included stoma creation, whereas 1.1 % (11/963) of patients without initial stoma creation developed anastomotic leaks requiring stoma. Patients who required a stoma had worse preoperative performance status (ECOG 0/1: 77.2 vs. 86.1 %, p = 0.002), greater burden of disease (PCI 17.6 vs. 12.9, p < 0.0001), and were more likely to have R2 resections (74.5 vs. 48.8 %, p < 0.0001) than those without stoma creation. Stomas were intended to be permanent in 17.5 % (35/199). Of 164 patients with potentially reversible ostomies, only 26.2 % (43/164) underwent reversal. Disease progression (43/164, 26.2 %) and death (40/164, 24.3 %) most commonly precluded reversal. After reversal, 27.9 % (12/43) suffered a Clavien I/II morbidity, 27.9 % (12/43) suffered Clavien III/IV morbidity, and 30-day mortality was 4.7 % (2/43). Anastomotic leak occurred after 9 % (3/33) of ileostomy and 10 % (1/10) of colostomy reversals. Conclusions Stomas are more common among CRS/HIPEC patients with a high burden of disease and poor functional status. Reversal is uncommon and is associated with significant major morbidity. Preoperative counseling for those with high disease burden and poor functional status should include the risk of permanent stoma. PMID:26077915

  14. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 {+-} 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 {+-} 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  15. Assessing the performance of a soy methyl ester -polystyrene topical treatment to extend the service life of concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D'Shawn G.

    The ICRP has published two biokinetic models providing a basis for radiation dose assessment due to radionuclides incorporated inside the gastrointestinal tract. These models are a sufficient tool to assess the committed dose equivalent for occupational exposures to workers assuming normal anatomy. The colostomy is becoming a more prevalent procedure. A colostomy permanently or temporarily bypasses a portion of colon to allow rest and healing. There are four different colostomies; ascending, transverse, descending and sigmoid and an ileostomy. As a patient's strength returns, they can return to normal daily activities, including returning to work. Therefore, as an ostomy patient returns to the workforce handling radioactive material, the potential for exposure to the radioactive material for these workers increases. The aim of this project is to determined whether or not an additional risk exists for these workers and if additional limitations should be placed on ostomy patients handling uranium. In order to determine if an additional risk exists two pathways are considered, ingestion and injection. Injection is a unique pathway for this work and is defined as radioactive material entering through the stoma. As part of the injection scenario as well as in the event contamination occurs, the dose per hour to the stoma was also determined. Using modified ICRP 30 gastrointestinal models and ICRP 100 HATM models to reflect the anatomy changes for each procedure, the committed dose equivalent (CDE) and committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) was determined for each procedure. In addition, using the more limiting value between the CDE and CEDE annual limit, the annual limit on intake (ALI) was determined. Based on a decrease in CDE values within the alimentary tract for each procedure and the determination the ALIs were either equivalent or orders of magnitude greater than the current ICRP ALI values no additional risk exists. Finally, based on the dose per hour

  16. Reconstruction for chronic dysfunction of ileoanal pouches.

    PubMed Central

    Fonkalsrud, E W; Bustorff-Silva, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A retrospective review was performed to determine the results after surgical reconstruction for chronic dysfunction of ileal pouch-anal procedures for ulcerative colitis and familial colonic polyposis at a university medical center. METHODS: During the 20-year period from 1978 to 1998, 601 patients underwent colectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis, familial colonic polyposis, or Hirschsprung's disease. A J pouch was used for 351 patients, a lateral pouch for 221, an S pouch for 6, and a straight pull-through for 23. Acute complications after pouch construction have been detailed in previous publications and are not included in this study. Chronic pouch stasis with diarrhea, frequency, urgency, and soiling gradually became more severe in 164 patients (27.3%), associated with pouch enlargement, an elongated efferent limb, and obstruction to pouch outflow, largely related to the pouch configuration used during the authors' early clinical experience. These patients were sufficiently symptomatic to be considered for reconstruction (mean 68 months after IPAA). Transanal resection of an elongated IPAA spout was performed on 58 patients; abdominoperineal mobilization of the pouch with resection and tapering of the lower end (AP reconstruction) and ileoanal anastomosis on 83; pouch removal and new pouch construction on 7; and conversion of a straight pull-through to a pouch on 16. RESULTS: Good long-term results (mean 7.7 years) with improvement in symptoms occurred in 98% of transanal resections, 91.5% of AP reconstructions, 86% of new pouch constructions, and 100% of conversions of a straight pull-through to a pouch. The average number of bowel movements per 24 hours at 6 months was 4.8. Complications occurred in 11.6% of reconstructed patients. Five of the 164 patients (3.1%) required eventual pouch removal and permanent ileostomy. The high rate of pouch revision in this series of patients undergoing IPAA is due to a policy of

  17. Urolithiasis and crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Sandro Roberto da Silva; Mendonça, Tiago; Oliveira, Pedro; Oliveira, Tiago; Dias, José; Lopes, Tomé

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present an updated description of the relation between Crohn's disease (CD) and Urolithiasis. Patients and Methods: A literature search for English-language original and review articles was conducted in Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases in the month of December 2014 for papers either published or e-published up to that date, addressing the association between CD and urolithiasis as its consequence. All articles published in English language were selected for screening based on the following search terms: “CD,” “renal calculus,” “IBD,” and “urolithiasis.” We restricted the publication dates to the last 15 years (2000–2014). Results: In total, 901 patients were included in this review of which 95 were identified as having CD and urolithiasis simultaneously, for a total of 10.5%. Average age was 45.07 years old, irrespective of gender. 28.6% of patients received some kind of medical intervention without any kind of surgical technique involved, 50% of patients were submitted to a surgical treatment, and the remaining 21.4% were submitted to a combination of surgical and medical treatment. Urolithiasis and pyelonephritis incidence ranged from 4% to 23% with a risk 10–100 times greater than the risk for general population or for patients with UC, being frequent in patients with ileostomy and multiple bowel resections. We found that urolithiasis occurred in 95 patients from a total of 901 patients with CD (10.5%); 61.81% in men and 38.19% in women. Stone disease seems to present approximately 4–7 years after the diagnosis of bowel disease and CaOx seems to be the main culprit. Conclusions: CD is a chronic, granulomatous bowel disease, with urolithiasis as the most common extraintestinal manifestation (EIM), particularly frequent in patients submitted to bowel surgery. This complication needs to be recognized and addressed appropriately, especially in patients with unexplained renal dysfunction, abdominal pain, or recurrent urinary