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Sample records for ilma kuulajata pole

  1. South Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-02

    As spring progresses at the south pole, the surface reacts to the change of season. This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a region of the south pole that is monitored throughout spring, summer, and fall at the south pole.

  2. Inflatable Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A.

    1995-01-01

    Lightweight, portable tool reaches object at height or across gap. Extends reach up to 20 feet (6 meters). When not in use, tool collapses to 3 to 5 percent of its inflated length. Developed for use as self-rescue device by astronaut who becomes untethered outside spacecraft: astronaut uses pole to reach grapple on spacecraft and pull to it. Useful on Earth as rescue device or in performing routine tasks like changing high light bulb without ladder. When task with inflatable pole completed, operator opens vent valve to deflate tube. Operator then opens gun, removes fabric cover, and repacks tube.

  3. Taper of wood poles

    Treesearch

    Billy Bohannan; Hermann Habermann; Joan E. Lengel

    1974-01-01

    Round wood pole use has changed without accompanying advancement in engineering design data. Previous pole design was based on the assumption that maximum stress occurred at the groundline but, with the larger poles that are now being used, maximum stress may occur along the pole length. For accurate engineering analysis the shape or taper of a pole must be known. Both...

  4. Comparison of success rate of intubation through Air-Q with ILMA using two different endotracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, S K; Bharath, K V; Saini, Vikas

    2016-04-01

    Air-Q™ is a newly introduced airway device, which can be used to facilitate endotracheal intubation. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether use of two different endotracheal tubes (ETTs) (standard polyvinyl chloride [PVC] and reinforced PVC) increases the success rate of blind intubation through Air-Q™ (Group Q) when compared with intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA- Fastrach™) keeping ILMA as control (Group I). One hundred and twenty patients aged between 18 and 60 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II, undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia, were enrolled into this prospective, randomised, case-control study to compare the success rate of tracheal intubation between ILMA (Fastrach™) and Air-Q™ intubating laryngeal airway. Those patients with anticipated difficult airway were excluded from the study. All the recruited patients completed the study. Reinforced PVC ETT was used in both airway devices to secure intubation. Since standard PVC tube is recommended for use in Air-Q, when first intubation attempt failed, second or third attempt was made with standard PVC ETT. Total of three attempts were made for each procedure: Whereas in ILMA group, only reinforced tube was used in all three attempts. The overall success rate after three attempts was more with Air-Q (96.6%) in our study compared with ILMA (91.6%) but no significant difference was seen between the groups (P = 0.43). The present study shows that when intubation with reinforced tube fails, the success rate with use of conventional PVC tube is more with Air-Q when compared with ILMA.

  5. Comparison of success rate of intubation through Air-Q with ILMA using two different endotracheal tubes

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, SK; Bharath, KV; Saini, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q™ is a newly introduced airway device, which can be used to facilitate endotracheal intubation. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether use of two different endotracheal tubes (ETTs) (standard polyvinyl chloride [PVC] and reinforced PVC) increases the success rate of blind intubation through Air-Q™ (Group Q) when compared with intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA- Fastrach™) keeping ILMA as control (Group I). Methods: One hundred and twenty patients aged between 18 and 60 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II, undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia, were enrolled into this prospective, randomised, case–control study to compare the success rate of tracheal intubation between ILMA (Fastrach™) and Air-Q™ intubating laryngeal airway. Those patients with anticipated difficult airway were excluded from the study. All the recruited patients completed the study. Reinforced PVC ETT was used in both airway devices to secure intubation. Since standard PVC tube is recommended for use in Air-Q, when first intubation attempt failed, second or third attempt was made with standard PVC ETT. Total of three attempts were made for each procedure: Whereas in ILMA group, only reinforced tube was used in all three attempts. Results: The overall success rate after three attempts was more with Air-Q (96.6%) in our study compared with ILMA (91.6%) but no significant difference was seen between the groups (P = 0.43). Conclusion: The present study shows that when intubation with reinforced tube fails, the success rate with use of conventional PVC tube is more with Air-Q when compared with ILMA. PMID:27141106

  6. Magnet pole tips

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  7. Magnet pole tips

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-11-19

    An improved magnet more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  8. Lunar South Pole Illumination

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Simulated illumination conditions over the lunar South Pole region, from ~80°S to the pole. The movie runs for 28 days, centered on the LCROSS impact date on October 9th, 2009. The illumination ca...

  9. Endotracheal intubation with intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA), C-Trach, and Cobra PLA in simulated cervical spine injury patients: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Deepak G; Ramachandran, Rashmi; Rewari, Vimi; Trikha, Anjan; Chandralekha

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the success rate of fiberoptic-guided endotracheal intubation through an Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA), a Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway (Cobra PLA), and a C-Trach Laryngeal Mask Airway (C-Trach) in patients whose necks are stabilized in a hard cervical collar. One hundred and eighty ASA I-II patients were randomized to undergo endotracheal intubation after general anesthesia via an ILMA (group ILMA), a C-Trach (group C-Trach) or a Cobra PLA (group CPLA) with the application of an appropriately-sized hard cervical collar. A fiberoptic bronchoscope was used for intubation via the ILMA and Cobra PLA. Rate of successful insertion of an endotracheal tube through the three devices was the primary aim. Other parameters compared were time taken for device insertion, endotracheal intubation, hemodynamic changes, incidence of hypoxia, and mucosal injury during the procedure. The incidence of postoperative sore throat was also compared between the three groups. The success rates of intubation in the ILMA, C-Trach, and CPLA groups were 100, 100, and 98% respectively. The first-attempt success rate was significantly better with the C-Trach compared to Cobra PLA (100 vs. 85%, p < 0.05). The time taken for device insertion was significantly more with the Cobra PLA as compared to that taken with an ILMA or a C-Trach (35.7 vs. 30.3 and 27.5 s, respectively). Intubation through a C-Trach took the least amount of time (84.4 s) as compared to an ILMA (117.9 s) or a Cobra PLA (139.2 s). The incidence of hypoxia and airway morbidity was similar between the groups. The success rates of fiberoptic-guided endotracheal intubation through an ILMA and a Cobra PLA are similar to the success rate of intubation using a C-Trach in patients whose cervical spines are immobilized with a hard cervical collar.

  10. Orbiter escape pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Winston D. (Inventor); Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor); Pelischek, Timothy E. (Inventor); Becker, Bruce H. (Inventor); Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Grimaldi, Margaret E. (Inventor); McManamen, John P. (Inventor); Castro, Edgar O. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A Shuttle type of aircraft (10) with an escape hatch (12) has an arcuately shaped pole housing (16) attachable to an interior wall and ceiling with its open end adjacent to the escape hatch. The pole housing 16 contains a telescopically arranged and arcuately shaped primary pole member (22) and extension pole member (23) which are guided by roller assemblies (30,35). The extension pole member (23) is slidable and extendable relative to the primary pole member (22). For actuation, a spring actuated system includes a spring (52) in the pole housing. A locking member (90) engages both pole members (22,23) through notch portions (85,86) in the pole members. The locking member selectively releases the extension pole member (23) and the primary pole member (22). An internal one-way clutch or anti-return mechanism prevents retraction of the extension pole member from an extended position. Shock absorbers (54)(150,152) are for absoring the energy of the springs. A manual backup deployment system is provided which includes a canted ring (104) biased by a spring member (108). A lever member (100) with a slot and pin connection (102) permits the mechanical manipulation of the canted ring to move the primary pole member. The ring (104) also prevents retraction of the main pole. The crew escape mechanism includes a magazine (60) and a number of lanyards (62), each lanyard being mounted by a roller loop (68) over the primary pole member (22). The strap on the roller loop has stitching for controlled release, a protection sheath (74) to prevent tangling and a hook member (69) for attachment to a crew harness.

  11. A Conventional Mean Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatakos, N. G.; McCarthy, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    A CONVENTIONAL MEAN POLE PATH The gradual drift of the pole associated with the rotational axis of the Earth in a terrestrial reference frame is characterized by the motion of a "mean pole." The IERS Conventions (2010) does not provide a formal definition of such a "mean pole." In its glossary it defines the terminology "mean pole" in the celestial frame by using the definition "the position on the celestial sphere towards which the Earth's axis points at a particular epoch, with the oscillations due to precession-nutation removed." The need for a terrestrial mean pole is mentioned in Section 7.1.4 of the IERS Conventions, which outlines the procedure to account for the variation in terrestrial site coordinates caused by the pole tide. It states, that an estimate of the wander of the mean pole to within about 10 milliarc-seconds is needed to ensure that the geopotential field is aligned to the long term mean pole. Historically the angular coordinates of this "mean pole" were calculated by averaging the observed angular coordinates of the rotational pole over six years, the beat period of the annual and approximately 14-month Chandler motions of the rotational pole. The IERS Conventions (2010) realization of the mean pole is composed of a cubic fit of the polar coordinates valid over 1976-2010 and a linear model for extrapolation after 2010.0. Further it notes that in the future, the IERS conventional mean pole will be revised as needed with sufficient advance notice. However, this document leaves open the formal definition of a conventional terrestrial mean pole, the spectral frequency content to be expected in such a definition and a procedure to be used to realize the coordinates of the path for users. Background is provided regarding past realizations of a "mean pole," and the requirements for a realization of a mean pole path are reviewed. Possible definitions and potential mathematical models to provide mean pole coordinates in the future are outlined. In

  12. The Totem Pole Recycled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewall, Susan Breyer

    1991-01-01

    Presents an activity that integrates science, environmental education, art, and social studies. Students identify and research an endangered species and construct a totem pole depicting the species using a recyclable material. (MDH)

  13. Acetylene around Jupiter Poles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-29

    This graphic shows the distribution of the organic molecule acetylene at the north and south poles of Jupiter, based on data obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft in early January 2001. Movie is available at the Photojournal.

  14. The Totem Pole Recycled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewall, Susan Breyer

    1991-01-01

    Presents an activity that integrates science, environmental education, art, and social studies. Students identify and research an endangered species and construct a totem pole depicting the species using a recyclable material. (MDH)

  15. ILMA: Ion Laser Mass Analyser. A Mass-Spectrometer for In-Situ Characterization of a Near Earth Object (NEO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottin, Hervé; Arezki, B.; Berthelier, J. J.; Bouabdellah, A.; Boukrara, A.; Briois, C.; Carrasco, N.; Gilbert, P.; Engrand, C.; Grand, N.; Hilchenbach, M.; Krüger, H.; Makarov, A.; Pennanech, C.; Puget, P.; Quirico, E.; Szopa, C.; Thirkell, L.; Zapf, P.; Thissen, R.

    Like other small bodies of the Solar System, asteroids are the remnants of planet formation. Their compositions are inherited from the Solar Nebula at the time of planetesimals accretion into planets, 4.5 billion years ago. They are valuable objects to assess the physicochemical conditions prevailing at the time and place of their formation in the Solar Nebula. Among them, some are known to be rich in carbon and volatile species (including water), which suggests that they never underwent major heating and differentiation events. Their organic content is also of prime interest because the chemical evolution leading to life on Earth may have been initiated by the delivery of extraterrestrial organic compounds into primitive oceans. For these reasons, several space missions are currently considered by ESA and JAXA for a sample return mission to a primitive carbonaceous Near-Earth Object (NEO): MARCO POLO, HAYABUZA 2, etc... Their goal is to characterize a NEO at multiple scales via in-situ measurements by a science payload onboard an orbiter and a lander, and to bring samples back to Earth. ILMA is a concept for a new generation high resolution mass spectrometer, proposed to be part of a lander payload for in situ science. This instrument will be a Fourier Transform ion trap mass spectrometer using Laser Desorption and Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LDIMS) into a single platform. To this end, an Orbitrap mass analyser (developed by the Thermofisher Company) will be coupled to a laser source. The sample will be exposed to the laser beam producing desorbed ions which will be collected into the ion trap using the orbital trapping method. Ions will be stabilized in the trap by purely electrostatic quadro-logarithmic electrical fields and the detection undertaken by a non destructive measurement of the ion oscillation frequency inside the trap. Indeed, the trapped ions induce a periodic signal converted using Fourier Transform (FT) into an ultra-high mass resolution

  16. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  17. Pole pulling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    McIntire, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for removal of embedded utility-type poles which removes the poles quickly and efficiently from their embedded position without damage to the pole or surrounding structures. The apparatus includes at least 2 piston/cylinder members equally spaced about the pole, and a head member affixed to the top of each piston. Elongation of the piston induces rotation of the head into the pole to increase the gripping action and reduce slippage. Repeated actuation and retraction of the piston and head member will "jack" the pole from its embedded position.

  18. Moon - North Pole Mosaic

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-05

    This view of the Moon north pole is a mosaic assembled from 18 images taken by NASA's Galileo imaging system through a green filter as the spacecraft flew by on December 7, 1992. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00130

  19. Neptune's 'Hot' South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These thermal images show a 'hot' south pole on the planet Neptune. These warmer temperatures provide an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere.

    The images were obtained with the Very Large Telescope in Chile, using an imager/spectrometer for mid-infrared wavelengths on Sept. 1 and 2, 2006. The telescope is operated by the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (known as ESO).

    Scientists say Neptune's south pole is 'hotter' than anywhere else on the planet by about 10 degrees Celsius (50 degrees Fahrenheit). The average temperature on Neptune is about minus 200 degrees Celsius (minus 392 degrees Fahrenheit).

    The upper left image samples temperatures near the top of Neptune's troposphere (near 100 millibar pressure, which is one-tenth the Earth atmospheric pressure at sea level). The hottest temperatures are indicated at the lower part of the image, at Neptune's south pole (see the graphic at the upper right). The lower two images, taken 6.3 hours apart, sample temperatures at higher altitudes in Neptune's stratosphere. They do show generally warmer temperatures near, but not at, the south pole. They also show a distinct warm area which can be seen in the lower left image and rotated completely around the back of the planet and returned to the earth-facing hemisphere in the lower right image.

  20. Neptune's 'Hot' South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These thermal images show a 'hot' south pole on the planet Neptune. These warmer temperatures provide an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere.

    The images were obtained with the Very Large Telescope in Chile, using an imager/spectrometer for mid-infrared wavelengths on Sept. 1 and 2, 2006. The telescope is operated by the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (known as ESO).

    Scientists say Neptune's south pole is 'hotter' than anywhere else on the planet by about 10 degrees Celsius (50 degrees Fahrenheit). The average temperature on Neptune is about minus 200 degrees Celsius (minus 392 degrees Fahrenheit).

    The upper left image samples temperatures near the top of Neptune's troposphere (near 100 millibar pressure, which is one-tenth the Earth atmospheric pressure at sea level). The hottest temperatures are indicated at the lower part of the image, at Neptune's south pole (see the graphic at the upper right). The lower two images, taken 6.3 hours apart, sample temperatures at higher altitudes in Neptune's stratosphere. They do show generally warmer temperatures near, but not at, the south pole. They also show a distinct warm area which can be seen in the lower left image and rotated completely around the back of the planet and returned to the earth-facing hemisphere in the lower right image.

  1. Neptune Hot South Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-18

    These thermal images show a hot south pole on the planet Neptune. These warmer temperatures provide an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere. The images were obtained with the Very Large Telescope in Chile Sept. 1 and 2, 2006.

  2. A LINE POLE 20, STUBBED HISTORIC POLE WITH ORIGINAL GLASS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 20, STUBBED HISTORIC POLE WITH ORIGINAL GLASS PIN-TYPE INSULATORS AND INTACT COMMUNICATION LINE CROSS ARM. VIEW TO WEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  3. A LINE POLE 3, HISTORIC POLE WITH ORIGINAL GLASS PINTYPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 3, HISTORIC POLE WITH ORIGINAL GLASS PIN-TYPE INSULATORS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  4. Single phase two pole/six pole motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1984-09-25

    A single phase alternating current two pole/six pole motor is provided with a main stator winding having six coils disposed unequally around the periphery of the machine. These coils are divided into two groups. When these groups are connected such that their magnetomotive forces are additive, two pole motor operation results. When the polarity of one of the groups is then reversed, six pole motor operation results. An auxiliary stator winding which is similar to the main stator winding is displaced from the main stator winding by 90 electrical degrees on a two pole basis. 12 figs.

  5. Single phase two pole/six pole motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, Herbert S.

    1984-01-01

    A single phase alternating current two pole/six pole motor is provided with a main stator winding having six coils disposed unequally around the periphery of the machine. These coils are divided into two groups. When these groups are connected such that their magnetomotive forces are additive, two pole motor operation results. When the polarity of one of the groups is then reversed, six pole motor operation results. An auxiliary stator winding which is similar to the main stator winding is displaced from the main stator winding by 90 electrical degrees on a two pole basis.

  6. Rad Pole Cam Development

    SciTech Connect

    Heckendorn, F. M.; Odell, D. M. C; Harpring, L. J.; Peterson, K. D.

    2005-10-05

    The RadPoleCam was developed to provide Department Of Energy (DOE) first responders the capability to assess the radiological and visual condition of remote or inaccessible locations. Real time gamma isotopic identification is provided to the first responder in the form of audio feedback (i.e. spoken through head phones) from a gamma detector mounted on a collapsible pole that can extend from 1 to 9 meters (6 to 29 feet). Simultaneously, selectable direct and side looking visual images are provided from the 5cm (2in) diameter, waterproof probe tip. The lightweight, self contained, ruggedized, system will provide a rapidly deployable field system for visual and radiological search and assessment of confined spaces and extended reach locations.

  7. Moon - North Pole Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the Moon's north pole is a mosaic assembled from 18 images taken by Galileo's imaging system through a green filter as the spacecraft flew by on December 7, 1992. The left part of the Moon is visible from Earth; this region includes the dark, lava-filled Mare Imbrium (upper left); Mare Serenitatis (middle left); Mare Tranquillitatis (lower left), and Mare Crisium, the dark circular feature toward the bottom of the mosaic. Also visible in this view are the dark lava plains of the Marginis and Smythii Basins at the lower right. The Humboldtianum Basin, a 650-kilometer (400-mile) impact structure partly filled with dark volcanic deposits, is seen at the center of the image. The Moon's north pole is located just inside the shadow zone, about a third of the way from the top left of the illuminated region.

  8. Wandering Poles of Enceladus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-30

    Working with image data from NASA's Cassini mission, researchers have found evidence that Saturn's moon Enceladus may have tipped over, reorienting itself so that terrain closer to its original equator was relocated to the poles. This phenomenon is known as true polar wander. Researchers discovered a chain of basins across the surface of Enceladus along with a pair of depressions that line up with an equator and poles, respectively, if the moon's axis of rotation was reoriented by about 55 degrees of latitude. These maps look toward the icy moon's southern hemisphere, with colors representing highs and lows. Purple represents the lowest elevations, while red represents the highest. The map at left shows the surface of Enceladus in its possible ancient orientation, millions of years ago. The chain of basins representing topographic lows can be seen in blue and purple, running along the equator, with an additional low region around the original south pole. The region that encloses the moon's currently active south polar terrain, with its long, linear "tiger stripe" fractures, would have been at middle latitudes just south of the equator. The map at right shows the current orientation of Enceladus. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21612

  9. Applications of NO2 Satellite Observations at High Latitudes for Monitoring Air Quality (ILMA): Objectives and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ialongo, Iolanda; Tamminen, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    The first results of ILMA project are presented in this paper. The project aims at increasing the scientific exploitation of satellite data for air quality monitoring at high latitudes. The specific focus of the project is evaluating the quality of satellite NO2 retrievals and preparing for upcoming TROPOMI mission. Satellite-based OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) NO2 total columns are compared with Pandora measurements performed in Helsinki in 2012. The median relative difference for OMI standard product is 1% and -6% for clear sky and all sky conditions, respectively. Larger differences between OMI and Pandora correspond to cloudy autumn-winter days with solar zenith angles above 70◦. Both satellite- and ground-based data show similar weekly cycle, with lower NO2 levels during the weekend compared to the weekdays.

  10. Orbitrap-based mass analyser for in-situ characterization of asteroids: ILMA, Ion Laser Mass Analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briois, C.; Cotti, H.; Thirkell, L.; Space Orbitrap Consortium[K. Aradj, French; Bouabdellah, A.; Boukrara, A.; Carrasco, N.; Chalumeau, G.; Chapelon, O.; Colin, F.; Coll, P.; Engrand, C.; Grand, N.; Kukui, A.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Pennanech, C.; Szopa, C.; Thissen, R.; Vuitton, V.; Zapf], P.; Makarov, A.

    2014-07-01

    Since about a decade the boundaries between comets and carbonaceous asteroids are fading [1,2]. No doubt that the Rosetta mission should bring a new wealth of data on the composition of comets. But as promising as it may look, the mass resolving power of the mass spectrometers onboard (so far the best on a space mission) will only be able to partially account for the diversity of chemical structures present. ILMA (Ion-Laser Mass Analyser) is a new generation high mass resolution LDI-MS (Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometer) instrument concept using the Orbitrap technique, which has been developed in the frame of the two Marco Polo & Marco Polo-R proposals to the ESA Cosmic Vision program. Flagged by ESA as an instrument concept of interest for the mission in 2012, it has been under study for a few years in the frame of a Research and Technology (R&T) development programme between 5 French laboratories (LPC2E, IPAG, LATMOS, LISA, CSNSM) [3,4], partly funded by the French Space Agency (CNES). The work is undertaken in close collaboration with the Thermo Fisher Scientific Company, which commercialises Orbitrap-based laboratory instruments. The R&T activities are currently concentrating on the core elements of the Orbitrap analyser that are required to reach a sufficient maturity level for allowing design studies of future space instruments. A prototype is under development at LPC2E and a mass resolution (m/Δm FWHM) of 100,000 as been obtained at m/z = 150 for a background pressure of 10^{-8} mbar. ILMA would be a key instrument to measure the molecular, elemental and isotopic composition of objects such as carbonaceous asteroids, comets, or other bodies devoid of atmosphere such as the surface of an icy satellite, the Moon, or Mercury.

  11. Six pole/eight pole single-phase motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, Herbert S.

    1984-01-01

    A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups which are connected to form eight poles for eight-pole operation and to form six poles for six-pole operation. Each group contains four series connected coil elements with each element spanning approximately one-seventh of the periphery of the machine. The coil groups are spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart such that each end coil of one group overlaps one of the end coils of the other group. An auxiliary stator winding having two coil groups with the same relative angular displacement as the main stator winding coil groups is included.

  12. A Fractured Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-15

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft zoomed by Saturn's icy moon Enceladus on Oct. 14, 2015, capturing this stunning image of the moon's north pole. A companion view from the wide-angle camera (PIA20010) shows a zoomed out view of the same region for context. Scientists expected the north polar region of Enceladus to be heavily cratered, based on low-resolution images from the Voyager mission, but high-resolution Cassini images show a landscape of stark contrasts. Thin cracks cross over the pole -- the northernmost extent of a global system of such fractures. Before this Cassini flyby, scientists did not know if the fractures extended so far north on Enceladus. North on Enceladus is up. The image was taken in visible green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 4,000 miles (6,000 kilometers) from Enceladus and at a Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 9 degrees. Image scale is 115 feet (35 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19660

  13. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  14. Moon - North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the north polar region of the Moon was obtained by Galileo's camera during the spacecraft's flyby of the Earth-Moon system on December 7 and 8, 1992. The north pole is to the lower right of the image. The view in the upper left is toward the horizon across the volcanic lava plains of Mare Imbrium. The prominent crater with the central peak is Pythagoras, an impact crater some 130 kilometers (80 miles) in diameter. The image was taken at a distance of 121,000 kilometers (75,000 miles) from the Moon through the violet filter of Galileo's imaging system. According to team scientists, the viewing geometry provided by the spacecraft's pass over the north pole and the low sun-angle illumination provide a unique opportunity to assess the geologic relationships among the smooth plains, cratered terrain and impact ejecta deposits in this region of the Moon. JPL manages the Galileo Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  15. MODIS Views North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image over the North Pole was acquired by the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard the Terra spacecraft, on May 5, 2000. The scene was received and processed by Norway's MODIS Direct Broadcast data receiving station, located in Svalbard, within seconds of photons hitting the sensor's detectors. (Click for more details about MODIS Direct Broadcast data.) In this image, the sea ice appears white and areas of open water, or recently refrozen sea surface, appear black. The irregular whitish shapes toward the bottom of the image are clouds, which are often difficult to distinguish from the white Arctic surface. Notice the considerable number of cracks, or 'leads,' in the ice that appear as dark networks of lines. Throughout the region within the Arctic Circle leads are continually opening and closing due to the direction and intensity of shifting wind and ocean currents. Leads are particularly common during the summer, when temperatures are higher and the ice is thinner. In this image, each pixel is one square kilometer. Such true-color views of the North Pole are quite rare, as most of the time much of the region within the Arctic Circle is cloaked in clouds. Image by Allen Lunsford, NASA GSFC Direct Readout Laboratory; Data courtesy Tromso receiving station, Svalbard, Norway

  16. Neptune's Wandering Hot Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn; Fletcher, Leigh; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Geballe, Tom; Hammel, Heidi; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Encrenaz, Therese; Hofstadter, Mark; Mousis, Olivier; Fuse, Tetsuharu

    2010-05-01

    Images of stratospheric emission from Neptune obtained in 2006 at ESO's Very Large Telescope (Orton et al., 2007, A&A 473, L5) revealed a near-polar hot spot near 70 deg. S latitude that was detectable in different filters sampling both methane (~7-micron) and ethane (~12-micron) emission from Neptune's stratosphere. Such a feature was not present in 2003 Keck and 2005 Gemini North observations: these showed only a general warming trend towards Neptune's pole that was longitudinally homogeneous. Because of the paucity of longitudinal sampling in the 2003, 2005 and 2006 images, it was not clear whether the failure to see this phenomenon in 2003 and 2005 was simply the result of insufficient longitudinal sampling or whether the phenomenon was truly variable in time. To unravel these two possibilities, we proposed for time on large telescopes that were capable of resolving Neptune at these wavelengths. We were granted time at Gemini South in 2007 using T-Recs, Subaru time in 2008 using the COMICS instrument and VLT time in 2008 and 2009 using VISIR. Two serendipitous T-Recs images of Neptune were also obtained in 2007 using a broad-band N (8-14 micron) filter, whose radiance is dominated by 12-micron ethane emission, and whose primary purpose was navigation of N-band spectroscopy. The feature was re-observed (i) in 2007 in the T-Recs N-band filter and (ii) in 2008 with COMICS in a 12.5-micron image. Unfortunately, none of the telescope time granted was sufficient to sample all longitudes over the 12-hour period of this latitude, and so no definitive separation of the two possibilities was obtained. However, considering the ensemble of images as a random sample of longitudes, it is likely that the phenomenon is ephemeral in time, as it was observed only twice among 9 independent observing epochs. We will continue to request observations to sample all longitudes systematically, but our current sample argues that the phenomenon is truly ephemera, because we most likely

  17. Posterior pole tumor update.

    PubMed

    Ou, Judy I; Wheeler, Sharon M; O'Brien, Joan M

    2002-12-01

    This chapter focuses on the diagnosis and management of choroidal melanoma in light of recent findings from the COMS. Retinoblastoma is emphasized to describe recent trends in primary treatment away from EBRT and toward chemoreduction with local therapy. In addition, vascular and glial tumors of the retina and tumors of the retinal pigment epithelium are described because of the association between these lesions and systemic disease. Recent advances in treatment and genetic testing for these diseases are discussed. Finally, ocular metastasis, intraocular lymphoid tumors, and intraocular leukemia are included because of their importance in determining systemic treatment and prognosis. The chapter gives an overview of important posterior pole tumors and highlights recent developments in the management of each intraocular disease process.

  18. Longer life for wood poles

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkinson, J.; Tackaberry, R.

    1982-11-01

    Investigates the use of liquid fumigants on in-service wooden utility poles in order to prevent decay. Reveals that although utility poles are pressure-treated with chemicals before they go into service as supports for transmission and distribution lines, they are frequently invaded by one or more of 225 species of fungus. Indicates that while the average service life of poles is 15-25 yrs, retreatment with fumigants may extend it to 35-40 yrs. Discusses trees and treatment, fungi, pole inspection, and fumigation. Points out that the Bonneville Power Administration estimates that it can save $2.2 million per year by retreating 15,000 poles instead of having to replace 1500 of them per year for 10 yrs. Reports that research results on decay and fumigation have helped more than 160 electric utilities who are using the fumigants. Concludes that although some decay-prone areas in poles, such as seasoning checks and woodpecker holes, will continue to invite the fungal menace, the increasing effort to inspect and fumigate poles on a large scale will ensure safer and more reliable power lines, while eliminating much of the conventional expenditure on replacing decayed poles.

  19. The South Pole Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhl, J.E.; Ade, P.A.R.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Cho, H.M.; Crawford,T.; Dobbs, M.; Greer, C.H.; Halverson, N.W.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Lanting,T.M.; Lee, A.T.; Leitch, E.M.; Leong, J.; Lu, W.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.S.; Mohr, J.J.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Runyan, M.C.; Schwan, D.; Sharp, M.K.; Spieler, H.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A.A.

    2004-11-04

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10 m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope will be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency-multiplexed readouts. The first key project will be to conduct a survey over 4000 degrees for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect. This survey should find many thousands of clusters with a mass selection criteria that is remarkably uniform with redshift. Armed with redshifts obtained from optical and infrared follow-up observations, it is expected that the survey will enable significant constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy.

  20. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, J.L.; Brandt, J.E.

    1994-08-02

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole. 18 figs.

  1. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, John L.; Brandt, James E.

    1994-01-01

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole.

  2. Recycling of treated wood poles

    SciTech Connect

    Fansham, P.

    1995-11-01

    There are approximately 150 million utilities poles in service in North America. Of the 3 million poles removed from service each year, many poles still contain a sound and structurally intact core and only the outer layer has deteriorated. Since most of the old poles are treated with either pentachlorophenol or creosote there are limited disposal options available to pole users. The practice of giving old poles away to farmers or other interested parties in falling into disfavour since this practice does not absolve the utility of the environmental liability associated with the treated wood. TWT has commercialised a thermolysis (Pyrolysis) based process capable of removing oil based preservatives from treated wood. The patented process involves: the shaving of the weathered pole exterior; the rapid distillation of oil based preservatives in an oxygen depleted environment; condensation of the vapours; and separation of liquids. TWT has constructed a 30,000 pole per year facility east of Calgary and has provided recycled poles for the construction of two power lines now in use by TransAlta Utilities Corporation, Canada`s largest investor owned electric utility. TWT has tested two thermolysis (Pyrolysis) technologies and has determined that contact thermolysis using a heated auger design performed better and with less plugging than a fast fluid bed reactor. The fluid bed reactor is prone to coke formation and contamination of the oil by fine char particles. Residual PCP concentration in the shavings was reduced from 9500 ppm to 10 ppm. Leachate testing on the char yielded a PCP concentration of 1.43 ppm in the Leachate, well below the EPA standard maximum of 100 ppm.

  3. Six pole/eight pole single-phase motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1984-07-31

    A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups which are connected to form eight poles for eight-pole operation and to form six poles for six-pole operation. Each group contains four series connected coil elements with each element spanning approximately one-seventh of the periphery of the machine. The coil groups are spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart such that each end coil of one group overlaps one of the end coils of the other group. An auxiliary stator winding having two coil groups with the same relative angular displacement as the main stator winding coil groups is included. 10 figs.

  4. Orbitrap for ILMA: Ion Laser Mass Analyser. A Mass-Spectrometer for In-Situ Characterization of a Near Earth Object (NEO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, Roland; Thissen, R.; Arezki, B.; Berthelier, J. J.; Bouabdellah, A.; Boukrara, A.; Briois, C.; Carrasco, N.; Gilbert, P.; Engrand, C.; Grand, N.; Hilchenbach, M.; Krüger, H.; Makarov, A.; Pennanech, C.; Puget, P.; Quirico, E.; Szopa, C.; Thirkell, L.; Zapf, P.; Cottin, H.

    Like other small bodies of the Solar System, asteroids are the remnants of planet formation. Their compositions are inherited from the Solar Nebula at the time of planetesimal accretion into planets, 4.5 billion years ago. They are valuable objects to assess the physicochemical conditions prevailing at the time and place of their formation in the Solar Nebula. Among them, some are known to be rich in carbon and volatile species (including water), which suggests that they never underwent major heating and differentiation events. Their organic content is also of prime interest because the chemical evolution leading to life on Earth may have been initiated by the delivery of extraterrestrial organic compounds into primitive oceans. For these reasons, several space missions are currently considered by ESA and JAXA for a sample return mission to a primitive carbonaceous Near-Earth Object (NEO): MARCO POLO, HAYABUZA 2, etc... Their goal is to characterize a NEO at multiple scales via in-situ measurements by a science payload onboard an orbiter and a lander, and to bring samples back to Earth. ILMA is a concept for a new generation high resolution mass spectrometer, proposed to be part of a lander payload for in situ science. This instrument will be a Fourier Transform ion trap mass spectrometer using Laser Desorption and Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LDIMS) into a single platform. To this end, an Orbitrap mass analyser (developed by the Thermofisher Company) will be coupled to a laser source. The sample will be exposed to the laser beam producing desorbed ions which will be collected into the ion trap using the orbital trapping method. Ions will be stabilized in the trap by purely electrostatic quadro-logarithmic electrical fields and the detection undertaken by a non destructive measurement of the ion oscillation frequency inside the trap. Indeed, the trapped ions induce a periodic signal converted using Fourier Transform (FT) into an ultra-high mass resolution spectrum

  5. Single phase four pole/six pole motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, Herbert S.

    1984-01-01

    A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups each including the series connection of three coils. These coil groups can be connected in series for six pole operation and in parallel for four pole operation. The coils are approximately equally spaced around the periphery of the machine but are not of equal numbers of turns. The two coil groups are identically wound and spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart. One coil of each group has more turns and a greater span than the other two coils.

  6. Single phase four pole/six pole motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1984-10-09

    A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups each including the series connection of three coils. These coil groups can be connected in series for six pole operation and in parallel for four pole operation. The coils are approximately equally spaced around the periphery of the machine but are not of equal numbers of turns. The two coil groups are identically wound and spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart. One coil of each group has more turns and a greater span than the other two coils. 10 figs.

  7. Low loss pole configuration for multi-pole homopolar magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Hakun, Claef F. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A new pole configuration for multi-pole homopolar bearings proposed in this invention reduces rotational losses caused by eddy-currents generated when non-uniform flux distributions exist along the rotor surfaces. The new homopolar magnetic bearing includes a stator with reduced pole-to-pole and exhibits a much more uniform rotor flux than with large pole-to-pole gaps. A pole feature called a pole-link is incorporated into the low-loss poles to provide a uniform pole-to-pole gap and a controlled path for pole-to-pole flux. In order to implement the low-loss pole configuration of magnetic bearings with small pole-to-pole gaps, a new stator configuration was developed to facilitate installation of coil windings. The stator was divided into sector shaped pieces, as many pieces as there are poles. Each sector-shaped pole-piece can be wound on a standard coil winding machine, and it is practical to wind precision layer wound coils. To achieve maximum actuation efficiency, it is desirable to use all the available space for the coil formed by the natural geometric configuration. Then, the coils can be wound in a tapered shape. After winding, the sectored-pole-pieces are installed into and fastened by bonding or other means, to a ring of material which encloses the sectored-pole-pieces, forming a complete stator.

  8. South Pole Lorentz Invariance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, Morgan; Smiciklas, Marc; Romalis, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Atomic spin co-magnetometers are among the most sensitive instruments to test for violations of CPT and Lorentz symmetry. Our rotating co-magnetometer has, in recent years, set the most stringent limits for such violations in fermions with measurements conducted in Princeton. In order to eliminate the gyroscopic pickup of Earth's rotation as a major limiting background, we now operate a Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. We discuss the current status of our ongoing South Pole experiment along with the latest results. This research is funded by NSF grant #PLR-1142032.

  9. Calligraphic Poling of Ferroelectric Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Adrey; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Calligraphic poling is a technique for generating an arbitrary, possibly complex pattern of localized reversal in the direction of permanent polarization in a wafer of LiNbO3 or other ferroelectric material. The technique is so named because it involves a writing process in which a sharp electrode tip is moved across a surface of the wafer to expose the wafer to a polarizing electric field in the desired pattern. The technique is implemented by use of an apparatus, denoted a calligraphic poling machine (CPM), that includes the electrode and other components as described in more detail below.

  10. IAU Poles and Rotation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    Every three years the IAU/IAG/COSPAR Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements of the Planets and Satellites revises tables giving the directions of the north poles rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, and asteriods and also tables of their sizes and shapes.

  11. 78 FR 52868 - Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 1 Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... regulations concerning pole attachments outlined in the DATES section. DATES: Effective August 27, 2013,...

  12. Resonance poles in three-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, B. C.; Afnan, I. R.

    1984-12-01

    We develop a method for finding resonance poles in Faddeev equations. The method is computationally simpler than previous methods and is based on the rotation of contour technique. It is applied to πd elastic scattering with coupling to the NΔ channel. The position of the pole is compared with predictions based on Argand diagram and speed analysis. We find that the conventional methods are unreliable if the pole is further from the real axis than the Δ resonance pole.

  13. Sectional Pole for Measuring Tree Heights

    Treesearch

    R. H. Brendemuehl; James B. Baker

    1965-01-01

    A sectional aluminum pole designed by the Silviculture Laboratory at Marianna, Florida, has proved useful for measuring tree heights. It is more convenient than a sectional bamboo pole 1 or a telescoping fiberglass pole. A tree 5 to 30 feet in height can be measured to the nearest tenth of a foot in 30 seconds. The pole is constructed of low-cost, readily available...

  14. South Pole Lorentz Invariance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, Morgan; Smiciklas, Marc; Romalis, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Searches for Lorentz and CPT violation play an important role in testing current theories of space-time. To test one of the consequences of local Lorentz invariance we have performed a precision test of spatial isotropy at the Amundsen-Scott station near the geographic South Pole. This location provides the most isotropic environment available on Earth. The experiment is a rotating atomic-spin co-magnetometer which compares energy levels of 21Ne and Rubidium atoms as a function of direction. The experimental sensitivity obtained is more than an order of magnitude better than in previous such measurements, known as Hughes-Drever experiments. By operating the experiment at the Pole we are able to eliminate background signals due to the gyroscopic interactions of spins with Earth's rotation as well as diurnal environmental effects. Here we will present final results from the experiment's 2-year data collection period. This is the first precision atomic physics experiment performed at the Pole, and we will discuss the potential for future such measurements.

  15. South Pole Lorentz Invariance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, Morgan; Smiciklas, Marc; Romalis, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetries are important because they form a cornerstone of quantum field theory and general relativity. To test one of the consequences of local Lorentz invariance we have performed a precision test of spatial isotropy at the Amundsen-Scott station near the geographic South Pole. This location provides the most isotropic environment available on Earth. We use an atomic spin co-magnetometer to compare energy levels in 21 Ne and Rubidium atoms as the apparatus rotates with respect to the cosmos. Our experimental sensitivity is more than an order of magnitude greater than in previous such measurements, known as Hughes-Drever experiments. By operating at the South Pole we eliminate background signals due to the gyroscopic interactions of spins with Earth's rotation as well as diurnal environmental effects. The experiment has finished a 2-year data collection period and we expect to present the final results at the meeting. This is the first precision atomic physics experiment performed at the Pole and we will discuss the potential for future such measurements.

  16. Method and apparatus for assembling a permanent magnet pole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Carl, Jr., Ralph James; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Dawson, Richard Nils; Qu, Ronghai; Avanesov, Mikhail Avramovich

    2009-08-11

    A pole assembly for a rotor, the pole assembly includes a permanent magnet pole including at least one permanent magnet block, a plurality of laminations including a pole cap mechanically coupled to the pole, and a plurality of laminations including a base plate mechanically coupled to the pole.

  17. Designated fiber stress for wood poles

    Treesearch

    Ronald W. Wolfe; Robert O. Kluge

    2005-01-01

    Wood poles have been used to support utility distribution lines for well over 100 years. Over that time, specifications for a “wood utility pole” have evolved from the closest available tree stem more than 15 ft in length to straight, durable timbers of lengths ranging up 125 ft and base diameters of as much as 27 in. The continued success of wood poles in this...

  18. Pole to Pole Videoconferences Connect Students and Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Lemone, P.; Yule, S.; Boger, R.; Galloni, M.; Kopplin, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    Alaskan and Argentinean students as well as arctic and antarctic scientists participated in two International Polar Year (IPY) Pole to Pole Videoconferences in 2007 and 2008. The videoconferences involved elementary, middle and high school students as well as scientists from Alaska, Argentina, Colorado and Washington DC. Alaska students were located in Fairbanks, Healy, Shageluk and Wasilla while the Argentinean students were located in Ushuaia, Argentina, at the southern tip of South America. The purpose was to ask each other and the scientists about local environmental changes, seasonal indicators, and climate change, and how to study the seasonal indicators to determine whether they are being affected by climate change. The videoconferences were followed by web chats and web forums to allow more students in other countries including those in non-polar regions, to interact with scientists, and help students develop ideas for their research projects. These activities are part of the Seasons and Biomes Project that engages K-12 teachers and students in Earth system science investigations as a way of teaching and learning science. This project also provides professional development workshops to teachers and teacher trainers. Seasons and Biomes is one of the projects in the University of the Arctic IPY Higher Education Outreach Cluster Project that has been approved by the IPY Joint Committee. As well, it is part of the GLOBE program, an international hands-on, inquiry-based Earth and environmental science and education program for primary and secondary students in 110 countries. The videoconferences, web chats and forums generated much interest and enthusiasm among students and scientists, and have provided the impetus for student research project initiations and collaborations between schools.

  19. A LINE POLE 77A, HISTORIC POLE WITH HISTORIC REPLACEMENT PINTYPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 77A, HISTORIC POLE WITH HISTORIC REPLACEMENT PIN-TYPE INSULATORS MADE OF BROWN PORCELAIN. VIEW TO WEST-SOUTHWEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  20. Tectonic Maps of the Poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These tectonic relief maps of the north (left, view large [540k]) and south (right, view large [411k]) poles are the result of new satellite-based technologies which are being used to analyze tectonic activity in the Earth's crust. These maps, known as Digital Tectonic Activity Maps (DTAMs), synoptically depict the architecture of the Earth's crust including current and past tectonic activity. This is significant because it permits researchers to view broad zones of activity over the entire surface of the Earth, rather than focusing on single boundary features. By looking at these 'big pictures,' scientists can possibly identify regions of activity which were not previously recognized or mapped using traditional methods. For more information, see: DTAM web site Putting Earthquakes in Their Place Images courtesy Brian Montgomery, NASA GSFC; data by Paul Lowman and Jacob Yates, NASA GSFC

  1. Tectonic Maps of the Poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These tectonic relief maps of the north (left, view large [540k]) and south (right, view large [411k]) poles are the result of new satellite-based technologies which are being used to analyze tectonic activity in the Earth's crust. These maps, known as Digital Tectonic Activity Maps (DTAMs), synoptically depict the architecture of the Earth's crust including current and past tectonic activity. This is significant because it permits researchers to view broad zones of activity over the entire surface of the Earth, rather than focusing on single boundary features. By looking at these 'big pictures,' scientists can possibly identify regions of activity which were not previously recognized or mapped using traditional methods. For more information, see: DTAM web site Putting Earthquakes in Their Place Images courtesy Brian Montgomery, NASA GSFC; data by Paul Lowman and Jacob Yates, NASA GSFC

  2. Pole tide triggering of seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, V.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of the pole tide (PT) on intensity of seismic process is searched on base of Harvard Centroid-moment tensors catalogue (CMT). The normal and shear stresses excited by PT were calculated for each earthquake (EQ) from CMT (32.3 thousands of EQ events after for- and aftershock declustering). There was revealed that there are two maxima of PT influence on weak (less 5.5 magnitudes) thrust-slip EQ near the both extrema (min and max) of shear stress. This influence has 95 % level of statistical significance by Schuster and χ^2 criteria and could explain the 0.6-year periodicity in seismic intensity spectrum. The PT influence on seismicity becomes negligible when PT variations decrease up to 100~mas. This could explain 6-7 years periodicity in seismic intensity spectrum.

  3. A `Pole To Pole' Holocene Sea-Level Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, B.; Vacchi, M.; Shaw, T.; Ashe, E.; Engelhart, S. E.; Khan, N.; Kopp, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) records exhibit spatial and temporal variability that arises from the complex pattern of interactions among eustatic (land ice volume and thermal expansion), isostatic (glacio and hydro), tectonic (neotectonic deformation) and local (tidal range change and sediment compaction) components. Each of these components have different response timescales varying relative importance during the Holocene and among regions. We have compiled a Holocene RSL database of 3000 validated sea-level index points from Greenland, North American Atlantic coast, Caribbean, South American Atlantic coast and Antarctica. The databases were constructed from previously published results that were collated in a formalized and consistent methodology to facilitate the development and comparison of regional RSL records. The RSL records are mostly derived from sea-level indicators from intertidal environments. The database also includes information relevant to sediment compaction, and modelling of both modern-day and paleotidal ranges. We assess rates of RSL change by fitting the RSL records with noisy-input Gaussian process models. Holocene RSL records from near-field regions (e.g., Antarctica, Greenland and Canada) reveal a complex pattern of RSL fall from a maximum marine limit due to the net effect of eustatic sea-level rise and glacio-isostatic uplift with rates of RSL fall as great as 69 m/ka. Intermediate field regions (e.g., U.S. mid-Atlantic coast, St. Croix) display variable rates of RSL rise from the cumulative effect of eustatic and isostatic factors. Fast rates of RSL rise (up to 10 m/ka) are found in the early Holocene in regions near the center of forebulge collapse. Far-field RSL records (South America) exhibit a mid-Holocene highstand, the timing and magnitude of which varies between 8 and 4 ka and <1 and 6 m, respectively. By comparing these records across a pole to pole database that spans a range of `fingerprints' from land-based ice sheets, we

  4. 47 CFR 32.2411 - Poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Poles. 32.2411 Section 32.2411 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2411 Poles. This...

  5. New pole placement algorithm - Polynomial matrix approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafai, B.; Keel, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple and direct pole-placement algorithm is introduced for dynamical systems having a block companion matrix A. The algorithm utilizes well-established properties of matrix polynomials. Pole placement is achieved by appropriately assigning coefficient matrices of the corresponding matrix polynomial. This involves only matrix additions and multiplications without requiring matrix inversion. A numerical example is given for the purpose of illustration.

  6. Macro Fiber Piezocomposite Actuator Poling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Bryant, Robert G.; Manos, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The performance and advantages of Piezocomposite Actuators are to provide a low cost, in-situ actuator/sensor that is flexible, low profile and high strain per volt performance in the same plane of poled voltage. This paper extends reported data for the performance of these Macrofiber Composite (MFC) Actuators to include 4 progressively narrower Intedigitized electrode configurations with several line widths and spacing ratios. Data is reported for max free strain, average strain per applied volt, poling (alignment of the electric dipoles of the PZT ceramic) voltage vs. strain and capacitance, time to poling voltage 95% saturation. The output strain per volt progressively increases as electrode spacing decreases, with saturation occurring at lower poling voltages. The narrowest spacing ratio becomes prone to voltage breakdown or short circuits limiting the spacing width with current fabrication methods. The capacitance generally increases with increasing poling voltage level but has high sensitivity to factors such as temperature, moisture and time from poling which limit its usefulness as a simple indicator. The total time of applied poling voltage to saturate or fully line up the dipoles in the piezoceramic was generally on the order of 5-20 seconds. Less sensitivity to poling due to the applied rate of voltage increase over a 25 to 500 volt/second rate range was observed.

  7. Pole position studied with artificial earth satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Long-arc orbit computation of highest accuracy can provide pole positions. Optical Baker-Nunn and laser range observations of several satellites are combined. The accuracy of the pole position is comparable to that of the mean satellite-tracking station coordinates (plus or minus 5 m) when sufficient tracking data are available. Exploitation of the technique requires more accurate tracking data.

  8. Vibration Monitoring of Power Distribution Poles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark Scott; Gail Heath; John Svoboda

    2006-04-01

    Some of the most visible and least monitored elements of our national security infrastructure are the poles and towers used for the distribution of our nation’s electrical power. Issues surrounding these elements within the United States include safety such as unauthorized climbing and access, vandalism such as nut/bolt removal or destructive small arms fire, and major vandalism such as the downing of power poles and towers by the cutting of the poles with a chainsaw or torches. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has an ongoing research program working to develop inexpensive and sensitive sensor platforms for the monitoring and characterization of damage to the power distribution infrastructure. This presentation covers the results from the instrumentation of a variety of power poles and wires with geophone assemblies and the recording of vibration data when power poles were subjected to a variety of stimuli. Initial results indicate that, for the majority of attacks against power poles, the resulting signal can be seen not only on the targeted pole but on sensors several poles away in the distribution network and a distributed sensor system can be used to monitor remote and critical structures.

  9. Pole blight of western white pine

    Treesearch

    Charles D. Leaphart; Otis L. Copeland; Donald P. Graham

    1957-01-01

    Pole blight is one of the most serious diseases of western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl.) and is restricted to that species. The disease is given this name because it affects pole-size trees primarily, usually those within the 40- to 100-year age class, although trees both younger and older are occasionally affected.

  10. Strength of single-pole utility structures

    Treesearch

    Ronald W. Wolfe

    2006-01-01

    This section presents three basic methods for deriving and documenting Rn as an LTL value along with the coefficient of variation (COVR) for single-pole structures. These include the following: 1. An empirical analysis based primarily on tests of full-sized poles. 2. A theoretical analysis of mechanics-based models used in...

  11. Baryon transition form factors at the pole

    SciTech Connect

    Tiator, L.; Döring, M.; Workman, R. L.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Omerović, R.; Stahov, J.; Švarc, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic resonance properties are uniquely defined at the pole and do not depend on the separation of the resonance from background or the decay channel. Photon-nucleon branching ratios are nowadays often quoted at the pole, and we generalize the considerations to the case of virtual photons. We derive and compare relations for nucleon to baryon transition form factors both for the Breit-Wigner and the pole positions. Using the MAID2007 and SAID SM08 partial wave analyses of pion electroproduction data, we compare the $G_M$, $G_E$, and $G_C$ form factors for the $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance excitation at the Breit-Wigner resonance and pole positions up to $Q^2=5$ GeV$^2$. We also explore the $E/M$ and $S/M$ ratios as functions of $Q^2$. For pole and residue extraction, we apply the Laurent + Pietarinen method.

  12. Baryon transition form factors at the pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiator, L.; Döring, M.; Workman, R. L.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Omerović, R.; Stahov, J.; Švarc, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic resonance properties are uniquely defined at the pole and do not depend on the separation of the resonance from background or the decay channel. Photon-nucleon branching ratios are nowadays often quoted at the pole, and we generalize the considerations to the case of virtual photons. We derive and compare relations for nucleon to baryon transition form factors both for the Breit-Wigner and the pole positions. Using the MAID2007 and SAID SM08 partial wave analyses of pion electroproduction data, we compare the GM, GE, and GC form factors for the Δ (1232 ) resonance excitation at the Breit-Wigner resonance and pole positions up to Q2=5 GeV2 . We also explore the E /M and S /M ratios as functions of Q2. For pole and residue extraction, we apply the Laurent + Pietarinen method.

  13. Characterization of thermally poled germanosilicate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, A.; Digonnet, M. J. F.; Kino, G. S.; Ay, F.; Aydinli, A.

    2004-10-01

    We report measurements of the nonlinearity profile of thermally poled low-loss germanosilicate films deposited on fused-silica substrates by PECVD, of interest as potential electro-optic devices. The profiles of films grown and poled under various conditions all exhibit a sharp peak ~0.5 μm beneath the anode surface, followed by a weaker pedestal of approximately constant amplitude down to a depth of 13-16 μm, without the sign reversal typical of poled undoped fused silica. These features suggest that during poling, the films significantly slow down the injection of positive ions into the structure. After local optimization, we demonstrate a record peak nonlinear coefficient of ~1.6 pm/V, approximately twice as strong as the highest reliable value reported in thermally poled fused silica glass, a significant improvement that was qualitatively expected from the presence of Ge.

  14. Holography with a Landau pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faedo, Antón F.; Mateos, David; Pantelidou, Christiana; Tarrío, Javier

    2017-02-01

    Holography for UV-incomplete gauge theories is important but poorly understood. A paradigmatic example is d = 4, N=4 super Yang-Mills coupled to N f quark flavors, which possesses a Landau pole at a UV scale ΛLP. The dual gravity solution exhibits a UV singularity at a finite proper distance along the holographic direction. Despite this, holographic renormalization can be fully implemented via analytic continuation to an AdS solution. The presence of a UV cut-off manifests itself in several interesting ways. At energies E ≪ ΛLP no pathologies appear, as expected from effective field theory. In contrast, at scales E ≲ ΛLP the gravitational potential becomes repulsive, and at temperatures T ≲ ΛLP the specific heat becomes negative. Although we focus on N=4 super Yang-Mills with flavor, our qualitative results apply to a much more general class of theories, since they only depend on the fact that the metric near the UV singularity is a hyper-scaling violating metric with exponent θ > d - 1.

  15. Geometric Modelling of Octagonal Lamp Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. O.; Lichti, D. D.

    2014-06-01

    Lamp poles are one of the most abundant highway and community components in modern cities. Their supporting parts are primarily tapered octagonal cones specifically designed for wind resistance. The geometry and the positions of the lamp poles are important information for various applications. For example, they are important to monitoring deformation of aged lamp poles, maintaining an efficient highway GIS system, and also facilitating possible feature-based calibration of mobile LiDAR systems. In this paper, we present a novel geometric model for octagonal lamp poles. The model consists of seven parameters in which a rotation about the z-axis is included, and points are constrained by the trigonometric property of 2D octagons after applying the rotations. For the geometric fitting of the lamp pole point cloud captured by a terrestrial LiDAR, accurate initial parameter values are essential. They can be estimated by first fitting the points to a circular cone model and this is followed by some basic point cloud processing techniques. The model was verified by fitting both simulated and real data. The real data includes several lamp pole point clouds captured by: (1) Faro Focus 3D and (2) Velodyne HDL-32E. The fitting results using the proposed model are promising, and up to 2.9 mm improvement in fitting accuracy was realized for the real lamp pole point clouds compared to using the conventional circular cone model. The overall result suggests that the proposed model is appropriate and rigorous.

  16. Development of Mini-pole Superconducting Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Jan, J. C.; Hwang, C. S.; Lin, P. H.; Chang, C. H.; Lin, F. Y.

    2007-01-19

    A mini-pole superconducting undulator with a 15mm period length (SU15) was developed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC). The coil was wound by a superconducting (SC) NbTi wire with small dimensions and low Cu/SC ratio. The design field strength of SU15 with 158turns/pole was 1.4T at 215A, and the magnet gap was 5.6 mm. Extra trim coils and poles are mounted on the main iron pole. The trim coils directly compensate for the strength error of the peak field. The prototype racetrack iron pole was fabricated via electric discharge machining to produce a complete set of 40-poles. The coil was impregnated by epoxy and wrapped in Kapton to maintain insulation between coil and iron pole. A substitution beam duct was built and assembled with the magnet array and tested in the test Dewar. The conceptual design of bath liquid helium (LHe) cryostat has to tolerate more image current and radiation heating on the beam duct.

  17. What does the "mean pole" mean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, J. C.; Petit, G.; Luzum, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Rotational deformation (also called the pole tide) is the response of the solid earth and ocean to the Earth's wobble, which includes gravitational and surface displacement components. An important part of the model is the Conventional Mean Pole, which is required to remove the slow variation in the polar motion. This ensures that the rotational deformation model removes only the principal periodic motions (annual, Chandler and any other high frequency variations). Previously, no dependable mean pole product had been available. Consequently, for the 2010 Conventions, a cubic was fit to a filtered time series of polar motion and this model was adopted, along with a simple linear extrapolation into the future that was expected to be adequate until the next Conventions update. In light of the large changes in the mean pole due to recent ice mass losses, such extrapolations may not be reliable. To avoid this, the next Conventions update will include the use of a regularly updated mean pole table. Some subtleties in that choice will be noted. However, the original pole tide model was conceived when the mean pole was moving (more or less) linearly, largely in response to glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). With the recent ice mass losses, particularly in Greenland, this motion is decidedly non-linear, and it is unclear whether the pole tide model correctly reflects this new reality. There are questions as to whether the mean pole should be the slow variation as conceived currently or should it reflect only the long-term linear motion (either based on a GIA model or a linear fit over an appropriate time span).

  18. Cold Hole Over Jupiter's Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations with two NASA telescopes show that Jupiter has an arctic polar vortex similar to a vortex over Earth's Antarctica that enables depletion of Earth's stratospheric ozone.

    These composite images of Jupiter's north polar region from the Hubble Space Telescope (right) and the Infrared Telescope Facility (left) show a quasi-hexagonal shape that extends vertically from the stratosphere down into the top of the troposphere. A sharp temperature drop, compared to surrounding air masses, creates an eastward wind that tends to keep the polar atmosphere, including the stratospheric haze, isolated from the rest of the atmosphere.

    The linear striations in the composite projections are artifacts of the image processing. The area closest to the pole has been omitted because it was too close to the edge of the planet in the original images to represent the planet reliably.

    The composite on the right combines images from the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 of the Hubble Space Telescope taken at a wavelength of 890 nanometers, which shows stratospheric haze particles.

    The sharp boundary and wave-like structure of the haze layer suggest a polar vortex and a similarity to Earth's stratospheric polar clouds. Images of Jupiter's thermal radiation clinch that identification. The composite on the left, for example, is made from images taken with Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mid-Infrared Large-Well Imager at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility at a wavelength of 17 microns. It shows polar air mass that is 5 to 6 degrees Celsius (9 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit) colder than its surroundings, with the same border as the stratospheric haze. Similar observations at other infrared wavelengths show the cold air mass extends at least as high as the middle stratosphere down to the top of the troposphere.

    These images were taken Aug. 11 through Aug. 13, 1999, near a time when Jupiter's north pole was most visible from Earth. Other Infrared Telescope Facility images at

  19. Multiplicative-cascade dynamics in pole balancing.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Henry S; Kelty-Stephen, Damian G; Vaz, Daniela V; Michaels, Claire F

    2014-06-01

    Pole balancing is a key task for probing the prospective control that organisms must engage in for purposeful action. The temporal structure of pole-balancing behaviors will reflect the on-line operation of control mechanisms needed to maintain an upright posture. In this study, signatures of multifractality are sought and found in time series of the vertical angle of a pole balanced on the fingertip. Comparisons to surrogate time series reveal multiplicative-cascade dynamics and interactivity across scales. In addition, simulations of a pole-balancing model generating on-off intermittency [J. L. Cabrera and J. G. Milton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 158702 (2002)] were analyzed. Evidence of multifractality is also evident in simulations, though comparing simulated and participant series reveals a significantly greater contribution of cross-scale interactivity for the latter. These findings suggest that multiplicative-cascade dynamics are an extension of on-off intermittency and play a role in prospective coordination.

  20. The pole tide in deep oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid-dynamical theory of the pole tide is examined by describing the oceanic response to the Chandler wobble and assessing its implications for mantle anelasticity and low-frequency ocean dynamics. The Laplace tide equations accounting for bottom friction are given, and a spherical harmonic approach is delineated in which the time-independent portion of the tide height is expanded. Pole-tide height and related inertia products are linearly proportional to wobble amplitude, and the final equations are modified to account for mantle elasticity and oceanic loading. Results for pole tide effects are given for various earth models with attention to the role of boundary constraints. A dynamic effect is identified which lengthens the Chandler period by about 1 day more than static lengthening, a contribution that suggests a vigorous low-frequency response. The values derived are shown to agree with previous models that do not incorporate the effects of the pole tide.

  1. Gravity at the Moon North Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-19

    This is a polar stereographic map of gravity of the north polar region of the moon from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory GRAIL mission. The map displays the region from latitude 60 north to the pole.

  2. Pole and piling production in the Midsouth

    Treesearch

    Roy C. Beltz; Joe F. Christopher

    1968-01-01

    In 1964, nearly 53 million cubic feet of poles and piling were produced in the Midsouth-Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. Virtually all the volume was southern pine.

  3. A Salient-Pole Synchronous Generator with Permanent Magnets between the Field Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Yasuhiro; Hayamizu, Takahito; Shima, Kazuo; Fukami, Tadashi; Hanaoka, Ryoichi; Takata, Shinzo

    In this paper, a new salient-pole synchronous generator (SG) termed the PMa-SG is presented. In the PMa-SG, permanent magnets (PMs) are placed between the pole shoes to reduce the magnetic saturation in the field poles. By using finite element analysis (FEA), the internal magnetic fields and basic characteristics of a 2.8-MVA PMa-SG were compared with those of a conventional SG of the same size, and the reduction effect of the magnetic saturation of the PMs was examined. The FEA simulations were also validated by experiments on a 2.0-kVA prototype machine. The PMs placed between the pole shoes reduce the magnetic saturation in the pole bodies and pole tips and effectively increase the terminal voltage and output power.

  4. Economic Analysis of the South Pole Traverse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-29

    up the Leverett Glacier en route to South Pole during the 2008–09 season...fleet. This proof-of-concept effort estab- lished a 1030-mile safe route across the Ross Ice Shelf, up the Leverett Glacier , and across the Polar...Figure 2. Three SPoT sled trains heading up the Leverett Glacier en route to South Pole during the 2008–09 season. The front-most train includes the

  5. A moving-barber-pole illusion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Chubb, Charles; Sperling, George

    2014-05-01

    In the barber-pole illusion (BPI), a diagonally moving grating is perceived as moving vertically because of the shape of the vertically oriented window through which it is viewed-a strong shape-motion interaction. We introduce a novel stimulus-the moving barber pole-in which a diagonal, drifting sinusoidal carrier is windowed by a raised, vertical, drifting sinusoidal modulator that moves independently of the carrier. In foveal vision, the moving-barber-pole stimulus can be perceived as several active barber poles drifting horizontally but also as other complex dynamic patterns. In peripheral vision, pure vertical motion (the moving-barber-pole illusion [MBPI]) is perceived for a wide range of conditions. In foveal vision, the MBPI is observed, but only when the higher-order modulator motion is masked. Theories to explain the BPI make indiscriminable predictions in a standard barber-pole display. But, in moving-barber-pole stimuli, the motion directions of features (e.g., end stops) of the first-order carrier and of the higher-order modulator are all different from the MBPI. High temporal frequency stimuli viewed peripherally greatly reduce the effectiveness of higher-order motion mechanisms and, ideally, isolate a single mechanism responsible for the MBPI. A three-stage motion-path integration mechanism that (a) computes local motion energies, (b) integrates them for a limited time period along various spatial paths, and (c) selects the path with the greatest motion energy, quantitatively accounts for these high-frequency data. The MBPI model also accounts for the perceived motion-direction in peripherally viewed moving-barber-pole stimuli that do and do not exhibit the MBPI over the entire range of modulator (0-10 Hz) and carrier (2.5-10 Hz) temporal frequencies tested.

  6. Fiberglass distribution poles: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.F.; Hosford, G.S.; Boozer, J.F. III

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the design considerations and manufacturing techniques along with mechanical test results of fiberglass reinforced composite (FRC) primary distribution poles. With it`s light weight, and virtually no maintenance it offers a viable alternative for use in remote and inaccessible locations. This paper also discusses a case study where seventy five FRC primary distribution poles have been installed on a distribution system in a remote area accessible only by foot and helicopter.

  7. Mechanical Four-Pole Parameters: Transmission Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-19

    theory a. an effective means of analyzing four-terminal networksl•; more recently, with mchanical notetion, they have been used to solve vibra- tion...they are driven and terminated ao that only symmetrical vibrations about their mid- points are excited. Four-pole parameter theory is actually a simple... theory of transmission miatzices. When more complicated situations are encountered than those mentioned hitherto, four-pole theory becomes inadequate

  8. Assessment of structural integrity of wooden poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craighead, Ian A.; Thackery, Steve; Redstall, Martin; Thomas, Matthew R.

    2000-05-01

    Despite recent advances in the development of new materials, wood continues to be used globally for the support of overhead cable networks used by telecommunications and electrical utility companies. As a natural material, wood is subject to decay and will eventually fail, causing disruption to services and danger to public and company personnel. Internal decay, due to basidomycetes fungi or attack by termites, can progress rapidly and is often difficult to detect by casual inspection. The traditional method of testing poles for decay involves hitting them with a hammer and listening to the sound that results. However, evidence suggests that a large number of poles are replaced unnecessarily and a significant number of poles continue to fail unexpectedly in service. Therefore, a more accurate method of assessing the structural integrity of wooden poles is required. Over the last 25 years there have been a number of attempts at improving decay detection. Techniques such as ultrasound, drilling X rays etc. have been developed but have generally failed to improve upon the practicality and accuracy of the traditional testing method. The paper describes the use of signal processing techniques to analyze the acoustic response of the pole and thereby determine the presence of decay. Development of a prototype meter is described and the results of initial tests on several hundred poles are presented.

  9. Poles apart: Scott, Amundsen and science.

    PubMed

    Larson, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    One hundred years ago, teams led by Roald Amundsen and Robert Scott may have been heading in the same direction but they were poles apart in the way they sought their goals. Amundsen led a five-person team of expert Nordic skiers and dog-sledders with a single goal: getting to the South Pole first. He planned and executed the effort brilliantly. Scott, in contrast, led a complex and multi-faceted Antarctic expedition with 33 explorers and scientists, many of whom were focused on ambitious and often taxing scientific research projects that had nothing whatsoever to do with reaching the Pole. Although Scott failed to reach the South Pole first and died with four men on the return trip, his expedition made significant contributions to Antarctic science. Indeed, at least some of Scott's failure to reach the Pole first and the subsequent death of his polar party on the return trip can be attributed to burden of trying to do too much and not focusing on reaching the pole.

  10. Pole movement in electronic and optoelectronic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Pal, S.; Biswas, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    An RLC circuit with poles on the left half of the complex frequency plane is capable of executing transient oscillations. During this period, energy conversion from potential to kinetic and from kinetic to potential continuously goes on, until the stored energy is lost in dissipation through the resistance. On the other hand, in an electronic or opto-electronic oscillator with an embedded RLC circuit, the poles are forcibly placed on the right-half plane (RHP) and as far as practicable away from the imaginary axis in order to help the growth of oscillation as quickly as possible. And ultimately, it is imagined that, like the case of an ideal linear harmonic oscillator, the poles are frozen on the imaginary axis so that the oscillation neither grows nor decays. The authors feel that this act of holding the poles right on the imaginary axis is a theoretical conjecture in a soft or hard self-excited oscillator. In this article, a detailed discussion on pole movement in an electronic and opto-electronic oscillator is carried out from the basic concept. A new analytical method for estimating the time-dependent part of the pole is introduced here.

  11. HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) Data from CDIAC's HIPPO Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    The HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) study of the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases measured meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol constituents along transects from approximately pole-to-pole over the Pacific Ocean. HIPPO flew hundreds of vertical profiles from the ocean/ice surface to as high as the tropopause, at five times during different seasons over a three year period from 2009-2011. HIPPO provides the first high-resolution vertically-resolved global survey of a comprehensive suite of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols pertinent to understanding the carbon cycle and challenging global climate models.

  12. Clouds Over the North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 29 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    Like yesterday's image, the linear 'ripples' are water-ice clouds. As spring is deepening at the North Pole these clouds are becoming more prevalent.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.9, Longitude 135.5 East (224.5 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter

  13. Clouds Over the North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 29 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    Like yesterday's image, the linear 'ripples' are water-ice clouds. As spring is deepening at the North Pole these clouds are becoming more prevalent.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.9, Longitude 135.5 East (224.5 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter

  14. The potential of wood-based composite poles

    Treesearch

    Todd F. Shupe; Cheng Piao; Chung Y. Hse

    2009-01-01

    Wood-based composite utility poles are receiving increasing attention in the North American pole market. This interest is being driven by many increasing factors such as increasing: (1) disposal costs of solid wood poles, (2) liability and environmental concerns with traditional means of disposal of solid wood poles, (3) cost and concerns of long-term...

  15. Mechanical properties of small-scale wood laminated composite poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse

    2004-01-01

    Power companies in the United States consume millions of solid wood poles every year. These poles are from high-valued trees that are becoming more expensive and less available. wood laminated composite poles (LCP) are a novel alternative to solid wood poles. LCP consists of trapezoid wood strips that are bonded by a synthetic resin. The wood strips can be made from...

  16. Cover pole design for easy transport, assembly and field use.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cover poles, also called Robel poles, are used to measure a variety of structural vegetation attributes commonly used in wildlife and livestock management. Although cover pole dimensions, measurement criteria, and interpretation of cover pole data vary depending on measurement objectives, the techni...

  17. Reorientation of the early lunar pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Futoshi; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2014-06-01

    Palaeomagnetic measurements suggest that an active core dynamo operated on the Moon from 4.2 to 3.56 billion years ago. Since the Apollo era, many magnetic anomalies have been observed on the Moon. The magnetization of the lunar crust in some of these regions could preserve the signature of an early dipolar magnetic field generated by a core dynamo. Thus, the magnetic anomalies may yield information about the position of the palaeomagnetic pole during the time that the dynamo operated. Here we present a comprehensive survey of magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface using magnetometer data obtained by the Lunar Prospector and Kaguya lunar orbiters. We extract magnetization vectors from 24 magnetic anomalies using an iterative inversion method and derive the palaeomagnetic poles. We find that the north poles, as well as the antipodal south poles, cluster in two distinct locations: one near the present rotation axis and the other at mid-latitude. The clustering is consistent with a dipole-dominated magnetic field generated in the lunar core by a dynamo that was reversing, much like that of Earth. Furthermore, the two pole clusters imply that the Moon experienced a polar wander event during its ancient history due to the reorientation of the Moon with respect to its spin axis by 45°-60°.

  18. Pole tide in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, I. P.; Rabinovich, A. B.; Kulikov, E. A.

    2014-03-01

    The pole tide, which is driven by the Chandler Wobble, has a period of about 14 months and typical amplitudes in the World Ocean of ˜0.5 cm. However, in the Baltic Sea the pole tide is anomalously high. To examine this effect we used long-term hourly sea level records from 23 tide gauges and monthly records from 64 stations. The lengths of the series were up to 123 years for hourly records and 211 years for monthly records. High-resolution spectra revealed a cluster of neighboring peaks with periods from 410 to 440 days. The results of spectral analysis were applied to estimate the integral amplitudes of pole tides from all available tide gauges along the coast of the Baltic Sea. The height of the pole tide was found to gradually increase from the entrance (Danish Straits, 1.5-2 cm) to the northeast end of the sea. The largest amplitudes—up to 4.5-7 cm—were observed in the heads of the Gulf of Finland and the Gulf of Bothnia. Significant temporal fluctuations in amplitudes and periods of the pole tide were observed during the 19th and 20th centuries.

  19. Pion scattering poles and chiral symmetry restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Fraile, D.; Nicola, A. Gomez; Herruzo, E. T.

    2007-10-15

    Using unitarized chiral perturbation theory methods, we perform a detailed analysis of the {pi}{pi} scattering poles f{sub 0}(600) and {rho}(770) behavior when medium effects such as temperature or density drive the system towards chiral symmetry restoration. In the analysis of real poles below threshold, we show that it is crucial to extend properly the unitarized amplitudes so that they match the perturbative Adler zeros. Our results do not show threshold enhancement effects at finite temperature in the f{sub 0}(600) channel, which remains as a pole of broad nature. We also implement T=0 finite-density effects related to chiral symmetry restoration, by varying the pole position with the pion decay constant. Although this approach takes into account only a limited class of contributions, we reproduce the expected finite-density restoration behavior, which drives the poles towards the real axis, producing threshold enhancement and {pi}{pi} bound states. We compare our results with several model approaches and discuss the experimental consequences, both in relativistic heavy ion collisions and in {pi}{yields}{pi}{pi} and {gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} reactions in nuclei.

  20. Effect of the pole--human body interaction on pole vaulting performance.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Adamantios; Schade, Falk; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2004-09-01

    The purposes of this study were: (a) to examine the interactions between the athlete and the pole and the possibility for the athlete to take advantage of the pole's elasticity by means of muscular work and (b) to develop performance criteria during the interaction between the athlete and the pole in pole vaulting. Six athletes performed 4-11 trials each, at 90% of their respective personal best performance. All trials were recorded using four synchronized, genlocked video cameras operating at 50 Hz. The ground reaction forces exerted on the bottom of the pole were measured using a planting box fixed on a force plate (1000 Hz). The interaction between athlete and pole may be split into two parts. During the first part, energy is transferred into the pole and the total energy of the athlete decreases. The difference between the energy decrease of the athlete and the pole energy is an indicator of the energy produced by the athletes by means of muscular work (criterion 1). During the second part of the interaction, energy is transferred back to the athlete and the total energy of the athlete increases. The difference between the returned pole energy and the amount of energy increase of the athlete defines criterion 2. In general, the function of the pole during the interaction is: (a) store part of the kinetic energy that the athlete achieved during the run up as strain energy and convert this strain energy into potential energy of the athlete, (b) allow the active system (athlete) to produce muscular work to increase the total energy potential.

  1. Gravity increase at the south pole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.

    1967-01-01

    Abstract. Measurements made between December 1957 and January 1966 of the gravity difference between the McMurdo Sound pendulum station, which is on bedrock, and the South Pole station, which is on the Antarctic ice sheet, show a gravity increase at the South Pole of 0.11 milligals per year. The most likely hypothesis for the increase is that it was caused by ice flowing downslope across a gravity gradient and by the sinking of the South Pole station as a result of accumulation of ice. An alternate hypothesis that the gravity increase was caused by a decrease in ice thickness, of about 40 centimeters per year, is theoretically possible but is not supported by direct evidence.

  2. New magnet pole shape for isochronous cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    A new design has been developed for shaping pole tips to produce the radially increasing fields required for isochronous cyclotrons. The conventional solid hill poles are replaced by poles mounted over a small secondary gap which tapers radially from maximum at the magnet edge to zero near the center. Field measurements with a model magnet and calculations with the code TRIM show an increase in field at the edge of the magnet without the usual corresponding large increase in fringing, and a radial field shape more nearly field independent than for conventional hills. The flying hills have several advantages for variable energy multiparticle cyclotrons: (1) a large reduction in the power dissipated by isochronizing trim coils; (2) a more constant shape and magnitude flutter factor, eliminating flutter coils and increasing the operating range; and (3) a sharper fall-off of the fringe field, simplifying beam extraction.

  3. A method to determine asteroid poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deangelis, G.

    1993-01-01

    The determination of spin axis and shape is well known to be of fundamental importance for studies about the rotational and physical properties of asteroids. In particular, knowledge that the pole coordinate distribution is random or not could indicate the probable non-Maxwellian distribution of asteroid spin axes, while the distribution in terms of size and shape could place important constraints on the theories about the collisional history of some individual asteroids, of asteroid families, and of the asteroid population as a whole. Many kinds of methods have been developed to determine pole coordinates. An EA method is presented, from which it is possible to obtain the solution with no trial poles, but with a simultaneous least square fit on both the E and A part. Results for rotational and shape parameters were obtained for 18 asteroids: the values of the obtained parameters are generally in close agreement with those of others.

  4. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, William

    1987-01-01

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifier circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedback loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point or pole is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  5. Detectors for the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. L.; Ade, P.; Aird, K.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J.; Becker, D.; Benson, B.; Bleem, L.; Britton, J.; Carlstrom, J.; Cho, H.; de Haan, T.; Crawford, T.; Crites, A.; Datesman, A.; Dobbs, M.; Everett, W.; Ewall-Wice, A.; George, E.; Halverson, N.; Harrington, N.; Henning, J.; Hilton, G.; Holzapfel, W.; Hoover, S.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Keisler, R.; Kennedy, J.; Lee, A.; Leitch, E.; Li, D.; Lueker, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Mcmahon, J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.; Montgomery, J.; Montroy, T.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J.; Niemack, M.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C.; Ruhl, J.; Saliwanchik, B.; Sayre, J.; Schafer, K.; Shirokoff, E.; Story, K.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J.; Wang, G.; Williamson, R.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.; Young, E.

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10-m mm/sub-mm telescope at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. It's primary science goals consist of a galaxy cluster survey for understanding Dark Energy and probing the physics of Inflation through the CMB polarization. Both science goals require exceptional sensitivity necessitating focal planes with many optical elements. The focal planes of the SPT utilize Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers to build arrays of nearly 1000 detectors. In this talk, I will present the TES bolometer technology for both the first SPT focal plane and its upcoming upgrade to a polarization sensitive array.

  6. Light propagation in the South Pole ice

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dawn; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is located in the ice near the geographic South Pole. Particle showers from neutrino interactions in the ice produce light which is detected by IceCube modules, and the amount and pattern of deposited light are used to reconstruct the properties of the incident neutrino. Since light is scattered and absorbed by ice between the neutrino interaction vertex and the sensor, IceCube event reconstruction depends on understanding the propagation of light through the ice. This paper presents the current status of modeling light propagation in South Pole ice, including the recent observation of an azimuthal anisotropy in the scattering.

  7. Determination of pole sensitivities by Danilevskii's method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nail, J. B.; Mitchell, J. R.; Mcdaniel, W. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    In control theory, a synonymous term for pole sensitivity is eigenvalue sensitivity. Existing methods of calculating eigenvalues are cumbersome, and cannot be trusted for systems roughly greater than tenth order. The method proposed in the present paper is applicable to high-order system. (It has been routinely used to generate eigenvalue sensitivities for systems up to 26th order, using a UNIVAC 1106.) Danilevskii's method is shown to be suitable for performing the necessary evaluations. The result is a rational function that can be used to evaluate the sensitivities for all distinct poles.

  8. On the design of pole modules for inverse systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, B. F.; Sain, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    When a linear dynamical system admits more than one inverse, it is known that the pole module of any inverse must contain, either as a submodule or as a factor module, a module of fixed poles isomorphic to the zero module of the original system. Design of the pole module for such an inverse system is resolved by introducing a variable pole module for the inverse, by determining necessary and sufficient conditions for a desired module to be a variable pole module, and by studying the manner in which the fixed and variable modules assemble into the pole module of the inverse. If the fixed and variable pole spectra are disjoint, the pole module of the inverse system is a direct sum of the fixed- and variable-pole modules; if not, procedures for addressing the Jordan structure are presented.

  9. Numerical pole assignment by eigenvalue Jacobian inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevaston, George E.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical procedure for solving the linear pole placement problem is developed which operates by the inversion of an analytically determined eigenvalue Jacobian matrix. Attention is given to convergence characteristics and pathological situations. It is not concluded that the algorithm developed is suitable for computer-aided control system design with particular reference to the scan platform pointing control system for the Galileo spacecraft.

  10. Uranus, Toward the Planet Pole of Rotation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-05

    These two pictures of Uranus were compiled from images recorded by NASA Voyager 2 on Jan. 1O, 1986. This view is toward the planet pole of rotation, which lies just left of center. The image on the right is a false-color image.

  11. New aspects of the equilibrium pole tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.; Steinberg, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new spherical harmonic algorithm is developed for the calculation of the loading and self-gravitating equilibrium pole tide. Based on a suggestion of Dahlen (1976), this approach minimizes the distortions in tide height caused by an incomplete representation of the ocean function. With slight modification this approach easily could be used to compute self-gravitating and loading lunisolar tides as well. Using the algorithm, the static pole tide is compared with tide observations at a variety of locations around the world, and statistically significant evidence for pole tide enhancements is found in midocean as well as the shallow seas. Also included is a reinvestigation of the effect of the static tide on the Chandler-wobble period. The difference between the wobble period of an oceanless elastic earth with a fluid core (Smith and Dahlen, 1981) and the period of an earth minus static oceans yields a 7.4-day discrepancy. It is concluded from tide observations that much of the discrepancy can probably be accounted for by nonequilibrium pole-tide behavior in the deep oceans.

  12. Poling of Microwave Electro-Optic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Kenneth D.

    1997-01-01

    The desire to transmit high frequency, microwave RF signals over fiber optic cables has necessitated the need for electro-optic modulation devices. However, in order to reap these potential benefits, it is necessary to develop the devices and their associated fabrication processes, particularly those processes associated with the poling of the devices. To this end, we entered into a cooperative research agreement with Richard Kunath of NASA LeRC. A graduate student in my group, Tony Kowalczyk, worked closely with the group at NASA to develop processes for construction of a microwave frequency electro-optic modulator. Materials were commercially obtained from Amoco Chemical and in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin. The photolithography processes were developed at NASA LeRC and the electric-field poling process was carried out in our laboratory at CWRU. During the grant period, the poling process conditions were investigated for these multilayer devices. Samples were poled and the resulting nonlinear optical properties were evaluated in our laboratory. Following the grant period, Kowalczyk went to NASA under a NRC fellowship, and I continued to collaborate as a consultant. Publications listed at the end of this report came out of this work. Another manuscript is in preparation and will be submitted shortly.

  13. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihem, Karim; IceCube Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    New detection techniques for (GZK) neutrinos are required for instrumenting a large detector volume needed to observe the low neutrino fluxes at the EeV energy range. Studies on a larger IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole have been intensively investigated in the last decade. A larger effective volume at a reasonable cost is possible if an acoustic array is a part of a large hybrid detector which includes radio and the existing optical array. The feasibility and the physics capabilities of an acoustic array at the South Pole depend on the knowledge of the acoustic properties of the ice such as the sound speed, the attenuation length, the background noise level and the transient rate. To investigate the ice properties, the first three acoustic strings of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) have been deployed in the austral summer 2006/2007, then completed with an additional string in 2007/2008. With its four strings SPATS was able to evaluate in situ the acoustic properties of the South Pole ice in the 10-100 kHz frequency range. In this paper the performance of SPATS is described, results on the acoustic ice properties are presented and a new drilling method to deploy acoustic strings in ice is introduced.

  14. Bending strength of Chilean radiata pine poles

    Treesearch

    Gina Cerda; Ronald W. Wolfe

    2003-01-01

    Because radiata pine has thrived in south-central Chile since it was introduced there more than a century ago, pine plantation productivity there has grown tremendously. Plantation owners are seeking new markets for this material. One potential market is utility poles. The American National Standards Institute 05.1 standard (ANSI 05.1) provides a means for radiata pine...

  15. Why is g Larger at the Poles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iona, Mario

    1978-01-01

    Explains that the larger value of g at the poles is not due only to differences in the radii of the earth, but that other factors are also responsible such as the rotation of the earth and the increase in the earth's density toward its center. (GA)

  16. Multiplicative-cascade dynamics in pole balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Henry S.; Kelty-Stephen, Damian G.; Vaz, Daniela V.; Michaels, Claire F.

    2014-06-01

    Pole balancing is a key task for probing the prospective control that organisms must engage in for purposeful action. The temporal structure of pole-balancing behaviors will reflect the on-line operation of control mechanisms needed to maintain an upright posture. In this study, signatures of multifractality are sought and found in time series of the vertical angle of a pole balanced on the fingertip. Comparisons to surrogate time series reveal multiplicative-cascade dynamics and interactivity across scales. In addition, simulations of a pole-balancing model generating on-off intermittency [J. L. Cabrera and J. G. Milton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 158702 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.89.158702] were analyzed. Evidence of multifractality is also evident in simulations, though comparing simulated and participant series reveals a significantly greater contribution of cross-scale interactivity for the latter. These findings suggest that multiplicative-cascade dynamics are an extension of on-off intermittency and play a role in prospective coordination.

  17. Third Pole Environment (TPE) -Latest Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Yao, T.; Zhang, F.; Yang, X.; Wang, W.; Ping, F.

    2014-12-01

    Centered on the Tibetan Plateau, the Third Pole region is a unique geographical unit, which represents one of the largest ice masses on the Earth. The region has great impacts on environmental changes in China, the Northern Hemisphere and the globe.It also demonstrates sensitive feedbacks to global changes and the impacts of anthropogenic activities in surrounding regions. Like the Arctic and Antarctica, the Third Pole region is an especially sensitive area that draws great attention from the scientific community. In 2009, with support from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and international organizations, the Third Pole Environment (TPE) program, led by Chinese scientists, was officially launched. The program focuses on the theme of "water-ice-air-ecosystem-human" interactions, with the aim to address the following scientific questions, such as the spatial and temporal characteristics of past environmental changes in the Third pole, the interactions between hydrosphere and cryosphere and hazard processes, the ecological systems' impacts on and response to environmental changes, and the impacts of anthropogenic activities on environmental changes in the region and adaptation strategies. The goal of the program is to reveal environmental change processes and mechanisms on the Third Pole and their influences on and responses to global changes, and thus to serve for enhancement of human adaptation to the changing environment and realization of human-nature harmony. Under the leadership of the co-chairs, and relying on Scientific Committee and the TPE office, the program has accomplished a number of scientific tasks since its inauguration. TPE has made tremendous progress in the research of glacier changes, interactions between the westerlies and monsoon, establishment of field stations, data sharing and education.

  18. Pole orientation, sidereal period, and sense of rotation of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. C.; Gehrels, T.

    1986-01-01

    Pole orientations of asteroids were determined. The method, called photometric astrometry, takes precise epochs of lightcurves into account. Pole determination research on asteroids 532 Herculina, 45 Eugenia, and 3 Juno continues. Discrepancies between various pole determination techniques presently being used are analyzed. The study of asteroid shapes and creating a generalized master pole determination technique also continues which will incorporate the best features of several current methods.

  19. Determination of pole orientations and shapes of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, Per; Barucci, M. Antonietta; Drummond, Jack D.; Lumme, Kari; Ostro, Steven J.

    1989-01-01

    The principles of asteroid light-curve inversion are discussed together with basic principles involved in approaches for deriving asteroid pole and shape parameters from photometry data. The merits of various pole determination techniques are described and compared. Results obtained so far on the pole orientations and shapes of asteroids are presented.

  20. Economics of Red Pine Management for Utility Pole Timber

    Treesearch

    Gerald H. Grossman; Karen Potter-Witter

    1991-01-01

    Including utility poles in red pine management regimes leads to distinctly different management recommendations. Where utility pole markets exist, managing for poles will maximize net returns. To do so, plantations should be maintained above 110 ft2/ac, higher than usually recommended. In Michigan's northern lower peninsula, approximately...

  1. 30 CFR 57.6701 - Tamping and loading pole requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tamping and loading pole requirements. 57.6701 Section 57.6701 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... poles shall be of wood or other nonconductive, nonsparking material. Couplings for poles shall...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6701 - Tamping and loading pole requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tamping and loading pole requirements. 56.6701 Section 56.6701 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Equipment/tools § 56.6701 Tamping and loading pole requirements. Tamping and loading poles shall be of...

  3. Theoretical modeling and experimental analyses of laminated wood composite poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Vijaya Gopu; Chung Y. Hse

    2005-01-01

    Wood laminated composite poles consist of trapezoid-shaped wood strips bonded with synthetic resin. The thick-walled hollow poles had adequate strength and stiffness properties and were a promising substitute for solid wood poles. It was necessary to develop theoretical models to facilitate the manufacture and future installation and maintenance of this novel...

  4. North Pole Region of the Moon as Seen by Clementine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lunar mosaic of 1500 Clementine images of the north polar region of the moon. The projection is orthographic centered on the north pole. The polar regions of the moon are of special interest because of the postulated occurrence of ice in permanently shadowed areas. The north pole of the moon is absent of the very rugged terrain seen at the south pole.

  5. Permanent magnet machine and method with reluctance poles and non-identical PM poles for high density operation

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2010-05-18

    A method and apparatus in which a stator (11) and a rotor (12) define a primary air gap (20) for receiving AC flux and at least one source (23, 40), and preferably two sources (23, 24, 40) of DC excitation are positioned for inducing DC flux at opposite ends of the rotor (12). Portions of PM material (17, 17a) are provided as boundaries separating PM rotor pole portions from each other and from reluctance poles. The PM poles (18) and the reluctance poles (19) can be formed with poles of one polarity having enlarged flux paths in relation to flux paths for pole portions of an opposite polarity, the enlarged flux paths communicating with a core of the rotor (12) so as to increase reluctance torque produced by the electric machine. Reluctance torque is increased by providing asymmetrical pole faces. The DC excitation can also use asymmetric poles and asymmetric excitation sources. Several embodiments are disclosed with additional variations.

  6. New magnet pole shape for isochronous cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-06-01

    A new design has been developed for shaping pole tips to produce the radially increasing fields required for isochronous cyclotrons. The conventional solid hillpoles are replaced by poles mounted over a small secondary gap which tapers radially from maximum at the magnet edge to zero near the center. Field measurements with a model magnet and calculations with the code TRIM show an increase in field at the edge of the magnet without the usual corresponding large increase in fringing, and a radial field shape more nearly field independent than for conventional hills. The flying hills have several advantages for variable energy multiparticle cyclotrons: (1) a large reduction in the power dissipated by isochronizing trim coils; (2) a more constant shape and magnitude flutter factor, eliminating flutter coils and increasing the operating range; and (3) a sharper fall-off of the fringe field, simplifying beam extraction. 6 figures.

  7. Photocouplings at the pole from pion photoproduction

    DOE PAGES

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Huang, F.; ...

    2014-06-24

    The reactions γp → π0p and γp → π+n are analyzed in a semi-phenomenological approach up to E ~ 2.3 GeV. Fits to differential cross section and single and double polarization observables are performed. A good overall reproduction of the available photoproduction data is achieved. The Julich2012 dynamical coupled-channel model -which describes elastic πN scattering and the world data base of the reactions πN → ηN, KΛ, and KΣ at the same time– is employed as the hadronic interaction in the final state. Furthermore, the framework guarantees analyticity and, thus, allows for a reliable extraction of resonance parameters in termsmore » of poles and residues. In particular, the photocouplings at the pole can be extracted and are presented.« less

  8. Photocouplings at the pole from pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Huang, F.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S.; MeiBner, U. -G.; Nakayama, K.

    2014-06-24

    The reactions γp → π0p and γp → π+n are analyzed in a semi-phenomenological approach up to E ~ 2.3 GeV. Fits to differential cross section and single and double polarization observables are performed. A good overall reproduction of the available photoproduction data is achieved. The Julich2012 dynamical coupled-channel model -which describes elastic πN scattering and the world data base of the reactions πN → ηN, KΛ, and KΣ at the same time– is employed as the hadronic interaction in the final state. Furthermore, the framework guarantees analyticity and, thus, allows for a reliable extraction of resonance parameters in terms of poles and residues. In particular, the photocouplings at the pole can be extracted and are presented.

  9. The 10 Meter South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlstrom, J. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Busetti, S.; Chang, C. L.; Chauvin, E.; Cho, H.-M.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Halverson, N. W.; Heimsath, S.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Lanting, T. M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Leong, J.; Lu, W.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Ruhl, J. E.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schwan, D.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.

    2011-05-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10 m diameter, wide-field, offset Gregorian telescope with a 966 pixel, multicolor, millimeter-wave, bolometer camera. It is located at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Antarctica. The design of the SPT emphasizes careful control of spillover and scattering, to minimize noise and false signals due to ground pickup. The key initial project is a large-area survey at wavelengths of 3, 2, and 1.3 mm, to detect clusters of galaxies via the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect and to measure the small-scale angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The data will be used to characterize the primordial matter power spectrum and to place constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. A second-generation camera will measure the polarization of the CMB, potentially leading to constraints on the neutrino mass and the energy scale of inflation.

  10. Poled polymer films for nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, K.D.; Kuzyk, M.G.; Holland, W.R.; Cahill, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Second harmonic generation was measured for a thin corona-poled film of a dicyanovinyl azo dye incorporated in the side-chain methacrylate polymer. Measurements were performed at a wavelength of 1.58 ..mu..m as a function of incident angle for both p- and s-polarized incident light. From these measurements the form and magnitude of the second harmonic coefficient tensor were determined. The molecular distribution implied by the data is consistent with a thermodynamic potential containing only the dipolar orienting energy acting during poling. We have also demonstrated anomalous-dispersion phase-matched second harmonic generation for the first time using electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISH) in a liquid solution of Foron Brilliant Blue S-R (FBB). Results are described. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Closing in on Jupiter North Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-02

    As NASA's Juno spacecraft closed in on Jupiter for its Aug. 27, 2016 pass, its view grew sharper and fine details in the north polar region became increasingly visible. The JunoCam instrument obtained this view on August 27, about two hours before closest approach, when the spacecraft was 120,000 miles (195,000 kilometers) away from the giant planet (i.e., for Jupiter's center). Unlike the equatorial region's familiar structure of belts and zones, the poles are mottled with rotating storms of various sizes, similar to giant versions of terrestrial hurricanes. Jupiter's poles have not been seen from this perspective since the Pioneer 11 spacecraft flew by the planet in 1974. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21030

  12. NASA satellite to track North Pole expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The proposed expedition of a lone explorer and the use of Nimbus 6 (NASA meteorological research satellite) to track his journey is reported. The journey is scheduled to start March 4, 1978, and will cover a distance of 6.000 Km (3,728 miles) from northern Canada to the North Pole and return, traveling the length of Greenland's isolated interior. The mode of transportation for the explorer will be by dog sled. Instrumentation and tracking techniques are discussed.

  13. Self Assembly and Pyroelectric Poling for Organics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-06

    develop new device concepts for hybrid OEO nanophotonic platforms. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS pyroelectric, poling of EO polymers , electrooptic polymers 16...SAM structure and electronic performance of various commonly used organic semiconducting small molecules/ polymers . Mechanisms for improving device... polymers have been processed at multiple length scales and be used in complex and densely packed structures of nano-photonic and plasmonic waveguides to

  14. Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion (PEXSI)

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    The Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion method (PEXSI) is a fast method for evaluating certain selected elements of a matrix function. PEXSI is highly scalable on distributed memory parallel machines. For sparse matrices, the PEXSI method can be more efficient than the widely used diagonalization method for evaluating matrix functions, especially when a relatively large number of eigenpairs are needed to be computed in the diagonalization methond

  15. Laser range pole field evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A field evaluation was made of the laser pole equipment. The basic plan for the evaluation was to expose the equipment to the actual people and environment for which it was intended and determine, through the use of the equipment, its resultant effectivity in terms of improved performance. Results show the equipment performed better than expected in the high elevation clean air of Colorado, and did as well in Tennessee.

  16. Pole Assignment for Second-Order Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHU, E. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper contains some results for pole assignment problems for the second-order system M ẍ(t)+D ẋ(t)+K x (t)=B u (t) . Specifically, Algorithm 0 constructs feedback matrices F1 and F2 such that the closed-loop quadratic pencil Pc( λ)= λ2M+ λ ( D+ BF2)+( K+ BF1) has a desired set of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors are well-conditioned. The method is a modification of the SVD-based method proposed by Juang and Maghami [1, 2] which is a second-order adaptation of the well-known robust eigenvalue assignment method by Kautsky et al. [3] for first-order systems. Robustness is achieved by minimising some not-so-well-known condition numbers of the eigenvalues of the closed-loop second-order pencil. We next consider the partial pole assignment problem. In 1997, Datta, Elhay and Ram proposed three biorthogonality relations for eigenvectors of symmetric definite quadratic pencils [4]. One of these relations was used to derive an explicit solution to the partial pole assignment problem by state feedback for the related single-input symmetric definite second-order control system. The solution shed new light on the stabilisation and control of large flexible space structures, for which only one small subset of the spectrum needs to be reassigned while retaining the complementary part of the spectrum. In this paper, the method has been generalised for multi-input and non-symmetric quadratic pencils. Finally, we discuss briefly the output feedback pole assignment problem.

  17. The South Pole and the Ross Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image shows a rare clear view of the South Pole (lower right) and the Ross Sea, Antarctica. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) acquired the scene on December 26, 2001. The geographic South Pole is located in the center of Antarctica, at an altitude of 2,900 meters (9,300 feet). It rests on a continent-wide ice sheet that is 2,870 m thick, with the underlying bedrock only 30 m (98 feet) above sea level. The ice underlying the South Pole is as much as 140,000 years old, and is currently accumulating at about 82 cm (32 inches) per year. Roughly 2,500 km (1,550 miles) away is the green water of the Ross Sea, which indicates the presence of large numbers of phytoplankton. This is a highly productive part of the world's oceans. Also note the ice gathered around McMurdo Sound, seen toward the lefthand shoreline of the Ross Sea, at the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. According to National Science Foundation researchers, this ice is making it difficult for penguins to reach their food supply. Separating the continental Antarctic ice sheet from the Ross Sea are the Queen Maud Mountains and the Ross Ice Shelf. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  18. The Gattini South Pole UV experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Anna M.; Ahmed, Sara; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Croner, Ernest; Delacroix, Alex; Ebihara, Yusuke; Fucik, Jason; Martin, D. Christopher; Velur, Viswa; Weatherwax, Allan

    2012-09-01

    The Gattini South Pole UV experiment (Gattini SPUV) was deployed to the South Pole dark sector in February 2010 and has recently completed a highly successful first season of winter time observations. The experiment has, for the first time ever, measured and categorized the optical night sky brightness at the very blue wavelengths. The experiment consists of a remotely operated 6” aperture custom designed telescope. The telescope feeds a blue sensitive imager with 4 degree field of view that contains a bank of 3 filters: SDSS g’, Bessel U and a custom “super U” filter specifically designed to probe the sky emission at wavelengths approaching the atmospheric cut-off. The filters are continually cycled with exposure times ranging from 30 to 300 seconds throughout the winter period. The telescope, in addition, feeds a 2 degree long slit VPH grating spectrograph with R~1000. The bandwidth is 350-450nm. The spectra are recorded simultaneously with the imager exposures. The experiment is designed for low temperature Antarctic operation and resides on the roof of the MAPO building in the South Pole Antarctic sector. The primary science goals are to categorize the Antarctic winter-time sky background at the very bluest of wavelengths as a pathfinder for the Antarctic Cosmic Web Imager. We present a technical overview of the experiment and results from the first winter season.

  19. The South Pole and the Ross Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image shows a rare clear view of the South Pole (lower right) and the Ross Sea, Antarctica. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) acquired the scene on December 26, 2001. The geographic South Pole is located in the center of Antarctica, at an altitude of 2,900 meters (9,300 feet). It rests on a continent-wide ice sheet that is 2,870 m thick, with the underlying bedrock only 30 m (98 feet) above sea level. The ice underlying the South Pole is as much as 140,000 years old, and is currently accumulating at about 82 cm (32 inches) per year. Roughly 2,500 km (1,550 miles) away is the green water of the Ross Sea, which indicates the presence of large numbers of phytoplankton. This is a highly productive part of the world's oceans. Also note the ice gathered around McMurdo Sound, seen toward the lefthand shoreline of the Ross Sea, at the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. According to National Science Foundation researchers, this ice is making it difficult for penguins to reach their food supply. Separating the continental Antarctic ice sheet from the Ross Sea are the Queen Maud Mountains and the Ross Ice Shelf. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  20. Pollution Beat Explorers to South Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen became the first man to reach the South Pole in December 1911. More than 100 years later, an international team of scientists that includes a NASA researcher has proven that air pollution from industrial activities arrived to the planet’s southern pole long before any human. Using data from 16 ice cores collected from widely spaced locations around the Antarctic continent, including the South Pole, a group led by Joe McConnell of the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Reno, Nevada, created the most accurate and precise reconstruction to date of lead pollution over Earth’s southernmost continent. The new record, described in an article published today in the online edition of the Nature Publishing Group’s journal Scientific Reports, spans a 410-year period from 1600 to 2010. More here: 1.usa.gov/1oB4p9U NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  1. NASA Satellites See Santa's North Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    All was well at the North Pole this summer, when Santa and his elves were busily making toys and taking orders for this Christmas. NASA's Terra satellite was able to piece together a number of images it took to give us a complete look at the North Pole, which is usually very difficult to see by satellites, so Santa can keep his exact location secret. On June 30, 2011 the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite made multiple passes over the Arctic from its orbit in space, capturing a true-color image of the summer lands and sea-ice near the North Pole on each pass. Individual images were then pieced together to create a large mosaic of the area, which gives a broader view that would not be possible with individual images. In this mosaic of the Arctic, the polar ice cap appears blue-white, while the ice covering land appears bright white. The ice of Greenland, in the lower left (southwest), is especially bright. Clouds also appear bright white, and can be difficult to separate from ice in true-color images. Most of the clouds in this image appear in billowing swirls, while ice tends to be smoother. This can only be confirmed in the false-color images that were also generated by MODIS that same day. The North Pole is found northeast off the coast of Greenland, in the middle of the ice-covered Arctic Ocean and roughly near the center of this image. This is the northernmost point on Earth. From the North Pole, all directions are south. Santa will be leaving from here on the night of the 24th and circling the globe. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us

  2. The science of the lunar poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    It was the great geochemist Harold Urey who first called attention to peculiar conditions at the poles of the Moon where the very small inclination of the lunar spin axis with respect to the sun causes craters and other depressions to be permanently shaded from sunlight allowing very low temperatures. Urey suggested that the expected low temperature surfaces could cold trap and collect any vapors that might transiently pass through the lunar environment. Urey's notion has led to studies of the poles as a new research area in lunar science. The conditions and science of the poles are utterly unlike those of the familiar Moon of Neil Armstrong, and the study of the poles is similar to our understanding of the Moon itself at the dawn of the space age, with possibilities outweighing current understanding. Broadly, we can treat the poles as a dynamic system of input, transport, trapping, and loss. Volatile sources range from continuous, including solar wind, the Earth's polar fountain and micrometeorites, to episodic, including comets and wet asteroids, to nearly unique events including late lunar outgassing and passage through giant molecular clouds. The lunar exosphere transports volatiles to the poles, complicated by major perturbances to the atmosphere by volatile-rich sources. Trapping includes cold trapping, but also in situ creation of more refractory species such as organics, clathrates and water-bearing minerals, as well as sequester by regolith overturn or burial by larger impacts. Finally, volatiles are lost to space by ionization and sweeping. Spacecraft results have greatly added to the understanding of the polar system. Temperatures have been precisely measured by LRO, and thermal models now allow determination of temperature over the long evolution of the lunar orbit, and show very significant changes in temperature and temperature distribution with time and depth. Polar topography is revealed in detail by Selene and LRO laser altimeters while direct

  3. Enhanced Hydrogen Abundances Near Both Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.; Lawrence, D. J.; Getenay, I.; Elphic, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Binder, A. B.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical analyses of all samples of the Moon returned to Earth show that the lunar surface is highly depleted in volatiles. Specifically, the H content of lunar soils averages only 50 ppm, which can be explained in terms of surface implantation of solar-wind H. We note that all returned samples come from near-equatorial latitudes where daytime temperatures are sufficiently high that water is not stable to evaporation, photo dissociation, ionization, and eventual loss to space through pickup by the solar wind. However, it has long been postulated that a significant fraction of water delivered to the Moon by comets, meteoroids, and interplanetary dust can be stably trapped within the permanently shaded floors of polar craters where temperatures are sufficiently low so that sublimation times can be longer than several billion years. Recent results from analysis of the high-altitude (100 +/- 20 km) portion of the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS) dataset have revealed that H abundances near both lunar poles are enhanced relative to that which exist at equatorial latitudes. Because this average enhancement is not much larger than the near-equatorial average of 50 ppm, it is reasonable to ask how much of the polar-H enhancement comes from the solar wind and how much comes from lunar impacts by solid interplanetary materials. Perhaps the low temperatures at polar latitudes could reduce loss rates of solar-wind-implanted H sufficiently to account for the inferred difference between average polar and equatorial H abundances. Although the foregoing suggestion is plausible, neither laboratory simulations on returned soil samples nor numerical simulations of H loss rates from the radiation-damaged surfaces of soil grains have been performed to prove its feasibility. We try to address this question by analyzing the low-altitude (30 +/- 15 km) portion of LPNS data to search for relatively small spatial-scale enhancements in H data to search for relatively small

  4. Modified π π amplitude with σ pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bydžovský, P.; Kamiński, R.; Nazari, V.

    2014-12-01

    A set of well-known once subtracted dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition is used to modify unitary multichannel S (π π , K K ¯, and η η ) and P (π π , ρ 2 π , and ρ σ ) wave amplitudes mostly below 1 GeV. Before the modifications, these amplitudes significantly did not satisfy the crossing symmetry condition and did not describe the π π threshold region. Moreover, the pole of the S wave amplitude related with the f0(500 ) meson (former f0(600 ) or σ ) had much smaller imaginary part and bigger real one in comparison with those in the newest Particle Data Group Tables. Here, these amplitudes are supplemented by near threshold expansion polynomials and refitted to the experimental data in the effective two pion mass from the threshold to 1.8 GeV and to the dispersion relations up to 1.1 GeV. In result the self consistent, i.e., unitary and fulfilling the crossing symmetry condition, S and P wave amplitudes are formed and the σ pole becomes much narrower and lighter. To eliminate doubts about the uniqueness of the so obtained sigma pole position short and purely mathematical proof of the uniqueness of the results is also presented. This analysis is addressed to a wide group of physicists and aims at providing a very effective and easy method of modification of, many presently used, π π amplitudes with a heavy and broad σ meson without changing of their original mathematical structure.

  5. Bacterial Activity in South Pole Snow

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Edward J.; Lin, Senjie; Capone, Douglas G.

    2000-01-01

    Large populations (200 to 5,000 cells ml−1 in snowmelt) of bacteria were present in surface snow and firn from the south pole sampled in January 1999 and 2000. DNA isolated from this snow yielded ribosomal DNA sequences similar to those of several psychrophilic bacteria and a bacterium which aligns closely with members of the genus Deinococcus, an ionizing-radiation- and desiccation-resistant genus. We also obtained evidence of low rates of bacterial DNA and protein synthesis which indicates that the organisms were metabolizing at ambient subzero temperatures (−12 to −17°C). PMID:11010907

  6. Proportional wire calorimeter for magnet pole tips

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D; Ludlam, T; Renardy, J; Willis, W; Zurfluh, E

    1980-01-01

    A total absorption calorimeter is designed to have magnetic properties comparable to those of ordinary steel, and thus can be incorporated into the poles of a spectrometer magnet without compromising the field quality. A test device has been built which consists of an iron structure penetrated by a finegrain pattern of holes, each acting as a proportional tube such that 90% of the volume is occupied by iron. Measurements of the energy and space resolution of this device in a high energy beam will be presented.

  7. Bacterial activity in South Pole snow.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, E J; Lin, S; Capone, D G

    2000-10-01

    Large populations (200 to 5,000 cells ml(-1) in snowmelt) of bacteria were present in surface snow and firn from the south pole sampled in January 1999 and 2000. DNA isolated from this snow yielded ribosomal DNA sequences similar to those of several psychrophilic bacteria and a bacterium which aligns closely with members of the genus Deinococcus, an ionizing-radiation- and desiccation-resistant genus. We also obtained evidence of low rates of bacterial DNA and protein synthesis which indicates that the organisms were metabolizing at ambient subzero temperatures (-12 to -17 degrees C).

  8. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, W.

    1985-02-08

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifer circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedstock loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  9. The Pole Orientation, Pole Precession, and Moment of Inertia Factor of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.; French, R. G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M.; Colwell, J. E.; Marouf, E.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Sepersky, T.; Lonergan, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses our determination of the Saturn's pole orientation and precession using a combination of Earthbased and spacecraft based observational data. From our model of the polar motion and the observed precession rate we obtain a value for Saturn's polar moment of inertia

  10. Landau pole in the pyramid scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Tom; Fortin, Jean-François; Kathrein, Scott

    2010-12-01

    We revisit the problem of the hidden sector Landau pole in the pyramid scheme. There is a fixed line in the plane of hidden sector gauge coupling and Yukawa couplings between the trianon fields. We postulate that the couplings flow to this line, at a point where the hidden sector gauge coupling is close to the strong coupling edge of its perturbative regime. Below the masses of the heavier trianons, the model quickly flows to a confining NF=NC=3 supersymmetric gauge theory, as required by phenomenological considerations. We study possible discrete R symmetries, which guarantee, among other things, that the basin of attraction of the fixed line has full codimension in the space of R-allowed couplings. The Yukawa couplings required to get the fixed line violate the pyrma-baryon symmetries we invoked in previous work to find a dark matter candidate. Omitting one of them, we have a dark matter candidate, and an acceptable renormalization group flow down from the unification scale, if the confinement scale of the hidden sector group is lowered from 5 to 2 TeV. However, we cannot find anomaly-free symmetries, which guarantee a set of pyrma-baryon violating couplings that eliminate the Landau pole, but do not allow a supersymmetry preserving vacuum of the model. We can do this with only one pyrma-baryon violating coupling, but this lowers the confinement scale to 900 GeV, which may already be ruled out due to light hidden sector baryons.

  11. a New Ediacaran Pole from Easternmost Baltica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meert, J. G.; Levashova, N. M.; Kuznetsov, N. B.; Sergeeva, N. D.; Golovanova, I. V.; Danukalov, K. N.; Bazhenov, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Ediacaran paleogeography is notoriously messy due to equally confusing paleomagnetic data from both Laurentia and Baltica. Ediacaran (~Vendian) rocks have been studied from several localities from Baltica, but the so far published poles can be used to place the Baltic craton at nearly any latitude and orientation [Meert et al., 2007]. At the same time, it is challenging to understand the paleogeography of the Ediacaran world given all the biologic, climatic and tectonic changes during the time interval from 635-542 Ma. We present preliminary paleomagnetic and geochronological data from (late?) Ediacaran sediments from the deformed (low metamorphic grade) peri-Uralian margin of Baltica. We successfully isolated a dual-polarity high-temperature component from eleven sites; the primary origin of this remanence is strongly supported by a positive reversal test (class B). The corresponding paleomagnetic pole is in close agreement with the coeval results from the Winter Coast of northern Baltica [Popov et al., 2002; 2005; Iglesia Llanos et al., 2005], despite a ~1600 km separation between two study areas. These data jointly indicate a very low (<10 degrees N or S) paleolatitude for eastern Baltica in Ediacaran time. Paleogeographic implications of these new data will be discussed in the context of Ediacaran-Cambrian tectonic models. This study is supported by RFBR grant 11-05-00037 and NSF grant EAR11-19038.

  12. Helioseismology from the South Pole: 1987 campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferies, S.; Pomerantz, M.A. ); Duvall, T.L. Jr. ); Harvey, J.W.; Jaksha, D. )

    1988-01-01

    Helioseismology is the study of the Sun's interior by means of observations of its global oscillations. The Sun constantly oscillates, at periods of about 5 minutes, in millions of different modes which probe different depth and latitude ranges. Helioseismological observations have been made from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station nearly every year since 1980. This site offers the unique advantage of uninterrupted sunlight during the austral summer (except for clouds, of course) and otherwise generally good atmospheric conditions for astronomical observations. Thus, it is possible to measure oscillations without long nighttime gaps which confuse measurements made at low-latitude observatories. Measurements from the South Pole and elsewhere have shown that the solar interior is roughly similar to the predictions of the theory of stellar structure and evolution. This theory is one of the key foundations of our present picture of the universe. It is, therefore, disturbing that there are small, but highly significant, discrepancies between theory and observations and that these discrepancies have not been resolved by reasonable adjustments of theoretical parameters and physics. Currently, the source of these discrepancies is not at all clear. Helioseismology, however, not only revealed the problem but offers excellent prospects for solving it.

  13. South Pole-Aitken Basin Mission (SPAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Yingst, R. A.; Minitti, M.; Head, J. W., III; Prockter, L.; Dahl, J. M.; Cooper, C. D.; Crumpler, L.; Gershman, R.; Welch, R.; Jet Propulsion LABORATORY Team

    1997-03-01

    Recent Clementine data of the farside of the moon has shown high resolution details of the South Pole-Aitken basin. The basin is over 2500 km in diameter, making it the largest impact basin thus far identified in our solar system. Estimates for the excavation depth from the basin suggest that the lower crust/upper mantle may have been reached. Clementine UVVIS data show noritic compositions and high FeO wt pct compositions, supporting that at least the lower crust may have been excavated. Because the geology of the area offers a unique opportunity to study the stratigraphy of the lunar crust at depth as well as the composition of rocks from the lunar farside, we have selected a site in the South Pole-Aitken basin for a sample return mission. Although the mission described below is currently unsuitable as a Discovery class mission, other scenarios are still possible that will reduce the mass and make the mission more feasible.

  14. Dynamics of Enceladus South Pole Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, Martin; Schmidt, J.; Spahn, F.

    2007-10-01

    The Saturnian moon Enceladus was recently found to be a potent source of gas and dust particles. There was an active region observed on the south pole of Enceladus with jets spraying material in the space. The ejected dust particles are considered to be the main source of the faint E ring. In our work we investigate the long-term dynamics of icy particles ejected from the south pole of Enceladus. The motion of the ejected grains, being subject to many perturbation forces, strongly depends on particle properties (e.g. size, charge etc.). We study the resulting spatial distribution of particles in the E ring. Primarily we focus on the structure of the ring in the vicinity of Enceladus. In our study we also concentrated on processes limiting particle lifetime. These are mainly collisions with Enceladus and other Saturnian satellites or main ring, as well as the sputtering of particles by plasma ions bombardment. Modeling the equilibrium between particle sources and sinks we found the size distribution which is expected to be observed in the E ring.

  15. Dynamics of Enceladus south pole ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, M.; Schmidt, J.; Spahn, F.

    2007-08-01

    The Saturnian moon Enceladus was recently found to be a potent source of gas and dust particles. There was an active region observed on the south pole of Enceladus with jets spraying material in the space. The ejected dust particles are considered to be the main source of the faint E ring. In our work we investigate the long-term dynamics of icy particles ejected from the south pole of Enceladus. The motion of the ejected grains, being subject to many perturbation forces, strongly depends on particle properties (e.g. size, charge etc.).We study the resulting spatial distribution of particles in the E ring. Primarily we focus on the structure of the ring in the vicinity of Enceladus. In our study we also concentrated on processes limiting particle lifetime. These are mainly collisions with Enceladus and other Saturnian satellites or main ring, as well as the sputtering of particles by plasma ions bombardment. Modeling the equilibrium between particle sources and sinks we found the size distribution which is expected to be observed in the E ring.

  16. Static Multiple-Pole Homopolar Generator With a Superconducting Screen,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-03

    STANAR193-A OlCFILE GORY 00 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION STATIC MULTIPLE-POLE HOMOPOLAR GENERATOR WITH A SUPERC9ONDUCTING SCREEN by V.P. Kartsev, avld...November 1983 MICROFICHE MJR: FTD-83-C-001336 STATIC %fULTIPLE-POLE HOMOPOLAR GENERATOR WITH A SUPRCONDUCTING SCREEN By: V.P. Kartsev, and I.M. Yegorov...this translation were extracted from the best quality copy available. STATIC MULTIPLE-POLE HOMOPOLAR GENERATOR WITH A SUPERCONDUCTING SCREEN V.P

  17. DESIGN CONCEPT FOR AN ELEVATED SOUTH POLE STATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Because of the failing condition of the present South Pole Station and the need for a station with a minimum life of 15 years, in 1960 the Laboratory...was requested to study design concepts for the South Pole Station. All concepts were to be com patible with the logistical and natural problems...composite design was selected as the most promising for the South Pole Station. Following this selection, a conceptual design was developed. The

  18. A Double-Pole High Voltage High Current Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A DOUBLE- POLE HIGH...December 2005 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: A Double- Pole High Voltage High Current Switch 6. AUTHOR(S...to divert heavy charged particles, e.g. Cu+. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 68 14. SUBJECT TERMS Double- Pole , Pulse Forming Inductive Network, PFIN

  19. Delivery of Fuel and Construction Materials to South Pole Station

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    AID-A270 431 Delivery of Fuel and Construction Materials to South Pole Station Stephen L. DenHartog and George L. Blaisdell July 993 DTIC ELECT S OCT...South Pole Station, ideally with minimal impact on the current science and operational program. The new station will require the delivery of massive...amounts of construction materials to this remote site. The existing means of delivering material and fuel to the South Pole include the use of specialized

  20. North Pole Region of the Moon as Seen by Clementine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-03

    Lunar mosaic of ~1500 Clementine images of the north polar region of the moon. The projection is orthographic centered on the north pole. The polar regions of the moon are of special interest because of the postulated occurrence of ice in permanently shadowed areas. The north pole of the moon is absent of the very rugged terrain seen at the south pole. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00002

  1. 30 CFR 56.12048 - Communication conductors on power poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Electricity § 56.12048 Communication conductors on power poles. Telegraph, telephone, or signal wires shall... powerlines, they shall be installed as specified by the National Electrical Code....

  2. South Pole Region of the Moon as Seen by Clementine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Lunar mosaic of 1500 Clementine images of the south polar region of the moon. The projection is orthographic, centered on the south pole. The Schrodinger Basin (320 km in diameter) is located in the lower right of the mosaic. Amundsen-Ganswindt is the more subdued circular basin between Schrodinger and the pole. The polar regions of the moon are of special interest because of the postulated occurrence of ice in permanently shadowed areas. The south pole is of greater interest because the area that remains in shadow is much larger than that at the north pole.

  3. BLDG 101, OVERVIEW WITH LIGHTNING POLES Naval Magazine Lualualei, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 101, OVERVIEW WITH LIGHTNING POLES - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Operational Storage Building, Fifteenth Street near Kolekole Road intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. South Pole Region of the Moon as Seen by Clementine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-03

    Lunar mosaic of ~1500 Clementine images of the south polar region of the moon. The projection is orthographic, centered on the south pole. The Schrodinger Basin (320 km in diameter) is located in the lower right of the mosaic. Amundsen-Ganswindt is the more subdued circular basin between Schrodinger and the pole. The polar regions of the moon are of special interest because of the postulated occurrence of ice in permanently shadowed areas. The south pole is of greater interest because the area that remains in shadow is much larger than that at the north pole. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00001

  5. LODGEPOLE BRIDGE, FACING NORTHWEST Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LODGEPOLE BRIDGE, FACING NORTHWEST - Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, Spanning Marble Fork of Kaweah River, approximately 21 miles northwest of Ash Mountain Entrance, Three Rivers, Tulare County, CA

  6. LODGEPOLE BRIDGE, FACING SOUTHEAST Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LODGEPOLE BRIDGE, FACING SOUTHEAST - Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, Spanning Marble Fork of Kaweah River, approximately 21 miles northwest of Ash Mountain Entrance, Three Rivers, Tulare County, CA

  7. Bridging the Poles: Education Linked with Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S.; Bell, R. E.; Turrin, M.; Maru, P.

    2004-12-01

    An international group of 65 scientists, educators and media specialists gathered at the "Bridging the Poles" workshop in Washington, DC on June 23-25, to define strategies that will inspire the general public and engage the next generation of polar scientists, engineers and leaders. This NSF-sponsored workshop was the first effort to develop an integrated education and outreach program for the International Polar Year of 2007-2009. Through a series of plenary talks and roundtable discussions, workshop participants focused on: engaging diverse communities, opportunities and needs for different levels, possibilities for thematic areas, and programs to feature nationally and internationally over the next 5 years. To maximize the potential of the International Polar Year, we need to coordinate research, education and outreach efforts, at the international as well as national level, with the goal of building an integrated and exciting public presence during 2007-2009. Successful education and outreach programming requires leveraging existing resources, creating new programs, connecting communities, and developing partnerships between agencies, scientists, educators, and the public. We need to consider the rich heritage of indigenous Arctic peoples, build capacity within communities through targeted efforts, and focus on making the poles relevant to diverse communities by using interdisciplinary approaches, e.g. cultural as well as scientific. A series of education and outreach packages for large-scale science endeavors should be rolled out to the public as major media events. The media -- television, radio and print -- as well as educators, zoos and museums are eager to use timely, accessible, and meaningful content. An Interagency Working Group on IPY Education and Outreach, with a staff and a central office, must be created to coordinate and leverage programs. A sophisticated web portal should be developed to serve content and contacts for researchers, educators, the

  8. Single-pole ladder at quarter filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, D. N.; Kiselev, M. N.; Kikoin, K.

    2007-06-01

    We study the ground state and excitation spectrum of a quasi-one-dimensional system consisting of a pole and rungs oriented in opposite directions (“centipede ladder,” CL) at quarter filling. The spin and charge excitation spectra are found in the limits of small and large longitudinal hoppings t‖ compared to the on-rung hopping rate t⊥ and exchange coupling I⊥ . At small t‖ , the system with ferromagnetic on-rung exchange demonstrates instability against dimerization. Coherent propagation of charge-transfer excitons is possible in this limit. At large t‖ , CL behaves like two-orbital Hubbard chain, but the gap opens in the charge excitation spectrum, thus reducing the symmetry from SU(4) to SU(2). The spin excitations are always gapless and their dispersion changes from quadratic magnonlike for ferromagnetic on-rung exchange to linear spinonlike for antiferromagnetic on-rung exchange in weak longitudinal hopping limit.

  9. Performance of new generation pole light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, K. C.; Karunanithi, S.; Thio, G.

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a standalone photovoltaic power supply which caters for garden lighting scheme. New Generation Pole Light (NGPL) consists of three parts which are light dependent resistor (LDR) and pyroelectric infrared (PIR) sensors, microcontroller and light emitting diode (LED) and finally, solar charging system. During the night, LED is switched on with two operating modes which are ultra-bright lighting for a predetermine period (when human presence is detected) and dim lighting. Meanwhile, LED is switched off at day time and solar charging system will recover the capacity of discharged battery. NGPL provides portable, sustainable, environmental friendly and requires minimal maintenance for outdoor lighting scheme for both urban and rural areas.

  10. Search, north pole environmental observatorty, and ipy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morison, J.; Overland, J.

    2003-04-01

    The Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) has been conceived as an interdisciplinary, interagency program with international ties and a core aim of understanding the complex of significant, interrelated, atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial changes that have occurred in the Arctic in recent decades. These changes are affecting every part of the Arctic environment and are having repercussions on society. There is evidence that these changes are connected with the positive trend in the strength of the circumpolar vortex as often characterized by the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index. It is unclear what feedback processes on climate or ecosystems may be involved in the recent changes, but modeling and retrospective studies indicate they could be characteristic of global warming. In any event, observations suggest that the impact at high latitudes is substantial. SEARCH will seek to detect future change in large part by establishing distributed observatories both on land and in the ocean. It will understand change through a program of coordinated modeling and analysis, including development of an Arctic System Reanalysis. SEARCH will help to adapt to change by communicating with Arctic communities and industries. The North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) is a NSF Office of Polar Programs funded distributed observatory centered on the North Pole. It includes annual establishment of an automated drifting station and deep ocean mooring as well as repeated hydrographic surveys. Starting in 2000 and funded through 2004, the NPEO observations in this critical region have shown that the ocean and ice are to a large extent still in the changed condition characteristic of the 1990s. In many ways NPEO is an example of the measurement philosophy and approach that can be used to implement SEARCH. Our vision is that by time of IPY, the SEARCH program will have matured to the extent that it might engage in a yearlong intensive sampling period involving the international

  11. Jupiter's interior and deep atmosphere: The initial pole-to-pole passes with the Juno spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, S. J.; Adriani, A.; Adumitroaie, V.; Allison, M.; Anderson, J.; Atreya, S.; Bloxham, J.; Brown, S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; DeJong, E.; Folkner, W.; Gautier, D.; Grassi, D.; Gulkis, S.; Guillot, T.; Hansen, C.; Hubbard, W. B.; Iess, L.; Ingersoll, A.; Janssen, M.; Jorgensen, J.; Kaspi, Y.; Levin, S. M.; Li, C.; Lunine, J.; Miguel, Y.; Mura, A.; Orton, G.; Owen, T.; Ravine, M.; Smith, E.; Steffes, P.; Stone, E.; Stevenson, D.; Thorne, R.; Waite, J.; Durante, D.; Ebert, R. W.; Greathouse, T. K.; Hue, V.; Parisi, M.; Szalay, J. R.; Wilson, R.

    2017-05-01

    On 27 August 2016, the Juno spacecraft acquired science observations of Jupiter, passing less than 5000 kilometers above the equatorial cloud tops. Images of Jupiter's poles show a chaotic scene, unlike Saturn's poles. Microwave sounding reveals weather features at pressures deeper than 100 bars, dominated by an ammonia-rich, narrow low-latitude plume resembling a deeper, wider version of Earth's Hadley cell. Near-infrared mapping reveals the relative humidity within prominent downwelling regions. Juno's measured gravity field differs substantially from the last available estimate and is one order of magnitude more precise. This has implications for the distribution of heavy elements in the interior, including the existence and mass of Jupiter's core. The observed magnetic field exhibits smaller spatial variations than expected, indicative of a rich harmonic content.

  12. Automatic pole-zero/zero-pole digital compensator for high-resolution spectroscopy: Design and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, A.; Pullia, A.; Ripamonti, G.

    1999-08-01

    In a high-resolution spectroscopy system the relatively long exponential decay due to the charge preamplifier is customarily canceled in an analogue fashion by means of a PZ (Pole-Zero) stage. The accurateness of such a compensation has a big impact on the energy resolution because it strongly affects the baseline-stability problems. The authors have automatically and on-line performed such a compensation in a digital way, while maintaining a spectroscopy performance and keeping at minimum both the ADC sampling frequency (thus power consumption) and its resolution (thus cost). This is done through an IIR filter, implemented within a FPGA by a DSP. The so-compensated waveform has, in excellent approximation, an all-pole shape. Starting from such a signal, the minimum-noise filters for energy and/or time measurements are then promptly synthesized and implemented for real time operation through the same DSP.

  13. Jupiter's interior and deep atmosphere: The initial pole-to-pole passes with the Juno spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Bolton, S J; Adriani, A; Adumitroaie, V; Allison, M; Anderson, J; Atreya, S; Bloxham, J; Brown, S; Connerney, J E P; DeJong, E; Folkner, W; Gautier, D; Grassi, D; Gulkis, S; Guillot, T; Hansen, C; Hubbard, W B; Iess, L; Ingersoll, A; Janssen, M; Jorgensen, J; Kaspi, Y; Levin, S M; Li, C; Lunine, J; Miguel, Y; Mura, A; Orton, G; Owen, T; Ravine, M; Smith, E; Steffes, P; Stone, E; Stevenson, D; Thorne, R; Waite, J; Durante, D; Ebert, R W; Greathouse, T K; Hue, V; Parisi, M; Szalay, J R; Wilson, R

    2017-05-26

    On 27 August 2016, the Juno spacecraft acquired science observations of Jupiter, passing less than 5000 kilometers above the equatorial cloud tops. Images of Jupiter's poles show a chaotic scene, unlike Saturn's poles. Microwave sounding reveals weather features at pressures deeper than 100 bars, dominated by an ammonia-rich, narrow low-latitude plume resembling a deeper, wider version of Earth's Hadley cell. Near-infrared mapping reveals the relative humidity within prominent downwelling regions. Juno's measured gravity field differs substantially from the last available estimate and is one order of magnitude more precise. This has implications for the distribution of heavy elements in the interior, including the existence and mass of Jupiter's core. The observed magnetic field exhibits smaller spatial variations than expected, indicative of a rich harmonic content. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Control of subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) infesting power poles.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Martin A; Westlake, Terry; Kathuria, Amrit

    2010-12-01

    A trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of termiticidal dusts (arsenic trioxide, triflumuron, and Metarhizium anisopliae), a timber fumigant (dazomet) and liquid termiticides (bifenthrin, chlorfenapyr, chlorpyrifos, fipronil, and imidacloprid) for controlling subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) infesting in-service power poles in New South Wales, Australia. Dusts were applied to parts of the pole where termites were present. Fumigant was inserted into holes drilled into the base of the pole. Liquid termiticides were mixed with soil around the base of the pole and injected into internal voids if present. Poles were inspected for up to 5 yr, and the time taken for reinfestation to occur was recorded. Before the start of the trial, the major Australian pole owners were surveyed to obtain an estimate of the annual national cost of termite infestation to the power supply industry. The annual costs of termite treatment and replacing damaged poles were estimated at AU$2 million and AU$13 million, respectively. Infestation rates were lower for all treatments compared with controls within the first 12 mo of the study. Dazomet, arsenic trioxide, fipronil, and chlorpyrifos were the most efficacious treatments. Efficacy was positively related to the amount of termiticide applied and negatively related to the infestation severity but was unaffected by geographical location. Survival curves were calculated of the time elapsed before the recurrence of termite infestations (survival absence of reinfestation). Survival was highest for poles treated with liquid termiticides.

  15. Gluability of out-of-service utility poles

    Treesearch

    Han Roliadi; Chung Y. Hse; Elvin T. Choong; Todd F. Shupe

    2000-01-01

    This investigation determined the gluability of weathered, out-of-service southern yellow pine (SYP) (Pinus spp.) utility poles. Three types of adhesives were used: resorcinol-phenol formaldehyde (RPF), polyvinyl acetate (PVA), and casein. The poles consisted of two service duration groups: 5 and 25 years. Longer weathering caused greater reduction in creosote content...

  16. Charge dynamics and distributions in thermally poled silica fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Danny W.; Xu, Wei; Fleming, Simon C.

    1999-11-01

    Silica glass plays a key role in photonic systems because of its excellent optical properties, such as low loss, low fabrication cost and high photo-refractive damage threshold. Unfortunately, silica, being centrosymmetric, has no intrinsic linear electro-optic (LEO) coefficient or second-order nonlinearity (SON). However, thermal poling has been demonstrated to produce a LEO coefficient and SON of approximately 1 pm/V in silica glass and fiber. It is necessary to understand the mechanism of thermal poling in order to achieve a larger, stable and reliable LEO effect. A series of thermal poling experiments on silicate fiber was carried out. The in situ measurements of the total LEO coefficients (the sum of the poling field induced LEO coefficient and the thermal poling induced residual LEO coefficient) suggest movement of charges. Thermal poling induced residual LEO coefficients are measured in situ during prolonged negative thermal poling. Both the shielding field and the ionization field are frozen-in at room temperature and lead to LEO effect. The time evolution of the residual LEO coefficients shows that the competition between the shielding and ionization fields is a linear process. Using this new understanding, a specialty optical fiber was developed for the production of thermally poled optical fiber devices.

  17. Trekking poles: Can you save your knees and the environment?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.; Martinez, T.A.; Proudman, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    The increasing use of trekking poles has stimulated a growing awareness of some environmental and social impacts associated with their use. These impacts have not been documented in the scientific literature. This article reviews the impacts of trekking pole use to provide a basis for further dialogue, and suggests how they may be altered or used in ways that will minimize impact.

  18. pbx is required for pole and eye regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chieh G; Wang, Irving E; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Planarian regeneration involves regionalized gene expression that specifies the body plan. After amputation, planarians are capable of regenerating new anterior and posterior poles, as well as tissues polarized along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial-lateral axes. Wnt and several Hox genes are expressed at the posterior pole, whereas Wnt inhibitory genes, Fgf inhibitory genes, and prep, which encodes a TALE-family homeodomain protein, are expressed at the anterior pole. We found that Smed-pbx (pbx for short), which encodes a second planarian TALE-family homeodomain transcription factor, is required for restored expression of these genes at anterior and posterior poles during regeneration. Moreover, pbx(RNAi) animals gradually lose pole gene expression during homeostasis. By contrast, pbx was not required for initial anterior-posterior polarized responses to wounds, indicating that pbx is required after wound responses for development and maintenance of poles during regeneration and homeostatic tissue turnover. Independently of the requirement for pbx in pole regeneration, pbx is required for eye precursor formation and, consequently, eye regeneration and eye replacement in homeostasis. Together, these data indicate that pbx promotes pole formation of body axes and formation of regenerative progenitors for eyes.

  19. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or more...

  20. Finite element analyses of wood laminated composite poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; R.C. Tang; Chung Y. Hse

    2005-01-01

    Finite element analyses using ANSYS were conducted on orthotropic, polygonal, wood laminated composite poles subjected to a body force and a concentrated load at the free end. Deflections and stress distributions of small-scale and full-size composite poles were analyzed and compared to the results obtained in an experimental study. The predicted deflection for both...

  1. Optimization of a hollow cylindrical prestressed concrete utility pole

    SciTech Connect

    Tavatli, D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the major concerns in the design of circular prestressed concrete utility poles (hollow or solid) is economy. Several designs can be used in a particular design situation, but the most inexpensive design is of primary interest. Cost optimization of hollow prestressed concrete utility poles was carried out in this study based on design variables, including the inside and outside diameter and the area of prestressing strands at the pole tip. Optimization of poles was also carried out when prestressing is not constant throughout the pole and varies at different sections. The interior penalty function method is primarily used in the cost-optimization process. An optimization program was developed to optimize a given objective function along with its constraints. An initial design package was written to obtain an initial design point in the feasible region of design. A second program known as the flexible tolerance method is also used to optimize the utility poles. Cost optimization of the pole when prestressing is constant or when it varies along the pole is quite possible and can be studied for different design variables. Results of optimization with constant prestress force for two and three design variables provide nearly the same kind of results.

  2. 1. Launch facility, delta 6, approach road and gate, pole ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Launch facility, delta 6, approach road and gate, pole marking the hardened intersite cable system in right center, commercial power pole outside fence in left center, view towards south - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility D-6, 4 miles north of Badlands National Park Headquarters, 4.5 miles east of Jackson County line on county road, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  3. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or...

  4. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or...

  5. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or...

  6. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or...

  7. Mechanical properties of spindle poles are symmetrically balanced

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Itabashi, Takeshi; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2017-01-01

    The metaphase spindle is organized for accurate chromosome segregation. One of the fundamental features of the spindle across the species is its symmetrical shape; the spindle consists of two polar arrays of microtubules at both ends. Although it has been suggested that the formation of the bipolar shape requires force balance coordination by molecular motors, i.e., kinesins and dyneins, quantitative analysis for the pole mechanics has not been conducted. Here, we demonstrate that it is not only the shape but also the stiffness and microtubule density of the pairs of pole regions are symmetrically balanced in single spindles self-assembled in Xenopus egg extracts. We found that the inhibition of dynein functions dramatically reduced the stiffness and microtubule density in the pole region. By contrast, the inhibition of one of the kinesins, Eg5, which is the antagonistic motor protein of dynein, increased the value of these parameters. Moreover, the inhibition of both dynein and Eg5 recovered these parameter values to those of non-treated spindle poles. We also found that, when one pole structure was held widened with the use of two glass microneedles, the opposite pole structure spontaneously widened, resulting in the formation of the barrel-like shaped spindle. The values of stiffness and microtubule density in the manipulated pole region decreased, following the spontaneous decrement of those in the paired unmanipulated pole region. These results suggest that the spindle possesses a mechanism to dynamically maintain its symmetry in mechanical properties. PMID:28409085

  8. A LINE POLE 1 IN FOREGROUND AND MYSTIC LAKE POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 1 IN FOREGROUND AND MYSTIC LAKE POWERHOUSE IN BACKGROUND. A LINE POLE 1 IS A MODERN REPLACEMENT STRUCTURE WITH BROWN PORCELAIN SUSPENSION-TYPE INSULATORS. VIEW TO EAST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  9. A Graphics System for Pole-Zero Map Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, William Fred, III

    Computer scientists have developed an interactive, graphical display system for pole-zero map analysis. They designed it for use as an educational tool in teaching introductory courses in automatic control systems. The facilities allow the user to specify a control system and an input function in the form of a pole-zero map and then examine the…

  10. Detail of 25' highband reflector screen poles with monopole antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 25' high-band reflector screen poles with monopole antenna elements behind, note the metal sleeve bases of the reflector screen poles and the guy wire anchors from the dipole antenna elements (left foreground), view facing north northwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Detail of 25' highband reflector screen pole showing the horizontal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 25' high-band reflector screen pole showing the horizontal wood beams and vertical wires hung from ceramic insulators, note the dipole antenna element and 94' low-band reflector screen poles in background, view facing north - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Mechanical properties of spindle poles are symmetrically balanced.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Itabashi, Takeshi; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2017-01-01

    The metaphase spindle is organized for accurate chromosome segregation. One of the fundamental features of the spindle across the species is its symmetrical shape; the spindle consists of two polar arrays of microtubules at both ends. Although it has been suggested that the formation of the bipolar shape requires force balance coordination by molecular motors, i.e., kinesins and dyneins, quantitative analysis for the pole mechanics has not been conducted. Here, we demonstrate that it is not only the shape but also the stiffness and microtubule density of the pairs of pole regions are symmetrically balanced in single spindles self-assembled in Xenopus egg extracts. We found that the inhibition of dynein functions dramatically reduced the stiffness and microtubule density in the pole region. By contrast, the inhibition of one of the kinesins, Eg5, which is the antagonistic motor protein of dynein, increased the value of these parameters. Moreover, the inhibition of both dynein and Eg5 recovered these parameter values to those of non-treated spindle poles. We also found that, when one pole structure was held widened with the use of two glass microneedles, the opposite pole structure spontaneously widened, resulting in the formation of the barrel-like shaped spindle. The values of stiffness and microtubule density in the manipulated pole region decreased, following the spontaneous decrement of those in the paired unmanipulated pole region. These results suggest that the spindle possesses a mechanism to dynamically maintain its symmetry in mechanical properties.

  13. Identity Pole: Confronting Issues of Personal and Cultural Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciminero, Sandra Elser

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the "Identity Pole" was to explore the big idea of identity. Students would confront issues of personal and cultural meaning, and draw upon interdisciplinary connections for inspiration. The author chose to present totem poles of the Northwest Coast Native Americans/First Nations of Canada, as well as school, state and national…

  14. pbx is required for pole and eye regeneration in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chieh G.; Wang, Irving E.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Planarian regeneration involves regionalized gene expression that specifies the body plan. After amputation, planarians are capable of regenerating new anterior and posterior poles, as well as tissues polarized along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial-lateral axes. Wnt and several Hox genes are expressed at the posterior pole, whereas Wnt inhibitory genes, Fgf inhibitory genes, and prep, which encodes a TALE-family homeodomain protein, are expressed at the anterior pole. We found that Smed-pbx (pbx for short), which encodes a second planarian TALE-family homeodomain transcription factor, is required for restored expression of these genes at anterior and posterior poles during regeneration. Moreover, pbx(RNAi) animals gradually lose pole gene expression during homeostasis. By contrast, pbx was not required for initial anterior-posterior polarized responses to wounds, indicating that pbx is required after wound responses for development and maintenance of poles during regeneration and homeostatic tissue turnover. Independently of the requirement for pbx in pole regeneration, pbx is required for eye precursor formation and, consequently, eye regeneration and eye replacement in homeostasis. Together, these data indicate that pbx promotes pole formation of body axes and formation of regenerative progenitors for eyes. PMID:23318641

  15. Distribution of pole blight of western white pine

    Treesearch

    Donald P. Graham

    1955-01-01

    Disease surveys conducted in 1953 and 1954 to determine the distribution of pole blight of western white pine (Pinus monticola, Dougl.) reveal that most areas of damage have now been found. During 1953 extensive surveys of pole blight distribution disclosed 20 new diseased areas and a number of affected stands adjacent to or near old disease centers. The 1954...

  16. Derivation of nominal strength for wood utility poles

    Treesearch

    Ronald W. Wolfe; Jozsef Bodig; Patricia Lebow

    2001-01-01

    The designated fiber stress values published in the American National Standards Institute Standard for Poles, ANSI 05.1, no longer reflect the state of the knowledge. These values are based on a combination of test data from small clear wood samples and small poles (

  17. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph operating... equipped with third-rail shoes shall have a device for insulating the current collecting apparatus from...

  18. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph operating... equipped with third-rail shoes shall have a device for insulating the current collecting apparatus from...

  19. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph operating... equipped with third-rail shoes shall have a device for insulating the current collecting apparatus from...

  20. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph operating... equipped with third-rail shoes shall have a device for insulating the current collecting apparatus from...

  1. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph operating... equipped with third-rail shoes shall have a device for insulating the current collecting apparatus from...

  2. A Graphics System for Pole-Zero Map Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, William Fred, III

    Computer scientists have developed an interactive, graphical display system for pole-zero map analysis. They designed it for use as an educational tool in teaching introductory courses in automatic control systems. The facilities allow the user to specify a control system and an input function in the form of a pole-zero map and then examine the…

  3. Strength loss in southern pine poles damaged by woodpeckers

    Treesearch

    R.W. Rumsey; G.E. Woodson

    1973-01-01

    Woodpecker damage caused extensive reductions in strength of 50-foot, class-2 utility poles, the amount depending on the cross-sectional area of wood removed and its distance from the apex. Two methods for estimating when damaged poles should be replaced proved to be conservative when applied to results of field tests. Such conservative predictions of falling loads...

  4. Strength loss in southern pine poles damaged by woodpeckers

    Treesearch

    R.L. Rumsey; George E. Woodson

    1973-01-01

    Woodpecker damage caused extensive reductions in strength of 50-foot, class-2 utility poles, the amount depending on the cross-sectional area of wood removed and its distance from the apex. Two methods for estimating when damaged poles should be replaced proved to be conservative when applied to results of field rests. Such conservative predictions of failing loads...

  5. Pole distribution of PVI transcendents close to a critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, Davide

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of the poles of Painlevé VI transcendents associated to semi-simple Frobenius manifolds is determined close to a critical point. It is shown that the poles accumulate at the critical point, asymptotically along two rays. As an example, the Frobenius manifold given by the quantum cohomology of CP2 is considered. The general PVI is also considered.

  6. Micromechanics of the Vertebrate Meiotic Spindle Examined by Stretching along the Pole-to-Pole Axis

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Jun; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Shimamoto, Yuta; Kapoor, Tarun M.; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2014-01-01

    The meiotic spindle is a bipolar molecular machine that is designed to segregate duplicated chromosomes toward the opposite poles of the cell. The size and shape of the spindle are considered to be maintained by a balance of forces produced by molecular motors and microtubule assembly dynamics. Several studies have probed how mechanical perturbations of the force balance affect the spindle structure. However, the spindle’s response to a stretching force acting at the spindle pole and along its long axis, i.e., the direction in which chromosomes are segregated, has not been examined. Here, we describe a method to apply a stretching force to the metaphase spindle assembled in Xenopus egg extracts and measure the relationship between the force and the three-dimensional deformation of the spindle. We found that the spindle behaves as a Zener-type viscoelastic body when forces are applied at the spindle pole, generating a restoring force for several minutes. In addition, both the volume of the spindle and the tubulin density are conserved under the stretching force. These results provide insight into how the spindle size is maintained at metaphase. PMID:24507614

  7. Micromechanics of the vertebrate meiotic spindle examined by stretching along the pole-to-pole axis.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Jun; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Shimamoto, Yuta; Kapoor, Tarun M; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2014-02-04

    The meiotic spindle is a bipolar molecular machine that is designed to segregate duplicated chromosomes toward the opposite poles of the cell. The size and shape of the spindle are considered to be maintained by a balance of forces produced by molecular motors and microtubule assembly dynamics. Several studies have probed how mechanical perturbations of the force balance affect the spindle structure. However, the spindle's response to a stretching force acting at the spindle pole and along its long axis, i.e., the direction in which chromosomes are segregated, has not been examined. Here, we describe a method to apply a stretching force to the metaphase spindle assembled in Xenopus egg extracts and measure the relationship between the force and the three-dimensional deformation of the spindle. We found that the spindle behaves as a Zener-type viscoelastic body when forces are applied at the spindle pole, generating a restoring force for several minutes. In addition, both the volume of the spindle and the tubulin density are conserved under the stretching force. These results provide insight into how the spindle size is maintained at metaphase. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Conservative Duplication of Spindle Poles during Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wesp, Andreas; Prinz, Susanne; Fink, Gerald R.

    2001-01-01

    During sporulation in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae, spindle pole bodies acquire the so-called meiotic plaque, a prerequisite for spore formation. Mpc70p is a component of the meiotic plaque and is thus essential for spore formation. We show here that MPC70/mpc70 heterozygous strains most often produce two spores instead of four and that these spores are always nonsisters. In wild-type strains, Mpc70p localizes to all four spindle pole bodies, whereas in MPC70/mpc70 strains Mpc70p localizes to only two of the four spindle pole bodies, and these are always nonsisters. Our data can be explained by conservative spindle pole body distribution in which the two newly synthesized meiosis II spindle pole bodies of MPC70/mpc70 strains lack Mpc70p. PMID:11244080

  9. Conservative duplication of spindle poles during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wesp, A; Prinz, S; Fink, G R

    2001-04-01

    During sporulation in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae, spindle pole bodies acquire the so-called meiotic plaque, a prerequisite for spore formation. Mpc70p is a component of the meiotic plaque and is thus essential for spore formation. We show here that MPC70/mpc70 heterozygous strains most often produce two spores instead of four and that these spores are always nonsisters. In wild-type strains, Mpc70p localizes to all four spindle pole bodies, whereas in MPC70/mpc70 strains Mpc70p localizes to only two of the four spindle pole bodies, and these are always nonsisters. Our data can be explained by conservative spindle pole body distribution in which the two newly synthesized meiosis II spindle pole bodies of MPC70/mpc70 strains lack Mpc70p.

  10. Heavy Cratering near Callisto's South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Images from NASA's Galileo spacecraft provide new insights into this region near Callisto's south pole. This two frame mosaic shows a heavily cratered surface with smooth plains in the areas between craters. North is to the top of the image. The smoothness of the plains appears to increase toward the south pole, approximately 480 kilometers (293 miles) south of the bottom of the image. This smoothness of Callisto's surface was not evident in images taken during the 1979 flyby of NASA's Voyager spacecraft because the resolution was insufficient to show the effect. This smooth surface, and the process(es) that cause it, are among the most intriguing aspects of Callisto. Although not fully understood, the process(es) responsible for this smoothing could include erosion by tiny meteorites and energetic ions. Some craters, such as Keelut, the 47 kilometer (29 mile) crater in the lower right corner, have sharp, well defined rims. Keelut contains an inner ring surrounding a central depression about 17 kilometers (11 miles) in diameter. Keelut, and the more irregularly shaped, degraded Reginleif, the 32 kilometer (19.5 mile) crater in the top center of the image, are very shallow and have flat floors. Crater forms can be seen down to less than 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in diameter in the image. Each picture element (pixel) in this image is approximately 0.68 kilometers (0.41 miles) across.

    This image which was taken by the Galileo spacecraft's solid state imaging (CCD) system during its eighth orbit around Jupiter, on May 6th, 1997. The center of the image is located at 71.3 degrees south latitude, 97.6 degrees west longitude, and was taken when the spacecraft was approximately 35,470 kilometers (21,637 miles) from Callisto.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at

  11. Uranus, towards the planet's pole of rotation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    These two pictures of Uranus were compiled from images recorded by Voyager 2 on Jan. 1O, 1986, when the NASA spacecraft was 18 million kilometers (11 million miles) from the planet. The images were obtained by Voyager's narrow-angle camera; the view is toward the planet's pole of rotation, which lies just left of center. The picture on the left has been processed to show Uranus as human eyes would see it from the vantage point of the spacecraft. The second picture is an exaggerated false-color view that reveals details not visible in the true-color view -- including indications of what could be a polar haze of smog-like particles. The true-color picture was made by combining pictures taken through blue, green and orange filters. The dark shading of the upper right edge of the disk is the terminator, or day-night boundary. The blue-green appearance of Uranus results from methane in the atmosphere; this gas absorbs red wavelengths from the incoming sunlight, leaving the predominant bluish color seen here. The picture on the right uses false color and contrast enhancement to bring out subtle details in the polar region of the atmosphere. Images shuttered through different color filters were added and manipulated by computer, greatly enhancing the low-contrast details in the original images. Ultraviolet, violet- and orange-filtered images were displayed, respectively, as blue, green and red to produce this false-color picture. The planet reveals a dark polar hood surrounded by a series of progressively lighter convective bands. The banded structure is real, though exaggerated here. The brownish color near the center of the planet could be explained as being caused by a thin haze concentrated over the pole -- perhaps the product of chemical reactions powered by ultraviolet light from the Sun. One such reaction produces acetylene from methane -- acetylene has been detected on Uranus by an Earth-orbiting spacecraft -- and further reactions involving acetylene are known to

  12. Uranus, towards the planet's pole of rotation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    These two pictures of Uranus were compiled from images recorded by Voyager 2 on Jan. 1O, 1986, when the NASA spacecraft was 18 million kilometers (11 million miles) from the planet. The images were obtained by Voyager's narrow-angle camera; the view is toward the planet's pole of rotation, which lies just left of center. The picture on the left has been processed to show Uranus as human eyes would see it from the vantage point of the spacecraft. The second picture is an exaggerated false-color view that reveals details not visible in the true-color view -- including indications of what could be a polar haze of smog-like particles. The true-color picture was made by combining pictures taken through blue, green and orange filters. The dark shading of the upper right edge of the disk is the terminator, or day-night boundary. The blue-green appearance of Uranus results from methane in the atmosphere; this gas absorbs red wavelengths from the incoming sunlight, leaving the predominant bluish color seen here. The picture on the right uses false color and contrast enhancement to bring out subtle details in the polar region of the atmosphere. Images shuttered through different color filters were added and manipulated by computer, greatly enhancing the low-contrast details in the original images. Ultraviolet, violet- and orange-filtered images were displayed, respectively, as blue, green and red to produce this false-color picture. The planet reveals a dark polar hood surrounded by a series of progressively lighter convective bands. The banded structure is real, though exaggerated here. The brownish color near the center of the planet could be explained as being caused by a thin haze concentrated over the pole -- perhaps the product of chemical reactions powered by ultraviolet light from the Sun. One such reaction produces acetylene from methane -- acetylene has been detected on Uranus by an Earth-orbiting spacecraft -- and further reactions involving acetylene are known to

  13. Glacier melt on the Third Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, T.

    2015-12-01

    With an average elevation above 4,000 metres, the Third Pole (TP) is a unique region with many high mountains centered on the Tibetan Plateau stretching over 5 million square kilometers. Major environmental changes are taking place on the TP characterized by complex interactions of atmospheric, cryospheric, hydrological, geological and environmental processes. These processes are critical for the well-being of the three billion people inhabiting the plateau and the surrounding regions. Glacier melt is one of the most significant environmental changes observed on the TP. Over the past decade, most of the glaciers on the TP have undergone considerable melt. The Third Pole Environment (TPE) has focused on the causes of the glacier melt by conducting large-scale ground in-situ observation and monitoring, analyzing satellite images and remote sensing data, and applying numerical modeling to environmental research on the TP. The studies of long-term record of water stable isotopes in precipitation and ice core throughout the TP have revealed different features with regions, thus proposing significant influence of atmospheric circulations on spatial precipitation pattern over the TP. Validation of the result by isotope-equipped general circulation models confirms the spatial distribution of different atmospheric circulation dominances on the TP, with northern part dominated by the westerlies, southern part by the summer monsoon, and central part featuring the influences of both circulation systems. Such unique circulation patterns also bear directly on the status of glaciers and lakes over the TP and its surroundings. The studies therefore found the largest glacier melt in the monsoon-dominated southern part, moderate melt in the central part of transition, and the least melt, or even slight advance in the westerlies-dominated northern TP. It is clear that some mountains on the TP are undergoing rapid melt and the consequence of without ice and snow will be very soon. The

  14. Pole preservatives in soils adjacent to in-service utility poles in the United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.B.; Ripp, J.A.; Sims, R.; Ladwig, K.

    1997-12-01

    As a result of increasing concerns regarding the environmental fate of wood preservatives, EPRI carried out a study of soils in the vicinity of in-service wood pole sites. More than 8,000 soil samples adjacent to 180 PCP-treated and 22 creosote-treated wood poles were collected and analyzed for chemicals of interest. The results showed that concentrations of wood preservative chemicals tended to be highest in soils located in very close proximity to the poles with rapid decreases in concentrations observed with distance from the poles. Soil partitioning, biodegradation, and modeling studies on PCP were also completed to augment the soil data and to provide additional information on the release, migration, and fate of wood preservatives at in-service pole sites.

  15. Pole-factorization theorem in quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1996-01-01

    In quantum electrodynamics a classical part of the S-matrix is normally factored out in order to obtain a quantum remainder that can be treated perturbatively without the occurrence of infrared divergences. However, this separation, as usually performed, introduces spurious large-distance effects that produce an apparent breakdown of the important correspondence between stable particles and poles of the S-matrix, and, consequently, lead to apparent violations of the correspondence principle and to incorrect results for computations in the mesoscopic domain lying between the atomic and classical regimes. An improved computational technique is described that allows valid results to be obtained in this domain, and that leads, for the quantum remainder, in the cases studied, to a physical-region singularity structure that, as regards the most singular parts, is the same as the normal physical-region analytic structure in theories in which all particles have non-zero mass. The key innovations here are to define the classical part in coordinate space, rather than in momentum space, and to define there a separation of the photon-electron coupling into its classical and quantum parts that has the following properties: (1) The contributions from the terms containing only classical couplings can be summed to all orders to give a unitary operator that generates the coherent state that corresponds to the appropriate classical process, and (2) The quantum remainder can be rigorously shown to exhibit, as regards its most singular parts, the normal analytic structure. 22 refs.

  16. Spindle position control by embedded electromagnetic poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, N.-C.; Lee, R.-M.

    2010-10-01

    A novel embedded cylindrical-array magnetic actuator (ECAMA) is proposed and verified by experiments to provide sufficient magnetic force for spindle deviation regulation of high-speed milling process. Four I-shape silicon steel columns enclosing the spindle constitute the backbone of the ECAMA. The shape of modified concave-type yokes is designed to reduce the average air gap between magnetic poles and the spindle. In contrast to the conventional AMB (active magnetic bearing) design for which coils are usually wound on the yokes, the copper wire is wound on the I-shape silicon steel columns. As a result, the overall wound coil turns can be much increased. In other words, stronger magnetic force can be induced by ECAMA. On the other hand, to reduce the cost of ECAMA, two pairs of self-sensing modules are employed to replace the gap sensors for measurement of spindle position deviation. In order to verify the efficacy of the proposed ECAMA and the self-sensing module, high-speed milling tests are undertaken. By inspection on the precision and quality of the finish surface of workpiece, the superiority of ECAMA and the self-sensing module are assured.

  17. In Situ Poling and Imidization of Amorphous Piezoelectric Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wise, Kristopher E.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An amorphous piezoelectric polyimide containing polar functional groups has been developed using a combination of experimental and molecular modeling for potential use in high temperature applications. This amorphous polyimide, (Beta-CN)APB/ODPA, has exhibited good thermal stability and piezoelectric response at temperatures up to 150C. Density functional calculations predicted that a partially cured amic acid (open imide ring) possesses a dipole moment four times larger than the fully imidized closed ring. In situ poling and imidization of the partially cured (Beta-CN)APB/ODPA, was studied in an attempt to maximize the degree of dipolar orientation and the resultant piezoelectric response. A positive corona poling was used to minimize localized arcing during poling and to allow use of higher poling fields without dielectric breakdown. The dielectric relaxation strength, remanent polarization, and piezoelectric response were evaluated as a function of the poling profile. The partially cured, corona poled polymers exhibited higher dielectric relaxation strength (delta varepsilon), remanent polarization (Pr) and piezoelectric strain coefficient (d33) than the fully cured, conventionally poled ones.

  18. South Pole Fault Zone, 900 km long and almost through the pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, D. U.; Cianfarra, P.; Salvini, F.

    2010-12-01

    The most prominent feature of snow and ice topography of the East Antarctic Plateau is the 850 x 1100 km Pensacola Basin, named for the mountain range at its mouth. The basin's headwall is a remarkably linear 900 km-long, 100 -200 km-wide zone wherein snow surface slopes of 3 m/km contrast with values of 1 m/km on either side, a total relief of 200 to 400 meters. About 700 km of this slope lies along the 35th meridian, the remainder continuing through the pole for another 200 km. Satellite images show an easily mapped zebra-striped snow unit occurs throughout the basin and beyond. The stripes are well-known from other areas as megadunes, enigmatic, upwind climbing dunes of alternating snow and ice bands with 2 km wavelength and only 1-4 m amplitude. Superposition relationships show this unit is the bottom member of a four-unit snow stratigraphy, the basis for the first geologic map of the youngest snow units of the South Pole region. The megadune stripes are draped obliquely down over the headwall slope to disappear beneath younger snow fill of the Recovery Basin at its foot before cropping out again on the floor of the main basin. Nearer the pole, the slope forms the edge of a 15,000 km2 triangular plateau, the pole located half-way down the slope. Megadune stripes from higher elevations disappear beneath younger snows of the small basin and the pole to reappear on the floor of the main basin as ghosts of megadune stripes. Farther out on the floor they emerge from beneath this thin cover as fully exposed megadune stripes. An overlay of the snow- geologic map across the relatively low resolution maps of bedrock topography shows the surface slope separates two domains of contrasting bedrock topography, the lower elevation domain corresponding to the basin floor. The most likely explanation for this remarkably linear snow slope is flow of ice over a previously unrecognized 200-400 m-high, 900 km-long bedrock fault-line scarp. Along its distal end, the surface slope

  19. Collecting Micrometeorites from the South Pole Water Well

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    Susan Taylor, James H. Lever, Ralph P. Harvey, and May 1997 John Govoni C R R EL R EP O R T 9 7 -1 Collecting Micrometeorites from the South Pole ...Water Well Abstract: A collector was designed and built to retrieve micrometeorites from the floor of the South Pole Water Well. The large volume of...firn and ice being melted for the well and the low component of terrestrial material in Antarctic ice make the South Pole Water Well an ideal place to

  20. Dynamic analysis of the earth pole oscillation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    In the framework of classical mechanics, we perform an amplitude-frequency analysis of a small-parameter model of the Earth pole diurnal oscillations under the action of luni-solar gravitational-tidal torques. The Euler-Liouville dynamic equations with irregular perturbations taken into account are used to obtain the structural properties of diurnal oscillations of the Earth pole coordinates. The results of the Earth pole motion simulation are compared with the high-precision data of VLBI observations on a short time interval.

  1. The self-consistent dynamic pole tide in global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic pole tide is characterized in a self-consistent manner by means of introducing a single nondifferential matrix equation compatible with the Liouville equation, modelling the ocean as global and of uniform depth. The deviations of the theory from the realistic ocean, associated with the nonglobality of the latter, are also given consideration, with an inference that in realistic oceans long-period modes of resonances would be increasingly likely to exist. The analysis of the nature of the pole tide and its effects on the Chandler wobble indicate that departures of the pole tide from the equilibrium may indeed be minimal.

  2. Electrohydrodynamic printing under applied pole-type nozzle configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Sun, Daoheng

    2013-01-01

    A pole-type nozzle has an inserted pole that jams a contraction flow into capillary in electrohydrodynamic deposition. The jammed solution improves Taylor cone formation by shortening the hysteresis time so that pole-type nozzle is suitable for high-resolution electrohydrodynamic printing. Experimental results demonstrate a governed frequency-dividing relationship with an integral ratio of applied voltage frequency to droplet deposition frequency. It is observed that low integral frequency ratio is in favor of low voltage amplitude and duty cycle, and high voltage frequency, since polymer solution jets in a small fluidic volume per droplet under low electric force and short pulse duration.

  3. Swing phase kinematics of horses trotting over poles.

    PubMed

    Brown, S; Stubbs, N C; Kaiser, L J; Lavagnino, M; Clayton, H M

    2015-01-01

    Trotting over poles is used therapeutically to restore full ranges of limb joint motion. The mechanics of trotting over poles have not yet been described, hence quantitative evidence for the presumed therapeutic effects is lacking. To compare limb kinematics in horses trotting over level ground, over low poles and over high poles to determine changes in joint angulations and hoof flight arcs. Repeated measures experimental study in sound horses. Standard motion analysis procedures with skin-fixed reflective markers were used to measure swing phase kinematics from 8 horses trotting on level ground, over low (11 cm) and high (20 cm) poles spaced 1.05 ± 0.05 m apart. Spatiotemporal variables and peak swing phase joint flexion angles were compared using repeated measures ANOVA (P<0.05) with Bonferroni correction for pairwise post hoc testing. Peak heights of the fore and hind hooves increased significantly and progressively from no poles (fore: 13.8 ± 3.8 cm; hind: 10.8 ± 2.4 cm) to low poles (fore: 30.9 ± 4.9 cm; hind: 24.9 ± 3.7 cm) and to high poles (fore: 41.0 ± 3.9 cm; hind: 32.7 ± 4.0 cm). All joints of the fore- and hindlimbs contributed to the increase in hoof height through increased swing phase flexion. The hooves cleared the poles due to increases in joint flexion rather than by raising the body higher during the suspension phases of the stride. The increases in swing phase joint flexions indicate that trotting over poles is effective for activating and strengthening the flexor musculature. Unlike the use of proprioceptive stimulation devices in which the effects decrease over time due to habituation, the horse is required to elevate the hooves to ensure clearance whenever poles are present. The need to raise the limbs sufficiently to clear the poles and place the hooves accurately requires visuomotor coordination, which may be useful in the rehabilitation of neurological cases. The Summary is available in Chinese - see Supporting

  4. Asteroid 45 Eugenia - Lightcurves and the pole orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. C.; Birch, P. V.; Surdej, J.; Pospieszalska-Surdej, A.

    1988-01-01

    Three lightcurves obtained in 1969 and six from 1984 are presented for the 250-km U-type asteroid Eugenia. The asteroid's north pole is within + or - 10 deg of ecliptic longitude 106 deg and a latitude of +26 deg, in keeping with an amplitude-aspect pole analysis. While only one maximum and one minimum are present when observations are closest to both the north and south poles, there are two of each at other oppositions. It is suggested that this effect may be due to the surface albedo features of Eugenia.

  5. Improvements in two-dimensional magnet pole design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, Z.; Traveria, M.; Campmany, J.

    2004-11-01

    We present here an improved methodology to design magnet poles in two dimensions using two models for the pole profile. To this end, we have developed a group of codes that run on MS-DOS and UNIX and use both POISSON and OPERA-2D codes. This procedure includes the evaluation of the sensitivity of the final pole profile to geometrical and current intensity errors in order to estimate mechanical and operational tolerances. In order to test the feasibility of this method, we have applied it to the case of the 1.2 T combined magnet of the new synchrotron to be built nearby Barcelona.

  6. The self-consistent dynamic pole tide in global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic pole tide is characterized in a self-consistent manner by means of introducing a single nondifferential matrix equation compatible with the Liouville equation, modelling the ocean as global and of uniform depth. The deviations of the theory from the realistic ocean, associated with the nonglobality of the latter, are also given consideration, with an inference that in realistic oceans long-period modes of resonances would be increasingly likely to exist. The analysis of the nature of the pole tide and its effects on the Chandler wobble indicate that departures of the pole tide from the equilibrium may indeed be minimal.

  7. Pole-to-pole biogeography of surface and deep marine bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Ghiglione, Jean-François; Galand, Pierre E; Pommier, Thomas; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Maas, Elizabeth W; Bakker, Kevin; Bertilson, Stefan; Kirchmanj, David L; Lovejoy, Connie; Yager, Patricia L; Murray, Alison E

    2012-10-23

    The Antarctic and Arctic regions offer a unique opportunity to test factors shaping biogeography of marine microbial communities because these regions are geographically far apart, yet share similar selection pressures. Here, we report a comprehensive comparison of bacterioplankton diversity between polar oceans, using standardized methods for pyrosequencing the V6 region of the small subunit ribosomal (SSU) rRNA gene. Bacterial communities from lower latitude oceans were included, providing a global perspective. A clear difference between Southern and Arctic Ocean surface communities was evident, with 78% of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) unique to the Southern Ocean and 70% unique to the Arctic Ocean. Although polar ocean bacterial communities were more similar to each other than to lower latitude pelagic communities, analyses of depths, seasons, and coastal vs. open waters, the Southern and Arctic Ocean bacterioplankton communities consistently clustered separately from each other. Coastal surface Southern and Arctic Ocean communities were more dissimilar from their respective open ocean communities. In contrast, deep ocean communities differed less between poles and lower latitude deep waters and displayed different diversity patterns compared with the surface. In addition, estimated diversity (Chao1) for surface and deep communities did not correlate significantly with latitude or temperature. Our results suggest differences in environmental conditions at the poles and different selection mechanisms controlling surface and deep ocean community structure and diversity. Surface bacterioplankton may be subjected to more short-term, variable conditions, whereas deep communities appear to be structured by longer water-mass residence time and connectivity through ocean circulation.

  8. A Totem Pole Represents Native Culture at Seattle Pacific University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tollefson, Kenneth

    1980-01-01

    The article describes a totem pole carved by a Tlingit artist using traditional symbols to illustrate the history and mission of Seattle Pacific University. The article also reports the 1979 dedication ceremony. (SB)

  9. 4. Interior view to northwest, showing tiers of poles for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Interior view to northwest, showing tiers of poles for hanging tobacco to cure. - Edgewood Farm, Tobacco Barn, West side of State Route 600, .8 mile north of State Route 778, Clover, Halifax County, VA

  10. 30 CFR 57.12048 - Communication conductors on power poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., telephone, or signal wires shall not be installed on the same crossarm with power conductors. When carried on poles supporting powerlines, they shall be installed as specified by the National Electrical Code....

  11. 7. LOOKING SOUTHWEST, VIEW FROM ROADBED WITH 4' RANGE POLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LOOKING SOUTHWEST, VIEW FROM ROADBED WITH 4' RANGE POLE AT NORTHWEST SIDE OF BRIDGE RAILING - Illinois River Bridge, Spanning Illinois River at Benton County Road 3, Siloam Springs, Benton County, AR

  12. 3. FENCE AND POLE WITH BUILDINGS 600608 IN THE BACKGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FENCE AND POLE WITH BUILDINGS 600-608 IN THE BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Military Family Housing, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  13. Cassini Observes the Active South Pole of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porco, C. C.; Helfenstein P.; Thomas, P. C.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Wisdom, J.; West, R.; Neukum, G.; Denk, T.; Wagner, R.; Roatsch, T.; Kieffer, S.; Turtle, E.; McEwen, A.; Johnson, T. V.; Rathbun, J.; Veverka, J.; Wilson, D.; Perry, J.; Spitale, J.; Brahic, A.; Burns, J. A.; DelGenio, A. D.; Dones, L.; Murray, C. D.; Squyres, S.

    2007-01-01

    Cassini has identified a geologically active province a the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The shape of Enceladus suggests a possible intense heating epoch in the past by capture into a 1:4 secondary spin/orbit resonance.

  14. NORTH ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ABOVEGROUND PORTION IS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ABOVE-GROUND PORTION IS ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. EAST ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. VIEW FACING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. A LINE POLE 2, DETAIL OF MODERN BROWN PORCELAIN SUSPENSIONTYPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 2, DETAIL OF MODERN BROWN PORCELAIN SUSPENSION-TYPE INSULATORS. VIEW TO WEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  17. Pole placement by static and dynamic output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, C. I.; Stevens, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper gives new results concerning pole-assignability by static and dynamic output feedback, based on the interpretation of transfer functions, feedback laws, poles and zeroes in terms of the incidence geometry of m-planes and p-planes in (m+p)-space. As an illustration of the most basic ideas, a short proof of the Brasch-Pearson theorem is given. A more careful analysis of this proof yields a significant extension of this theorem, which is considerably sharpened in the case of pole-assignment by constant gain output feedback. As a final application, a root-locus design technique for non-square systems is introduced: zero placement by pre- or post-compensation. This zero placement problem is then analyzed by methods similar to those developed for pole placement by output feedback.

  18. Cassini Observes the Active South Pole of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porco, C. C.; Helfenstein P.; Thomas, P. C.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Wisdom, J.; West, R.; Neukum, G.; Denk, T.; Wagner, R.; Roatsch, T.; hide

    2007-01-01

    Cassini has identified a geologically active province a the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The shape of Enceladus suggests a possible intense heating epoch in the past by capture into a 1:4 secondary spin/orbit resonance.

  19. Detail of base of monopole antenna element with graduated pole, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of base of monopole antenna element with graduated pole, view facing north - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  20. 9. VIEW SHOWING TRUSSES FROM DECK WITH 4' RANGE POLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW SHOWING TRUSSES FROM DECK WITH 4' RANGE POLE AT SECOND VERTICAL POST ON SOUTH SIDE, LOOKING WEST - White River Bridge, Spanning White River at U.S. Highway 70, De Valls Bluff, Prairie County, AR

  1. Detail of northeast corner showing metal plates and poles of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of northeast corner showing metal plates and poles of unknown purpose. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue, & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. BLDG 2, FRONT ELEVATION (PIER SIDE) WITH POLE. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 2, FRONT ELEVATION (PIER SIDE) WITH POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Explosive & Small Train Depot, Main wharf area between wharves W2 & W3, north of First Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. TOWER 450 WITH POLE. Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOWER 450 WITH POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Near A Avenue between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Ninth Street & D Avenue intersection, & F Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. TOWER S389, WITH POLE. MAGAZINES IN BACKGROUND. Naval Magazine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOWER S389, WITH POLE. MAGAZINES IN BACKGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Near A Avenue between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Ninth Street & D Avenue intersection, & F Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. 31. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1973. WELL WITH POLE DERRICK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1973. WELL WITH POLE DERRICK AND COMPLETE SET OF WHEELS, ROADWAY ACCESS. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  6. Dynamic Electromechanical Characterization of Axially Poled PZT 95/5

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, Lalit C.; Furnish, Michael D.; Montgomery, Stephen T.; Setchell, Robert E.

    1999-06-25

    We are conducting a comprehensive experimental study of the electromechanical behavior of poled PZT 95/5 (lead zirconate titattate). As part of this study, eight plane-wave tests have been conducted on axially poled PZT 95/5 at stress levels ranging from 0.9 to 4.6 GPa, using VISAR and electrical diagnos- tics. Observed wave velocities were slightly decreased from ultrasonic vahtes, by contrast' with unpoled samples. Compression waveforms show a step at 0.6 GPa more marked than for normally poled or unpoled samples; this may correspond to a poling effect on the ferroelectric/antiferroelectric transition. A similar step is observed on release. The released charge upon loading to 0.9 GPa is consistent with nearly complete depoling. Loading to higher stresses gave lower currents (factor of 10), suggesting shock-induced conduc- tivity or electrical breakdown.

  7. 5. This Aframe was used to handle poles while being ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. This A-frame was used to handle poles while being trimmed to correct length after the peeling process. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Log Peeling Operation, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  8. LODGEPOLE BRIDGE DETAIL, FACING SOUTHEAST Generals Highway, Lodge Pole ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LODGEPOLE BRIDGE DETAIL, FACING SOUTHEAST - Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, Spanning Marble Fork of Kaweah River, approximately 21 miles northwest of Ash Mountain Entrance, Three Rivers, Tulare County, CA

  9. MAGAZINE 243, FRONT ELEVATION WITH POLE. MAGAZINE 242 IN BACKGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAGAZINE 243, FRONT ELEVATION WITH POLE. MAGAZINE 242 IN BACKGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Magazine Type 2, Fourth Place, Seventh & Eighth Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Pentachlorophenol contamination of private drinking water from treated utility poles.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Lee; Cragin, Lori; Center, Gail; Giguere, Cary; Comstock, Jeff; Boccuzzo, Linda; Sumner, Austin

    2013-02-01

    In 2009, after resident calls regarding an odor, the Vermont Department of Health and state partners responded to 2 scenarios of private drinking water contamination from utility poles treated with pentachlorophenol (PCP), an organochlorine wood preservative used in the United States. Public health professionals should consider PCP contamination of private water if they receive calls about a chemical or gasoline-like odor with concurrent history of nearby utility pole replacement.

  11. Pole blight - a new disease of western white pine

    Treesearch

    C. A. Wellner

    1947-01-01

    Pole blight is a killer. Apparently attacking pole-size western white pine trees of any vigor or crown class, it seems to require from one to ten years to kill a tree. White pine is generally believed to be the only species susceptible, although there is a possibility that grand fir and Douglas-fir also may be attacked. Not enough time has elapsed for us to say how...

  12. Safe-Egress Pole For Vehicle In Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Winston D.; Wesselski, Clarence J.; Pelischek, Timothy E.; Becker, Bruce H.; Kahn, Jon; Grimaldi, Margaret E.; Mcmanamen, John; Castro, Edgar O.

    1990-01-01

    Telescoping pole helps people leave moving vehicle in emergency. Extends from vehicle far enough to guide people away from structural features that could strike and injure them. Also used to deliver cargo from aircraft without damage to or by wings or to eject supplies from moving trucks so they land off roadway. Concept developed to help crewmembers escape from Space Shuttle under certain flight conditions. Pole compact and lightweight.

  13. Higher Pole Linear Traps for Atomic Clock Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically higher pole linear ion traps for frequency standard use. We have built a 12-pole trap and have successfully loaded ions into it from a linear quadrupole trap. By solving the Boltzmann equation describing large ion clouds where space charge interactions are important, we show that clock frequency changes due to ion number fluctuations are much smaller in ion clocks based multipole traps than comparable clocks based on quadrupole linear traps.

  14. Gamma Oscillations in the Temporal Pole in Response to Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Uono, Shota; Matsuda, Kazumi; Usui, Keiko; Usui, Naotaka; Inoue, Yushi; Toichi, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    The eyes of an individual act as an indispensable communication medium during human social interactions. Functional neuroimaging studies have revealed that several brain regions are activated in response to eyes and eye gaze direction changes. However, it remains unclear whether the temporal pole is one of these regions. Furthermore, if the temporal pole is activated by these stimuli, the timing and manner in which it is activated also remain unclear. To investigate these issues, we analyzed intracranial electroencephalographic data from the temporal pole that were obtained during the presentation of eyes and mosaics in averted or straight directions and their directional changes. Time–frequency statistical parametric mapping analyses revealed that the bilateral temporal poles exhibited greater gamma-band activation beginning at 215 ms in response to eyes compared with mosaics, irrespective of the direction. Additionally, the right temporal pole showed greater gamma-band activation beginning at 197 ms in response to directional changes of the eyes compared with mosaics. These results suggest that gamma-band oscillations in the temporal pole were involved in the processing of the presence of eyes and changes in eye gaze direction at a relatively late temporal stage compared with the posterior cortices. PMID:27571204

  15. Effective diffraction gratings via acidic etching of thermally poled glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenskii, A. N.; Reduto, I. V.; Petrikov, V. D.; Lipovskii, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Relief diffraction gratings are formed via acidic chemical etching of a periodically poled soda-lime glass. The thermal poling under 1000 V DC is performed at 325 °C using a thermally stable glassy-carbon anodic electrode with periodic grooves, the depth of the grooves being of ∼650 nm. Poling-induced modification of the glass results in deepening the glass anodic surface in the regions under the ribs of the anodic electrode due to volume relaxation and in increasing chemical durability of these regions in acidic media comparatively to the virgin glass. Chemical etching of the poled glass in NH4F:8H2O solution allows additional to the thermal poling shaping of the glass surface via faster dissolution of unpoled/less poled glass regions. The morphology of the glass surface before and after the etching is characterized with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. About 30 min etching provides the formation of ∼0.9 μm in height relief diffraction gratings with the diffraction efficiency close to the theoretically achievable ∼30% for multi-order diffraction. In vivo measuring of the diffraction efficiency in the course of the etching allows precise fabrication of the gratings.

  16. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer.

  17. Knee joint forces during downhill walking with hiking poles.

    PubMed

    Schwameder, H; Roithner, R; Müller, E; Niessen, W; Raschner, C

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine external and internal loads on the knee joint during downhill walking with and without hiking poles. Kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic data were collected from eight males during downhill walking on a ramp declined at 25 degrees. Planar knee joint moments and forces were calculated using a quasi-static knee model. The results were analysed for an entire pole-cycle as well as differentiated between single and double support phases and between each step of a pole-cycle. Significant differences between downhill walking with and without hiking poles were observed for peak and average magnitudes of ground reaction force, knee joint moment, and tibiofemoral compressive and shear forces (12-25%). Similar reductions were found in patellofemoral compressive force, the quadriceps tendon force and the activity of the vastus lateralis; however, because of a high variability, these differences were not significant. The reductions seen during downhill walking with hiking poles compared with unsupported downhill walking were caused primarily by the forces applied to the hiking poles and by a change in posture to a more forward leaning position of the upper body, with the effect of reducing the knee moment arm.

  18. International Youth Conference on the Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, A. K.; Kuhn, T. S.; Baeseman, J.; Garmulewicz, A.; Raymond, M.; Salmon, R.

    2006-12-01

    The International Polar Year (IPY) is an international effort, involving more than 50 countries, to focus research in both the sciences and social sciences on the world's Polar Regions. In order to secure youth involvement in the IPY, the Youth Steering Committee (YSC) has been formed, aiming specifically to network young polar researchers from all backgrounds enabling collaboration and to involve this group in outreach focused towards other young people. A conference targeted directly at an audience of early career researchers and international youth will be central to fulfilling these aims. The YSC has therefore developed the concept of the International Youth Conference on the Poles (IYCP). Proposed for 2008, this conference will bring together youth from a diverse set of backgrounds and nationalities to discuss the issues affecting the Polar Regions, their effects on a global scale and ways of addressing these issues. The conference will also serve to highlight ongoing IPY research, especially research being undertaken by young researchers, and provide a perennial framework for youth involvement in polar research and policies. The IYCP will run for three days in May 2008, attracting an international youth audience, as well as representatives from polar organizations, teachers, politicians, policy makers, the general public and media. The IYCP will be divided into three sections. Youth Roundtable Discussions will bring youth together to discuss issues affecting the Polar Regions and potential solutions to these. A Young Researchers Conference will provide the opportunity for young researchers working in the Polar Regions to present their work to an interdisciplinary audience. The Polar Fair will provide an interactive environment for youth to learn about the Polar Regions. The IYCP will be of great importance to the IPY because it will serve as the principle venue during the Polar Year where youth from many different disciplines, backgrounds and countries will

  19. Prognostic Significance of POLE Proofreading Mutations in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Church, David N.; Stelloo, Ellen; Nout, Remi A.; Valtcheva, Nadejda; Depreeuw, Jeroen; ter Haar, Natalja; Noske, Aurelia; Amant, Frederic; Wild, Peter J.; Lambrechts, Diether; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Bosse, Tjalling

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current risk stratification in endometrial cancer (EC) results in frequent over- and underuse of adjuvant therapy, and may be improved by novel biomarkers. We examined whether POLE proofreading mutations, recently reported in about 7% of ECs, predict prognosis. Methods: We performed targeted POLE sequencing in ECs from the PORTEC-1 and -2 trials (n = 788), and analyzed clinical outcome according to POLE status. We combined these results with those from three additional series (n = 628) by meta-analysis to generate multivariable-adjusted, pooled hazard ratios (HRs) for recurrence-free survival (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) of POLE-mutant ECs. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: POLE mutations were detected in 48 of 788 (6.1%) ECs from PORTEC-1 and-2 and were associated with high tumor grade (P < .001). Women with POLE-mutant ECs had fewer recurrences (6.2% vs 14.1%) and EC deaths (2.3% vs 9.7%), though, in the total PORTEC cohort, differences in RFS and CSS were not statistically significant (multivariable-adjusted HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.13 to 1.37, P = .15; HR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.03 to 1.44, P = .11 respectively). However, of 109 grade 3 tumors, 0 of 15 POLE-mutant ECs recurred, compared with 29 of 94 (30.9%) POLE wild-type cancers; reflected in statistically significantly greater RFS (multivariable-adjusted HR = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.84, P = .03). In the additional series, there were no EC-related events in any of 33 POLE-mutant ECs, resulting in a multivariable-adjusted, pooled HR of 0.33 for RFS (95% CI = 0.12 to 0.91, P = .03) and 0.26 for CSS (95% CI = 0.06 to 1.08, P = .06). Conclusion: POLE proofreading mutations predict favorable EC prognosis, independently of other clinicopathological variables, with the greatest effect seen in high-grade tumors. This novel biomarker may help to reduce overtreatment in EC. PMID:25505230

  20. Pole-to-pole biogeography of surface and deep marine bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, Jean-François; Galand, Pierre E.; Pommier, Thomas; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Maas, Elizabeth W.; Bakker, Kevin; Bertilson, Stefan; Kirchman, David L.; Lovejoy, Connie; Yager, Patricia L.; Murray, Alison E.

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic and Arctic regions offer a unique opportunity to test factors shaping biogeography of marine microbial communities because these regions are geographically far apart, yet share similar selection pressures. Here, we report a comprehensive comparison of bacterioplankton diversity between polar oceans, using standardized methods for pyrosequencing the V6 region of the small subunit ribosomal (SSU) rRNA gene. Bacterial communities from lower latitude oceans were included, providing a global perspective. A clear difference between Southern and Arctic Ocean surface communities was evident, with 78% of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) unique to the Southern Ocean and 70% unique to the Arctic Ocean. Although polar ocean bacterial communities were more similar to each other than to lower latitude pelagic communities, analyses of depths, seasons, and coastal vs. open waters, the Southern and Arctic Ocean bacterioplankton communities consistently clustered separately from each other. Coastal surface Southern and Arctic Ocean communities were more dissimilar from their respective open ocean communities. In contrast, deep ocean communities differed less between poles and lower latitude deep waters and displayed different diversity patterns compared with the surface. In addition, estimated diversity (Chao1) for surface and deep communities did not correlate significantly with latitude or temperature. Our results suggest differences in environmental conditions at the poles and different selection mechanisms controlling surface and deep ocean community structure and diversity. Surface bacterioplankton may be subjected to more short-term, variable conditions, whereas deep communities appear to be structured by longer water-mass residence time and connectivity through ocean circulation. PMID:23045668

  1. 49 CFR 234.243 - Wire on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wire on pole line and aerial cable. 234.243....243 Wire on pole line and aerial cable. Wire on a pole line shall be securely attached to an insulator that is properly fastened to a cross arm or bracket supported by a pole or other support. Wire...

  2. 49 CFR 234.243 - Wire on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wire on pole line and aerial cable. 234.243....243 Wire on pole line and aerial cable. Wire on a pole line shall be securely attached to an insulator that is properly fastened to a cross arm or bracket supported by a pole or other support. Wire...

  3. 49 CFR 234.243 - Wire on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wire on pole line and aerial cable. 234.243....243 Wire on pole line and aerial cable. Wire on a pole line shall be securely attached to an insulator that is properly fastened to a cross arm or bracket supported by a pole or other support. Wire...

  4. Efficacy of the lithotripsy in treating lower pole renal stones.

    PubMed

    Cui, Helen; Thomee, Eeke; Noble, Jeremy G; Reynard, John M; Turney, Benjamin W

    2013-06-01

    Use of extracorporeal lithotripsy is declining in North America and many European countries despite international guidelines advocating it as a first-line therapy. Traditionally, lithotripsy is thought to have poor efficacy at treating lower pole renal stones. We evaluated the success rates of lithotripsy for lower pole renal stones in our unit. 50 patients with lower pole kidney stones ≤15 mm treated between 3/5/11 and 19/4/12 were included in the study. Patients received lithotripsy on a fixed-site Storz Modulith SLX F2 lithotripter according to a standard protocol. Clinical success was defined as stone-free status or asymptomatic clinically insignificant residual fragments (CIRFs) ≤3 mm at radiological follow-up. The mean stone size was 7.8 mm. The majority of stones (66 %) were between 5 and 10 mm. 28 % of stones were between 10 and 15 mm. For solitary lower pole stones complete stone clearance was achieved in 63 %. Total stone clearance including those with CIRFs was achieved in 81 % of patients. As expected, for those with multiple lower pole stones the success rates were lower: complete clearance was observed in 39 % and combined clearance including those with CIRFs was 56 %. Overall, complete stone clearance was observed in 54 % of patients and clearance with CIRFs was achieved in 72 % of patients. Success rate could not be attributed to age, stone size or gender. Our outcome data for the treatment of lower pole renal stones (≤15 mm) compare favourably with the literature. With this level of stone clearance, a non-invasive, outpatient-based treatment like lithotripsy should remain the first-line treatment option for lower pole stones. Ureteroscopy must prove that it is significantly better either in terms of clinical outcome or patient satisfaction to justify replacing lithotripsy.

  5. Avoidance of a Landau pole by flat contributions in QED

    SciTech Connect

    Klaczynski, Lutz; Kreimer, Dirk

    2014-05-15

    We consider massless Quantum Electrodynamics in the momentum scheme and carry forward an approach based on Dyson–Schwinger equations to approximate both the β-function and the renormalized photon self-energy (Yeats, 2011). Starting from the Callan–Symanzik equation, we derive a renormalization group (RG) recursion identity which implies a non-linear ODE for the anomalous dimension and extract a sufficient but not necessary criterion for the existence of a Landau pole. This criterion implies a necessary condition for QED to have no such pole. Solving the differential equation exactly for a toy model case, we integrate the corresponding RG equation for the running coupling and find that even though the β-function entails a Landau pole it exhibits a flat contribution capable of decreasing its growth, in other cases possibly to the extent that such a pole is avoided altogether. Finally, by applying the recursion identity, we compute the photon propagator and investigate the effect of flat contributions on both spacelike and timelike photons. -- Highlights: •We present an approach to approximate both the β-function and the photon self-energy. •We find a sufficient criterion for the self-energy to entail the existence of a Landau pole. •We study non-perturbative ‘flat’ contributions that emerge within the context of our approach. •We discuss a toy model and how it is affected by flat contributions.

  6. A nondestructive characterization system of periodically poled crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huaixi; Zhou, Huang; Chen, Liyuan; Zou, Xiaolin; Miao, Long; Feng, Xinkai; Li, Guangwei; Liang, Wanguo

    2015-08-01

    Periodically poled crystals are widely used as SHG, DFG, SFG, OPO and THz generation, and there is a broad application prospect in some areas such as the laser display, optical fiber communication, atmospheric exploration and military confrontation. At present, to get the parameters of periodically poled crystals, like duty ratio, the main method is chemical etching of the samples. In this paper, we present a nondestructive characterization system of periodically poled crystals. When we apply a proper high voltage on both sides of the periodically poled crystal, the refractive index difference of positive and negative domain will be increased and we can observe a clear domain pattern by the a microscope so as to obtain general information. Then a single frequency laser is prepared to radiate on +z surface of the periodically poled crystal, we can get some orders of diffraction according to diffraction optics principle. Finally, we can measure the parameters such as period, duty ratio by use of numerical analysis. The testing sample size of this system can be up to 60mm, The accuracy of the testing period can be 0.1μm, and the measurement range of duty ratio is 20%-50%.

  7. Two-pole structure of the D0* (2400)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaladejo, Miguel; Fernandez-Soler, Pedro; Guo, Feng-Kun; Nieves, Juan

    2017-04-01

    The so far only known charmed non-strange scalar meson is dubbed as D0* (2400) in the Review of Particle Physics. We show, within the framework of unitarized chiral perturbation theory, that there are in fact two (I = 1 / 2 ,JP =0+) poles in the region of the D0* (2400) in the coupled-channel Dπ, Dη and Ds K bar scattering amplitudes. With all the parameters previously fixed, we predict the energy levels for the coupled-channel system in a finite volume, and find that they agree remarkably well with recent lattice QCD calculations. This successful description of the lattice data is regarded as a strong evidence for the two-pole structure of the D0* (2400). With the physical quark masses, the poles are located at (2105-8+6 - i102-12+10) MeV and (2451-26+36 - i134-8+7) MeV, with the largest couplings to the Dπ and Ds K bar channels, respectively. Since the higher pole is close to the Ds K bar threshold, we expect it to show up as a threshold enhancement in the Ds K bar invariant mass distribution. This could be checked by high-statistic data in future experiments. We also show that the lower pole belongs to the same SU(3) multiplet as the Ds0 * (2317) state. Predictions for partners in the bottom sector are also given.

  8. Revisiting the pole tide for and from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shailen; Wahr, John; Beckley, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Satellite altimeter sea surface height observations include the geocentric displacements caused by the pole tide, namely the response of the solid Earth and oceans to polar motion. Most users of these data remove these effects using a model that was developed more than 20 years ago. We describe two improvements to the pole tide model for satellite altimeter measurements. Firstly, we recommend an approach that improves the model for the response of the oceans by including the effects of self-gravitation, loading, and mass conservation. Our recommended approach also specifically includes the previously ignored displacement of the solid Earth due to the load of the ocean response, and includes the effects of geocenter motion. Altogether, this improvement amplifies the modeled geocentric pole tide by 15 %, or up to 2 mm of sea surface height displacement. We validate this improvement using two decades of satellite altimeter measurements. Secondly, we recommend that the altimetry pole tide model exclude geocentric sea surface displacements resulting from the long-term drift in polar motion. The response to this particular component of polar motion requires a more rigorous approach than is used by conventional models. We show that erroneously including the response to this component of polar motion in the pole tide model impacts interpretation of regional sea level rise by ± 0.25 mm/year.

  9. Assessment of Pole Erosion in a Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Ortega, Alejandro L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster called H6 have been performed to quantify the erosion rate at the inner pole. The assessments have been made in two versions of the thruster, namely the unshielded (H6US) and magnetically shielded (H6MS) configurations. The simulations have been performed with the 2-D axisymmetric code Hall2De which employs a new multi-fluid ion algorithm to capture the presence of low-energy ions in the vicinity of the poles. It is found that the maximum computed erosion rate at the inner pole of the H6MS exceeds the measured rate of back-sputtered deposits by 4.5 times. This explains only part of the surface roughening that was observed after a 150-h wear test, which covered most of the pole area exposed to the plasma. For the majority of the pole surface the computed erosion rates are found to be below the back-sputter rate and comparable to those in the H6US which exhibited little to no sputtering in previous tests. Possible explanations for the discrepancy are discussed.

  10. Anaphase A: Disassembling Microtubules Move Chromosomes toward Spindle Poles

    PubMed Central

    Asbury, Charles L.

    2017-01-01

    The separation of sister chromatids during anaphase is the culmination of mitosis and one of the most strikingly beautiful examples of cellular movement. It consists of two distinct processes: Anaphase A, the movement of chromosomes toward spindle poles via shortening of the connecting fibers, and anaphase B, separation of the two poles from one another via spindle elongation. I focus here on anaphase A chromosome-to-pole movement. The chapter begins by summarizing classical observations of chromosome movements, which support the current understanding of anaphase mechanisms. Live cell fluorescence microscopy studies showed that poleward chromosome movement is associated with disassembly of the kinetochore-attached microtubule fibers that link chromosomes to poles. Microtubule-marking techniques established that kinetochore-fiber disassembly often occurs through loss of tubulin subunits from the kinetochore-attached plus ends. In addition, kinetochore-fiber disassembly in many cells occurs partly through ‘flux’, where the microtubules flow continuously toward the poles and tubulin subunits are lost from minus ends. Molecular mechanistic models for how load-bearing attachments are maintained to disassembling microtubule ends, and how the forces are generated to drive these disassembly-coupled movements, are discussed. PMID:28218660

  11. Plasmon-pole models affect band gaps in GW calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Paul; Wu, Zhigang

    2013-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations have long been known to underestimate the band gaps in semiconductors. Significant improvements have been made by using GW calculations that uses the self energy, defined as the product of the Green function (G) and screened Coulomb exchange (W). However, many approximations are made in the GW method, specifically the plasmon-pole approximation. This approximation replaces the integration necessary to produce W with a simple approximation to the inverse dielectric function. Four different plasmon-pole approximations have been tested using the tight-binding program ABINIT: Godby-Needs, Hybertsen-Louie, von der Linden-Horsch, and Engel-Farid. For many materials, the differences in the GW band gaps for the different plasmon-pole models are negligible, but for systems with localized electrons, the difference can be larger than 1 eV. The plasmon-pole approximation is generally chosen to best agree with experimental data, but this is misleading in that this ignores all of the other approximations used in the GW method. Improvements in plasmon-pole models in GW can only come about by trying to reproduce the results of the numerical integration rather than trying to reproduce experimental results.

  12. Development of a multi-pole magnetorheological brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Yaojung; Nguyen, Quang-Anh

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach in the design and optimization of a novel multi-pole magnetorheological (MR) brake that employs magnetic flux more effectively on the surface of the rotor. MR brakes with conventional single ring-type electromagnetic poles have reached the limits of torque enhancement. One major reason is the limitation of the magnetic field strength within the active area of the MR fluid due to the geometric constraints of the coil. The multi-pole MR brake design features multiple electromagnetic poles surrounded by several coils. As a result, the active chaining areas for the MR fluid are greatly increased, and significant brake torque improvement is achieved. The coil structure, as a part of the stator, becomes flexible and customizable in terms of space usage for the winding and bobbin design. In addition, this brake offers extra options in its dimensions for torque enhancement because either the radial or the axial dimensions of the rotor can be increased. Magnetic circuit analysis was conducted to analyze the effects of the design parameters on the field torque. After that, simulations were done to find the optimal design under all major geometric constraints with a given power supply. The results show that the multi-pole MR brake provides a considerable braking torque increase while maintaining a compact and solid design. This is confirmation of its feasibility in actual braking applications.

  13. Analysis of the perturbed Chandler wobble of the Earth pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Yu. G.; Perepelkin, V. V.; Filippova, A. S.

    2017-06-01

    Based on the model of a viscoelastic rigid body for the deformable Earth, we investigate the behavior of the main component of the perturbed Earth pole oscillation process, the Chandler wobble. An amplitude- frequency analysis of the perturbed Chandler wobble of the Earth pole due to the precessional motion of the lunar orbit is provided. The parameters of the complex dynamical process that describes the mutual orientation of the Earth's instantaneous rotation axis, the axis of its figure, and its angular momentum vector are studied qualitatively. Using a numerical-analytical approach, we consider the possibilities for identifying the Chandler wobble parameters and fitting the developed refined theoretical model to the real trajectory measurements of the Earth pole.

  14. A cold-pole enhancement in Mercury's sodium exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; McClintock, William E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Merkel, Aimee W.; Vervack, Ronald J.; Burger, Matthew H.

    2016-11-01

    The ultraviolet and visible spectrometer component of the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft characterized the local-time distribution of the sodium exosphere over the course of its orbital mission. The observations show that the sodium exosphere is enhanced above Mercury's cold-pole longitudes. Based on previously published sodium exosphere models, we infer that these regions act as night side surface reservoirs, temporary sinks to the exosphere that collect sodium atoms transported antisunward. The reservoirs are revealed as exospheric enhancements when they are exposed to sunlight. As in the models the reservoir is depleted as the cold poles rotate from dawn to dusk, but unlike the models the depletion is only partial. The persistence of the reservoir means that it could, over the course of geologically long periods of time, contribute to an increase in the bulk concentration of sodium near the cold-pole longitudes.

  15. Global plate tectonics and the secular motion of the pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soler, T.

    1977-01-01

    Astronomical data compiled during the last 70 years by the international organizations providing the coordinates of the instantaneous pole clearly shows a persistent drift of the mean pole. The differential contributions to the earth's second-order tensor of inertia were obtained and applied, resulting in no significant displacement of the earth's principal axis. In view of the above, the effect that theoretical geophysical models for absolute plate velocities may have on an apparent displacement of the mean pole as a consequence of station drifting was analyzed. The investigation also reports new values for the crustal tensor of inertia (assuming an ellipsoidal earth) and the orientation of its axis of figure, reopening the old speculation of a possible sliding of the whole crustover the upper mantle, including the supporting geophysical and astronomic evidence.

  16. Images and topographic relief at the north pole of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, Franz W.; Maurice, Kelly E.; Thomas, John K.; Leff, Craig E.; Wall, Stephen D.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of unique coverage of the north pole of Venus using a subset of 13 images from a total of about 775 synthetic aperture radar orbits during cycle 1 of the Magellan mission is reported. Images at 13 distinctly different azimuths are reported that range over 360 deg in longitude and that show the topographic relief at vastly different imaging geometries at intervals of about 20 deg. A pair of intersecting or crossing orbits is used to assess the topographic relief with stereo radargrammetric techniques, and to refine this assessment using a multiimage clinometric approach. It is shown that the pole is located in accentuated topography with elevation differences in the range of no more than 1 km. It is concluded that pinpointing the location of the pole from the overlapping images and standard mission data is accurate to within about 100 pixels or 8 km (RMS).

  17. Electromagnetic Radial Forces in a Hybrid Eight-Stator-Pole, Six-Rotor-Pole Bearingless Switched-Reluctance Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Siebert, Mark W.; Ho, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis and experimental measurement of the electromagnet force loads on the hybrid rotor in a novel bearingless switched-reluctance motor (BSRM) have been performed. A BSRM has the combined characteristics of a switched-reluctance motor and a magnetic bearing. The BSRM has an eight-pole stator and a six-pole hybrid rotor, which is composed of circular and scalloped lamination segments. The hybrid rotor is levitated using only one set of stator poles. A second set of stator poles imparts torque to the scalloped portion of the rotor, which is driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by a processor. Analysis was done for nonrotating rotor poles that were oriented to achieve maximum and minimum radial force loads on the rotor. The objective is to assess whether simple one-dimensional magnetic circuit analysis is sufficient for preliminary evaluation of this machine, which may exhibit strong three-dimensional electromagnetic field behavior. Two magnetic circuit geometries, approximating the complex topology of the magnetic fields in and around the hybrid rotor, were employed in formulating the electromagnetic radial force equations. Reasonable agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions was obtained with typical magnetic bearing derating factors applied to the predictions.

  18. Third Pole Environment (TPE): a new frontier for interdisciplinary research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Yao, T.; Thompson, L. G.; Mosbrugger, V.; Zhang, F.; Ma, Y.; Yang, X.; Wang, W.; Joswiak, D.; Liu, X.; Devkota, L. P.; Tayal, S.; Luo, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau and surrounding mountain ranges, referred to by scientists as the Third Pole (TP), represent one of the largest ice masses of the Earth. The region is one of the most sensitive areas responding to global climate change due to its high altitude and the presence of permafrost and glaciers. The near 100,000 km2 of glaciers ensure the permanent flow of major rivers in this region and provide water to 1.4 billion people in Asia. Thus, environmental changes taking place on the TP significantly influences social and economic development of countries in this region such as China, India, Nepal, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bhutan. With an average elevation higher than 4,000 metres above sea level, the Third Pole is characterized by complex interactions of atmospheric, cryospheric, hydrological, geological and environmental processes that bear special significance for the Earth's biodiversity, climate and water cycles. For a comprehensive understanding of the environment of the TP and its implications on the development of the region, we need to integrate different disciplines under a them of 'water-ice-air-ecosystem -human' interactions and reveal environmental change processes and mechanisms on the TP and their influences on and regional responses to global changes, and thus to serve for enhancement of human adaptation to the changing environment. Like Antarctica and the Arctic, the Third Pole region is drawing increased attention of the international academic community. A series of observations and monitoring programs in the Third Pole region has been widely implemented. However, data necessary to precisely assess the environmental, societal and economic changes caused by alterations in the Third Pole dynamics are either lacking or insufficient. The Third Pole Environment (TPE) program is thus established as a comprehensive and coordinated international research, monitoring and capacity building initiative, with goals to address the influence

  19. The solar photon thruster as a terrestrial pole sitter.

    PubMed

    Matloff, Gregory L

    2004-05-01

    Geosynchronous satellites are invisible at high latitudes. A pole-sitting spacecraft would have communication, climate-studies, and near-polar Earth observation applications. We present a pole-sitter based on the solar photon thruster (SPT), a two-sail variant of the solar sail using a large curved collector sail (always normal to the Sun) to direct sunlight against a much smaller thruster. Thrust decreases slower for an SPT than for a conventional sail arrangement as the angle between sunlight and the collector normal increases. An SPT pole-sitter is offset from the terrestrial pole so that a component of Earth gravity balances the solar radiation-pressure component pushing the SPT off station. The component of gravitational attraction of the Earth pulling the spacecraft towards Earth is also balanced by a solar radiation-pressure component. Results are presented for 80-100% collector/thruster reflectivities. For a spacecraft areal mass thickness of 0.002 kg/m(2), collector and thruster reflectivities of 0.9, the SPT can be situated above latitude 45 degrees at a distance of approximately 60 Earth radii. An SPT pole sitter would be affected by lunar perturbation, which can be compensated for by an on-board rocket thruster producing 2 x 10(-6) g acceleration, a second SPT thruster sail thrusting against the influence of the Moon, or by directing a microwave beam against the spacecraft. Since an SPT pole sitter is in a position rather than an orbit, the effect of terrestrial gravitation limits the size and design of the payload package, which limits terrestrial target resolution.

  20. Express method of construction of accurate inverse pole figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovich, Yu; Isaenkova, M.; Fesenko, V.

    2016-04-01

    With regard to metallic materials with the FCC and BCC crystal lattice a new method for constructing the X-ray texture inverse pole figures (IPF) by using tilt curves of spinning sample, characterized by high accuracy and rapidity (express), was proposed. In contrast to the currently widespread method to construct IPF using orientation distribution function (ODF), synthesized in several partial direct pole figures, the proposed method is based on a simple geometrical interpretation of a measurement procedure, requires a minimal operating time of the X-ray diffractometer.

  1. Plate motion and the secular shift of the mean pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.; Carpenter, L.; Agreen, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The global plate motion indicates that changes in the products of inertia of the earth due to tectonic plate movement may provide a secular shift of the mean pole. A mathematical procedure for calculating this shift based on the plate theory is presented. Explicit expressions were obtained for the dependence of the secular polar shift on the dimensions and locations of the plate boundaries. Numerical results show that the secular motion of the mean pole is 0.0002 sec/year in the direction of 67 W. Hence, it is deduced that the influence of the plate motion on the secular polar shift may account for 10% of the observed value.

  2. Revised paleomagnetic pole for the Sonoma Volcanics, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    Paleomagnetic sampling of the Miocene and Pliocene Sonoma Volcanics, northern California, was undertaken to supplement an earlier collection. Data from 25 cooling units yield positive fold and reversal tests, and a paleomagnetic pole located at 80.2??N., 069.2??E., with ??95 = 6.8??. This paleopole is significantly displaced (9.6?? ?? 5.3?? of latitude) to the farside of the geographic pole. A highly elliptical distribution of the data in both direction and VGP space indicates that incomplete averaging of geomagnetic secular variation is a more likely explanation for this anomaly than is northward translation of the volcanic field. -Author

  3. Challenges of Rover Navigation at the Lunar Poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara; Deans, Matt; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Edwards, Larry; Dille, Michael; Fong, Terry; Colaprete, Tony; Miller, Scott; Vaughan, Ryan; Andrews, Dan; Allan, Mark; Furlong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Observations from Lunar Prospector, LCROSS, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), and other missions have contributed evidence that water and other volatiles exist at the lunar poles in permanently shadowed regions. Combining a surface rover and a volatile prospecting and analysis payload would enable the detection and characterization of volatiles in terms of nature, abundance, and distribution. This knowledge could have impact on planetary science, in-situ resource utilization, and human exploration of space. While Lunar equatorial regions of the Moon have been explored by manned (Apollo) and robotic missions (Lunokhod, Cheng'e), no surface mission has reached the lunar poles.

  4. Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, J.; Belman, A.B.; Kass, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Four children between 5 and 10 years old suffered traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole following flank trauma. All patients were evaluated with excretory urography and isotope renography. The renal scan clearly demonstrated failure of perfusion of the lower renal pole and urinary extravasation, and was believed to be more valuable than the standard excretory urogram as a diagnostic tool. All children were managed similarly: delayed (72 to 96 hours) exploration, simple removal of the amputated segment and insertion of a Penrose drain. They all have done well. The patients were normotensive at followup and had excellent function of the remaining portion of the kidney.

  5. Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Frawley, James J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic component anomaly maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor s magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative anomaly pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these anomalies we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable anomaly pairs and from these we computed four North and 3 South poles with two at approximately 60 degrees north latitude. These results suggest that during the existence of the Martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals.

  6. Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frawley, James J.; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic component anomaly maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor's magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative anomaly pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these anomalies we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable anomaly pairs and from these we computed paleo-poles that were nearly equally divided between north, south and mid-latitudes. These results suggest that during the existence of the martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals and excursions.

  7. Nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the distal pole of the scaphoid

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Bhavuk; Gupta, Himanshu; Kotwal, Prakash P

    2011-01-01

    Post traumatic osteonecrosis of distal pole of scaphoid is very rare. We present a case of 34 years old male, drill operator by occupation with nontraumatic osteonecrosis of distal pole of the scaphoid. The patient was managed conservatively and was kept under regular follow-up every three months. The patient was also asked to change his profession. Two years later, the patient had no pain and had mild restriction of wrist movements (less than 15 degrees in either direction). The radiographs revealed normal density of the scaphoid suggesting revascularization. PMID:21430877

  8. Pole and prime meridian expressions for Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, T. C.; Callahan, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Simple trigonometric expressions are derived for the right ascensions and declinations of the spin axes of Phobos and Deimos as well as for their prime meridians. Simple expressions are possible since both satellites are in synchronous rotation about Mars and since the orbits of both satellites are accurately modeled as precessing ellipses. Spin axis expressions reflect the offset and precession of the orbit pole about the Laplacian pole. Prime meridian expressions include orbital mean motion, long-period solar perturbations, secular acceleration, and short-period, tidally induced forced libration. These simple expressions agree with rigorous expressions to + or - 0.2 deg.

  9. Pole and prime meridian expressions for Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, T. C.; Callahan, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Simple trigonometric expressions are derived for the right ascensions and declinations of the spin axes of Phobos and Deimos as well as for their prime meridians. Simple expressions are possible since both satellites are in synchronous rotation about Mars and since the orbits of both satellites are accurately modeled as precessing ellipses. Spin axis expressions reflect the offset and precession of the orbit pole about the Laplacian pole. Prime meridian expressions include orbital mean motion, long-period solar perturbations, secular acceleration, and short-period, tidally induced forced libration. These simple expressions agree with rigorous expressions to + or - 0.2 deg.

  10. Neuropathological Correlates of Temporal Pole White Matter Hyperintensities in CADASIL

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Ihara, Masafumi; Tham, Carina; Low, Roger WC; Slade, Janet Y; Moss, Tim; Oakley, Arthur E; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Kalaria, Raj N

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose White matter (WM) hyperintensities upon magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or leukoaraiosis is characteristic of stroke syndromes. Increased MRI signals in the anterior temporal pole are suggested to be diagnostic for cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), with 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The structural correlates of these specific WM hyperintensities seen on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences in the temporal pole of CADASIL are unclear. We assessed pathological changes in post-mortem tissue from the temporal pole to reveal the cause of CADASIL specific WM hyperintensities. Materials & Methods A combination of tinctorial and immunostaining approaches and in vitro imaging methods were used to quantify the extent of perivascular space (PVS), arteriosclerosis determined as the sclerotic index (SI), WM myelination as the myelin index (MI) and damage within the WM as accumulated degraded myelin basic protein (dMBP) in samples of the anterior temporal pole from 9 CADASIL and 8 sporadic subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia (SIVD) cases, and 5 similar age (young) and 5 older controls. Luxol fast blue (LFB) stained serial sections from a CADASIL case were also used to reconstruct the temporal pole, which was then compared to the MR images. Results LFB sections used to reconstruct the temporal pole revealed an abundance of enlarged PVS in the WM that topographically appeared as indistinct opaque regions. The mean and total areas of the PVS per WM area (%PVS) were significantly greater in CADASIL compared to the controls. The MI was severely reduced in CADASIL in relation to the SIVD and control sample that was consistent with increased immunoreactivity of dMBP, indicating myelin degeneration. Cerebral microvessels associated with the PVS exhibited a 4.5 fold greater number of basophilic (hyalinised) vessels and a 57% increase in the SI values in CADASIL subjects compared to young

  11. Synchronized Lunar Pole Impact Plume Sample Return Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Foster, Cyrus; Colaprete, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The presented trajectory design enables two maneuverable spacecraft launched onto the same trans-lunar injection trajectory to coordinate a steep impact of a lunar pole and subsequent sample return of the ejecta plume to Earth. To demonstrate this concept, the impactor is assumed to use the LCROSS missions trajectory and spacecraft architecture, thus the permanently-shadowed Cabeus crater on the lunar south pole is assumed as the impact site. The sample-return spacecraft is assumed to be a CubeSat that requires a complimentary trajectory design that avoids lunar impact after passing through the ejecta plume to enable sample-return to Earth via atmospheric entry.

  12. From 'third pole' to north pole: a Himalayan origin for the arctic fox.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Li, Qiang; Takeuchi, Gary T; Xie, Guangpu

    2014-07-22

    The 'third pole' of the world is a fitting metaphor for the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau, in allusion to its vast frozen terrain, rivalling the Arctic and Antarctic, at high altitude but low latitude. Living Tibetan and arctic mammals share adaptations to freezing temperatures such as long and thick winter fur in arctic muskox and Tibetan yak, and for carnivorans, a more predatory niche. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first evolutionary link between an Early Pliocene (3.60-5.08 Myr ago) fox, Vulpes qiuzhudingi new species, from the Himalaya (Zanda Basin) and Kunlun Mountain (Kunlun Pass Basin) and the modern arctic fox Vulpes lagopus in the polar region. A highly hypercarnivorous dentition of the new fox bears a striking resemblance to that of V. lagopus and substantially predates the previous oldest records of the arctic fox by 3-4 Myr. The low latitude, high-altitude Tibetan Plateau is separated from the nearest modern arctic fox geographical range by at least 2000 km. The apparent connection between an ancestral high-elevation species and its modern polar descendant is consistent with our 'Out-of-Tibet' hypothesis postulating that high-altitude Tibet was a training ground for cold-environment adaptations well before the start of the Ice Age. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Slanted and saw-toothed stator poles for improved performance of doubly salient permanent magnet motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, A. R. C. Sekhar; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive finite element analyses conducted on doubly salient permanent magnet motor (DSPM) for improving the torque characteristics by novel methods; namely (i) slanted stator pole and (ii) saw-toothed stator pole. In the first method, stator poles are given a slant at the pole face; the slant in a direction opposite to the rotation of the motor has resulted in 7.33% and 71.45% increase in the average and maximum torques, respectively, when compared with the motor with original stator poles. With appropriate saw-tooth shaped stator poles, various permanent magnet torque and static torque profiles can be achieved.

  14. USACE Participation in the Pole Mountain Advanced Classification Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    mm millimeter Nfa number of false alarms PMTMA Pole Mountain Target and Maneuver Area Sky Sky Research, Inc SLO San Luis Obispo ...plus Direct Fire and Indirect Fire Areas), and most recently at Camp San Luis Obispo (SLO), Camp Butner, and Camp Beale in connection with 2009 through

  15. A LINE POLE 20, DETAIL OF ORIGINAL GLASS PINTYPE INSULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 20, DETAIL OF ORIGINAL GLASS PIN-TYPE INSULATORS AND INTACT COMMUNICATION LINE CROSS ARM WITH TWO GLASS INSULATORS. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  16. A LINE POLE 75, DETAIL OF ORIGINAL GLASS PINTYPE INSULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 75, DETAIL OF ORIGINAL GLASS PIN-TYPE INSULATORS AND INTACT COMMUNICATION LINE CROSS ARM WITH ONE GLASS INSULATOR. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  17. Single-pole switching schemes for EHV transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alias, Qais M.

    The financial constraints that electric utilities face require new and innovative techniques to be used to minimize the installation of new power system facilities, while maintaining high reliability. Also, the enactment of siting regulations for transmission lines makes it more difficult to install new transmission facilities quickly. Recognizing that a high percentage of transmission line faults are single phase to earth and temporary, provides the impetus for considering single pole switching to enhance the reliability of EHV transmission systems. The effectiveness of single pole switching schemes, largely determined by the speed with which the secondary arcs extinguish, allow system restoration. Simulation techniques that enable better prediction of the faulted system response are very important to the design and assessment of the various single pole switching scheme applications. Digital methods are developed to enable the faulted response of EHV systems to be simulated for a variety of different single pole switching schemes. These include, conventional switching, autoreclosure, neutral switched reactor and High Speed Grounding Switch implementations.

  18. Sectional Aluminum Poles Improve Length Measurements in Standing Trees

    Treesearch

    Joe P. McClure

    1968-01-01

    The use of sectional aluminum poles to measure lengths in standing trees can reduce bias and improve measurement precision. The method has been tested extensively under a variety of field conditions by Forest Survey crews in the Southeast. Over 16,000 trees with lengths up to 120 feet have been measured over the past 5 years.

  19. Poles Apart? Gender Differences in Proposals for Sexuality Education Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2008-01-01

    Are young women and men's preferences for sexuality education content poles apart? This article explores gender differences in senior school students' suggestions for issues sexuality education should cover. Findings are analysed in relation to debate about mixed and single sex classrooms and boys' perceived disinterest in lessons. It is argued…

  20. Detail of double pole utility tower at the edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of double pole utility tower at the edge of the mesa. National Old Trails Road right-of-way crosses in foreground over a dry laid basaltic rock retaining wall. View south. - La Bajada Historic Trails and Roads, Approximately 1 mile East/Northeast of intersection of State Highway 16 and Indian Service Road 841, La Bajada, Santa Fe County, NM

  1. Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, Y.; Becker, K.-H.; Berdermann, J.; Bissok, M.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Bothe, M.; Carson, M.; Descamps, F.; Fischer-Wolfarth, J.-H.; Gustafsson, L.; Hallgren, A.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Heller, R.; Hundertmark, S.; Karg, T.; Krieger, K.; Laihem, K.; Meures, T.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Oberson, F.; Paul, L.; Pohl, M.; Price, B.; Ribordy, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Schunck, M.; Semburg, B.; Stegmaier, J.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Wiebusch, C.

    2012-08-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) was built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the South Pole ice in the 10-100 kHz frequency range, for the purpose of assessing the feasibility of an acoustic neutrino detection array at the South Pole. The SPATS hardware consists of four vertical strings deployed in the upper 500 m of the South Pole ice cap. The strings form a trapezoidal array with a maximum baseline of 543 m. Each string has seven stages equipped with one transmitter and one sensor module (glaciophone). Sound is detected or generated by piezoelectric ceramic elements inside the modules. Analogue signals are sent to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PC-based data acquisition system. The data from all strings are collected on a central computer in the IceCube Laboratory from where they are sent to a central data storage facility via a satellite link or stored locally on tape. A technical overview of SPATS and its performance is presented.

  2. Mechanized thinning of northern hardwood pole stands: methods and economics.

    Treesearch

    Frank E. Biltonen; Wiliam A. Hillstrom; Helmuth M. Steinhilb; Richard M. Godman

    1976-01-01

    Describes a study of various thinning treatments in northern hardwood pole stands, using mechanized felling, skidding, and field chipping, as well as chain saw felling. Cost analyses showed that a profit can be made although it is less than can be made with clearcutting.

  3. WEST ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. NOTE THE CIRCULAR OPENINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. NOTE THE CIRCULAR OPENINGS INTO THE UNDERGROUND PORTION OF THE STRUCTURE. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. SOUTH ELEVATION OF BATTERY COMMAND CENTER WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION OF BATTERY COMMAND CENTER WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. THE ENTRY STAIRWAY IS IN THE FOREGROUND. THE ABOVE-GROUND SECTION OF THE STRUCTURE IS ON THE RIGHT, UNDERGROUND PORTION ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Catapult effect in pole vaulting: is muscle coordination determinant?

    PubMed

    Frère, Julien; Göpfert, Beat; Hug, François; Slawinski, Jean; Tourny-Chollet, Claire

    2012-02-01

    This study focused on the phase between the time of straightened pole and the maximum height (HP) of vaulter and aimed at determining the catapult effect in pole vaulting on HP. Seven experienced vaulters performed 5-10 vaults recorded by two video cameras, while the surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of 10 upper limbs muscles was recorded. HP was compared with an estimated maximum height (HP(est)) allowing the computation of a push-off index. Muscle synergies were extracted from the sEMG activity profiles using a non-negative matrix factorization algorithm. No significant difference (p>0.47) was found between HP(est) (4.64±0.21m) and HP (4.69±0.23m). Despite a high inter-individual variability in sEMG profiles, two muscle synergies were extracted for all the subjects which accounted for 96.1±2.9% of the total variance. While, the synergy activation coefficients were very similar across subjects, a higher variability was found in the muscle synergy vectors. Consequently, whatever the push-off index among the pole vaulters, the athletes used different muscle groupings (i.e., muscle synergy vectors) which were activated in a similar fashion (i.e., synergy activation coefficients). Overall, these results suggested that muscle coordination adopted between the time of straightened pole and the maximum height does not have a major influence on HP.

  6. Ultrasonic Imaging for Poling Uniformity Measurements in PZT Ceramic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, E.E.

    2000-03-14

    This report summarizes the results of a project sponsored by Honeywell Corporation (formerly AlliedSignal Inc.) Federal Manufacturing and Technologies/Kansas City (FM and T/KC) and conducted jointly with the University of Missouri, Rolla, titled ''Ultrasonic Imaging for Poling Uniformity Measurements in PZT Ceramic Elements.'' In this three-month research project, a series of experiments was performed on soft and hard lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) structures to determine the effectiveness of ultrasonic measurements as a nondestructive method of evaluating poling quality and uniformity. The study revealed that acoustic velocity correlates well with the degree of poling of PZT structures, as predicted by elastic theory. Additionally, time-of-flight (TOF) imaging was shown to be an ideal tool for viewing the spatial distribution of poled material and of material affected by the electric field beyond the edge of electroded regions. Finally, the effectiveness of ultrasonic methods for flaw detection and evaluation of PZT/stainless steel bonds was also demonstrated.

  7. Compositional mapping of Titan's North Pole with VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Shannon; Barnes, Jason W.; Sotin, Christophe; Soderblom, Jason M.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger Nelson

    2016-10-01

    Titan's methane lakes and seas are almost exclusively found at the moon's north polar region. The factors that drive this distribution are not yet well understood. The poles are generally lower in elevation and a few Kelvin colder than the equator. But the south pole looks very different from the north with only one large lake and a few smaller bodies. To further illuminate what processes might make the north pole unique, we investigate the region's compositional variability and the connection to morphology by analyzing the entirety of the publically available data from Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) that cover the north pole. Because VIMS can only observe the surface in seven IR windows, we identify the relative composition ("spectral units") of the north polar terrain (90N - 45N) and compare our results to those of Birch et al. (Icarus, in revision), who defined geomorphological units in Cassini RADAR north polar data. We find interesting correlations and examples of distinct composition boundaries in VIMS that aren't reflected in the RADAR data. These results provide a more complete context for lake formation/retention hypotheses as well as identify features for further study.

  8. Restoration guidelines for riparian areas using dormant stock "pole" cuttings

    Treesearch

    Tony Barron

    1996-01-01

    The Open Space Division manages seven thousand acres of riparian areas comprising the Rio Grande Valley State Park. In 1988. Open Space began experimenting with dormant stock cuttings. This paper contains methods and procedures for establishing dormant stock cuttings. Dormant stock cuttings will be referred to as "poles" in this paper.

  9. Late 20th Century increase in South Pole snow accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosley-Thompson, E.; Paskievitch, J.F.; Gow, A.J.; Thompson, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A compilation of the 37-year history of net accumulation at the South Pole [Mosley-Thompson et al., 1995] suggests an increase in net annual accumulation since 1965. This record is sporadic and its quality is compromised by spatially restricted observations and nonsystematic measurement procedures. Results from a new, spatially extensive network of 236 accumulation poles document that the current 5-year (1992-1997) average annual net accumulation at the South Pole is 84.5??8.9 mm water equivalent (w.e.). This accumulation rate reflects a 30% increase since the 1960s when the best, although not optimal, records indicate that it was 65 mm w.e. Identification of two prominent beta radioactivity horizons (1954/1955 and 1964/1965) in six firn cores confirms an increase in accumulation since 1965. Viewed from a longer perspective of accumulation provided by ice cores and a snow mine study, the net accumulation of the 30-year period, 1965-1994, is the highest 30-year average of this millennium. Limited data suggest this recent accumulation increase extends beyond the South Pole region and may be characteristic of the high East Antarctic Plateau. Enhanced accumulation over the polar ice sheets has been identified as a potential early indicator of warmer sea surface temperatures and may offset a portion of the current rise in global sea level. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  11. Charge quantisation without magnetic poles: A topological approach to electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solha, Romero

    2016-01-01

    The present work provides a theoretical explanation for the quantisation of electric charges, an open problem since Millikan's oil drop experiment in 1909. This explanation is based solely on Maxwell's theory, it recasts Electromagnetic theory under the language of complex line bundles; therefore, neither magnetic poles nor quantum mechanics are invoked.

  12. How do bacteria localize proteins to the cell pole?

    PubMed Central

    Laloux, Géraldine; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is now well appreciated that bacterial cells are highly organized, which is far from the initial concept that they are merely bags of randomly distributed macromolecules and chemicals. Central to their spatial organization is the precise positioning of certain proteins in subcellular domains of the cell. In particular, the cell poles – the ends of rod-shaped cells – constitute important platforms for cellular regulation that underlie processes as essential as cell cycle progression, cellular differentiation, virulence, chemotaxis and growth of appendages. Thus, understanding how the polar localization of specific proteins is achieved and regulated is a crucial question in bacterial cell biology. Often, polarly localized proteins are recruited to the poles through their interaction with other proteins or protein complexes that were already located there, in a so-called diffusion-and-capture mechanism. Bacteria are also starting to reveal their secrets on how the initial pole ‘recognition’ can occur and how this event can be regulated to generate dynamic, reproducible patterns in time (for example, during the cell cycle) and space (for example, at a specific cell pole). Here, we review the major mechanisms that have been described in the literature, with an emphasis on the self-organizing principles. We also present regulation strategies adopted by bacterial cells to obtain complex spatiotemporal patterns of protein localization. PMID:24345373

  13. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  14. Poling process optimization of piezo nano composite PZT/polimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridlo, M. Rosyid; Lestari, Titik; Mardiyanto, Oemry, Achiar

    2013-09-01

    The objective of poling process is to make the electric dipole directions to be parallel in the inside perovskite crystal of piezo materials. In simply way, poling was carried out by giving the two sides of a piezo material by highly electrical potential. More parallel of electrical dipoles, it is more strength the piezo characteristics. The optimization involved control of temperature, time depth and the electrical voltage. The samples was prepared by solgel method with precursor tetrabutyl titanat Ti(OC4H9)4, zirconium nitrat Zr(NO3)4ṡ5H2O, Pb(CH3COO)2ṡ3H2O and solution ethylene glycol. Molar ratio Pb:Zr:Ti = 1,1:0,52:0,48 with concidering lossed Pb. Result of solgel process is nano powder PZT. The formed nano powder PZT was then mixed with polimer PVDF and pressed 10 MPa at 150 °C with the size 15 mm in diameter. After poling, piezoelectric constant d33 was measured. The highest d33 = 45 pC/N was found at poling parameters V = 5 kV/ mm, T = 120 °C dan time depth = 1 hours.

  15. Participation in the north ecliptic pole sky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick

    1992-01-01

    This grant supported research into the nature of the faintest x-ray sources found in the ROSAT All Sky Survey, with particular emphasis on distant clusters of galaxies. The project was broadened to include sources found in the ROSAT deep pointing at the North Ecliptic Pole. Progress on the research is briefly summarized.

  16. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at the South Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-03

    This hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered on the North Pole. NASA Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00008

  17. Detection of active decay at groundline in utility poles

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo; Walter C. Shortle; Julian Ochrymowych

    1977-01-01

    Active wood decay at groundline in in-service utility poles can be detected by a skilled inspector using: 1. A knowledge of basic patterns of decay. 2. Recognition of obvious signs of decay. 3. Proper interpretation of information obtained from a pulsed-current meter-Shigometer®-used with various probes and probing techniques.

  18. Liquid crystal deposition on poled, single crystalline lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath, S. C.; Pimputkar, K. R.; Pronschinske, A. M.; Pearl, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the mechanisms for molecular organization at poled ferroelectric surfaces, single crystalline lithium niobate (LN), 'Z-cut' along the (0 0 0 1) plane, has been prepared and characterized and subsequently exposed to liquid crystal molecules. As a model system we chose to study the anchoring of 4- n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) to LN. Liquid crystalline films are of interest because of their useful electronic and optical properties as well as chemical sensing attributes. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface contact angle measurements (CA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surface of lithium niobate as well as the nature of 8CB films grown on the surface. Atomically flat LN surfaces were prepared as a support for monolayer thick, 8CB molecular domains. 8CB liquid crystal molecules were deposited by an ambient vaporization technique and the films were analyzed using XPS and CA. Understanding electrostatic anchoring mechanisms and thin film organization for this molecule on uniformly poled surfaces allows for a fuller appreciation of how molecular deposition of other polarizable molecules on periodically poled and patterned poled lithium niobate surfaces would occur.

  19. CROWtm FIELD DEMONSTRATION WITH BELL LUMBER AND POLE

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle A. Johnson, Jr.; L. John Fahy

    2002-03-01

    In 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in-situ remediation project for the contaminated aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) site in New Brighton, Minnesota. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Waste (CROW{trademark}) process, which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover nonaqueous phase liquids. While reviewing the site evaluation information, it became apparent that better site characterization would enhance the outcome of the project. Additional coring indicated that the areal extent of the contaminated soils was approximately eight times greater than initially believed. Because of the uncertainties, in 1993, a pilot test was conducted that provided containment and organic recovery information that assisted in the design of the full-scale CROW process demonstration. After reviewing the cost ramifications of implementing the full-scale CROW field demonstration, Bell Pole approached Western Research Institute (WRI) with a request for a staged, sequential site remediation. Bell Pole's request for the change in the project scope was prompted by budgetary constraints. Bell Pole felt that although a longer project might be more costly, by extending the length of the project, the yearly cost burden would be more manageable. After considering several options, WRI recommended implementing a phased approach to remediate the contaminated area. Phase 1 involves a CROW process demonstration to remediate the upgradient one-third of the contaminated area, which contains the largest amount of free organic material. The Bell Pole Phase 1 CROW demonstration began in mid-1995 and was operated until January 2001. The operation of the demonstration was satisfactory, although at less than the design conditions. During the demonstration, 25,502,902 gal of hot water was injected and 83,155 gal of organics was transferred to the storage tank. During operations more than 65% of the produced

  20. Decay resistance of out-of-service utility poles as related to the distribution of residual creosote content

    Treesearch

    Han Roliadi; Chung Y. Hse; Elvin T. Choong; Todd F. Shupe

    2000-01-01

    Decay resistance of out-of-service poles was investigated to evaluate their effectiveness against biodegradation for possible recycling of these poles for composite products. Decay resistance was related to creosote content and creosote distribution in poles with service durations of 5 and 25 years and also freshly treated poles. Weathering of the poles had caused...

  1. Bycatch in the Maldivian pole-and-line tuna fishery.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kelsey I; Nadheeh, Ibrahim; Jauharee, A Riyaz; Anderson, R Charles; Adam, M Shiham

    2017-01-01

    Tropical tuna fisheries are among the largest worldwide, with some having significant bycatch issues. However, pole-and-line tuna fisheries are widely believed to have low bycatch rates, although these have rarely been quantified. The Maldives has an important pole-and-line fishery, targeting skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis). In the Maldives, 106 pole-and-line tuna fishing days were observed between August 2014 and November 2015. During 161 fishing events, tuna catches amounted to 147 t: 72% by weight was skipjack, 25% yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and 3% other tunas. Bycatch (all non-tuna species caught plus all tuna discards) amounted to 951 kg (0.65% of total tuna catch). Most of the bycatch (95%) was utilized, and some bycatch was released alive, so dead discards were particularly low (0.02% of total tuna catch, or 22 kg per 100 t). Rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinnulata) and dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) together constituted 93% of the bycatch. Live releases included small numbers of silky sharks (Carcharhinus falciformis) and seabirds (noddies, Anous tenuirostris and A. stolidus). Pole-and-line tuna fishing was conducted on free schools and schools associated with various objects (Maldivian anchored fish aggregating devices [aFADs], drifting FADs from western Indian Ocean purse seine fisheries, other drifting objects and seamounts). Free school catches typically included a high proportion of large skipjack and significantly less bycatch. Associated schools produced more variable tuna catches and higher bycatch rates. Fishing trips in the south had significantly lower bycatch rates than those in the north. This study is the first to quantify bycatch rates in the Maldives pole-and-line tuna fishery and the influence of school association on catch composition. Ratio estimator methods suggest roughly 552.6 t of bycatch and 27.9 t of discards are caught annually in the fishery (based on 2015 national catch), much less than other Indian Ocean tuna

  2. Acute effects of flexible pole exercise on heart rate dynamics.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Letícia Santana; Moreira, Patrícia S; Antonio, Ana M; Cardoso, Marco A; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Navega, Marcelo T; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Valenti, Vitor E

    2015-01-01

    Exercise with flexible poles provides fast eccentric and concentric muscle contractions. Although the literature reports significant muscle chain activity during this exercise, it is not clear if a single bout of exercise induces cardiac changes. In this study we assessed the acute effects of flexible pole exercise on cardiac autonomic regulation. The study was performed on 22 women between 18 and 26 years old. We assessed heart rate variability (HRV) in the time (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50) and frequency (HF, LF and LF/HF ratio) domains and geometric indices of HRV (RRTri, TINN, SD1, SD2 and SD1/SD2 ratio). The subjects remained at rest for 10 min and then performed the exercises with the flexible poles. Immediately after the exercise protocol, the volunteers remained seated at rest for 60 min and HRV was analyzed. We observed no significant changes in time domain (SDNN: p=0.72; RMSSD: p=0.94 and pNN50: p=0.92) or frequency domain indices (LF [nu]: p=0.98; LF [ms(2)]: p=0.72; HF [nu]: p=0.98; HF [ms(2)]: p=0.82 and LF/HF ratio: p=0.7) or in geometric indices (RRTri: p=0.54; TINN: p=0.77; SD1: p=0.94; SD2: p=0.67 and SD/SD2: p=0.42) before and after a single bout of flexible pole exercise. A single bout of flexible pole exercise did not induce significant changes in cardiac autonomic regulation in healthy women. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. South Pole Queen Maud Land Traverses, 1964-68 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C. R.

    2009-12-01

    Between early December, 1964, and late January, 1968, the three-part "South Pole Queen Maud Land Traverse" (SPQMLT), supported by the U.S. Antarctic Research Program (USARP), explored the previously unexamined interior of Queen Maud Land, making measurements of surface height and slope, surface mass balance, bore-hole temperatures, ice thickness, seismic wave velocities in and below the ice, gravity, and magnetics. The traverse followed a zigzag, space-filling route between Pole Station, the abandoned Pole of Relative Inaccessibility station, and Plateau Station on the east and roughly the Greenwich Meridian on the west. The traverse equipment featured two large Model 843 Tucker Sno-Cats, designed and built especially for work on the high East Antarctic plateau. Unfortunately, for programmatic reasons a planned 4th season to drive the Sno-Cats back to Pole Station could not be supported, so they were permanently abandoned at the end of the third traverse, at 78° 42.2'S, 6° 52'W. The SPQMLT was remarkable not only for working in a previously unexplored area, but also for the introduction of several new techniques to Antarctic traverse studies, two of which, radar sounding and determination of accumulation rates using a dated radioactive fallout horizon, were major advances that will be discussed by other authors in this session. In this presentation I will discuss the seismic, gravity, and magnetic observations and what they suggest about the character of the underlying terrain. Because of the pronounced differences in route pattern between the SPQMLT and the recent Troll-Pole-Troll traverses the data will be strongly complementary. From SPQMLT only the positions and surface heights are not up to modern standards of accuracy, but the former are adequate for regional studies and the latter have all been superseded by satellite radar and laser altimetry anyway.

  4. Bycatch in the Maldivian pole-and-line tuna fishery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kelsey I.; Nadheeh, Ibrahim; Jauharee, A. Riyaz; Anderson, R. Charles; Adam, M. Shiham

    2017-01-01

    Tropical tuna fisheries are among the largest worldwide, with some having significant bycatch issues. However, pole-and-line tuna fisheries are widely believed to have low bycatch rates, although these have rarely been quantified. The Maldives has an important pole-and-line fishery, targeting skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis). In the Maldives, 106 pole-and-line tuna fishing days were observed between August 2014 and November 2015. During 161 fishing events, tuna catches amounted to 147 t: 72% by weight was skipjack, 25% yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and 3% other tunas. Bycatch (all non-tuna species caught plus all tuna discards) amounted to 951 kg (0.65% of total tuna catch). Most of the bycatch (95%) was utilized, and some bycatch was released alive, so dead discards were particularly low (0.02% of total tuna catch, or 22 kg per 100 t). Rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinnulata) and dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) together constituted 93% of the bycatch. Live releases included small numbers of silky sharks (Carcharhinus falciformis) and seabirds (noddies, Anous tenuirostris and A. stolidus). Pole-and-line tuna fishing was conducted on free schools and schools associated with various objects (Maldivian anchored fish aggregating devices [aFADs], drifting FADs from western Indian Ocean purse seine fisheries, other drifting objects and seamounts). Free school catches typically included a high proportion of large skipjack and significantly less bycatch. Associated schools produced more variable tuna catches and higher bycatch rates. Fishing trips in the south had significantly lower bycatch rates than those in the north. This study is the first to quantify bycatch rates in the Maldives pole-and-line tuna fishery and the influence of school association on catch composition. Ratio estimator methods suggest roughly 552.6 t of bycatch and 27.9 t of discards are caught annually in the fishery (based on 2015 national catch), much less than other Indian Ocean tuna

  5. Is it possible to reduce the knee joint compression force during level walking with hiking poles?

    PubMed

    Jensen, S B; Henriksen, M; Aaboe, J; Hansen, L; Simonsen, E B; Alkjaer, T

    2011-12-01

    Walking with hiking poles has become a popular way of exercising. Walking with poles is advocated as a physical activity that significantly reduces the loading of the hip, knee and ankle joints. We have previously observed that pole walking does not lead to a reduction of the load on the knee joint. However, it is unclear whether an increased force transmitted through the poles can reduce the load on the knee joint. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate if an increased load transmitted through the arms to the poles could reduce the knee joint compression force during level walking with poles. We hypothesized that an increased pole force would result in a reduction of the knee joint compression force. Gait analyses from 10 healthy subjects walking with poles were obtained. The pole force was measured simultaneously during the gait analyses. The knee joint compression forces were estimated by using a biomechanical knee joint model. The results showed that the subjects were able to increase the pole force by 2.4 times the normal pole force. However, this did not lead to a reduction in the knee joint compressive force and we rejected our hypothesis. In conclusion, the use of poles during level walking does not seem to reduce knee joint compressive loads. However, it is possible that the use of poles in other populations (e.g. osteoarthritis patients) and in terrain would unload the knee joint. This should be investigated in the future.

  6. Theory of electric creep and electromechanical coupling with domain evolution for non-poled and fully poled ferroelectric ceramics.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaodong; Wang, Yang; Zhong, Zheng; Weng, George J

    2016-10-01

    Unlike mechanical creep with inelastic deformation, electric creep with domain evolution is a rarely studied subject. In this paper, we present a theory of electric creep and related electromechanical coupling for both non-poled and fully poled ferroelectric ceramics. We consider electric creep to be a time-dependent process, with an initial condition lying on the D (electric displacement) versus E (electric field) hysteresis loop. Both processes are shown to share the same Gibbs free energy and thermodynamic driving force, but relative to creep, the hysteresis loop is just a field-dependent process. With this view, we develop a theory with a single thermodynamic driving force but with two separate kinetic equations, one for the field-dependent loops in terms of a Lorentzian-like function and the other for the time-dependent D in terms of a dissipation potential. We use the 0°-90° and then 90°-180° switches to attain these goals. It is demonstrated that the calculated results are in broad agreement with two sets of experiments, one for a non-poled PIC-151 and the other for a fully poled PZT-5A. The theory also shows that creep polarization tends to reach a saturation state with time and that the saturated polarization has its maximum at the coercive field.

  7. Theory of electric creep and electromechanical coupling with domain evolution for non-poled and fully poled ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiaodong; Wang, Yang; Zhong, Zheng; Weng, George J.

    2016-10-01

    Unlike mechanical creep with inelastic deformation, electric creep with domain evolution is a rarely studied subject. In this paper, we present a theory of electric creep and related electromechanical coupling for both non-poled and fully poled ferroelectric ceramics. We consider electric creep to be a time-dependent process, with an initial condition lying on the D (electric displacement) versus E (electric field) hysteresis loop. Both processes are shown to share the same Gibbs free energy and thermodynamic driving force, but relative to creep, the hysteresis loop is just a field-dependent process. With this view, we develop a theory with a single thermodynamic driving force but with two separate kinetic equations, one for the field-dependent loops in terms of a Lorentzian-like function and the other for the time-dependent D in terms of a dissipation potential. We use the 0°-90° and then 90°-180° switches to attain these goals. It is demonstrated that the calculated results are in broad agreement with two sets of experiments, one for a non-poled PIC-151 and the other for a fully poled PZT-5A. The theory also shows that creep polarization tends to reach a saturation state with time and that the saturated polarization has its maximum at the coercive field.

  8. Titan's Gas Behavior During the South Pole Fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottini, Valeria; Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Jennings, Donald E.; Gorius, Nicolas; Irwin, Patrick G. J.

    2015-11-01

    Titan’s southern middle atmosphere has been showing several changes since the start of fall season in 2009. In 2012 a large cloud appeared [1], [2], [3], temperatures became very low and condensation and gas concentration at the South Pole increased [3], [4].In this work we will show the results of gas abundances retrievals in the South Pole and their latitudinal variation changes as the cold season evolved with time.We analyzed several Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS [5]) mid-infrared observations of the South Pole acquired during 2013-2014. The data coordinates were converted in order to be centered on the atmospheric pole and refer to the 1 mbar level and not to the surface. We first determine stratospheric temperatures from the same data and latitudes from the n4 band of methane centered around 1300 cm-1. We retrieve the temperature profiles applying a radiative transfer forward model combined with a non-linear optimal estimation inversion method [6]. We then retrieve the main gases abundances and track their variation with latitude using the same method.Latitudinal changes of the main Titan’s gases - HC3N, C4H2, C6H6, C2H2, C2H4, C3H8 and HCN - show different trends in the Southern polar regions over 2014, when winter was getting closer. We observe a ring-shape in some of the gas abundance distributions, with a local maximum peak around -75 deg of latitude. We also observe an increase of abundance of most of the gases toward the south pole, as seen previously in the North during the winter. The observed increase of benzene over the South Pole is definitely evident and strong. References: [1] West, R. A. et al. (2013) BAAS, 45, 305.03. [2] Jennings, D. E. et al. (2012) ApJ, 754, L3. [3] de Kok, R. et al. (2014), Nature, 514, 7520, 65-67. [4] Vinatier S. et al. (2015) Icarus, Volume 250, p. 95-115. [5] Flasar et al. (2004) Space Sci. Rev., 115, 169-297. [6] Irwin, P.G.J. et al. (2008) J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans., 109, 1136-1150.

  9. Mechanical properties of small-scale laminated wood composite poles: effects of taper and webs

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; R.C. Tang; Chung Y. Hse

    2006-01-01

    Laminated hollow wood composite poles represent an efficient utilization of the timber resource and a promising alternative for solid poles that are commonly used in the power transmission and telecommunication lines. The objective of this study was to improve the performance of composite poles by introducing the bio-mimicry concept into the design of hollow wood...

  10. 49 CFR 236.71 - Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. 236.71... Instructions: All Systems Wires and Cables § 236.71 Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. Signal wire on... pole or other support. Signal wire shall not interfere with, or be interfered by, other wires on the...

  11. 49 CFR 234.243 - Wire on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wire on pole line and aerial cable. 234.243... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.243 Wire on pole line and aerial cable. Wire... bracket supported by a pole or other support. Wire shall not interfere with, or be interfered with by...

  12. 78 FR 15615 - Practice and Procedure; Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures; Allocation of Unusable Space Costs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 1 Practice and Procedure; Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures; Allocation of Unusable... policies concerning a methodology for just and reasonable rates for pole attachments, conduits, and rights... sets forth the allocation of unusable space costs in the pole attachment rate formula for...

  13. Effect of Materials and Manufacturing on the Bending Stiffness of Vaulting Poles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. L.; Kukureka, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in the world record height achieved in pole vaulting can be related to the improved ability of the athletes, in terms of their fitness and technique, and to the change in materials used to construct the pole. For example in 1960 there was a change in vaulting pole construction from bamboo to glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP)…

  14. View of worlds tallest totem pole, 136.5 feet tall. First ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of worlds tallest totem pole, 136.5 feet tall. First potlatch pole since 1904. Dedicated to all things and all peoples of southeast Alaska, 1971. Oct potlatch, looking northwest - Kake Salmon Cannery, Totem Pole, Kake, Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area, AK

  15. Finite element modeling of small-scale tapered wood-laminated composite poles with biomimicry features

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; R.C. Tang; Chung Y. Hse

    2008-01-01

    Tapered composite poles with biomimicry features as in bamboo are a new generation of wood laminated composite poles that may some day be considered as an alternative to solid wood poles that are widely used in the transmission and telecommunication fields. Five finite element models were developed with ANSYS to predict and assess the performance of five types of...

  16. Effect of Materials and Manufacturing on the Bending Stiffness of Vaulting Poles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. L.; Kukureka, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in the world record height achieved in pole vaulting can be related to the improved ability of the athletes, in terms of their fitness and technique, and to the change in materials used to construct the pole. For example in 1960 there was a change in vaulting pole construction from bamboo to glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP)…

  17. 49 CFR 234.243 - Wire on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wire on pole line and aerial cable. 234.243... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.243 Wire on pole line and aerial cable. Wire... bracket supported by a pole or other support. Wire shall not interfere with, or be interfered with...

  18. 49 CFR 236.71 - Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. 236.71... Instructions: All Systems Wires and Cables § 236.71 Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. Signal wire on... pole or other support. Signal wire shall not interfere with, or be interfered by, other wires on...

  19. 49 CFR 236.71 - Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. 236.71... Instructions: All Systems Wires and Cables § 236.71 Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. Signal wire on... pole or other support. Signal wire shall not interfere with, or be interfered by, other wires on...

  20. 49 CFR 236.71 - Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. 236.71... Instructions: All Systems Wires and Cables § 236.71 Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. Signal wire on... pole or other support. Signal wire shall not interfere with, or be interfered by, other wires on...

  1. 49 CFR 236.71 - Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. 236.71... Instructions: All Systems Wires and Cables § 236.71 Signal wires on pole line and aerial cable. Signal wire on... pole or other support. Signal wire shall not interfere with, or be interfered by, other wires on...

  2. The South Pole Imaging Fabry Perot Interferometer (SPIFI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Swain, M. R.; Jackson, J. M.; Bolato, A. D.; Davidson, J. A.; Savage, M.

    1996-01-01

    The design and construction of the South Pole imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer (SPIFI) is reported. The SPIFI is a direct detection imaging spectrometer for use in the far infrared and submillimeter bands accessible to the 1.7 m telescope at the South Pole, and in the submillimeter bands accessible to the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), HI. It employs a 5 x 5 silicon bolometer array and three cryogenic Fabry Perot interferometers in series in order to achieve velocity resolutions of between 300 km/s and 30 km/s over the entire field of view with a resolution of up to 1 km/s at the center pixel. The scientific justification for the instrument is discussed, considering the spectral lines available to SPIFI. The optical path, the cryogenic Fabry-Perot, the adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and the detector array are described. The instrument's sensitivity is presented and compared with coherent systems.

  3. Invariant poles feedback control of flexible, highly variable spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for single-axis control of a model of a highly flexible Space Station. Active damping of lower frequency flexibility modes is employed. In the control technique, referred to as invariant poles feedback control (IPFC), feedback gains are adjusted so that the closed-loop system's characteristic equation is matched to that of a reference model; hence, closed-loop system's poles will not move - they will be invariant (provided bending frequencies and parameters can be identified accurately). This is accomplished by obtaining the system's characteristic equation in closed form; equating respective coefficients between terms of like powers in s in the system and reference model characteristic equations; and, solving for the feedback gains. The feedback gains are explicit functions of system plant parameters and the coefficients of the reference model's characteristic equation, and are easily programmed for the digital computer.

  4. Invariant poles feedback control of flexible highly variable spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a technique for single-axis control of a model of a highly flexible space station. Active damping of lower frequency flexibility modes is employed. In the control technique, referred to as invariant poles feedback control, feedback gains are adjusted so that the closed-loop system characteristic equation is matched to that of a reference model. Hence closed-loop system poles will not move; they will be invariant (provided that bending frequencies and parameters can be identified accurately). This is accomplished by obtaining the system characteristic equation in closed form; equating respective coefficients between terms of like powers in s in the system and reference model characteristic equations; and solving for the feedback gains. The feedback gains are explicit functions of system plant parameters and the coefficients of the reference model characteristic equation, and are easily programmed for the digital computer.

  5. Lunar Prospecting: Searching for Volatiles at the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Carvalho, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The Resource Prospector is an in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technology demonstration mission, planned for a 2021 launch to search for and analyze volatiles at the Lunar South Pole. The mission poses unique operational challenges. Operating at the Lunar South Pole requires navigating a surface with lighting, shadow and regolith characteristics unlike those of previous missions. The short round trip communications time enables reactive surface operations for science and engineering. Navigation of permanently shadowed regions with a solar powered rover creates risks, including power and thermal management, and requires constant real time decision making for safe entry, path selection and egress. The mission plan requires a faster rover egress from the lander than any previous NASA rover mission.

  6. Atmospheric ozone at South Pole, Antarctica, in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Oltmans, S. J.; Grass, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Results of NOAA's measurements of the ozone vertical distributions at the South Pole and of the annual course of total ozone, conducted in 1986 with balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes and a Dobson spectrophotometer, are described. The major finding was that the stratospheric ozone decreases abruptly between September 20 and October 15, with the bulk decrease occurring between 12 and 21 km. In this period, the column ozone and ozone volume mixing ratio at 16 km (the altitude of the normal ozone maximum at South Pole) decreased by 78 percent, and column ozone between 12 and 21 km decreased by 50 percent. The results of these measurements are compared with data obtained in 1971, and the changes observed in the ozone vertical distributions and in the temporal variations of atmospheric ozone are discussed.

  7. Voronoi poles-based saliency feature detection from point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tingting; Wei, Ning; Dong, Fangmin; Yang, Yuanqin

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we represent a novel algorithm for point cloud feature detection. Firstly, the algorithm estimates the local feature for each sample point by computing the ratio of the distance from the inner voronoi pole and the outer voronoi pole to the surface. Then the surface global saliency feature is detected by adding the results of the difference of Gaussian for local feature under different scales. Compared with the state of the art methods, our algorithm has higher computing efficiency and more accurate feature detection for sharp edge. The detected saliency features are applied as the weights for surface mesh simplification. The numerical results for mesh simplification show that our method keeps the more details of key features than the traditional methods.

  8. Pole topology of the structure functions of continuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutschka, Christian; Kahl, Gerhard

    2002-05-01

    We develop a theory of the pole topology of the Laplace transform of the structure functions of continuous N component systems based on the Wiener-Hopf technique. We classify systems according to the spectrum of the N×N matrix Q~(t), with elements Qij(t)=δij- 2π(ρiρj)∫e- trqij(r)dr, associated with their factor functions qij(r). For the simplest nontrivial class of systems-namely, that with only two eigenvalues of Q~(t) different from one-a full and explicit analysis of the pole topology is possible. We illustrate the theory with exactly solvable examples, such as the Percus-Yevick equation for arbitrary mixtures of hard spheres (HS) and polydisperse HS and the mean spherical model for binary mixtures of adhesive spheres.

  9. The South Pole Telescope: Unraveling the Mystery of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Christian L.; de Haan, Tijmen; Bleem, Lindsey E.

    2016-07-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10-meter telescope designed to survey the millimeter-wave sky, taking advantage of the exceptional observing conditions at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. The telescope and its ground-breaking 960-element bolometric camera finished surveying 2500 square degrees at 95. 150, and 220 GHz in November 2011. We have discovered hundreds of galaxy clusters in the SPT-SZ survey through the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) effect. The formation of galaxy clusters the largest bound objects in the universe is highly sensitive to dark energy and the history of structure formation. I will discuss the cosmological constraints from the SPT-SZ galaxy cluster sample as well as future prospects with the soon to-be-installed SPT-3G camera.

  10. Atmospheric ozone at South Pole, Antarctica, in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Oltmans, S. J.; Grass, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Results of NOAA's measurements of the ozone vertical distributions at the South Pole and of the annual course of total ozone, conducted in 1986 with balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes and a Dobson spectrophotometer, are described. The major finding was that the stratospheric ozone decreases abruptly between September 20 and October 15, with the bulk decrease occurring between 12 and 21 km. In this period, the column ozone and ozone volume mixing ratio at 16 km (the altitude of the normal ozone maximum at South Pole) decreased by 78 percent, and column ozone between 12 and 21 km decreased by 50 percent. The results of these measurements are compared with data obtained in 1971, and the changes observed in the ozone vertical distributions and in the temporal variations of atmospheric ozone are discussed.

  11. Asteroid 532 Herculina - Lightcurves, pole orientation and a model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. C.; Birch, P. V.; Drummond, J.; Pospieszalska-Surdej, A.; Surdej, J.

    1987-01-01

    While photoelectric lightcurves obtained for 532 Herculina in 1984 exhibit two maxima and two minima, the lightcurve has shown only one maximum and one minimum over the same rotation period in some other oppositions. The use of photometric astronomy yields a sidereal period of 0.3918711 + or 0.0000001 day, with a retrograde rotation for the north pole at 276 deg longitude and +1 deg latitude. A model consisting of a sphere with two dark regions that are each about 0.13 times the brightness of the surrounding surface is developed for Herculina, and it is shown that its generated lightcurves are consistent with both the observed amplitudes and the timings of extrema over the 28,630 sidereal rotations of 30 years. The lightcurves for the next four oppositions are predicted on the basis of the photometric astrometry pole and the two dark region model.

  12. Subleading poles in the numerical unitarity method at two loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, S.; Febres Cordero, F.; Ita, H.; Jaquier, M.; Page, B.

    2017-05-01

    We describe the unitarity approach for the numerical computation of two-loop integral coefficients of scattering amplitudes. It is well known that the leading propagator singularities of an amplitude's integrand are related to products of tree amplitudes. At two loops, Feynman diagrams with doubled propagators appear naturally, which lead to subleading pole contributions. In general, it is not known how these contributions can be directly expressed in terms of a product of on-shell tree amplitudes. We present a universal algorithm to extract these subleading pole terms by releasing some of the on-shell conditions. We demonstrate the new approach by numerically computing two-loop four-gluon integral coefficients.

  13. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in South Pole ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Gustafsson, L.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Imlay, R. L.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemming, N.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Knops, S.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, T.; Kroll, G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lafebre, S.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Lehmann, R.; Lennarz, D.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Majumdar, P.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Matusik, M.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; Ono, M.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Prikockis, M.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Roucelle, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Slipak, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stephens, G.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Voigt, B.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; IceCube Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) and a retrievable transmitter deployed in holes drilled for the IceCube experiment, we have measured the attenuation of acoustic signals by South Pole ice at depths between 190 m and 500 m. Three data sets, using different acoustic sources, have been analyzed and give consistent results. The method with the smallest systematic uncertainties yields an amplitude attenuation coefficient α = 3.20 ± 0.57 km-1 between 10 and 30 kHz, considerably larger than previous theoretical estimates. Expressed as an attenuation length, the analyses give a consistent result for λ ≡ 1/α of ˜300 m with 20% uncertainty. No significant depth or frequency dependence has been found.

  14. The Revised Pole Model and New Observations of Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.-Y.; Shen, K.-X.; Qiao, R.-Ch; Dourneau, G.; Yu, Y.

    2015-10-01

    We used 3108 Earth-based astrometric observations from the Natural Satellite Data Center (NSDC) over more than 30 years time span from 1975 to 2006 for determining the epoch state vectors of the Neptunes largest satellite Triton. In integrating the perturbation equation, the barycentric frame of Neptune-Triton system is adopted, and in considering the oblateness perturbation due to Neptune, a revised pole model describing the precession of the Neptune's pole is used in our calculation. Moreover, a total of 1095 new observed positions of Triton were collected during 46 nights of observations in 2007, 2008 and 2009. We compared our observations to two ephemerides of Triton and most of the available planetary ephemerides of Neptune.

  15. Direct detection of variable tropospheric clouds near Titan's south pole.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael E; Bouchez, Antonin H; Griffith, Caitlin A

    Atmospheric conditions on Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, allow the possibility that it could possess a methane condensation and precipitation cycle with many similarities to Earth's hydrological cycle. Detailed imaging studies of Titan have hitherto shown no direct evidence for tropospheric condensation clouds, although there has been indirect spectroscopic evidence for transient clouds. Here we report images and spectra of Titan that show clearly transient clouds, concentrated near the south pole, which is currently near the point of maximum solar heating. The discovery of these clouds demonstrates the existence of condensation and localized moist convection in Titan's atmosphere. Their location suggests that methane cloud formation is controlled seasonally by small variations in surface temperature, and that the clouds will move from the south to the north pole on a 15-year timescale.

  16. Laser Provides First 3-D View of Mars' North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This first three-dimensional picture of Mars' north pole enables scientists to estimate the volume of its water ice cap with unprecedented precision, and to study its surface variations and the heights of clouds in the region for the first time.

    Approximately 2.6 million of these laser pulse measurements were assembled into a topographic grid of the north pole with a spatial resolution of 0.6 miles (one kilometer) and a vertical accuracy of 15-90 feet (5-30 meters).

    The principal investigator for MOLA is Dr. David E. Smith of Goddard. The MOLA instrument was designed and built by the Laser Remote Sensing Branch of Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics at Goddard. The Mars Global Surveyor Mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for the NASA Office of Space Science.

  17. Planetary science: constant illumination at the lunar north pole.

    PubMed

    Bussey, D Ben J; Fristad, Kirsten E; Schenk, Paul M; Robinson, Mark S; Spudis, Paul D

    2005-04-14

    Images returned by the spacecraft Clementine have been used to produce a quantitative illumination map of the north pole of the Moon, revealing the percentage of time that points on the surface are illuminated during the lunar day. We have used this map to identify areas that are constantly illuminated during a lunar day in summer and which may therefore be in permanent sunlight. All are located on the northern rim of Peary crater, close to the north pole. Permanently sunlit areas represent prime locations for lunar outpost sites as they have abundant solar energy, are relatively benign thermally (when compared with equatorial regions), and are close to permanently shadowed regions that may contain water ice.

  18. 8. Finish line, marked by white poles, as viewed from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Finish line, marked by white poles, as viewed from infield tote board. Shown are all the best locations for viewing the finish line, including the Clubhouse on the left and Original Grandstand on the right. For a similar view taken in 1939 by a photographer for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper, see photo WA-201-24. (August 1993) - Longacres, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  19. Optical vortex converter with helical-periodically poled ferroelectric crystal.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linghao; Ye, Fangwei; Chen, Xianfeng

    2011-06-06

    A kind of optical vortex converter is proposed in helical-periodically poled ferroelectric crystal based on transverse electro-optics effect. It can be used to generate optical vortex from non-vortex beam and transform the topological charge of optical vortex. An optical vortex adder or substrator is proposed under the control of electric filed. This device will find its applications in high dimensional communication system for signal processing and optical manipulation in micro and mesoscopic scale.

  20. Edge detection, cosmic strings and the south pole telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Andrew; Brandenberger, Robert

    2009-02-01

    We develop a method of constraining the cosmic string tension Gμ which uses the Canny edge detection algorithm as a means of searching CMB temperature maps for the signature of the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We test the potential of this method using high resolution, simulated CMB temperature maps. By modeling the future output from the South Pole Telescope project (including anticipated instrumental noise), we find that cosmic strings with Gμ > 5.5 × 10-8 could be detected.

  1. Detachments of the retinal pigment epithelium at the posterior pole.

    PubMed

    Noble, K G; Levitzky, M J; Carr, R E

    1976-08-01

    Multiple vitelliform cysts of the retina, a disorder of unknown cause in which there are multiple detachments of the retinal pigment epithelium at the posterior pole, occurred in five patients. In four patients all lesions were located outside the parafoveal area while one patient showed bilateral foveal elevations associated with more eccentric detachments. Several patients showed slow resolution of some of the detachments with mild disturbances of the pigment epithelium.

  2. Observations of a Filament in the North Ecliptic Pole Supercluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Joseph Henry

    2005-01-01

    Our work on the ROSAT All-Sky Survey at the North Ecliptic Pole has increased from 7 to 21 the group and cluster membership of a previously known supercluster there, revealing a particularly striking example of a filament. We obtained observations of two clusters in this filament to elucidate its dynamics. However, these observations were severely compromised by flares: less than 20% of the requested time survived screening. Consequently the data were inadequate for the project.

  3. Lightcurves and pole position of asteroid 3 Juno

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birch, P. V.; Taylor, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen lightcurves of asteroid 3 Juno from three different oppositions are given. The pole of Juno is less than 10 deg from ecliptic longitude 104 deg and latitude + 36 deg (or 316 and + 62 deg). The sidereal period is 0.3003969 + or - 0.0000003 (1 sigma) day and the rotation is prograde. There is little similarity between the Juno lightcurves from 8 oppositions which is unexplained at this time.

  4. Automated Pole Placement Algorithm for Multivariable Optimal Control Synthesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE COMPLETING FORM *I. REPORT NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESO N . RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (end Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED...Weighting Parameter p ..... 20 2.3 Single Input Asymptotic Root Loci ... ......... .. 22 2.4 Multiple Input Asymptotic Root Loci ... ........ .. 23...solution to the pole assignment problem in the single input (m=l) case, when it exits, can be shown to be unique. In the multiple input case (l<m<n), the

  5. Matrix Methods for Determining System Poles from Transient Response.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    K’ whose elements are spaced q samples apart are orthogonal to *, and one can determine the system poles from i provided the decimation aliasing...of the literature in that it stresses the use of matrix methods and vector space geometry rather than "sequential" concepts, primarily because we...this could as easily average out some of the signal, and it would be hard to guarantee preservation of rank. This alternative will not be explored

  6. Algorithm for IAU north poles and rotation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieske, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    In 1970 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) defined any object's north pole to be that axis of rotation which lies north of the solar system's invariable plane. A competing definition in widespread use at some institutions followed the 'right hand rule' whereby the 'north' axis of rotation was generally said to be that of the rotational angular momentum. In the case of the latter definition, the planet Neptune and its satellite Triton would have their 'north' poles in opposite hemispheres because Triton's angular momentum vector is in the hemisphere opposite from that of Neptune's rotation angular momentum. The IAU resolutions have been somewhat controversial in some quarters ever since their adoption. A Working Group has periodically updated the recommended values of planet and satellite poles and rotation rates in accordance with the IAU definition of north and the IAU definition of prime meridian. Neither system is completely satisfactory in the perception of all scientists, and some confusion has been generated by publishing data in the two different systems. In this paper we review the IAU definitions of north and of the location of prime meridian and we present the algorithm which has been employed in determining the rotational parameters of the natural satellites. The IAU definition of the prime meridian contains some ambiguities which in practice have been 'specified' by the numerical values published by the IAU working group but which have not yet been explicitly documented. The purpose of this paper is to explicitly document the algorithm employed by the IAU working group in specifying satellite poles and rotation rates.

  7. The treatment of lower pole renal calculi in 2003.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, Brian R; Assimos, Dean G

    2002-01-01

    The optimal treatment of patients with lower pole renal calculi is still being defined. Shock wave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and ureteroscopy are all currently utilized to treat patients with this condition. These methods have yielded varying degrees of success. The influence of collecting system anatomy on shock wave lithotripsy results remains controversial. Ongoing randomized, prospective trials evaluating the efficacy of all of these respective therapeutic options will, it is hoped, determine the best approaches for this patient cohort.

  8. Algorithm for IAU north poles and rotation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieske, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    In 1970 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) defined any object's north pole to be that axis of rotation which lies north of the solar system's invariable plane. A competing definition in widespread use at some institutions followed the 'right hand rule' whereby the 'north' axis of rotation was generally said to be that of the rotational angular momentum. In the case of the latter definition, the planet Neptune and its satellite Triton would have their 'north' poles in opposite hemispheres because Triton's angular momentum vector is in the hemisphere opposite from that of Neptune's rotation angular momentum. The IAU resolutions have been somewhat controversial in some quarters ever since their adoption. A Working Group has periodically updated the recommended values of planet and satellite poles and rotation rates in accordance with the IAU definition of north and the IAU definition of prime meridian. Neither system is completely satisfactory in the perception of all scientists, and some confusion has been generated by publishing data in the two different systems. In this paper we review the IAU definitions of north and of the location of prime meridian and we present the algorithm which has been employed in determining the rotational parameters of the natural satellites. The IAU definition of the prime meridian contains some ambiguities which in practice have been 'specified' by the numerical values published by the IAU working group but which have not yet been explicitly documented. The purpose of this paper is to explicitly document the algorithm employed by the IAU working group in specifying satellite poles and rotation rates.

  9. Seasonal Evolution of Titan's South Pole 220 cm-1 Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Donald

    2016-06-01

    A cloud of ices that had been seen only in Titan's north during winter began to emerge at the south pole in 2012. Discovered by Voyager IRIS as an emission feature at 220 cm-1, the cloud has been studied extensively in both the north and south by Cassini CIRS. The spectral feature acts as a tracer of the seasonal changes at Titan's poles, relating to evolving composition, temperature structure and dynamics. Although candidates have been proposed, the chemical makeup of the cloud has never been identified. The cloud is composed of condensates derived from gases created at high altitude and transported to the cold, shadowed pole. In the north the cloud has diminished gradually over the Cassini mission as Titan has transitioned from winter to spring. The southern cloud, on the other hand, grew rapidly after 2012. By late 2014 it had developed a complex ring structure that was confined to latitudes poleward of 70°S within the deep temperature well that had formed at the south pole [1]. The location of the cloud coincides in latitude with the HCN cloud reported by ISS and VIMS [2,3]. CIRS also saw enhanced gas emissions at those latitudes [4]. When it first formed, the cloud was abundant at altitudes as high as 250 km, while later it was found mostly at 100-150 km, suggesting that the material that had been deposited from above had gathered at the lower altitudes. Radiance from the southern cloud increased until mid-2015 and since then has decreased. The cloud may be transitioning to the more uniform hood morphology familiar in the north. Taking the north and south together, by the end of the Cassini mission in 2017 we will have observed almost an entire seasonal cycle of the ice cloud.

  10. Effect of poling time and grid voltage on phase transition and piezoelectricity of poly(vinyledene fluoride) thin films using corona poling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadeva, Suresha K.; Berring, John; Walus, Konrad; Stoeber, Boris

    2013-07-01

    Corona poling was used to create piezoelectric polyvinylidene flouride (PVDF) thin films and the effects of poling time and grid voltage on the electric and physical properties of the samples was studied. Using x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and direct measurement of piezoelectricity, the phase transition behaviour and piezoelectric constant of stretched and poled PVDF film was investigated. Results indicate that the poling time and grid voltage have no substantial influence on the phase transition behaviour of PVDF. However, they were found to have a significant effect on the piezoelectric charge constant of PVDF.

  11. Factorization and resummation for collinear poles in QCD amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance J.; Magnea, Lorenzo; Sterman, George

    2008-05-28

    We study the origin of subleading soft and collinear poles of form factors and amplitudes in dimensionally-regulated massless gauge theories. In the case of form factors of fundamental fields, these poles originate from a single function of the coupling, denoted G({alpha}{sub s}), depending on both the spin and gauge quantum numbers of the field. We relate G({alpha}{sub s}) to gauge-theory matrix elements involving the gluon field strength. We then show that G({alpha}{sub s}) is the sum of three terms: a universal eikonal anomalous dimension, a universal non-eikonal contribution, given by the coefficient B{sub {delta}}({alpha}{sub s}) of {delta}(1-z) in the collinear evolution kernel, and a process-dependent short-distance coefficient function, which does not contribute to infrared poles. Using general results on the factorization of soft and collinear singularities in fixed-angle massless gauge theory amplitudes, we conclude that all such singularities are captured by the eikonal approximation, supplemented only by the knowledge of B{sub {delta}}({alpha}{sub s}). We explore the consequences of our results for conformal gauge theories, where in particular we find a simple exact relation between the form factor and the cusp anomalous dimension.

  12. Lunar South Pole Illumination: Review, Reassessment, and Power System Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, James

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews past analyses and research related to lunar south pole illumination and presents results of independent illumination analyses using an analytical tool and a radar digital elevation model. The analysis tool enables assessment at most locations near the lunar poles for any time and any year. Average illumination fraction, energy storage duration, solar/horizon terrain elevation profiles and illumination fraction profiles are presented for various highly illuminated sites which have been identified for manned or unmanned operations. The format of the data can be used by power system designers to develop mass optimized solar and energy storage systems. Data are presented for the worse case lunar day (a critical power planning bottleneck) as well as three lunar days during lunar south pole winter. The main site under consideration by present lunar mission planners (on the Crater Shackleton rim) is shown to have, for the worse case lunar day, a 0.71 average illumination fraction and 73 to 117 hours required for energy storage (depending on power system type). Linking other sites and including towers at either site are shown to not completely eliminate the need for energy storage.

  13. Means and method for nonuniform poling of piezoelectric transducers

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, David K.; Margetan, Frank J.; Hasselbusch, Michael D.; Wormley, Samuel J.; Hughes, Michael S.; Thompson, Donald O.

    1990-10-09

    An apparatus and method for nonuniform poling of piezoelectric transducers includes machining one or more indentation into an end of a piezoelectric rod and cutting the rod to present a thickened disk shape. Highly electrically conductive material is deposited on at least the indentations in the one end and on at least portions of the opposite face of the member. One or more electrodes are configured to matingly fit within the indentations on the one face of the disk, with a like number of electrodes being positionable on the opposite face of the material. Electrical power is then applied to the electrodes in desired amounts, polarity, and duration. The indentations vary the electrical field produced within the piezoelectric material to produce nonuniform poling in the material. The thick disk is then cut to remove the indentations and to present a thin, flat two sided disk for installation in a conventional piezoelectric transducer probe. The indentations are selected to produce poling in accordance with desired transducer response profiles such as Gaussian or Bessel functions.

  14. Means and method for nonuniform poling of piezoelectric transducers

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, D.K.; Margetan, F.J.; Hasselbusch, M.D.; Wormley, S.J.; Hughes, M.S.; Thompson, D.O.

    1990-10-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for nonuniform poling of piezoelectric transducers includes machining one or more indentation into an end of a piezoelectric rod and cutting the rod to present a thickened disk shape. Highly electrically conductive material is deposited on at least the indentations in the one end and on at least portions of the opposite face of the member. One or more electrodes are configured to matingly fit within the indentations on the one face of the disk, with a like number of electrodes being positionable on the opposite face of the material. Electrical power is then applied to the electrodes in desired amounts, polarity, and duration. The indentations vary the electrical field produced within the piezoelectric material to produce nonuniform poling in the material. The thick disk is then cut to remove the indentations and to present a thin, flat two sided disk for installation in a conventional piezoelectric transducer probe. The indentations are selected to produce poling in accordance with desired transducer response profiles such as Gaussian or Bessel functions. 14 figs.

  15. Poling of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A.; Zhao, Ping

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to create and evaluate a smart composite structure that can be used for integrated load sensing and structural health monitoring. In this structure, PVDF films are used as the matrix material instead of epoxy resin or other thermoplastics. The reinforcements are two layers of carbon fiber with one layer of Kevlar separating them. Due to the electrical conductivity properties of carbon fiber and the dielectric effect of Kevlar, the structure acts as a capacitor. Furthermore, the piezoelectric properties of the PVDF matrix can be used to monitor the response of the structure under applied loads. In order to exploit the piezoelectric properties of PVDF, the PVDF material must be polarized to align the dipole moments of its crystalline structure. The optimal condition for poling the structure was found by performing a 23 factorial design of experiment (DoE). The factors that were studied in DoE were temperature, voltage, and duration of poling. Finally, the response of the poled structure was monitored by exposing the samples to an applied load.

  16. On the Double Pole Structure of the Λ(1405)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, Luis; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio

    In the last decade there have been increased theoretical and experimental evidences about the existence of two poles associated to the Λ(1405). In this contribution we summarize several recent works presenting a successful strategy to extract the position of the two Λ(1405) poles from experimental photoproduction data on the γp → KπΣ reaction at Jefferson Lab. The idea is based on considering a production mechanism as model independent as possible and implementing the final state interaction of the final meson-baryon pair based on small modifications of the unitary chiral perturbation theory amplitudes. Precise values for the two poles of the Λ(1405) resonance are then provided. On the other hand, we also present other work where we analyze theoretically the Λb → J/ψK-p reaction from where a recent LHCb experiment extracts a Λ(1405) contribution in the K-p spectrum close to threshold and two baryon states of hidden charm in the J/ψ p spectrum, claimed to be pentaquarks. By assuming that the observed narrow state around 4450 MeV has a nature stemming mostly from {\\bar{D}}\

  17. CROW{trademark} FIELD DEMONSTRATION WITH BELL LUMBER AND POLE

    SciTech Connect

    L. John Fahy; Lyle A. Johnson, Jr.

    1997-04-01

    Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated for Western Research Institute (WRI) to implement an in situ remediation project for the contaminated aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site in New Brighton, Minnesota. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Waste (CROW{trademark}) process, which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) (Johnson and Sudduth 1989). Wood treating activities began at the Bell Pole Site in 1923 and have included the use of creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in a fuel oil carrier. Creosote was used as a wood preservative from 1923 to 1958. Provalene 4-A, a non-sludging fuel-oil-type carrier for PCP, was used from 1952 until it was no longer commercially available in 1968. A 5-6% mixture of PCP in fuel oil has been used as a wood preservative since 1952, and a fuel-oil-type carrier, P-9, has been used since 1968. While reviewing the site evaluation information, it became apparent that better site characterization would enhance the outcome of the project. Additional coring indicated that the area's extent of the contaminated soils was approximately eight times greater than initially believed. Because of these uncertainties, a pilot test was conducted, which provided containment and organic recovery information that assisted in the design of the full-scale CROW process demonstration.

  18. Background Studies for Acoustic Neutrino Detection at the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The detection of acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions is a promising method. to measure the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos expected on Earth. The energy threshold for this process depends strongly on the absolute noise level in the target material. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS). deployed in the upper part of four boreholes of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, has monitored the noise in Antarctic ice at the geographic South Pole for more than two years down to 500 m depth. The noise is very stable and Gaussian distributed, Lacking an in situ calibration up to now, laboratory measurements have been used to estimate the absolute noise level in the 10-50 kHz frequency range to be smaller than 20 mPa. Using a threshold trigger. sensors of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup registered acoustic events in the IceCube detector volume and its vicinity. Acoustic signals from refreezing IceCube holes and from anthropogenic sources have been used to test the localization of acoustic events. An upper limit on the neutrino flux at energies E(sub v) > 10(exp 11) GeV is derived from acoustic data taken over eight months.

  19. Dynamics of the North Sea pole tide reconsidered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    1986-01-01

    The anomalous tide in the North Sea, driven by the Chandler wobble, is here re-examined. A previously published solution in which these 'pole tide' observations were explained as a forced co-oscillation from the deep water tide is shown to be untenable, because it is very unlikely that the deep ocean tide is anything but equilibrium. Using the same physics as in the previous solution (viscous, linear, quasi-geostrophic dynamics), it is now suggested that the only plausible explanation is that there is a coincidental resonance between the long-wavelength branch topographic Rossby wave of the North Sea and the direct driving by the pole tide potential. This resonance is not a basin-resonance, but that of a free wave driven by a travelling forcing function. Simplified models reproduce the observations in qualitative fashion. If this explanation is the correct one, then the Arctic seas north of Asia and North America appear to be likely candidates as other regions where there may be a large pole tide response and, hence, a locus of wobble dissipation. Given the difficulties of observation, the long times required, and the general instability of the dissipation calculation with the simplified analytical model, probably a numerical model will be required for further progress.

  20. Manliness and Exploration: The Discovery of the North Pole.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Americans crowded newsstands in early 1910 to read Robert Peary's firsthand account of his expedition to the North Pole. As they read "The Discovery of the North Pole," serialized exclusively in Hampton's Magazine, few knew that this harrowing, hypermasculine tale was really crafted by New York poet Elsa Barker. Barker's authorship of the North Pole story put her at the center of a large community of explorers, writers, patrons, and fans who were taken with Arctic exploration as much for its national symbolism as for its thrilling tales. The fact that Barker was a woman made her ascent into elite expeditionary circles remarkable. Yet this essay argues that it was also representative: women shaped the ideas and practices of manly exploration at home as well as in the field. Peary's dependence upon women writers, patrons, and audiences came at a time when explorers were breaking away from their traditional base of support: male scientific networks that had promoted their expeditions since the 1850s. Despite the "go-it-alone" ideals of their expedition accounts, explorers adopted masculine roles shaped by the world around them: by the growing influence of women writers, readers, and lecture-goers and, simultaneously, by the declining influence of traditional scientific peers and patrons. Barker and Peary's story, then, reveals a new fault line that opened up between scientists and explorers in the late nineteenth century over the issue of manliness, a fault line still largely uncharted in historical scholarship.

  1. Wind Stress Forcing of the North Sea "Pole Tide"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, William P.; Chao, Benjamin Fong; Zheng, Dawei; Au, Andrew Y.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted numerical simulations of the wind-forcing of the sea level variations in the North Sea using a barotropic ocean model with realistic geography, bathymetry, and boundary conditions, to examine the forcing of the 14-month "pole tide" which is known to be strong along the Denmark- Netherlands coast. The simulation input is the monthly-mean surface wind stress field from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis for the 40-year period 1958-1997. The output sea level response was then compared with 10 coastal tide gauge records from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). Besides the strong seasonal variations, several prominent quasi-periodicities exist at around 7 years, 3 years, 14 months, 9 months, and 6.5 months. Correlation and spectral analyses show remarkable agreement between the model output and the observations, particularly in the 14-month, or Chandler period band. The latter indicates that the enhanced pole tide found in the North Sea along the Denmark-Netherlands coast is actually the coastal setup response to wind stress forcing with a periodicity of 14 months. We find no need to invoke a geophysical explanation involving resonance-enhancement of pole tide in the North Sea to explain the observations.

  2. Effect of roof strength in injury mitigation during pole impact.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Keith; Hutchinson, John; Mihora, Dennis; Kumar, Sri; Frieder, Russell; Sances, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Motor vehicle accidents involving pole impacts often result in serious head and neck injuries to occupants. Pole impacts are typically associated with rollover and side collisions. During such events, the roof structure is often deformed into the occupant survival space. The existence of a strengthened roof structure would reduce roof deformation and accordingly provide better protection to occupants. The present study examines the effect of reinforced (strengthened) roofs using experimental crash study and computer model simulation. The experimental study includes the production cab structure of a pickup truck. The cab structure was loaded using an actual telephone pole under controlled laboratory conditions. The cab structure was subjected to two separate load conditions at the A-pillar and door frame. The contact force and deformation were measured using a force gauge and potentiometer, respectively. A computer finite element model was created to simulate the experimental studies. The results of finite element model matched well with experimental data during two different load conditions. The validated finite element model was then used to simulate a reinforced roof structure. The reinforced roof significantly reduced the structural deformations compared to those observed in the production roof. The peak deformation was reduced by approximately 75% and peak velocity was reduced by approximately 50%. Such a reduction in the deformation of the roof structure helps to maintain a safe occupant survival space.

  3. Background Studies for Acoustic Neutrino Detection at the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Stamatikos, M.

    2012-01-01

    The detection of acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions is a promising method. to measure the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos expected on Earth. The energy threshold for this process depends strongly on the absolute noise level in the target material. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS). deployed in the upper part of four boreholes of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, has monitored the noise in Antarctic ice at the geographic South Pole for more than two years down to 500 m depth. The noise is very stable and Gaussian distributed, Lacking an in situ calibration up to now, laboratory measurements have been used to estimate the absolute noise level in the 10-50 kHz frequency range to be smaller than 20 mPa. Using a threshold trigger. sensors of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup registered acoustic events in the IceCube detector volume and its vicinity. Acoustic signals from refreezing IceCube holes and from anthropogenic sources have been used to test the localization of acoustic events. An upper limit on the neutrino flux at energies E(sub v) > 10(exp 11) GeV is derived from acoustic data taken over eight months.

  4. Pole-phase modulated toroidal winding for an induction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.; Ostovic, V.

    1999-11-02

    A stator (10) for an induction machine for a vehicle has a cylindrical core (12) with inner and outer slots (26, 28) extending longitudinally along the inner and outer peripheries between the end faces (22, 24). Each outer slot is associated with several adjacent inner slots. A plurality of toroidal coils (14) are wound about the core and laid in the inner and outer slots. Each coil occupies a single inner slot and is laid in the associated outer slot thereby minimizing the distance the coil extends from the end faces and minimizing the length of the induction machine. The toroidal coils are configured for an arbitrary pole phase modulation wherein the coils are configured with variable numbers of phases and poles for providing maximum torque for cranking and switchable to another phase and pole configuration for alternator operation. An adaptor ring (36) circumferentially positioned about the stator improves mechanical strength, and provides a coolant channel manifold (34) for removing heat produced in stator windings during operation.

  5. Background studies for acoustic neutrino detection at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Denger, T.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, T.; Kroll, G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lafebre, S.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Majumdar, P.; Marotta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Ono, M.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Prikockis, M.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schmidt, T.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Slipak, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stephens, G.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Stür, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsk, P.

    2012-01-01

    The detection of acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions is a promising method to measure the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos expected on Earth. The energy threshold for this process depends strongly on the absolute noise level in the target material. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), deployed in the upper part of four boreholes of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, has monitored the noise in Antarctic ice at the geographic South Pole for more than two years down to 500 m depth. The noise is very stable and Gaussian distributed. Lacking an in situ calibration up to now, laboratory measurements have been used to estimate the absolute noise level in the 10-50 kHz frequency range to be smaller than 20 mPa. Using a threshold trigger, sensors of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup registered acoustic events in the IceCube detector volume and its vicinity. Acoustic signals from refreezing IceCube holes and from anthropogenic sources have been used to test the localization of acoustic events. An upper limit on the neutrino flux at energies Eν > 1011 GeV is derived from acoustic data taken over eight months.

  6. Narrow-band ELF events observed from South Pole Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavisides, J.; Weaver, C.; Lessard, M.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) waves are typically in the range of 3 Hz - 3 kHz and can play a role in acceleration and pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles in the radiation belts. Observations of a not uncommon, but not well studied ELF phenomenon are presented with ground-based data from South Pole Station. The narrow-band waves last approximately one or two minutes maintaining bandwidth over the course of the event, begin around 100 Hz, decrease to about 70 Hz, and typically show a higher frequency harmonic. The waves have only been documented at four locations - Heacock, 1974 (Alaska); Sentman and Ehring, 1994 (California); Wang et al, 2005 and Wang et al, 2011 (Taiwan); and Kim et al, 2006 (South Pole). The waves observed at the South Pole are not detected when the Sun drops below a 10 degree elevation angle, which is not true for the other locations. We extend the study of Kim et al, 2006, and explore possible generation mechanisms including sunlit ionosphere and ion cyclotron wave modes, as well as correspondence with energetic particle precipitation.

  7. Automatic Pole and Q-Value Extraction for RF Structures

    SciTech Connect

    C. Potratz, H.-W. Glock, U. van Rienen, F. Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    The experimental characterization of RF structures like accelerating cavities often demands for measuring resonant frequencies of Eigenmodes and corresponding (loaded) Q-values over a wide spectral range. A common procedure to determine the Q-values is the -3dB method, which works well for isolated poles, but may not be applicable directly in case of multiple poles residing in close proximity (e.g. for adjacent transverse modes differing by polarization). Although alternative methods may be used in such cases, this often comes at the expense of inherent systematic errors. We have developed an automation algorithm, which not only speeds up the measurement time significantly, but is also able to extract Eigenfrequencies and Q-values both for well isolated and overlapping poles. At the same time the measurement accuracy may be improved as a major benefit. To utilize this procedure merely complex scattering parameters have to be recorded for the spectral range of interest. In this paper we present the proposed algorithm applied to experimental data recorded for superconducting higher-order-mode damped multi-cell cavities as an application of high importance.

  8. Different pole structures in line shapes of the X(3872)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xian-Wei; Oller, J. A.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a near-threshold parameterization that is more general than the effective-range expansion up to and including the effective range because it can also handle a near-threshold zero in the D^0\\bar{D}^{*0} S-wave. In terms of it we analyze the CDF data on inclusive p\\bar{p} scattering to J/ψ π ^+π ^-, and the Belle and BaBar data on B decays to K J/ψ π ^+π ^- and K D\\bar{D}^{*0} around the D^0\\bar{D}^{*0} threshold. It is shown that data can be reproduced with similar quality for X(3872) being a bound and/or a virtual state. We also find that X(3872) might be a higher-order virtual-state pole (double or triplet pole), in the limit in which the small D^{*0} width vanishes. Once the latter is restored the corrections to the pole position are non-analytic and much bigger than the D^{*0} width itself. The X(3872) compositeness coefficient in D^0\\bar{D}^{*0} ranges from nearly 0 up to 1 in the different scenarios.

  9. Pole-phase modulated toroidal winding for an induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John Michael; Ostovic, Vlado

    1999-11-02

    A stator (10) for an induction machine for a vehicle has a cylindrical core (12) with inner and outer slots (26, 28) extending longitudinally along the inner and outer peripheries between the end faces (22, 24). Each outer slot is associated with several adjacent inner slots. A plurality of toroidal coils (14) are wound about the core and laid in the inner and outer slots. Each coil occupies a single inner slot and is laid in the associated outer slot thereby minimizing the distance the coil extends from the end faces and minimizing the length of the induction machine. The toroidal coils are configured for an arbitrary pole phase modulation wherein the coils are configured with variable numbers of phases and poles for providing maximum torque for cranking and switchable to a another phase and pole configuration for alternator operation. An adaptor ring (36) circumferentially positioned about the stator improves mechanical strength, and provides a coolant channel manifold (34) for removing heat produced in stator windings during operation.

  10. Derivation of Feynman rules for higher order poles using cross-ratio identities in CHY construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kang; Rao, Junjie; Feng, Bo

    2017-06-01

    In order to generalize the integration rules to general CHY integrands which include higher order poles, algorithms are proposed in two directions. One is to conjecture new rules, and the other is to use the cross-ratio identity method. In this paper, we use the cross-ratio identity approach to re-derive the conjectured integration rules involving higher order poles for several special cases: the single double pole, single triple pole and duplexdouble pole. The equivalence between the present formulas and the previously conjectured ones is discussed for the first two situations.

  11. A poling study of lead zirconate titanate/polyurethane 0-3 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. T.; Kwok, K. W.; Shin, F. G.; Kopf, S.

    2007-08-01

    0-3 composites of lead zirconate titanate particles dispersed in a thermoplastic elastomer polyurethane matrix were fabricated. The dielectric permittivity and loss of the composite film were measured and compared to the theoretical values. The composites were polarized by the ac fields at different frequencies. With the application of the Sawyer-Tower circuit, the D-E hysteresis loops of the composites can be measured during the poling process. By decreasing the poling frequency, the composite sample shows a larger "remanent" polarization at the same poling field. To evaluate the poling effectiveness, the pyroelectric coefficients of the poled composite samples were measured by a dynamic method.

  12. Pole-Like Object Extraction from Mobile LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Han; Tan, Feitong; Wang, Ruisheng

    2016-06-01

    Object detection and recognition from LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data has been a research topic in the fields of photogrammetry and computer vision. Unlike point clouds collected in well-controlled indoor environments, point clouds in urban environments are more complex due to complexity of the real world. For example, trees sometimes close to signs or buildings, which will cause occlusions in the point clouds. Current object detection or reconstruction algorithms will have problems when recognizing objects with severe occlusions caused by trees etc. In this paper, a robust vegetation removal method and a DBSCAN based pole-like object detection method are proposed. Based on observation that major difference between vegetation and other rigid objects is their penetrability with respect to LiDAR, we introduce a local roughness measure to differentiate rigid objects from non-rigid ones (vegetation in this paper). First, a local sphere with a small radius is generated for each input point. Three principal components of the local sphere are then calculated, and a plane is determined. The roughness is obtained through calculating the standard deviation of distances from all inside points to the plane by a weighted summation of the normalized distances. The further the point to the plane, the smaller the weight is. Finally, a graph cuts based method is introduced to classify the input point sets into two groups. The data term is defined by the normalized roughness of the current point, and the smoothness term is defined by the normalized distance between the point and its nearest neighbour point. In terms of pole-like object detection, first, a uniformed 2D grid is generated through projecting all the points to the XY-plane. The seed points of the pole-like objects are obtained by determining the x and y coordinates by the centres of the highest density cells of the grid and the z coordinate by the mean height of the point sets of each object. Finally, a DBSCAN

  13. Autumn at Titan's South Pole: The 220 cm-1 Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Achterberg, R. K.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; de Kok, R. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.

    2015-10-01

    Beginning in 2012 an atmospheric cloud known by its far-infrared emission has formed rapidly at Tit an's South Pole [1, 2]. The build-up of this condensate is a result of deepening temperatures and a gathering of gases as Winter approaches. Emission from the cloud in the south has been doubling each year since 2012, in contrast to the north where it has halved every 3.8 years since 2004. The morphology of the cloud in the south is quite different from that in the north. In the north, the cloud has extended over the whole polar region beyond 55 N, whereas in the south the cloud has been confined to within about 10 degrees of the pole. The cloud in the north has had the form of a uniform hood, whereas the southern cloud has been much more complex. A map from December 2014,recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini, showed the 220 cm-1 emission coming from a distinct ring with a maximum at about 80 S. In contrast, emissions from the gases HC3N, C4H2 and C6H6 peaked near the pole and had a ring at 70 S. The 220 cm-1 ring at 80 S coincided with the minimum in the gas emission pattern. The80 S condensate ring encompassed the vortex cloud seen by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS)[3, 4]. Both the 220 cm-1 ring and the gas "bull's-eye" pattern were centered on a point that was shifted from the geographic South Pole by 4 degrees in the direction of the Sun. This corresponds to the overall tilt of Titan's atmosphere discovered from temperature maps early in the Cassini mission by Achterberg et al. [5]. The tilt may be reinforced by the presumably twice-yearly (north and south) spin-up of the atmosphere at the autumnal pole. The bull's-eye pattern of the gas emissions can be explained by the retrieved abundance distributions, which are maximum near the pole and decrease sharply toward lower latitudes, together with temperatures that are minimum at the pole and increase toward lower latitudes

  14. Rotation of the Colorado Plateau: An updated analysis of paleomagnetic poles

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, P.; Gordon, R.G. )

    1990-09-01

    All available Jurassic, Triassic, and late Paleozoic paleomagnetic poles from the Colorado Plateau and stable North America are used to estimate the rotation of the Colorado Plateau relative to stable North America since Jurassic time. The paleomagnetic poles differ from those of a prior study (Bryan and Gordon, 1986) through the addition of seven recently published poles, the deletion of one pole, and the replacement of two others. The authors also improve on the prior analysis by omitting Cretaceous poles. From the systematic offset between plateau poles and stable North American poles they estimate rotation of the Colorado Plateau to be 5.0{degree} {sup +2.4{degree}}{sub {minus}2.3{degree}} (95% confidence limits) clockwise, {approximately}1{degree} larger than they found before. The null hypothesis of no systematic difference between plateau poles and stable North American poles can be rejected with a formally high level of confidence (99.99%). The hypothesis that the systematic differences between plateau and off-plateau poles is as large as 10{degree}, as proposed by several workers using fewer poles, can be rejected at an equally high level of confidence.

  15. Live imaging of spindle pole disorganization in docetaxel-treated multicolor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaushi, Shinji . E-mail: ssaka@biochem.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Nishida, Kumi; Minamikawa, Harumi; Fukada, Takashi; Oka, Shigenori; Sugimoto, Kenji

    2007-06-08

    Treatment of cells with docetaxel at low concentrations induces aberrant bipolar spindles of which two centrosomes stay at only one pole, and also induces multipolar spindles. To gain insight into the relations between centrosome impairment and structural defects of the spindle, live-cell imaging was performed on a human MDA Auro/imp/H3 cell line in which centrosomes/mitotic spindles, nuclear membrane and chromatin were simultaneously visualized by fluorescent proteins. In the presence of docetaxel at IC{sub 50} concentration, the centrosomes did not segregate, and multiple aster-like structures ectopically arose around the disappearing nuclear membrane. Those ectopic structures formed an acentrosomal pole opposing to the two-centrosomes-containing pole. In late metaphase, one pole often fragmented into multiple spindle poles, leading multipolar division. These results suggest that spindle pole fragility may be induced by centrosome impairment, and collapse of the pole may contribute to induction of aneuploid daughter cells.

  16. Understanding the cancelation of double poles in the Pfaffian of CHY-formulism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rijun; Du, Yi-Jian; Feng, Bo

    2017-06-01

    For a physical field theory, the tree-level amplitudes should possess only single poles. However, when computing amplitudes with Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formulation, individual terms in the intermediate steps will contribute higher-order poles. In this paper, we investigate the cancelation of higher-order poles in CHY formula with Pfaffian as the building block. We develop a diagrammatic rule for expanding the reduced Pfaffian. Then by organizing diagrams in appropriate groups and applying the cross-ratio identities, we show that all potential contributions to higher-order poles in the reduced Pfaffian are canceled out, i.e., only single poles survive in Yang-Mills theory and gravity. Furthermore, we show the cancelations of higher-order poles in other field theories by introducing appropriate truncations, based on the single pole structure of Pfaffian.

  17. Mother Earths and the Suns Magnetic Pole Reversals; Jupiters Red Cyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mc Leod, Edward M.; Balam Matagmaon, Chan; Pawa Matagamon, Sagamo

    2003-10-01

    Our prior models for magnetic pole reversal used elementary physics analysis of a vertically looping solid metal core falling off. The cores momentum eventually extinguishes the clockwise circulating positively charged fluid metal, leading to magnetic field fallback to zero. That metal circulation was postulated as the cause of the incorrectly directed north magnetic pole at the south geographic pole. When the orthogonally oriented oscillations of the solid core reestablish fluid metal circulation, it could be either properly ccw, yielding pole reversal, or along the plane of the original loop, so that there would be a north pole at India. Similar considerations could explain the twenty-two year cycle pole reversals of the sun. Jupiters cyclonic red storm could be merely the intersection of its embedding ionized belt of gas with the perpendicularly oriented magnetic field of a secondary pole directly below it. Meandering secondary magnetic dipoles intersected by vigorous winds, deflect them inward as the source of hurricane-like earthly storms!

  18. Laparoscopic upper pole heminephroureterectomy in children: Seven-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Marte, Antonio; Papparella, Alfonso; Pintozzi, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive surgery is the current approach to perform heminephroureterectomy (HN) in children. This can be obtained through a transperitoneal (TP) or a retroperitoneal approach. Here, we report our experience using a TP approach. Materials and Methods: From 2005 to 2014, 22 TP laparoscopic upper poles HN were performed at our institution. There were nine girls and 13 boys aged between 20 months and 6 years (mean age 3.9). Eight patients were diagnosed prenatally, 17 patients presented with urinary tract infection (UTI) and three with vomiting and failure to thrive. The indication for HN was reflux nephropathy and UTI in non-functioning upper pole in 19 patients and cystic dysplasia in 1 patient. The surgical technique involved the following steps: Cystoscopic recognition; positioning of 3-4 trocar (right HN); identification of the kidney (detachment of the colon); isolation and low ligation of the dilated ureter; decrossing from renal vessels; section of the parenchyma by LigaSure; haemostasis with clips and LigaSure; drain. Results: The mean operative time was 154 min (range: 81-220 min). All patients were discharged from the 2nd to 4th day. Neither major complication nor conversion was recorded. 1 patient presented leakage of urine for 7 days from the drainage which resolved spontaneously. At ultrasound follow-up, 5 patients showed a secondary perirenal cyst, 2-5 cm diameter that resolved spontaneously. Conclusion: The results indicate that laparoscopic upper pole heminephrectomy is the treatment of choice in cases of non-functioning dilated lower segments of duplicated kidneys. The use of laparoscopic approach offers a good working space, a good visual control of the vessels and allows a very low isolation of the ureteral stump which counterbalance the peritoneal violation. PMID:26712285

  19. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-12

    A BARREL balloon launches up into the sky, destined to float on the circumpolar winds around the South Pole for up to three weeks while measuring Earth's magnetic field and energetic particles from the radiation belts. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/Brett Anderson Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  20. GREM 1 and POLE variants in hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Eiengård, Frida; Lundstam, Ulf; Zagoras, Theofanis; Nilsson, Staffan; Edsjö, Anders; Pedersen, Jan; Svensson, Janhenry; Skullman, Stefan; Karlsson, B. Göran; Björk, Jan; Nordling, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary factors are thought to play a role in at least one third of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) but only a limited proportion of these have mutations in known high‐penetrant genes. In a relatively large part of patients with a few or multiple colorectal polyps the underlying genetic cause of the disease is still unknown. Using exome sequencing in combination with linkage analyses together with detection of copy‐number variations (CNV), we have identified a duplication in the regulatory region of the GREM1 gene in a family with an attenuated/atypical polyposis syndrome. In addition, 107 patients with colorectal cancer and/or polyposis were analyzed for mutations in the candidate genes identified. We also performed screening of the exonuclease domain of the POLE gene in a subset of these patients. The duplication of 16 kb in the regulatory region of GREM1 was found to be disease‐causing in the family. Functional analyses revealed a higher expression of the GREM1 gene in colorectal tissue in duplication carriers. Screening of the exonuclease domain of POLE in additional CRC patients identified a probable causative novel variant c.1274A>G, p.Lys425Arg. In conclusion a high penetrant duplication in the regulatory region of GREM1, predisposing to CRC, was identified in a family with attenuated/atypical polyposis. A POLE variant was identified in a patient with early onset CRC and a microsatellite stable (MSS) tumor. Mutations leading to increased expression of genes can constitute disease‐causing mutations in hereditary CRC syndromes. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26493165

  1. GREM1 and POLE variants in hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rohlin, Anna; Eiengård, Frida; Lundstam, Ulf; Zagoras, Theofanis; Nilsson, Staffan; Edsjö, Anders; Pedersen, Jan; Svensson, Janhenry; Skullman, Stefan; Karlsson, B Göran; Björk, Jan; Nordling, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary factors are thought to play a role in at least one third of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) but only a limited proportion of these have mutations in known high-penetrant genes. In a relatively large part of patients with a few or multiple colorectal polyps the underlying genetic cause of the disease is still unknown. Using exome sequencing in combination with linkage analyses together with detection of copy-number variations (CNV), we have identified a duplication in the regulatory region of the GREM1 gene in a family with an attenuated/atypical polyposis syndrome. In addition, 107 patients with colorectal cancer and/or polyposis were analyzed for mutations in the candidate genes identified. We also performed screening of the exonuclease domain of the POLE gene in a subset of these patients. The duplication of 16 kb in the regulatory region of GREM1 was found to be disease-causing in the family. Functional analyses revealed a higher expression of the GREM1 gene in colorectal tissue in duplication carriers. Screening of the exonuclease domain of POLE in additional CRC patients identified a probable causative novel variant c.1274A>G, p.Lys425Arg. In conclusion a high penetrant duplication in the regulatory region of GREM1, predisposing to CRC, was identified in a family with attenuated/atypical polyposis. A POLE variant was identified in a patient with early onset CRC and a microsatellite stable (MSS) tumor. Mutations leading to increased expression of genes can constitute disease-causing mutations in hereditary CRC syndromes. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A Search for Phyllosilicates Near the Lunar South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, E. A.; Vilas, F.; Domingue, D. L.; Stockstill, K. R.; Coombs, C. R.; McFadden, L. A.

    1996-09-01

    The Clementine bistatic radar experiment observed strong signals within 5(o) latitude of the lunar south pole suggesting that ice could be trapped in the 16000 km(2) permanently-shadowed region (Nozette et al. ,LPSC, 1996). Theoretical studies (e.g., Ingersoll et al., Icarus, 1992) suggest that water ice could exist in permanently shadowed regions on the moon near the poles extending to +/- 76.5(o) latitude. We decided to investigate the possibility of the interaction of liquid H2O with surrounding rock by looking for the spectral signature shown by some phyllosilicates, products of the aqueous alteration process, near the lunar south pole. We modeled the transmission curves of spectra of 20 asteroids. Ten of these spectra are of C-class asteroids showing the 0.7mu m absorption feature attributed to Fe(2+) -> Fe(3+) in oxidized iron in phyllosilicates present in 50% of existing C-class asteroid spectra. The other ten included asteroids of S, C, D, P, and unusual classes showing a variety of absorption features. An algorithm was designed to differentiate between the Galileo filter photometry of those asteroids having spectra that show the 0.7-mu m feature and those that do not. Telescopic spectra of various lunar sites were also examined. None of these lunar spectra showed any 0.7-mu m absorption feature. Images from the Galileo Lunmap 14 image suite (Gaddis et al., JGR 100, 1995) taken with the GRN, RED, 756-nm and 889-nm filters were coregistered for an area covering -84(o) to -60(o) latitude, near 90(o) W longitude. This area was chosen as an area where the spatial resolution was sufficient to correlate data accurately among the different images, and where areas that both have and have not undergone aqueous alteration could be expected. The results of the application of the algorithm for detecting the 0.7-mu m feature will be presented.

  3. Energy harvesting using AC machines with high effective pole count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Richard Theodore

    In this thesis, ways to improve the power conversion of rotating generators at low rotor speeds in energy harvesting applications were investigated. One method is to increase the pole count, which increases the generator back-emf without also increasing the I2R losses, thereby increasing both torque density and conversion efficiency. One machine topology that has a high effective pole count is a hybrid "stepper" machine. However, the large self inductance of these machines decreases their power factor and hence the maximum power that can be delivered to a load. This effect can be cancelled by the addition of capacitors in series with the stepper windings. A circuit was designed and implemented to automatically vary the series capacitance over the entire speed range investigated. The addition of the series capacitors improved the power output of the stepper machine by up to 700%. At low rotor speeds, with the addition of series capacitance, the power output of the hybrid "stepper" was more than 200% that of a similarly sized PMDC brushed motor. Finally, in this thesis a hybrid lumped parameter / finite element model was used to investigate the impact of number, shape and size of the rotor and stator teeth on machine performance. A typical off-the-shelf hybrid stepper machine has significant cogging torque by design. This cogging torque is a major problem in most small energy harvesting applications. In this thesis it was shown that the cogging and ripple torque can be dramatically reduced. These findings confirm that high-pole-count topologies, and specifically the hybrid stepper configuration, are an attractive choice for energy harvesting applications.

  4. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-28

    The BARREL instrument in Antarctica– prior to being encased in its protective box – destined to float beneath a giant balloon to study magnetic fields and energetic particles near the South Pole. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/Brett Anderson Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. SNAP sky background at the north ecliptic pole

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, Greg

    2002-07-01

    I summarize the extant direct and indirect data on the sky background SNAP will see at the North Ecliptic Pole over the wavelength range 0.4 < {lambda} < 1.7 {micro}m. At the spatial resolution of SNAP the sky background due to stars and galaxies is resolved, so the only source considered is zodiacal light. Several models are explored to provide interpolation in wavelength between the broadband data from HST and COBE observations. I believe the input data are now established well enough that the accuracy of the sky background presented here is sufficient for SNAP simulations, and that it will stand up to scrutiny by reviewers.

  6. Wind Forcing of the North Sea Pole Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, W.; Chao, B. F.; Zheng, D. W.; Au, Z. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The Chandler wobble of the earth's rotation has a period near 14 months and sets up the 0.5 cm amplitude pole tide in the deep oceans, However, the pole tide is anomalously large in the North Sea, where the amplitude increases sharply up to 3 cm along the continental coast. It is shown here that the sea levels are well correlated with winds at the pole tide frequency. The Princeton Ocean Model is used to investigate the response of the North Sea to wind forcing. The barotropic numerical ocean model depicts realistic coastlines and bathymetry at 5 ft x 5 ft resolution, with 97 x 73 grid points. The monthly mean wind fields for the 40-year period (1958-1997) from the National Centers for Atmospheric Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis were used to force the model. The winds were converted to stress with a neutral drag coefficient that varied linearly with windspeed (instead of using the NCEP windstress). A 5-day simulation was made for each month until the resulting flow regime came into equilibrium, and model water levels at various station locations were saved for comparison with tidal-gauge observed sea levels from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). The comparison is made for 10 North Sea stations with high quality tide gauge data. We find: (1) good agreement in annual and semi-annual phases and in the trend of amplitude w.r.t. latitude; (2) more importantly for this study, the model-predicted and observed non-seasonal sea level variations show a very significant temporal correlation as well as spectral coherence. However, a large amplitude difference exists between the two sets -- the overall amplitude variability of the observed is generally a factor of 2-3 larger than the model prediction (this same phenomenon has been reported in ocean circulation studies, although the cause is not yet clear.) Our results indicate that the wind forcing is the main cause of the observed large pole tide in the North Sea.

  7. Multi-Body Orbit Architectures for Lunar South Pole Coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebow, D. J.; Ozimek, M. T.; Howell, K. C.; Folta, D. C.

    2006-01-01

    A potential ground station at the lunar south pole has prompted studies of orbit architectures that ensure adequate coverage. Constant communications can be achieved with two spacecraft in different combinations of Earth-Moon libration point orbits. Halo and vertical families, as well as other orbits near L1 and L2 are considered. The investigation includes detailed results using nine different orbits with periods ranging from 7 to 16 days. Natural solutions are generated in a full ephemeris model, including solar perturbations. A preliminary station-keeping analysis is also completed.

  8. Are Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies Viewed Pole-on?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    0.2’’ respectively. Figure 1 displays the position of each slit over a Barbosa et al. (2009) GMOS IFU image of the [S III] flux (which originates...C. Winge, H. Schmitt: Gemini/ GMOS IFU gas velocity ’tomography’ of the narrow line region of nearby active galaxies, MNRAS, 396 (2009) 2. [2] D...1995) 81. 4 P o S ( N L S 1 ) 0 5 0 Are NLS1s Pole-on? Travis C. Fischer 5 Figure 1: NGC 4051 GMOS IFU image showing integrated [SIII] flux

  9. Elliptical Chandler pole motions of the Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yury; Ferrandiz, Jose

    2010-05-01

    In the work the values of the period and eccentricity of Chandler motion of poles of axes of rotation of the Earth and Mars have been determined. The research has been carried out on the basis of developed earlier by authors an intermediate rotary Chandler-Euler motion of the weakly deformable celestial bodies (Barkin, Ferrandiz and Getino, 1996; Barkin, 1998). An influence of a liquid core on Chandler motion of a pole in the given work has not considered. The periods of the specified pole motions make 447.1 d for the Earth and 218.1 d for Mars. In comparison with Euler motions of poles because of elastic properties of planets the Chandler periods are increased accordingly on 142.8 d (about 46.9 %) for the Earth and on 26.2 d (on 13.7 %) for Mars. Values of eccentricities of specified Chandler motions of pole e = √b2 --a2- b (here a both b are smaller and big semi-axes of Chandler ellipse) make 0.09884 for the Earth and 0.3688 for Mars (accordingly, on 21.1 % and 6.2 % more than the appropriate values of eccentricities for models of planets as rigid non-spherical bodies). Axes of an ellipse a also b correspond to the principal equatorial axes of inertia of a planet Ox and Oyfor which the moments of inertia have the smallest valueA and middle value B. The pole of the principal axis of inertia Ox for the Earth is displaced to the west on the angle 14°9285, and the pole of the principal axis of inertia Ox for Mars is displaced to the west on the angle 105°0178 (in the appropriate basic geographical systems of coordinates of the given planets). For ellipticties of Chandler trajectories ɛ = (b- a)-b the values 0.004897 (for the Earth) and 0.07048 (for Mars) have been obtained. The specified values surpass by Euler values of appropriate ellipticties on 46.8 % (in case of the Earth) and on 13.3 % (in the case of Mars). Love number k2describing the elastic properties of planets, were accepted equal 0.30 for the Earth and 0.153 for Mars. Estimations of Chandler periods

  10. Electron muon scattering in the exotic Z(0)' pole

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, H.; Ravinez, O.; Romero, D.; Reyes, J.

    2009-04-30

    The search for new physics in the future Internacional Linear Collider ILC, implies the existence of new particles, among them, the Z(0)' particle. In this regard, we calculate the e{sup +}+e{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup +}+{mu}{sup -} scattering cross section near the Z(0)' pole, whitin the contex of the SU(3){sub L}xU(1){sub Y} weak model, which contains exotic leptons, quarks, and bosons (E,J,U,V) with the finality of obtain constraints in the parameters of the model.

  11. Pole-zero form fractional model identification in frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mansouri, R.; Djamah, T.; Djennoune, S.; Bettayeb, M.

    2009-03-05

    This paper deals with system identification in the frequency domain using non integer order models given in the pole-zero form. The usual identification techniques cannot be used in this case because of the non integer orders of differentiation which makes the problem strongly nonlinear. A general identification method based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is developed and allows to estimate the (2n+2m+1) parameters of the model. Its application to identify the ''skin effect'' of a squirrel cage induction machine modeling is then presented.

  12. The Chandler wobble of the poles and its amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenkov, N.

    2015-08-01

    It is shown that the period of the Chandler wobble of the poles (CWP) is a combined oscillation caused by three periodic processes experienced by the Earth: (a) lunisolar tides, (b) the precession of the orbit of the Earth's monthly revolution around the barycenter of the Earth-Moon system, and (c) the motion of the perigee of this orbit. The addition of the 1.20 - year Chandler wobble to sidereal, anomalistic, and synodic lunar yearly forcing gives rise slow periodic variations in the CWP amplitude with periods of 32 to 51 years.

  13. Wind Forcing of the North Sea Pole Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, W.; Chao, B. F.; Zheng, D. W.; Au, Z. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The Chandler wobble of the earth's rotation has a period near 14 months and sets up the 0.5 cm amplitude pole tide in the deep oceans, However, the pole tide is anomalously large in the North Sea, where the amplitude increases sharply up to 3 cm along the continental coast. It is shown here that the sea levels are well correlated with winds at the pole tide frequency. The Princeton Ocean Model is used to investigate the response of the North Sea to wind forcing. The barotropic numerical ocean model depicts realistic coastlines and bathymetry at 5 ft x 5 ft resolution, with 97 x 73 grid points. The monthly mean wind fields for the 40-year period (1958-1997) from the National Centers for Atmospheric Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis were used to force the model. The winds were converted to stress with a neutral drag coefficient that varied linearly with windspeed (instead of using the NCEP windstress). A 5-day simulation was made for each month until the resulting flow regime came into equilibrium, and model water levels at various station locations were saved for comparison with tidal-gauge observed sea levels from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). The comparison is made for 10 North Sea stations with high quality tide gauge data. We find: (1) good agreement in annual and semi-annual phases and in the trend of amplitude w.r.t. latitude; (2) more importantly for this study, the model-predicted and observed non-seasonal sea level variations show a very significant temporal correlation as well as spectral coherence. However, a large amplitude difference exists between the two sets -- the overall amplitude variability of the observed is generally a factor of 2-3 larger than the model prediction (this same phenomenon has been reported in ocean circulation studies, although the cause is not yet clear.) Our results indicate that the wind forcing is the main cause of the observed large pole tide in the North Sea.

  14. Evidence of water ice near the lunar poles

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Little, R. C.; Lawrence, S. L.; Gasnault, O. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Elphic, Richard C.,; Prettyman, T. H.; Steinberg, John Tyree; Binder, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Lunar Prospector epithermal neutron data were studied to evaluate the probable chemical state of enhanced hydrogen, [H], reported previously to be near both lunar poles [1,2]. Improved versions of thermal and epithermal neutron data were developed for this purpose. Most important is the improved spatial resolution obtained by using shortened integration times. A new data set was created, Epi* = [Epithermal - 0.057 x Thermal], to reduce effects of composition variations other than those due to hydrogen. The Epi* counting rates are generally low near both lunar poles and high over terrane near recent impact events such as Tycho and Jackson. However, other lunar features are also associated with high Epi* rates, which represent a wide range of terrane types that seem to have little in common. If we postulate that one property all bright Epi* features do have in common is low [H], then measured Epi* counting rates appear to be quantitatively self consistent. If we assume that [H]=O above the top 98th percentile of Epi* counting rates at 2{sup o} x 2{sup o} spatial resolution, then [H]{sub ave} = 55 ppm for latitudes equatorward of [75{sup o}]. This value is close to the average found in returned lunar soil samples, [H]{sub ave} {approx} 50 ppm [3]. Using the foregoing physical interpretation of Epi* counting rates, we find that the Epi* counts within most of the large craters poleward of {+-}70{sup o} are higher, and therefore [H] is lower, than that in neighboring inter-crater plains, as shown in Figure 1. Fourteen of these craters that have areas larger than the LP epithermal spatial resolution (55 km diameter at 30 km altitude), were singled out for study. [H] is generally found to increase with decreasing distance from the poles (hence decreasing temperature). However, quantitative estimates of the diffusivity of hydrogen at low temperature show that diffusion can not be an important factor in explaining the difference between the relatively low [H] observed within

  15. Pole-zero form fractional model identification in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, R.; Djamah, T.; Bettayeb, M.; Djennoune, S.

    2009-03-01

    This paper deals with system identification in the frequency domain using non integer order models given in the pole-zero form. The usual identification techniques cannot be used in this case because of the non integer orders of differentiation which makes the problem strongly nonlinear. A general identification method based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is developed and allows to estimate the (2n+2m+1) parameters of the model. Its application to identify the "skin effect" of a squirrel cage induction machine modeling is then presented.

  16. Two Years of Ozone Observations from the South Pole Brewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Tom; Savastiouk, Volodya; Evans, Robert; Oltmans, Samuel; Booth, John; Cox, Amy

    2010-05-01

    A Mark III, double-monochromator Brewer Ozone Spectrophotometer has now been operating at the Amundsen-Scott Antarctic Base for more than two years. The instrument was installed under an agreement with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) by Environment Canada in February of 2008. It has now collected more than two years of observations. Both direct sun data and moon measurements have been made and the results compared with the station Dobson Spectrophotometer observations. The Brewer has operated well under the harsh conditions at the South Pole, enduring outside temperatures below -70C. Some the results of the analysis of these data will be presented and discussed.

  17. Low thrust power-limited transfer for a pole squatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakwell, J. V.; Golan, O. M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of minimum fuel transfer in a central gravity field for power-limited low thrust propulsion has been studied by several investigators. Orbital averaging was used by Edelbaum in the co-axial and co-planar cases, and by Marec and Vinh for the general transfer between elliptical orbits. The co-latus rectum transfer, which has a complete analytical solution, can be applied to the Pole Squatter. Typical results for the evolution of the orbit parameters and the variation of the thrust acceleration along the orbit are shown.

  18. Plasmon Pole Approximations within a GW Sternheimer implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, Vincent; Cote, Michel

    We use an implementation of the GW approximation that exploits a Sternheimer equation and a Lanczos procedure to circumvent the resource intensive sum over all bands and inversion of the dielectric matrix. I will present further improvement of the method that uses Plasmon Pole approximations to evaluate the integral over all frequencies analytically. A comparison study between the von Linden-Horsh and Engel-Farid approaches for energy levels of various molecules along with benchmarking of the computational ressources needed by the method will be discussed.

  19. Low thrust power-limited transfer for a pole squatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakwell, J. V.; Golan, O. M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of minimum fuel transfer in a central gravity field for power-limited low thrust propulsion has been studied by several investigators. Orbital averaging was used by Edelbaum in the co-axial and co-planar cases, and by Marec and Vinh for the general transfer between elliptical orbits. The co-latus rectum transfer, which has a complete analytical solution, can be applied to the Pole Squatter. Typical results for the evolution of the orbit parameters and the variation of the thrust acceleration along the orbit are shown.

  20. Blinded histopathological characterisation of POLE exonuclease domain-mutant endometrial cancers: sheep in wolf's clothing.

    PubMed

    Van Gool, Inge C; Ubachs, Jef E H; Stelloo, Ellen; de Kroon, Cor D; Goeman, Jelle J; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Creutzberg, Carien L; Bosse, Tjalling

    2017-08-10

    POLE exonuclease domain mutations identify a subset of endometrial cancer (EC) patients with an excellent prognosis. Implementation of this biomarker has been suggested to refine adjuvant treatment decisions, but the necessary sequencing is not widely performed and relatively expensive. Therefore, we aimed to identify histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics to aid the detection of POLE-mutant ECs. Fifty-one POLE-mutant endometrioid, 67 POLE-wild-type endometrioid and 15 POLE-wild-type serous ECs were included (total N=133). An expert gynaecopathologist, blinded for molecular features, evaluated each case (≥2 slides) for 16 morphological characteristics. Immunohistochemistry was performed for p53, p16, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2. POLE-mutant ECs were characterised by a prominent immune infiltrate: 80% showed peritumoural lymphocytes and 59% tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes, compared to 43% and 28% of POLE-wild-type endometrioid and 27% and 13% of serous counterparts (P<0.01, all comparisons). Of POLE-mutants, 33% contained tumour giant cells, which was significantly higher than in POLE-wild-type endometrioid (10%; P=0.003), but not significantly different from serous cancers (53%). Serous-like features were as often (focally) present in POLE-mutant as in POLE-wild-type endometrioid cases (6-24% depending on the feature). The majority of POLE-mutant ECs showed wild-type p53 (86%), negative/focal p16 (82%) and normal mismatch repair protein expression (90%). A simple combination of morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics (tumour type, grade, peritumoural lymphocytes, MLH1, p53 expression) can assist in pre-screening for POLE exonuclease domain mutations in EC, increasing the probability of a mutation being present from 7% to 33%. This facilitates the implementation of this important prognostic biomarker in routine pathology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights

  1. Performance Prediction of a Hybrid-Excitation Synchronous Machine with Axially Arranged Excitation Poles and Permanent-Magnet Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuuchi, Kotaro; Fukami, Tadashi; Naoe, Nobuyuki; Hanaoka, Ryoichi; Takata, Shinzo; Miyamoto, Toshio

    This paper presents a method of predicting the steady-state performance of a new hybrid-excitation synchronous machine (HESM) theoretically. The field pole of this HESM is axially divided into two parts; one is an excitation part and the other a permanent-magnet (PM) part. A nonlinear equivalent circuit, which can include the saliency of the rotor and the magnetic saturation due to iron core, is derived. Based on this equivalent circuit, the steady-state performance of the HESM is calculated, and the results are confirmed through experiments.

  2. Elemental Mercury Diffusion Processes and Concentration at the Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxley, F. I.; Killen, R. M.; Hurley, D. M.; Dream

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) spectrograph onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft made the first detection of element mercury (Hg) vapor in the lunar exosphere after the Lunar Crater Observing and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Centaur rocket impacted into the Cabeus crater in the southern polar region of the Moon. The lunar regolith core samples from the Apollo missions determined that Hg had a devolatilized pattern with a concentration gradient increasing with depth, in addition to a layered pattern suggesting multiple episodes of burial and volatile loss. Hg migration on the lunar surface resulted in cold trapping at the poles. We have modeled the rate at which indigenous Hg is lost from the regolith through diffusion out of lunar grains. We secondly modeled the migration of Hg vapor in the exosphere and estimated the rate of cold-trapping at the poles using a Monte Carlo technique. The Hg vapor may be lost from the exosphere via ionization, Jeans escape, or re-impact into the surface causing reabsorption.

  3. Uncertainty maps for asteroid shape and pole solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartczak, Przemyslaw; Dudzinski, Grzegorz

    2016-10-01

    SAGE (Shaping Asteroids with Genetic Evolution) inversion method is based on genetic algorithm to obtain pole solutions, rotation periods and non-convex shapes of asteroids (Bartczak et.al, 2014). During the process computer graphics methods are used to compare model's synthetic lightcurves to photometric observations. The method is suitable for modelling both single and binary objects. A modelling run starts with a sphere, with no assumptions about the shape, and subsequently it converges to a stable spin and shape solution. Center of mas and moment of inertia are calculated for each model.Modelling of an asteroid consists of multiple runs of the process, each of them following different path towards a stable solution. As a result we obtain a family of solutions. If enough data is provided, solutions are consistent with each other and can be used for error estimation.We choose only the best models from a family of solutions, meaning every model that fits 5% threshold above best χ2 found. By comparing them we are able to construct a map of uncertainties for the shape, showing areas in good and poor agreement with chosen models. Such map can then be represented with a 3D visualisation. Moreover, we create a map of errors for pole solutions and periods.

  4. Scaphoid Proximal Pole Fracture Following Headless Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Rancy, Schneider K.; Zelken, Jonathan A.; Lipman, Joseph D.; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Headless screw fixation of scaphoid fractures and nonunions yields predictably excellent outcomes with a relatively low complication profile. However, intramedullary implants affect the load to failure and stress distribution within bone and may be implicated in subsequent fracture. Case Description We describe a posttraumatic fracture pattern of the scaphoid proximal pole originating at the previous headless screw insertion site in three young male patients with healed scaphoid nonunions. Each fracture was remarkably similar in shape and size, comprised the volar proximal pole, and was contiguous with the screw entry point. Treatment was challenging but successful in all cases. Literature Review Previous reports have posited that stress-raisers secondary to screw orientation may be implicated in subsequent peri-implant fracture of the femoral neck. Repeat scaphoid fracture after screw fixation has also been reported. However, the shape and locality of secondary fracture have not been described, nor has the potential role of screw fixation in the production of distinct fracture patterns. Clinical Relevance Hand surgeons must be aware of this difficult complication that may follow antegrade headless screw fixation of scaphoid fracture nonunion, and of available treatment strategies. PMID:26855840

  5. Semantic representations in the temporal pole predict false memories

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Martin J.; Anjum, Raeesa S.; Kumaran, Dharshan; Schacter, Daniel L.; Spiers, Hugo J.; Hassabis, Demis

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience have given us unprecedented insight into the neural mechanisms of false memory, showing that artificial memories can be inserted into the memory cells of the hippocampus in a way that is indistinguishable from true memories. However, this alone is not enough to explain how false memories can arise naturally in the course of our daily lives. Cognitive psychology has demonstrated that many instances of false memory, both in the laboratory and the real world, can be attributed to semantic interference. Whereas previous studies have found that a diverse set of regions show some involvement in semantic false memory, none have revealed the nature of the semantic representations underpinning the phenomenon. Here we use fMRI with representational similarity analysis to search for a neural code consistent with semantic false memory. We find clear evidence that false memories emerge from a similarity-based neural code in the temporal pole, a region that has been called the “semantic hub” of the brain. We further show that each individual has a partially unique semantic code within the temporal pole, and this unique code can predict idiosyncratic patterns of memory errors. Finally, we show that the same neural code can also predict variation in true-memory performance, consistent with an adaptive perspective on false memory. Taken together, our findings reveal the underlying structure of neural representations of semantic knowledge, and how this semantic structure can both enhance and distort our memories. PMID:27551087

  6. Elemental Mercury Diffusion Processes and Concentration at the Lunar Poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxley, Frederick; Killen, Rosemary M.; Hurley, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) spectrograph onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft made the first detection of element mercury (Hg) vapor in the lunar exosphere after the Lunar Crater Observing and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Centaur rocket impacted into the Cabeus crater in the southern polar region of the Moon. The lunar regolith core samples from the Apollo missions determined that Hg had a devolatilized pattern with a concentration gradient increasing with depth, in addition to a layered pattern suggesting multiple episodes of burial and volatile loss. Hg migration on the lunar surface resulted in cold trapping at the poles. We have modeled the rate at which indigenous Hg is lost from the regolith through diffusion out of lunar grains. We secondly modeled the migration of Hg vapor in the exosphere and estimated the rate of cold-trapping at the poles using a Monte Carlo technique. The Hg vapor may be lost from the exosphere via ionization, Jeans escape, or re-impact into the surface causing reabsorption.

  7. Geologic Mapping of the Lunar South Pole Quadrangle (LQ-30)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Petro, N. E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we use recent image, spectral and topographic data to map the geology of the lunar South Pole quadrangle (LQ-30) at 1:2.5M scale [1-7]. The overall objective of this research is to constrain the geologic evolution of LQ-30 (60 -90 S, 0 - 180 ) with specific emphasis on evaluation of a) the regional effects of impact basin formation, and b) the spatial distribution of ejecta, in particular resulting from formation of the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin and other large basins. Key scientific objectives include: 1) Determining the geologic history of LQ-30 and examining the spatial and temporal variability of geologic processes within the map area. 2) Constraining the distribution of impact-generated materials, and determining the timing and effects of major basin-forming impacts on crustal structure and stratigraphy in the map area. And 3) assessing the distribution of potential resources (e.g., H, Fe, Th) and their relationships with surface materials.

  8. Transient Broad Specular Reflections from Titan's North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Rajani D.; Barnes, Jason W.

    2016-10-01

    In 2014, Cassini observed rough patches or transient broad specular reflections on one of Titan's seas, Punga Mare. These observations were made by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The rough patches were interpreted to be waves on the surface of the hydrocarbon sea with slopes of 60 ± 10. Although long anticipated, this was an important observation since there was no detection of waves in the initial flybys of north polar lakes and seas until the northern summer approached.We have analyzed several recent VIMS flybys of Titan's north pole looking for these rough surfaces. Our observations are classified as clouds, mudflats, specular reflections, or waves based on VIMS color composites. We observe waves in at least two seas at the north pole, Ligeia Mare and Kraken Mare. In addition, we also observe specular reflections from the shoreline or land, indicating the wet sidewalk effect or mudflat in other flybys. Wet sidewalk observations indicate a recent rainfall event causing diffuse specular reflection.These new observations help us understand more about the weather conditions and sea-wind interaction generating waves on the seas.

  9. DISCOVERY OF FOG AT THE SOUTH POLE OF TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Smith, A. L.; Chen, C.; Adamkovics, M.

    2009-11-20

    While Saturn's moon Titan appears to support an active methane hydrological cycle, no direct evidence for surface-atmosphere exchange has yet appeared. The indirect evidence, while compelling, could be misleading. It is possible, for example, that the identified lake features could be filled with ethane, an involatile long-term residue of atmospheric photolysis; the apparent stream and channel features could be ancient remnants of a previous climate; and the tropospheric methane clouds, while frequent, could cause no rain to reach the surface. We report here the detection of fog at the south pole of Titan during late summer using observations from the VIMS instrument on board the Cassini spacecraft. While terrestrial fog can form from a variety of causes, most of these processes are inoperable on Titan. Fog on Titan can only be caused by evaporation of nearly pure liquid methane; the detection of fog provides the first direct link between surface and atmospheric methane. Based on the detections presented here, liquid methane appears widespread at the south pole of Titan in late southern summer, and the hydrological cycle on Titan is currently active.

  10. Acoustic wave filter based on periodically poled lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Courjon, Emilie; Bassignot, Florent; Ulliac, Gwenn; Benchabane, Sarah; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2012-09-01

    Solutions for the development of compact RF passive transducers as an alternative to standard surface or bulk acoustic wave devices are receiving increasing interest. This article presents results on the development of an acoustic band-pass filter based on periodically poled ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate. The fabrication of periodically poled transducers (PPTs) operating in the range of 20 to 650 MHz has been achieved on 3-in (76.2-mm) 500-μm-thick wafers. This kind of transducer is able to excite elliptical as well as longitudinal modes, yielding phase velocities of about 3800 and 6500 ms(-1), respectively. A new type of acoustic band-pass filter is proposed, based on the use of PPTs instead of the SAWs excited by classical interdigital transducers. The design and the fabrication of such a filter are presented, as well as experimental measurements of its electrical response and transfer function. The feasibility of such a PPT-based filter is thereby demonstrated and the limitations of this method are discussed.

  11. Towards a research pole in photonics in Western Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Rominu, Mihai; Miutescu, Eftimie; Burlea, Amelia; Vlascici, Miomir; Gheorghiu, Nicolae; Cira, Octavian; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Mnerie, Corina; Demian, Dorin; Marcauteanu, Corina; Topala, Florin; Rolland, Jannick P.; Voiculescu, Ioana; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-07-01

    We present our efforts in establishing a Research Pole in Photonics in the future Arad-Timisoara metropolitan area projected to unite two major cities of Western Romania. Research objectives and related training activities of various institutions and groups that are involved are presented in their evolution during the last decade. The multi-disciplinary consortium consists principally of two universities, UAVA (Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad) and UMF (Victor Babes Medicine and Pharmacy University of Timisoara), but also of the Arad County Emergency University Hospital and several innovative SMEs, such as Bioclinica S.A. (the largest array of medical analysis labs in the region) and Inteliform S.R.L. (a competitive SME focused on mechatronics and mechanical engineering). A brief survey of the individual and joint projects of these institutions is presented, together with their teaching activities at graduate and undergraduate level. The research Pole collaborates in R&D, training and education in biomedical imaging with universities in USA and Europe. Collaborative activities, mainly on Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) projects are presented in a multidisciplinary approach that includes optomechatronics, precision mechanics and optics, dentistry, medicine, and biology.

  12. Groebner Basis Solutions to Satellite Trajectory Control by Pole Placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukelova, Z.; Krsek, P.; Smutny, V.; Pajdla, T.

    2013-09-01

    Satellites play an important role, e.g., in telecommunication, navigation and weather monitoring. Controlling their trajectories is an important problem. In [1], an approach to the pole placement for the synthesis of a linear controller has been presented. It leads to solving five polynomial equations in nine unknown elements of the state space matrices of a compensator. This is an underconstrained system and therefore four of the unknown elements need to be considered as free parameters and set to some prior values to obtain a system of five equations in five unknowns. In [1], this system was solved for one chosen set of free parameters with the help of Dixon resultants. In this work, we study and present Groebner basis solutions to this problem of computation of a dynamic compensator for the satellite for different combinations of input free parameters. We show that the Groebner basis method for solving systems of polynomial equations leads to very simple solutions for all combinations of free parameters. These solutions require to perform only the Gauss-Jordan elimination of a small matrix and computation of roots of a single variable polynomial. The maximum degree of this polynomial is not greater than six in general but for most combinations of the input free parameters its degree is even lower. [1] B. Palancz. Application of Dixon resultant to satellite trajectory control by pole placement. Journal of Symbolic Computation, Volume 50, March 2013, Pages 79-99, Elsevier.

  13. Taking on the tall poles of autonomous robot navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Mark; Rajagopalan, Venkat; Steinbis, John; Haddon, John; Cannon, Paul

    2011-05-01

    The Holy Grail of autonomous ground robotics has been to make ground vehicles that behave like humans. Over the years, as a community, we have realized the difficulty of this task, and we have back pedaled from the initial Holy Grail and have constrained and narrowed the domains of operation in order to get robotic systems fielded. This has lead to phrases such as "operation in structured environments" and "open-and-rolling terrain" in the context of autonomous robot navigation. Unfortunately, constraining the problem in this way has only put off the inevitable, i.e., solving the myriad of difficult robotics problems that we identified as long ago as the 1980's on the Autonomous Land Vehicle Project and in most cases are still facing today. These "Tall Poles" have included but are not limited to navigation through complex terrain geometry, navigation through thick vegetation, the detection of geometry-less obstacles such as negative obstacles and thin obstacles, the ability to deal with diverse and dynamic environmental conditions, the ability to function in dynamic and cluttered environments alongside other humans, and any combination of the above. This paper is an overview of the progress we have made at Autonomous Systems over the last three years in trying to knock down some of the tall poles remaining in the field of autonomous ground robotics.

  14. Solvent cleaning of pole transformers containing PCB contaminated insulating oil.

    PubMed

    Kanbe, H; Shibuya, M

    2001-01-01

    In 1989, it was discovered that the recycled insulation oil in pole transformers for electric power supply was contaminated with trace amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; maximum 50 mg-PCB/kg-insulation oil). In order to remove the PCBs from transformer components using n-hexane as a solvent, we investigated the relationship between progressive stages of dismantling and cleaning results. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Based on the cleaning test results, we made an estimate of the residual PCB amount on iron and copper components. By dismantling the test pole transformers into the "iron core and coil portion" and cleaning the components, we achieved a residual PCB amount that was below the limit of detection (0.05 mg-PCB/kg-material). To achieve a residual PCB amount below the limit of detection for the transformer paper component, it was necessary to cut the paper into pieces smaller than 5 mm. We were unable to achieve a residual PCB amount below the limit of detection for the wood component. (2) Compared to Japan's stipulated limited concentration standard values for PCBs, the results of the cleaning test show that cleaning iron or copper components with PCBs only on their surface with the solvent n-hexane will satisfy the limited concentration standard values when care is taken to ensure the component surfaces have adequate contact with the cleaning solvent.

  15. Bell Pole CROW pilot test results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, L.J.; Johnson, L.A. Jr.; Sola, D.V.; Horn, S.G.; Christofferson, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project to address the creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated surficial aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW{trademark}) process which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Based on the results from the pilot test the following conclusions can be made: (1) The pilot test provided sufficient hydraulic information to design the full-scale CROW remediation system. The pumping test portion of the pilot test indicated uniform aquifer properties. The entire thickness of the aquifer reached the target temperature range and containment of the injected hot water was achieved. (2) Pretest injection and production rate predictions were achieved. (3) The post test soil boring data indicated hot-water injection displaced greater than 80% of the NAPL near the injection well. The data indicates that a NAPL saturation of approximately 19% (pore volume basis) and a 500 fold decrease in PCP concentration can be achieved with 20 pore volumes of flushing. (4) The treatment system used during the pilot test was effective in reducing PCP and PAH compounds to concentrations acceptable for sanitary sewer discharge. (5) The microbial assay of the post test samples found an encouraging increase in microbial population compared to earlier data collected before the pilot test.

  16. Bell Pole CROW pilot test results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, L.J.; Johnson, L.A. Jr. ); Sola, D.V.; Horn, S.G.; Christofferson, J.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project to address the creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated surficial aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW[trademark]) process which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Based on the results from the pilot test the following conclusions can be made: (1) The pilot test provided sufficient hydraulic information to design the full-scale CROW remediation system. The pumping test portion of the pilot test indicated uniform aquifer properties. The entire thickness of the aquifer reached the target temperature range and containment of the injected hot water was achieved. (2) Pretest injection and production rate predictions were achieved. (3) The post test soil boring data indicated hot-water injection displaced greater than 80% of the NAPL near the injection well. The data indicates that a NAPL saturation of approximately 19% (pore volume basis) and a 500 fold decrease in PCP concentration can be achieved with 20 pore volumes of flushing. (4) The treatment system used during the pilot test was effective in reducing PCP and PAH compounds to concentrations acceptable for sanitary sewer discharge. (5) The microbial assay of the post test samples found an encouraging increase in microbial population compared to earlier data collected before the pilot test.

  17. Semantic representations in the temporal pole predict false memories.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Martin J; Anjum, Raeesa S; Kumaran, Dharshan; Schacter, Daniel L; Spiers, Hugo J; Hassabis, Demis

    2016-09-06

    Recent advances in neuroscience have given us unprecedented insight into the neural mechanisms of false memory, showing that artificial memories can be inserted into the memory cells of the hippocampus in a way that is indistinguishable from true memories. However, this alone is not enough to explain how false memories can arise naturally in the course of our daily lives. Cognitive psychology has demonstrated that many instances of false memory, both in the laboratory and the real world, can be attributed to semantic interference. Whereas previous studies have found that a diverse set of regions show some involvement in semantic false memory, none have revealed the nature of the semantic representations underpinning the phenomenon. Here we use fMRI with representational similarity analysis to search for a neural code consistent with semantic false memory. We find clear evidence that false memories emerge from a similarity-based neural code in the temporal pole, a region that has been called the "semantic hub" of the brain. We further show that each individual has a partially unique semantic code within the temporal pole, and this unique code can predict idiosyncratic patterns of memory errors. Finally, we show that the same neural code can also predict variation in true-memory performance, consistent with an adaptive perspective on false memory. Taken together, our findings reveal the underlying structure of neural representations of semantic knowledge, and how this semantic structure can both enhance and distort our memories.

  18. Skiing efficiency versus performance in double-poling ergometry.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, L Joakim; Lund Ohlsson, Marie; Supej, Matej; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2013-01-01

    This study is on how leg utilisation may affect skiing efficiency and performance in double-poling ergometry. Three experiments were conducted, each with a different style of the double-poling technique: traditional with small knee range-of-motion and fixed heels (TRAD); modern with large knee range-of-motion and fixed heels (MOD1) and modern with large knee range-of-motion and free heels (MOD2). For each style, motion data were extracted with automatic marker recognition of reflective markers and applied to a 3D full-body musculoskeletal simulation model. Skiing efficiency (skiing work divided by metabolic muscle work) and performance (forward impulse) were computed from the simulation output. Skiing efficiency was 4.5%, 4.1% and 4.1% for TRAD, MOD1 and MOD2, respectively. Performance was 111, 143 and 149 Ns for TRAD, MOD1 and MOD2, respectively. Thus, higher lower body utilisation increased the performance but decreased the skiing efficiency. These results demonstrate the potential of musculoskeletal simulations for skiing efficiency estimations.

  19. A Simulational Approach to Electric Field Poling in Doped Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmore, T. A.; Talbot, J.; Lackritz, H. S.

    1997-03-01

    The electric field poling process in doped polymers has been investigated using molecular simulations. Modeling of the systems was done using a mixture of self-avoiding flexible polymers and rigid rod dopants on a modified Flory-Huggins lattice. The allowed motions of the polymer dopant segments are chosen to insure ergodicity and efficient sampling of the Boltzmann distribution of energies. The time scaling of these local motions in the dynamic simulations is based on the amount of segmental cooperativity and is assigned a priori. Dopant dipole moments have been included to study the dynamic evolution of local electric fields and their affect on the dopant orientational distribution. In high temperature (high mobility) systems, dipole alignment and relaxation have been studied. Exponential decay of the bulk orientation was observed after removal of the poling field. Well below Tg (low mobility systems) the decay was observed to be non-exponential and characterized by KWW β parameters of 0.5-0.7. These results compare favorably with results from second harmonic generation experiments. Processing parameters such as temperature, applied field magnitude, and dopant concentration were also investigated to study their effect on both the molecular orientation and the electric field distributions.

  20. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at the North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered on the North Pole. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  1. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at the North Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-03

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered on the North Pole. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00007

  2. Effect of plasticity on the dynamics of Enceladus's south pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, M.; Cadek, O.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.

    2012-09-01

    The intense activity at the south pole of Enceladus hints at an internal water reservoir. However, there is no direct evidence of liquid water at present and its long-term stability in the interior remains problematic. By modeling heat production and transfer in the ice shell in a spherical geometry, in a previous study Behounková et al. [1], we have shown that tidal heating naturally leads to a concentration of convective hot upwellings in the south polar region, favoring the preservation of liquid water at depth. We show that large volumes of water are produced within the ice shell at the south pole during periods of elevated orbital eccentricity (3-5 times the present-day value). Strong lateral variations in the melt production and crystallization rates result in stress concentration in the south polar region, thus providing an explanation for the tectonic activity observed today. We predict that an internal ocean may be sustained over the long term as the consequence of repeated periods with elevated orbital eccentricity, leading to episodic melting and resurfacing events. In order to model the resurfacing event following a tidally-induced melting episode, we are currently incorporating plasticity effects. We also improve the modeling of tidal deformation by incorporating the Andrade model, which is expected to better reproduce the viscoelastic properties of water ice Castillo-Rogez et al. [2].

  3. Albedo of Permanently Shadowed Regions of the Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Bussey, B.; Cahill, J. T.; McGovern, A.

    2012-12-01

    Due to the slight tilt in the Moon's spin axis, some topographic depressions near the lunar poles experience permanent shadow and may serve as cold traps, harboring water ice and/or other volatile compounds [1]. Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) provide an opportunity toward understanding the amount, nature and transport of volatiles on the Moon and may also be a potential resource for human exploration. While many different data sets have suggested the presence of water ice in PSRs near the lunar poles many questions remain. For example, ice does not appear to be uniformly distributed across identified PSRs. More work is needed to understand the distribution of ice in PSRs and how delivery and retention mechanisms influence the distribution. The active illumination of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) provides a unique contribution toward exploration PSR exploration. While LOLA is principally a laser altimeter used for quantitative topography and related cartographic and geodetic applications [2], LOLA also measures the intensity and width of the return laser pulse (1064 nm) from the surface. Here we use a global mosaic (4 pixels per degree) of LOLA albedo data corrected for instrumental drift, irregular variations, and calibrated to normal albedo using local equatorial measurements of normal albedo obtained by the Kaguya Multiband Imager [3]. Recent work using LOLA albedo shows the floor of Shackleton crater, near the lunar south pole, is brighter than the surrounding terrain (and the interior of nearby craters) at 1064 nm [4]. This albedo difference may be due to decreased space weathering due to shadowing from the Sun or to a 1 μm thick layer with 20% water ice a the surface of the crater floor [4]. Here we use LOLA dayside reflectance measurements to examine the albedo of PSRs catalogued by [5] derived from illumination modeling of a hybrid 100 m/pixel LOLA-LROC digital terrain model (DTM) up to 83° north and south latitudes. The upper latitude

  4. Pole of rotating analysis of present-day Juan de Fuca plate motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, C.; Wilson, D. S.; Hey, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    Convergence rates between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates are calculated by means of their relative, present-day pole of rotation. A method of calculating the propagation of errors in addition to the instantaneous poles of rotation is also formulated and applied to determine the Euler pole for Pacific-Juan de Fuca. This pole is vectorially added to previously published poles for North America-Pacific and 'hot spot'-Pacific to obtain North America-Juan de Fuca and 'hot spot'-Juan de Fuca, respectively. The errors associated with these resultant poles are determined by propagating the errors of the two summed angular velocity vectors. Under the assumption that hot spots are fixed with respect to a mantle reference frame, the average absolute velocity of the Juan de Puca plate is computed at approximately 15 mm/yr, thereby making it the slowest-moving of the oceanic plates.

  5. Fungal associates, detection, and fumigant control of decay in treated southern pine poles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, R.A.; Wang, C.J.K.; Terracina, F.C.

    1982-12-01

    Efforts to demonstrate the effective arrest and control of fungi growth in southern pine poles (by the application of the fumigants Vapam and chloropicrin) are described. Agreement percentages and confidence limits are determined for electrical resistance, torque changes during drilling, x-ray radiographs, culturing of decay fungi, and impact energy absorption. Based on cultural and dissection studies, this report describes seven decay patterns in the poles and the associated fungi indicated and speculates when some fungi invade the poles.

  6. Coordinated Ground and Space Measurements of Auroral Surge over South Pole.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    3y V. Coordinated Ground and Space Measurements of co an Auroral Surge over South Pole T. J. ROSENBERG and D. L. DETRICK Institute for Physical...Measurements of an Auroral Surge over South Pole 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Rosenberg, T. J., and DetrickD. L., University of Maryland; Mizera, Paul F., 13a. TYPE...premidnight auroral surge over Amundsen-Scott South Pole station. The set of near-simultaneous measurements provides an excellent opportunity to gain a

  7. Role of Rad23 and Dsk2 in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Spindle Pole Body Duplication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0310 TITLE: Role of Rad23 and Dsk2 in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Spindle Pole Body Duplication PRINCIPAL...Feb 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of Rad23 and Dsk2 in Nucleotide Excision Repair and Spindle Pole Body Duplication Sb. GRANT...Degradation, Cell Cycle, Spindle Pole Body 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON OF ABSTRACT OF

  8. MOLA: Seasonal Snow Variations on Mars: Slow Flyover of the Martian North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    MOLA: Seasonal Snow Variations on Mars: Slow Flyover of the Martian North Pole: False Color. This is a visualization of the topography near the Martian north pole as measured with the MOLA instrument. This particular animation shows a slow zoom to the surface of the pole, a flyover of the polar cap and a slow zoom out. The surface color is based on the elevation of the topography.

  9. Formation of a Bright Polar Hood over the Summer North Pole of Saturn in 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Blalock, John J.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn P.

    2016-10-01

    We report that a bright polar hood has formed over the north pole of Saturn, seen first in images captured by the Cassini ISS camera in 2016. When the north pole was observed during the previous period of Cassini spacecraft's high-inclination orbits in 2012-2013, the concentration of light-scattering aerosols within 2-degree latitude of the north pole appeared to be less than that of the surrounding region, and appeared as a dark hole in all ISS filters, in particular in the shorter wavelength filters BL1 (460 nm), and VIO (420 nm). The north pole's appearance in 2012 was in contrast to that of the south pole in 2007, when the south pole had a bright polar hood in those short wavelengths; the south pole appeared dark in all other ISS filters in 2007. The difference between the south pole in 2007 and the north pole in 2012 was interpreted to be seasonal; in 2007, Saturn was approaching the equinox of 2009 and the south pole had been continuously illuminated since the previous equinox in 1995. In 2012, the north pole had been illuminated for only ~3 years after the long winter polar night. The bright hood over the summer south pole in 2007 was hypothesized to consist of aerosols produced by ultraviolet photodissociation of hydrocarbon molecules. Fletcher et al (2015) predicted that a similar bright hood should form over the north pole as Saturn approaches the 2017 solstice. In 2016, the Cassini spacecraft raised its orbital inclination again in preparation for its Grande Finale phase of the mission, from where it has a good view of the north pole. New images captured in 2016 show that the north pole has developed a bright polar hood. We present new images of the north polar region captured in 2016 that show the north pole, and other seasonally evolving high-latitude features including the northern hexagon. Our research has been supported by the Cassini Project, NASA grants OPR NNX11AM45G, CDAPS NNX15AD33G PATM NNX14AK07G, and NSF grant AAG 1212216.

  10. Clarifications concerning the definition and determination of the celestial ephemeris pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capitaine, N.; Williams, J. G.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    The precise meaning and consequences of the introduction beginning in 1984 of the 1980 IAU theory of nutation (Wahr, 1980; Seidelmann, 1982) based on the celestial ephemeris pole (CEP) rather than the instantaneous pole of rotation (IPR) of the previous theory (Woolard, 1953) are analyzed and discussed. The CEP implicitly accounts for the forced diurnal polar motion and thus implies a fixed change of 0.0087 arcsec in the mean celestial pole. It is pointed out that past determinations of the obliquity and the celestial pole which were assumed to be referred to the IPR were actually referred to the CEP. A number of clarified formulations of the new theory are proposed.

  11. The Seasonal and Diurnal Variations of Lower and Middle Atmosphere Temperatures at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; Pan, W.; Gardner, C. S.

    2001-05-01

    An Fe Boltzmann Temperature Lidar was operated at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station from 1999-2001. Temperature profiles were obtained by combining the lidar data from 30-75 km and the balloon data from ground to around 35 km. We summarize the seasonal variations of the troposphere up to mesosphere temperatures at the South Pole. Furthermore, more than 24 hours continuous lidar observations at the South Pole allow us to study the diurnal variations of the stratosphere temperatures. We also present the seasonal and diurnal variations of the mesospheric Fe densities, which indicate the effects of Fe chemistry and the persistent oscillations at the South Pole.

  12. Caulobacter PopZ forms a polar subdomain dictating sequential changes in pole composition and function.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Grant R; Comolli, Luis R; Gaietta, Guido M; Fero, Michael; Hong, Sun-Hae; Jones, Ying; Lee, Julie H; Downing, Kenneth H; Ellisman, Mark H; McAdams, Harley H; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-04-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has morphologically and functionally distinct cell poles that undergo sequential changes during the cell cycle. We show that the PopZ oligomeric network forms polar ribosome exclusion zones that change function during cell cycle progression. The parS/ParB chromosomal centromere is tethered to PopZ at one pole prior to the initiation of DNA replication. During polar maturation, the PopZ-centromere tether is broken, and the PopZ zone at that pole then switches function to act as a recruitment factor for the ordered addition of multiple proteins that promote the transformation of the flagellated pole into a stalked pole. Stalked pole assembly, in turn, triggers the initiation of chromosome replication, which signals the formation of a new PopZ zone at the opposite cell pole, where it functions to anchor the newly duplicated centromere that has traversed the long axis of the cell. We propose that pole-specific control of PopZ function co-ordinates polar development and cell cycle progression by enabling independent assembly and tethering activities at the two cell poles.

  13. Caulobacter PopZ forms a polar subdomain dictating sequential changes in pole composition and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Grant R.; Comolli, Luis R.; Gaietta, Guido M.; Fero, Michael; Hong, Sun-Hae; Jones, Ying; Lee, Julie H.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Ellisman, Mark H.; McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Summary The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has morphologically and functionally distinct cell poles that undergo sequential changes during the cell cycle. We show that the PopZ oligomeric network forms polar ribosome exclusion zones that change function during cell cycle progression. The parS/ParB chromosomal centromere is tethered to PopZ at one pole prior to the initiation of DNA replication. During polar maturation, the PopZ-centromere tether is broken, and the PopZ zone at that pole then switches function to act as a recruitment factor for the ordered addition of multiple proteins that promote the transformation of the flagellated pole into a stalked pole. Stalked pole assembly, in turn, triggers the initiation of chromosome replication, which signals the formation of a new PopZ zone at the opposite cell pole, where it functions to anchor the newly duplicated centromere that has traversed the long axis of the cell. We propose that pole-specific control of PopZ function co-ordinates polar development and cell cycle progression by enabling independent assembly and tethering activities at the two cell poles. PMID:20149103

  14. BLDG 1 FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 1 FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Administration Building, Between Constitution & Constellation Streets, east side of main quad, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Reliability and validity of a new double poling ergometer for cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Nilsson, Johnny

    2008-01-15

    Thirty-eight competitive cross-country skiers were divided into three groups to assess the reliability and validity of a new double poling ergometer. Group A (n = 22) performed two maximal 60-s tests, Group B (n = 8) repeated peak oxygen uptake tests on the double poling ergometer, and Group C (n = 8) performed a maximal 6-min test on the double poling ergometer and a double poling time-trial on snow. The correlation between the power calculated at the flywheel and the power applied at the base of the poles was r = 0.99 (P < 0.05). The power at the poles was 50-70% higher than that at the flywheel. There was a high test-retest reliability in the two 60-s power output tests (coefficient of variation = 3.0%) and no significant difference in peak oxygen uptake in the two 6-min all-out tests (coefficient of variation = 2.4%). There was a strong correlation between the absolute (W) and relative power (W x kg(-1)) output in the 6-min double poling ergometer test and the double poling performance on snow (r = 0.86 and 0.89 respectively; both P < 0.05). In conclusion, our results show that the double poling ergometer has both high reliability and validity. However, the power calculated at the flywheel underestimated the total power produced and needs to be corrected for in ergonomic estimations.

  16. Arthroscopic excision of distal pole of patella for refractory patellar tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John D

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the results of arthroscopic tendon debridement with excision of the distal pole of the patella for refractory patellar tendinitis. Nine patients failed at least 3 months of conservative therapy and underwent arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with debridement of the deep proximal patella tendon. At least 3 months postoperatively (range, 3 months-5 years), 8 patients reported no distal patellar pole tenderness (Bassett sign), and 1 patient reported only mild tenderness. Arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with tendon debridement holds promise for the treatment of refractory patellar tendinitis.

  17. Relationship between Poling Characteristics and Phase Boundaries of Potassium-Sodium Niobate Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Jiagang

    2016-04-13

    The controversy about the optimum poling conditions of (K,Na)NbO3 (KNN)-based lead-free ceramics was still unresolved and the relationships between poling characteristics and phase boundary types were rarely mentioned. Here, we tried to unveil the relationships between poling characteristics and phase boundary types of these ceramics. The optimum poling temperatures should be chosen near their corresponding phase transition temperatures. In addition, a large piezoelectricity can be attained in the ceramics with a multiphase coexistence under a lower poling electric field (poling electric field (≥E(C)) is required to achieve the sufficient polarization in the ones with single O or T phase. More interestingly, it is the first time to report that the ceramics with different phase boundaries can be fully poled after the measurement of P-E loops, where the d33 values match those of the corresponding ones poled by the DC electric field. We believe that this modified poling process can benefit the improved piezoelectricity of KNN-based ceramics.

  18. An integrated lake geographical information system on the third pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Lu, A.

    2016-12-01

    Alpine lakes on the Third Pole (TP) have been used as an indicator for knowing hydrologic process, evaluating water resources and understanding climate change. However, the main driving forces and climate-driven mechanisms of lake variations still remain debate. One of a reason that limits these researches is lack of the understanding of the lake hydrological characteristics. In this study, we created a lake inventory on TP, and for the first time, we established a comprehensive hydrological network for each lake mainly based on 246 scenes Landsat series images, 236 Chinese topographic maps, and SRTM DEM. According to the lake's location in the hydrological network, the lakes can be classified as closed lake, upstream lake or outflow lake. The closed lake has only inlet with no outlet. Water in the closed lake does not leave the basin by the surface runoff. The upstream lake has inlet and outlet, and the runoff will finally flow into a closed lake. The outflow lake has inlet and outlet, while the runoff will join into rivers and may eventually join into the ocean. These three kinds of lakes have different drainage modes, so their intensity and forms affected by climate change may not the same. It's necessary to distinguish them and consider them separately. The results show that there are 396 closed lakes, 472 supplying lakes and 312 outflow lakes on TP in 2010, with the area of 35,498.2 km2, 7,301.6km2, and 3,373.6 km2, respectively. Meanwhile, we determined the relationship between lakes and their supplying glaciers. What's more, an integrated lake geographical information system on the third pole has been build. This system realizes the information visualization and mainly includes two functions. If you click any lake, you can know the catchment of this lake, the streams how the runoff inputs a lake, and how a lake is connected to another lake or river. And you also can know if there are glaciers supply the lake or not, and the location and area of these

  19. What is the South Pole-Aitken basin hiding?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Nimmo, F.; Wieczorek, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The South Pole-Aitken (SP-A) basin is remarkable because of its great age, size, elliptical structure, and asymmetrical depth of excavation. Recent studies have elucidated its general shape (e.g. [1]), but questions still remain about what processes influenced the distribution of topography and crustal thickness inside the basin. There are emerging indications that SP-A may have impacted into a unique terrain, and that there is a remaining signature of that terrain imbedded in the details of the SP-A topography and crustal thickness. A recent study of the lunar farside highlands north of the basin [2] demonstrated that their crustal structure and shape can be described by a degree-2 harmonic that extends over about a quarter of the lunar surface. The process that generated this terrain would have likely once extended into the southern half of the farside and its characteristic degree-2 shape would have been obscured by the South Pole-Aitken impact. If so, the low topography in the southern central part of the basin, which is the lowest on the Moon, would be partially the result of the superposition of the SP-A excavation cavity over a preexisting degree-2 terrain that decreases in elevation and crustal thickness towards the south pole. We tested this hypothesis in several ways, including fitting degree-2 harmonics to the farside highlands and extrapolating them across the basin, “removing” the expected degree-2 signal from SP-A, and measuring the degree-2 character of the interior basin topography and crustal thickness. In all cases, there is evidence that the preexisting terrain was degree-2 in character, and that it controlled portions of the basin topography and crustal structure we see now. There are three implications of these results. The first is that the north-south asymmetry in the depth of SP-A [1] is not likely due to some asymmetry in the impact process that develops at very large scales. The second is that knowledge of the preexisting crustal

  20. Incomplete rotational cooling in a 22-pole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, E. S.; Egger, G.; Lee, S.; Lakhmanskaya, O.; Simpson, M.; Wester, R.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic 22-pole ion traps have found many applications in ion-molecule reaction kinetics and in high resolution molecular spectroscopy. For most of these applications it is important to know the translational and internal temperatures of the trapped ions. Here, we present detailed rotational state thermometry measurements over an extended temperature range for hydroxyl anions in He, HD, and H2. The measured rotational temperatures show a termination of the thermalisation with the buffer gas around 25 K, independent of mass ratio and confinement potential of the trap. Different possible explanations for this incomplete thermalisation are discussed, among them the thermalisation of the buffer gas, room temperature blackbody radiation or warm gas entering the trap, and heating due to energy transfer from rotationally excited hydrogen molecules.

  1. Crystal oscillators using negative voltage gain, single pole response amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive crystal oscillator is provided which employs negative voltage gain, single pole response amplifiers. The amplifiers may include such configurations as gate inverters, operational amplifiers and conventional bipolar transistor amplifiers, all of which operate at a frequency which is on the roll-off portion of their gain versus frequency curve. Several amplifier feedback circuit variations are employed to set desired bias levels and to allow the oscillator to operate at the crystal's fundamental frequency or at an overtone of the fundamental frequency. The oscillator is made less expensive than comparable oscillators by employing relatively low frequency amplifiers and operating them at roll-off, at frequencies beyond which they are customarily used. Simplicity is provided because operation at roll-off eliminates components ordinarily required in similar circuits to provide sufficient phase-shift in the feedback circuitry for oscillation to occur.

  2. Lack of exposed ice inside lunar south pole Shackleton Crater.

    PubMed

    Haruyama, Junichi; Ohtake, Makiko; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Morota, Tomokatsu; Honda, Chikatoshi; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Pieters, Carle M; Hara, Seiichi; Hioki, Kazuyuki; Saiki, Kazuto; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Iwasaki, Akira; Abe, Masanao; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Takeda, Hiroshi; Shirao, Motomaro; Yamaji, Atsushi; Josset, Jean-Luc

    2008-11-07

    The inside of Shackleton Crater at the lunar south pole is permanently shadowed; it has been inferred to hold water-ice deposits. The Terrain Camera (TC), a 10-meter-resolution stereo camera onboard the Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) spacecraft, succeeded in imaging the inside of the crater, which was faintly lit by sunlight scattered from the upper inner wall near the rim. The estimated temperature of the crater floor, based on the crater shape model derived from the TC data, is less than approximately 90 kelvin, cold enough to hold water-ice. However, at the TC's spatial resolution, the derived albedo indicates that exposed relatively pure water-ice deposits are not on the crater floor. Water-ice may be disseminated and mixed with soil over a small percentage of the area or may not exist at all.

  3. Sturm-Liouville eigenproblems with an interior pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of self-adjoint Sturm-Liouville problems with a simple pole on the interior of an interval are investigated. Three general theorems are proved, and it is shown that as n approaches infinity, the eigenfunctions more and more closely resemble those of an ordinary Sturm-Liouville problem. The low-order modes differ significantly from those of a nonsingular eigenproblem in that both eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are complex, and the eigenvalues for all small n may cluster about a common value in contrast to the widely separated eigenvalues of the corresponding nonsingular problem. In addition, the WKB is shown to be accurate for all n, and all eigenvalues of a normal one-dimensional Sturm-Liouville equation with nonperiodic boundary conditions are well separated.

  4. Lunar South Pole space water extraction and trucking system

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A. |; Zupp, G.; Schnitzler, B.; Larson, T.K.; Rice, J.W.

    1998-03-01

    This concept proposes to use thermal processes alone to extract water from the lunar South Pole and launch payloads to low lunar orbit. Thermal steam rockets would use water propellant for space transportation. The estimated mass of a space water tanker powered by a nuclear heated steam rocket suggests it can be designed for launch in the Space Shuttle bay. The performance depends on the feasibility of a nuclear reactor rocket engine producing steam at 1,100 degrees Kelvin, with a power density of 150 Megawatts per ton of rocket, and operating for thousands of 20 minute cycles. An example uses reject heat from a small nuclear electric power supply to melt 17,800 tons per year of lunar ice. A nuclear heated steam rocket would use the propellant water to launch and deliver 3,800 tons of water per year to a 100 km low lunar orbit.

  5. Dynamical origin and the pole structure of X(3872).

    PubMed

    Danilkin, I V; Simonov, Yu A

    2010-09-03

    The dynamical mechanism of channel coupling with the decay channels is applied to the case of coupled charmonium--DD* states with JPC=1++. A pole analysis is done and the DD* production cross section is calculated in qualitative agreement with experiment. The sharp peak at the D0D0* threshold and flat background are shown to be due to Breit-Wigner resonance, shifted by channel coupling from the original position of 3954 MeV for the 23P1, QQ state. A similar analysis, applied to the n=2, 3P2, 1P1, 3P0, allows us to associate the first one with the observed Z(3930) J=2 and explains the destiny of 3P0.

  6. Lack of Exposed Ice Inside Lunar South Pole Shackleton Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Junichi; Ohtake, Makiko; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Morota, Tomokatsu; Honda, Chikatoshi; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Pieters, Carle M.; Hara, Seiichi; Hioki, Kazuyuki; Saiki, Kazuto; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Iwasaki, Akira; Abe, Masanao; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Takeda, Hiroshi; Shirao, Motomaro; Yamaji, Atsushi; Josset, Jean-Luc

    2008-11-01

    The inside of Shackleton Crater at the lunar south pole is permanently shadowed; it has been inferred to hold water-ice deposits. The Terrain Camera (TC), a 10-meter-resolution stereo camera onboard the Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) spacecraft, succeeded in imaging the inside of the crater, which was faintly lit by sunlight scattered from the upper inner wall near the rim. The estimated temperature of the crater floor, based on the crater shape model derived from the TC data, is less than ˜90 kelvin, cold enough to hold water-ice. However, at the TC’s spatial resolution, the derived albedo indicates that exposed relatively pure water-ice deposits are not on the crater floor. Water-ice may be disseminated and mixed with soil over a small percentage of the area or may not exist at all.

  7. A New Source of Micrometeorites: The South Pole Water Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S.; Lever, J.; Harvey, R.

    1996-03-01

    In 1995 we built, tested and deployed a collector to suction particulates from the bottom of the South Pole drinking water well (SPWW) in the hope of finding large numbers of micrometeorites. The SPWW, because it melts huge amounts of firn and ice, provides an efficient way of concentrating micrometeorites, which occur ubiquitously but in low concentrations in terrestrial environments. We made 5 separate collections, traversing an area of about 30 m^2 and collecting approximately 200 g of material. Microscopic examination of the 250-425 micrometer size fraction from 2 of the 5 collections suggests that 1 of every 1000 particles in this size fraction is a melted micrometeorite. There are also translucent and transparent spherules, similar to those described by Maurette et al., which are thought to be extraterrestrial and particles which appear to be unmelted micrometeorites. Dating of the ice brackets the depositional age of any micrometeorites collected between 1000-1500 AD.

  8. Persistent parainfluenza virus shedding during isolation at the South Pole.

    PubMed

    Muchmore, H G; Parkinson, A J; Humphries, J E; Scott, E N; McIntosh, D A; Scott, L V; Cooney, M K; Miles, J A

    1981-01-15

    Persistent parainfluenza virus shedding in healthy young adults occurred throughout the 8 1/2-month winter isolation period at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during 1978. Two episodes of respiratory illness were observed after 10 and 29 weeks of complete social isolation. Throat swabs collected both routinely, and during each outbreak of respiratory illness, were directly inoculated into cell cultures. Parainfluenza virus types 1 and 3 were recovered from both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects throughout the winter. No other viruses were obtained by these efforts. The presence of parainfluenza virus in these subjects long after the accepted incubation period for viral upper respiratory illness, and when the introduction of new virus to this community was impossible, suggests its persistence in man.

  9. Alpine tectonics and rotation pole evolution of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Koen

    1990-12-01

    The geological evolution of the Betic Cordilleras and Pyrenees reflects the Cretaceous and Tertiary rotation pole and kinematic evolution of the Iberian and African plates. New constraints on the Alpine tectonic evolution of the Iberian plate are provided by P- T- t data and regionally consistent stretching lineations from the metamorphic parts of the Betic Cordilleras. High-pressure low-temperature metamorphism in the Betic Cordilleras resulted from continent-continent collision which caused subduction to a maximum depth of 37 km. A preliminary 116 ± 10 Ma radiometric age for this event corresponds to the initiation of seafloor spreading to the west of Iberia which lasted until about 80 Ma. Intracontinental thrusting in the Betics between 99 Ma and 83 Ma took place after subduction ended. E-W to ESE-WNW trending stretching lineations indicate the direction of thrusting, which resulted in extensional strains of 200-600%. The timing of thrusting in the Betics coincides with a 95-80 Ma tectonic phase in northern Africa, during which E-W stretching lineations were formed. The stretching lineations are coincident with the 110-80 Ma motion vector of Africa-Iberia with respect to Eurasia. Thrusting in the Betics and deformation in northern Africa was driven by convergence of Africa-Iberia and Eurasia. Cretaceous deformation is further recorded by terrigeneous sedimentation in the Mauritanian Flysch and by the tectosedimentary evolution of the Malaguide Complex. Crustal thinning, magmatism and metamorphism in the Pyrenees during the 110-85 Ma period is governed by a left-lateral strike-slip of Africa-Iberia with respect to Eurasia around the same rotation pole as thrusting in the Betics. During the 80-54 Ma period the rotation pole was situated west of Gibraltar, near the previous active collision zone. This inhibited large-scale overthrusting and related penetrative deformation in northern Africa and the Betic Cordilleras. Deformation was instead transferred to the

  10. The Reid93 Potential Triton in the Unitary Pole Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afnan, I. R.; Gibson, B. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Reid93 potential provides a representation of the nucleon-nucleon ( NN) scattering data that rivals that of a partial wave analysis. We present here a unitary pole approximation (UPA) for this contemporary NN potential that provides a rank one separable potential for which the wave function of the deuteron (3S1-3D1) and singlet anti-bound (1S0) state are exactly those of the original potential. Our motivation is to use this UPA potential to investigate the sensitivity of the electric dipole moment for the deuteron and 3H and 3He to the ground state nuclear wave function. We compare the Reid93 results with those for the original Reid (Reid68) potential to illustrate the accuracy of the bound state properties.

  11. Titan's temporal evolution in stratospheric trace gases near the poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Jennings, D.; Achterberg, R.; Bampasidis, G.; Lavvas, P.; Nixon, C.; Teanby numeration="7">Teanby, N.; Anderson, C.; Cottini, V.; Flasar, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze spectra acquired by the Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) at high resolution from October 2010 until September 2014 in nadir mode. Up until mid 2012, Titan's Northern atmosphere exhibited the enriched chemical content found since the Voyager days (November 1980), with a peak around the Northern Spring Equinox (NSE) in 2009. Since then, we have observed the appearance at Titan's south pole of several trace species for the first time, such as HC3N and C6H6, observed only at high northern latitudes before equinox. We investigate here latitudes poleward of 50°S and 50°N from 2010 (after the Southern Autumnal Equinox : SAE) until 2014.

  12. Aerosol measurements at the south pole during 1987. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Bodhaine, B.A.; Harris, J.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates an atmospheric monitoring observatory at Amundsen-Scott Station, South Pole. The aerosol measurement program consists of the continuous measurement of condensation nuclei (CN) concentration and aerosol scattering extinction coefficient. During 1987, a special aerosol experiment was conducted that included filter samples for subsequent analysis by the proton induced x-ray emission technique, diffusion battery measurements for size information in the sub-0.1 micrometer size range, and aerosol absorption measurements using an aethalometer. Surface and upper air meteorological data were also available. The purpose of the report is to present all of the aerosol data obtained during 1987.

  13. South Pole submillimeter isotropy measurements of the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Dragovan, M. ); Platt, S.R.; Pernic, R.J. ); Stark, A.A. )

    1990-01-15

    Observations were made from the United States Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during the austral summer of 1988--89 to search for spatial anisotropy in the submillimeter Cosmic Microwave Background. Three 30{prime}{times}30{prime} regions of the sky were observed at 350 {mu}m, 450 {mu}m, and 600 {mu}m with the University of Chicago 32-Channel Submillimeter Photometer and a 1.2-meter off-axis parabolic telescope, designed and constructed at AT T Bell Laboratories. Reimaging optics gave each of the 32 bolometers in the array a 5-arc minute field of view. The search is sensitive to fluctuations on all angular scales between 5- and 30-arc minutes.

  14. Microtubules search for chromosomes by pivoting around the spindle pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva

    2014-03-01

    During cell division, proper segregation of genetic material between the two daughter cells requires that the spindle microtubules attach to the chromosomes via kinetochores, protein complexes on the chromosome. The central question, how microtubules find kinetochores, is still under debate. We observed in fission yeast that kinetochores are captured by microtubules pivoting around the spindle pole body, instead of growing towards the kinetochores. By introducing a theoretical model, we show that the observed angular movement of microtubules is sufficient to explain the process of kinetochore capture. Our theory predicts that the speed of the capture process depends mainly on how fast microtubules pivot. We confirmed this prediction experimentally by speeding up and slowing down microtubule pivoting. Thus, microtubules explore space by pivoting, as they search for intracellular targets such as kinetochores.

  15. Roadside tree/pole crash barrier field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests was carried out to evaluate the performance of a crash barrier designed to protect the occupants of an automobile from serious injury. The JPL barrier design is a configuration of empty aluminum beverage cans contained in a tear-resistant bag which, in turn, is encased in a collapsible container made of plywood and steel. Tests were conducted with a driven vehicle impacting the barrier. The basic requirements of NCHRP Report 153 were followed except that speeds of 30 mph rather than 60 mph were used. Accelerometer readings on the driver's helmet showed that the driver was never subjected to dangerous decelerations, and never experienced more than temporary discomfort. Also, all of the requirements of the cited report were met. An extrapolation of data indicated that the JPL barrier installed in front of a tree or telephone pole along a roadside would also have met the requirements at a speed of 40 mph.

  16. Reggeon Non_Factorizability and Fixed Pole in DVCS

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Londergan, J.Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; /Indiana U.

    2009-08-03

    We argue that deeply virtual Compton scattering will display Regge behavior {nu}{sub R}{sup {alpha}}(t) at high energy at fixed-t, even at high photon virtuality, not necessarily conventional scaling. A way to see this is to track the Reggeon contributions to quark-nucleon scattering and notice that the resulting Generalized Parton Distributions would have divergent behavior at the break-points. In addition, we show that the direct two-photon to quark coupling will be accessible at large t where it dominates the DVCS amplitude for large energies. This contribution, the J = 0 fixed-pole, should be part of the future DVCS experimental programs at Jlab or LHeC.

  17. Shapes and Poles of the Small Satellites of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Simon B.; Showalter, Mark R.; Spencer, John R.; Weaver, H. A.; Binzel, Richard P.; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Stern, S. A.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Young, Leslie A.; Ennico, Kimberly

    2015-11-01

    Pluto-Charon is a binary dwarf planet surrounded by four much smaller satellites: Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra (in order of increasing distance from the barycenter). These satellites were discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope, which also showed that their orbits are nearly circular around the system barycenter and coplanar to the central binary. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew through the Pluto system on July 14, 2015, and obtained the first resolved images of all four small satellites. We will present initial models for the shapes and densities of the small satellites determined from both those resolved images and earlier unresolved images, as well as measurements of the rotational poles of small satellites at the time of the Pluto encounter. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  18. High Resolution Measurement of LF Auroral Hiss at South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Labelle, J.

    2005-05-01

    In December 2002, a Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) and a new digitization system were deployed at South Pole station(-74° magnetic latitude). The motivation was to measure three types of auroral radio emissions: Auroral Roar, a relatively narrowband (δf/f<0.1) emission near 2 and 3 times the F region ionospheric electron cyclotron frequency (fce); Auroral Hiss, a whistler mode wave emission with frequencies lower than 1MHz; and Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst, broadband impulsive radio emissions observed at ground level during the breakup phase of auroral substorms. High resolution broad band structure of those three emissions are recorded automatically at South Pole, and are crucial to our understanding the mechanism and relations of auroral radio emissions. This experiment uses a 3×3 meter square magnetic dipole antenna, located 1.7 km away from the South Pole station. A pre-amplifier is buried right below the eastern pylon of the antenna, connected by a 1.7 km long co-axial cable to a LF-HF receiver in the station. The output of the receiver is fed into the Versatile Electromagnetic Wave Receiver (VIEW) and Windows system equipped with a digitization board. Customed software was used to digitize the selected signals at 1-2 MHz. This data acquisition system was designed so that researchers at Dartmouth College can review the data from South Pole weekly and save interesting parts according to instructions sent from Dartmouth. In the year of 2004(from Jan through September), the experiment concentrated on the auroral hiss frequency band, covering either 0-500 kHz or 0-1000 kHz. With 3-6 hours window per day, VIEW captured more than 30 GBytes data of auroral hiss waveforms. Many experiments report wave forms of VLF auroral hiss at f < 30 kHz. We focused on waveforms of LF auroral hiss, typically at 100-300 kHz. At these frequencies, the hiss shows striking fine structure. We classified our LF hiss events into three different types: standard

  19. THE SPITZER-WISE SURVEY OF THE ECLIPTIC POLES

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Cutri, R. M.; Marsh, K.; Padgett, D.; Tsai, C. W.; Cohen, M.; Wright, E.; Petty, S.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P.; Mainzer, A.; Ressler, M.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Carey, S.; Surace, J.; Lonsdale, C.; Skrutskie, M.; Stanford, S.

    2011-07-10

    We have carried out a survey of the north and south ecliptic poles, EP-N and EP-S, respectively, with the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The primary objective was to cross-calibrate WISE with the Spitzer and Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) photometric systems by developing a set of calibration stars that are common to these infrared missions. The ecliptic poles were continuous viewing zones for WISE due to its polar-crossing orbit, making these areas ideal for both absolute and internal calibrations. The Spitzer IRAC and MIPS imaging survey covers a complete area of 0.40 deg{sup 2} for the EP-N and 1.28 deg{sup 2} for the EP-S. WISE observed the whole sky in four mid-infrared bands, 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 {mu}m, during its eight-month cryogenic mission, including several hundred ecliptic polar passages; here we report on the highest coverage depths achieved by WISE, an area of {approx}1.5 deg{sup 2} for both poles. Located close to the center of the EP-N, the Sy-2 galaxy NGC 6552 conveniently functions as a standard calibrator to measure the red response of the 22 {mu}m channel of WISE. Observations from Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS/IRS-LL and WISE show that the galaxy has a strong red color in the mid-infrared due to star-formation and the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN), while over a baseline >1 year the mid-IR photometry of NGC 6552 is shown to vary at a level less than 2%. Combining NGC 6552 with the standard calibrator stars, the achieved photometric accuracy of the WISE calibration, relative to the Spitzer and MSX systems, is 2.4%, 2.8%, 4.5%, and 5.7% for W1 (3.4 {mu}m), W2 (4.6 {mu}m), W3 (12 {mu}m), and W4 (22 {mu}m), respectively. The WISE photometry is internally stable to better than 0.1% over the cryogenic lifetime of the mission. The secondary objective of the Spitzer-WISE Survey was to explore the poles at greater flux-level depths, exploiting the higher angular resolution Spitzer observations and the

  20. Patterned piezo-, pyro-, and ferroelectricity of poled polymer electrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xunlin

    2010-07-01

    Polymers with strong piezo-, pyro-, and ferroelectricity are attractive for a wide range of applications. In particular, semicrystalline ferroelectric polymers are suitable for a large variety of piezo- and pyroelectric transducers or sensors, while amorphous polymers containing chromophore molecules are particularly interesting for photonic devices. Recently, a new class of polymer materials has been added to this family: internally charged cellular space-charge polymer electrets (so-called "ferroelectrets"), whose piezoelectricity can be orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional ferroelectric polymers. Suitable patterning of these materials leads to improved or unusual macroscopic piezo-, pyro-, and ferroelectric or nonlinear optical properties that may be particularly useful for advanced transducer or waveguide applications. In the present paper, the piezo-, pyro-, and ferroelectricity of poled polymers is briefly introduced, an overview on the preparation of polymer electrets with patterned piezo-, pyro-, and ferroelectricity is provided and a survey of selected applications is presented.

  1. Cassini observes the active south pole of Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Porco, C C; Helfenstein, P; Thomas, P C; Ingersoll, A P; Wisdom, J; West, R; Neukum, G; Denk, T; Wagner, R; Roatsch, T; Kieffer, S; Turtle, E; McEwen, A; Johnson, T V; Rathbun, J; Veverka, J; Wilson, D; Perry, J; Spitale, J; Brahic, A; Burns, J A; Delgenio, A D; Dones, L; Murray, C D; Squyres, S

    2006-03-10

    Cassini has identified a geologically active province at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. In images acquired by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), this region is circumscribed by a chain of folded ridges and troughs at approximately 55 degrees S latitude. The terrain southward of this boundary is distinguished by its albedo and color contrasts, elevated temperatures, extreme geologic youth, and narrow tectonic rifts that exhibit coarse-grained ice and coincide with the hottest temperatures measured in the region. Jets of fine icy particles that supply Saturn's E ring emanate from this province, carried aloft by water vapor probably venting from subsurface reservoirs of liquid water. The shape of Enceladus suggests a possible intense heating epoch in the past by capture into a 1:4 secondary spin/orbit resonance.

  2. A very deep IRAS survey at the north ecliptic pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Hacking, P. B.; Condon, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    The data from approximately 20 hours observation of the 4- to 6-square degree field surrounding the north ecliptic pole have been combined to produce a very deep IR survey at the four IRAS bands. Scans from both pointed and survey observations were included in the data analysis. At 12 and 25 microns the deep survey is limited by detector noise and is approximately 50 times deeper than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). At 60 microns the problems of source confusion and Galactic cirrus combine to limit the deep survey to approximately 12 times deeper than the PSC. These problems are so severe at 100 microns that flux values are only given for locations corresponding to sources selected at 60 microns. In all, 47 sources were detected at 12 microns, 37 at 25 microns, and 99 at 60 microns. The data-analysis procedures and the significance of the 12- and 60-micron source-count results are discussed.

  3. Pediatric Scaphoid Proximal Pole Nonunion With Avascular Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Edward W; Smetana, Brandon S; Patterson, J Megan M

    2016-12-24

    A 13-year-old, right hand-dominant, otherwise healthy boy presented with left wrist pain 19 months after a nonmotorized scooter injury. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging at presentation demonstrated proximal pole scaphoid nonunion with avascular necrosis of the proximal fragment. Operative and nonsurgical treatment options were discussed and the family elected for an attempt at nonsurgical management. The patient was placed in a short-arm thumb spica cast, with a window for a bone stimulator, for 14 weeks. At the conclusion of the treatment, the pain had resolved and x-ray and computed tomography scan demonstrated bony union. The authors recommend considering an initial trial of nonsurgical management for treatment of all pediatric scaphoid nonunions.

  4. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Members of the BARREL team in Antarctica jump up and down in what they call the Low Wind Dance as they hope for the low wind conditions needed to launch another balloon. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/Brett Anderson Read more: www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/nasas-barrel-returns-success... -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    The BARREL team at the South African research station, SANAE IV, lay out the 130-foot-long balloon on the ground to prepare for inflation. The entire set up and launch process takes three to four hours. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/Nicky Knox Read more: www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/nasas-barrel-returns-success... -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A view looking over the payload – the instruments that fly under a balloon – while the BARREL balloon inflates. The orange parachute lies on the ground in front of the payload, while most of the balloon length can be seen stretched along the ground toward the part being inflated. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL Read more: www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/nasas-barrel-returns-success... -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy.NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.Follow us on TwitterLike us on FacebookFind us on Instagram

  7. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    The Halley station team members assisted the BARREL team with the launches. Here, one gives the thumbs up to start inflating a BARREL balloon. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/M. Krzysztofowicz Read more: www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from... -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Orographic Condensation at the South Pole of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corlies, Paul; Hayes, Alexander; Adamkovics, Mate

    2016-10-01

    Although many clouds have been observed on Titan over the past two decades (Griffith et al. 1998, Rodriquez et al 2009, Brown et al. 2010), only a handful of clouds have been analyzed in detail (Griffith et al 2005, Brown et al 2009, Adamkovics et al 2010). In light of new data and better radiative transfer (RT) modelling, we present here a reexamination of one of these cloud systems observed in March 2007, formerly identified as ground fog (Brown et al 2009), using the Cassini VIMS instrument. Combining our analysis with RADAR observations we attempt to understand the connection and correlation between this low altitude atmospheric phenomenon and the local topography, suggesting instead, a topographically driven (orographic) cloud formation mechanism. This analysis would present the first links between cloud formation and topography on Titan, and has valuable implications in understanding additional cloud formation mechanisms, allowing for a better understanding of Titan's atmospheric dynamics.We will also present an update on an ongoing ground based observation campaign looking for clouds on Titan. This campaign, begun back in April 2014, has been (nearly) continuously monitoring Titan for ongoing cloud activity. Although a variety of telescope and instruments have been used in an effort to best capture the onset of cloud activity expected at Titan's North Pole, no cloud outbursts have yet been observed from the ground (though frequent observations have been made with Cassini ISS/VIMS). This is interesting because it further suggests a developing dichotomy between Titan's seasons, since clouds were observable from the ground during southern summer. Thus, monitoring the onset of large scale cloud activity at Titan's North Pole will be crucial to understanding Titan's hydrologic cycle on seasonal timescales.

  9. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-02

    Release of a BARREL balloon. The launch crew can be seen on the right holding the payload as the top of the balloon moves overhead where they can release it. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy.NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.Follow us on TwitterLike us on FacebookFind us on Instagram

  10. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-16

    Getting ready to lay out a BARREL balloon to prepare for inflation. The helium stillages used to fill the balloon can be seen in the background. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/Brett Anderson Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  11. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-06

    The BARREL team at Halley Research Station in Antarctica, work to inflate a balloon. The long tube on the left is the inflation tube used to fill the top of the balloon with helium. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy.NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.Follow us on TwitterLike us on FacebookFind us on Instagram

  12. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-31

    BARREL researchers get ready to release the top part of the balloon, called the bubble, as it fills with enough helium to support itself. Only the top part of the balloon is inflated before launch since the helium expands as the balloon ascends. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/Nicky Knox Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. An atmospheric history of ethane from South Pole firn air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, K. R.; Aydin, K. M.; Lang, P.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2009-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon in the atmosphere and is important to tropospheric photochemistry. Sources of ethane include natural gas and oil leaks, automotive emissions and biomass burning, with smaller contributions from oceanic, vegetative, and soil emissions. The primary loss pathway for ethane is via reaction with hydroxyl radical, which controls ethane seasonality and lifetime (1-2 months during summer). There is a relatively limited database of atmospheric ethane measurements, which is insufficient to characterize long-term trends in the sources and sinks of this compound or to determine anthropogenic influence on the ethane budget. In this study, an atmospheric history of ethane over the past century is reconstructed from South Pole firn air measurements, in conjunction with a 1-D firn air diffusion model. Eighty firn air samples were collected in glass flasks from two adjacent holes drilled to 118 m at South Pole, Antarctica during the 2008/2009 season. The flasks were shipped back and analyzed by high resolution GC/MS at UCI. Firn air dating was based on the measured CO2 profile and known atmospheric history of CO2. Ethane levels in the firn increased from about 132 ppt in the deepest sample, to 259 ppt at 106 m, then decreased to 230 ppt at 30 m. Dating based on mean CO2 ages indicates that the ethane levels over Antarctica roughly doubled (from 130 to 260 ppt) between 1930 and the 1980’s. Over this time period, ethane increased at a rate of about 0.7 ppt yr-1 from 1930-1950 and 3.2 ppt yr-1 from 1950-1987. Ethane levels stabilized during the 1980’s and declined by approximately 1.8 ppt yr-1 from 1988-2004. Surface air measurements from several high latitude southern hemisphere sites indicate that the modern mean atmospheric ethane level is approximately 200 ppt.

  14. Co-activation based parcellation of the human frontal pole

    PubMed Central

    Ray, KL.; Zald, DH.; Bludau, S.; Riedel, MC.; Bzdok, D.; Yanes, J.; Falcone, KE.; Amunts, K.; Fox, PT.; Eickhoff, SB.; Laird, AR.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the human frontal pole (FP) has been considered as a single architectonic area. Brodmann’s area 10, in the frontal lobe with known contributions in the execution of various higher order cognitive processes. However, recent cytoarchitectural studies of the FP in humans have shown that this portion of cortex contains two distinct cytoarchitectonic regions. Since architectonic differences are accompanied by differential connectivity and functions, the frontal pole qualifies as a candidate region for exploratory parcellation into functionally discrete subregions. We investigated whether this functional heterogeneity is reflected in distinct segregations within cytoarchitectonically defined FP-areas using meta-analytic co-activation based parcellation (CBP). The CBP method examined the co-activation patterns of all voxels within the FP as reported in functional neuroimaging studies archived in the BrainMap database. Voxels within the FP were subsequently clustered into sub-regions based on the similarity of their respective meta-analytically derived co-activation maps. Performing this CBP analysis on the FP via k-means clustering produced a distinct 3-cluster parcellation for each hemisphere corresponding to previously identified cytoarchitectural differences. Post-hoc functional characterization of clusters via BrainMap metadata revealed that lateral regions of the FP mapped to memory and emotion domains, while the dorso- and ventromedial clusters were associated broadly with emotion and social cognition processes. Furthermore, the dorsomedial regions contain an emphasis on theory of mind and affective related paradigms whereas ventromedial regions couple with reward tasks. Results from this study support previous segregations of the FP and provide meta-analytic contributions to the ongoing discussion of elucidating functional architecture within human FP. PMID:26254112

  15. Optical poling of several halogen derivatives of pyrazoloquinoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koścień, E.; Sanetra, J.; Gondek, E.; Jarosz, B.; Kityk, I. V.; Ebothe, J.; Kityk, A. V.

    2004-12-01

    Paper deals with optical absorption and second-order optical poling effect in a new synthesized halogen derivatives of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline. The experimental study and quantum chemical simulations are presented. In optical poling experiment (fundamental wavelength λ = 1.76 μm) we have found that the maximal output of second-order susceptibility (up to 1.53 pm/V) is observed for the chromophore possessing two methyl groups and fluor. The quantum chemical analysis reveals similarity in the absorption spectra of methyl-containing halogen derivatives which are characterized by four or five strong absorption bands in the spectral range 200-500 nm. A substitution of the methyl groups by the phenyl group causes the substantial changes of the absorption spectra mainly in the spectral range 240-370 nm. The comparison of measured and calculated absorption spectra manifests rather good agreement, namely in the part regarding the spectral positions of the first oscillator (absorption threshold). At the same time, the measured spectra reveal the considerable broadening almost of all absorption bands and even complete damping some of them in the case of phenyl derivatives. Semi-empirical PM3 method demonstrate substantially better agreement with the experimental values compared to the AM1 method. The lowest magnitude of the nonlinear optical susceptibility is revealed for Br-containing [PQ]-derivative. It is assumed that Br leads here to a suppressing of the charge transfers mechanism what is the reason for a relatively low nonlinear optical efficiency.

  16. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-16

    The BARREL team at the South African research station, SANAE IV, poses next to the instrument box, which will float in the atmosphere beneath the balloon that can be seen being inflated in the background. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/Brett Anderson Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  17. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-20

    While large compared to a human, BARREL balloons are actually much smaller than typical science balloons, which can be as large as a football field. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/Brett Anderson Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  18. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-31

    A team member from South African research station, SANAE IV, helps unwrap the balloon from its protective yellow plastic cover just prior to inflation. Credit: NASA/Goddard/BARREL/Nicky Knox Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  19. Ballooning in the constant sun of the South Pole summer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-01

    BARREL team members lift up the instrument box below an inflated BARREL balloon to help with launch. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Francois Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-barrel-returns-successful-from-antarctica/ -- Three months, 20 balloons, and one very successful campaign. The team for NASA's BARREL – short for Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses -- mission returned from Antarctica in March 2014. BARREL's job is to help unravel the mysterious Van Allen belts, two gigantic donuts of radiation that surround Earth, which can shrink and swell in response to incoming energy and particles from the sun and sometimes expose satellites to harsh radiation. While in Antarctica, the team launched 20 balloons carrying instruments that sense charged particles that are scattered into the atmosphere from the belts, spiraling down the magnetic fields near the South Pole. Each balloon traveled around the pole for up to three weeks. The team will coordinate the BARREL data with observations from NASA's two Van Allen Probes to better understand how occurrences in the belts relate to bursts of particles funneling down toward Earth. BARREL team members will be on hand at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in DC on April 26 and 27, 2014 for the exhibit Space Balloons: Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather. NASA image use policy.NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.Follow us on TwitterLike us on FacebookFind us on Instagram

  20. Determination of regional Euler pole parameters for Eastern Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umnig, Elke; Weber, Robert; Schartner, Matthias; Brueckl, Ewald

    2017-04-01

    The horizontal motion of lithospheric plates can be described as rotations around a rotation axes through the Earth's center. The two possible points where this axes intersects the surface of the Earth are called Euler poles. The rotation is expressed by the Euler parameters in terms of angular velocities together with the latitude and longitude of the Euler pole. Euler parameters were calculated from GPS data for a study area in Eastern Austria. The observation network is located along the Mur-Mürz Valley and the Vienna Basin. This zone is part of the Vienna Transfer Fault, which is the major fault system between the Eastern Alps and the Carpathians. The project ALPAACT (seismological and geodetic monitoring of ALpine-PAnnonian ACtive Tectonics) investigated intra plate tectonic movements within the Austrian part in order to estimate the seismic hazard. Precise site coordinate time series established from processing 5 years of GPS observations are available for the regional network spanning the years from 2010.0 to 2015.0. Station velocities with respect to the global reference frame ITRF2008 have been computed for 23 sites. The common Euler vector was estimated on base of a subset of reliable site velocities, for stations directly located within the area of interest. In a further step a geokinematic interpretation shall be carried out. Therefore site motions with respect to the Eurasian Plate are requested. To obtain this motion field different variants are conceivable. In a simple approach the mean ITRF2008 velocity of IGS site GRAZ can be adopted as Eurasian rotational velocity. An improved alternative is to calculate site-specific velocity differences between the Euler rotation and the individual site velocities. In this poster presentation the Euler parameters, the residual motion field as well as first geokinematic interpretation results are presented.