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Sample records for imaging contrast based

  1. Contrast Enhancement Based on Intrinsic Image Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huanjing; Yang, Jingyu; Sun, Xiaoyan; Wu, Feng; Hou, Chunping

    2017-05-10

    In this paper, we propose to introduce intrinsic image decomposition priors into decomposition models for contrast enhancement. Since image decomposition is a highly ill-posed problem, we introduce constraints on both reflectance and illumination layers to yield a highly reliable solution. We regularize the reflectance layer to be piecewise constant by introducing a weighted `1 norm constraint on neighboring pixels according to the color similarity, so that the decomposed reflectance would not be affected much by the illumination information. The illumination layer is regularized by a piecewise smoothness constraint. The proposed model is effectively solved by the Split Bregman algorithm. Then, by adjusting the illumination layer, we obtain the enhancement result. To avoid potential color artifacts introduced by illumination adjusting and reduce computing complexity, the proposed decomposition model is performed on the value channel in HSV space. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method performs well for a wide variety of images, and achieves better or comparable subjective and objective quality compared with state-of-the-art methods.

  2. Multiscale toggle contrast operator-based mineral image enhancement.

    PubMed

    Bai, X; Zhou, F

    2011-08-01

    Mineral image is one type of crucial data for mineral research and analysis. However, some mineral images are not clear in some cases. To efficiently enhance mineral images and therefore benefit the applications of these images, a multiscale toggle contrast operator based algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, the toggle contrast operator is discussed. Secondly, the multiscale toggle contrast operator using structuring elements with different sizes is given. Thirdly, the multiscale toggle contrast operator is used to enhance the original image at different scales. Finally, the final enhanced image is constructed from the multiscale enhanced results. Because multiscale structuring elements are used, the algorithm performs efficiently and produces few noises. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is efficient for mineral image enhancement. More importantly, the proposed algorithm could be also used in other types of images, such as visual image, medical image and so on, for image enhancement. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. Inorganic nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Chul; Glaus, Charles; Chen, Jingyi; Welch, Michael J.; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles including semiconductor quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles, and gold nanoparticles have been developed as contrast agents for diagnostics by molecular imaging. Compared to traditional contrast agents, nanoparticles offer several advantages: their optical and magnetic properties can be tailored by engineering the composition, structure, size, and shape; their surfaces can be modified with ligands to target specific biomarkers of disease; the contrast enhancement provided can be equivalent to millions of molecular counterparts; and they can be integrated with a combination of different functions for multi-modal imaging. Here, we review recent advances in the development of contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles for molecular imaging, with a touch on contrast enhancement, surface modification, tissue targeting, clearance, and toxicity. As research efforts intensify, contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles that are highly sensitive, target-specific, and safe to use are expected to enter clinical applications in the near future. PMID:21074494

  4. Complex dark-field contrast in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    Without assuming that the sub-pixel microstructures of an object to be imaged distribute in space randomly, we investigate the influence of the object's microstructures on grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging. Our theoretical analysis and 3D computer simulation study based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory show that the existing dark-field contrast can be generalized into a complex dark-field contrast in a way such that its imaginary part quantifies the effect of the object's sub-pixel microstructures on the phase of intensity oscillations. A method based on the phase-attenuation duality that holds for soft tissues to be imaged at high x-ray energies is proposed to retrieve the imaginary part of the complex dark-field contrast for imaging. In comparison to the existing dark-field contrast, the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast exhibits significantly stronger selectivity on the shape of the object's sub-pixel microstructures. Thus the x-ray imaging corresponding to the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast can provide additional and complementary information to that corresponding to the attenuation contrast, phase contrast and the existing dark-field contrast.

  5. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for MR Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinical imaging modality effective for anatomical and functional imaging of diseased soft tissues, including solid tumors. MRI contrast agents have been routinely used for detecting tumor at an early stage. Gadolinium based contrast agents are the most commonly used contrast agents in clinical MRI. There have been significant efforts to design and develop novel Gd(III) contrast agents with high relaxivity, low toxicity and specific tumor binding. The relaxivity of the Gd(III) contrast agents can be increased by proper chemical modification. The toxicity of Gd(III) contrast agents can be reduced by increasing the agents’ thermodynamic and kinetic stability, as well as optimizing their pharmacokinetic properties. The increasing knowledge in the field of cancer genomics and biology provides an opportunity for designing tumor-specific contrast agents. Various new Gd(III) chelates have been designed and evaluated in animal models for more effective cancer MRI. This review outlines the design and development, physicochemical properties, and in vivo properties of several classes of Gd(III)-based MR contrast agents for tumor imaging. PMID:23047730

  6. Grid-Based Fourier Transform Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad

    Low contrast in x-ray attenuation imaging between different materials of low electron density is a limitation of traditional x-ray radiography. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One recently developed phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al. that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 microm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 microm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the grid in the Fourier domain. A Matlab code was written to perform the image processing. For the first time, the effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the window function type used to separate the harmonics, and the window widths, were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and new methods investigated to form improved phase contrast images.

  7. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) have attracted enormous attention due to their wide applications, including for magnetic separation, for magnetic hyperthermia, and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This review article introduces the methods of synthesizing MIONs, and their application as MRI contrast agents. Currently, many methods have been reported for the synthesis of MIONs. Herein, we only focus on the liquid-based synthesis methods including aqueous phase methods and organic phase methods. In addition, the MIONs larger than 10 nm can be used as negative contrast agents and the recently emerged extremely small MIONs (ES-MIONs) smaller than 5 nm are potential positive contrast agents. In this review, we focus on the ES-MIONs because ES-MIONs avoid the disadvantages of MION-based T2- and gadolinium chelate-based T1-weighted contrast agents.

  8. Contrast transfer function in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianheng; Du, Yang; Lin, Danying; Liu, Xin; Niu, Hanben

    2014-05-01

    x-Ray grating interferometry is a method for x-ray wave front sensing and phase-contrast imaging that has been developed over past few years. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the quality of an image. In characterizing the performance of this interferometer, the contrast transfer function is considered in this paper. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function (CTF) is derived and quantified for this interferometer. The illumination source and digital detector are both considered as significant factors controlling image quality, and it can be noted that contrast and resolution in turn depends primarily on the projected intensity profile of the array source and the pixel size of the detector. Furthermore, a test pattern phantom with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies was designed and imaging of this phantom was simulated by a computer. Contrast transfer function behavior observed in the simulated image is consistent with our theoretical CTF. This might be beneficial for the evaluation and optimization of a grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system.

  9. Mesh-based phase contrast Fourier transform imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad; Bashir, Sajid; MacDonald, C. A.; Petruccelli, Jonathan C.

    2017-04-01

    Traditional x-ray radiography is limited by low attenuation contrast in materials of low electron density. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a recently developed technique that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 μm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 μm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the mesh in the Fourier domain. The effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the width of the window function used to separate the harmonics were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and combined to form improved phase contrast images.

  10. [Gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Muñoz, S; Calles Blanco, C; Marcin, Javier; Fernández Álvarez, C; Lafuente Martínez, J

    2014-06-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are increasingly being used in magnetic resonance imaging. These agents can improve the contrast in images and provide information about function and metabolism, increasing both sensitivity and specificity. We describe the gadolinium-based contrast agents that have been approved for clinical use, detailing their main characteristics based on their chemical structure, stability, and safety. In general terms, these compounds are safe. Nevertheless, adverse reactions, the possibility of nephrotoxicity from these compounds, and the possibility of developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis will be covered in this article. Lastly, the article will discuss the current guidelines, recommendations, and contraindications for their clinical use, including the management of pregnant and breast-feeding patients.

  11. Image contrast enhancement based on a local standard deviation model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Dah-Chung; Wu, Wen-Rong

    1996-12-31

    The adaptive contrast enhancement (ACE) algorithm is a widely used image enhancement method, which needs a contrast gain to adjust high frequency components of an image. In the literature, the gain is usually inversely proportional to the local standard deviation (LSD) or is a constant. But these cause two problems in practical applications, i.e., noise overenhancement and ringing artifact. In this paper a new gain is developed based on Hunt`s Gaussian image model to prevent the two defects. The new gain is a nonlinear function of LSD and has the desired characteristic emphasizing the LSD regions in which details are concentrated. We have applied the new ACE algorithm to chest x-ray images and the simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  12. A nonlinear image contrast sharpening approach based on Munsell's scale.

    PubMed

    Matz, Sean C; de Figueiredo, Rui J P

    2006-04-01

    Contrast is a measure of the variation in intensity or gray value in a specified region of an image. The region can be most or all of the image, giving rise to a global concept of contrast. The region might, on the other hand, be a small window in which case the concept of contrast is a locally defined expression. In this work, we introduce a nonlinear local contrast enhancement method. This method utilizes the Munsell value scale which is based upon human visual perception. Use of the Munsell value scale allows for the partitioning of the gray scale into ten discrete subintervals. Subsequent local processing occurs within each of these subintervals. Inside each subinterval, this method constructs a contrast enhancement function that is a smooth approximation to the threshold step function and which maps a given subinterval into itself. This function then thresholds the gray values in a subinterval in a smooth manner about a locally computed quantity called the mean edge gray value. By enhancing the contrast in this way, the original shades of gray are preserved. That is, the groupings of the gray values by subinterval are preserved. As a result, no gray value distortion is introduced into the image.

  13. Contrast-based sensorless adaptive optics for retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Bui, Bang; Nguyen, Christine T O; He, Zheng; Metha, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Conventional adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes use wavefront sensing methods to characterize ocular aberrations for real-time correction. However, there are important situations in which the wavefront sensing step is susceptible to difficulties that affect the accuracy of the correction. To circumvent these, wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (or non-wavefront sensing AO; NS-AO) imaging has recently been developed and has been applied to point-scanning based retinal imaging modalities. In this study we show, for the first time, contrast-based NS-AO ophthalmoscopy for full-frame in vivo imaging of human and animal eyes. We suggest a robust image quality metric that could be used for any imaging modality, and test its performance against other metrics using (physical) model eyes.

  14. Contrast-based sensorless adaptive optics for retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Bui, Bang; Nguyen, Christine T.O.; He, Zheng; Metha, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Conventional adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes use wavefront sensing methods to characterize ocular aberrations for real-time correction. However, there are important situations in which the wavefront sensing step is susceptible to difficulties that affect the accuracy of the correction. To circumvent these, wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (or non-wavefront sensing AO; NS-AO) imaging has recently been developed and has been applied to point-scanning based retinal imaging modalities. In this study we show, for the first time, contrast-based NS-AO ophthalmoscopy for full-frame in vivo imaging of human and animal eyes. We suggest a robust image quality metric that could be used for any imaging modality, and test its performance against other metrics using (physical) model eyes. PMID:26417525

  15. Analyser-based phase contrast image reconstruction using geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, M J; Pavlov, K M; Siu, K K W; Menk, R H; Tromba, G; Lewis, R A

    2007-07-21

    Analyser-based phase contrast imaging can provide radiographs of exceptional contrast at high resolution (<100 microm), whilst quantitative phase and attenuation information can be extracted using just two images when the approximations of geometrical optics are satisfied. Analytical phase retrieval can be performed by fitting the analyser rocking curve with a symmetric Pearson type VII function. The Pearson VII function provided at least a 10% better fit to experimentally measured rocking curves than linear or Gaussian functions. A test phantom, a hollow nylon cylinder, was imaged at 20 keV using a Si(1 1 1) analyser at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility. Our phase retrieval method yielded a more accurate object reconstruction than methods based on a linear fit to the rocking curve. Where reconstructions failed to map expected values, calculations of the Takagi number permitted distinction between the violation of the geometrical optics conditions and the failure of curve fitting procedures. The need for synchronized object/detector translation stages was removed by using a large, divergent beam and imaging the object in segments. Our image acquisition and reconstruction procedure enables quantitative phase retrieval for systems with a divergent source and accounts for imperfections in the analyser.

  16. Spatial entropy-based global and local image contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Celik, Turgay

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel algorithm, which enhances the contrast of an input image using spatial information of pixels. The algorithm introduces a new method to compute the spatial entropy of pixels using spatial distribution of pixel gray levels. Different than the conventional methods, this algorithm considers the distribution of spatial locations of gray levels of an image instead of gray-level distribution or joint statistics computed from the gray levels of an image. For each gray level, the corresponding spatial distribution is computed using a histogram of spatial locations of all pixels with the same gray level. Entropy measures are calculated from the spatial distributions of gray levels of an image to create a distribution function, which is further mapped to a uniform distribution function to achieve the final contrast enhancement. The method achieves contrast improvement in the case of low-contrast images; however, it does not alter the image if the image’s contrast is high enough. Thus, it always produces visually pleasing results without distortions. Furthermore, this method is combined with transform domain coefficient weighting to achieve both local and global contrast enhancement at the same time. The level of the local contrast enhancement can be controlled. Several experiments on effects of contrast enhancement are performed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms produce better or comparable enhanced images than several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  17. Color Retinal Image Enhancement Based on Luminosity and Contrast Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mei; Jin, Kai; Wang, Shaoze; Ye, Juan; Qian, Dahong

    2017-05-03

    Many common eye diseases and cardiovascular diseases can be diagnosed through retinal imaging. However, due to uneven illumination, image blurring, and low contrast, retinal images with poor quality are not useful for diagnosis, especially in automated image analyzing systems. Here we propose a new image enhancement method to improve color retinal image luminosity and contrast. A luminance gain matrix, which is obtained by gamma correction of the value channel in the HSV (Hue, Saturation, and Value) color space, is used to enhance the R, G, and B (Red, Green and Blue) channels, respectively. Contrast is then enhanced in the luminosity channel of L*a*b* color space by CLAHE (contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization). Image enhancement by the proposed method is compared to other methods by evaluating quality scores of the enhanced images. The performance of the method is mainly validated on a dataset of 961 poor quality retinal images. Quality assessment (range 0-1) of image enhancement of this poor dataset indicated that our method improved color retinal image quality from an average of 0.0404 (standard deviation 0.0291) up to an average of 0.4565 (standard deviation 0.1000). The proposed method is shown to achieve superior image enhancement compared to contrast enhancement in other color spaces or by other related methods, while simultaneously preserving image naturalness. This method of color retinal image enhancement may be employed to assist ophthalmologists in more efficient screening of retinal diseases and in development of improved automated image analysis for clinical diagnosis.

  18. Mineral image enhancement based on sequential combination of toggle and top-hat based contrast operator.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiangzhi

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing mineral image especially making mineral image details clear is very useful for mineral analysis. To effectively enhance mineral image, an algorithm based on the toggle contrast operator and top-hat based contrast operator is proposed in this paper. Sequentially combining the toggle contrast operator and top-hat based contrast operator could be used to identify image features especially the image details. So, appropriately exacting the identified image features by the sequentially combined toggle and top-hat based contrast operator is important for mineral image enhancement, which is analyzed firstly in this paper. After that, the multi-scale extension of feature extraction is given and used to construct the final features for mineral image enhancement. By importing the final extracted image features into the original mineral image through contrast enlargement, the original mineral image is well enhanced and the mineral image details are very clear. Experimental results on different types of mineral images verified the effective performance of the proposed algorithm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  20. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.

  1. Analysis of High Contrast Imaging Techniques for Space Based Direct Planetary Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Gezari, Dan Y.; Nisenson, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report on our ongoing investigations of a number of techniques for direct detection and imaging of Earth-like planets around nearby stellar sources. Herein, we give a quantitative analysis of these techniques and compare and contrast them via computer simulations. The techniques we will be reporting on are Bracewell Interferometry, Nisenson Apodized Square Aperture, and Coronagraphic masking techniques. We parameterize our results with respect to wavelength, aperture size, effects of mirror speckle, both mid- and high-spatial frequency, detector and photon noise as well pointing error. The recent numerous detections of Jupiter and Saturn like planets has driven a resurgence in research of space based high contrast imaging techniques for direct planetary imaging. Work is currently ongoing for concepts for NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder mission and a number of study teams have been funded. The authors are members of one team.

  2. Segmenting Microscopy Images of Multi-Well Plates Based on Image Contrast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Liao, Bo; Li, Weiwei; Dong, Xiangjun; Flavel, Matthew; Jois, Markandeya; Li, Guojun; Xian, Bo

    2017-10-01

    Image segmentation is a key process in analyzing biological images. However, it is difficult to detect the differences between foreground and background when the image is unevenly illuminated. The unambiguous segmenting of multi-well plate microscopy images with various uneven illuminations is a challenging problem. Currently, no publicly available method adequately solves these various problems in bright-field multi-well plate images. Here, we propose a new method based on contrast values which removes the need for illumination correction. The presented method is effective enough to distinguish foreground and therefore a model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans) from an unevenly illuminated microscope image. In addition, the method also can solve a variety of problems caused by different uneven illumination scenarios. By applying this methodology across a wide range of multi-well plate microscopy images, we show that our approach can consistently analyze images with uneven illuminations with unparalleled accuracy and successfully solve various problems associated with uneven illumination. It can be used to process the microscopy images captured from multi-well plates and detect experimental subjects from an unevenly illuminated background.

  3. Feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic image based on multiscale analysis and morphology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shibin; Yu, Shaode; Yang, Yuhan; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII).

  4. Feature and Contrast Enhancement of Mammographic Image Based on Multiscale Analysis and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shibin; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII). PMID:24416072

  5. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based “nanobubble” contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size. PMID:25321797

  6. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-09-22

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based "nanobubble" contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size.

  7. Microbubble-based synchrotron radiation phase contrast imaging: basic study and angiography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Xi, Yan; Chai, Wei-Min; Wang, Yongting; Guan, Yongjing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Xie, Honglan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of microbubbles as phase contrast imaging (PCI) agents for angiography applications. The hypothesis was that the introduction of microbubbles into tissue produces a significant change in the refractive index and highlights the lumen of the vessel in PCI. The absorption and phase contrast images of commercially available microbubbles were obtained and compared in vitro. A further increase in contrast was observed in PCI. Microbubbles highlighted the lumen of the renal microvessels, acting as a positive contrast medium in ex vivo imaging. In addition, home-made microbubbles with larger diameters were introduced for image contrast enhancement in living tumor-bearing mice, demonstrating the feasibility of microbubble-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging for tumor vasculature in vivo.

  8. Infrared and color visible image fusion system based on luminance-contrast transfer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Gong, Wenfeng; Wang, Chensheng

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, an infrared and color image fusion algorithm based on luminance-contrast transfer technique is presented. This algorithm shall operate YCbCr transform on color visible image, and obtain the luminance component. Then, the grey-scale image fusion methods are utilized to fuse the luminance component of visible and infrared images to acquire grey-scale fusion image. After that, the grey-scale fusion image and visible image are fused to form color fusion image based on inversed YCbCr transform. To acquire better details appearance, a natural-sense color transfer fusion algorithm based on reference image is proposed. Furthermore, a real-time infrared/visible image fusion system based on FPGA is realized. Finally, this design and achievement is verified experimentally, and the experimental results show that the system can produce a color fusion image with good image quality and real-time performance.

  9. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  10. Bisphosphonate-Based Contrast Agents for Radiological Imaging of Microcalcifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    treatment of patients with bone metastases [5]. Two such commercially available compounds are pamidronate disodium, available as Aredia® from...reaction has superior yield (>70%) to the 18-21% yield for pamidronate - IRDye-78 (LI-COR) conjugation reported previously [6]. Representative images are

  11. Registration of phase-contrast images in propagation-based X-ray phase tomography.

    PubMed

    Weber, L; Hänsch, A; Wolfram, U; Pacureanu, A; Cloetens, P; Peyrin, F; Rit, S; Langer, M

    2017-08-16

    X-ray phase tomography aims at reconstructing the 3D electron density distribution of an object. It offers enhanced sensitivity compared to attenuation-based X-ray absorption tomography. In propagation-based methods, phase contrast is achieved by letting the beam propagate after interaction with the object. The phase shift is then retrieved at each projection angle, and subsequently used in tomographic reconstruction to obtain the refractive index decrement distribution, which is proportional to the electron density. Accurate phase retrieval is achieved by combining images at different propagation distances. For reconstructions of good quality, the phase-contrast images recorded at different distances need to be accurately aligned. In this work, we characterise the artefacts related to misalignment of the phase-contrast images, and investigate the use of different registration algorithms for aligning in-line phase-contrast images. The characterisation of artefacts is done by a simulation study and comparison with experimental data. Loss in resolution due to vibrations is found to be comparable to attenuation-based computed tomography. Further, it is shown that registration of phase-contrast images is nontrivial due to the difference in contrast between the different images, and the often periodical artefacts present in the phase-contrast images if multilayer X-ray optics are used. To address this, we compared two registration algorithms for aligning phase-contrast images acquired by magnified X-ray nanotomography: one based on cross-correlation and one based on mutual information. We found that the mutual information-based registration algorithm was more robust than a correlation-based method. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Nonlinear contrast imaging with an array-based micro-ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Needles, A; Arditi, M; Rognin, N G; Mehi, J; Coulthard, T; Bilan-Tracey, C; Gaud, E; Frinking, P; Hirson, D; Foster, F S

    2010-12-01

    The main goal of this study was to determine the optimal strategy for a real-time nonlinear contrast mode for small-animal imaging at high frequencies, on a new array-based micro-ultrasound system. Previously reported contrast imaging at frequencies above 15 MHz has primarily relied on subtraction schemes involving B-mode image data. These approaches provide insufficient contrast to tissue ratios under many imaging conditions. In this work, pulse inversion, amplitude modulation and combinations of these were systematically investigated for the detection of nonlinear fundamental and subharmonic signal components to maximize contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in the 18-24 MHz range. From in vitro and in vivo measurements, nonlinear fundamental detection with amplitude modulation provided optimal results, allowing an improvement in CTR of 13 dB compared with fundamental imaging. Based on this detection scheme, in vivo parametric images of murine kidneys were generated using sequences of nonlinear contrast images after intravenous bolus injections of microbubble suspensions. Initial parametric images of peak enhancement (PE), wash-in rate (WiR) and rise time (RT) are presented. The parametric images are indicative of blood perfusion kinetics, which, in the context of preclinical imaging with small animals, are anticipated to provide valuable insights into the progression of human disease models, where blood perfusion plays a critical role in either the diagnosis or treatment of the disease. Copyright © 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [An adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization based on image contrast analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongquan

    2011-12-01

    In order to get real time ultrasound images with clear structure and improved contrast, an adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization method based on image contrast analysis was investigated. It firstly introduced the dynamic beamforming of ultrasound system, as well as the definition of assumed system's sound speed and the true sound speed propagated in tissues the degrade image quality due to their mismatch was also discussed. After given the pixel gray level value based ultrasound image contrast ratio, the basic idea to precisely estimate the true sound speed for real time system sound speed was proposed. Algorithms have been verified both in tissue-mimicking phantoms with known sound speeds and in vivo ultrasound images, compared with other existing method. The testing results showed that this new method not only produced accurate sound speed for ultrasound image optimization, but also finely met the critical computation requirement for real time applications.

  14. Modified Sigmoid Function Based Gray Scale Image Contrast Enhancement Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Harish Kumar; Pal, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of an image enhancement is to improve eminence by maximizing the information content in the test image. Conventional contrast enhancement techniques either often fails to produce reasonable results for a broad variety of low-contrast and high contrast images, or cannot be automatically applied to different images, because they are parameters dependent. Hence this paper introduces a novel hybrid image enhancement approach by taking both the local and global information of an image. In the present work, sigmoid function is being modified on the basis of contrast of the images. The gray image enhancement problem is treated as nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints and solved by particle swarm optimization. The entropy and edge information is included in the objective function as quality measure of an image. The effectiveness of modified sigmoid function based enhancement over conventional methods namely linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and adaptive histogram equalization are better revealed by the enhanced images and further validated by statistical analysis of these images.

  15. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian; Chabior, Michael; Auweter, Sigrid; Reiser, Maximilian; Bamberg, Fabian

    2013-09-01

    In this review article we describe the development of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging, with particular emphasis on potential biomedical applications of the technology. We review the basics of image formation in grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with laboratory X-ray sources. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical concepts to extend grating-based multimodal radiography to quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

  16. Sensitive segmentation of low-contrast multispectral images based on multiparameter space-resonance imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetshin, Alexander M.; Akhmetshin, Lyudmila G.

    2001-10-01

    A new method of low contrast multispectral, hyperspectral and multiparameter images segmentation is outlined. The one has significant advantage in sensitivity and space resolving power of segmentation in comparison with known methods such as principal component transformation and fuzzy C-means clustering segmentation ones. New method is based on using of two important stages: 1) application virtual long-wave holographic transformation to each separate image of analyzed multispectral sequence (it is needed for increasing sensitivity of further analysis); 2) to each pixel of analyzed multispectral image is compare a virtual nonrecursive digital filter with complex coefficients. The one is characterized by its amplitude-frequency (AFC) and phase-frequency (PFC) characteristics. Information features used for visualization and segmentation are frequencies corresponded to maximum (resonance point) or minimum (antiresonance point) of AFC and group delay function calculated on base PFC. Information possibilities of new method are demonstrated on examples of multispectral remote sensing, various physical nature geophysical fields fusion and multiparameter MRI brain tumor hidden area influence detection.

  17. Melanin-Based Contrast Agents for Biomedical Optoacoustic Imaging and Theranostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    Optoacoustic imaging emerged in early 1990s as a new biomedical imaging technology that generates images by illuminating tissues with short laser pulses and detecting resulting ultrasound waves. This technique takes advantage of the spectroscopic approach to molecular imaging, and delivers high-resolution images in the depth of tissue. Resolution of the optoacoustic imaging is scalable, so that biomedical systems from cellular organelles to large organs can be visualized and, more importantly, characterized based on their optical absorption coefficient, which is proportional to the concentration of absorbing chromophores. Optoacoustic imaging was shown to be useful in both preclinical research using small animal models and in clinical applications. Applications in the field of molecular imaging offer abundant opportunities for the development of highly specific and effective contrast agents for quantitative optoacoustic imaging. Recent efforts are being made in the direction of nontoxic biodegradable contrast agents (such as nanoparticles made of melanin) that are potentially applicable in clinical optoacoustic imaging. In order to increase the efficiency and specificity of contrast agents and probes, they need to be made smart and capable of controlled accumulation in the target cells. This review was written in recognition of the potential breakthroughs in medical optoacoustic imaging that can be enabled by efficient and nontoxic melanin-based optoacoustic contrast agents. PMID:28783106

  18. High Quality Image of Biomedical Object by X-ray Refraction Based Contrast Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, E.; Maksimenko, A.; Hirano, K.; Hyodo, K.; Sugiyama, H.; Shimao, D.; Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Yuasa, T.; Ichihara, S.; Arai, Y.; Ando, M.

    2007-01-19

    Recently we have developed a new Computed Tomography (CT) algorithm for refraction contrast that uses the optics of diffraction-enhanced imaging. We applied this new method to visualize soft tissue which is not visualized by the current absorption based contrast. The meaning of the contrast that appears in refraction-contrast X-ray CT images must be clarified from a biologic or anatomic point of view. It has been reported that the contrast is made with the specific gravity map with a range of approximately 10 {mu}arc sec. However, the relationship between the contrast and biologic or anatomic findings has not been investigated, to our knowledge. We compared refraction-contrast X-ray CT images with microscopic X-ray images, and we evaluated refractive indexes of pathologic lesions on phase-contrast X-ray CT images. We focused our attenuation of breast cancer and lung cancer as samples. X-ray refraction based Computed Tomography was appeared to be a pathological ability to depict the boundary between cancer nest and normal tissue, and inner structure of the disease.

  19. High Quality Image of Biomedical Object by X-ray Refraction Based Contrast Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, E.; Maksimenko, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Hirano, K.; Hyodo, K.; Shimao, D.; Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Yuasa, T.; Ichihara, S.; Arai, Y.; Ando, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recently we have developed a new Computed Tomography (CT) algorithm for refraction contrast that uses the optics of diffraction-enhanced imaging. We applied this new method to visualize soft tissue which is not visualized by the current absorption based contrast. The meaning of the contrast that appears in refraction-contrast X-ray CT images must be clarified from a biologic or anatomic point of view. It has been reported that the contrast is made with the specific gravity map with a range of approximately 10 μarc sec. However, the relationship between the contrast and biologic or anatomic findings has not been investigated, to our knowledge. We compared refraction-contrast X-ray CT images with microscopic X-ray images, and we evaluated refractive indexes of pathologic lesions on phase-contrast X-ray CT images. We focused our attenuation of breast cancer and lung cancer as samples. X-ray refraction based Computed Tomography was appeared to be a pathological ability to depict the boundary between cancer nest and normal tissue, and inner structure of the disease.

  20. Spectral Imaging Technology-Based Evaluation of Radiation Treatment Planning to Remove Contrast Agent Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Yi-Qun, Xu; Wei, Liu; Xin-Ye, Ni

    2016-10-01

    This study employs dual-source computed tomography single-spectrum imaging to evaluate the effects of contrast agent artifact removal and the computational accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning improvement. The phantom, including the contrast agent, was used in all experiments. The amounts of iodine in the contrast agent were 30, 15, 7.5, and 0.75 g/100 mL. Two images with different energy values were scanned and captured using dual-source computed tomography (80 and 140 kV). To obtain a fused image, 2 groups of images were processed using single-energy spectrum imaging technology. The Pinnacle planning system was used to measure the computed tomography values of the contrast agent and the surrounding phantom tissue. The difference between radiotherapy treatment planning based on 80 kV, 140 kV, and energy spectrum image was analyzed. For the image with high iodine concentration, the quality of the energy spectrum-fused image was the highest, followed by that of the 140-kV image. That of the 80-kV image was the worst. The difference in the radiotherapy treatment results among the 3 models was significant. When the concentration of iodine was 30 g/100 mL and the distance from the contrast agent at the dose measurement point was 1 cm, the deviation values (P) were 5.95% and 2.20% when image treatment planning was based on 80 and 140 kV, respectively. When the concentration of iodine was 15 g/100 mL, deviation values (P) were -2.64% and -1.69%. Dual-source computed tomography single-energy spectral imaging technology can remove contrast agent artifacts to improve the calculated dose accuracy in radiotherapy treatment planning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging at CPHS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ran; Chen, Zhiqiang; Huang, Zhifeng; Xiao, Yongshun; Wang, Xuewu; Wie, Jie; Loong, C.-K.

    2011-09-01

    Since the launching of the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) project of Tsinghua University in 2009, works have begun on the design and engineering of an imaging/radiography instrument for the neutron source provided by CPHS. The instrument will perform basic tasks such as transmission imaging and computerized tomography. Additionally, we include in the design the utilization of coded-aperture and grating-based phase contrast methodology, as well as the options of prompt gamma-ray analysis and neutron-energy selective imaging. Previously, we had implemented the hardware and data-analysis software for grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging. Here, we investigate Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations of neutron refraction phenomena and then model the grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging system according to the classic-optics-based method. The simulated experimental results of the retrieving phase shift gradient information by five-step phase-stepping approach indicate the feasibility of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging as an option for the cold neutron imaging instrument at the CPHS.

  2. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  3. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-01

    In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  4. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-09-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, 4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  5. Microbubbles as x-ray scattering contrast agents using analyzer-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Arfelli, F; Rigon, L; Menk, R H

    2010-03-21

    Conventional contrast agents utilized in diagnostic radiology are based on x-ray absorption properties; alternative physical principles capable of providing a contrast enhancement in radiographs have never been applied. This study exploits the possibility of using a novel type of contrast media based on x-ray scattering. The contrast agents consist of microbubble echo-enhancing agents, usually applied in ultrasound examinations, which are invisible with conventional x-ray absorption techniques. The experiment was carried out at the medical beamline of the synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste, Italy. A flat silicon analyzer crystal typically used for diffraction-enhanced imaging was utilized as a tool for detecting the scattering properties of the contrast agents. In analyzer-based imaging, it is possible to detect the scattering properties of the sample by shifting the analyzer crystal to selected positions of its reflectivity curve. In particular, when the sample consists of a large number of micro-particles an overall effect can be observed. Phantoms containing contrast agents based on microbubbles were imaged at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. High visibility of the details was demonstrated, and a strong contrast enhancement was measured compared to normal x-ray absorption techniques.

  6. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  7. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Baran, P; Pacile, S; Nesterets, Y I; Mayo, S C; Dullin, C; Dreossi, D; Arfelli, F; Thompson, D; Lockie, D; McCormack, M; Taba, S T; Brun, F; Pinamonti, M; Nickson, C; Hall, C; Dimmock, M; Zanconati, F; Cholewa, M; Quiney, H; Brennan, P C; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  8. Time-domain imaging with quench-based fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Walter J.; Solomon, Metasebya; Sudlow, Gail P.; Berezin, Mikhail; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Time-domain diffuse optical imaging was performed to assess the FRET and quenching in living mice with orthotopic breast cancer. Tumor contrast enhancement was accompanied by increased fluorescence lifetime after administration of quenched probes selective for matrix metalloproteinases while no significant change was observed for non-quenched probes for integrin receptors. These results demonstrate the utility of timedomain imaging for detection of cancer-related enzyme activity in vivo.

  9. Cuckoo search algorithm based satellite image contrast and brightness enhancement using DWT-SVD.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, A K; Soni, V; Kumar, A; Singh, G K

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a new contrast enhancement approach which is based on Cuckoo Search (CS) algorithm and DWT-SVD for quality improvement of the low contrast satellite images. The input image is decomposed into the four frequency subbands through Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), and CS algorithm used to optimize each subband of DWT and then obtains the singular value matrix of the low-low thresholded subband image and finally, it reconstructs the enhanced image by applying IDWT. The singular value matrix employed intensity information of the particular image, and any modification in the singular values changes the intensity of the given image. The experimental results show superiority of the proposed method performance in terms of PSNR, MSE, Mean and Standard Deviation over conventional and state-of-the-art techniques.

  10. Comparison of laboratory grating-based and speckle-tracking x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romell, J.; Zhou, T.; Zdora, M.; Sala, S.; Koch, F. J.; Hertz, H. M.; Burvall, A.

    2017-06-01

    Phase-contrast imaging with x-rays is a developing field for imaging weakly absorbing materials. In this work, two phase-contrast imaging methods, grating- and speckle-based imaging, that measure the derivative of the phase shift, have been implemented with a laboratory source and compared experimentally. It was found that for the same dose conditions, the speckle-tracking differential phase-contrast images have considerably higher contrast-to-noise ratio than the grating-based images, but at the cost of lower resolution. Grating-based imaging performs better in terms of resolution, but would require longer exposure times, mainly due to absorption in the grating interferometer.

  11. Energy weighting in grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelzer, Georg; Weber, Thomas; Anton, Gisela; Ballabriga Sune, Rafael; Bayer, Florian; Campbell, Michael; Haas, Wilhelm; Horn, Florian; Llopart Cudie, Xavi; Michel, Norbert; Mollenbauer, Uwe; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Ritter, Ina; Wölfel, Stefan; Wong, Winnie S.; Zang, Andrea; Michel, Thilo

    2014-03-01

    With energy-resolving photon-counting detectors in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging it is possible to reduce the dose needed and optimize the imaging chain towards better performance. The advantage of photon- counting detector's linear energy response and absence of electronic noise in attenuation based imaging is known. The access to the energy information of the photons counted provides even further potential for optimization by applying energy weighting factors. We have evaluated energy weighting for grating-based phase-contrast imaging. Measurements with the hybrid photon-counting detector Dosepix were performed. The concept of energy binning implemented in the pixel electronics allows individual storing of the energy information of the incoming photons in 16 energy bins for each pixel. With this technique the full spectral information can be obtained pixel wise from one single acquisition. On the differential phase-contrast data taken, we applied different types of energy weighting factors. The results presented in this contribution demonstrate the advantages of energy-resolved photon-counting in differential phase-contrast imaging. Using a x-ray spectrum centred significantly above the interferometers design energy leads to poor image quality. But with the proposed method and detector the quality was enhanced by 2.8 times in signal-to-noise ratio squared. As this is proportional to dose, energy- resolved photon-counting might be valuable especially for medical applications.

  12. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  13. Recent advances in synchrotron-based hard x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Nelson, J.; Holzner, C.; Andrews, J. C.; Pianetta, P.

    2013-12-01

    Ever since the first demonstration of phase contrast imaging (PCI) in the 1930s by Frits Zernike, people have realized the significant advantage of phase contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging in terms of sensitivity to ‘transparent’ features within specimens. Thus, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, typically containing low Z elements such as C, H, O and N. Particularly when synchrotron hard x-rays are employed, the favourable brightness, energy tunability, monochromatic characteristics and penetration depth have dramatically enhanced the quality and variety of XPCI methods, which permit detection of the phase shift associated with 3D geometry of relatively large samples in a non-destructive manner. In this paper, we review recent advances in several synchrotron-based hard x-ray XPCI methods. Challenges and key factors in methodological development are discussed, and biological and medical applications are presented.

  14. Stochastic parallel gradient descent based adaptive optics used for a high contrast imaging coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bing; Ren, De-Qing; Zhang, Xi

    2011-08-01

    An adaptive optics (AO) system based on a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm is proposed to reduce the speckle noises in the optical system of a stellar coronagraph in order to further improve the contrast. The principle of the SPGD algorithm is described briefly and a metric suitable for point source imaging optimization is given. The feasibility and good performance of the SPGD algorithm is demonstrated by an experimental system featured with a 140-actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shark wavefront sensor. Then the SPGD based AO is applied to a liquid crystal array (LCA) based coronagraph to improve the contrast. The LCA can modulate the incoming light to generate a pupil apodization mask of any pattern. A circular stepped pattern is used in our preliminary experiment and the image contrast shows improvement from 10-3 to 10-4.5 at an angular distance of 2λ/D after being corrected by SPGD based AO.

  15. Infrared and multi-type images fusion algorithm based on contrast pyramid transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Wang, Yan; Wu, Yujing; Qian, Yunsheng

    2016-09-01

    A fusion algorithm for infrared and multi-type images based on contrast pyramid transform (CPT) combined with Otsu method and morphology is proposed in this paper. Firstly, two sharpened images are combined to the first fused image based on information entropy weighted scheme. Afterwards, two enhanced images and the first fused one are decomposed into a series of images with different dimensions and spatial frequencies. To the low-frequency layer, the Otsu method is applied to calculate the optimal segmentation threshold of the first fused image, which is subsequently used to determine the pixel values in top layer fused image. With respect to the high-frequency layers, the top-bottom hats morphological transform is employed to each layer before maximum selection criterion. Finally, the series of decomposed images are reconstructed and then superposed with the enhanced image processed by morphological gradient operation as a second fusion to get the final fusion image. Infrared and visible images fusion, infrared and low-light-level (LLL) images fusion, infrared intensity and infrared polarization images fusion, and multi-focus images fusion are discussed in this paper. Both experimental results and objective metrics demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed algorithm over the conventional ones used to compare.

  16. A Novel Mouse Segmentation Method Based on Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Micro-CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming; Yang, Xiaoquan

    2017-01-01

    With the development of hybrid imaging scanners, micro-CT is widely used in locating abnormalities, studying drug metabolism, and providing structural priors to aid image reconstruction in functional imaging. Due to the low contrast of soft tissues, segmentation of soft tissue organs from mouse micro-CT images is a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose a mouse segmentation scheme based on dynamic contrast enhanced micro-CT images. With a homemade fast scanning micro-CT scanner, dynamic contrast enhanced images were acquired before and after injection of non-ionic iodinated contrast agents (iohexol). Then the feature vector of each voxel was extracted from the signal intensities at different time points. Based on these features, the heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney could be classified into different categories and extracted from separate categories by morphological processing. The bone structure was segmented using a thresholding method. Our method was validated on seven BALB/c mice using two different classifiers: a support vector machine classifier with a radial basis function kernel and a random forest classifier. The results were compared to manual segmentation, and the performance was assessed using the Dice similarity coefficient, false positive ratio, and false negative ratio. The results showed high accuracy with the Dice similarity coefficient ranging from 0.709 ± 0.078 for the spleen to 0.929 ± 0.006 for the kidney. PMID:28060917

  17. Feasibility study of hidden flow imaging based on laser speckle technique using multiperspectives contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Moshe, Tomer

    2014-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the insertion of lens array in the front of a CCD camera in a laser speckle imaging (LSI) like-technique to acquire multiple speckle reflectance projections for imaging blood flow in an intact biological tissue. In some of LSI applications, flow imaging is obtained by thinning or removing of the upper tissue layers to access blood vessels. In contrast, with the proposed approach flow imaging can be achieved while the tissue is intact. In the system, each lens from an hexagonal lens array observed the sample from slightly different perspectives and captured with a CCD camera. In the computer, these multiview raw images are converted to speckled contrast maps. Then, a self-deconvolution shift-and-add algorithm is employed for processing yields high contrast flow information. The method is experimentally validated first with a plastic tube filled with scattering liquid running at different controlled flow rates hidden in a biological tissue and then extensively tested for imaging of cerebral blood flow in an intact rodent head experience different conditions. A total of fifteen mice were used in the experiments divided randomly into three groups as follows: Group 1 (n=5) consisted of injured mice experience hypoxic ischemic brain injury monitored for ~40 min. Group 2 (n=5) injured mice experience anoxic brain injury monitored up to 20 min. Group 3 (n=5) experience functional activation monitored up to ~35 min. To increase tissue transparency and the penetration depth of photons through head tissue layers, an optical clearing method was employed. To our knowledge, this work presents for the first time the use of lens array in LSI scheme.

  18. Microbubbles as a scattering contrast agent for grating-based x-ray dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Velroyen, A; Bech, M; Malecki, A; Tapfer, A; Yaroshenko, A; Ingrisch, M; Cyran, C C; Auweter, S D; Nikolaou, K; Reiser, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2013-02-21

    In clinically established-absorption-based-biomedical x-ray imaging, contrast agents with high atomic numbers (e.g. iodine) are commonly used for contrast enhancement. The development of novel x-ray contrast modalities such as phase contrast and dark-field contrast opens up the possible use of alternative contrast media in x-ray imaging. We investigate using ultrasound contrast agents, which unlike iodine-based contrast agents can also be administered to patients with renal impairment and thyroid dysfunction, for application with a recently developed novel x-ray dark-field imaging modality. To produce contrast from these microbubble-based contrast agents, our method exploits ultra-small-angle coherent x-ray scattering. Such scattering dark-field x-ray images can be obtained with a grating-based x-ray imaging setup, together with refraction-based differential phase-contrast and the conventional attenuation contrast images. In this work we specifically show that ultrasound contrast agents based on microbubbles can be used to produce strongly enhanced dark-field contrast, with superior contrast-to-noise ratio compared to the attenuation signal. We also demonstrate that this method works well with an x-ray tube-based setup and that the relative contrast gain even increases when the pixel size is increased from tenths of microns to clinically compatible detector resolutions about up to a millimetre.

  19. Fat-based registration of breast dynamic contrast enhanced water images.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subashini; Hargreaves, Brian A; Daniel, Bruce L

    2017-07-26

    In this study, a 3D fat-based deformable registration algorithm was developed for registering dynamic contrast-enhanced breast images. The mutual information similarity measure with free-form deformation motion correction in rapidly enhancing lesions can introduce motion. However, in Dixon-based fat-water separated acquisitions, the nonenhancing fat signal can directly be used to estimate deformable motion, which can be later used to deform the water images. Qualitative comparison of the fat-based registration method to a water-based registration method, and to the unregistered images, was performed by two experienced readers. Quantitative analysis of the registration was evaluated by estimating the mean-squared signal difference on the fat images. Using a scale of 0 (no motion) to 2 ( > 4 voxels of motion), the average image quality score of the fat-based registered images was 0.5 ± 0.6, water-based registration was 0.8 ± 0.8, and the unregistered dataset was 1.6 ± 0.6. The mean-squared-signal-difference metric on the fat images was significantly lower for fat-based registered images compared with both water-based registered and unregistered images. Fat-based registration of breast dynamic contrast-enhanced images is a promising technique for performing deformable motion correction of breast without introducing new motion. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Simulation of single grid-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (g-PCXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. W.; Lee, H. W.; Cho, H. S.; Je, U. K.; Park, C. K.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. A.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, D. Y.; Park, Y. O.; Woo, T. H.; Lee, S. H.; Chung, W. H.; Kim, J. W.; Kim, J. G.

    2017-04-01

    Single grid-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (g-PCXI) technique, which was recently proposed by Wen et al. to retrieve absorption, scattering, and phase-gradient images from the raw image of the examined object, seems a practical method for phase-contrast imaging with great simplicity and minimal requirements on the setup alignment. In this work, we developed a useful simulation platform for g-PCXI and performed a simulation to demonstrate its viability. We also established a table-top setup for g-PCXI which consists of a focused-linear grid (200-lines/in strip density), an x-ray tube (100-μm focal spot size), and a flat-panel detector (48-μm pixel size) and performed a preliminary experiment with some samples to show the performance of the simulation platform. We successfully obtained phase-contrast x-ray images of much enhanced contrast from both the simulation and experiment and the simulated contract seemed similar to the experimental contrast, which shows the performance of the developed simulation platform. We expect that the simulation platform will be useful for designing an optimal g-PCXI system.

  1. Optimum wavelet based masking for the contrast enhancement of medical images using enhanced cuckoo search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Ebenezer; Anitha, J

    2016-04-01

    Unsharp masking techniques are a prominent approach in contrast enhancement. Generalized masking formulation has static scale value selection, which limits the gain of contrast. In this paper, we propose an Optimum Wavelet Based Masking (OWBM) using Enhanced Cuckoo Search Algorithm (ECSA) for the contrast improvement of medical images. The ECSA can automatically adjust the ratio of nest rebuilding, using genetic operators such as adaptive crossover and mutation. First, the proposed contrast enhancement approach is validated quantitatively using Brain Web and MIAS database images. Later, the conventional nest rebuilding of cuckoo search optimization is modified using Adaptive Rebuilding of Worst Nests (ARWN). Experimental results are analyzed using various performance matrices, and our OWBM shows improved results as compared with other reported literature.

  2. Microbubbles as a scattering contrast agent for grating-based x-ray dark-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velroyen, A.; Bech, M.; Malecki, A.; Tapfer, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Ingrisch, M.; Cyran, C. C.; Auweter, S. D.; Nikolaou, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-02-01

    In clinically established—absorption-based—biomedical x-ray imaging, contrast agents with high atomic numbers (e.g. iodine) are commonly used for contrast enhancement. The development of novel x-ray contrast modalities such as phase contrast and dark-field contrast opens up the possible use of alternative contrast media in x-ray imaging. We investigate using ultrasound contrast agents, which unlike iodine-based contrast agents can also be administered to patients with renal impairment and thyroid dysfunction, for application with a recently developed novel x-ray dark-field imaging modality. To produce contrast from these microbubble-based contrast agents, our method exploits ultra-small-angle coherent x-ray scattering. Such scattering dark-field x-ray images can be obtained with a grating-based x-ray imaging setup, together with refraction-based differential phase-contrast and the conventional attenuation contrast images. In this work we specifically show that ultrasound contrast agents based on microbubbles can be used to produce strongly enhanced dark-field contrast, with superior contrast-to-noise ratio compared to the attenuation signal. We also demonstrate that this method works well with an x-ray tube-based setup and that the relative contrast gain even increases when the pixel size is increased from tenths of microns to clinically compatible detector resolutions about up to a millimetre.

  3. Chemical-contrast imaging with pulse-shaping based pump-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Daniel C.; Bhagwat, Amar R.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy and pulse-shaping techniques are providing new modes of contrast for the field of multiphoton microscopy. Endogenous species such as heme proteins show rich nonlinear spectroscopic signatures of excited state absorption, stimulated emission and ground-state bleaching. Commercially available octave-spanning Ti:sapphire oscillators offer new opportunities for imaging based on pump-probe contrast. Spatial light modulators take advantage of this large bandwidth, shaping pulses of light to selectively excite molecular structures with similar spectral properties. We present two-color pump-probe imaging of heme proteins solutions and red blood cells.

  4. Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles as magnetic resonance contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    As we move towards an era of personalized medicine, molecular imaging contrast agents are likely to see an increasing presence in routine clinical practice. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has garnered particular interest as a platform for molecular imaging applications due its ability to monitor anatomical changes concomitant with physiologic and molecular changes. One promising new direction in the development of MR contrast agents involves the labeling and/or loading of nanoparticles with gadolinium (Gd). These nanoplatforms are capable of carrying large payloads of Gd, thus providing the requisite sensitivity to detect molecular signatures within disease pathologies. In this review, we discuss some of the progress that has recently been made in the development of Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles and outline some of the physical and chemical properties that will be important to incorporate into the next generation of contrast agents, including high Gd chelate stability, high “relaxivity per particle” and “relaxivity density”, and biodegradability. PMID:23432004

  5. Region of interest extraction based on saliency detection and contrast analysis for remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jing; Zhang, Libao; Wang, Shuang

    2016-10-01

    Region of Interest (ROI) extraction is an important component in remote sensing images processing, which is useful for further practical applications such as image compression, image fusion, image segmentation and image registration. Traditional ROI extraction methods are usually prior knowledge-based and depend on a global searching solution which are time consuming and computational complex. Saliency detection which is widely used for ROI extraction from natural scene images in these years can effectively solve the problem of high computation complexity in ROI extraction for remote sensing images as well as retain accuracy. In this paper, a new computational model is proposed to improve the accuracy of ROI extraction in remote sensing images. Considering the characteristics of remote sensing images, we first use lifting wavelet transform based on adaptive direction evaluation (ADE) to obtain multi-scale orientation contrast feature map (MF). Secondly, the features of color are exploited using the information content analysis to provide a color information map (CIM). Thirdly, feature fusion is used to integrate multi-scale orientation contrast features and color information for generating a saliency map. Finally, an adaptive threshold segmentation algorithm is employed to obtain the ROI. Compared with existing models, our method can not only effectively extract detail of the ROIs, but also effectively remove mistaken detection of the inner parts of the ROIs.

  6. Co-registration and distortion correction of diffusion and anatomical images based on inverse contrast normalization.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Chitresh; Haldar, Justin P; Choi, Soyoung; Joshi, Anand A; Shattuck, David W; Leahy, Richard M

    2015-07-15

    Diffusion MRI provides quantitative information about microstructural properties which can be useful in neuroimaging studies of the human brain. Echo planar imaging (EPI) sequences, which are frequently used for acquisition of diffusion images, are sensitive to inhomogeneities in the primary magnetic (B0) field that cause localized distortions in the reconstructed images. We describe and evaluate a new method for correction of susceptibility-induced distortion in diffusion images in the absence of an accurate B0 fieldmap. In our method, the distortion field is estimated using a constrained non-rigid registration between an undistorted T1-weighted anatomical image and one of the distorted EPI images from diffusion acquisition. Our registration framework is based on a new approach, INVERSION (Inverse contrast Normalization for VERy Simple registratION), which exploits the inverted contrast relationship between T1- and T2-weighted brain images to define a simple and robust similarity measure. We also describe how INVERSION can be used for rigid alignment of diffusion images and T1-weighted anatomical images. Our approach is evaluated with multiple in vivo datasets acquired with different acquisition parameters. Compared to other methods, INVERSION shows robust and consistent performance in rigid registration and shows improved alignment of diffusion and anatomical images relative to normalized mutual information for non-rigid distortion correction.

  7. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  8. Contrast enhancement of x-ray image based on singular value selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chun; Wang, Jing-Wein; Lin, Shu-Yuan

    2010-04-01

    Low-contrast profile images are frequently encountered in medical practice, and the correct interpretation of these images is of vital importance. This study introduces a contrast enhancement technique based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to enhance low-contrast fracture x-ray images. We propose a development of the traditional singular value solution by applying a feature selection process on the extracted singular values. The proposal calls for the establishment of a feature space in which the interpretability or perception of information in images for human viewers is enhanced, while noise and blurring are reduced. In this approach, the area of interest is manually cropped, and histogram equalization (HE) and singular value selection procedures are then conducted for comparative study. This approach exploits the spectral property of SVD, and the singular value selection algorithm is developed based on the corresponding Fourier domain technique for high frequency enhancement. The proposed method can generate more enhanced views of the target images than HE processing. Ten physicians confirm the performance of the proposed model using the visual analog scale (VAS). The average VAS score improves from 2.5 with HE to 8.3 using the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is helpful in fracture x-ray image processing.

  9. Noise in x-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas; Bartl, Peter; Bayer, Florian; Durst, Juergen; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Ritter, Andre; Anton, Gisela

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging is a fast developing new modality not only for medical imaging, but as well for other fields such as material sciences. While these many possible applications arise, the knowledge of the noise behavior is essential. Methods: In this work, the authors used a least squares fitting algorithm to calculate the noise behavior of the three quantities absorption, differential phase, and dark-field image. Further, the calculated error formula of the differential phase image was verified by measurements. Therefore, a Talbot interferometer was setup, using a microfocus x-ray tube as source and a Timepix detector for photon counting. Additionally, simulations regarding this topic were performed. Results: It turned out that the variance of the reconstructed phase is only dependent of the total number of photons used to generate the phase image and the visibility of the experimental setup. These results could be evaluated in measurements as well as in simulations. Furthermore, the correlation between absorption and dark-field image was calculated. Conclusions: These results provide the understanding of the noise characteristics of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and will help to improve image quality.

  10. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: proof-of-concept experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ± 30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS were found to be different

  11. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  12. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  13. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hoennicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-15

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  14. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-01

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  15. Fractal coding of wavelet image based on human vision contrast-masking effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hai; Shen, Lansun

    2000-06-01

    In this paper, a fractal-based compression approach of wavelet image is presented. The scheme tries to make full use of the sensitivity features of the human visual system. With the wavelet-based multi-resolution representation of image, detail vectors of each high frequency sub-image are constructed in accordance with its spatial orientation in order to grasp the edge information to which human observer is sensitive. Then a multi-level selection algorithm based on human vision's contrast masking effect is proposed to make the decision whether a detail vector is coded or not. Those vectors below the contrast threshold are discarded without introducing visual artifacts because of the ignorance of human vision. As for the redundancy of the retained vectors, different fractal- based methods are employed to decrease the correlation in single sub-image and between the different resolution sub- images with the same orientation. Experimental results suggest the efficiency of the proposed scheme. With the standard test image, our approach outperforms the EZW algorithm and the JPEG method.

  16. Noise and Analyzer-Crystal Angular Position Analysis for Analyzer-Based Phase-Contrast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Keivan; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-01-01

    The analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging (ABI) method is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. Like many of the modern imaging techniques, ABI is a computed imaging method (meaning that images are calculated from raw data). ABI can simultaneously generate a number of planar parametric images containing information about absorption, refraction, and scattering properties of an object. These images are estimated from raw data acquired by measuring (sampling) the angular intensity profile (AIP) of the X-ray beam passed through the object at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. The noise in the estimated ABI parametric images depends upon imaging conditions like the source intensity (flux), measurements angular positions, object properties, and the estimation method. In this paper, we use the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) to quantify the noise properties in parametric images and to investigate the effect of source intensity, different analyzer-crystal angular positions and object properties on this bound, assuming a fixed radiation dose delivered to an object. The CRLB is the minimum bound for the variance of an unbiased estimator and defines the best noise performance that one can obtain regardless of which estimation method is used to estimate ABI parametric images. The main result of this manuscript is that the variance (hence the noise) in parametric images is directly proportional to the source intensity and only a limited number of analyzer-crystal angular measurements (eleven for uniform and three for optimal non-uniform) are required to get the best parametric images. The following angular measurements only spread the total dose to the measurements without improving or worsening CRLB, but the added measurements may improve parametric images by reducing estimation bias. Next, using CRLB we evaluate the Multiple-Image Radiography (MIR), Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) and Scatter Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (S

  17. Noise and analyzer-crystal angular position analysis for analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Keivan; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-04-01

    The analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (ABI) method is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. Like many of the modern imaging techniques, ABI is a computed imaging method (meaning that images are calculated from raw data). ABI can simultaneously generate a number of planar parametric images containing information about absorption, refraction, and scattering properties of an object. These images are estimated from raw data acquired by measuring (sampling) the angular intensity profile of the x-ray beam passed through the object at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. The noise in the estimated ABI parametric images depends upon imaging conditions like the source intensity (flux), measurements angular positions, object properties, and the estimation method. In this paper, we use the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) to quantify the noise properties in parametric images and to investigate the effect of source intensity, different analyzer-crystal angular positions and object properties on this bound, assuming a fixed radiation dose delivered to an object. The CRLB is the minimum bound for the variance of an unbiased estimator and defines the best noise performance that one can obtain regardless of which estimation method is used to estimate ABI parametric images. The main result of this paper is that the variance (hence the noise) in parametric images is directly proportional to the source intensity and only a limited number of analyzer-crystal angular measurements (eleven for uniform and three for optimal non-uniform) are required to get the best parametric images. The following angular measurements only spread the total dose to the measurements without improving or worsening CRLB, but the added measurements may improve parametric images by reducing estimation bias. Next, using CRLB we evaluate the multiple-image radiography, diffraction enhanced imaging and scatter diffraction enhanced imaging estimation techniques

  18. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Millon, Antoine; Robson, Philip M.; Mani, Venkatesh

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerosis is the number one killer in the Western world, and threatens to become the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is therefore paramount to develop non-invasive methods for the detection of high-risk, asymptomatic individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms or events. In the recent past, great strides have been made in the understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved in the atherosclerotic cascade down to the molecular details. This has allowed the development of contrast agents that can aid in the in vivo characterization of these processes. Gadolinium chelates are among the contrast media most commonly used in MR imaging. Originally used for MR angiography for the detection and quantification of vascular stenosis, more recently they have been applied to improve characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. In this manuscript, we will briefly review gadolinium-chelates (Gd) based contrast agents for non-invasive MR imaging of atherosclerosis. We will first describe Gd-based non-targeted FDA approved agents, used routinely in clinical practice for the evaluation of neovascularization in other diseases. Secondly, we will describe non-specific and specific targeted contrast agents, which have great potential for dissecting specific biological processes in the atherosclerotic cascade. Lastly, we will briefly compare Gd-based agents to others commonly used in MRI and to other imaging modalities. PMID:23539505

  19. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Millon, Antoine; Robson, Philip M; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi

    2013-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerosis is the number one killer in the Western world, and threatens to become the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is therefore paramount to develop non-invasive methods for the detection of high-risk, asymptomatic individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms or events. In the recent past, great strides have been made in the understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved in the atherosclerotic cascade down to the molecular details. This has allowed the development of contrast agents that can aid in the in vivo characterization of these processes. Gadolinium chelates are among the contrast media most commonly used in MR imaging. Originally used for MR angiography for the detection and quantification of vascular stenosis, more recently they have been applied to improve characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. In this manuscript, we will briefly review gadolinium-chelates (Gd) based contrast agents for non-invasive MR imaging of atherosclerosis. We will first describe Gd-based non-targeted FDA approved agents, used routinely in clinical practice for the evaluation of neovascularization in other diseases. Secondly, we will describe non-specific and specific targeted contrast agents, which have great potential for dissecting specific biological processes in the atherosclerotic cascade. Lastly, we will briefly compare Gd-based agents to others commonly used in MRI and to other imaging modalities.

  20. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  1. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikejimba, Lynda; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lin, Yuan; Chen, Baiyu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Zerhouni, Moustafa; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2012-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel x-ray imaging technique that provides 3D structural information of the breast. In contrast to 2D mammography, DBT minimizes tissue overlap potentially improving cancer detection and reducing number of unnecessary recalls. The addition of a contrast agent to DBT and mammography for lesion enhancement has the benefit of providing functional information of a lesion, as lesion contrast uptake and washout patterns may help differentiate between benign and malignant tumors. This study used a task-based method to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: contrast enhanced mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d', derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine contrast, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 5 mm lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d' was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. In general, higher dose gave higher d', but for the lowest iodine concentration and lowest dose, dual energy subtraction tomosynthesis and temporal subtraction tomosynthesis demonstrated the highest performance.

  2. A Fusion Algorithm for GFP Image and Phase Contrast Image of Arabidopsis Cell Based on SFL-Contourlet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peng; Wang, Jing; Wei, Biao; Mi, Deling

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid multiscale and multilevel image fusion algorithm for green fluorescent protein (GFP) image and phase contrast image of Arabidopsis cell is proposed in this paper. Combining intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) transform and sharp frequency localization Contourlet transform (SFL-CT), this algorithm uses different fusion strategies for different detailed subbands, which include neighborhood consistency measurement (NCM) that can adaptively find balance between color background and gray structure. Also two kinds of neighborhood classes based on empirical model are taken into consideration. Visual information fidelity (VIF) as an objective criterion is introduced to evaluate the fusion image. The experimental results of 117 groups of Arabidopsis cell image from John Innes Center show that the new algorithm cannot only make the details of original images well preserved but also improve the visibility of the fusion image, which shows the superiority of the novel method to traditional ones. PMID:23476716

  3. [Measuring the contrast resolution limits of human vision based on the modern digital image processing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifang; Liu, Yuhong; Wang, Ying; Li, Hong; Li, Zhangyong; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Xie, Zhengxiang

    2008-10-01

    In the literatures on the human vision physiology and physics, there were reports about space resolution limit of 1' visual angle, frequency resolution limit of 5 nm and time resolution limit of 0.1" of human vision. However, there has been no report about the contrast resolution limit of human vision,especially the report of measuring method and result about the contrast resolution limit of human vision based on the modern digital image processing. Here we report a modern method for measuring the contrast resolution limit of human vision based on computer digital image processing technology, and we present the measured results and their mathematical models. The function relationships of contrast resolution limit varying with background gray in a photopic or a scotopic sights were illuminated respectively. It can be expected that such investigations with regard to human vision will establish the physiological foundation of the theories and techniques in hiding bodies and hiding figures (stealth), in anti-hiding bodies and anti-hiding figures, in the night vision system independent of infrared, as well as in their relative industries.

  4. Improved algorithm for processing grating-based phase contrast interferometry image sets

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Shashidhara Assoufid, Lahsen Xiao, Xianghui; Ham, Kyungmin; Johnson, Warren W.; Butler, Leslie G.

    2014-01-15

    Grating-based X-ray and neutron interferometry tomography using phase-stepping methods generates large data sets. An improved algorithm is presented for solving for the parameters to calculate transmissions, differential phase contrast, and dark-field images. The method takes advantage of the vectorization inherent in high-level languages such as Mathematica and MATLAB and can solve a 16 × 1k × 1k data set in less than a second. In addition, the algorithm can function with partial data sets. This is demonstrated with processing of a 16-step grating data set with partial use of the original data chosen without any restriction. Also, we have calculated the reduced chi-square for the fit and notice the effect of grating support structural elements upon the differential phase contrast image and have explored expanded basis set representations to mitigate the impact.

  5. Improved algorithm for processing grating-based phase contrast interferometry image sets.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Shashidhara; Assoufid, Lahsen; Xiao, Xianghui; Ham, Kyungmin; Johnson, Warren W; Butler, Leslie G

    2014-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray and neutron interferometry tomography using phase-stepping methods generates large data sets. An improved algorithm is presented for solving for the parameters to calculate transmissions, differential phase contrast, and dark-field images. The method takes advantage of the vectorization inherent in high-level languages such as Mathematica and MATLAB and can solve a 16 × 1k × 1k data set in less than a second. In addition, the algorithm can function with partial data sets. This is demonstrated with processing of a 16-step grating data set with partial use of the original data chosen without any restriction. Also, we have calculated the reduced chi-square for the fit and notice the effect of grating support structural elements upon the differential phase contrast image and have explored expanded basis set representations to mitigate the impact.

  6. Development of Ultrasound-switchable Fluorescence Imaging Contrast Agents based on Thermosensitive Polymers and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Pitta, Harish; Xie, Zhiwei; Hong, Yi; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first introduced a recently developed high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging technique, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF). The imaging principles based on two types of USF contrast agents were reviewed. To improve USF imaging techniques further, excellent USF contrast agents were developed based on high-performance thermoresponsive polymers and environment-sensitive fluorophores. Herein, such contrast agents were synthesized and characterized with five key parameters: (1) peak excitation and emission wavelengths (λex and λem), (2) the fluorescence intensity ratio between on and off states (IOn/IOff), (3) the fluorescence lifetime ratio between on and off states (τOn/τOff), (4) the temperature threshold to switch on fluorophores (Tth), and (5) the temperature transition bandwidth (TBW). We mainly investigated fluorescence intensity and lifetime changes of four environment-sensitive dyes [7-(2-Aminoethylamino)-N,N-dimethyl-4-benzofurazansulfonamide (DBD-ED), St633, Sq660, and St700] as a function of temperature, while the dye was attached to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) linear polymers or encapsulated in nanoparticles. Six fluorescence resonance energy transfer systems were invented in which both the donor (DBD-ED or ST425) and the acceptor (Sq660) were adopted. Our results indicate that three Förster resonance energy transfer systems, where both IOn/IOff and τOn/τOff are larger than 2.5, are promising for application in future surface tissue bioimaging by USF technique. PMID:26052192

  7. Analysis of a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Florian; Bayer, Florian; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Weber, Thomas; Zang, Andrea; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2014-03-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising imaging modality to increase soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based radiography. Complementary and otherwise inaccessible information is provided by the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. This could especially turn out to be useful in mammography, where tumourous tissue is connected with the presence of supertiny microcalcifications. In addition to the well-established image reconstruction process, an analysis method was introduced by Modregger, 1 which is based on deconvolution of the underlying scattering distribution within a single pixel revealing information about the sample. Subsequently, the different contrast modalities can be calculated with the scattering distribution. The method already proved to deliver additional information in the higher moments of the scattering distribution and possibly reaches better image quality with respect to an increased contrast-to-noise ratio. Several measurements were carried out using melamine foams as phantoms. We analysed the dependency of the deconvolution-based method with respect to the dark-field image on different parameters such as dose, number of iterations of the iterative deconvolution-algorithm and dark-field signal. A disagreement was found in the reconstructed dark-field values between the FFT method and the iterative method. Usage of the resulting characteristics might be helpful in future applications.

  8. Development of a dynamic 4D anthropomorphic breast phantom for contrast-based breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lin, Yuan; Segars, William P.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Ikejimba, Lynda; Chen, Baiyu; Lo, Joseph Y.; Dobbins, James T., III; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    Mammography is currently the most widely accepted tool for detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, the sensitivity of mammography is reduced in women with dense breast tissue due to tissue overlap, which may obscure lesions. Digital breast tomosynthesis with contrast enhancement reduces tissue overlap and provides additional functional information about lesions (i.e. morphology and kinetics), which in turn may improve lesion characterization. The performance of such techniques is highly dependent on the structural composition of the breast, which varies significantly across patients. Therefore, optimization of breast imaging systems should be done with respect to this patient versatility. Furthermore, imaging techniques that employ contrast require the inclusion of a temporally varying breast composition with respect to the contrast agent kinetics to enable the optimization of the system. To these ends, we have developed a dynamic 4D anthropomorphic breast phantom, which can be used for optimizing a breast imaging system by incorporating material characteristics. The presented dynamic phantom is based on two recently developed anthropomorphic breast phantoms, which can be representative of a whole population through their randomized anatomical feature generation and various compression levels. The 4D dynamic phantom is incorporated with the kinetics of contrast agent uptake in different tissues and can realistically model benign and malignant lesions. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed dynamic phantom, contrast-enhanced digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis were simulated where a ray-tracing algorithm emulated the projections, a filtered back projection algorithm was used for reconstruction, and dual-energy and temporal subtractions were performed and compared.

  9. Simulation tools for analyzer-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system with a conventional x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudevilla, Oriol; Zhou, Wei; Stoupin, Stanislav; Verman, Boris; Brankov, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    Analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) belongs to a broader family of phase-contrast (PC) X-ray imaging modalities. Unlike the conventional X-ray radiography, which measures only X-ray absorption, in PC imaging one can also measures the X-rays deflection induced by the object refractive properties. It has been shown that refraction imaging provides better contrast when imaging the soft tissue, which is of great interest in medical imaging applications. In this paper, we introduce a simulation tool specifically designed to simulate the analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging system with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source. By utilizing ray tracing and basic physical principles of diffraction theory our simulation tool can predicting the X-ray beam profile shape, the energy content, the total throughput (photon count) at the detector. In addition we can evaluate imaging system point-spread function for various system configurations.

  10. Surface impedance based microwave imaging method for breast cancer screening: contrast-enhanced scenario.

    PubMed

    Güren, Onan; Çayören, Mehmet; Ergene, Lale Tükenmez; Akduman, Ibrahim

    2014-10-07

    A new microwave imaging method that uses microwave contrast agents is presented for the detection and localization of breast tumours. The method is based on the reconstruction of breast surface impedance through a measured scattered field. The surface impedance modelling allows for representing the electrical properties of the breasts in terms of impedance boundary conditions, which enable us to map the inner structure of the breasts into surface impedance functions. Later a simple quantitative method is proposed to screen breasts against malignant tumours where the detection procedure is based on weighted cross correlations among impedance functions. Numerical results demonstrate that the method is capable of detecting small malignancies and provides reasonable localization.

  11. Tissue sensitive imaging and tomography without contrast agents for small animals with Timepix based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojanova, E.; Schyns, L. E. J. R.; Ludwig, D.; Jakubek, J.; Le Pape, A.; Sefc, L.; Lotte, S.; Sykora, V.; Turecek, D.; Uher, J.; Verhaegen, F.

    2017-01-01

    The tissue type resolving X-ray radiography and tomography can be performed even without contrast agents. The differences between soft tissue types such as kidney, muscles, fat, liver, brain and spleen were measured based on their spectral response. The Timepix based X-ray imaging detector WidePIX2×5 with 300 μm thick silicon sensors was used for most of the measurements presented in this work. These promising results are used for further optimizations of the detector technology and radiographic methods.

  12. Surface impedance based microwave imaging method for breast cancer screening: contrast-enhanced scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güren, Onan; Çayören, Mehmet; Tükenmez Ergene, Lale; Akduman, Ibrahim

    2014-10-01

    A new microwave imaging method that uses microwave contrast agents is presented for the detection and localization of breast tumours. The method is based on the reconstruction of breast surface impedance through a measured scattered field. The surface impedance modelling allows for representing the electrical properties of the breasts in terms of impedance boundary conditions, which enable us to map the inner structure of the breasts into surface impedance functions. Later a simple quantitative method is proposed to screen breasts against malignant tumours where the detection procedure is based on weighted cross correlations among impedance functions. Numerical results demonstrate that the method is capable of detecting small malignancies and provides reasonable localization.

  13. Edge-illumination x-ray phase contrast imaging with Pt-based metallic glass masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghamanesh, Somayeh; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud-Reza; Olivo, Alessandro; Sadeghilarijani, Maryam; Kato, Hidemi; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Yashiro, Wataru

    2017-06-01

    Edge-illumination x-ray phase contrast imaging (EI XPCI) is a non-interferometric phase-sensitive method where two absorption masks are employed. These masks are fabricated through a photolithography process followed by electroplating which is challenging in terms of yield as well as time- and cost-effectiveness. We report on the first implementation of EI XPCI with Pt-based metallic glass masks fabricated by an imprinting method. The new tested alloy exhibits good characteristics including high workability beside high x-ray attenuation. The fabrication process is easy and cheap, and can produce large-size masks for high x-ray energies within minutes. Imaging experiments show a good quality phase image, which confirms the potential of these masks to make the EI XPCI technique widely available and affordable.

  14. Design of water-based ferrofluids as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Casula, Maria F; Corrias, Anna; Arosio, Paolo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Sen, Tapas; Floris, Patrizia; Bruce, Ian J

    2011-05-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization and relaxometric study of ferrofluids based on iron oxide, with potential for use as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs). The effect of different cost-effective, water-based surface modification approaches which can be easily scaled-up for the large scale synthesis of the ferrofluids has been investigated. Surface modification was achieved by silanization, and/or coating with non-toxic commercial dispersants (a lauric polysorbate and a block copolymer with pigment affinic groups, namely Tween 20 and Disperbyk 190) which were added after or during iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis. It was observed that all the materials synthesized functioned as negative contrast agents at physiological temperature and at frequencies covered by clinical imagers. The relaxometric properties of the magnetic nanoparticles were significantly improved after surface coating with stabilizers compared to the original iron oxide nanoparticles, with particular reference to the silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The results indicate that the optimization of the preparation of colloidal magnetic ferrofluids by surface modification is effective in the design of novel contrast agents for MRI by enabling better or more effective interaction between the coated iron oxide nanoparticles and protons present in their aqueous environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lattice and strain analysis of atomic resolution Z-contrast images based on template matching.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jian-Min; Shah, Amish B; Kim, Honggyu; Meng, Yifei; Gao, Wenpei; Rouviére, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    A real space approach is developed based on template matching for quantitative lattice analysis using atomic resolution Z-contrast images. The method, called TeMA, uses the template of an atomic column, or a group of atomic columns, to transform the image into a lattice of correlation peaks. This is helped by using a local intensity adjusted correlation and by the design of templates. Lattice analysis is performed on the correlation peaks. A reference lattice is used to correct for scan noise and scan distortions in the recorded images. Using these methods, we demonstrate that a precision of few picometers is achievable in lattice measurement using aberration corrected Z-contrast images. For application, we apply the methods to strain analysis of a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown LaMnO₃ and SrMnO₃ superlattice. The results show alternating epitaxial strain inside the superlattice and its variations across interfaces at the spatial resolution of a single perovskite unit cell. Our methods are general, model free and provide high spatial resolution for lattice analysis.

  16. A Robust Range Grating Lobe Suppression Method Based on Image Contrast for Stepped-Frequency SAR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-Bin; Long, Teng; Ding, Ze-Gang; Wu, Yi-Rong

    2016-12-06

    The magnitude error and phase error (MEPE) in the transfer function of a stepped-frequency synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system results in a periodic MEPE in the synthesized wideband waveform (SWW), which induces the grating lobes in the high-resolution range profile (HRRP). In this paper, a robust data-driven grating lobe suppression (GLS) method is proposed. Based on a contrast-based error estimation method and the grating lobes of the brightest scatterers in the SAR image, the periodic MEPE can be robustly estimated using the proposed method. By compensating the estimated periodic MEPE, the range grating lobes can be suppressed to the background level of the SAR image. Simulation results and real data processing have demonstrated the superiority of the proposed method.

  17. A Robust Range Grating Lobe Suppression Method Based on Image Contrast for Stepped-Frequency SAR

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wen-Bin; Long, Teng; Ding, Ze-Gang; Wu, Yi-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude error and phase error (MEPE) in the transfer function of a stepped-frequency synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system results in a periodic MEPE in the synthesized wideband waveform (SWW), which induces the grating lobes in the high-resolution range profile (HRRP). In this paper, a robust data-driven grating lobe suppression (GLS) method is proposed. Based on a contrast-based error estimation method and the grating lobes of the brightest scatterers in the SAR image, the periodic MEPE can be robustly estimated using the proposed method. By compensating the estimated periodic MEPE, the range grating lobes can be suppressed to the background level of the SAR image. Simulation results and real data processing have demonstrated the superiority of the proposed method. PMID:27929411

  18. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  19. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-08-01

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα1 line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  20. Model-based pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Erdt, Marius; Dankerl, Peter; Kirschner, Matthias; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan; Uder, Michael; Janka, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to automatically detect and segment the pancreas in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The institutional review board of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg approved this study and waived the need for informed consent. Discriminative learning is used to build a pancreas tissue classifier incorporating spatial relationships between the pancreas and surrounding organs and vessels. Furthermore, discrete cosine and wavelet transforms are used to build texture features to describe local tissue appearance. Classification is used to guide a constrained statistical shape model to fit the data. The algorithm to detect and segment the pancreas was evaluated on 40 consecutive CT data that were acquired in the portal venous contrast agent phase. Manual segmentation of the pancreas was carried out by experienced radiologists and served as reference standard. Threefold cross validation was performed. The algorithm-based detection and segmentation yielded an average surface distance of 1.7 mm and an average overlap of 61.2 % compared with the reference standard. The overall runtime of the system was 20.4 min. The presented novel approach enables automatic pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images which are included in almost every clinical routine abdominal CT examination. Reliable pancreatic segmentation is crucial for computer-aided detection systems and an organ-specific decision support.

  1. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    SciTech Connect

    Krenkel, Martin Töpperwien, Mareike; Salditt, Tim; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke

    2016-03-15

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  2. In-line phase-contrast and grating-based phase-contrast synchrotron imaging study of brain micrometastasis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng; Kou, Binquan; Chi, Yayun; Xi, Yan; Cao, Yixin; Cui, Wenli; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Han; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Sun, Jianqi; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Current bio-medical imaging researches aim to detect brain micrometastasis in early stage for its increasing incidence and high mortality rates. Synchrotron phase-contrast imaging techniques, such as in-line phase-contrast (IPC) and grating-based phase-contrast (GPC) imaging, could provide a high spatial and density imaging study of biological specimens' 3D structures. In this study, we demonstrated the detection efficiencies of these two imaging tools on breast cancer micrometastasis in an ex vivo mouse brain. We found that both IPC and GPC can differentiate abnormal brain structures induced by micrometastasis from the surrounding normal tissues. We also found that GPC was more sensitive in detecting the small metastasis as compared to IPC. PMID:25818989

  3. In-line phase-contrast and grating-based phase-contrast synchrotron imaging study of brain micrometastasis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng; Kou, Binquan; Chi, Yayun; Xi, Yan; Cao, Yixin; Cui, Wenli; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Han; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Sun, Jianqi; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Jiong

    2015-03-01

    Current bio-medical imaging researches aim to detect brain micrometastasis in early stage for its increasing incidence and high mortality rates. Synchrotron phase-contrast imaging techniques, such as in-line phase-contrast (IPC) and grating-based phase-contrast (GPC) imaging, could provide a high spatial and density imaging study of biological specimens' 3D structures. In this study, we demonstrated the detection efficiencies of these two imaging tools on breast cancer micrometastasis in an ex vivo mouse brain. We found that both IPC and GPC can differentiate abnormal brain structures induced by micrometastasis from the surrounding normal tissues. We also found that GPC was more sensitive in detecting the small metastasis as compared to IPC.

  4. Noise analysis of grating-based x-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Revol, Vincent; Kottler, Christian; Kaufmann, Rolf; Urban, Claus; Straumann, Ulrich

    2010-07-15

    The sensitivity of x-ray radiographic images, meaning the minimal detectable change in the thickness or in the index of refraction of a sample, is directly related to the uncertainty of the measurement method. In the following work, we report on the recent development of quantitative descriptions for the stochastic error of grating-based differential phase contrast imaging (DPCi). Our model includes the noise transfer characteristics of the x-ray detector and the jitter of the phase steps. We find that the noise in DPCi depends strongly on the phase stepping visibility and the sample properties. The results are supported by experimental evidence acquired with our new instrument with a field of view of 50x70 mm{sup 2}. Our conclusions provide general guidelines to optimize grating interferometers for specific applications and problems.

  5. Low contrast detectability performance of model observers based on CT phantom images: kVp influence.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Giron, I; Calzado, A; Geleijns, J; Joemai, R M S; Veldkamp, W J H

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies low contrast detectability (LCD) performance of two model observers in CT phantom images acquired at different kVp levels and compares the results with humans in a 2-alternative forced choice experiment (2-AFC). Images of the Catphan phantom with objects of different contrasts (0.5 and 1%) and diameters (2-15 mm) were acquired in an Aquilion ONE 320-detector row CT (Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan), in two experiments, selecting (80-100-120-135 kV) with fixed mAs and varying the mAs to keep the dose constant, respectively. Four human observers evaluated the objects visibility obtaining a proportion correct (PC) for each case. LCD was also analyzed with two model observers (non-prewhitening matched filter with an eye filter, NPWE, and channelized Hotelling observer with Gabor channels, CHO). Object contrast was affected by kV, with differences up to 17% between the lowest and highest kV. Both models overestimated human performance and were corrected by efficiency and internal noise factors. The NPWE model reproduced better the human PC values trends showing Pearson's correlation coefficients ≥0.976 (0.954-0.987, 95% CI) for both experiments, whereas for CHO they were ≥0.706 (0.493-0.839). Bland-Altman plots showed better agreement between NPWE and humans being the average difference Δ and the range of the differences Δ±2σ (σ, standard deviation) of Δ=-0.3%, Δ±2σ = [-4.0%,4.5%]. For CHO, Δ=-1.2%, Δ± 2σ= [-10.7%,8.3%]. The NPWE model can be a useful tool to predict human performance in CT low contrast detection tasks in a standard phantom and be potentially used in protocol optimization based on kV selection.

  6. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ′}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ′} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ′}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ′} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of

  7. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d′, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d′ was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d′, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d′ values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and

  8. Analyzer-based phase contrast imaging and phase retrieval using a rotating anode x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, D. J.; Paganin, D. M.; Pavlov, K. M.; Kraeusslich, J.; Wehrhan, O.; Uschmann, I.; Foerster, E.

    2007-12-17

    We have performed an analyzer crystal based phase contrast imaging (ABI) experiment using a rotating anode x-ray source. The use of such an incoherent source demonstrates the potential of ABI as a quantitative characterization tool for the laboratory environment. A phase contrast image of a plastic phantom was recorded on high resolution x-ray film and the projected thickness was retrieved from a single image. The projected thickness recovered from the phase contrast image was shown to quantitatively agree with a reference optical microscope measurement.

  9. Closed Loop, DM Diversity-based, Wavefront Correction Algorithm for High Contrast Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Belikov, Ruslan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    High contrast imaging from space relies on coronagraphs to limit diffraction and a wavefront control systems to compensate for imperfections in both the telescope optics and the coronagraph. The extreme contrast required (up to 10(exp -10) for terrestrial planets) puts severe requirements on the wavefront control system, as the achievable contrast is limited by the quality of the wavefront. This paper presents a general closed loop correction algorithm for high contrast imaging coronagraphs by minimizing the energy in a predefined region in the image where terrestrial planets could be found. The estimation part of the algorithm reconstructs the complex field in the image plane using phase diversity caused by the deformable mirror. This method has been shown to achieve faster and better correction than classical speckle nulling.

  10. Closed Loop, DM Diversity-based, Wavefront Correction Algorithm for High Contrast Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Belikov, Ruslan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    High contrast imaging from space relies on coronagraphs to limit diffraction and a wavefront control systems to compensate for imperfections in both the telescope optics and the coronagraph. The extreme contrast required (up to 10(exp -10) for terrestrial planets) puts severe requirements on the wavefront control system, as the achievable contrast is limited by the quality of the wavefront. This paper presents a general closed loop correction algorithm for high contrast imaging coronagraphs by minimizing the energy in a predefined region in the image where terrestrial planets could be found. The estimation part of the algorithm reconstructs the complex field in the image plane using phase diversity caused by the deformable mirror. This method has been shown to achieve faster and better correction than classical speckle nulling.

  11. Study of quality perception in medical images based on comparison of contrast enhancement techniques in mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheus, B.; Verçosa, L. B.; Barufaldi, B.; Schiabel, H.

    2014-03-01

    With the absolute prevalence of digital images in mammography several new tools became available for radiologist; such as CAD schemes, digital zoom and contrast alteration. This work focuses in contrast variation and how the radiologist reacts to these changes when asked to evaluated image quality. Three contrast enhancing techniques were used in this study: conventional equalization, CCB Correction [1] - a digitization correction - and value subtraction. A set of 100 images was used in tests from some available online mammographic databases. The tests consisted of the presentation of all four versions of an image (original plus the three contrast enhanced images) to the specialist, requested to rank each one from the best up to worst quality for diagnosis. Analysis of results has demonstrated that CCB Correction [1] produced better images in almost all cases. Equalization, which mathematically produces a better contrast, was considered the worst for mammography image quality enhancement in the majority of cases (69.7%). The value subtraction procedure produced images considered better than the original in 84% of cases. Tests indicate that, for the radiologist's perception, it seems more important to guaranty full visualization of nuances than a high contrast image. Another result observed is that the "ideal" scanner curve does not yield the best result for a mammographic image. The important contrast range is the middle of the histogram, where nodules and masses need to be seen and clearly distinguished.

  12. Refracting Roentgen's rays: Propagation-based x-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.; Myers, D. E.; Paganin, D. M.

    2009-05-15

    Absorption-contrast x-ray imaging serves to visualize the variation in x-ray attenuation within the volume of a given sample, whereas phase contrast allows one to visualize variations in x-ray refractive index. The former imaging mechanism has been well known and widely utilized since the time of Roentgen's Nobel prize winning work, whereas the latter mechanism--sought for, but not found, by Roentgen himself--has laid the foundation for a revolution in x-ray imaging which is the central topic of this review. We consider the physical imaging mechanisms underlying both absorption contrast and phase contrast, together with the associated inverse problem of how one may obtain quantitative two- or three-dimensional information regarding a sample, given one or more phase-contrast images of the same. Practical questions are considered, regarding optimized phase-contrast imaging geometries as a function of detector resolution, source size, x-ray spectrum, and dose. Experimental examples pertaining to biomedical applications are given, and prospects for the future outlined.

  13. A fusion method for visible and infrared images based on contrast pyramid with teaching learning based optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Haiyan; Wang, Yanyan

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel image fusion scheme based on contrast pyramid (CP) with teaching learning based optimization (TLBO) for visible and infrared images under different spectrum of complicated scene. Firstly, CP decomposition is employed into every level of each original image. Then, we introduce TLBO to optimizing fusion coefficients, which will be changed under teaching phase and learner phase of TLBO, so that the weighted coefficients can be automatically adjusted according to fitness function, namely the evaluation standards of image quality. At last, obtain fusion results by the inverse transformation of CP. Compared with existing methods, experimental results show that our method is effective and the fused images are more suitable for further human visual or machine perception.

  14. Increasing the darkfield contrast-to-noise ratio using a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Pelzer, Georg; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Zang, Andrea; Durst, Jürgen; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2013-07-29

    A novel information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging based on the deconvolution of the object and the reference phase stepping curve (PSC) as proposed by Modregger et al. was investigated in this paper. We applied the method for the first time on data obtained with a polychromatic spectrum and compared the results to those, received by applying the commonly used method, based on a Fourier analysis. We confirmed the expectation, that both methods deliver the same results for the absorption and the differential phase image. For the darkfield image, a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increase by a factor of 1.17 using the new method was found. Furthermore, the dose saving potential was estimated for the deconvolution method experimentally. It is found, that for the conventional method a dose which is higher by a factor of 1.66 is needed to obtain a similar CNR value compared to the novel method. A further analysis of the data revealed, that the improvement in CNR and dose efficiency is due to the superior background noise properties of the deconvolution method, but at the cost of comparability between measurements at different applied dose values, as the mean value becomes dependent on the photon statistics used.

  15. Optimization of propagation-based phase-contrast imaging at a laboratory setup.

    PubMed

    Bidola, Pidassa M; Zanette, Irene; Achterhold, Klaus; Holzner, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-11-16

    Single distance X-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging is considered as a simple method compared to those requiring additional precise instruments and sophisticated algorithms to retrieve phase images. It requires, however, a modicum of conditions within the setup which include partial coherence and small pixel size at the sample position. While these conditions are usually satisfied at synchrotron light sources, they are not always satisfied within laboratory setups. In fact, these setups are limited by the size of the polychromatic source that directly influences the partial coherence of the beam, the propagation distance and the photon flux. A prior knowledge of the sample refractive index, namely the ratio of delta (δ) and beta (β) values, are also essential for the phase retrieval but this method is powerful in the presence of noise compared to absorption-based imaging. An investigation of the feasibility and the efficient applicability of this method in a commercially available X-ray microscope is conducted in this work.

  16. Nulling interferometers for space-based high contrast visible imaging and measurement of exoplanetary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Brian Andrew

    This dissertation presents the legacy, theory, design, characterization, and application prospects of a fully symmetric monolithic nulling interferometer (nuller). A nuller's function is to destructively interfere light originating from a bright, on-axis, unresolved source in order to lower its contrast with faint, off-axis sources of light in the field of view. The primary application lies in astronomical instrumentation, serving as an enabling technology for directly imaging exoplanets and measuring exozodiacal dust and debris disks, the planetary system evolutionary components around nearby stars. Typical on-sky planet/star flux ratios are 1:109 or less in the visible. Mitigating this contrast is key to spectroscopic study of exoplanets, which aims to characterize exoplanetary atmospheres and potentially locate biosignatures on exo-Earths. Within the past decade, adaptive optics-equipped breadboard demonstrations of nullers and other coronagraphs have shown the capability to image nearby (≤ 30 lightyears) extrasolar analogs to Jupiter with a 0.5 meter diameter telescope in the visible. The quiet laboratory environments that have been produced to demonstrate this capability do not reflect those of typical ground-based observatories where thermal drifts perturb optical alignment and atmospheric turbulence perturbs the source wavefront. Space-based platforms circumvent the atmosphere problem, but are still subjected to thermal instabilities and their associated risks. Robust optical systems must be designed and flight-tested in order to address such risks and provide grounds for their inclusion in the design of future exo-Earth imaging satellites. Sub-orbital platforms such as sounding rockets and high-altitude balloons provide a rapid, low-cost means of providing heritage for such optical systems while also delivering significant scientific results. The primary risk inherent with these platforms are harsh transient environmental conditions, for which, similar to

  17. Video image processing greatly enhances contrast, quality, and speed in polarization-based microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Video cameras with contrast and black level controls can yield polarized light and differential interference contrast microscope images with unprecedented image quality, resolution, and recording speed. The theoretical basis and practical aspects of video polarization and differential interference contrast microscopy are discussed and several applications in cell biology are illustrated. These include: birefringence of cortical structures and beating cilia in Stentor, birefringence of rotating flagella on a single bacterium, growth and morphogenesis of echinoderm skeletal spicules in culture, ciliary and electrical activity in a balancing organ of a nudibranch snail, and acrosomal reaction in activated sperm. PMID:6788777

  18. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N.; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-07-01

    Multiple-image radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging method, which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to CT

  19. Contrast based band selection for optimized weathered oil detection in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levaux, Florian; Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Neyt, Xavier

    2012-09-01

    Hyperspectral imagery offers unique benefits for detection of land and water features due to the information contained in reflectance signatures such as the bi-directional reflectance distribution function or BRDF. The reflectance signature directly shows the relative absorption and backscattering features of targets. These features can be very useful in shoreline monitoring or surveillance applications, for example to detect weathered oil. In real-time detection applications, processing of hyperspectral data can be an important tool and Optimal band selection is thus important in real time applications in order to select the essential bands using the absorption and backscatter information. In the present paper, band selection is based upon the optimization of target detection using contrast algorithms. The common definition of the contrast (using only one band out of all possible combinations available within a hyperspectral image) is generalized in order to consider all the possible combinations of wavelength dependent contrasts using hyperspectral images. The inflection (defined here as an approximation of the second derivative) is also used in order to enhance the variations in the reflectance spectra as well as in the contrast spectrua in order to assist in optimal band selection. The results of the selection in term of target detection (false alarms and missed detection) are also compared with a previous method to perform feature detection, namely the matched filter. In this paper, imagery is acquired using a pushbroom hyperspectral sensor mounted at the bow of a small vessel. The sensor is mechanically rotated using an optical rotation stage. This opto-mechanical scanning system produces hyperspectral images with pixel sizes on the order of mm to cm scales, depending upon the distance between the sensor and the shoreline being monitored. The motion of the platform during the acquisition induces distortions in the collected HSI imagery. It is therefore

  20. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  1. Using the magnetosome to model effective gene-based contrast for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Goldhawk, Donna E; Rohani, Roja; Sengupta, Anindita; Gelman, Neil; Prato, Frank S

    2012-01-01

    Formation of iron biominerals is a naturally occurring phenomenon, particularly among magnetotactic bacteria which produce magnetite (Fe(3) O(4) ) in a subcellular compartment termed the magnetosome. Under the control of numerous genes, the magnetosome serves as a model upon which to (1) develop gene-based contrast in mammalian cells and (2) provide a mechanism for reporter gene expression in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There are two main components to the magnetosome: the biomineral and the lipid bilayer that surrounds it. Both are essential for magnetotaxis in a variety of magnetotactic bacteria, but nonessential for cell survival. Through comparative genome analysis, a subset of genes characteristic of the magnetotactic phenotype has been found both within and outside a magnetosome genomic island. The functions of magnetosome-associated proteins reflect the complex nature of this intracellular structure and include vesicle formation, cytoskeletal attachment, iron transport, and crystallization. Examination of magnetosome genes and structure indicates a protein-directed and stepwise assembly of the magnetosome compartment. Attachment of magnetosomes along a cytoskeletal filament aligns the magnetic particles such that the cell may be propelled along an external magnetic field. Interest in this form of magnetotaxis has prompted research in several areas of medicine, including magnetotactic bacterial targeting of tumors, MR-guided movement of magnetosome-bearing cells through vessels and molecular imaging of mammalian cells using MRI, and its hybrid modalities. The potential adaptation of magnetosome genes for noninvasive medical imaging provides new opportunities for development of reporter gene expression for MRI.

  2. Automatic x-ray image contrast enhancement based on parameter auto-optimization.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Harold Li, H; Zhang, Tiezhi; Ma, Fangfang; Yang, Deshan

    2017-09-06

    Insufficient image contrast associated with radiation therapy daily setup x-ray images could negatively affect accurate patient treatment setup. We developed a method to perform automatic and user-independent contrast enhancement on 2D kilo voltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) x-ray images. The goal was to provide tissue contrast optimized for each treatment site in order to support accurate patient daily treatment setup and the subsequent offline review. The proposed method processes the 2D x-ray images with an optimized image processing filter chain, which consists of a noise reduction filter and a high-pass filter followed by a contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) filter. The most important innovation is to optimize the image processing parameters automatically to determine the required image contrast settings per disease site and imaging modality. Three major parameters controlling the image processing chain, i.e., the Gaussian smoothing weighting factor for the high-pass filter, the block size, and the clip limiting parameter for the CLAHE filter, were determined automatically using an interior-point constrained optimization algorithm. Fifty-two kV and MV x-ray images were included in this study. The results were manually evaluated and ranked with scores from 1 (worst, unacceptable) to 5 (significantly better than adequate and visually praise worthy) by physicians and physicists. The average scores for the images processed by the proposed method, the CLAHE, and the best window-level adjustment were 3.92, 2.83, and 2.27, respectively. The percentage of the processed images received a score of 5 were 48, 29, and 18%, respectively. The proposed method is able to outperform the standard image contrast adjustment procedures that are currently used in the commercial clinical systems. When the proposed method is implemented in the clinical systems as an automatic image processing filter, it could be useful for allowing quicker and potentially more

  3. Imaging liver lesions using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography with bi-lateral filter post-processing.

    PubMed

    Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian S; Fingerle, Alexander A; Noël, Peter B; Köhler, Thomas; Drecoll, Enken; Rummeny, Ernst J; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging shows improved soft-tissue contrast compared to standard absorption-based X-ray imaging. Especially the grating-based method seems to be one promising candidate for clinical implementation due to its extendibility to standard laboratory X-ray sources. Therefore the purpose of our study was to evaluate the potential of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography in combination with a novel bi-lateral denoising method for imaging of focal liver lesions in an ex vivo feasibility study. Our study shows that grating-based phase-contrast CT (PCCT) significantly increases the soft-tissue contrast in the ex vivo liver specimens. Combining the information of both signals--absorption and phase-contrast--the bi-lateral filtering leads to an improvement of lesion detectability and higher contrast-to-noise ratios. The normal and the pathological tissue can be clearly delineated and even internal structures of the pathological tissue can be visualized, being invisible in the absorption-based CT alone. Histopathology confirmed the presence of the corresponding findings in the analyzed tissue. The results give strong evidence for a sufficiently high contrast for different liver lesions using non-contrast-enhanced PCCT. Thus, ex vivo imaging of liver lesions is possible with a polychromatic X-ray source and at a spatial resolution of ∼100 µm. The post-processing with the novel bi-lateral denoising method improves the image quality by combining the information from the absorption and the phase-contrast images.

  4. Imaging Liver Lesions Using Grating-Based Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography with Bi-Lateral Filter Post-Processing

    PubMed Central

    Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian S.; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Noël, Peter B.; Köhler, Thomas; Drecoll, Enken; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging shows improved soft-tissue contrast compared to standard absorption-based X-ray imaging. Especially the grating-based method seems to be one promising candidate for clinical implementation due to its extendibility to standard laboratory X-ray sources. Therefore the purpose of our study was to evaluate the potential of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography in combination with a novel bi-lateral denoising method for imaging of focal liver lesions in an ex vivo feasibility study. Our study shows that grating-based phase-contrast CT (PCCT) significantly increases the soft-tissue contrast in the ex vivo liver specimens. Combining the information of both signals – absorption and phase-contrast – the bi-lateral filtering leads to an improvement of lesion detectability and higher contrast-to-noise ratios. The normal and the pathological tissue can be clearly delineated and even internal structures of the pathological tissue can be visualized, being invisible in the absorption-based CT alone. Histopathology confirmed the presence of the corresponding findings in the analyzed tissue. The results give strong evidence for a sufficiently high contrast for different liver lesions using non-contrast-enhanced PCCT. Thus, ex vivo imaging of liver lesions is possible with a polychromatic X-ray source and at a spatial resolution of ∼100 µm. The post-processing with the novel bi-lateral denoising method improves the image quality by combining the information from the absorption and the phase-contrast images. PMID:24465378

  5. Low-Molecular-Weight Iron Chelates May Be an Alternative to Gadolinium-based Contrast Agents for T1-weighted Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Haeckel, Akvile; Hauptmann, Ralf; Mueller, Susanne; Kuhl, Christiane K; Schellenberger, Eyk A

    2017-01-07

    Purpose To synthesize two low-molecular-weight iron chelates and compare their T1 contrast effects with those of a commercial gadolinium-based contrast agent for their applicability in dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods The animal experiments were approved by the local ethics committee. Two previously described iron (Fe) chelates of pentetic acid (Fe-DTPA) and of trans-cyclohexane diamine tetraacetic acid (Fe-tCDTA) were synthesized with stability constants several orders of magnitude higher than those of gadolinium-based contrast agents. The T1 contrast effects of the two chelates were compared with those of gadopentetate dimeglumine in blood serum phantoms at 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T. For in vivo studies, a human breast cancer cell line (MDA-231) was implanted in five mice per group. The dynamic contrast effects of the chelates were compared by performing DCE MR imaging with intravenous application of Fe-DTPA or Fe-tCDTA on day 1 and DCE MR imaging in the same tumors with gadopentetate dimeglumine on day 2. Quantitative DCE maps were generated with software and were compared by means of a one-tailed Pearson correlation test. Results Relaxivities in serum (0.94 T at room temperature) of Fe-tCDTA (r1 = 2.2 mmol(-1) · sec(-1), r2 = 2.5 mmol(-1) · sec(-1)) and Fe-DTPA (r1 = 0.9 mmol(-1) · sec(-1), r2 = 0.9 mmol(-1) · sec(-1)) were approximately twofold and fivefold lower, respectively, compared with those of gadopentetate dimeglumine (r1 = 4.1 mmol(-1) · sec(-1), r2 = 4.8 mmol(-1) · sec(-1)). Used at moderately higher concentrations, however, iron chelates generated similar contrast effects at T1-weighted MR imaging in vitro in serum, in vivo in blood, and for DCE MR imaging of breast cancer xenografts. The volume transfer constant values for Fe-DTPA and Fe-tCDTA in the same tumors correlated well with those observed for gadopentetate dimeglumine (Fe-tCDTA Pearson R, 0.99; P = .0003; Fe-DTPA Pearson R, 0

  6. Fe-based nanoparticulate metallic alloys as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bomatí-Miguel, Oscar; Morales, María P; Tartaj, Pedro; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Bonville, Pierre; Santos, Martín; Zhao, Xinqing; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino

    2005-10-01

    Pharmaceutical grade magnetic colloidal dispersions have been prepared from iron alloys synthesized by laser pyrolysis. The colloids were obtained by simultaneous dispersion and coating of the particles with dextran in a strong alkaline solution. Both powders and dispersions have been analyzed in terms of microstructural characteristics, chemical composition and magnetic properties. The powders consist of uniform spherical nanoparticles (12 nm of diameter) showing a metallic core encapsulated into an iron-oxide shell. On the other hand, the colloidal dispersions consist of magnetic particles-aggregates with hydrodynamic sizes of approximately 75 nm. Magnetic resonance images of rats were taken after the intravenously administration of the Fe colloidal dispersions, and compared with those obtained using a commercial iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent. The results showed a contrast improvement of 60% in the liver with respect to the commercial sample, which suggests that this product could be a suitable contrast agent for NMR imaging of liver and spleen.

  7. In vivo x-ray phase contrast analyzer-based imaging for longitudinal osteoarthritis studies in guinea pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coan, Paola; Wagner, Andreas; Bravin, Alberto; Diemoz, Paul C.; Keyriläinen, Jani; Mollenhauer, Juergen

    2010-12-01

    Over the last two decades phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques have been extensively studied for applications in the biomedical field. Published results demonstrate the high capability of these imaging modalities of improving the image contrast of biological samples with respect to standard absorption-based radiography and routinely used clinical imaging techniques. A clear depiction of the anatomic structures and a more accurate disease diagnosis may be provided by using radiation doses comparable to or lower than those used in current clinical methods. In the literature many works show images of phantoms and excised biological samples proving the high sensitivity of the phase contrast imaging methods for in vitro investigations. In this scenario, the applications of the so-called analyzer-based x-ray imaging (ABI) phase contrast technique are particularly noteworthy. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo x-ray ABI phase contrast imaging for biomedical applications and in particular with respect to joint anatomic depiction and osteoarthritis detection. ABI in planar and tomographic modes was performed in vivo on articular joints of guinea pigs in order to investigate the animals with respect to osteoarthritis by using highly monochromatic x-rays of 52 keV and a low noise detector with a pixel size of 47 × 47 µm2. Images give strong evidence of the ability of ABI in depicting both anatomic structures in complex systems as living organisms and all known signs of osteoarthritis with high contrast, high spatial resolution and with an acceptable radiation dose. This paper presents the first proof of principle study of in vivo application of ABI. The technical challenges encountered when imaging an animal in vivo are discussed. This experimental study is an important step toward the study of clinical applications of phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques.

  8. In vivo x-ray phase contrast analyzer-based imaging for longitudinal osteoarthritis studies in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Coan, Paola; Wagner, Andreas; Bravin, Alberto; Diemoz, Paul C; Keyriläinen, Jani; Mollenhauer, Juergen

    2010-12-21

    Over the last two decades phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques have been extensively studied for applications in the biomedical field. Published results demonstrate the high capability of these imaging modalities of improving the image contrast of biological samples with respect to standard absorption-based radiography and routinely used clinical imaging techniques. A clear depiction of the anatomic structures and a more accurate disease diagnosis may be provided by using radiation doses comparable to or lower than those used in current clinical methods. In the literature many works show images of phantoms and excised biological samples proving the high sensitivity of the phase contrast imaging methods for in vitro investigations. In this scenario, the applications of the so-called analyzer-based x-ray imaging (ABI) phase contrast technique are particularly noteworthy. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo x-ray ABI phase contrast imaging for biomedical applications and in particular with respect to joint anatomic depiction and osteoarthritis detection. ABI in planar and tomographic modes was performed in vivo on articular joints of guinea pigs in order to investigate the animals with respect to osteoarthritis by using highly monochromatic x-rays of 52 keV and a low noise detector with a pixel size of 47 × 47 µm(2). Images give strong evidence of the ability of ABI in depicting both anatomic structures in complex systems as living organisms and all known signs of osteoarthritis with high contrast, high spatial resolution and with an acceptable radiation dose. This paper presents the first proof of principle study of in vivo application of ABI. The technical challenges encountered when imaging an animal in vivo are discussed. This experimental study is an important step toward the study of clinical applications of phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques.

  9. Segmentation and Tracking of Lymphocytes Based on Modified Active Contour Models in Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiwen

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes an improved active contour model for segmenting and tracking accurate boundaries of the single lymphocyte in phase-contrast microscopic images. Active contour models have been widely used in object segmentation and tracking. However, current external-force-inspired methods are weak at handling low-contrast edges and suffer from initialization sensitivity. In order to segment low-contrast boundaries, we combine the region information of the object, extracted by morphology gray-scale reconstruction, and the edge information, extracted by the Laplacian of Gaussian filter, to obtain an improved feature map to compute the external force field for the evolution of active contours. To alleviate initial location sensitivity, we set the initial contour close to the real boundaries by performing morphological image processing. The proposed method was tested on live lymphocyte images acquired through the phase-contrast microscope from the blood samples of mice, and comparative experimental results showed the advantages of the proposed method in terms of the accuracy and the speed. Tracking experiments showed that the proposed method can accurately segment and track lymphocyte boundaries in microscopic images over time even in the presence of low-contrast edges, which will provide a good prerequisite for the quantitative analysis of lymphocyte morphology and motility. PMID:26089973

  10. Image Contrast in Holographic Reconstructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, B. R.

    1969-01-01

    The fundamental concepts of holography are explained using elementary wave ideas. Discusses wavefront reconstruction and contrast in hemigraphic images. The consequence of recording only the intensity at a given surface and using an oblique reference wave is shown to be an incomplete reconstruction resulting in image of low contrast. (LC)

  11. Technique: imaging earliest tooth development in 3D using a silver-based tissue contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Raj, Muhammad T; Prusinkiewicz, Martin; Cooper, David M L; George, Belev; Webb, M Adam; Boughner, Julia C

    2014-02-01

    Looking in microscopic detail at the 3D organization of initiating teeth within the embryonic jaw has long-proved technologically challenging because of the radio-translucency of these tiny un-mineralized oral tissues. Yet 3D image data showing changes in the physical relationships among developing tooth and jaw tissues are vital to understand the coordinated morphogenesis of vertebrate teeth and jaws as an animal grows and as species evolve. Here, we present a new synchrotron-based scanning solution to image odontogenesis in 3D and in histological detail using a silver-based contrast agent. We stained fixed, intact wild-type mice aged embryonic (E) day 10 to birth with 1% Protargol-S at 37°C for 12-32 hr. Specimens were scanned at 4-10 µm pixel size at 28 keV, just above the silver K-edge, using micro-computed tomography (µCT) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron. Synchrotron µCT scans of silver-stained embryos showed even the earliest visible stages of tooth initiation, as well as many other tissue types and structures, in histological detail. Silver stain penetration was optimal for imaging structures in intact embryos E15 and younger. This silver stain method offers a powerful yet straightforward approach to visualize at high-resolution and in 3D the earliest stages of odontogenesis in situ, and demonstrates the important of studying the tooth organ in all three planes of view. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. SU-E-J-16: Automatic Image Contrast Enhancement Based On Automatic Parameter Optimization for Radiation Therapy Setup Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J; Li, H. Harlod; Zhang, T; Yang, D; Ma, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In RT patient setup 2D images, tissues often cannot be seen well due to the lack of image contrast. Contrast enhancement features provided by image reviewing software, e.g. Mosaiq and ARIA, require manual selection of the image processing filters and parameters thus inefficient and cannot be automated. In this work, we developed a novel method to automatically enhance the 2D RT image contrast to allow automatic verification of patient daily setups as a prerequisite step of automatic patient safety assurance. Methods: The new method is based on contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and high-pass filtering algorithms. The most important innovation is to automatically select the optimal parameters by optimizing the image contrast. The image processing procedure includes the following steps: 1) background and noise removal, 2) hi-pass filtering by subtracting the Gaussian smoothed Result, and 3) histogram equalization using CLAHE algorithm. Three parameters were determined through an iterative optimization which was based on the interior-point constrained optimization algorithm: the Gaussian smoothing weighting factor, the CLAHE algorithm block size and clip limiting parameters. The goal of the optimization is to maximize the entropy of the processed Result. Results: A total 42 RT images were processed. The results were visually evaluated by RT physicians and physicists. About 48% of the images processed by the new method were ranked as excellent. In comparison, only 29% and 18% of the images processed by the basic CLAHE algorithm and by the basic window level adjustment process, were ranked as excellent. Conclusion: This new image contrast enhancement method is robust and automatic, and is able to significantly outperform the basic CLAHE algorithm and the manual window-level adjustment process that are currently used in clinical 2D image review software tools.

  13. Propagator based formalism for optimizing in-line phase contrast imaging in laboratory X-ray setups.

    PubMed

    Balles, Andreas; Zabler, Simon; Ebensperger, Thomas; Fella, Christian; Hanke, Randolf

    2016-09-01

    We derive a propagator based formalism for optimizing phase contrast imaging in laboratory setups as well as in synchrotron setups. We confirm based on five different setups the well known existence of an optimum position for the sample in terms of phase contrast by measuring two types of fibers and evaluating the fringe contrast. Furthermore, we demonstrate for these setups a correlation of our formula and the fringe contrast. Hence, an estimate of this optimum position is given by our formalism which only depends on the source size, the detector blurring, and the total distance between source and detector.

  14. Super-Gaussian apodization in ground based telescopes for high contrast coronagraph imaging.

    PubMed

    Cagigas, Miguel A; Valle, Pedro J; Cagigal, Manuel P

    2013-05-20

    We introduce the use of Super-Gaussian apodizing functions in the telescope pupil plane and/or the coronagraph Lyot plane to improve the imaging contrast in ground-based coronagraphs. We describe the properties of the Super-Gaussian function, we estimate its second-order moment in the pupil and Fourier planes and we check it as an apodizing function. We then use Super-Gaussian function to apodize the telescope pupil, the coronagraph Lyot plane or both of them. The result is that a proper apodizing masks combination can reduce the exoplanet detection distance up to a 45% with respect to the classic Lyot coronagraph, for moderately aberrated wavefronts. Compared to the prolate spheroidal function the Super-Gaussian apodizing function allows the planet light up to 3 times brighter. An extra help to increase the extinction rate is to perform a frame selection (Lucky Imaging technique). We show that a selection of the 10% best frames will reduce up to a 20% the detection angular distance when using the classic Lyot coronagraph but that the reduction is only around the 5% when using an apodized coronagraph.

  15. Prediction of object detection, recognition, and identification [DRI] ranges at color scene images based on quantifying human color contrast perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, Ephi; Levin, Ilia; Yaron, Ofer

    2016-10-01

    We propose a novel approach to predict, for specified color imaging system and for objects with known characteristics, their detection, recognition, identification (DRI) ranges in a colored dynamic scene, based on quantifying the human color contrast perception. The method refers to the well established L*a*b*, 3D color space. The nonlinear relations of this space are intended to mimic the nonlinear response of the human eye. The metrics of L*a*b* color space is such that the Euclidian distance between any two colors in this space is approximately proportional to the color contrast as perceived by the human eye/brain. The result of this metrics leads to the outcome that color contrast of any two points is always greater (or equal) than their equivalent grey scale contrast. This meets our sense that looking on a colored image, contrast is superior to the gray scale contrast of the same image. Yet, color loss by scattering at very long ranges should be considered as well. The color contrast derived from the distance between the colored object pixels and to the nearby colored background pixels, as derived from the L*a*b* color space metrics, is expressed in terms of gray scale contrast. This contrast replaces the original standard gray scale contrast component of that image. As expected, the resulted DRI ranges are, in most cases, larger than those predicted by the standard gray scale image. Upon further elaboration and validation of this method, it may be combined with the next versions of the well accepted TRM codes for DRI predictions. Consistent prediction of DRI ranges implies a careful evaluation of the object and background color contrast reduction along the range. Clearly, additional processing for reconstructing the objects and background true colors and hence the color contrast along the range, will further increase the DRI ranges.

  16. Recent advances in ytterbium-based contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography imaging: promises and prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlan; Liu, Jianhua; Ai, Kelong; Yuan, Qinghai; Lu, Lehui

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is one of the most widely used diagnostic imaging techniques in the clinic, and has raised significant interest in recent years both in research and practice owing to its many advantages such as deep penetration depth, high resolution and facile image processing. Developing heavy metal-based CT contrast agents, especially heavy metal-containing nanoparticulate CT contrast agents, has become a key focus in research fields to address issues of clinical iodinated agents involving short circulation time, low contrast efficiency and potential renal toxicity. In this review, we summarize the development of ytterbium (Yb)-based CT contrast agents and highlight the design and applications of Yb-based nanoparticulate CT contrast agents. Yb has high atomic number and higher abundance in the earth's crust relative to Au, Ta and Bi, which have received much attention as a CT contrast agents. In particular, in contrast to these metal elements, as well as I, Yb has K-edge energy that is located just within the higher-intensity region of X-ray spectra, which can induce significant enhancement in the contrast efficiency. When encapsulated in nanoparticles, Yb can remain in the circulation for a long time. This long in vivo circulation time, combined with the proper K-edge energy and a large absorption cross-section of Yb in the near-infrared region, makes Yb-based nanoparticles particularly promising in angiography, 'multicolor' spectral CT imaging, and multimodal imaging. Finally, we also discuss the prospects and the challenges in the development of Yb-based CT contrast agents.

  17. Content-Based Image Retrieval Using Spatial Layout Information in Brain Tumor T1-Weighted Contrast-Enhanced MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Wu, Yao; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Yang; Chen, Yang; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Lu, Zhentai

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR (CE-MR) images of brain tumors. When a tumor region is fed to the CBIR system as a query, the system attempts to retrieve tumors of the same pathological category. The bag-of-visual-words (BoVW) model with partition learning is incorporated into the system to extract informative features for representing the image contents. Furthermore, a distance metric learning algorithm called the Rank Error-based Metric Learning (REML) is proposed to reduce the semantic gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantic concepts. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain T1-weighted CE-MR dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). Using the BoVW model with partition learning, the mean average precision (mAP) of retrieval increases beyond 4.6% with the learned distance metrics compared with the spatial pyramid BoVW method. The distance metric learned by REML significantly outperforms three other existing distance metric learning methods in terms of mAP. The mAP of the CBIR system is as high as 91.8% using the proposed method, and the precision can reach 93.1% when the top 10 images are returned by the system. These preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and feasible for the retrieval of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MR Images. PMID:25028970

  18. In vivo confirmation of hydration based contrast mechanisms for terahertz medical imaging using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Sung, Shijun; Garritano, James; Nowroozi, Bryan; Tewari, Priyamvada; Ennis, Daniel B.; Alger, Jeffery; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2014-09-01

    Terahertz (THz) detection has been proposed and applied to a variety of medical imaging applications in view of its unrivaled hydration profiling capabilities. Variations in tissue dielectric function have been demonstrated at THz frequencies to generate high contrast imagery of tissue, however, the source of image contrast remains to be verified using a modality with a comparable sensing scheme. To investigate the primary contrast mechanism, a pilot comparison study was performed in a burn wound rat model, widely known to create detectable gradients in tissue hydration through both injured and surrounding tissue. Parallel T2 weighted multi slice multi echo (T2w MSME) 7T Magnetic Resonance (MR) scans and THz surface reflectance maps were acquired of a full thickness skin burn in a rat model over a 5 hour time period. A comparison of uninjured and injured regions in the full thickness burn demonstrates a 3-fold increase in average T2 relaxation times and a 15% increase in average THz reflectivity, respectively. These results support the sensitivity and specificity of MRI for measuring in vivo burn tissue water content and the use of this modality to verify and understand the hydration sensing capabilities of THz imaging for acute assessments of the onset and evolution of diseases that affect the skin. A starting point for more sophisticated in vivo studies, this preliminary analysis may be used in the future to explore how and to what extent the release of unbound water affects imaging contrast in THz burn sensing.

  19. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (<1 month). This work significantly increases the shelf life of the new-generation ICG-NPs (>6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38-40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging.

  20. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (<1 month). This work significantly increases the shelf life of the new-generation ICG-NPs (>6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging. PMID:27775014

  1. Physicochemical characterization of a novel graphene-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy D; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lalwani, Gaurav; Tembulkar, Tanuf; Button, Terry; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a novel carbon nanostructure-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (MRI CA); graphene nanoplatelets intercalated with manganese (Mn2+) ions, functionalized with dextran (GNP-Dex); and the in vitro assessment of its essential preclinical physicochemical properties: osmolality, viscosity, partition coefficient, protein binding, thermostability, histamine release, and relaxivity. The results indicate that, at concentrations between 0.1 and 100.0 mg/mL, the GNP-Dex formulations are hydrophilic, highly soluble, and stable in deionized water, as well as iso-osmolar (upon addition of mannitol) and iso-viscous to blood. At potential steady-state equilibrium concentrations in blood (0.1–10.0 mg/mL), the thermostability, protein-binding, and histamine-release studies indicate that the GNP-Dex formulations are thermally stable (with no Mn2+ ion dissociation), do not allow non-specific protein adsorption, and elicit negligible allergic response. The r1 relaxivity of GNP-Dex was 92 mM−1s−1 (per-Mn2+ ion, 22 MHz proton Larmor frequency); ~20- to 30-fold greater than that of clinical gadolinium (Gd3+)- and Mn2+-based MRI CAs. The results open avenues for preclinical in vivo safety and efficacy studies with GNP-Dex toward its development as a clinical MRI CA. PMID:23946653

  2. Research on respiratory motion correction method based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound images of single mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji; Li, Tao; Zheng, Shiqiang; Li, Yiyong

    2015-03-01

    To reduce the effects of respiratory motion in the quantitative analysis based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) image sequencesof single mode. The image gating method and the iterative registration method using model image were adopted to register liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequences of single mode. The feasibility of the proposed respiratory motion correction method was explored preliminarily using 10 hepatocellular carcinomas CEUS cases. The positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images after correction were visually evaluated. Before and after correction, the quality of the weighted sum of transit time (WSTT) parametric images were also compared, in terms of the accuracy and spatial resolution. For the corrected and uncorrected sequences, their mean deviation values (mDVs) of time-intensity curve (TIC) fitting derived from CEUS sequences were measured. After the correction, the positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images were almost invariant. In contrast, the lesions in the uncorrected images all shifted noticeably. The quality of the WSTT parametric maps derived from liver CEUS image sequences were improved more greatly. Moreover, the mDVs of TIC fitting derived from CEUS sequences after the correction decreased by an average of 48.48+/-42.15. The proposed correction method could improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis based on liver CEUS image sequences of single mode, which would help in enhancing the differential diagnosis efficiency of liver tumors.

  3. Milestones and basic principles of grating-based x-ray and neutron phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    This is a review of the most important milestones in the last ten years of development in the field of grating-based x-ray and neutron imaging. It provides a description of the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with x-rays and neutrons. Furthermore, it reviews the theory of grating-based quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteosarcoma using a bis(alendronate)-based bone-targeted contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Ge, Pingju; Sheng, Fugeng; Jin, Yiguang; Tong, Li; Du, Lina; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Ning; Li, Gongjie

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is currently used for diagnosis of osteosarcoma but not well even though contrast agents are administered. Here, we report a novel bone-targeted MR imaging contrast agent, Gd2-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate-bis(alendronate) (Gd2-DTPA-BA) for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. It is the conjugate of a bone cell-seeking molecule (i.e., alendronate) and an MR imaging contrast agent (i.e., Gd-DTPA). Its physicochemical parameters were measured, including pKa, complex constant, and T1 relaxivity. Its bone cell-seeking ability was evaluated by measuring its adsorption on hydroxyapatite. Hemolysis was investigated. MR imaging and biodistribution of Gd2-DTPA-BA and Gd-DTPA were studied on healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing nude mice. Gd2-DTPA-BA showed high adsorption on hydroxyapatite, the high MR relaxivity (r1) of 7.613mM(-1)s(-1) (2.6 folds of Gd-DTPA), and no hemolysis. The MR contrast effect of Gd2-DTPA-BA was much higher than that of Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection to the mice. More importantly, the MR imaging of osteosarcoma was significantly improved by Gd2-DTPA-BA. The signal intensity of Gd2-DTPA-BA reached 120.3% at 50min, equal to three folds of Gd-DTPA. The bone targeting index (bone/blood) of Gd2-DTPA-BA in the osteosarcoma-bearing mice was very high to 130 at 180min. Furthermore, the contrast enhancement could also be found in the lung due to metastasis of osteosarcoma. Gd2-DTPA-BA plays a promising role in the diagnoses of osteosacomas, including the primary bone tumors and metastases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Accelerated susceptibility-based positive contrast imaging of MR compatible metallic devices based on modified fast spin echo sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Caiyun; Xie, Guoxi; Zhang, Yongqin; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Min; Su, Shi; Dong, Ying; Liu, Xin; Ji, Jim

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to develop an accelerated susceptibility-based positive contrast MR imaging method for visualizing MR compatible metallic devices. A modified fast spin echo sequence is used to accelerate data acquisition. Each readout gradient in the modified fast spin echo is slightly shifted by a short distance T shift. Phase changes accumulated within T shift are then used to calculate the susceptibility map by using a kernel deconvolution algorithm with a regularized ℓ1 minimization. To evaluate the proposed fast spin echo method, three phantom experiments were conducted and compared to a spin echo based technique and the gold standard CT for visualizing biopsy needles and brachytherapy seeds. Compared to the spin echo based technique, the data sampling speed of the proposed method was faster by 2-4 times while still being able to accurately visualize and identify the location of the biopsy needle and brachytherapy seeds. These results were confirmed by CT images of the same devices. Results also demonstrated that the proposed fast spin echo method can achieve good visualization of the brachytherapy seeds in positive contrast and in different orientations. It is also capable of correctly differentiating brachytherapy seeds from other similar structures on conventional magnitude images.

  6. Highly sensitive detection of the soft tissues based on refraction contrast by in-plane diffraction-enhanced imaging CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Eiko; Maksimenko, Anton; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Arai, Yoshinori; Shimao, Daisuke; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the recently proposed computed tomography (CT) technique based on refractive effects for biomedical use, which reconstructs the in-plane refractive-index gradient vector field in a cross-sectional plane of interest by detecting the angular deviation of the beam, refracted by a sample, from the incident beam, using the diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The CT has advantages for delineating biological weakly absorbing soft tissues over the conventional absorption-contrast CT because of the use of phase sensitive detection. The paper aims to define the imaging scheme rigidly and to demonstrate its efficacy for non-destructive measurement of biomedical soft-tissue samples without imaging agent. We first describe the imaging principle of in-plane DEI-CT from the physico-mathematical viewpoints in detail, and investigate what physical quantities are extracted from the reconstructed images. Then, we introduce the imaging system using the synchrotron radiation as a light source, constructed at beamline BL-14B in KEK, Japan. Finally, we demonstrate the advantage of the refraction-based image for non-destructive analysis of biological sample by investigating the image of human breast cancer tumors obtained using the imaging system. Here, the refraction- and the apparent absorption-based images obtained simultaneously by the in-plane DEI-CT are compared. Also, the conventional absorption-based image obtained using micro-computed tomography (μCT) imaging system is compared with them. Thereby, it is shown that the refraction contrast much more sensitively delineates the soft tissues than the absorption contrast. In addition, the radiologic-histologic correlation study not only validates the efficacy for imaging soft tissues, but also produces the potential that the pathological inspection for the breast cancer tumors may be feasible non-destructively.

  7. Rapid contrast evaluation method based on affinity beads and backscattered electron imaging for the screening of electron stains.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Hiroki; Inoue, Kanako; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Park, Pyoyun; Ikeda, Kenichi

    2015-10-01

    Uranyl salts are toxic and radioactive; therefore, several studies have been conducted to screen for substitutes of electron stains. In this regard, the contrast evaluation process is time consuming and the results obtained are inconsistent. In this study, we developed a novel contrast evaluation method using affinity beads and a backscattered electron image (BSEI), obtained using scanning electron microscopy. The contrast ratios of BSEI in each electron stain treatment were correlated with those of transmission electron microscopic images. The affinity beads bound to cell components independently. Protein and DNA samples were enhanced by image contrast treated with electron stains; however, this was not observed for sugars. Protein-conjugated beads showed an additive effect of image contrast when double-stained with lead. However, additive effect of double staining was not observed in DNA-conjugated beads. The varying chemical properties of oligopeptides showed differences in image contrast when treated with each electron stain. This BSEI-based evaluation method not only enables screening for alternate electron stains, but also helps analyze the underlying mechanisms of electron staining of cellular structures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Biofilm imaging in porous media by laboratory X-Ray tomography: Combining a non-destructive contrast agent with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging tools

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Mario A.; Morales, Verónica L.; Derlon, Nicolas; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Kaufmann, Rolf; Holzner, Markus

    2017-01-01

    X-ray tomography is a powerful tool giving access to the morphology of biofilms, in 3D porous media, at the mesoscale. Due to the high water content of biofilms, the attenuation coefficient of biofilms and water are very close, hindering the distinction between biofilms and water without the use of contrast agents. Until now, the use of contrast agents such as barium sulfate, silver-coated micro-particles or 1-chloronaphtalene added to the liquid phase allowed imaging the biofilm 3D morphology. However, these contrast agents are not passive and potentially interact with the biofilm when injected into the sample. Here, we use a natural inorganic compound, namely iron sulfate, as a contrast agent progressively bounded in dilute or colloidal form into the EPS matrix during biofilm growth. By combining a very long source-to-detector distance on a X-ray laboratory source with a Lorentzian filter implemented prior to tomographic reconstruction, we substantially increase the contrast between the biofilm and the surrounding liquid, which allows revealing the 3D biofilm morphology. A comparison of this new method with the method proposed by Davit et al (Davit et al., 2011), which uses barium sulfate as a contrast agent to mark the liquid phase was performed. Quantitative evaluations between the methods revealed substantial differences for the volumetric fractions obtained from both methods. Namely, contrast agent—biofilm interactions (e.g. biofilm detachment) occurring during barium sulfate injection caused a reduction of the biofilm volumetric fraction of more than 50% and displacement of biofilm patches elsewhere in the column. Two key advantages of the newly proposed method are that passive addition of iron sulfate maintains the integrity of the biofilm prior to imaging, and that the biofilm itself is marked by the contrast agent, rather than the liquid phase as in other available methods. The iron sulfate method presented can be applied to understand biofilm

  9. Mobile phone based laser speckle contrast imager for assessment of skin blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Saknite, Inga; Krievina, Gita; Zaharans, Janis; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of skin blood flow is of interest for evaluation of skin viability as well as for reflection of the overall condition of the circulatory system. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LASCI) are optical techniques used for assessment of skin perfusion. However, these systems are still too expensive and bulky to be widely available. Implementation of such techniques as connection kits for mobile phones have a potential for primary diagnostics. In this work we demonstrate simple and low cost LASCI connection kit for mobile phone and its comparison to laser Doppler perfusion imager. Post-occlusive hyperemia and local thermal hyperemia tests are used to compare both techniques and to demonstrate the potential of LASCI device.

  10. High-contrast active cavitation imaging technique based on multiple bubble wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shukuan; Xu, Shanshan; Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a unique method that combines the ultrafast active cavitation imaging technique with multiple bubble wavelet transform (MBWT) for improving cavitation detection contrast was presented. The bubble wavelet was constructed by the modified Keller-Miksis equation that considered the mutual effect among bubbles. A three-dimensional spatial model was applied to simulate the spatial distribution of multiple bubbles. The effects of four parameters on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of cavitation images were evaluated, including the following: initial radii of bubbles, scale factor in the wavelet transform, number of bubbles, and the minimum inter-bubble distance. And the other two spatial models and cavitation bubble size distributions were introduced in the MBWT method. The results suggested that in the free-field experiments, the averaged SNR of images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 7.16 ± 0.09 dB and 3.14 ± 0.14 dB compared with the values of images acquired by the B-mode and single bubble wavelet transform (SBWT) methods. In addition, in the tissue experiments, the averaged cavitation-to-tissue ratio of cavitation images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 4.69 ± 0.25 dB and 1.74± 0.29 dB compared with that of images acquired by B-mode and SBWT methods.

  11. Strategies for Optimizing Water-Exchange Rates of Lanthanide-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N.; Allen, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in strategies for tuning the water-exchange rates of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Water-exchange rates play a critical role in determining the efficiency of contrast agents; consequently, optimization of water-exchange rates, among other parameters, is necessary to achieve high efficiencies. This need has resulted in extensive research efforts to modulate water-exchange rates by chemically altering the coordination environments of the metal complexes that function as contrast agents. The focus of this review is coordination-chemistry-based strategies used to tune the water-exchange rates of lanthanide(III)-based contrast agents for MRI. Emphasis will be given to results published in the 21st century, as well as implications of these strategies on the design of contrast agents. PMID:23921796

  12. A user-friendly LabVIEW software platform for grating based X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenghao; Han, Huajie; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Wu, Zhao; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide greatly improved contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging for weakly absorbing samples, such as biological soft tissues and fibre composites. In this study, we introduced an easy and fast way to develop a user-friendly software platform dedicated to the new grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the University of Science and Technology of China. The control of 21 motorized stages, of a piezoelectric stage and of an X-ray tube are achieved with this software, it also covers image acquisition with a flat panel detector for automatic phase stepping scan. Moreover, a data post-processing module for signals retrieval and other custom features are in principle available. With a seamless integration of all the necessary functions in one software package, this platform greatly facilitate users' activities during experimental runs with this grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging setup.

  13. A new method for information retrieval in two-dimensional grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Ge, Xin; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Tian, Yang-Chao; Wu, Zi-Yu

    2012-11-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to be an extremely powerful phase-sensitive imaging technique. By using two-dimensional (2D) gratings, the observable contrast is extended to two refraction directions. Recently, we have developed a novel reverse-projection (RP) method, which is capable of retrieving the object information efficiently with one-dimensional (1D) grating-based phase contrast imaging. In this contribution, we present its extension to the 2D grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging, named the two-dimensional reverse-projection (2D-RP) method, for information retrieval. The method takes into account the nonlinear contributions of two refraction directions and allows the retrieval of the absorption, the horizontal and the vertical refraction images. The obtained information can be used for the reconstruction of the three-dimensional phase gradient field, and for an improved phase map retrieval and reconstruction. Numerical experiments are carried out, and the results confirm the validity of the 2D-RP method.

  14. Increasing the field of view in grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging using stitched gratings.

    PubMed

    Meiser, J; Willner, M; Schröter, T; Hofmann, A; Rieger, J; Koch, F; Birnbacher, L; Schüttler, M; Kunka, D; Meyer, P; Faisal, A; Amberger, M; Duttenhofer, T; Weber, T; Hipp, A; Ehn, S; Walter, M; Herzen, J; Schulz, J; Pfeiffer, F; Mohr, J

    2016-03-17

    Grating based X-ray differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI) allows for high contrast imaging of materials with similar absorption characteristics. In the last years' publications, small animals or parts of the human body like breast, hand, joints or blood vessels have been studied. Larger objects could not be investigated due to the restricted field of view limited by the available grating area. In this paper, we report on a new stitching method to increase the grating area significantly: individual gratings are merged on a carrier substrate. Whereas the grating fabrication process is based on the LIGA technology (X-ray lithography and electroplating) different cutting and joining methods have been evaluated. First imaging results using a 2×2 stitched analyzer grating in a Talbot-Lau interferometer have been generated using a conventional polychromatic X-ray source. The image quality and analysis confirm the high potential of the stitching method to increase the field of view considerably.

  15. Optimization of grating duty cycle in non-interferometric grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ronghui; Wu, Zhao; Xiong, Ying; Wei, Chenxi; Zhang, Xiaobo; Hu, Renfang; Wang, Lei; Guo, Liang; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yangchao

    2017-08-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging technology is one of the most potential imaging methods in real applications. It can be classified into two categories: interferometry and non-interferometric imaging. The non-interferometric grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging (NIGPCI) instrument has a great advantage in the forthcoming commercial applications for the flexible system design and the use of large periodic gratings. The performance of the NIGPCI instrument depends on its angular sensitivity to a great extent. Therefore, good angular sensitivity is mandatory in order to obtain high quality phase-contrast images. Several parameters, such as the X-ray spectrum, the inter-grating distances, and the parameters of the three gratings, influence the angular sensitivity of the imaging system. However, the quantitative relationship between the angular sensitivity and grating duty cycle is unclear. Therefore, this paper is devoted to revealing their internal relation by theoretical deduction and emulation of the imaging process with the theories of linear system and Fourier optics. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis method to optimize the duty cycles of gratings is proposed and its applicability to a general NIGPCI system is verified.

  16. Ultrasound Contrast Plane Wave Imaging Based on Bubble Wavelet Transform: In Vitro and In Vivo Validations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diya; Zong, Yujin; Yang, Xuan; Hu, Hong; Wan, Jinjin; Zhang, Lei; Bouakaz, Ayache; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study described here was to develop an ultrasound contrast plane wave imaging (PWI) method based on pulse-inversion bubble wavelet transform imaging (PIWI) to improve the contrast-to-tissue ratio of contrast images. A pair of inverted "bubble wavelets" with plane waves was constructed according to the modified Herring equation. The original echoes were replaced by the maximum wavelet correlation coefficients obtained from bubble wavelet correlation analysis. The echoes were then summed to distinguish microbubbles from tissues. In in vivo experiments on rabbit kidney, PIWI improved the contrast-to-tissue ratio of contrast images up to 4.5 ± 1.5 dB, compared with that obtained in B-mode (p < 0.05), through use of a pair of inverted plane waves. The disruption rate and infusion time of microbubbles in PIWI-based PWI were then quantified using two perfusion parameters, area under the curve and half transmit time estimated from time-intensity curves, respectively. After time-intensity curves were denoised by detrended fluctuation analysis, the average area under the curve and half transit time of PIWI-based PWI were 55.94% (p < 0.05) and 20.51% (p < 0.05) higher than those of conventional focused imaging, respectively. Because of its high contrast-to-tissue ratio and low disruption of microbubbles, PIWI-based PWI has a long infusion time and is therefore beneficial for transient monitoring and perfusion assessment of microbubbles circulating in vessels. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance analysis of the attenuation-partition based iterative phase retrieval algorithm for in-line phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    The phase retrieval is an important task in x-ray phase contrast imaging. The robustness of phase retrieval is especially important for potential medical imaging applications such as phase contrast mammography. Recently the authors developed an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, the attenuation-partition based algorithm, for the phase retrieval in inline phase-contrast imaging [1]. Applied to experimental images, the algorithm was proven to be fast and robust. However, a quantitative analysis of the performance of this new algorithm is desirable. In this work, we systematically compared the performance of this algorithm with other two widely used phase retrieval algorithms, namely the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm and the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) algorithm. The systematical comparison is conducted by analyzing phase retrieval performances with a digital breast specimen model. We show that the proposed algorithm converges faster than the GS algorithm in the Fresnel diffraction regime, and is more robust against image noise than the TIE algorithm. These results suggest the significance of the proposed algorithm for future medical applications with the x-ray phase contrast imaging technique. PMID:20720992

  18. High-Contrast Imaging of Epsilon Eridani with Ground-Based Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuki, T.; Yamada, T.; Carson, J. C.; Kuzuhara, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Nishikawa, J.; Sitko, M. L.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Epsilon Eridani is one of the nearest solar-type stars. Its proximity and relatively young age allow high-contrast imaging observations to achieve sensitivities to planets at narrow separations down to an inner radius of approximately 5 AU. Previous observational studies of the system report a dust disk with asymmetric morphology as well as a giant planet with large orbital eccentricity, which may require another massive companion to induce the peculiar morphology and to enhance the large orbital eccentricity. In this paper, we report results from deep high-contrast imaging observations to detect the previously reported planet and search for other unseen less massive companions with Subaru/HiCIAO, Gemini-South/NICI, and VLT/NACO. No positive detection was made, but high-contrast measurements with the CH4S narrow-band filter of HiCIAO achieved sensitivities at 14.7 mag differential magnitude level, at an angular separation of 1.0''. In terms of planetary mass, as determined by cooling evolutionary models, the highest sensitivities were achieved by the Lp broad-band filter of NACO, resulting in sensitivities corresponding to 1.8, 2.8, and 4.5 M(sub jup) at the projected separation of 3 AU, if 200, 400, and 800 Myr is assumed for the age of the system, respectively. We also discuss origins of the dust disk from the detection sensitivity in the planetary mass and find that a less massive eccentric planet is preferred for disk stirring, which is consistent with the orbital parameters of epsilon Eri b claimed from the previous long-term radial velocity monitoring.

  19. Material contrast based inline metrology: process verification and control using back scattered electron imaging on CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, Carsten; Fischer, Daniel; Schulz, Bernd; Vaid, Alok; Adan, Ofer; Levi, Shimon; Ge, Adam; Zhou, Jessica; Bar-Zvi, Maayan; Enge, Ronny; Groh, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscope (CDSEM) is the traditional workhorse solution for inline process control. Measurements are extracted from top-down images based on secondary electron collection while scanning the specimen. Secondary electrons holding majority of detection yield. These images provide more on the structural information of the specimen surface and less in terms of material contrast. In some cases there is too much structural information in the image which can irritate the measurement, in other cases small but important differences between various material compounds cannot be detected as images are limited by contrast information and resolution of primary scanning beam. Furthermore, accuracy in secondary electron based metrology is limited by charging. To gather the exact required information for certain material compound as needed, a technique, known from material analytic SEḾs has been introduced for inline CDSEM analysis and process control: Low Loss Back Scattered Electron Imaging (LL-BSE). The key at LL-BSE imaging is the collection of only the back scattered electrons (BSE) from outermost specimen surface which undergo the least amount possible of energy loss in the process of image generation following impact of the material by a primary beam. In LL-BSE very good and measurable material distinction and sensitivity, even for very low density material compounds can be achieved. This paper presents new methods for faster process development cycle, at reduced cost, based on LL-BSE mass data mining instead of sending wafers for destructive material analysis.

  20. Adapted polarization state contrast image.

    PubMed

    Richert, Michael; Orlik, Xavier; De Martino, Antonello

    2009-08-03

    We propose a general method to maximize the polarimetric contrast between an object and its background using a predetermined illumination polarization state. After a first estimation of the polarimetric properties of the scene by classical Mueller imaging, we evaluate the incident polarized field that induces scattered polarization states by the object and background, as opposite as possible on the Poincar e sphere. With a detection method optimized for a 2-channel imaging system, Monte Carlo simulations of low flux coherent imaging are performed with various objects and backgrounds having different properties of retardance, dichroism and depolarization. With respect to classical Mueller imaging, possibly associated to the polar decomposition, our results show a noticeable increase in the Bhattacharyya distance used as our contrast parameter.

  1. A grating-based single-shot x-ray phase contrast and diffraction method for in vivo imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Eric E.; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F.; Wen Han

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a single-shot version of the grating-based phase contrast x-ray imaging method and demonstrate its capability of in vivo animal imaging. Here, the authors describe the principle and experimental results. They show the source of artifacts in the phase contrast signal and optimal designs that minimize them. They also discuss its current limitations and ways to overcome them. Methods: A single lead grid was inserted midway between an x-ray tube and an x-ray camera in the planar radiography setting. The grid acted as a transmission grating and cast periodic dark fringes on the camera. The camera had sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the fringes. Refraction and diffraction in the imaged object manifested as position shifts and amplitude attenuation of the fringes, respectively. In order to quantify these changes precisely without imposing a fixed geometric relationship between the camera pixel array and the fringes, a spatial harmonic method in the Fourier domain was developed. The level of the differential phase (refraction) contrast as a function of hardware specifications and device geometry was derived and used to guide the optimal placement of the grid and object. Both ex vivo and in vivo images of rodent extremities were collected to demonstrate the capability of the method. The exposure time using a 50 W tube was 28 s. Results: Differential phase contrast images of glass beads acquired at various grid and object positions confirmed theoretical predictions of how phase contrast and extraneous artifacts vary with the device geometry. In anesthetized rats, a single exposure yielded artifact-free images of absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction. Differential phase contrast was strongest at bone-soft tissue interfaces, while diffraction was strongest in bone. Conclusions: The spatial harmonic method allowed us to obtain absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction images, all from a

  2. Multi-contrast MRI registration of carotid arteries based on cross-sectional images and lumen boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Xia; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xiao-Pan; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Guo-Peng; Li, Bao-Juan; Chen, Hui-Jun; Lu, Hong-Bing

    2017-02-01

    Ischemic stroke has great correlation with carotid atherosclerosis and is mostly caused by vulnerable plaques. It's particularly important to analysis the components of plaques for the detection of vulnerable plaques. Recently plaque analysis based on multi-contrast magnetic resonance imaging has attracted great attention. Though multi-contrast MR imaging has potentials in enhanced demonstration of carotid wall, its performance is hampered by the misalignment of different imaging sequences. In this study, a coarse-to-fine registration strategy based on cross-sectional images and wall boundaries is proposed to solve the problem. It includes two steps: a rigid step using the iterative closest points to register the centerlines of carotid artery extracted from multi-contrast MR images, and a non-rigid step using the thin plate spline to register the lumen boundaries of carotid artery. In the rigid step, the centerline was extracted by tracking the crosssectional images along the vessel direction calculated by Hessian matrix. In the non-rigid step, a shape context descriptor is introduced to find corresponding points of two similar boundaries. In addition, the deterministic annealing technique is used to find a globally optimized solution. The proposed strategy was evaluated by newly developed three-dimensional, fast and high resolution multi-contrast black blood MR imaging. Quantitative validation indicated that after registration, the overlap of two boundaries from different sequences is 95%, and their mean surface distance is 0.12 mm. In conclusion, the proposed algorithm has improved the accuracy of registration effectively for further component analysis of carotid plaques.

  3. Detection of cell death in tumors by using MR imaging and a gadolinium-based targeted contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anant S; Neves, Andre A; de Backer, Maaike M; Hu, De-En; Davletov, Bazbek; Kettunen, Mikko I; Brindle, Kevin M

    2008-03-01

    To prospectively determine in an animal model whether an ionic gadolinium (Gd(3+)) chelate conjugate of the C2A domain of synaptotagmin I can be used with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to detect tumor cell death noninvasively in vivo. Animal experiments were approved by a local ethics review committee. Gd(3+) chelates and fluorescent probes were attached to the lysine epsilon-amino groups of a glutathione-S-transferase-C2A fusion protein. Binding to phosphatidylserine (PS) was characterized by using surface plasmon resonance, and binding to dying cells in vitro was characterized by using flow cytometry and MR imaging. Binding to dying tumor cells in vivo was detected with T1 mapping and T1-weighted MR imaging and compared in drug-treated animals (n = 10); in animals injected with a site-directed mutant, which was inactive in PS binding (PS inactive) and which showed lesser binding to dying cells (n = 6); and in untreated animals injected with PS-active (n = 6) and PS-inactive (n = 6) contrast agents. Among groups, differences that were significant were analyzed by using analysis of variance and Dunnett post hoc analysis. The contrast agent had a relatively high affinity for PS (dissociation constant = 333 nmol/L +/- 85 [mean +/- standard error of the mean]; n = 3) and bound to apoptotic and necrotic, but not viable, cells in vitro. There was a greater tumor accumulation of the PS-active contrast agent compared with the PS-inactive contrast agent in drug-treated animals (P < .05) and compared with untreated animals injected with the PS-active and PS-inactive contrast agents (P < .01 for both). A relatively small (approximately 100 kDa) Gd(3+)-based contrast agent, which gives positive contrast on MR images, can be used to detect tumor cell death in vivo, and future derivatives of it may be used to assess early tumor responses to treatment. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  4. Atmospheric visibility estimation and image contrast calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermansson, Patrik; Edstam, Klas

    2016-10-01

    A method, referred to as contrast calibration, has been developed for transforming digital color photos of outdoor scenes from the atmospheric conditions, illumination and visibility, prevailing at the time of capturing the image to a corresponding image for other atmospheric conditions. A photo captured on a hazy day can, for instance, be converted to resemble a photo of the same scene for good visibility conditions. Converting digital color images to specified lightning and transmission conditions is useful for image based assessment of signature suppression solutions. The method uses "calibration objects" which are photographed at about the same time as the scene of interest. The calibration objects, which (indirectly) provide information on visibility and lightning conditions, consist of two flat boards, painted in different grayscale colors, and a commercial, neutral gray, reference card. Atmospheric extinction coefficient and sky intensity can be determined, in three wavelength bands, from image pixel values on the calibration objects and using this information the image can be converted to other atmospheric conditions. The image is transformed in contrast and color. For illustration, contrast calibration is applied to sample images of a scene acquired at different times. It is shown that contrast calibration of the images to the same reference values of extinction coefficient and sky intensity results in images that are more alike than the original images. It is also exemplified how images can be transformed to various other atmospheric weather conditions. Limitations of the method are discussed and possibilities for further development are suggested.

  5. Inverse geometry for grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Donath, Tilman; Bunk, Oliver; David, Christian; Chabior, Michael; Schuster, Manfred; Baumann, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Franz; Reznikova, Elena; Mohr, Juergen; Hempel, Eckhard; Popescu, Stefan; Hoheisel, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Phase-contrast imaging using conventional polychromatic x-ray sources and grating interferometers has been developed and demonstrated for x-ray energies up to 60 keV. Here, we conduct an analysis of possible grating configurations for this technique and present further geometrical arrangements not considered so far. An inverse interferometer geometry is investigated that offers significant advantages for grating fabrication and for the application of the method in computed tomography (CT) scanners. We derive and measure the interferometer's angular sensitivity for both the inverse and the conventional configuration as a function of the sample position. Thereby, we show that both arrangements are equally sensitive and that the highest sensitivity is obtained, when the investigated object is close to the interferometer's phase grating. We also discuss the question whether the sample should be placed in front of or behind the phase grating. For CT applications, we propose an inverse geometry with the sample position behind the phase grating.

  6. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  7. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  8. Subject-specific patch-based denoising for contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lorraine; Ebrahimi, Mehran; Pop, Mihaela

    2016-03-01

    Many patch-based techniques in imaging, e.g., Non-local means denoising, require tuning parameters to yield optimal results. In real-world applications, e.g., denoising of MR images, ground truth is not generally available and the process of choosing an appropriate set of parameters is a challenge. Recently, Zhu et al. proposed a method to define an image quality measure, called Q, that does not require ground truth. In this manuscript, we evaluate the effect of various parameters of the NL-means denoising on this quality metric Q. Our experiments are based on the late-gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac MR images that are inherently noisy. Our described exhaustive evaluation approach can be used in tuning parameters of patch-based schemes. Even in the case that an estimation of optimal parameters is provided using another existing approach, our described method can be used as a secondary validation step. Our preliminary results suggest that denoising parameters should be case-specific rather than generic.

  9. Optical Imaging with Dynamic Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Biological imaging applications often employ molecular probes or nanoparticles for enhanced contrast. However, resolution and detection are still often limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the Isample, which can produce high levels of background that obscure the signals of interest. In this article we describe approaches to overcome this obstacle based on the concept of dynamic contrast, a strategy for elucidating signals by the suppression or removal of background noise. Dynamic contrast mechanisms can greatly reduce the loading requirement of contrast agents, and may be especially useful for single-probe imaging. Dynamic contrast modalities are also platform-independent, and can enhance the performance of sophisticated biomedical imaging systems or simple optical microscopes alike. Dynamic contrast is performed in two stages: i) a signal modulation scheme to introduce time-dependent changes in amplitude or phase, and ii) a demodulation step for signal recovery. Optical signals can be coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, photoswitchable probes, or plasmon-resonant nanostructures for modulation by magnetomotive, photonic, or photothermal mechanisms respectively. With respect to image demodulation, many of the strategies developed for signal processing in electronics and communication technologies can also be applied toward the editing of digital images. The image processing step can be as simple as differential imaging, or may involve multiple reference points for deconvolution using cross-correlation algorithms. Periodic signals are particularly amenable to image demodulation strategies based on Fourier transform; the contrast of the demodulated signal increases with acquisition time, and modulation frequencies in the kHz range are possible. Dynamic contrast is an emerging topic with considerable room for development, both with respect to molecular or nanoscale probes for signal modulation, and also to methods for more efficient image processing and editing

  10. Optical imaging with dynamic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-24

    Biological imaging applications often employ molecular probes or nanoparticles for enhanced contrast. However, resolution and detection are still often limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the sample, which can produce high levels of background that obscure the signals of interest. Herein, we describe approaches to overcome this obstacle based on the concept of dynamic contrast: a strategy for elucidating signals by the suppression or removal of background noise. Dynamic contrast mechanisms can greatly reduce the loading requirement of contrast agents, and may be especially useful for single-probe imaging. Dynamic contrast modalities are also platform-independent, and can enhance the performance of sophisticated biomedical imaging systems or simple optical microscopes alike. Dynamic contrast is performed in two stages: 1) a signal modulation scheme to introduce time-dependent changes in amplitude or phase, and 2) a demodulation step for signal recovery. Optical signals can be coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, photoswitchable probes, or plasmon-resonant nanostructures for modulation by magnetomotive, photonic, or photothermal mechanisms, respectively. With respect to image demodulation, many of the strategies developed for signal processing in electronics and communication technologies can also be applied toward the editing of digital images. The image-processing step can be as simple as differential imaging, or may involve multiple reference points for deconvolution by using cross-correlation algorithms. Periodic signals are particularly amenable to image demodulation strategies based on Fourier transform; the contrast of the demodulated signal increases with acquisition time, and modulation frequencies in the kHz range are possible. Dynamic contrast is an emerging topic with considerable room for development, both with respect to molecular or nanoscale probes for signal modulation, and also to methods for more efficient image processing and editing

  11. High-resolution functional imaging with ultrasound contrast agents based on RF processing in an in vivo kidney experiment.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, X A; Willigers, J M; Prinzen, F W; Peschar, M; Ledoux, L A; Hoeks, A P

    2001-02-01

    Knowledge of the relative tissue perfusion distribution is valuable in the diagnosis of numerous diseases. Techniques for the assessment of the relative perfusion distribution, based on ultrasound (US) contrast agents, have several advantages compared to established nuclear techniques. These are, among others, a better spatial and temporal resolution, the lack of exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation and the relatively low cost. In the present study, US radiofrequency (RF) image sequences are acquired, containing the signal intensity changes associated with the transit of a bolus contrast agent through the microvasculature of a dog kidney. The primary objective is to explore the feasibility of calculating functional images with high spatial resolution. The functional images characterize the transit of the contrast agent bolus and represent distributions of peak time, peak value, transit time, peak area, wash-in rate and wash-out decay constant. For the evaluation of the method, dog experiments were performed under optimized conditions where motion artefacts were minimized and an IA injection of the contrast agent Levovist was employed. It was demonstrated that processing of RF signals obtained with a 3.5-MHz echo system can provide functional images with a high spatial resolution of 2 mm in axial resolution, 2 to 5 mm in lateral resolution and a slice thickness of 2 mm. The functional images expose several known aspects of kidney perfusion, like perfusion heterogeneity of the kidney cortex and a different peripheral cortical perfusion compared to the inner cortex. Based on the findings of the present study, and given the results of complimentary studies, it is likely that the functional images reflect the relative perfusion distribution of the kidney.

  12. Characterization of an x-ray phase contrast imaging system based on the miniature synchrotron MIRRORCLE-6X

    SciTech Connect

    Heekeren, Joop van; Kostenko, Alexander; Hanashima, Takayasu; Yamada, Hironari; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Offerman, S. Erik; Vliet, Lucas J. van

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The implementation of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) for soft-tissue patient imaging is hampered by the lack of a bright and spatially coherent x-ray source that fits into the hospital environment. This article provides a quantitative characterization of the phase-contrast enhancement of a PCI system based on the miniature synchrotron technology MIRRORCLE-6X. Methods: The phase-contrast effect was measured using an edge response of a plexiglass plate as a function of the incident angle of radiation. We have developed a comprehensive x-ray propagation model based on the system's components, properties, and geometry in order to interpret the measurement data. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to estimate the system's spectral properties and resolution. Results: The measured ratio of the detected phase-contrast to the absorption contrast is currently in the range 100% to 200%. Experiments show that with the current implementation of the MIRRORCLE-6X, a target smaller than 30-40 {mu}m does not lead to a larger phase-contrast. The reason for this is that the fraction of x-rays produced by the material (carbon filament and glue) that is used for mounting the target in the electron beam is more than 25% of the total amount of x-rays produced. This increases the apparent source size. The measured phase-contrast is at maximum two times larger than the absorption contrast with the current set-up. Conclusions: Calculations based on our model of the present imaging system predict that the phase-contrast can be up to an order of magnitude larger than the absorption contrast in case the materials used for mounting the target in the electron beam do not (or hardly) produce x-rays. The methods described in this paper provide vital feedback for guiding future modifications to the design of the x-ray target of MIRRORCLE-type system and configuration of the in-line PCI systems in general.

  13. A compressed sensing-based iterative algorithm for CT reconstruction and its possible application to phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueli; Luo, Shuqian

    2011-08-18

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a technology that obtains the tomogram of the observed objects. In real-world applications, especially the biomedical applications, lower radiation dose have been constantly pursued. To shorten scanning time and reduce radiation dose, one can decrease X-ray exposure time at each projection view or decrease the number of projections. Until quite recently, the traditional filtered back projection (FBP) method has been commonly exploited in CT image reconstruction. Applying the FBP method requires using a large amount of projection data. Especially when the exposure speed is limited by the mechanical characteristic of the imaging facilities, using FBP method may prolong scanning time and cumulate with a high dose of radiation consequently damaging the biological specimens. In this paper, we present a compressed sensing-based (CS-based) iterative algorithm for CT reconstruction. The algorithm minimizes the l1-norm of the sparse image as the constraint factor for the iteration procedure. With this method, we can reconstruct images from substantially reduced projection data and reduce the impact of artifacts introduced into the CT reconstructed image by insufficient projection information. To validate and evaluate the performance of this CS-base iterative algorithm, we carried out quantitative evaluation studies in imaging of both software Shepp-Logan phantom and real polystyrene sample. The former is completely absorption based and the later is imaged in phase contrast. The results show that the CS-based iterative algorithm can yield images with quality comparable to that obtained with existing FBP and traditional algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithms. Compared with the common reconstruction from 180 projection images, this algorithm completes CT reconstruction from only 60 projection images, cuts the scan time, and maintains the acceptable quality of the reconstructed images.

  14. Feasibility study of propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray lung imaging on the Imaging and Medical beamline at the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Murrie, Rhiannon P; Stevenson, Andrew W; Morgan, Kaye S; Fouras, Andreas; Paganin, David M; Siu, Karen K W

    2014-03-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PB-PCXI) using synchrotron radiation has achieved high-resolution imaging of the lungs of small animals both in real time and in vivo. Current studies are applying such imaging techniques to lung disease models to aid in diagnosis and treatment development. At the Australian Synchrotron, the Imaging and Medical beamline (IMBL) is well equipped for PB-PCXI, combining high flux and coherence with a beam size sufficient to image large animals, such as sheep, due to a wiggler source and source-to-sample distances of over 137 m. This study aimed to measure the capabilities of PB-PCXI on IMBL for imaging small animal lungs to study lung disease. The feasibility of combining this technique with computed tomography for three-dimensional imaging and X-ray velocimetry for studies of airflow and non-invasive lung function testing was also investigated. Detailed analysis of the role of the effective source size and sample-to-detector distance on lung image contrast was undertaken as well as phase retrieval for sample volume analysis. Results showed that PB-PCXI of lung phantoms and mouse lungs produced high-contrast images, with successful computed tomography and velocimetry also being carried out, suggesting that live animal lung imaging will also be feasible at the IMBL.

  15. Intra-individual comparison of different gadolinium-based contrast agents in the quantitative evaluation of C6 glioma with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Gang; Lou, Xin; Chen, Zhiye; Ma, Lin

    2017-01-01

    This experiment aimed to compare the ionic (Gadodiamide, Gd-DTPA-BMA) and non-ionic (Gadopentetate dimeglumine, Gd-DTPA) gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) in the quantitative evaluation of C6 glioma with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). A C6 glioma model was established in 12 Wistar rats, and magnetic resonance (MR) scans were performed six days after tumor implantation. Imaging was performed using a 3.0-T MR scanner with a 7-inch handmade circular coil. Pre-contrast T1 mapping and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1WI after a bolus injection (0.2 mL s(-1)) of GBCA at 0.4 mmol kg(-1) were performed. Each rat received two DCE-MRI scans, 24 h apart. The first and second scans were performed using Gd-DTPA-BMA and Gd-DTPA, respectively. Image data were processed using the Patlak model. Both K (trans) and V p maps were generated. Tumors were manually segmented on all 3D K (trans) and V p maps. Pixel counts and mean values were recorded for use in a paired t-test. Three radiologists independently performed the tumor segmentation and value calculation. The agreements from different observers were subjective to the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Readers demonstrated that the pixel counts of tumors in K (trans) maps were higher with Gd-DTPA-BMA than with Gd-DTPA (P<0.001, all readers). Although the K (trans) values were higher with Gd-DTPA-BMA than with Gd-DTPA, there was no statistical significance (P>0.05, all readers). The pixel counts of tumors in V p maps, as well as V p values, showed no obvious difference between the two agents (P>0.05, all readers). Excellent interobserver measurement reproducibility and reliability were demonstrated in the ICC tests. The Gd-DTPA-BMA contrast agent had significantly higher pixel counts of glioma in the K (trans) maps, and an increased tendency for average K (trans) values, indicating that DCE-MRI with Gd-DTPA-BMA may be more suitable and sensitive for the evaluation of glioma.

  16. Improved reverse projection method for large refraction angle in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenbin; Wu, Zhao; Wei, Chenxi; Hu, Yue; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yangchao

    2016-03-01

    Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging has attracted significant attentions in the past years due to its capability in achieving x-ray phase contrast imaging with low brilliance source. The reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose information extraction approach, which bases on the linear approximation of the shifting curve around its half-slope. However, when the refraction angle is beyond the linear range of the shifting curve, the extracted information is no longer credible. In this paper, we present an improved retrieval method by calculating an inverse function. Compared with the original retrieval method, our method does not rely on the first order approximation, and thus is suitable for large refraction angle. Theoretical derivations and numerical simulations are performed to confirm the accuracy of the method.

  17. Tensor-based tracking of the aorta in phase-contrast MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Yoo-Jin; Malsam, Anton; Ley, Sebastian; Rengier, Fabian; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Unterhinninghofen, Roland

    2014-03-01

    The velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is a valuable technique to measure the blood flow velocity in terms of time-resolved 3D vector fields. For diagnosis, presurgical planning and therapy control monitoring the patient's hemodynamic situation is crucial. Hence, an accurate and robust segmentation of the diseased vessel is the basis for further methods like the computation of the blood pressure. In the literature, there exist some approaches to transfer the methods of processing DT-MR images to PC-MR data, but the potential of this approach is not fully exploited yet. In this paper, we present a method to extract the centerline of the aorta in PC-MR images by applying methods from the DT-MRI. On account of this, in the first step the velocity vector fields are converted into tensor fields. In the next step tensor-based features are derived and by applying a modified tensorline algorithm the tracking of the vessel course is accomplished. The method only uses features derived from the tensor imaging without the use of additional morphology information. For evaluation purposes we applied our method to 4 volunteer as well as 26 clinical patient datasets with good results. In 29 of 30 cases our algorithm accomplished to extract the vessel centerline.

  18. High-contrast imaging of ɛ Eridani with ground-based instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuki, T.; Yamada, T.; Carson, J. C.; Kuzuhara, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Nishikawa, J.; Sitko, M. L.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Abe, L.; Brander, W.; Brandt, T. D.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Goto, M.; Grady, C. A.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S. S.; Henning, T.; Hodapp, K. W.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Janson, M.; Kandori, R.; Knapp, G. R.; Kwon, J.; Matsuo, T.; McElwain, M. W.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.; Moro-Martin, A.; Nishimura, T.; Pyo, T.; Serabyn, E.; Suenaga, T.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takahashi, Y. H.; Takami, M.; Takato, N.; Terada, H.; Thalmann, C.; Turner, E. L.; Watanabe, M.; Wisniewski, J.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2016-11-01

    ɛ Eridani is one of the nearest solar-type stars. Its proximity and relatively young age allow high-contrast imaging observations to achieve sensitivities to planets at narrow separations down to an inner radius of 5 AU. Previous observational studies of the system report a dust disk with asymmetric morphology as well as a giant planet with large orbital eccentricity, which may require another massive companion to induce the peculiar morphology and to enhance the large orbital eccentricity. In this paper, we report results from deep high-contrastimaging observations to detect the previously reported planet and search for other unseen less massive companions with Subaru/HiCIAO, Gemini-South/NICI, and VLT/NACO. No positive detection was made, but high-contrast measurements with the CH4S narrow-band filter of HiCIAO achieved sensitivities at 14.7 mag differential magnitude level, at an angular separation of 1.0″. In terms of planetary mass, as determined by cooling evolutionary models, the highest sensitivities were achieved by the Lp broad-band filter of NACO, resulting in sensitivities corresponding to 1.8, 2.8, and 4.5 Mjup at the projected separation of 3 AU, if 200, 400, and 800 Myr is assumed for the age of the system, respectively. We also discuss origins of the dust disk from the detection sensitivity in the planetary mass and find that a less massive eccentric planet is preferred for disk stirring, which is consistent with the orbital parameters of ɛ Eri b claimed from the previous long-term radial velocity monitoring.

  19. High-contrast imaging testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  20. Ex Vivo Perfusion-Simulation Measurements of Microbubbles as a Scattering Contrast Agent for Grating-Based X-Ray Dark-Field Imaging.

    PubMed

    Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Yaroshenko, Andre; Müller, Mark; Paprottka, Philipp; Ingrisch, Michael; Cyran, Clemens C; Auweter, Sigrid D; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of dedicated contrast agents for x-ray dark-field imaging, which exploits small-angle scattering at microstructures for contrast generation, is of strong interest in analogy to the common clinical use of high-atomic number contrast media in conventional attenuation-based imaging, since dark-field imaging has proven to provide complementary information. Therefore, agents consisting of gas bubbles, as used in ultrasound imaging for example, are of particular interest. In this work, we investigate an experimental contrast agent based on microbubbles consisting of a polyvinyl-alcohol shell with an iron oxide coating, which was originally developed for multimodal imaging and drug delivery. Its performance as a possible contrast medium for small-animal angiography was examined using a mouse carcass to realistically consider attenuating and scattering background signal. Subtraction images of dark field, phase contrast and attenuation were acquired for a concentration series of 100%, 10% and 1.3% to mimic different stages of dilution in the contrast agent in the blood vessel system. The images were compared to the gold-standard iodine-based contrast agent Solutrast, showing a good contrast improvement by microbubbles in dark-field imaging. This study proves the feasibility of microbubble-based dark-field contrast-enhancement in presence of scattering and attenuating mouse body structures like bone and fur. Therefore, it suggests a strong potential of the use of polymer-based microbubbles for small-animal dark-field angiography.

  1. Hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging with the Compact Light Source based on inverse Compton X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Bech, Martin; Bunk, Oliver; David, Christian; Ruth, Ronald; Rifkin, Jeff; Loewen, Rod; Feidenhans’l, Robert; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2009-01-01

    The first imaging results obtained from a small-size synchrotron are reported. The newly developed Compact Light Source produces inverse Compton X-rays at the intersection point of the counter propagating laser and electron beam. The small size of the intersection point gives a highly coherent cone beam with a few milliradian angular divergence and a few percent energy spread. These specifications make the Compact Light Source ideal for a recently developed grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging method. PMID:19096173

  2. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  3. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic.

  4. Construction and evaluation of a high-energy grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Seifert, Maria; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Weber, Thomas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    Interferometric x-ray imaging becomes more and more attractive for applications such as medical imaging or non-destructive testing, because it provides the opportunity to obtain additional information on the internal structure of radiographed objects.12 Therefore, three types of images are acquired: An attenuation image like in conventional x-ray imaging, an image of the differential phase-shift generated by the object and the so called dark-field image, which contains information about the object's granularity even on sub-pixel scale.3 However, most experiments addressing grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging with polychromatic sources are restricted to energies up to about 40 keV. For the application of this imaging method to thicker objects like human specimens or dense components, higher tube voltages are required. This is why we designed and constructed a laboratory setup for high energies, which is able to image larger objects.4 To evaluate the performance of the setup, the mean visibility of the field of view was measured for several tube voltages. The result shows that the mean visibility has a peak value of 23% at a tube voltage of 60 kV and is constantly greater than 16% up to a tube voltage of 120 kV. Thus, good image quality is provided even for high energies. To further substantiate the performance of the setup at high energies, a human ex-vivo foot was examined at a tube voltage of 75 kV. The interferometric x-ray images show a good image quality and a promising diagnostic power.

  5. A method for automatic segmentation of nuclei in phase-contrast images based on intensity, convexity and texture.

    PubMed

    Dewan, M Ali Akber; Ahmad, M Omair; Swamy, M N S

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of nuclei in phase-contrast images using the intensity, convexity and texture of the nuclei. The proposed method consists of three main stages: preprocessing, h-maxima transformation-based marker controlled watershed segmentation ( h-TMC), and texture analysis. In the preprocessing stage, a top-hat filter is used to increase the contrast and suppress the non-uniform illumination, shading, and other imaging artifacts in the input image. The nuclei segmentation stage consists of a distance transformation, h-maxima transformation and watershed segmentation. These transformations utilize the intensity information and the convexity property of the nucleus for the purpose of detecting a single marker in every nucleus; these markers are then used in the h-TMC watershed algorithm to obtain segments of the nuclei. However, dust particles, imaging artifacts, or prolonged cell cytoplasm may falsely be segmented as nuclei at this stage, and thus may lead to an inaccurate analysis of the cell image. In order to identify and remove these non-nuclei segments, in the third stage a texture analysis is performed, that uses six of the Haralick measures along with the AdaBoost algorithm. The novelty of the proposed method is that it introduces a systematic framework that utilizes intensity, convexity, and texture information to achieve a high accuracy for automatic segmentation of nuclei in the phase-contrast images. Extensive experiments are performed demonstrating the superior performance ( precision = 0.948; recall = 0.924; F1-measure = 0.936; validation based on  ∼ 4850 manually-labeled nuclei) of the proposed method.

  6. Contrast based circular approximation for accurate and robust optic disc segmentation in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Sigut, Jose; Nunez, Omar; Fumero, Francisco; Gonzalez, Marta; Arnay, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    A new method for automatic optic disc localization and segmentation is presented. The localization procedure combines vascular and brightness information to provide the best estimate of the optic disc center which is the starting point for the segmentation algorithm. A detection rate of 99.58% and 100% was achieved for the Messidor and ONHSD databases, respectively. A simple circular approximation to the optic disc boundary is proposed based on the maximum average contrast between the inner and outer ring of a circle centered on the estimated location. An average overlap coefficient of 0.890 and 0.865 was achieved for the same datasets, outperforming other state of the art methods. The results obtained confirm the advantages of using a simple circular model under non-ideal conditions as opposed to more complex deformable models.

  7. A flexible patch based approach for combined denoising and contrast enhancement of digital X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Irrera, Paolo; Bloch, Isabelle; Delplanque, Maurice

    2016-02-01

    Denoising and contrast enhancement play key roles in optimizing the trade-off between image quality and X-ray dose. However, these tasks present multiple challenges raised by noise level, low visibility of fine anatomical structures, heterogeneous conditions due to different exposure parameters, and patient characteristics. This work proposes a new method to address these challenges. We first introduce a patch-based filter adapted to the properties of the noise corrupting X-ray images. The filtered images are then used as oracles to define non parametric noise containment maps that, when applied in a multiscale contrast enhancement framework, allow optimizing the trade-off between improvement of the visibility of anatomical structures and noise reduction. A significant amount of tests on both phantoms and clinical images has shown that the proposed method is better suited than others for visual inspection for diagnosis, even when compared to an algorithm used to process low dose images in clinical routine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Linear information retrieval method in X-ray grating-based phase contrast imaging and its interchangeability with tomographic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Gao, K.; Wang, Z. L.; Shao, Q. G.; Hu, R. F.; Wei, C. X.; Zan, G. B.; Wali, F.; Luo, R. H.; Zhu, P. P.; Tian, Y. C.

    2017-06-01

    In X-ray grating-based phase contrast imaging, information retrieval is necessary for quantitative research, especially for phase tomography. However, numerous and repetitive processes have to be performed for tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we report a novel information retrieval method, which enables retrieving phase and absorption information by means of a linear combination of two mutually conjugate images. Thanks to the distributive law of the multiplication as well as the commutative law and associative law of the addition, the information retrieval can be performed after tomographic reconstruction, thus simplifying the information retrieval procedure dramatically. The theoretical model of this method is established in both parallel beam geometry for Talbot interferometer and fan beam geometry for Talbot-Lau interferometer. Numerical experiments are also performed to confirm the feasibility and validity of the proposed method. In addition, we discuss its possibility in cone beam geometry and its advantages compared with other methods. Moreover, this method can also be employed in other differential phase contrast imaging methods, such as diffraction enhanced imaging, non-interferometric imaging, and edge illumination.

  9. View-sharing PROPELLER with pixel-based optimal blade selection: application on dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Huang, Hsuan-Hung; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Wu, Ming-Ting

    2014-06-01

    To achieve better spatial and temporal resolution of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, the concept of k-space data sharing, or view sharing, can be implemented for PROPELLER acquisition. As found in other view-sharing methods, the loss of high-resolution dynamics is possible for view-sharing PROPELLER (VS-Prop) due to the temporal smoothing effect. The degradation can be more severe when a narrow blade with less phase encoding steps is chosen in the acquisition for higher frame rate. In this study, an iterative algorithm termed pixel-based optimal blade selection (POBS) is proposed to allow spatially dependent selection of the rotating blades, to generate high-resolution dynamic images with minimal reconstruction artifacts. In the reconstruction of VS-Prop, the central k-space which dominates the image contrast is only provided by the target blade with the peripheral k-space contributed by a minimal number of consecutive rotating blades. To reduce the reconstruction artifacts, the set of neighboring blades exhibiting the closest image contrast with the target blade is picked by POBS algorithm. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments were conducted in this study to investigate the dynamic response and spatial profiles of images generated using our proposed method. In addition, dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular imaging of healthy subjects was performed to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages. The simulation results show that POBS VS-Prop can provide timely dynamic response to rapid signal change, especially for a small region of interest or with the use of narrow blades. The POBS algorithm also demonstrates its capability to capture nonsimultaneous signal changes over the entire FOV. In addition, both phantom and in vivo experiments show that the temporal smoothing effect can be avoided by means of POBS, leading to higher wash-in slope of contrast enhancement after the bolus injection. With the satisfactory reconstruction quality provided by

  10. Anti-biofouling polymer-decorated lutetium-based nanoparticulate contrast agents for in vivo high-resolution trimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Dong, Kai; Liu, Jianhua; Han, Xueli; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-06-25

    Nanomaterials have gained considerable attention and interest in the development of novel and high-resolution contrast agents for medical diagnosis and prognosis in clinic. A classical urea-based homogeneous precipitation route that combines the merits of in situ thermal decomposition and surface modification is introduced to construct polyethylene glycol molecule (PEG)-decorated hybrid lutetium oxide nanoparticles (PEG-UCNPs). By utilizing the admirable optical and magnetic properties of the yielded PEG-UCNPs, in vivo up-conversion luminescence and T1 -enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of small animals are conducted, revealing obvious signals after subcutaneous and intravenous injection, respectively. Due to the strong X-ray absorption and high atomic number of lanthanide elements, X-ray computed-tomography imaging based on PEG-UCNPs is then designed and carried out, achieving excellent imaging outcome in animal experiments. This is the first example of the usage of hybrid lutetium oxide nanoparticles as effective nanoprobes. Furthermore, biodistribution, clearance route, as well as long-term toxicity are investigated in detail after intravenous injection in a murine model, indicating the overall safety of PEG-UCNPs. Compared with previous lanthanide fluorides, our nanoprobes exhibit more advantages, such as facile construction process and nearly total excretion from the animal body within a month. Taken together, these results promise the use of PEG-UCNPs as a safe and efficient nanoparticulate contrast agent for potential application in multimodal imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Oxidation-Responsive, EuII/III-Based, Multimodal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance and Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report, for the first time, a multimodal, oxidation-responsive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging that uses the differences in the properties between Eu in the +2 and +3 oxidation states. The enhancement of contrast in T1-weighted magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging was observed in the +2 but not in the +3 oxidation state, and the complex is a known chemical exchange saturation transfer agent for magnetic resonance imaging in the +3 oxidation state. PMID:28393130

  12. Three-dimensional image contrast using biospeckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, Robson Pierangeli; Braga, Roberto A., Jr.

    2010-09-01

    The biospeckle laser (BSL) has been applied in many areas of knowledge and a variety of approaches has been presented to address the best results in biological and non-biological samples, in fast or slow activities, or else in defined flow of materials or in random activities. The methodologies accounted in the literature consider the apparatus used in the image assembling and the way the collected data is processed. The image processing steps presents in turn a variety of procedures with first or second order statistics analysis, and as well with different sizes of data collected. One way to access the biospeckle in defined flow, such as in capillary blood flow in alive animals, was the adoption of the image contrast technique which uses only one image from the illuminated sample. That approach presents some problems related to the resolution of the image, which is reduced during the image contrast processing. In order to help the visualization of the low resolution image formed by the contrast technique, this work presents the three-dimensional procedure as a reliable alternative to enhance the final image. The work based on a parallel processing, with the generation of a virtual map of amplitudes, and maintaining the quasi-online characteristic of the contrast technique. Therefore, it was possible to generate in the same display the observed material, the image contrast result and in addiction the three-dimensional image with adjustable options of rotation. The platform also offers to the user the possibility to access the 3D image offline.

  13. Laser Image Contrast Enhancement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Robert L. (Inventor); Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical image enhancement system provides improved image contrast in imaging of a target in high temperature surroundings such as a furnace. The optical system includes a source of vertically polarized light such as laser and a beam splitter for receiving the light and directing the light toward the target. A retardation plate is affixed to a target-facing surface of the beam splitter and a vertical polarizer is disposed along a common optical path with the beam splitter between the retardation plate and the target. A horizontal polarizer disposed in the common optical path, receives light passing through a surface of the beam splitter opposed to the target-facing surface. An image detector is disposed at one end of the optical path. A band pass filter having a band pass filter characteristic matching the frequency of the vertically polarized light source is disposed in the path between the horizontal polarizer and the image detector. The use of circular polarization, together with cross polarizers, enables the reflected light to be passed to the detector while blocking thermal radiation.

  14. Laser Image Contrast Enhancement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Robert L. (Inventor); Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical image enhancement system provides improved image contrast in imaging of a target in high temperature surroundings such as a furnace. The optical system includes a source of vertically polarized light such as laser and a beam splitter for receiving the light and directing the light toward the target. A retardation plate is affixed to a target-facing surface of the beam splitter and a vertical polarizer is disposed along a common optical path with the beam splitter between the retardation plate and the target. A horizontal polarizer disposed in the common optical path, receives light passing through a surface of the beam splitter opposed to the target-facing surface. An image detector is disposed at one end of the optical path. A band pass filter having a band pass filter characteristic matching the frequency of the vertically polarized light source is disposed in the path between the horizontal polarizer and the image detector. The use of circular polarization, together with cross polarizers, enables the reflected light to be passed to the detector while blocking thermal radiation.

  15. [Contrastive analysis on soil alkalinization predicting models based on measured reflectance and TM image reflectance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xiong, Hei-Gang; Long, Tao; Lu, Wen-Juan

    2011-01-01

    Based on the monitored data of soil pH and measured Vis-NIR reflectance on spot in Qitai oasis alkalinized area in Xinjiang, as well as comparison of the relationship between measured reflectance and soil pH and the relationship between TM reflectance and soil pH, both of the reflectance multivariate linear regression models were built to evaluate soil alkalinization level, and the model accuracy of pH fitting was discussed with error inspection of post-sample. The results showed that there is a significant positive correlation between soil pH and reflectance. With pH rising the reflectance increased concurrently. So the alkalinization soil characterized by hardening had good spectral response characteristics. Both measured reflectance and TM image reflectance had good potential ability for change detection of the alkalinization soil. The pH predicting model of measured reflectance had higher accuracy and the major error was from different hardening state. If building model by TM reflectance directly, the accuracy of fitting was lower because of the vegetation information in image spectrum. With the vegetation factor removed with NDVI, the accuracy of TM predicting model was near the accuracy of measured reflectance predicting model, and both of the model levels were good.

  16. Patch Based Reconstruction Of Undersampled Data (PROUD) for High SNR and High Frame Rate Contrast Enhanced Liver Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Mitchell A.; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Xu, Bo; Prince, Martin R.; Elad, Michael; Wang, Yi; Spincemaille, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE High spatial-temporal four-dimensional imaging with large volume coverage is necessary to accurately capture and characterize liver lesions. Traditionally, parallel imaging and adapted sampling are used towards this goal, but they typically result in a loss of signal to noise. Furthermore, residual under-sampling artifacts can be temporally varying and complicate the quantitative analysis of contrast enhancement curves needed for pharmacokinetic modeling. We propose to overcome these problems using a novel patch-based regularization approach called Patch-based Reconstruction Of Under-sampled Data (PROUD). METHODS PROUD produces high frame rate image reconstructions by exploiting the strong similarities in spatial patches between successive time frames to overcome the severe k-space under-sampling. To validate PROUD, a numerical liver perfusion phantom was developed to characterize CNR performance compared to a previously proposed method, TRACER. A second numerical phantom was constructed to evaluate the temporal footprint and lag of PROUD and TRACER reconstructions. Finally, PROUD and TRACER were evaluated in a cohort of five liver donors. RESULTS In the CNR phantom, PROUD, compared to TRACER, improved peak CNR by 3.66 times while maintaining or improving temporal fidelity. In vivo, PROUD demonstrated an average increase in CNR of 60% compared to TRACER. CONCLUSION The results presented in this work demonstrate the feasibility of using a combination of patch based image constraints with temporal regularization to provide high SNR, high temporal frame rate and spatial resolution four dimensional imaging. PMID:25483782

  17. SU-E-T-407: Evaluation of the Stopping Power and Imaging Visibility for Iodine Based Contrast in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, H; Zhao, L; Rana, S; Chacko, M; Zheng, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between calculated and measured relative linear stopping power (RLSP) for contrast medium in proton therapy. Furthermore, the visibility for different concentrations in prostate phantom on orthogonal X-ray system was evaluated Methods and Materials: In prostate cancer patient, rectal balloon along with the contrast media was used to visualize the balloon position, thus facilitating the patient setup during each fraction of the uniform scanning proton treatment. There were no fiducial markers implanted in the prostate for this patient. A blue wax phantom with outer dimensions 10cm(H) x 14.5cm(L) x 10cm(W) was made in house. To hold iodine based contrast solution, a rectangular shaped hole with dimensions 7cm(H) x 8cm(L) x 4cm(W) was made inside the phantom. Organically bound 8.5% iodine based Cystografin Dilute contrast agent with molecular formula C11H9I3N2O4.C7H17NO5 was used in this study. Six solutions were prepared; each mixture of water and iodine based contrast agent at different concentrations as 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 50%. During computed tomographic(CT) simulation, solutions were placed together at the isocenter of CT and scanned at 120kVp using the same protocol as for prostate cancer patients. The treatment planning was done in CMS-XiO system. Multi-layer-ion-chamber (MLIC) was used to measure residual proton range. Results: The 50% concentration contrast solution was used during treatment for better visualization on orthogonal X-ray image. The measured RLSP for 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% & 50% solutions were 1.005, 1.010, 1.018, 1.023 & 1.033; and similarly calculated RLSP from XiO were 1.090, 1.135, 1.222, 1.299 & 1.448 respectively. Conclusion: The treatment planning system could overestimates the relative stopping power of contrast solution with high concentrations. It is recommended to override the contrast with measured RLSP for high atomic number based contrast solution in treatment

  18. Remote pedestrians detection at night time in FIR Image using contrast filtering and locally projected region based CNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehwan; Kim, Sungho

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a novel method to detect the remote pedestrians. After producing the human temperature based brightness enhancement image using the temperature data input, we generates the regions of interest (ROIs) by the multiscale contrast filtering based approach including the biased hysteresis threshold and clustering, remote pedestrian's height, pixel area and central position information. Afterwards, we conduct local vertical and horizontal projection based ROI refinement and weak aspect ratio based ROI limitation to solve the problem of region expansion in the contrast filtering stage. Finally, we detect the remote pedestrians by validating the final ROIs using transfer learning with convolutional neural network (CNN) feature, following non-maximal suppression (NMS) with strong aspect ratio limitation to improve the detection performance. In the experimental results, we confirmed that the proposed contrast filtering and locally projected region based CNN (CFLP-CNN) outperforms the baseline method by 8% in term of logaveraged miss rate. Also, the proposed method is more effective than the baseline approach and the proposed method provides the better regions that are suitably adjusted to the shape and appearance of remote pedestrians, which makes it detect the pedestrian that didn't find in the baseline approach and are able to help detect pedestrians by splitting the people group into a person.

  19. a Laboratory-Based X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging Scanner with Applications in Biomedical and Non-Medical Disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, C. K.; Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Munro, P. R. T.; Szafraniec, M. B.; Millard, T. P.; Speller, R.; Olivo, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) provides a much higher visibility of low-absorbing details than conventional, attenuation-based radiography. This is due to the fact that image contrast is determined by the unit decrement of the real part of the complex refractive index of an object rather than by its imaginary part (the absorption coefficient), which can be up to 1000 times larger for energies in the X-ray regime. This finds applications in many areas, including medicine, biology, material testing, and homeland security. Until lately, XPCi has been restricted to synchrotron facilities due to its demanding coherence requirements on the radiation source. However, edge illumination XPCi, first developed by one of the authors at the ELETTRA Synchrotron in Italy, substantially relaxes these requirements and therefore provides options to overcome this problem. Our group has built a prototype scanner that adapts the edge-illumination concept to standard laboratory conditions and extends it to large fields of view. This is based on X-ray sources and detectors available off the shelf, and its use has led to impressive results in mammography, cartilage imaging, testing of composite materials and security inspection. This article presents the method and the scanner prototype, and reviews its applications in selected biomedical and non-medical disciplines.

  20. Simulations of x-ray speckle-based dark-field and phase-contrast imaging with a polychromatic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdora, Marie-Christine; Thibault, Pierre; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Following the first experimental demonstration of x-ray speckle-based multimodal imaging using a polychromatic beam [I. Zanette et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112(25), 253903 (2014)], we present a simulation study on the effects of a polychromatic x-ray spectrum on the performance of this technique. We observe that the contrast of the near-field speckles is only mildly influenced by the bandwidth of the energy spectrum. Moreover, using a homogeneous object with simple geometry, we characterize the beam hardening artifacts in the reconstructed transmission and refraction angle images, and we describe how the beam hardening also affects the dark-field signal provided by speckle tracking. This study is particularly important for further implementations and developments of coherent speckle-based techniques at laboratory x-ray sources.

  1. Simulations of x-ray speckle-based dark-field and phase-contrast imaging with a polychromatic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zdora, Marie-Christine; Thibault, Pierre; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene

    2015-09-21

    Following the first experimental demonstration of x-ray speckle-based multimodal imaging using a polychromatic beam [I. Zanette et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112(25), 253903 (2014)], we present a simulation study on the effects of a polychromatic x-ray spectrum on the performance of this technique. We observe that the contrast of the near-field speckles is only mildly influenced by the bandwidth of the energy spectrum. Moreover, using a homogeneous object with simple geometry, we characterize the beam hardening artifacts in the reconstructed transmission and refraction angle images, and we describe how the beam hardening also affects the dark-field signal provided by speckle tracking. This study is particularly important for further implementations and developments of coherent speckle-based techniques at laboratory x-ray sources.

  2. Automatic glioma characterization from dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging: brain tumor segmentation using knowledge-based fuzzy clustering.

    PubMed

    Emblem, Kyrre E; Nedregaard, Baard; Hald, John K; Nome, Terje; Due-Tonnessen, Paulina; Bjornerud, Atle

    2009-07-01

    To assess whether glioma volumes from knowledge-based fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering of multiple MR image classes can provide similar diagnostic efficacy values as manually defined tumor volumes when characterizing gliomas from dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging. Fifty patients with newly diagnosed gliomas were imaged using DSC MR imaging at 1.5 Tesla. To compare our results with manual tumor definitions, glioma volumes were also defined independently by four neuroradiologists. Using a histogram analysis method, diagnostic efficacy values for glioma grade and expected patient survival were assessed. The areas under the receiver operator characteristics curves were similar when using manual and automated tumor volumes to grade gliomas (P = 0.576-0.970). When identifying a high-risk patient group (expected survival <2 years) and a low-risk patient group (expected survival >2 years), a higher log-rank value from Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was observed when using automatic tumor volumes (14.403; P < 0.001) compared with the manual volumes (10.650-12.761; P = 0.001-0.002). Our results suggest that knowledge-based FCM clustering of multiple MR image classes provides a completely automatic, user-independent approach to selecting the target region for presurgical glioma characterization. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Heart wall velocimetry and exogenous contrast-based cardiac flow imaging in Drosophila melanogaster using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choma, Michael A.; Suter, Melissa J.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-09-01

    Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is a central organism in biology and is becoming increasingly important in the cardiovascular sciences. Prior work in optical imaging of the D. melanogaster heart has focused on static and dynamic structural anatomy. In the study, it is demonstrated that Doppler optical coherence tomography can quantify dynamic heart wall velocity and hemolymph flow in adult D. melanogaster. Since hemolymph is optically transparent, a novel exogenous contrast technique is demonstrated to increase the backscatter-based intracardiac Doppler flow signal. The results presented here open up new possibilities for functional cardiovascular phenotyping of normal and mutant D. melanogaster.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a novel Gd-based contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of myelination

    PubMed Central

    Frullano, Luca; Zhu, Junqing; Miller, Robert H.; Wang, Yanming

    2013-01-01

    Myelin is a membrane system that fosters nervous impulse conduction in the vertebrate nervous system. Myelin sheath disruption is a common characteristic of several neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and various leukodystrophies. To date, the diagnosis of MS is obtained using a set of criteria in which MRI observations play a central role. However, because of the lack of specificity for myelin integrity, the use of MRI as the primary diagnostic tool has not yet been accepted. In order to improve MR specificity, we began developing MR probes targeted towards myelin. In this work we describe a new myelin-targeted MR contrast agent, Gd-DODAS, based on a stilbene binding moiety and demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to myelin in vitro and in vivo. We also present evidence that Gd-DODAS generates MR contrast in vivo in T1-weighed images and in T1 maps that correlates to the myelin content. PMID:23311333

  5. Molecular MR Imaging of CD44 in Breast Cancer with Hyaluronan-Based Contrast Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    bird-cage resonator for small-animal imaging. T1 weighted MR images and reconstructed pixel by pixel T1 maps of the MDA-MB-231 tumor measured...of a MDA-MB-231 tumor (yellow arrow) reconstructed from a set of T1 weighted fast spin- echo MR images acquired before (A) and at 1h (B) after... Polyak K. Molecular definition of breast tumor heterogeneity. Cancer Cell. 2007 Mar;11(3):259-73. 3. Ailles LE, Weissman IL. Cancer stem cells in

  6. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Shannon C.; Xu, Jun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Segmentation of breast lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the first step in lesion diagnosis in a computer-aided diagnosis framework. Because manual segmentation of such lesions is both time consuming and highly susceptible to human error and issues of reproducibility, an automated lesion segmentation method is highly desirable. Traditional automated image segmentation methods such as boundary-based active contour (AC) models require a strong gradient at the lesion boundary. Even when region-based terms are introduced to an AC model, grayscale image intensities often do not allow for clear definition of foreground and background region statistics. Thus, there is a need to find alternative image representations that might provide (1) strong gradients at the margin of the object of interest (OOI); and (2) larger separation between intensity distributions and region statistics for the foreground and background, which are necessary to halt evolution of the AC model upon reaching the border of the OOI. Methods: In this paper, the authors introduce a spectral embedding (SE) based AC (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast DCE-MRI. SE, a nonlinear dimensionality reduction scheme, is applied to the DCE time series in a voxelwise fashion to reduce several time point images to a single parametric image where every voxel is characterized by the three dominant eigenvectors. This parametric eigenvector image (PrEIm) representation allows for better capture of image region statistics and stronger gradients for use with a hybrid AC model, which is driven by both boundary and region information. They compare SEAC to ACs that employ fuzzy c-means (FCM) and principal component analysis (PCA) as alternative image representations. Segmentation performance was evaluated by boundary and region metrics as well as comparing lesion classification using morphological features from SEAC, PCA+AC, and FCM+AC. Results: On a cohort of 50

  7. Design of a novel class of protein-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for the molecular imaging of cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Pu, Fan; Cameron, Mathew; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of disease biomarkers, especially cancer biomarkers, could potentially improve our understanding of the disease and drug activity during preclinical and clinical drug treatment and patient stratification. MRI contrast agents with high relaxivity and targeting capability to tumor biomarkers are highly required. Extensive work has been done to develop MRI contrast agents. However, only a few limited literatures report that protein residues can function as ligands to bind Gd3+ with high binding affinity, selectivity, and relaxivity. In this paper, we focus on reporting our current progress on designing a novel class of protein-based Gd3+ MRI contrast agents (ProCAs) equipped with several desirable capabilities for in vivo application of MRI of tumor biomarkers. We will first discuss our strategy for improving the relaxivity by a novel protein-based design. We then discuss the effect of increased relaxivity of ProCAs on improving the detection limits for MRI contrast agent, especially for in vivo application. We will further report our efforts to improve in vivo imaging capability and our achievement in molecular imaging of cancer biomarkers with potential preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:23335551

  8. Optimal setting of automatic exposure control based on image noise and contrast on iodine-enhanced CT.

    PubMed

    Murazaki, Hiroo; Funama, Yoshinori; Sugaya, Yoshiaki; Miyazaki, Osamu; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Awai, Kazuo

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate variations in image noise and contrast using automatic exposure control (AEC) and different tube voltages on nonenhanced and iodine-enhanced hepatic computed tomography. Nonenhanced and iodine-enhanced simulated liver phantoms and AEC were used. Tube current was automatically adjusted with the noise index. Two types of assessments were performed: at a fixed noise index of 10 Hounsfield units and at different noise indexes, keeping the same contrast-to-noise ratio at different tube voltages (100, 120, and 130 kV). Image noise was measured, and contrast between the computed tomographic number of the simulated liver and nodule was computed. At a fixed noise index, image noise on iodine-enhanced images was 10% to 13% higher than on nonenhanced images at the same tube voltage. At 130 and 100 kV, contrast was 33.86 and 46.90 Hounsfield units, respectively, and image noise was almost the same. Contrast-to-noise ratios at 100, 120, and 130 kV were 3.31, 3.22, and 3.37, respectively, and volume computed tomographic dose index fell from 22.94 to 12.49 mGy with decreasing tube voltage. With AEC, image noise on iodine-enhanced images was higher than on nonenhanced images despite identical noise index settings. As tube voltage decreased, contrast on iodine-enhanced images increased. Considering noise index and contrast variations at different tube voltages, the optimal use of AEC on iodine-enhanced computed tomography facilitates a reduction in x-ray tube output while maintaining contrast-to-noise ratio. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pre-clinical evaluation of a nanoparticle-based blood-pool contrast agent for MR imaging of the placenta.

    PubMed

    Ghaghada, Ketan B; Starosolski, Zbigniew A; Bhayana, Saakshi; Stupin, Igor; Patel, Chandreshkumar V; Bhavane, Rohan C; Gao, Haijun; Bednov, Andrey; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Belfort, Michael; George, Verghese; Annapragada, Ananth V

    2017-09-01

    Non-invasive 3D imaging that enables clear visualization of placental margins is of interest in the accurate diagnosis of placental pathologies. This study investigated if contrast-enhanced MRI performed using a liposomal gadolinium blood-pool contrast agent (liposomal-Gd) enables clear visualization of the placental margins and the placental-myometrial interface (retroplacental space). Non-contrast MRI and contrast-enhanced MRI using a clinically approved conventional contrast agent were used as comparators. Studies were performed in pregnant rats under an approved protocol. MRI was performed at 1T using a permanent magnet small animal scanner. Pre-contrast and post-liposomal-Gd contrast images were acquired using T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences. Dynamic Contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was performed using gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem(®)). Visualization of the retroplacental clear space, a marker of normal placentation, was judged by a trained radiologist. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both single and averaged acquisitions. Images were reviewed by a radiologist and scored for the visualization of placental features. Contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) imaging using a liposomal CT agent was performed for confirmation of the MR findings. Transplacental transport of liposomal-Gd was evaluated by post-mortem elemental analysis of tissues. Ex-vivo studies in perfused human placentae from normal, GDM, and IUGR pregnancies evaluated the transport of liposomal agent across the human placental barrier. Post-contrast T1w images acquired with liposomal-Gd demonstrated significantly higher SNR (p = 0.0002) in the placenta compared to pre-contrast images (28.0 ± 4.7 vs. 6.9 ± 1.8). No significant differences (p = 0.39) were noted between SNR in pre-contrast and post-contrast liposomal-Gd images of the amniotic fluid, indicating absence of transplacental passage of the agent. The placental margins were

  10. SU-F-I-43: A Software-Based Statistical Method to Compute Low Contrast Detectability in Computed Tomography Images

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, M; Aldoohan, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The low contrast detectability (LCD) of a CT scanner is its ability to detect and display faint lesions. The current approach to quantify LCD is achieved using vendor-specific methods and phantoms, typically by subjectively observing the smallest size object at a contrast level above phantom background. However, this approach does not yield clinically applicable values for LCD. The current study proposes a statistical LCD metric using software tools to not only to assess scanner performance, but also to quantify the key factors affecting LCD. This approach was developed using uniform QC phantoms, and its applicability was then extended under simulated clinical conditions. Methods: MATLAB software was developed to compute LCD using a uniform image of a QC phantom. For a given virtual object size, the software randomly samples the image within a selected area, and uses statistical analysis based on Student’s t-distribution to compute the LCD as the minimal Hounsfield Unit’s that can be distinguished from the background at the 95% confidence level. Its validity was assessed by comparison with the behavior of a known QC phantom under various scan protocols and a tissue-mimicking phantom. The contributions of beam quality and scattered radiation upon the computed LCD were quantified by using various external beam-hardening filters and phantom lengths. Results: As expected, the LCD was inversely related to object size under all scan conditions. The type of image reconstruction kernel filter and tissue/organ type strongly influenced the background noise characteristics and therefore, the computed LCD for the associated image. Conclusion: The proposed metric and its associated software tools are vendor-independent and can be used to analyze any LCD scanner performance. Furthermore, the method employed can be used in conjunction with the relationships established in this study between LCD and tissue type to extend these concepts to patients’ clinical CT

  11. In vivo detection of copper ions by magnetic resonance imaging using a prion-based contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Makino, Satoshi; Umemoto, Tomohiro; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yezdimer, Eric M; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    Abnormal distributions of transition metals inside the body are potential diagnostic markers for several diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, and cancer. In this article, we demonstrate that P57/Gd, a novel prion-based contrast agent, can selectively image tissues with excessive copper accumulation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). P57/Gd selectivity binds copper(II) over other physiologically relevant cations such as zinc, iron, manganese, and calcium. To simulate a metabolic copper disorder, we treated mice with an intraperitoneal injection of a CuSO(4) solution to induce a renal copper overload. The MRI signal intensities from the renal cortex and medulla of copper spiked animals that were administered P57/Gd were found to correlate with the ex vivo copper concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents in biomedical imaging: recent advances in iron- and manganese-based magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Felton, Charlette; Karmakar, Alokita; Gartia, Yashraj; Ramidi, Punnamchandar; Biris, Alexandru S; Ghosh, Anindya

    2014-05-01

    Improvements in diagnostic measures for biomedical applications have been investigated in various studies for better interpretations of biological abnormalities and several medical conditions. The use of imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is widespread and becoming a standard procedure for such specialized applications. A major avenue being studied in MRI is the use of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) as contrast agents (CAs). Among various approaches, current research also incorporates use of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs and manganese-based NPs with biocompatible coatings for improved stability and reduced biodegradation when exposed to a biological environment. In this review, recent advances with these types of magnetic NPs and their potential use as CAs in MRI are reported, as well as new insights into the selectivity and cellular transport mechanism that occurs following injection.

  13. A multi-channel image reconstruction method for grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we report on the development of an advanced multi-channel (MC) image reconstruction algorithm for grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (GB-XPCT). The MC reconstruction method we have developed operates by concurrently, rather than independently as is done conventionally, reconstructing tomographic images of the three object properties (absorption, small-angle scattering, refractive index). By jointly estimating the object properties by use of an appropriately defined penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) estimator, the 2nd order statistical properties of the object property sinograms, including correlations between them, can be fully exploited to improve the variance vs. resolution tradeoff of the reconstructed images as compared to existing methods. Channel-independent regularization strategies are proposed. To solve the MC reconstruction problem, we developed an advanced algorithm based on the proximal point algorithm and the augmented Lagrangian method. By use of experimental and computer-simulation data, we demonstrate that by exploiting inter-channel noise correlations, the MC reconstruction method can improve image quality in GB-XPCT.

  14. Estimates of the Planet Yield from Ground-based High-contrast Imaging Observations as a Function of Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher

    2011-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, β Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether multiple

  15. ESTIMATES OF THE PLANET YIELD FROM GROUND-BASED HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING OBSERVATIONS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher

    2011-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, {beta} Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether

  16. Assessment of an advanced image-based technique to calculate virtual monoenergetic computed tomographic images from a dual-energy examination to improve contrast-to-noise ratio in examinations using iodinated contrast media.

    PubMed

    Grant, Katharine L; Flohr, Thomas G; Krauss, Bernhard; Sedlmair, Martin; Thomas, Christoph; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    Following the trend of low-radiation dose computed tomographic (CT) imaging, concerns regarding the detectability of low-contrast lesions have been growing. The goal of this research was to evaluate whether a new image-based algorithm (Mono+) for virtual monoenergetic imaging with a dual-energy CT scanner can improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and conspicuity of these low-contrast objects when using iodinated contrast media. Four circular phantoms of different diameter (10-40 cm) with an iodine insert at the center were scanned at a fixed radiation dose with different single- (80, 100, 120 kV) and dual-energy protocols (80/140 kV, 80/140 Sn kV, 100/140 Sn kV) using a dual-source CT system. In addition, an anthropomorphic abdominal phantom with different low-contrast lesions was scanned with the settings previously mentioned but also at only a half and a quarter of the initial dose. Dual-energy data were processed, and virtual monoenergetic images (range, 40-190 keV) were generated. Beside the established technique, a newly developed prototype algorithm to calculate monoenergetic images (Mono+) was used. To avoid noise increase at lower calculated energies, which is a known drawback of virtual monoenergetic images at low kilo electron-volt, a regional spatial frequency-based recombination of the high signal at lower energies and the superior noise properties at medium energies is performed to optimize CNR in case of Mono+ images. The CNR and low-contrast detectability were evaluated. For all phantom sizes, the Mono+ technique provided increasing iodine CNR with decreasing kilo electron-volt, with the optimum CNR obtained at the lowest energy level of 40 keV. For all investigated phantom sizes, CNR of Mono+ images at low kilo electron-volt was superior to the CNR in single-energy images at an equivalent radiation dose and even higher than the CNR obtained with 80-kV protocols. In case of the anthropomorphic phantom, low-contrast detectability in monoenergetic

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of remnants of an intradural oil-based contrast agent: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myint; Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Kasai, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Background Myodil (iophendylate), an oil-based positive contrast media, now discontinued, was widely used for performing myelography 30–70 years ago. We identified this agent as the explanation for uncommon magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a patient with thoracic spinal fracture. Design Case report and literature review. Findings An 81-year-old man complained of back pain after falling down stairs. Anamnesis revealed that he had undergone myelography with an oil-based contrast agent about 60 years previously as a part of the diagnostic workup for back pain and sudden onset of gait difficulty. Plain radiography of the thoraco-lumbar spine showed a fracture of the eleventh thoracic vertebra and a radio-opaque, oval shadow at the level of the T9–T10 vertebrae. Many small radio-opaque dots with the appearance of a string of pearls were seen from T8 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed a sharply demarcated intradural extramedullary mass, of approximately 5 mm in diameter on the left side of the dura in the region of the T9–T10. The mass showed high signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI, and low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI. Conclusions Increased awareness of this rare presentation of procedures performed in the past is essential when atypical radiographic images are encountered. This case illustrates rare sequelae of Myodil use manifesting decades after administration. PMID:22333888

  18. Deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging at 1064 nm using a contrast agent based on phosphorus phthalocyanine formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Depeng; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Yumiao; Geng, Jumin; Wang, Yuehang; Zhang, Yuzhen; Cook, Timothy R.; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Xia, Jun

    2017-03-01

    This study demonstrated the performance of photoacoustic imaging at 1064 nm using phosphorus phthalocyanine (P-Pc), a contrast agent with strong absorption at 1064 nm. Due to high maximum permissible exposure of 1064 nm laser light and strong absorbance of P-Pc at 1064 nm, we demonstrated an imaging depth of 11.6 cm in chicken breast tissue. For animal imaging, we used P-Pc to target tumor and to track intestine dynamics. Thus, using a contrast medium with extreme absorption at 1064 nm readily enables high quality photoacoustic imaging at exceptional depths.

  19. Laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique for material and medical science applications.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Yogesh S; Yadav, P S; Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P S; Shukla, M; Sinha, Amar

    2008-08-01

    In-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique is an emerging method for the study of materials such as carbon fibers, carbon composite materials, polymers, etc. Similarly this technique is also well suited for the imaging of soft materials such as tissues, distinguishing between tumor and normal tissue. These represent the class of materials for which X-ray attenuation cross-section is very small. Thus this method promises a far better contrast for low X-ray absorbing substances than the conventional radiography method. We have set up an experimental facility using a combination of X-ray CCD detector and a microfocus X-ray source. This facility is dedicated to micro-imaging experiments such as microtomography and high-resolution phase-contrast experiments. In this paper, the results of X-ray phase-contrast imaging experiments are described.

  20. Advanced image-based virtual monoenergetic dual-energy CT angiography of the abdomen: optimization of kiloelectron volt settings to improve image contrast.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Moritz H; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Hüsers, Kristina; Beeres, Martin; Bucher, Andreas M; Kaup, Moritz; Martin, Simon S; Fischer, Sebastian; Bodelle, Boris; Bauer, Ralf W; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J; Wichmann, Julian L

    2016-06-01

    To compare quantitative image quality parameters in abdominal dual-energy computed tomography angiography (DE-CTA) using an advanced image-based (Mono+) reconstruction algorithm for virtual monoenergetic imaging and standard DE-CTA. Fifty-five patients (36 men; mean age, 64.2 ± 12.7 years) who underwent abdominal DE-CTA were retrospectively included. Mono + images were reconstructed at 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 keV levels and as standard linearly blended M_0.6 images (60 % 100 kV, 40 % 140 kV). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the common hepatic (CHA), splenic (SA), superior mesenteric (SMA) and left renal arteries (LRA) were objectively measured. Mono+ DE-CTA series showed a statistically superior CNR for 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 keV (P < 0.031) compared to M_0.6 images for all investigated arteries except SMA at 80 keV (P = 0.08). CNR at 40 keV revealed a mean relative increase of 287.7 % compared to linearly blended images among all assessed arteries (P < 0.001). SNR of Mono+ images was consistently significantly higher at 40, 50, 60 and 70 keV compared to M_0.6 for CHA and SA (P < 0.009). Compared to linearly blended images, Mono+ reconstructions at low keV levels of abdominal DE-CTA datasets significantly improve quantitative image quality. • Mono+ combines increased attenuation with reduced image noise compared to standard DE-CTA. • Mono+ shows superior contrast-to-noise ratios at low keV compared to linearly-blended images. • Contrast-to-noise ratio in monoenergetic DE-CTA peaks at 40 keV. • Mono+ reconstructions significantly improve quantitative image quality at low keV levels.

  1. Equilibrium-phase MR angiography: Comparison of unspecific extracellular and protein-binding gadolinium-based contrast media with respect to image quality.

    PubMed

    Erb-Eigner, Katharina; Taupitz, Matthias; Asbach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare contrast and image quality of whole-body equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR angiography using a non-protein-binding unspecific extracellular gadolinium-based contrast medium with that of two contrast media with different protein-binding properties. 45 patients were examined using either 15 mL of gadobutrol (non-protein-binding, n = 15), 32 mL of gadobenate dimeglumine (weakly protein binding, n = 15) or 11 mL gadofosveset trisodium (protein binding, n = 15) followed by equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography of four consecutive anatomic regions. The time elapsed between the contrast injection and the beginning of the equilibrium-phase image acquisition in the respective region was measured and was up to 21 min. Signal intensity was measured in two vessels per region and in muscle tissue. Relative contrast (RC) values were calculated. Vessel contrast, artifacts and image quality were rated by two radiologists in consensus on a five-point scale. Compared with gadobutrol, gadofosveset trisodium revealed significantly higher RC values only when acquired later than 15 min after bolus injection. Otherwise, no significant differences between the three contrast media were found regarding vascular contrast and image quality. Equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography using a weakly protein-binding or even non-protein-binding contrast medium is equivalent to using a stronger protein-binding contrast medium when image acquisition is within the first 15 min after contrast injection, and allows depiction of the vasculature with high contrast and image quality. The protein-binding contrast medium was superior for imaging only later than 15 min after contrast medium injection. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mapping cardiogenic oscillations using synchrotron-based phase contrast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, Jordan; Dubsky, Stephen; Siu, Karen K. W.; Wallace, Megan; Siew, Melissa; Hooper, Stuart; Fouras, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    In many animals, including humans, the lungs encase the majority of the heart thus the motion of each organ affects the other. The effects of the motion of the heart on the lungs potentially provides information with regards to both lung and heart health. We present a novel technique that is capable of measuring the effect of the heart on the surrounding lung tissue through the use of advanced synchrotron imaging techniques and recently developed X-ray velocimetry methods. This technique generates 2D frequency response maps of the lung tissue motion at multiple projection angles from projection X-ray images. These frequency response maps are subsequently used to generate 3D reconstructions of the lung tissue exhibiting motion at the frequency of ventilation and the lung tissue exhibiting motion at the frequency of the heart. This technique has a combined spatial and temporal resolution sufficient to observe the dynamic and complex 3D nature of lung-heart interactions.

  3. Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a multi energy-channel photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Georg; Weber, Thomas; Anton, Gisela; Ballabriga, Rafael; Bayer, Florian; Campbell, Michael; Gabor, Thomas; Haas, Wilhelm; Horn, Florian; Llopart, Xavi; Michel, Norbert; Mollenbauer, Uwe; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Ritter, Ina; Sievers, Peter; Wölfel, Stefan; Wong, Winnie S; Zang, Andrea; Michel, Thilo

    2013-11-04

    We have carried out grating-based x-ray differential phase-contrast measurements with a hybrid pixel detector in 16 energy channels simultaneously. A method for combining the energy resolved phase-contrast images based on energy weighting is presented. An improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio by 58.2% with respect to an emulated integrating detector could be observed in the final image. The same image quality could thus be achieved with this detector and with energy weighting at 60.0% reduced dose compared to an integrating detector. The benefit of the method depends on the object, spectrum, interferometer design and the detector efficiency.

  4. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing.

    PubMed

    Weis, Christian; Hess, Andreas; Budinsky, Lubos; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM) based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods.

  5. Visualization of small lesions in rat cartilage by means of laboratory-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenzana, Massimo; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Das Neves Borges, Patricia; Endrizzi, Marco; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Olivo, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    Being able to quantitatively assess articular cartilage in three-dimensions (3D) in small rodent animal models, with a simple laboratory set-up, would prove extremely important for the development of pre-clinical research focusing on cartilage pathologies such as osteoarthritis (OA). These models are becoming essential tools for the development of new drugs for OA, a disease affecting up to 1/3 of the population older than 50 years for which there is no cure except prosthetic surgery. However, due to limitations in imaging technology, high-throughput 3D structural imaging has not been achievable in small rodent models, thereby limiting their translational potential and their efficiency as research tools. We show that a simple laboratory system based on coded-aperture x-ray phase contrast imaging (CAXPCi) can correctly visualize the cartilage layer in slices of an excised rat tibia imaged both in air and in saline solution. Moreover, we show that small, surgically induced lesions are also correctly detected by the CAXPCi system, and we support this finding with histopathology examination. Following these successful proof-of-concept results in rat cartilage, we expect that an upgrade of the system to higher resolutions (currently underway) will enable extending the method to the imaging of mouse cartilage as well. From a technological standpoint, by showing the capability of the system to detect cartilage also in water, we demonstrate phase sensitivity comparable to other lab-based phase methods (e.g. grating interferometry). In conclusion, CAXPCi holds a strong potential for being adopted as a routine laboratory tool for non-destructive, high throughput assessment of 3D structural changes in murine articular cartilage, with a possible impact in the field similar to the revolution that conventional microCT brought into bone research.

  6. Contrast-enhanced Reformatted MR Images for Preoperative Assessment of the Bridging Veins of the Skull Base.

    PubMed

    Wangaryattawanich, Pattana; Chavali, Lakshmi S; Shah, Komal B; Gogia, Bhanu; Valenzuela, Raul F; DeMonte, Franco; Kumar, Ashok J; Hayman, L Anne

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) venography and computed tomographic (CT) venography are suited for displaying the convexity veins that drain the medial and lateral surfaces of the brain hemispheres. However, such is not the case for the bridging veins of the skull base. Technical factors prevent contrast material-enhanced MR or CT images obtained in standard axial, coronal, and sagittal planes from fully displaying the curved pathways of these clinically important venous structures. This limitation can be overcome by using a reconstruction technique that depicts these venous structures and their interconnections. Curved and multiplanar reformatted images that distill the important venous features often require knowledgeable manipulation of source images by an operator who is familiar with numerous venous variants and their surgical implications. The normal anatomy of the draining veins is detailed-anatomy that radiologists must master before they can show the surgeon the important venous anatomy that is often missing at standard imaging; this information will foster better communication between radiologists and their surgical colleagues. As a practical matter, the skull base veins are arbitrarily subdivided into those that are at greatest risk with the pterional approach and the subtemporal approach, respectively. These approaches can be expanded to define connections between the superficial venous system and the other valveless venous networks that drain the deep portions of the cerebral hemisphere, the scalp, face, muscles of the neck, diploë of the skull, and meninges. As radiologists gain experience, their image interpretations should mature beyond simple analysis of the primary hemodynamic changes induced by intraoperative sacrifice or injury.

  7. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms.

  8. Visual Performance-Based Image Enhancement Methodology: An Investigation of Contrast Enhancement Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    484 (April 2001). 8. F. Lamberti, B. Montrucchio, and A. Sanna, "BBFHE: Block-based binomial filtering histogram equalization", WSEAS Transaction on Information Science and Applications, 1(6), 1591-1596, 2004.

  9. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  10. Pair-Wise, Deformable Mirror, Image Plane-Based Diversity Electric Field Estimation for High Contrast Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian D.; Shaklan, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements for high contrast coronagraphic imaging. A deformable mirror (DM) surface is modied with pairs of complementary shapes to create diversity in the image plane of the science camera where the intensity of the light is measured. Along with the Electric Field Conjugation correction algorithm, this estimation method has been used in various high contrast imaging testbeds to achieve the best contrasts to date both in narrow and in broad band light. We present the basic methodology of estimation in easy to follow list of steps, present results from HCIT and raise several open quations we are confronted with using this method.

  11. Pair-Wise, Deformable Mirror, Image Plane-Based Diversity Electric Field Estimation for High Contrast Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Kern, Brian D.; Shaklan, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements for high contrast coronagraphic imaging. A deformable mirror (DM) surface is modied with pairs of complementary shapes to create diversity in the image plane of the science camera where the intensity of the light is measured. Along with the Electric Field Conjugation correction algorithm, this estimation method has been used in various high contrast imaging testbeds to achieve the best contrasts to date both in narrow and in broad band light. We present the basic methodology of estimation in easy to follow list of steps, present results from HCIT and raise several open quations we are confronted with using this method.

  12. Endoscopy imaging intelligent contrast improvement.

    PubMed

    Sheraizin, S; Sheraizin, V

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a medical endoscopy video contrast improvement method that provides intelligent automatic adaptive contrast control. The method fundamentals are video data clustering and video data histogram modification. The video data clustering allows an effective use the low noise two channel contrast enhancement processing. The histogram analysis permitted to determine the video exposure type for simple and complicated contrast distribution. We determined the needed gamma value for automatic local area contrast improvement for the following exposure types: dark, normal, light, dark light, dark normal etc. The experimental results of medical endoscopy video processing allow defining the automatic gamma control range from 0.5 to 2.0.

  13. Amyloid-β plaque deposition measured using propagation-based X-ray phase contrast CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Astolfo, Alberto; Lathuilière, Aurélien; Laversenne, Vanessa; Schneider, Bernard; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta accumulation into insoluble plaques (Aβp) is known to play a significant role in the pathological process in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The presence of Aβp is also one of the neuropathological hallmarks for the disease. AD final diagnosis is generally acknowledged after the evaluation of Aβp deposition in the brain. Insoluble Aβp accumulation may also concur to cause AD as postulated in the so-called amyloid hypothesis. Therefore, the visualization, evaluation and quantification of Aβp are nowadays the keys for a better understanding of the disease, which may point to a possible cure for AD in the near future. Synchrotron-based X-ray phase contrast (XPC) has been demonstrated as the only imaging method that can retrieve the Aβp signal with high spatial resolution (up to 10 µm), high sensitivity and three-dimensional information at the same time. Although at the moment XPC is suitable for ex vivo samples only, it may develop into an alternative to positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in Aβp imaging. In this contribution the possibility of using synchrotron-based X-ray phase propagation computed tomography to visualize and measure Aβp on mouse brains is presented. A careful setup optimization for this application leads to a significant improvement of spatial resolution (∼1 µm), data acquisition speed (five times faster), X-ray dose (five times lower) and setup complexity, without a substantial loss in sensitivity when compared with the classic implementation of grating-based X-ray interferometry. PMID:27140162

  14. Photon detection efficiency of laboratory-based x-ray phase contrast imaging techniques for mammography: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghamanesh, S.; Aghamiri, S. M.; Kamali-Asl, A.; Yashiro, W.

    2017-09-01

    An important challenge in real-world biomedical applications of x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) techniques is the efficient use of the photon flux generated by an incoherent and polychromatic x-ray source. This efficiency can directly influence dose and exposure time and ideally should not affect the superior contrast and sensitivity of XPCI. In this paper, we present a quantitative evaluation of the photon detection efficiency of two laboratory-based XPCI methods, grating interferometry (GI) and coded-aperture (CA). We adopt a Monte Carlo approach to simulate existing prototypes of those systems, tailored for mammography applications. Our simulations were validated by means of a simple experiment performed on a CA XPCI system. Our results show that the fraction of detected photons in the standard energy range of mammography are about 1.4% and 10% for the GI and CA techniques, respectively. The simulations indicate that the design of the optical components plays an important role in the higher efficiency of CA compared to the GI method. It is shown that the use of lower absorbing materials as the substrates for GI gratings can improve its flux efficiency by up to four times. Along similar lines, we also show that an optimized and compact configuration of GI could lead to a 3.5 times higher fraction of detected counts compared to a standard and non-optimised GI implementation.

  15. Facile Preparation of a New Gadofullerene-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent with High 1H Relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chunying; Corwin, Frank D.; Zhang, Jianfei; Chen, Zhijian; Reid, Jonathan E.; Sun, Minghao; Xu, Wei; Sim, Jae Hyun; Wang, Chunru; Fatouros, Panos P.; Esker, Alan R.; Gibson, Harry W.; Dorn, Harry C.

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on the trimetallic nitride templated (TNT) metallofullerene, Gd3N@C80, was synthesized by a facile method in high yield. The observed longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r1 and r2, for water hydrogens in the presence of the water-soluble gadofullerene 2, Gd3N@C80(OH)~26(CH2CH2COOM)~16 (M = Na or H), are 207 and 282 mM-1s-1 (per C80 cage) at 2.4 T, respectively; these values are 50 times larger than those of Gd3+ poly(aminocarboxylate) complexes, such as commercial Omniscan® and Magnevist®. This high 1H relaxivity for this new hydroxylated and carboxylated gadofullerene derivative provides high signal enhancement at significantly lower Gd concentration as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo MRI studies. Dynamic light scattering data reveal a unimodal size distribution with an average hydrodynamic radius of ca. 78 nm in pure water (pH = 7), which is significantly different from other hydroxylated or carboxylated fullerene and metallofullerene derivatives reported to date. Agarose gel infusion results indicate that the gadofullerene 2 displayed diffusion properties different from that of commercial Omniscan® and those of PEG5000 modified Gd3N@C80. The reactive carboxyl functionality present on this highly efficient contrast agent may also serve as a precursor for biomarker tissue-targeting purposes. PMID:19445504

  16. Photon detection efficiency of laboratory-based x-ray phase contrast imaging techniques for mammography: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Saghamanesh, S; Aghamiri, S M; Kamali-Asl, A; Yashiro, W

    2017-09-01

    An important challenge in real-world biomedical applications of x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) techniques is the efficient use of the photon flux generated by an incoherent and polychromatic x-ray source. This efficiency can directly influence dose and exposure time and ideally should not affect the superior contrast and sensitivity of XPCI. In this paper, we present a quantitative evaluation of the photon detection efficiency of two laboratory-based XPCI methods, grating interferometry (GI) and coded-aperture (CA). We adopt a Monte Carlo approach to simulate existing prototypes of those systems, tailored for mammography applications. Our simulations were validated by means of a simple experiment performed on a CA XPCI system. Our results show that the fraction of detected photons in the standard energy range of mammography are about 1.4% and 10% for the GI and CA techniques, respectively. The simulations indicate that the design of the optical components plays an important role in the higher efficiency of CA compared to the GI method. It is shown that the use of lower absorbing materials as the substrates for GI gratings can improve its flux efficiency by up to four times. Along similar lines, we also show that an optimized and compact configuration of GI could lead to a 3.5 times higher fraction of detected counts compared to a standard and non-optimised GI implementation.

  17. Feasibility of spectral CT imaging for the detection of liver lesions with gold-based contrast agents - A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Müllner, Marie; Schlattl, Helmut; Hoeschen, Christoph; Dietrich, Olaf

    2015-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of gold-specific spectral CT imaging for the detection of liver lesions in humans at low concentrations of gold as targeted contrast agent. A Monte Carlo simulation study of spectral CT imaging with a photon-counting and energy-resolving detector (with 6 energy bins) was performed in a realistic phantom of the human abdomen. The detector energy thresholds were optimized for the detection of gold. The simulation results were reconstructed with the K-edge imaging algorithm; the reconstructed gold-specific images were filtered and evaluated with respect to signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The simulations demonstrate the feasibility of spectral CT with CNRs of the specific gold signal between 2.7 and 4.8 after bilateral filtering. Using the optimized bin thresholds increases the CNRs of the lesions by up to 23% compared to bin thresholds described in former studies. Gold is a promising new CT contrast agent for spectral CT in humans; minimum tissue mass fractions of 0.2 wt% of gold are required for sufficient image contrast. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Contrast agents in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yuling; Sun, Xilin; Shen, Baozhong

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a noninvasive method to assess angiogenesis, which is widely used in clinical applications including diagnosis, monitoring therapy response and prognosis estimation in cancer patients. Contrast agents play a crucial role in DCE-MRI and should be carefully selected in order to improve accuracy in DCE-MRI examination. Over the past decades, there was much progress in the development of optimal contrast agents in DCE-MRI. In this review, we describe the recent research advances in this field and discuss properties of contrast agents, as well as their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we discuss the research perspectives for improving this promising imaging method. PMID:28415647

  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of GdIII-Based Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agents for Molecular Imaging of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen**

    PubMed Central

    Ngen, Ethel J.; Rotz, Matthew W.; Kakkad, Samata; Lisok, Ala; Pracitto, Richard; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Chen, Zhengping; Shah, Tariq; Artemov, Dmitri; Meade, Thomas J.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is advantageous because it concurrently provides anatomic, functional, and molecular information. MR molecular imaging can combine the high spatial resolution of this established clinical modality with molecular profiling in vivo. However, as a result of the intrinsically low sensitivity of MR imaging, high local concentrations of biological targets are required to generate discernable MR contrast. We hypothesize that the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), an attractive target for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer, could serve as a suitable biomarker for MR-based molecular imaging. We have synthesized three new high-affinity, low-molecular-weight GdIII-based PSMA-targeted contrast agents containing one to three GdIII chelates per molecule. We evaluated the relaxometric properties of these agents in solution, in prostate cancer cells, and in an in vivo experimental model to demonstrate the feasibility of PSMA-based MR molecular imaging. PMID:26212031

  20. High-Performance Hybrid Bismuth-Carbon Nanotube Based Contrast Agent for X-ray CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Kumar, Ish; Cho, Stephen Y; Cheong, Benjamin Y; Pulikkathara, Merlyn X; Moghaddam, Sakineh E; Whitmire, Kenton H; Wilson, Lon J

    2017-02-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been used for a plethora of biomedical applications, including their use as delivery vehicles for drugs, imaging agents, proteins, DNA, and other materials. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new CNT-based contrast agent (CA) for X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The CA is a hybrid material derived from ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes (20-80 nm long, US-tubes) and Bi(III) oxo-salicylate clusters with four Bi(III) ions per cluster (Bi4C). The element bismuth was chosen over iodine, which is the conventional element used for CT CAs in the clinic today due to its high X-ray attenuation capability and its low toxicity, which makes bismuth a more-promising element for new CT CA design. The new CA contains 20% by weight bismuth with no detectable release of bismuth after a 48 h challenge by various biological media at 37 °C, demonstrating the presence of a strong interaction between the two components of the hybrid material. The performance of the new Bi4C@US-tubes solid material as a CT CA has been assessed using a clinical scanner and found to possess an X-ray attenuation ability of >2000 Hounsfield units (HU).

  1. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  2. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  3. Dendrimer-Based Responsive MRI Contrast Agents (G1-G4) for Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuegao; Coman, Daniel; Hyder, Fahmeed; Ali, Meser M.

    2016-01-01

    Biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS) is a molecular imaging platform for magnetic resonance that utilizes unique properties of low molecular weight paramagnetic monomers by detecting hyperfine-shifted nonexchangeable protons and transforming the chemical shift information to reflect its microenvironment (e.g., via temperature, pH, etc.). To optimize translational biosensing potential of BIRDS we examined if this detection scheme observed with monomers can be extended onto dendrimers, which are versatile and biocompatible macromolecules with modifiable surface for molecular imaging and drug delivery. Here we report on feasibility of paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS. The results show that BIRDS is resilient with paramagnetic dendrimers up to the fourth generation (i.e., G1-G4), where the model dendrimer and chelate were based on poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA4−) complexed with thulium ion (Tm3+). Temperature sensitivities of two prominent signals of Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA−)x (where n = 1–4, x = 6–39) were comparable to that of prominent signals in TmDOTA−. Transverse relaxation times of the coalesced nonexchangeable protons on Gn-PAMAM-(TmDOTA−)x were relatively short to provide signal-to-noise ratio that was comparable to or better than that of TmDOTA−. A fluorescent dye, rhodamine, was conjugated to a G2-PAMAM-(TmDOTA)12 to create a dual-modality nanosized contrast agent. BIRDS properties of the dendrimer were unaltered with rhodamine conjugation. Purposely designed paramagnetic dendrimers for BIRDS in conjunction with novel macromolecular surface modification for functional ligands/drugs could potentially be used for biologically compatible theranostic sensors. PMID:26497087

  4. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures.

    PubMed

    Gammer, Christoph; Burak Ozdol, V; Liebscher, Christian H; Minor, Andrew M

    2015-08-01

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast.

  5. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  6. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Phantom Imaging, and Cytotoxicity of A Novel Graphene-Based Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging - X-Ray Computed Tomography Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Sundararaj, Joe Livingston; Schaefer, Kenneth; Button, Terry; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-06-14

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), synthesized using potassium permanganate-based oxidation and exfoliation followed by reduction with hydroiodic acid (rGNP-HI), have intercalated manganese ions within the graphene sheets, and upon functionalization with iodine, show excellent potential as biomodal contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Structural characterization of rGNP-HI nanoparticles with low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed disc-shaped nanoparticles (average diameter, 200 nm, average thickness, 3 nm). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis confirmed the presence of intercalated manganese. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of rGNP-HI confirmed the reduction of oxidized GNPs (O-GNPs), absence of molecular and physically adsorbed iodine, and the functionalization of graphene with iodine as polyiodide complexes (I3(-) and I5(-)). Manganese and iodine content were quantified as 5.1 ± 0.5 and 10.54 ± 0.87 wt% by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and ion-selective electrode measurements, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis, using absorbance (LDH assay) and fluorescence (calcein AM) based assays, performed on NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts and A498 human kidney epithelial cells, showed CD50 values of rGNP-HI between 179-301 µg/ml, depending on the cell line and the cytotoxicity assay. CT and MRI phantom imaging of rGNP-HI showed high CT (approximately 3200% greater than HI at equimolar iodine concentration) and MRI (approximately 59% greater than equimolar Mn(2+) solution) contrast. These results open avenues for further in vivo safety and efficacy studies towards the development of carbon nanostructure-based multimodal MRI-CT contrast agents.

  7. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Phantom Imaging, and Cytotoxicity of A Novel Graphene-Based Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging - X-Ray Computed Tomography Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Sundararaj, Joe Livingston; Schaefer, Kenneth; Button, Terry; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), synthesized using potassium permanganate-based oxidation and exfoliation followed by reduction with hydroiodic acid (rGNP-HI), have intercalated manganese ions within the graphene sheets, and upon functionalization with iodine, show excellent potential as biomodal contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Structural characterization of rGNP-HI nanoparticles with low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed disc-shaped nanoparticles (average diameter, 200 nm, average thickness, 3 nm). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis confirmed the presence of intercalated manganese. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of rGNP-HI confirmed the reduction of oxidized GNPs (O-GNPs), absence of molecular and physically adsorbed iodine, and the functionalization of graphene with iodine as polyiodide complexes (I3− and I5−). Manganese and iodine content were quantified as 5.1 ± 0.5 and 10.54 ± 0.87 wt% by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and ion-selective electrode measurements, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis, using absorbance (LDH assay) and fluorescence (calcein AM) based assays, performed on NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts and A498 human kidney epithelial cells, showed CD50 values of rGNP-HI between 179-301 µg/ml, depending on the cell line and the cytotoxicity assay. CT and MRI phantom imaging of rGNP-HI showed high CT (approximately 3200% greater than HI at equimolar iodine concentration) and MRI (approximately 59% greater than equimolar Mn2+ solution) contrast. These results open avenues for further in vivo safety and efficacy studies towards the development of carbon nanostructure-based multimodal MRI-CT contrast agents. PMID:24999431

  8. An efficient perceived contrast evaluation model for natural images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao Song; Kim, Choon-Woo

    2010-01-01

    Perceived image contrast is one of the major factors affecting the image quality on displays. Various methods have been proposed to measure the image contrast. However, image contrasts in most of previous works are focused on B/W and defined on simple patterns such as sinusoidal grating. This paper introduces a perceived contrast evaluation model for natural color images. In pursuit of high accuracy, both global and local contrasts are taken into account. Global contrast indicates difference in the perceived luminance and chroma. Local contrast describes the distinguishable degree in image details. In the proposed method, global contrast is calculated based on the dynamic ranges in lightness and chroma. Local contrast is obtained by gradient computations. Both of the global and local contrasts are merged to achieve the perceived contrast. Two types of performance evaluations are performed. They are cross content and within content evaluations. Results of experiments show that global contrast is more effective in the cross content evaluation where the contrast differences between different natural color images are examined. For both of the cross and within content evaluations, the proposed measure yields high value of correlation coefficient with the subjective scores from human visual tests.

  9. Automated segmentation of middle hepatic vein in non-contrast x-ray CT images based on an atlas-driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Teruhiko; Zhou, Xiangrong; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kondo, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2008-03-01

    In order to support the diagnosis of hepatic diseases, understanding the anatomical structures of hepatic lobes and hepatic vessels is necessary. Although viewing and understanding the hepatic vessels in contrast media-enhanced CT images is easy, the observation of the hepatic vessels in non-contrast X-ray CT images that are widely used for the screening purpose is difficult. We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to support the liver diagnosis based on non-contrast X-ray CT images. This paper proposes a new approach to segment the middle hepatic vein (MHV), a key structure (landmark) for separating the liver region into left and right lobes. Extraction and classification of hepatic vessels are difficult in non-contrast X-ray CT images because the contrast between hepatic vessels and other liver tissues is low. Our approach uses an atlas-driven method by the following three stages. (1) Construction of liver atlases of left and right hepatic lobes using a learning datasets. (2) Fully-automated enhancement and extraction of hepatic vessels in liver regions. (3) Extraction of MHV based on the results of (1) and (2). The proposed approach was applied to 22 normal liver cases of non-contrast X-ray CT images. The preliminary results show that the proposed approach achieves the success in 14 cases for MHV extraction.

  10. Fast high-contrast imaging of animal development with scanned light sheet-based structured illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Philipp J.; Schmidt, Annette D.; Santella, Anthony; Khairy, Khaled; Bao, Zhirong; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Stelzer, Ernst H.K.

    2015-01-01

    Recording light microscopic images of large, non-transparent specimens, such as developing multi-cellular organisms, is complicated by decreased contrast due to light scattering. Early zebrafish development can be captured by standard light sheet microscopy; however, new imaging strategies are required to obtain high-quality data of late development or of less transparent organisms. We combined Digital Scanned Laser Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (DSLM) with incoherent structured illumination microscopy and created structured illumination patterns with continuously adjustable frequencies (DSLM-SI). Our method discriminates the specimen-related scattered background from signal fluorescence, thereby removing out-of-focus light and optimizing the contrast of in-focus structures. DSLM-SI provides rapid control of the illumination pattern, exceptional imaging quality and high imaging speeds. We performed long-term imaging of zebrafish development for 58 hours and fast multiple-view imaging of early Drosophila development. We reconstructed cell positions over time from the Drosophila DSLM-SI data and created a Fly Digital Embryo. PMID:20601950

  11. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani Smith, Stephanie; Hwang, Margaret; Rau, Christoph; Fishman, Andrew J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  12. Cartilage and soft tissue imaging using X-rays: propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography of the human knee in comparison with clinical imaging techniques and histology.

    PubMed

    Horng, Annie; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Geith, Tobias; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Auweter, Sigrid D; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian F; Coan, Paola

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates high-resolution tomographic x-ray phase-contrast imaging in whole human knee joints for the depiction of soft tissue with emphasis on hyaline cartilage. The method is compared with conventional computed tomography (CT), synchrotron radiation absorption-based CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After approval of the institutional review board, 2 cadaveric human knees were examined at an synchrotron institution using a monochromatic x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm field of view, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm. Images of phase-contrast imaging CT were reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Image quality and tissue contrast were evaluated and compared in all modalities and with histology. Phase-contrast imaging provides visualization of altered cartilage regions invisible in absorption CT with simultaneous high detail of the underlying bony abnormalities. The delineation of surface changes is similar to 3-T MRI using cartilage-dedicated sequences. Phase-contrast imaging CT presents soft tissue contrast surpassing that of conventional CT with a clear discrimination of ligamentous, muscular, neural, and vascular structures. In addition, phase-contrast imaging images show cartilage and meniscal calcifications that are not perceptible on conventional CT or on MRI. Phase-contrast imaging CT may facilitate a more complete evaluation of the human knee joint by providing concurrent comprehensive information about cartilage, the underlying subchondral bone, and their changes in osteoarthritic conditions.

  13. Comparison of propagation- and grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging techniques with a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Thüring, Thomas; Rutishauser, S.; Larsson, D. H.; Stampanoni, M.; David, C.; Hertz, H. M.; Burvall, A.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has been developed as an alternative to conventional absorption imaging, partly for its dose advantage over absorption imaging at high resolution. Grating-based imaging (GBI) and propagation-based imaging (PBI) are two phase-contrast techniques used with polychromatic laboratory sources. We compare the two methods by experiments and simulations with respect to required dose. A simulation method based on the projection approximation is designed and verified with experiments. A comparison based on simulations of the doses required for detection of an object with respect to its diameter is presented, showing that for monochromatic radiation, there is a dose advantage for PBI for small features but an advantage for GBI at larger features. However, GBI suffers more from the introduction of polychromatic radiation, in this case so much that PBI gives lower dose for all investigated feature sizes. Furthermore, we present and compare experimental images of biomedical samples. While those support the dose advantage of PBI, they also highlight the GBI advantage of quantitative reconstruction of multimaterial samples. For all experiments a liquid-metal-jet source was used. Liquid-metal-jet sources are a promising option for laboratory-based phase-contrast imaging due to the relatively high brightness and small spot size.

  14. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic and

  15. Measurement of image contrast using diffraction enhanced imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Miklos Z.; Sayers, Dale E.; Zhong, Zhong

    2003-02-01

    Refraction contrast of simple objects obtained using diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) was studied and compared to conventional radiographic contrast. Lucite cylinders and nylon wires were imaged using monochromatic synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (nslsweb.nsls.bnl.gov/nsls/Default.htm) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The DEI images were obtained by placing a silicon analyser crystal tuned to the [333] diffraction plane in the beam path between the sample and the detector. To compare the DEI images with conventional radiographic images requires a consistent definition of refraction and absorption contrast. Conventional definitions of contrast favour conventional radiography and DEI contrast is defined to emphasize the specific characteristics of DEI. The proposed definitions were then used to find the DEI gain (the ratio of the DEI contrast with respect to the conventional image contrast). The results presented here show that the DEI gain is consistently greater than 1, indicating that DEI provides more contrast information than conventional radiography.

  16. Non-linear direct multi-scale image enhancement based on the luminance and contrast masking characteristics of the human visual system.

    PubMed

    Nercessian, Shahan C; Panetta, Karen A; Agaian, Sos S

    2013-09-01

    Image enhancement is a crucial pre-processing step for various image processing applications and vision systems. Many enhancement algorithms have been proposed based on different sets of criteria. However, a direct multi-scale image enhancement algorithm capable of independently and/or simultaneously providing adequate contrast enhancement, tonal rendition, dynamic range compression, and accurate edge preservation in a controlled manner has yet to be produced. In this paper, a multi-scale image enhancement algorithm based on a new parametric contrast measure is presented. The parametric contrast measure incorporates not only the luminance masking characteristic, but also the contrast masking characteristic of the human visual system. The formulation of the contrast measure can be adapted for any multi-resolution decomposition scheme in order to yield new human visual system-inspired multi-scale transforms. In this article, it is exemplified using the Laplacian pyramid, discrete wavelet transform, stationary wavelet transform, and dual-tree complex wavelet transform. Consequently, the proposed enhancement procedure is developed. The advantages of the proposed method include: 1) the integration of both the luminance and contrast masking phenomena; 2) the extension of non-linear mapping schemes to human visual system inspired multi-scale contrast coefficients; 3) the extension of human visual system-based image enhancement approaches to the stationary and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms, and a direct means of; 4) adjusting overall brightness; and 5) achieving dynamic range compression for image enhancement within a direct multi-scale enhancement framework. Experimental results demonstrate the ability of the proposed algorithm to achieve simultaneous local and global enhancements.

  17. Contrast optimization in broadband polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Lijo; Hu, Haofeng; Boffety, Matthieu; Goudail, François

    2016-05-01

    For the sake of polarimetric accuracy, polarization imaging systems based on liquid crystal modulators often work at one given wavelength due to the strong chromatic properties of the liquid crystal retarders. This often requires the use of narrowband filters which reduces the amount of light in the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. For applications where the main parameter of interest is the target/background discriminability rather than polarimetric accuracy, spectral filtering may not be the best option. In this work, we investigate the impact of broadening the spectrum of the light entering the system on the discriminability performance of passive and active polarimetric systems. Through simulations, we show that broadening the bandwidth of the illumination can increase the contrast between two regions, as the increase of light flux compensates for the loss of polarimetric precision. Moreover, we show that taking into account the chromatic characteristics of the components of the imaging system can further enhance the contrast. We validate these findings through experiments in passive and active configurations, and demonstrate that the illumination bandwidth can be seen as an additional parameter to optimize polarimetric imaging set-ups.

  18. Enhancement of multispectral thermal infrared images - Decorrelation contrast stretching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Decorrelation contrast stretching is an effective method for displaying information from multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images. The technique involves transformation of the data to principle components ('decorrelation'), independent contrast 'stretching' of data from the new 'decorrelated' image bands, and retransformation of the stretched data back to the approximate original axes, based on the inverse of the principle component rotation. The enhancement is robust in that colors of the same scene components are similar in enhanced images of similar scenes, or the same scene imaged at different times. Decorrelation contrast stretching is reviewed in the context of other enhancements applied to TIR images.

  19. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Millard, T P; Endrizzi, M; Everdell, N; Rigon, L; Arfelli, F; Menk, R H; Stride, E; Olivo, A

    2015-07-29

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities.

  20. Analyzing indirect secondary electron contrast of unstained bacteriophage T4 based on SEM images and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-03-06

    The indirect secondary electron contrast (ISEC) condition of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) produces high contrast detection with minimal damage of unstained biological samples mounted under a thin carbon film. The high contrast image is created by a secondary electron signal produced under the carbon film by a low acceleration voltage. Here, we show that ISEC condition is clearly able to detect unstained bacteriophage T4 under a thin carbon film (10-15 nm) by using high-resolution field emission (FE) SEM. The results show that FE-SEM provides higher resolution than thermionic emission SEM. Furthermore, we investigated the scattered electron area within the carbon film under ISEC conditions using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulations indicated that the image resolution difference is related to the scattering width in the carbon film and the electron beam spot size. Using ISEC conditions on unstained virus samples would produce low electronic damage, because the electron beam does not directly irradiate the sample. In addition to the routine analysis, this method can be utilized for structural analysis of various biological samples like viruses, bacteria, and protein complexes.

  1. Contrast-Enhanced Image of Bellicia Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    In this contrast-enhanced infrared image of Bellicia Crater on the giant asteroid Vesta, scientists from NASA Dawn mission can see signs of the mineral olivine. Olivine was not expected to be found at Bellicia.

  2. Preliminary comparison of grating-based and in-line phase contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for mouse kidney at TOMCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Liu, P.; Irvine, S.; Pinzer, B.; Stampanoni, M.; Xu, L. X.

    2013-06-01

    Phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to be advantageous in revealing detailed structures inside biological specimens without contrast agents. Grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) and in-line phase contrast (ILPC) X-ray imaging are the two modalities frequently used at the beamline of TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs (TOMCAT) at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In this paper, we preliminarily compared the abilities of two types of phase contrast imaging in distinguishing micro structures in mouse kidneys. The 3D reconstructions showed that the microstructures in kidney, such as micro vessels and renal tubules, were displayed clearly with both imaging modalities. The two techniques may be viewed as complementary. For larger features with very small density variations DPC is the desirable method. In cases where dose and time limits may prohibit the multiple steps required for DPC, and when the focus is on finer features, the ILPC method may be considered as a more viable alternative. Moreover, high resolution ILPC images are comparable with histological results.

  3. Abdominal parametric perfusion imaging with respiratory motion-compensation based on contrast-enhanced ultrasound: In-vivo validation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diya; Xiao, Mengnan; Zhang, Yu; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-06-22

    Parametric perfusion imaging (PPI) based on dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) is a multi-parametric functional method that is increasingly used to characterize the hemodynamic features of abdominal tumors. Periodic respiratory kinetics adversely affects the signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) and accuracy of abdominal PPI. This study proposed respiratory motion-compensation (rMoCo) employing non-negative matrix factorization combined with fast block matching algorithm to effectively remove these disturbances on abdominal PPI, which was validated through in-vivo perfusion experiments. The mean calculation efficiency of rMoCo was improved by 83.6% when the algorithm was accelerated in a unique matching sequence, which was formed from dozens of DCEUS subsequences at the same respiratory phase. The horizontal and vertical displacements induced by respiratory kinetics were estimated to correct the extraction of time-intensity curves and the peak SNR remained at 22.58±2.90dB. Finally, the abdominal PPIs of four perfusion parameters were formed with non-negative rMoCo, and their SCR was improved by 3.99±0.49dB (p<0.05). Compared with the results without rMoCo, the continuity and visualization of abdominal arterioles were clearly enhanced, and their perfusion details were accurately characterized by PPIs with non-negative rMoCo. The proposed method benefits clinicians in providing accurate diagnoses and in developing appropriate therapeutic strategies for abdominal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimation of contrast of refraction contrast imaging compared with absorption imaging-basic approach.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masatsugu; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Okada, Hiroshi; Kitazawa, Sohei; Kitazawa, Riko; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sakurai, Takashi; Kondoh, Takeshi; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Maeda, Sakan; Sugimura, Kazuro; Tamura, Shinichi

    2005-03-01

    We discuss the usefulness of the refraction contrast method using highly parallel X-rays as a new approach to minute lung cancer detection. The advantages of refraction contrast images are discussed in terms of contrast, and a comparison is made with absorption images. We simulated refraction contrast imaging using globules with the density of water in air as models for minute lung cancer detection. The contrast intensified by bright and dark lines was compared on a globule with the contrast of absorption images. We adopted the Monte Carlo simulation to determine the strength of the profile curve of the photon counts at the detector. The obtained contrasts were more intense by two to three digits than those obtainable with the absorption contrast imaging method. The contrast in refraction contrast imaging was more intense than that obtainable with absorption contrast imaging. A two to three digit improvement in contrast means that it is possible to greatly reduce the exposure dose necessary for imaging. Therefore, it is expected to become possible to detect the interfaces of soft tissues, which are difficult to capture with conventional absorption imaging, at low dosages and high resolution.

  5. In vivo physiological saline-infused hepatic vessel imaging using a two-crystal-interferometer-based phase-contrast X-ray technique.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yoneyama, Akio; Wu, Jin; Momose, Atsushi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2012-03-01

    Using a two-crystal-interferometer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging system, the portal vein, capillary vessel area and hepatic vein of live rats were revealed sequentially by injecting physiological saline via the portal vein. Vessels greater than 0.06 mm in diameter were clearly shown with low levels of X-rays (552 µGy). This suggests that in vivo vessel imaging of small animals can be performed as conventional angiography without the side effects of the presently used iodine contrast agents.

  6. Imaging of Hydrogel Microsphere Structure and Foreign Body Response Based on Endogenous X-Ray Phase Contrast

    DOE PAGES

    Appel, Alyssa A.; Ibarra, Veronica; Somo, Sami I.; ...

    2016-10-31

    Transplantation of functional islets encapsulated in stable biomaterials has the potential to cure Type I diabetes. However, the success of these materials requires the ability to understand their stability in vivo. Imaging techniques that enable monitoring of biomaterial performance are critical to further development in the field. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that X-ray phase contrast (XPC) imaging techniques enable 3D imaging and evaluation of islet volume, alginate hydrogel structure and local soft tissue response. Islets were encapsulated in alginate systems prepared in methods used in clinical trials and implanted in a rodent omentum pouch modelmore » as a treatment for type I diabetes. Microbeads were imaged with XPC prior to implantation and following implantation into an omentum pouch. Islets could be identified within alginate beads and the islet volume quantified. Omental adipose tissue could be distinguished from inflammatory regions resulting from implanted beads. Individual beads and the local encapsulation response were visualized and quantifiable. Measurements were in agreement with histology. The 3D structure of the microbeads could be characterized with XPC and failed beads could also be identified. These results point to the substantial potential of XPC as a tool for imaging biomaterials in small animal models.« less

  7. Imaging of Hydrogel Microsphere Structure and Foreign Body Response Based on Endogenous X-Ray Phase Contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Alyssa A.; Ibarra, Veronica; Somo, Sami I.; Larson, Jeffery C.; Garson, Alfred B.; Guan, Huifeng; McQuilling, John Patrick; Zhong, Zhong; Anastasio, Mark A.; Opara, Emmanuel C.; Brey, Eric M.

    2016-10-31

    Transplantation of functional islets encapsulated in stable biomaterials has the potential to cure Type I diabetes. However, the success of these materials requires the ability to understand their stability in vivo. Imaging techniques that enable monitoring of biomaterial performance are critical to further development in the field. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that X-ray phase contrast (XPC) imaging techniques enable 3D imaging and evaluation of islet volume, alginate hydrogel structure and local soft tissue response. Islets were encapsulated in alginate systems prepared in methods used in clinical trials and implanted in a rodent omentum pouch model as a treatment for type I diabetes. Microbeads were imaged with XPC prior to implantation and following implantation into an omentum pouch. Islets could be identified within alginate beads and the islet volume quantified. Omental adipose tissue could be distinguished from inflammatory regions resulting from implanted beads. Individual beads and the local encapsulation response were visualized and quantifiable. Measurements were in agreement with histology. The 3D structure of the microbeads could be characterized with XPC and failed beads could also be identified. These results point to the substantial potential of XPC as a tool for imaging biomaterials in small animal models.

  8. Multiparametric MR imaging of prostate cancer foci: assessing the detectability and localizability of Gleason 7 peripheral zone cancers based on image contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Hrinivich, Thomas; Gómez, José A.; Moussa, Madeleine; Romagnoli, Cesare; Mandel, Jonathan; Bastian-Jordan, Matthew; Cool, Derek W.; Ghoul, Suha; Pautler, Stephen E.; Chin, Joseph L.; Crukley, Cathie; Bauman, Glenn S.; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MPMRI) supports detection and staging of prostate cancer, but the image characteristics needed for tumor boundary delineation to support focal therapy have not been widely investigated. We quantified the detectability (image contrast between tumor and non-cancerous contralateral tissue) and the localizability (image contrast between tumor and non-cancerous neighboring tissue) of Gleason score 7 (GS7) peripheral zone (PZ) tumors on MPMRI using tumor contours mapped from histology using accurate 2D-3D registration. Methods: MPMRI [comprising T2-weighted (T2W), dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and contrast transfer coefficient images] and post-prostatectomy digitized histology images were acquired for 6 subjects. Histology contouring and grading (approved by a genitourinary pathologist) identified 7 GS7 PZ tumors. Contours were mapped to MPMRI images using semi-automated registration algorithms (combined target registration error: 2 mm). For each focus, three measurements of mean +/- standard deviation of image intensity were taken on each image: tumor tissue (mT+/-sT), non-cancerous PZ tissue < 5 mm from the tumor (mN+/-sN), and non-cancerous contralateral PZ tissue (mC+/-sC). Detectability [D, defined as mT-mC normalized by sT and sC added in quadrature] and localizability [L, defined as mT-mN normalized by sT and sN added in quadrature] were quantified for each focus on each image. Results: T2W images showed the strongest detectability, although detectability |D|>=1 was observed on either ADC or DCE images, or both, for all foci. Localizability on all modalities was variable; however, ADC images showed localizability |L|>=1 for 3 foci. Conclusions: Delineation of GS7 PZ tumors on individual MPMRI images faces challenges; however, images may contain complementary information, suggesting a role for fusion of

  9. Microscopic identification of Chinese medicinal materials based on X-ray phase contrast imaging: from qualitative to quantitative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.; Liang, Z.; Tan, H.; Ni, L.; Zhao, Z.; Xiao, T.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    Although a variety of methods, ranging from simple morphological examination to physical and chemical analysis, and DNA molecular biology, exist for authenticating Chinese medicinal materials(CMMs), no methods can achieve both the source species identification and quality evaluation of CMMs simultaneously. Furthermore, the methods that are currently available for the identification of CMMs, including both optical and electronic microscopy, usually entail strict requirements for sample preparation or testing environment, such as the slicing of super-thin sections, or processing with specific chemical reagents. These treatments not only damage the CMMs but may also cause some of the original microstructures to be missed. Additionally, they may even yield false results. Owing to the unique penetrating character of X-rays, X-ray phase contrast imaging(XPCI) can be used to realize the inner microstructures of CMMs through nondestructive imaging. With the higher flux and luminance of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facility, XPCI can provides clearer and finer microstructures of CMMs, which are mainly composed of C, H, O, and N elements, with better spatial and density resolutions. For more than ten years, the X-ray imaging group at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics has investigated the microstructures of CMMs by XPCI and they have established and developed a quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT for investigating the characteristic microstructures of CMMs. During this period, a variety of typical CMMs have been investigated, from two-dimensional (2D) radiography to three-dimensional (3D) micro-CT, from qualitative to quantitative. Taken together, these results verify that quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT is a practical tool for the microscopic investigation of CMMs. Additionally, further efforts are being made to find the relationship between the microstructures' quantitative factors and active chemical components. At present

  10. High-contrast fluorescence imaging based on the polarization dependence of the fluorescence enhancement using an optical interference mirror slide.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    High-contrast fluorescence imaging using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide that enhances the fluorescence from a fluorophore located on top of the OIM surface is reported. To enhance the fluorescence and reduce the background light of the OIM, transverse-electric-polarized excitation light was used as incident light, and the transverse-magnetic-polarized fluorescence signal was detected. As a result, an approximate 100-fold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was achieved through a 13-fold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and an 8-fold reduction of the background light.

  11. Consecutive acquisition of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography and perfusion MR imaging with added dose of gadolinium-based contrast agent aids diagnosis of suspected brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Aoki, Shigeki; Shimoji, Keigo; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography (TCMRA) and perfusion MR imaging (PWI) have been used to assess the hemodynamics of brain tumors. We assessed the feasibility and value of consecutive performance of these techniques to evaluate suspected brain metastasis following supplementary injection of gadolinium-based contrast medium. In 69 patients with suspected brain metastasis, we obtained precontrast MR images followed by TCMRA and postcontrast T1-weighted images after administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadoteridol. When findings were negative or equivocal, we injected an additional 0.1-mmol/kg dose of gadoteridol and obtained PWI and second postcontrast T1-weighted images. We used a 3-point scale to grade perfusion maps and TCMRA and assessed whether these techniques added information to conventional MR imaging in the differential diagnosis. We also evaluated whether the second contrast injection improved the conspicuity and/or number of enhancing lesions and used a 4-point scoring system to quantitatively analyze diagnostic yield of TCMRA and PWI. We could assess tumor hemodynamics on PWI maps and TCMRA images in all 69 patients. In 14 cases (20%), PWI and/or TCMRA added information to conventional MR findings. After second injection of contrast medium, lesion conspicuity improved in 58 of the 69 cases (84%), and the number of detected lesions increased in 11 of 31 cases diagnosed with metastatic disease (36%). Quantitative analysis revealed TCMRA and PWI provided significant additional diagnostic information (Kruskal-Wallis test, P<0.0001). Consecutive acquisition of TCMRA and PWI using supplementary contrast injection can facilitate differential diagnosis of suspected brain metastasis and improve the number and conspicuity of detected lesions.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime contrast in small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Sun, LuZhe; Herman, Brian A.

    2007-02-01

    Early detection of primary tumors is the key for effective therapeutic intervention and successful patient survival. Small animal models emulating human diseases are powerful tools for our comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of tumor formation and metastasis to distant sites. Our long-term goal is to develop a non-invasive, multiphoton-fluorescence lifetime imaging (MP-FLIM) modality that can precisely quantify these steps in animal tumor models at a very early stage. The specific hypothesis is that fluorescence lifetime can be employed as reliable contrast parameter for providing higher detection sensitivity as compared with conventional intensity-based tumor imaging approaches and therefore it is possible to detect smaller tumor volumes (early detection) than those achieved by other prevailing methods. We base this hypothesis on our recent observations that (1) fluorescence lifetime is "intrinsic" to the fluorophore and its measurement is not affected by concentration and/or spectral artifacts as in intensity-based methods, (2) multiphoton excitation can enable increased tissue penetrability and reduced phototoxicity and (3) MP-FLIM approach can discriminate background autofluorescence from the fluorescent proteins in thick tissues thereby achieving a ten-fold increase in signal-to-background ratio over the intensity-based approaches. We present our preliminary data to support this hypothesis in primary tumor detection in nu/nu athymic mouse models.

  13. Speckle-Based X-Ray Phase-Contrast and Dark-Field Imaging with a Laboratory Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanette, I.; Zhou, T.; Burvall, A.; Lundström, U.; Larsson, D. H.; Zdora, M.; Thibault, P.; Pfeiffer, F.; Hertz, H. M.

    2014-06-01

    We report on the observation and application of near-field speckles with a laboratory x-ray source. The detection of speckles is possible thanks to the enhanced brilliance properties of the used liquid-metal-jet source, and opens the way to a range of new applications in laboratory-based coherent x-ray imaging. Here, we use the speckle pattern for multimodal imaging of demonstrator objects. Moreover, we introduce algorithms for phase and dark-field imaging using speckle tracking, and we show that they yield superior results with respect to existing methods.

  14. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  15. Dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent based on ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vivo application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Wasi Ahmad, Md; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2015-09-01

    A new type of dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles was synthesized. Gd3+ (8S7/2) plays an important role in T1 MRI contrast agents because of its large electron spin magnetic moment resulting from its seven unpaired 4f-electrons, and Dy3+ (6H15/2) has the potential to be used in T2 MRI contrast agents because of its very large total electron magnetic moment: among lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Dy2O3 nanoparticles have the largest magnetic moments at room temperature. Using these properties of Gd3+ and Dy3+ and their oxide nanoparticles, ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide (GDO) nanoparticles were synthesized and their potential to act as a dual-mode T1 and T2 MRI contrast agent was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The D-glucuronic acid coated GDO nanoparticles (davg = 1.0 nm) showed large r1 and r2 values (r2/r1 ≈ 6.6) and as a result clear dose-dependent contrast enhancements in R1 and R2 map images. Finally, the dual-mode imaging capability of the nanoparticles was confirmed by obtaining in vivo T1 and T2 MR images.

  16. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  17. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  18. Feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Voormolen, M M; Bouakaz, A; Krenning, B J; Lancée, C T; ten Cate, F J; de Jong, N

    2004-04-01

    Improved endocardial border delineation with the application of contrast agents should allow for less complex and faster tracing algorithms for left ventricular volume analysis. We developed a fast rotating phased array transducer for 3D imaging of the heart with harmonic capabilities making it suitable for contrast imaging. In this study the feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging is evaluated in vitro. A commercially available tissue mimicking flow phantom was used in combination with Sonovue. Backscatter power spectra from a tissue and contrast region of interest were calculated from recorded radio frequency data. The spectra and the extracted contrast to tissue ratio from these spectra were used to optimize the excitation frequency, the pulse length and the receive filter settings of the transducer. Frequencies ranging from 1.66 to 2.35 MHz and pulse lengths of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 cycles were explored. An increase of more than 15 dB in the contrast to tissue ratio was found around the second harmonic compared with the fundamental level at an optimal excitation frequency of 1.74 MHz and a pulse length of 2.5 cycles. Using the optimal settings for 3D harmonic contrast recordings volume measurements of a left ventricular shaped agar phantom were performed. Without contrast the extracted volume data resulted in a volume error of 1.5%, with contrast an accuracy of 3.8% was achieved. The results show the feasibility of accurate volume measurements from 3D harmonic contrast images. Further investigations will include the clinical evaluation of the presented technique for improved assessment of the heart.

  19. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  20. Potential influence of Gadolinium contrast on image segmentation in MR-based attenuation correction with Dixon sequences in whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MR.

    PubMed

    Ruhlmann, Verena; Heusch, Philipp; Kühl, Hilmar; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Antoch, Gerald; Forsting, Michael; Bockisch, Andreas; Buchbender, Christian; Quick, Harald H

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of Gadolinium contrast agent on image segmentation in magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction (AC) with four-segment dual-echo time Dixon-sequences in whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET)/MR imaging, and to analyze the consecutive effect on standardized uptake value (SUV). Hybrid imaging with an integrated PET/MR system was performed in 30 oncological patients. AC was based on MR imaging with a Dixon sequence with subsequent automated image segmentation. AC maps (µmaps) were acquired and reconstructed prior to (µmap-gd) and after (µmap+gd) Gd-contrast agent application. For quantification purposes, the SUV of organs and tumors based on both µmaps were compared. Tissue classification based on µmap-gd was correct in 29/30 patients; based on µmap+gd, the brain was falsely classified as fat in 12/30 patients with significant underestimation of SUV. In all cancerous lesions, tissue segmentation was correct. All concordant µmaps-gd/+gd resulted in no significant difference in SUV. In PET/MR, Gd-contrast agent potentially influences fat/water separation in Dixon-sequences of the head with above-average false tissue segmentation and an associated underestimation of SUV. Thus, MR-based AC should be acquired prior to Gd-contrast agent application. Additionally, integrating the MR-based AC maps into the reading-routine in PET/MR is recommended to avoid interpretation errors in cases where tissue segmentation fails.

  1. Real-time visualization of low contrast targets from high-dynamic range infrared images based on temporal digital detail enhancement filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Frederic; Schockaert, Cedric; Mirbach, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    An image detail enhancement method to effectively visualize low contrast targets in high-dynamic range (HDR) infrared (IR) images is presented regardless of the dynamic range width. In general, high temperature dynamics from real-world scenes used to be encoded in a 12 or 14 bits IR image. However, the limitations of the human visual perception, from which no more than 128 shades of gray are distinguishable, and the 8-bit working range of common display devices make necessary an effective 12/14 bits HDR mapping into the 8-bit data representation. To do so, we propose to independently treat the base and detail image components that result from splitting the IR image using two dedicated guided filters. We also introduce a plausibility mask from which those regions that are prominent to present noise are accurately defined to be explicitly tackled to avoid noise amplification. The final 8-bit data representation results from the combination of the processed detail and base image components and its mapping to the 8-bit domain using an adaptive histogram-based projection approach. The limits of the histogram are accommodated through time in order to avoid global brightness fluctuations between frames. The experimental evaluation shows that the proposed noise-aware approach preserves low contrast details with an overall contrast enhancement of the image. A comparison with widely used HDR mapping approaches and runtime analysis is also provided. Furthermore, the proposed mathematical formulation enables a real-time adjustment of the global contrast and brightness, letting the operator adapt to the visualization display device without nondesirable artifacts.

  2. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  3. Contrast sensitivity function and image discrimination.

    PubMed

    Peli, E

    2001-02-01

    A previous study tested the validity of simulations of the appearance of a natural image (from different observation distances) generated by using a visual model and contrast sensitivity functions of the individual observers [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 13, 1131 (1996)]. Deleting image spatial-frequency components that should be undetectable made the simulations indistinguishable from the original images at distances larger than the simulated distance. The simulated observation distance accurately predicted the distance at which the simulated image could be discriminated from the original image. Owing to the 1/f characteristic of natural images' spatial spectra, the individual contrast sensitivity functions (CSF's) used in the simulations of the previous study were actually tested only over a narrow range of retinal spatial frequencies. To test the CSF's over a wide range of frequencies, the same simulations and testing procedure were applied to five contrast versions of the images (10-300%). This provides a stronger test of the model, of the simulations, and specifically of the CSF's used. The relevant CSF for a discrimination task was found to be obtained by using 1-octave Gabor stimuli measured in a contrast detection task. The relevant CSF data had to be measured over a range of observation distances, owing to limitations of the displays.

  4. Automated segmentation of mammary gland regions in non-contrast torso CT images based on probabilistic atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Kan, M.; Hara, T.; Fujita, H.; Sugisaki, K.; Yokoyama, R.; Lee, G.; Hoshi, H.

    2007-03-01

    The identification of mammary gland regions is a necessary processing step during the anatomical structure recognition of human body and can be expected to provide the useful information for breast tumor diagnosis. This paper proposes a fully-automated scheme for segmenting the mammary gland regions in non-contrast torso CT images. This scheme calculates the probability for each voxel belonging to the mammary gland or other regions (for example pectoralis major muscles) in CT images and decides the mammary gland regions automatically. The probability is estimated from the location of the mammary gland and pectoralis major muscles in CT images. The location (named as a probabilistic atlas) is investigated from the pre-segmentation results in a number of different CT scans and the CT number distribution is approximated using a Gaussian function. We applied this scheme to 66 patient cases (female, age: 40-80) and evaluated the accuracy by using the coincidence rate between the segmented result and gold standard that is generated manually by a radiologist for each CT case. The mean value of the coincidence rate was 0.82 with the standard deviation of 0.09 for 66 CT cases.

  5. Ecchordosis Physaliphora: Evaluation with Precontrast and Contrast-Enhanced Fast Imaging Employing Steady-State Acquisition MR Imaging Based on Proposed New Classification.

    PubMed

    Özgür, A; Esen, K; Kara, E; Yencilek, E; Vayisoğlu, Y; Kara, T; Yıldız, A

    2016-09-01

    Ecchordosis physaliphora (EP) is a notochordal remnant typically located at the dorsal surface of the clivus, which has to be distinguished from the other retroclival lesions. Our aim is to investigate the imaging features of intracranial EP using precontrast and contrast-enhanced fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA). We retrospectively evaluated the precontrast and contrast-enhanced FIESTA images of 399 patients with temporal magnetic resonance imaging to detect "classical EP" and "possible EP." The classical EP was classified into type A (hyperintense excrescence (cyst-like component) on the dorsal surface of the clivus) and type B (hyperintense excrescence plus a hyperintense lesion within the clivus). Possible EP was subdivided as incomplete EP (T2-hypointense protrusion of the clivus) and EP variant (hyperintense lesion within the clivus alone). We found 31 (31 of 399, 7.7 %) EPs of which 11 were defined as classical EP (2.7 %) and 20 were defined as possible EP (5.0 %). Of the 11 classical EPs, 7 (63.6 %) were diagnosed as type A and 4 (% 36.4) were diagnosed as type B. Of the 20 possible EPs, 19 were classified as incomplete EP (95.0 %) and one was classified as EP variant (5.0 %). Contrast-enhanced FIESTA images are helpful in the assessment of EP, although we do not define a role in the current classification proposed by Chihara et al. (Eur Radiol 23:2854-2860, 2013).

  6. BR55: a lipopeptide-based VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound contrast agent for molecular imaging of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pochon, Sibylle; Tardy, Isabelle; Bussat, Philippe; Bettinger, Thierry; Brochot, Jean; von Wronski, Mathew; Passantino, Lisa; Schneider, Michel

    2010-02-01

    BR55, an ultrasound contrast agent functionalized with a heterodimer peptide targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), was evaluated in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating its potential for specific tumor detection. The targeted contrast agent was prepared by incorporation of a biospecific lipopeptide into the microbubble membrane. Experiments were performed in vitro to demonstrate the binding capacities of BR55 microbubbles on immobilized receptor proteins and on various endothelial or transfected cells expressing VEGFR2. The performance of BR55 microbubbles was compared with that of streptavidin-conjugated microbubbles targeted to the same receptor by coupling them to a biotinylated antibody. The specificity of BR55 binding to human and mouse endothelial cells was determined in competition experiments with the free lipopeptide, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or a VEGFR2-specific antibody. Molecular ultrasound imaging of VEGFR2 was performed in an orthotopic breast tumor model in rats using a nondestructive, contrast-specific imaging mode. BR55 was shown to bind specifically to the immobilized recombinant VEGFR2 under flow (dynamic conditions). BR55 accumulation on the target over time was similar to that of microbubbles bearing a specific antibody. BR55 avidly bound to cells expressing VEGFR2, and the pattern of microbubble distribution was correlated with the pattern of receptor expression determined by immunocytochemistry. The binding of targeted microbubbles on cells was competed off by an excess of free lipopeptide, the natural ligand (VEGF) and by a VEGFR2-specific antibody (P < 0.001). Although selected for the human receptor, the VEGFR2-binding lipopeptide was also shown to recognize the rodent receptor. Tumor perfusion was assessed during the vascular phase of BR55, and then the malignant lesion was highlighted by specific accumulation of the targeted microbubbles on tumoral endothelium. The presence of VEGFR2 was

  7. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M L; Hallin, Emil

    2015-07-17

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed.

  8. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M.; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M. L.; Hallin, Emil

    2015-07-01

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed.

  9. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M.; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M. L.; Hallin, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed. PMID:26183486

  10. Contrast optimization in broadband passive polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Boffety, Matthieu; Hu, Haofeng; Goudail, François

    2014-12-01

    Polarimetric imaging is often performed using light with a narrow spectrum for the sake of polarization measurement accuracy. However, due to the use of narrowband filters, this reduces the amount of light entering the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. This may not be the best choice for target detection applications, where a high target contrast is required rather than polarimetric accuracy. We address contrast optimization for broadband passive polarimetric imaging. We show through simulation and experiments that polarimetric contrast can be significantly increased by broadening the spectrum of analyzed light. In addition, we show that the contrast can be optimized by taking into account the spectral dependence of the scene and of the polarization analysis devices.

  11. Contrast dispersion imaging for cancer localization.

    PubMed

    Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2014-01-01

    Cancer growth is associated with angiogenic processes in many types of cancer. Several imaging strategies have therefore been developed that target angiogenesis as a marker for cancer localization. To this end, intravascular and extravascular tissue perfusion is typically assessed by dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) ultrasound (US) and MRI. All the proposed strategies, however, overlook important changes in the microvascular architecture that result from angiogenic processes. To overcome these limitations, we have recently introduced a new imaging strategy that analyzes the intravascular dispersion kinetics of contrast agents spreading through the microvasculature. Contrast dispersion is mainly determined by microvascular multi-path trajectories, reflecting the underlying microvascular architecture. This paper reviews the results obtained for prostate cancer localization by US and MRI dispersion imaging, also presenting the latest new developments and future perspectives.

  12. NASA High Contrast Imaging for Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Described is NASA's ongoing program for the detection and characterization of exosolar planets via high-contrast imaging. Some of the more promising proposed techniques under assessment may enable detection of life outside our solar system. In visible light terrestrial planets are approximately 10(exp -10) dimmer than the parent star. Issues such as diffraction, scatter, wavefront, amplitude and polarization all contribute to a reduction in contrast. An overview of the techniques will be discussed.

  13. NASA High Contrast Imaging for Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Described is NASA's ongoing program for the detection and characterization of exosolar planets via high-contrast imaging. Some of the more promising proposed techniques under assessment may enable detection of life outside our solar system. In visible light terrestrial planets are approximately 10(exp -10) dimmer than the parent star. Issues such as diffraction, scatter, wavefront, amplitude and polarization all contribute to a reduction in contrast. An overview of the techniques will be discussed.

  14. High-contrast imaging with METIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Absil, Olivier; Agócs, Tibor; Pantin, Eric; Quanz, Sascha; Stuik, Remko; Snik, Frans; Brandl, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    The Mid-infrared E-ELT Imager and Spectrograph (METIS) for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) consists of diffraction-limited imagers that cover 3 to 14 microns with medium resolution (R 5000) long slit spectroscopy, and an integral field spectrograph for high spectral resolution spectroscopy (R 100,000) over the L and M bands. One of the science cases that METIS addresses is the characterization of faint circumstellar material and exoplanet companions through imaging and spectroscopy. We present our approach for high contrast imaging with METIS, covering diffraction suppression with coronagraphs, the removal of slowly changing optical aberrations with focal plane wavefront sensing, interferometric imaging with sparse aperture masks, and observing strategies for both the imagers and IFU image slicers.

  15. GADOLINIUM(Gd)-BASED and Ion Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mri) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Thian C.

    2012-06-01

    It is known that one strength of MRI is its excellent soft tissue discrimination. It naturally provides sufficient contrast between the structural differences of normal and pathological tissues, their spatial extent and progression. However, to further extend its applications and enhance even more contrast for clinical studies, various Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been developed for different organs (brain strokes, cancer, cardio-MRI, etc). These Gd-based contrast agents are paramagnetic compounds that have strong T1-effect for enhancing the contrast between tissue types. Gd-contrast can also enhance magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for studying stenosis and for measuring perfusion, vascular susceptibility, interstitial space, etc. Another class of contrast agents makes use of ferrite iron oxide nanoparticles (including Superparamagnetic Ion Oxide (SPIO) and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO)). These nanoparticles have superior magnetic susceptibility effect and produce a drop in signal, namely in T2*-weighted images, useful for the determination of lymph nodes metastases, angiogenesis and arteriosclerosis plaques.

  16. In vivo long-term magnetic resonance imaging activity of ferritin-based magnetic nanoparticles versus a standard contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Valero, Elsa; Fiorini, Silvia; Tambalo, Stefano; Busquier, Heriberto; Callejas-Fernández, José; Marzola, Pasquina; Gálvez, Natividad; Domínguez-Vera, José M

    2014-07-10

    New long-circulating maghemite nanoparticles of 4 and 6 nm, coated with an apoferritin protein capsid, exhibit useful properties to act as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. A full in vivo study of the so-called apomaghemites reveals that their long-term MRI properties are better than those of a standard superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) widely used in biomedical applications. The biodistribution of apomaghemites and standard SPIO was investigated by MRI in mice at two different concentrations, 6 and 2.5 mg of Fe·kg(-1), over 60 days. Significant differences are found at low dose (2.5 mg of Fe·kg(-1)). Thus, whereas apomaghemites are active for MR bioimaging of liver for 45 days, standard SPIO is not effective beyond 7 days. On the basis of our data, we may concluded that apomaghemites can act as new long-term MRI liver contrast agents, allowing first the diagnosis of a liver pathology and then monitoring after treatment without the need for a second injection.

  17. Translation of Atherosclerotic Plaque Phase-Contrast CT Imaging from Synchrotron Radiation to a Conventional Lab-Based X-Ray Source

    PubMed Central

    Saam, Tobias; Herzen, Julia; Hetterich, Holger; Fill, Sandra; Willner, Marian; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Schüller, Ulrich; Auweter, Sigrid; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Bamberg, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Phase-contrast imaging is a novel X-ray based technique that provides enhanced soft tissue contrast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing human carotid arteries by grating-based phase-contrast tomography (PC-CT) at two different experimental set-ups: (i) applying synchrotron radiation and (ii) using a conventional X-ray tube. Materials and Methods Five ex-vivo carotid artery specimens were examined with PC-CT either at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility using a monochromatic X-ray beam (2 specimens; 23 keV; pixel size 5.4 µm), or at a laboratory set-up on a conventional X-ray tube (3 specimens; 35-40 kVp; 70 mA; pixel size 100 µm). Tomographic images were reconstructed and compared to histopathology. Two independent readers determined vessel dimensions and one reader determined signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) between PC-CT and absorption images. Results In total, 51 sections were included in the analysis. Images from both set-ups provided sufficient contrast to differentiate individual vessel layers. All PCI-based measurements strongly predicted but significantly overestimated lumen, intima and vessel wall area for both the synchrotron and the laboratory-based measurements as compared with histology (all p<0.001 with slope >0.53 per mm2, 95%-CI: 0.35 to 0.70). Although synchrotron-based images were characterized by higher SNRs than laboratory-based images; both PC-CT set-ups had superior SNRs compared to corresponding conventional absorption-based images (p<0.001). Inter-reader reproducibility was excellent (ICCs >0.98 and >0.84 for synchrotron and for laboratory-based measurements; respectively). Conclusion Experimental PC-CT of carotid specimens is feasible with both synchrotron and conventional X-ray sources, producing high-resolution images suitable for vessel characterization and atherosclerosis research. PMID:24039969

  18. Intravascular Targets for Molecular Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Moestue, Siver A.; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Hansen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Molecular targeting of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging is emerging as a new medical imaging modality. It combines advances in ultrasound technology with principles of molecular imaging, thereby allowing non-invasive assessment of biological processes in vivo. Preclinical studies have shown that microbubbles, which provide contrast during ultrasound imaging, can be targeted to specific molecular markers. These microbubbles accumulate in tissue with target (over) expression, thereby significantly increasing the ultrasound signal. This concept offers safe and low-cost imaging with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. It is therefore considered to have great potential in cancer imaging, and early-phase clinical trials are ongoing. In this review, we summarize the current literature on targets that have been successfully imaged in preclinical models using molecularly targeted ultrasound contrast agents. Based on preclinical experience, we discuss the potential clinical utility of targeted microbubbles. PMID:22837657

  19. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Contrast and resolution in imaging with microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...water jet of carbon suspension and imaged using a microfocus x - ray source coupled in-line with a synchronously gated intensified optically coupled...

  20. Peri-stent contrast staining, major evaginations and severe malapposition after biolimus-eluting stent implantation: a case report based on coronary optical frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2014-01-01

    Peri-stent contrast staining and late acquired malapposition represent pathological vessel wall healing patterns following percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation. Earlier studies have described these abnormal vessel wall responses commonly present after implantation of first-generation drug-eluting stents. These coronary vascular changes can cause flow disturbance and thereby dispose for later thrombotic events. This case report, based on coronary optical frequency domain imaging, describes peri-stent contrast staining, major evaginations and severe malapposition occurring 18months after third-generation biolimus-eluting stent implantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Local adaptive contrast enhancement for color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijk, Judith; den Hollander, Richard J. M.; Schavemaker, John G. M.; Schutte, Klamer

    2007-04-01

    A camera or display usually has a smaller dynamic range than the human eye. For this reason, objects that can be detected by the naked eye may not be visible in recorded images. Lighting is here an important factor; improper local lighting impairs visibility of details or even entire objects. When a human is observing a scene with different kinds of lighting, such as shadows, he will need to see details in both the dark and light parts of the scene. For grey value images such as IR imagery, algorithms have been developed in which the local contrast of the image is enhanced using local adaptive techniques. In this paper, we present how such algorithms can be adapted so that details in color images are enhanced while color information is retained. We propose to apply the contrast enhancement on color images by applying a grey value contrast enhancement algorithm to the luminance channel of the color signal. The color coordinates of the signal will remain the same. Care is taken that the saturation change is not too high. Gamut mapping is performed so that the output can be displayed on a monitor. The proposed technique can for instance be used by operators monitoring movements of people in order to detect suspicious behavior. To do this effectively, specific individuals should both be easy to recognize and track. This requires optimal local contrast, and is sometimes much helped by color when tracking a person with colored clothes. In such applications, enhanced local contrast in color images leads to more effective monitoring.

  2. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  3. Diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT): an emerging tool for rapid, high-resolution, 3-D imaging of metazoan soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J; Clarke, Julia A; Colbert, Matthew W; Morhardt, Ashley C; Cerio, Donald; Cost, Ian N; Cox, Philip G; Daza, Juan D; Early, Catherine M; Echols, M Scott; Henkelman, R Mark; Herdina, A Nele; Holliday, Casey M; Li, Zhiheng; Mahlow, Kristin; Merchant, Samer; Müller, Johannes; Orsbon, Courtney P; Paluh, Daniel J; Thies, Monte L; Tsai, Henry P; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-06-01

    Morphologists have historically had to rely on destructive procedures to visualize the three-dimensional (3-D) anatomy of animals. More recently, however, non-destructive techniques have come to the forefront. These include X-ray computed tomography (CT), which has been used most commonly to examine the mineralized, hard-tissue anatomy of living and fossil metazoans. One relatively new and potentially transformative aspect of current CT-based research is the use of chemical agents to render visible, and differentiate between, soft-tissue structures in X-ray images. Specifically, iodine has emerged as one of the most widely used of these contrast agents among animal morphologists due to its ease of handling, cost effectiveness, and differential affinities for major types of soft tissues. The rapid adoption of iodine-based contrast agents has resulted in a proliferation of distinct specimen preparations and scanning parameter choices, as well as an increasing variety of imaging hardware and software preferences. Here we provide a critical review of the recent contributions to iodine-based, contrast-enhanced CT research to enable researchers just beginning to employ contrast enhancement to make sense of this complex new landscape of methodologies. We provide a detailed summary of recent case studies, assess factors that govern success at each step of the specimen storage, preparation, and imaging processes, and make recommendations for standardizing both techniques and reporting practices. Finally, we discuss potential cutting-edge applications of diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT) and the issues that must still be overcome to facilitate the broader adoption of diceCT going forward.

  4. Reducing Iodine Contrast Volume in CT Angiography of the Abdominal Aorta Using Integrated Tube Potential Selection and Weight-Based Method Without Compromising Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Rogerio; Vrtiska, Terri J; Foley, Thomas A; Macedo, Thanila A; Cardona, Juan C Montoya; Williamson, Eric E; McCollough, Cynthia H; Fletcher, Joel G

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether image quality was maintained when a weight-based protocol incorporating tube potential selection was used to select lower iodine contrast volumes for aortic CT angiography (CTA). Patients with potentially decreased renal function underwent CTA performed with the iodinated contrast volume determined using a table incorporating different tube potentials and patient weights. The image quality of CTA examinations performed with a reduced iodine volume (hereafter known as "low-iodine CTA examinations"), internal control CTA examinations (i.e., prior examinations), and size-matched control CTA examinations was evaluated in separate reading sessions conducted by three vascular radiologists who were blinded as to the contrast volume and tube potential used. Side-by-side unblinded comparison of the examinations was also performed. Aortic attenuation and the contrast-to-noise ratio were measured. Comparisons were performed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Fifty low-iodine CTA examinations, 36 internal control CTA examinations, and 50 size-matched control CTA examinations were performed. Contrast volumes were 63% lower when the protocol based on tube potential and patient weight was used (mean contrast volume, 49 mL for low-iodine CTA vs 133 mL for internal control CTA and 138 mL for size-matched control CTA). The mean volume CT dose index was 15.1 mGy for low-iodine CTA versus 18.8 mGy for internal control CTA (p < 0.001), and 15.3 mGy for low-iodine CTA versus 17.1 mGy for size-matched control CTA (p = 0.11). Of the image quality and diagnostic confidence evaluations for low-iodine CTA examinations, over 97% had acceptable image quality and diagnostic confidence for blinded (50/50) and unblinded (35/36) comparisons. Aortic attenuation was similar between groups (p = 0.13-0.71). A weight-based protocol that incorporates tube potential selection allows the use of substantially lower volumes of iodinated contrast material

  5. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2016-07-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  6. Contrast mechanisms and image formation in helium ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bell, David C

    2009-04-01

    The helium ion microscope is a unique imaging instrument. Based on an atomic level imaging system using the principle of field ion microscopy, the helium ion source has been shown to be incredibly stable and reliable, itself a remarkable engineering feat. Here we show that the image contrast is fundamentally different to other microscopes such as the scanning electron microscope (SEM), although showing many operational similarities due to the physical ion interaction mechanisms with the sample. Secondary electron images show enhanced surface contrast due the small surface interaction volume as well as elemental contrast differences, such as for nanowires imaged on a substrate. We present images of nanowires and nanoparticles for comparison with SEM imaging. Applications of Rutherford backscattered ion imaging as a unique and novel imaging mechanism are described. The advantages of the contrast mechanisms offered by this instrument for imaging nanomaterials are clearly apparent due to the high resolution and surface sensitivity afforded in the images. Future developments of the helium ion microscope should yield yet further improvements in imaging and provide a platform for continued advances in microscope science and nanoscale research.

  7. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  8. Wave propagation simulation based on the Fourier diffraction integral for X-ray refraction contrast imaging-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki; Cho, Jin-Ho; Lim, Jae-Hong

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of coherent X-ray sources, X-ray refraction has begun to be utilized for X-ray imaging of unprecedented sensitivity. The aim of this study was to develop a wave propagation simulator that provides a map of X-ray refraction after passing through an object. We applied the Fresnel diffraction integral for calculating the propagated wave and then obtained the refraction map by differentiating the phase in the refraction-analyzing direction. The simulation was validated by comparing the computed tomography (CT) reconstruction of a virtual phantom with its map of refractive index: the deviations were below 0.7% for soft tissues under our test condition. The simulator can be used for testing and developing highly-sensitive X-ray imaging techniques based on X-ray refraction analysis prior to experimentation.

  9. An auto-tuning method for focusing and astigmatism correction in HAADF-STEM, based on the image contrast transfer function.

    PubMed

    Baba, N; Terayama, K; Yoshimizu, T; Ichise, N; Tanaka, N

    2001-01-01

    An auto-tuning method for high-angle annular detector dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) is proposed which corrects the defocus to the optimum Scherzer focus and compensates the astigmatism. Because the method is based on the image contrast transfer function formulated for the HAADF-STEM, the defocus and the astigmatism are accurately measured from input of two different defocus images. The method is designed to work independent of object function in the linear imaging model by analysing the spectral ratio between two Fourier spectra of their images, which is useful for cases where the spectrum of object function is not uniformly spread out over the reciprocal space. The method was preliminarily tested in a Hitachi HD-2000 STEM, and successful results of the auto-tunings from the viewpoint of verification of the algorithm were obtained using general specimens of Au fine particles and a thin section of a semiconductor device.

  10. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  11. Gd(DOTAlaP): Exploring the Boundaries of Fast Water Exchange in Gadolinium-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis of the single amino acid chelator DOTAlaP and four of its derivatives. The corresponding gadolinium(III) complexes were investigated for their kinetic inertness, relaxometric properties at a range of fields and temperatures, water exchange rate, and interaction with human serum albumin (HSA). Derivatives with one inner-sphere water (q = 1) were determined to have a mean water residency time between 8 and 6 ns in phoshate-buffered saline at 37 °C. The corresponding europium complexes were also formed and used to obtain information on the hydration number of the corresponding coordination complexes. Two complexes capable of binding HSA were also synthesized, of which one, Gd(5b), contains no inner-sphere water, while the other derivative, Gd(4b), is a mixture of ca. 15% q =1 and 85% q = 0. In the presence of HSA, the latter displayed a very short mean water residency time (τM310 = 2.4 ns) and enhanced relaxivity at intermediate and high fields. The kinetic inertness of Gd(4b) with respect to complex dissociation was decreased compared to its DOTAla analogue but still 100-fold more inert than [Gd(BOPTA)(H2O)]2–. Magnetic resonance imaging in mice showed that Gd(4b) was able to provide 38% better vessel to muscle contrast compared to the clinically used HSA binding agent MS-325. PMID:24922178

  12. A Brief Account of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V.; Lanza, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds. PMID:23983210

  13. A brief account of nanoparticle contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V; Lanza, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds.

  14. Contrast-dependent saturation adjustment for outdoor image enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhang; Cho, Woon; Jang, Jinbeum; Abidi, Mongi A; Paik, Joonki

    2017-01-01

    Outdoor images captured in bad-weather conditions usually have poor intensity contrast and color saturation since the light arriving at the camera is severely scattered or attenuated. The task of improving image quality in poor conditions remains a challenge. Existing methods of image quality improvement are usually effective for a small group of images but often fail to produce satisfactory results for a broader variety of images. In this paper, we propose an image enhancement method, which makes it applicable to enhance outdoor images by using content-adaptive contrast improvement as well as contrast-dependent saturation adjustment. The main contribution of this work is twofold: (1) we propose the content-adaptive histogram equalization based on the human visual system to improve the intensity contrast; and (2) we introduce a simple yet effective prior for adjusting the color saturation depending on the intensity contrast. The proposed method is tested with different kinds of images, compared with eight state-of-the-art methods: four enhancement methods and four haze removal methods. Experimental results show the proposed method can more effectively improve the visibility and preserve the naturalness of the images, as opposed to the compared methods.

  15. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Experimental setup and the system performance for single-grid-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) with a microfocus x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyunwoo; Park, Yeonok; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Park, Chulkyu; Woo, Taeho; Lee, Minsik; Kim, Jinsoo; Chung, Nagkun; Kim, Jinwon; Kim, Jinguk

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we investigated a simplified approach to phase-contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) by using a single antiscatter grid and a microfocus x-ray tube, which has potential to open the way to further widespread use of PCXI into the related application areas. We established a table-top setup for PCXI studies of biological and non-biological samples and investigated the system performance. The PCXI system consists of a focused-linear grid having a strip density of 200 lines/in. (JPI Healthcare Corp.), a microfocus x-ray tube having a focal spot size of about 5 μm (Hamamatsu, L7910), and a high-resolution CMOS imaging detector having a pixel size of 48 μm (Rad-icon Imaging Corp., Shad-o-Box 2048). By using our prototype system, we successfully obtained attenuation, scattering, and differential phase-contrast x-ray images of improved visibility from the raw images of several samples at x-ray tube conditions of 50 kVp and 6 mAs. Our initial results indicate that the single-grid-based approach seems a useful method for PCXI with great simplicity and minimal requirements on the setup alignment.

  17. Automated assessment of breast tissue density in non-contrast 3D CT images without image segmentation based on a deep CNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Kano, Takuya; Koyasu, Hiromi; Li, Shuo; Zhou, Xinxin; Hara, Takeshi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes a novel approach for the automatic assessment of breast density in non-contrast three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) images. The proposed approach trains and uses a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) from scratch to classify breast tissue density directly from CT images without segmenting the anatomical structures, which creates a bottleneck in conventional approaches. Our scheme determines breast density in a 3D breast region by decomposing the 3D region into several radial 2D-sections from the nipple, and measuring the distribution of breast tissue densities on each 2D section from different orientations. The whole scheme is designed as a compact network without the need for post-processing and provides high robustness and computational efficiency in clinical settings. We applied this scheme to a dataset of 463 non-contrast CT scans obtained from 30- to 45-year-old-women in Japan. The density of breast tissue in each CT scan was assigned to one of four categories (glandular tissue within the breast <25%, 25%-50%, 50%-75%, and >75%) by a radiologist as ground truth. We used 405 CT scans for training a deep CNN and the remaining 58 CT scans for testing the performance. The experimental results demonstrated that the findings of the proposed approach and those of the radiologist were the same in 72% of the CT scans among the training samples and 76% among the testing samples. These results demonstrate the potential use of deep CNN for assessing breast tissue density in non-contrast 3D CT images.

  18. MTF evaluation of in-line phase contrast imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoran; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2017-02-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) is a novel method that exploits the phase shift for the incident X-ray to form an image. Various XPCI methods have been proposed, among which, in-line phase contrast imaging (IL-PCI) is regarded as one of the most promising clinical methods. The contrast of the interface is enhanced due to the introduction of the boundary fringes in XPCI, thus it is generally used to evaluate the image quality of XPCI. But the contrast is a comprehensive index and it does not reflect the information of image quality in the frequency range. The modulation transfer function (MTF), which is the Fourier transform of the system point spread function, is recognized as the metric to characterize the spatial response of conventional X-ray imaging system. In this work, MTF is introduced into the image quality evaluation of the IL-PCI system. Numerous simulations based on Fresnel - Kirchhoff diffraction theory are performed with varying system settings and the corresponding MTFs were calculated for comparison. The results show that MTF can provide more comprehensive information of image quality comparing to contrast in IL-PCI.

  19. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  20. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  1. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  2. The TRENDS High-Contrast Imaging Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin

    2014-08-01

    We have established a multi-disciplinary program that combines precise Doppler measurements with high-contrast imaging. Using long-term RV accelerations (or 'trends'), we take a much-needed short-cut for identifying promising high-contrast imaging targets. The goal of this project is to directly detect and characterize the companions responsible for accelerating their host stars. By working at the interface of two powerful and complementary planet detection techniques, we are able to construct 3d-orbits, calculate dynamical masses, and explicitly calibrate theoretical atmospheric models for substellar objects in a regime where they currently break-down (low temperatures). Using a sample of non-detections, the TRENDS program also provides the ability to robustly determine the occurrence rate of giant planets from 0-20 AU through statistical inference.

  3. Variational contrast enhancement guided by global and local contrast measurements for single-image defogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li; Bi, Du-Yan; He, Lin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The visibility of images captured in foggy conditions is impaired severely by a decrease in the contrasts of objects and veiling with a characteristic gray hue, which may limit the performance of visual applications out of doors. Contrast enhancement together with color restoration is a challenging mission for conventional fog-removal methods, as the degrading effect of fog is largely dependent on scene depth information. Nowadays, people change their minds by establishing a variational framework for contrast enhancement based on a physically based analytical model, unexpectedly resulting in color distortion, dark-patch distortion, or fuzzy features of local regions. Unlike previous work, our method treats an atmospheric veil as a scattering disturbance and formulates a foggy image as an energy functional minimization to estimate direct attenuation, originating from the work of image denoising. In addition to a global contrast measurement based on a total variation norm, an additional local measurement is designed in that optimal problem for the purpose of digging out more local details as well as suppressing dark-patch distortion. Moreover, we estimate the airlight precisely by maximization with a geometric constraint and a natural image prior in order to protect the faithfulness of the scene color. With the estimated direct attenuation and airlight, the fog-free image can be restored. Finally, our method is tested on several benchmark and realistic images evaluated by two assessment approaches. The experimental results imply that our proposed method works well compared with the state-of-the-art defogging methods.

  4. Fast contrast enhanced imaging with projection reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Dana Ceceilia

    The use of contrast agents has lead to great advances in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Here we present the first application of projection reconstruction to contrast enhanced MRA. In this research the limited angle projection reconstruction (PR) trajectory is implemented to acquire higher resolution images per unit time than with conventional Fourier transform (FT) imaging. It is well known that as FOV is reduced in conventional spin- warp imaging, higher resolution per unit time can be obtained, but aliasing may appear as a replication of outside material within the FOV. The limited angle PR acquisition also produces aliasing artifacts. This method produced artifacts which were unacceptable in X-ray CT but which appear to be tolerable in MR Angiography. Resolution throughout the FOV is determined by the projection readout resolution and not by the number of projections. As the number of projections is reduced, the resolution is unchanged, but low intensity artifacts appear. Here are presented the results of using limited angle PR in phantoms and contrast-enhanced angiograms of humans.

  5. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray source for mammography: Feasibility study...W81XWH-04-1-0481 TITLE: High Resolution X - ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement PRINCIPAL...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Jun 2005 – 31 May 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER High Resolution X - ray

  6. Integrated Spectral Low Noise Image Sensor with Nanowire Polarization Filters for Low Contrast Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-05

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0359 Integrated Spectral Low Noise Image Sensor with Nanowire Polarization Filters for Low Contrast Imaging Viktor Gruev...To) 02/15/2011 - 08/15/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Integrated Spectral Low Noise Image Sensor with Nanowire Polarization Filters for Low Contrast...investigate alternative spectral imaging architectures based on my previous experience in this research area. I will develop nanowire polarization

  7. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  8. Magnetoliposomes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Stefaan J; Vande Velde, Greetje; Ketkar-Atre, Ashwini; Himmelreich, Uwe; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Among the wide variety in iron oxide nanoparticles which are routinely used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, magnetoliposomes (MLs) take up a special place. In the present work, the two main types (large and small MLs) are defined and their specific features are commented. For both types of MLs, the flexibility of the lipid coating allows for efficient functionalization, enabling bimodal imaging (e.g., MRI and fluorescence) or the use of MLs as theranostics. These features are especially true for large MLs, where several magnetite cores are encapsulated within a single large liposome, which were found to be highly efficient theranostic agents. By carefully fine-tuning the number of magnetite cores and attaching Gd(3+) -complexes onto the liposomal surface, the large MLs can be efficiently optimized for dynamic MRI. A special type of MLs, biogenic MLs, can also be efficiently used in this regard, with potential applications in cancer treatment and imaging. Small MLs, where the lipid bilayer is immediately attached onto a solid magnetite core, give a very high r2 /r1 ratio. The flexibility of the lipid bilayer allows the incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid conjugates to increase blood circulation times and be used as bone marrow contrast agents. Cationic lipids can also be incorporated, leading to high cell uptake and associated strong contrast generation in MRI of implanted cells. Unique for these small MLs is the high resistance the particles exhibit against intracellular degradation compared with dextran- or citrate-coated particles. Additionally, intracellular clustering of the iron oxide cores enhances negative contrast generation and enables longer tracking of labeled cells in time. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Exploring a new SPION-based MRI contrast agent with excellent water-dispersibility, high specificity to cancer cells and strong MR imaging efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuehua; Gong, An; Chen, Bin; Zheng, Jianjun; Chen, Tianxiang; Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-02-01

    Advances in contrast agents have greatly enhanced the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for early diagnosis of cancer. However, the commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)-based contrast agents synthesized by co-precipitation method are not monodisperse with irregular morphologies and ununiform sizes. Other reported SPION-based contrast agents synthesized by solvothermal method or thermal decomposition method are limited by the bad water-dispersibility and low specificity to cancer cells. Herein, we propose a new strategy for exploring SPION-based MRI contrast agents with excellent water-dispersibility and high specificity to cancer cells. The SPION was synthesized by a polyol method and then entrapped into albumin nanospheres (AN). After that, a ligand folic acid (FA) was conjugated onto the surface of the AN to construct a SPION-AN-FA composite. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) results indicate that the SPION-AN-FA has a spherical shape, a uniform size and an excellent water-dispersibility (polydispersity index (PDI) <0.05). The results of laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) and flow cytometry demonstrate that the SPION-AN-FA nanoparticles are highly specific to MCF-7 and SPC-A-1 cells due to the recognition of ligand FA and folate receptor α (FRα). The r2/r1 value of SPION-AN-FA is around 40, which is much higher than that of Resovist(®) indicating that our SPION-AN-FA has a stronger T2 shortening effect. The T2-weighted images of MCF-7 cells incubated with SPION-AN-FA are significantly darker than those of MCF-7 cells incubated with AN, indicating that our SPION-AN-FA has a strong MR imaging efficacy. In view of the excellent water-dispersibility, the high specificity to cancer cells and the strong MR imaging efficacy, our SPION-AN-FA can be used as a negative MR contrast agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adaptation of a clustered lumpy background model for task-based image quality assessment in x-ray phase-contrast mammography

    PubMed Central

    Zysk, Adam M.; Brankov, Jovan G.; Wernick, Miles N.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since the introduction of clinical x-ray phase-contrast mammography (PCM), a technique that exploits refractive-index variations to create edge enhancement at tissue boundaries, a number of optimization studies employing physical image-quality metrics have been performed. Ideally, task-based assessment of PCM would have been conducted with human readers. These studies have been limited, however, in part due to the large parameter-space of PCM system configurations and the difficulty of employing expert readers for large-scale studies. It has been proposed that numerical observers can be used to approximate the statistical performance of human readers, thus enabling the study of task-based performance over a large parameter-space. Methods: Methods are presented for task-based image quality assessment of PCM images with a numerical observer, the most significant of which is an adapted lumpy background from the conventional mammography literature that accounts for the unique wavefield propagation physics of PCM image formation and will be used with a numerical observer to assess image quality. These methods are demonstrated by performing a PCM task-based image quality study using a numerical observer. This study employs a signal-known-exactly, background-known-statistically Bayesian ideal observer method to assess the detectability of a calcification object in PCM images when the anode spot size and calcification diameter are varied. Results: The first realistic model for the structured background in PCM images has been introduced. A numerical study demonstrating the use of this background model has compared PCM and conventional mammography detection of calcification objects. The study data confirm the strong PCM calcification detectability dependence on anode spot size. These data can be used to balance the trade-off between enhanced image quality and the potential for motion artifacts that comes with use of a reduced spot size and increased exposure time

  11. Bacterial cell identification in differential interference contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Obara, Boguslaw; Roberts, Mark A J; Armitage, Judith P; Grau, Vicente

    2013-04-23

    Microscopy image segmentation lays the foundation for shape analysis, motion tracking, and classification of biological objects. Despite its importance, automated segmentation remains challenging for several widely used non-fluorescence, interference-based microscopy imaging modalities. For example in differential interference contrast microscopy which plays an important role in modern bacterial cell biology. Therefore, new revolutions in the field require the development of tools, technologies and work-flows to extract and exploit information from interference-based imaging data so as to achieve new fundamental biological insights and understanding. We have developed and evaluated a high-throughput image analysis and processing approach to detect and characterize bacterial cells and chemotaxis proteins. Its performance was evaluated using differential interference contrast and fluorescence microscopy images of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Results demonstrate that the proposed approach provides a fast and robust method for detection and analysis of spatial relationship between bacterial cells and their chemotaxis proteins.

  12. Angular Differential Imaging: a Powerful High-Contrast Imaging Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Macintosh, B; Nadeau, D

    2005-11-07

    Angular differential imaging is a high-contrast imaging technique that reduces speckle noise from quasi-static optical aberrations and facilitates the detection of faint nearby companions. A sequence of images is acquired with an altitude/azimuth telescope, the instrument rotator being turned off. This keeps the instrument and telescope optics aligned, stabilizes the instrumental PSF and allows the field of view to rotate with respect to the instrument. For each image, a reference PSF obtained from other images of the sequence is subtracted. All residual images are then rotated to align the field and are median combined. Observed performances are reported for Gemini Altair/NIRI data. Inside the speckle dominated region of the PSF, it is shown that quasi-static PSF noise can be reduced by a factor {approx}5 for each image subtraction. The combination of all residuals then provides an additional gain of the order of the square root of the total number of images acquired. To our knowledge, this is the first time an acquisition strategy and reduction pipeline designed for speckle attenuation and high contrast imaging is demonstrated to significantly get better detection limits with longer integration times at all angular separations. A PSF noise attenuation of 100 was achieved from 2-hour long sequences of images of Vega, reaching a 5-sigma contrast of 20 magnitudes for separations greater than 7''. This technique can be used with currently available instruments to search for {approx} 1 M{sub Jup} exoplanets with orbits of radii between 50 and 300 AU around nearby young stars. The possibility of combining the technique with other high-contrast imaging methods is briefly discussed.

  13. Motility contrast imaging of live porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David

    2013-02-01

    Freshly-harvested porcine oocytes are invested with cumulus granulosa cells in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). The cumulus cell layer is usually too thick to image the living oocyte under a conventional microscope. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the oocyte viability. The low success rate of implantation is the main problem for in vitro fertilization. In this paper, we demonstrate our dynamic imaging technique called motility contrast imaging (MCI) that provides a non-invasive way to monitor the COCs before and after maturation. MCI shows a change of intracellular activity during oocyte maturation, and a measures dynamic contrast between the cumulus granulosa shell and the oocytes. MCI also shows difference in the spectral response between oocytes that were graded into quality classes. MCI is based on shortcoherence digital holography. It uses intracellular motility as the endogenous imaging contrast of living tissue. MCI presents a new approach for cumulus-oocyte complex assessment.

  14. Global Contrast Based Salient Region Detection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Ming; Mitra, Niloy J; Huang, Xiaolei; Torr, Philip H S; Hu, Shi-Min

    2015-03-01

    Automatic estimation of salient object regions across images, without any prior assumption or knowledge of the contents of the corresponding scenes, enhances many computer vision and computer graphics applications. We introduce a regional contrast based salient object detection algorithm, which simultaneously evaluates global contrast differences and spatial weighted coherence scores. The proposed algorithm is simple, efficient, naturally multi-scale, and produces full-resolution, high-quality saliency maps. These saliency maps are further used to initialize a novel iterative version of GrabCut, namely SaliencyCut, for high quality unsupervised salient object segmentation. We extensively evaluated our algorithm using traditional salient object detection datasets, as well as a more challenging Internet image dataset. Our experimental results demonstrate that our algorithm consistently outperforms 15 existing salient object detection and segmentation methods, yielding higher precision and better recall rates. We also show that our algorithm can be used to efficiently extract salient object masks from Internet images, enabling effective sketch-based image retrieval (SBIR) via simple shape comparisons. Despite such noisy internet images, where the saliency regions are ambiguous, our saliency guided image retrieval achieves a superior retrieval rate compared with state-of-the-art SBIR methods, and additionally provides important target object region information.

  15. Contrast enhanced imaging with a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puett, Connor; Calliste, Jabari; Wu, Gongting; Inscoe, Christina R.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) captures some depth information and thereby improves the conspicuity of breast lesions, compared to standard mammography. Using contrast during DBT may also help distinguish malignant from benign sites. However, adequate visualization of the low iodine signal requires a subtraction step to remove background signal and increase lesion contrast. Additionally, attention to factors that limit contrast, including scatter, noise, and artifact, are important during the image acquisition and post-acquisition processing steps. Stationary DBT (sDBT) is an emerging technology that offers a higher spatial and temporal resolution than conventional DBT. This phantom-based study explored contrast-enhanced sDBT (CE sDBT) across a range of clinically-appropriate iodine concentrations, lesion sizes, and breast thicknesses. The protocol included an effective scatter correction method and an iterative reconstruction technique that is unique to the sDBT system. The study demonstrated the ability of this CE sDBT system to collect projection images adequate for both temporal subtraction (TS) and dual-energy subtraction (DES). Additionally, the reconstruction approach preserved the improved contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) achieved in the subtraction step. Finally, scatter correction increased the iodine signal and CNR of iodine-containing regions in projection views and reconstructed image slices during both TS and DES. These findings support the ongoing study of sDBT as a potentially useful tool for contrast-enhanced breast imaging and also highlight the significant effect that scatter has on image quality during DBT.

  16. Tailor-made quantum dot and iron oxide based contrast agents for in vitro and in vivo tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Pöselt, Elmar; Schmidtke, Christian; Fischer, Steffen; Peldschus, Kersten; Salamon, Johannes; Kloust, Hauke; Tran, Huong; Pietsch, Andrea; Heine, Markus; Adam, Gerhard; Schumacher, Udo; Wagener, Christoph; Förster, Stephan; Weller, Horst

    2012-04-24

    The biofunctionalization of CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots and Fe(3)O(4) nanocrystals using a novel ligand system based on polyisoprene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) ligands is described. The synthesis includes a partial ligand exchange of the hydrophobic nanocrystals with amino-functionalized polyisoprene ligands, followed by seeded micelle formation of the diblock-copolymers in water. The resulting water-soluble quantum dots showed fluorescence quantum efficiencies in the 40 to 50% range and extraordinary fluorescence stability in the biological environment after cross-linking of the polyisoprene moiety of the ligand shell. No toxicity was detected by water-soluble tetrazolium (WST8) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays, even at very high nanoparticle concentrations, and almost no nonspecific cell adhesion was detected. The ligand shell was further coupled to the antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) specific monoclonal antibody T84.1. The so-conjugated Fe(3)O(4) nanocrystals allowed in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting by magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Towards An Advanced Graphene-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent: Sub-acute Toxicity and Efficacy Studies in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy; Hoang, Dung Minh; Mullick Chowdhury, Sayan; Lee, Stephen; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Wadghiri, Youssef Z.; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical Gd3+-based T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) are suboptimal or unsuitable, especially at higher magnetic fields (>1.5 Tesla) for advanced MRI applications such as blood pool, cellular and molecular imaging. Herein, towards the goal of developing a safe and more efficacious high field T1 MRI CA for these applications, we report the sub-acute toxicity and contrast enhancing capabilities of a novel nanoparticle MRI CA comprising of manganese (Mn2+) intercalated graphene nanoparticles functionalized with dextran (hereafter, Mangradex) in rodents. Sub-acute toxicology performed on rats intravenously injected with Mangradex at 1, 50 or 100 mg/kg dosages 3 times per week for three weeks indicated that dosages ≤50 mg/kg could serve as potential diagnostic doses. Whole body 7 Tesla MRI performed on mice injected with Mangradex at a potential diagnostic dose (25 mg/kg or 455 nanomoles Mn2+/kg; ~2 orders of magnitude lower than the paramagnetic ion concentration in a typical clinical dose) showed persistent (up to at least 2 hours) contrast enhancement in the vascular branches (Mn2+ concentration in blood at steady state = 300 ppb, per voxel = 45 femtomoles). The results lay the foundations for further development of Mangradex as a vascular and cellular/ molecular MRI probe. PMID:26625867

  18. Molecular imaging with targeted contrast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Mark; Allroggen, Achim; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound uses targeted microbubbles that are retained in diseased tissue. The resonant properties of these microbubbles produce acoustic signals in an ultrasound field. The microbubbles are targeted to diseased tissue by using certain chemical constituents in the microbubble shell or by attaching disease-specific ligands such as antibodies to the microbubble. In this review, we discuss the applications of this technique to pathological states in the cerebrovascular system including atherosclerosis, tumor angiogenesis, ischemia, intravascular thrombus, and inflammation.

  19. Qualitative and Quantitative Imaging Evaluation of Renal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes with Grating-based X-ray Phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunagel, Margarita; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Marschner, Mathias; De Marco, Fabio; Viermetz, Manuel; Notohamiprodjo, Susan; Hellbach, Katharina; Auweter, Sigrid; Link, Vera; Woischke, Christine; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Herzen, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Current clinical imaging methods face limitations in the detection and correct characterization of different subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), while these are important for therapy and prognosis. The present study evaluates the potential of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) for visualization and characterization of human RCC subtypes. The imaging results for 23 ex vivo formalin-fixed human kidney specimens obtained with phase-contrast CT were compared to the results of the absorption-based CT (gbCT), clinical CT and a 3T MRI and validated using histology. Regions of interest were placed on each specimen for quantitative evaluation. Qualitative and quantitative gbPC-CT imaging could significantly discriminate between normal kidney cortex (54 ± 4 HUp) and clear cell (42 ± 10), papillary (43 ± 6) and chromophobe RCCs (39 ± 7), p < 0.05 respectively. The sensitivity for detection of tumor areas was 100%, 50% and 40% for gbPC-CT, gbCT and clinical CT, respectively. RCC architecture like fibrous strands, pseudocapsules, necrosis or hyalinization was depicted clearly in gbPC-CT and was not equally well visualized in gbCT, clinical CT and MRI. The results show that gbPC-CT enables improved discrimination of normal kidney parenchyma and tumorous tissues as well as different soft-tissue components of RCCs without the use of contrast media.

  20. Qualitative and Quantitative Imaging Evaluation of Renal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes with Grating-based X-ray Phase-contrast CT

    PubMed Central

    Braunagel, Margarita; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Marschner, Mathias; De Marco, Fabio; Viermetz, Manuel; Notohamiprodjo, Susan; Hellbach, Katharina; Auweter, Sigrid; Link, Vera; Woischke, Christine; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Herzen, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Current clinical imaging methods face limitations in the detection and correct characterization of different subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), while these are important for therapy and prognosis. The present study evaluates the potential of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) for visualization and characterization of human RCC subtypes. The imaging results for 23 ex vivo formalin-fixed human kidney specimens obtained with phase-contrast CT were compared to the results of the absorption-based CT (gbCT), clinical CT and a 3T MRI and validated using histology. Regions of interest were placed on each specimen for quantitative evaluation. Qualitative and quantitative gbPC-CT imaging could significantly discriminate between normal kidney cortex (54 ± 4 HUp) and clear cell (42 ± 10), papillary (43 ± 6) and chromophobe RCCs (39 ± 7), p < 0.05 respectively. The sensitivity for detection of tumor areas was 100%, 50% and 40% for gbPC-CT, gbCT and clinical CT, respectively. RCC architecture like fibrous strands, pseudocapsules, necrosis or hyalinization was depicted clearly in gbPC-CT and was not equally well visualized in gbCT, clinical CT and MRI. The results show that gbPC-CT enables improved discrimination of normal kidney parenchyma and tumorous tissues as well as different soft-tissue components of RCCs without the use of contrast media. PMID:28361951

  1. Synthesis route and three different core-shell impacts on magnetic characterization of gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticles as new contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizian, Gholamreza; Riyahi-Alam, Nader; Haghgoo, Soheila; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Zohdiaghdam, Reza; Rafiei, Behrooz; Gorji, Ensieh

    2012-10-01

    Despite its good resolution, magnetic resonance imaging intrinsically has low sensitivity. Recently, contrast agent nanoparticles have been used as sensitivity and contrast enhancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a new controlled synthesis method for gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticle preparation. For this purpose, diethyleneglycol coating of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3-DEG) was performed using new supervised polyol route, and small particulate gadolinium oxide (SPGO) PEGylation was obtained with methoxy-polyethylene-glycol-silane (550 and 2,000 Da) coatings as SPGO-mPEG-silane550 and 2,000, respectively. Physicochemical characterization and magnetic properties of these three contrast agents in comparison with conventional Gd-DTPA were verified by dynamic light scattering transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and the signal intensity and relaxivity measurements were performed using 1.5-T MRI scanner. As a result, the nanoparticle sizes of Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000 could be reached to 5.9, 51.3, 194.2 nm, respectively. The image signal intensity and longitudinal ( r 1) and transverse relaxivity ( r 2) measurements in different concentrations (0.3 to approximately 2.5 mM), revealed the r 2/ r 1 ratios of 1.13, 0.89, 33.34, and 33.72 for Gd-DTPA, Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000, respectively. The achievement of new synthesis route of Gd2O3-DEG resulted in lower r 2/ r 1 ratio for Gd2O3-DEG than Gd-DTPA and other previous synthesized methods by this and other groups. The smaller r 2/ r 1 ratios of two PEGylated-SPGO contrast agents in our study in comparison with r 2/ r 1 ratio of previous PEGylation ( r 2/ r 1 = 81.9 for mPEG-silane 6,000 MW) showed that these new three introduced contrast agents could potentially be proper contrast enhancers for cellular and molecular MR imaging.

  2. Coronary magnetic resonance vein imaging: imaging contrast, sequence, and timing.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Reza; Han, Yuchi; Peters, Dana C; Herzka, Daniel A; Wylie, John V; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig K; Yeon, Susan B; Zimetbaum, Peter J; Manning, Warren J

    2007-12-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in imaging the coronary vein anatomy to guide interventional cardiovascular procedures such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), a device therapy for congestive heart failure (CHF). With CRT the lateral wall of the left ventricle is electrically paced using a transvenous coronary sinus lead or surgically placed epicardial lead. Proper transvenous lead placement is facilitated by the knowledge of the coronary vein anatomy. Cardiovascular MR (CMR) has the potential to image the coronary veins. In this study we propose and test CMR techniques and protocols for imaging the coronary venous anatomy. Three aspects of design of imaging sequence were studied: magnetization preparation schemes (T(2) preparation and magnetization transfer), imaging sequences (gradient-echo (GRE) and steady-state free precession (SSFP)), and imaging time during the cardiac cycle. Numerical and in vivo studies both in healthy and CHF subjects were performed to optimize and demonstrate the utility of CMR for coronary vein imaging. Magnetization transfer was superior to T(2) preparation for contrast enhancement. Both GRE and SSFP were viable imaging sequences, although GRE provided more robust results with better contrast. Imaging during the end-systolic quiescent period was preferable as it coincided with the maximum size of the coronary veins.

  3. Seeing the invisible in differential interference contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenchao; Yin, Zhaozheng

    2016-12-01

    Automated microscopy image restoration, especially in Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging modality, has attracted increasing attentions since it greatly facilitates long-term living cell analysis without staining. Although the previous work on DIC image restoration is able to restore the nuclei regions of living cells, it is still challenging to reconstruct the unnoticeable cytoplasm details in DIC images. In this paper, we propose to extract the tiny movement information of living cells in DIC images and reveal the hidden details in DIC images by magnifying the cells' motion as well as attenuating the intensity variation from the background. From our restored images, we can clearly observe the previously-invisible details in DIC images. Experiments on two DIC image datasets show that the motion-based restoration method can reveal the hidden details of living cells. In addition, we demonstrate our restoration method can also be applied to other imaging modalities such as the phase contrast microscopy to enhance cells' details. Furthermore, based on the pixel-level restoration results, we can obtain the object-level segmentation by leveraging a label propagation approach, providing promising results on facilitating the cell shape and behavior analysis. The proposed algorithm can be a software module to enhance the visualization capability of microscopes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Tailoring the x-ray beam energy spectrum to enhance image quality of new radiography contrast agents based on Gd or other lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim; Zhong, Zhong; Bacarian, Tigran; Rigon, Luigi; Button, Terry M.; Ren, Baorui; Wu, Xiaoye; Zhong, Nan; Atkins, Harold L.

    2001-06-01

    Gadovist, a 1.0-molar Gd contrast agent from Schering AG, Berlin, Germany, in use in clinical MRI in Europe, was evaluated as a radiography contrast agent. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Schering AG is developing several such lanthanide-based contrast agents, while BNL evaluates them using different x-ray beam energy spectra. These energy spectra include a 'truly' monochromatic beam (0.2 keV energy bandwidth) from the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), BNL, tuned above the Gd K-edge, and x-ray-tube beams from different kVp settings and beam filtrations. Radiographs of rabbits' kidneys were obtained with Gadovist at the NSLS. Furthermore, a clinical radiography system was used for imaging rabbits' kidneys comparing Gadovist and Conray, an iodinated contrast agent. The study, using 74 kVp and standard Al beam filter for Conray and 66 kVp and an additional 1.5 mm Cu beam filter for Gadovist, produced comparable images for Gadovist and Conray; the injection volumes were the same, while the radiation absorbed dose for Gadovist was slightly smaller. A bent-crystal silicon monochromator operating in the Laue diffraction mode was developed and tested with a conventional x-ray tube beam; it narrows the energy spectrum to about 4 keV around the anode tungsten's K' line. Preliminary beam-flux results indicate that the method could be implemented in clinical CT if x-ray tubes with approximately twice higher output become available.

  5. TAILORING X-RAY BEAM ENERGY SPECTRUM TO ENHANCE IMAGE QUALITY OF NEW RADIOGRAPHY CONTRAST AGENTS BASED ON GD OR OTHER LANTHANIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    DILMANIAN,F.A.; WEINMANN,H.J.; ZHONG,Z.; BACARIAN,T.; RIGON,L.; BUTTON,T.M.; REN,B.; WU,X.Y.; ZHONG,N.; ATKINS,H.L.

    2001-02-17

    Gadovist, a 1.0-molar Gd contrast agent from Schering AG, Berlin Germany, in use in clinical MPI in Europe, was evaluated as a radiography contrast agent. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Schering AG is developing several such lanthanide-based contrast agents, while BNL evaluates them using different x-my beam energy spectra. These energy spectra include a ''truly'' monochromatic beam (0.2 keV energy bandwidth) from the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), BNL, tuned above the Gd K-edge, and x-ray-tube beams from different kVp settings and beam filtrations. Radiographs of rabbits' kidneys were obtained with Gadovist at the NSLS. Furthermore, a clinical radiography system was used for imaging rabbits' kidneys comparing Gadovist and Conray, an iodinated contrast agent. The study, using 74 kVp and standard Al beam filter for Conray and 66 kVp and an additional 1.5 mm Cu beam filter for Gadovist, produced comparable images for Gadovist and Conray; the injection volumes were the same, while the radiation absorbed dose for Gadovist was slightly smaller. A bent-crystal silicon monochromator operating in the Laue diffraction mode was developed and tested with a conventional x-ray tube beam; it narrows the energy spectrum to about 4 keV around the anode tungsten's Ku line. Preliminary beam-flux results indicate that the method could be implemented in clinical CT if x-ray tubes with {approximately} twice higher output become available.

  6. Contrast Media in PET/Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Varun Singh; Rana, Neelima; Nazar, Aftab Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Is there a need for the contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) scan or is the low-dose, non-contrast-enhanced PET/CT scan sufficient? The topic has been debated time and again. Although low-dose noncontrast CT serves the purpose of simple anatomic correlation and attenuation correction of PET images, many times patients have to undergo additional contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging modalities, which may lead to a delay in decision-making. In this review, the authors have addressed various such issues related to the use of contrast agents and special techniques of clinical interest based on their utility in dual-modality PET/CT.

  7. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: an investigation into the underlying sources of contrast.

    PubMed

    Ogunlade, Olumide; Beard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type. It is concluded that

  8. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: An investigation into the underlying sources of contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunlade, Olumide Beard, Paul

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. Methods: The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. Results: It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type

  9. Propagation-based phase-contrast enhancement of nanostructure images using a debris-free femtosecond-laser-driven cluster-based plasma soft x-ray source and an LiF crystal detector.

    PubMed

    Pikuz, Tatiana A; Faenov, Anatoly Ya; Gasilov, Sergei V; Skobelev, Igor Yu; Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Homma, Takayuki; Kawase, Keigo; Hayashi, Yukio; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Daido, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiaki; Bulanov, Sergei V

    2009-11-10

    We demonstrate in-line phase-contrast imaging of nanothickness foils by using a relatively large, polychromatic, debris-free femtosecond-laser-driven cluster-based plasma soft x-ray source, and a high-resolution, large dynamic range LiF crystal detector. The spatial coherence length of radiation in our setup reached a value of 5 microm on the sample plane, which is enough to observe phase-contrast enhancement in the images registered by the detector placed only a few hundred micrometers behind the object. We have developed a tabletop soft x-ray emission source, which emits radiation within a 4pi sr solid angle, and which allows one to obtain contact and propagation-based phase-contrast imaging of nanostructures with 700 nm spatial resolutions. This advance could be of utility for metrology applications.

  10. Contrast and resolution in direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging with partially coherent x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Han Shensheng; Yu Hong; Cheng Jing; Gao Chen; Luo Zhenlin

    2004-10-01

    A general treatment of x-ray image formation by direct Fresnel diffraction with partially coherent hard x rays is presented. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the visibility of an image, which depend primarily on the spatial coherence of the illumination and the distance from object to the image, with chromatic coherence of lesser importance. The dependence of the quality of phase-contrast images on the parameters of in-line imaging configuration is described quantitatively. The influence of spatial coherence of hard x-ray source on the imaging quality is also discussed based on the partially coherent direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging theory. Experimental results are also presented for phase-contrast x-ray images with partially coherent hard x rays.

  11. Using T2-Exchange from Ln3+DOTA-Based Chelates for Contrast-Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer with MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    and PET / CT imaging systems expose the subject to ionizing radiation, making them impractical for frequent therapeutic monitoring in patients. MRI...differentiate between indolent and aggressive forms, thereby performing disease staging entirely non-invasively. Also, in contrast to PET / CT or SPECT...sensitive, molecularly targeted MRI contrast agents for the early detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer. Also, in contrast to conventional PET / CT and

  12. Nanoengineered multimodal contrast agent for medical image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Gregory J.; Zheng, Jinzi; Brock, Kristy; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-04-01

    Multimodality imaging has gained momentum in radiation therapy planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Specifically, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are two complementary imaging modalities often utilized in radiation therapy for visualization of anatomical structures for tumour delineation and accurate registration of image data sets for volumetric dose calculation. The development of a multimodal contrast agent for CT and MR with prolonged in vivo residence time would provide long-lasting spatial and temporal correspondence of the anatomical features of interest, and therefore facilitate multimodal image registration, treatment planning and delivery. The multimodal contrast agent investigated consists of nano-sized stealth liposomes encapsulating conventional iodine and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The average loading achieved was 33.5 +/- 7.1 mg/mL of iodine for iohexol and 9.8 +/- 2.0 mg/mL of gadolinium for gadoteridol. The average liposome diameter was 46.2 +/- 13.5 nm. The system was found to be stable in physiological buffer over a 15-day period, releasing 11.9 +/- 1.1% and 11.2 +/- 0.9% of the total amounts of iohexol and gadoteridol loaded, respectively. 200 minutes following in vivo administration, the contrast agent maintained a relative contrast enhancement of 81.4 +/- 13.05 differential Hounsfield units (ΔHU) in CT (40% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 731.9 +/- 144.2 differential signal intensity (ΔSI) in MR (46% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the blood (aorta), a relative contrast enhancement of 38.0 +/- 5.1 ΔHU (42% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 178.6 +/- 41.4 ΔSI (62% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the liver (parenchyma), a relative contrast enhancement of 9.1 +/- 1.7 ΔHU (94% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes

  13. Functional magnetic resonance imaging: imaging techniques and contrast mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Howseman, A M; Bowtell, R W

    1999-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a widely used technique for generating images or maps of human brain activity. The applications of the technique are widespread in cognitive neuroscience and it is hoped they will eventually extend into clinical practice. The activation signal measured with fMRI is predicated on indirectly measuring changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin which arise from an increase in blood oxygenation in the vicinity of neuronal firing. The exact mechanisms of this blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast are highly complex. The signal measured is dependent on both the underlying physiological events and the imaging physics. BOLD contrast, although sensitive, is not a quantifiable measure of neuronal activity. A number of different imaging techniques and parameters can be used for fMRI, the choice of which depends on the particular requirements of each functional imaging experiment. The high-speed MRI technique, echo-planar imaging provides the basis for most fMRI experiments. The problems inherent to this method and the ways in which these may be overcome are particularly important in the move towards performing functional studies on higher field MRI systems. Future developments in techniques and hardware are also likely to enhance the measurement of brain activity using MRI. PMID:10466145

  14. Comparing signal intensity and refraction sensitivity of double and single mask edge illumination lab-based x-ray phase contrast imaging set-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallon, G. K.; Diemoz, P. C.; Vittoria, F. A.; Basta, D.; Endrizzi, M.; Olivo, A.

    2017-10-01

    Double mask edge illumination (DM-EI) set-ups can detect differential phase and attenuation information from a sample. However, analytical separation of the two signals often requires acquiring two frames with inverted differential phase contrast signals. Typically, between these two acquisitions, the first mask is moved to create a different illumination condition. This can lead to potential errors which adversely affect the data collected. In this paper, we implement a single mask EI laboratory set-up that allows for a single shot retrieval of the differential phase and attenuation images, without the need for a high resolution detector or high magnification. As well as simplifying mask alignment, the advantages of the proposed set-up can be exploited in one of two ways: either the total acquisition time can be halved with respect to the DM-EI set-up or, for the same acquisition time, twice the statistics can be collected. In this latter configuration, the signal-to-noise ratio and contrast in the mixed intensity images, and the angular sensitivity of the two set-ups were compared. We also show that the angular sensitivity of the single mask set-up can be well approximated from its illumination curve, which has been modelled as a convolution between the source spatial distribution at the detector plane, the pre-sample mask and the detector point spread function (PSF). A polychromatic wave optics simulation was developed on these bases and benchmarked against experimental data. It can also be used to predict the angular sensitivity and contrast of any set-up as a function of detector PSF.

  15. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  16. In vivo imaging with near-infrared fluorescence lifetime contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a mainstay of biomedical research, allowing detection of molecular events in both fixed and living cells, tissues and whole animals. Such high resolution fluorescence imaging is hampered by unwanted signal from intrinsic background fluorescence and scattered light. The signal to background ratio can be improved by using extrinsic contrast agents and greatly enhanced by multispectral imaging methods. Unfortunately, these methods are insufficient for deep tissue imaging where high contrast and speedy acquisition are necessary. Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is an inherent characteristic of each fluorescent species that can be independent of intensity and spectral properties. Accordingly, FLT-based detection provides an additional contrast mechanism to optical measurements. This contrast is particularly important in the near-infrared (NIR) due to relative transparency of tissue as well as the broad absorption and emission spectra of dyes that are active in this region. Here we report comparative analysis of signal distribution of several NIR fluorescent polymethine dyes in living mice and their correlations with lifetimes obtained in vitro using solution models. The FLT data obtained from dyes dissolved in serum albumin solution correlated well with FLTs measured in vivo. Thus the albumin solution model could be used as a good predictive model for in vivo FLT behavior of newly developed fluorescent reporters. Subsequent experiments in vivo, including monitoring slow release kinetics and detecting proteinuria, demonstrate the complementary nature of FLT for fluorescence intensity imaging.

  17. Safety of the Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Focusing in Part on Their Accumulation in the Brain and Especially the Dentate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2016-05-01

    The established class of intravenous contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging is the gadolinium chelates, more generally referred to as the gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). These can be differentiated on the basis of stability in vivo, with safety and tolerability of the GBCAs dependent upon chemical and biologic inertness. This review discusses first the background in terms of development of these agents and safety discussions therein, and second their relative stability based both on in vitro studies and clinical observations before and including the advent of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This sets the stage for the subsequent focus of the review, the current knowledge regarding accumulation of gadolinium in the brain and specifically the dentate nucleus after intravenous administration of the GBCAs and differentiation among agents on this basis. The information available to date, from the initial conception of these agents in 1981 to the latest reports concerning safety, demonstrates a significant difference between the macrocyclic and linear chelates. The review concludes with a discussion of the predictable future, which includes, importantly, a reassessment of the use of the linear GBCAs or a subset thereof.

  18. Vascular applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Kunal S; Lee, Jake J; Taha, Ashraf A; Avgerinos, Efthymios; Chaer, Rabih A

    2017-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging is a powerful noninvasive modality offering numerous potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in vascular medicine. CEUS imaging uses microbubble contrast agents composed of an encapsulating shell surrounding a gaseous core. These microbubbles act as nearly perfect intravascular reflectors of ultrasound energy and may be used to enhance the overall contrast and quality of ultrasound images. The purpose of this narrative review is to survey the current literature regarding CEUS imaging and discuss its diagnostic and therapeutic roles in current vascular and selected nonvascular applications. The PubMed, MEDLINE, and Embase databases were searched until July 2016 using the PubMed and Ovid Web-based search engines. The search terms used included contrast-enhanced, microbubble, ultrasound, carotid, aneurysm, and arterial. The diagnostic and therapeutic utility of CEUS imaging has grown exponentially, particularly in the realms of extracranial carotid arterial disease, aortic disease, and peripheral arterial disease. Studies have demonstrated that CEUS imaging is diagnostically superior to conventional ultrasound imaging in identifying vessel irregularities and measuring neovascularization to assess plaque vulnerability and end-muscle perfusion. Groups have begun to use microbubbles as agents in therapeutic applications for targeted drug and gene therapy delivery as well as for the enhancement of sonothrombolysis. The emerging technology of microbubbles and CEUS imaging holds considerable promise for cardiovascular medicine and cancer therapy given its diagnostic and therapeutic utility. Overall, with proper training and credentialing of technicians, the clinical implications are innumerable as microbubble technology is rapidly bursting onto the scene of cardiovascular medicine. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...high spatial coherence, such as synchrotrons 46, microfocus x - ray tubes 7, or laser plasma x - ray sources 8,9are employed is the phase contrast component...imaging apparatus to determine the deflection of the bead as a function of acoustic pressure. The x - rays , generated by a microfocus x - ray tube

  20. Hemodynamics in Normal Cerebral Arteries: Qualitative Comparison of 4D Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance and Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cebral, Juan R.; Putman, Christopher M.; Alley, Marcus T.; Hope, Thomas; Bammer, Roland; Calamante, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the hemodynamic conditions in normal cerebral arteries is important for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms leading to the initiation and progression of cerebrovascular diseases. Information about the baseline values of hemodynamic variables such as wall shear stresses is necessary for comparison to pathological conditions such as in cerebral aneurysms or arterial stenoses. The purpose of this study was to compare the blood flow patterns in cerebral arteries of normal subjects determined by 4D phase-contrast magnetic resonance and image-based computational fluid dynamics techniques in order to assess their consistency and to highlight their differences. The goal was not to validate (or disprove) any of the two methodologies but rather to identify regions where disagreements are to be expected and to provide guidance when interpreting the data produced by each technique. PMID:19684874

  1. Advances in engineering of high contrast CARS imaging endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Deladurantaye, Pascal; Paquet, Alex; Paré, Claude; Zheng, Huimin; Doucet, Michel; Gay, David; Poirier, Michel; Cormier, Jean-François; Mermut, Ozzy; Wilson, Brian C.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    The translation of CARS imaging towards real time, high resolution, chemically selective endoscopic tissue imaging applications is limited by a lack of sensitivity in CARS scanning probes sufficiently small for incorporation into endoscopes. We have developed here a custom double clad fiber (DCF)-based CARS probe which is designed to suppress the contaminant Four-Wave-Mixing (FWM) background generated within the fiber and integrated it into a fiber based scanning probe head of a few millimeters in diameter. The DCF includes a large mode area (LMA) core as a first means of reducing FWM generation by ~3 dB compared to commercially available, step-index single mode fibers. A micro-fabricated miniature optical filter (MOF) was grown on the distal end of the DCF to block the remaining FWM background from reaching the sample. The resulting probe was used to demonstrate high contrast images of polystyrene beads in the forward-CARS configuration with > 10 dB suppression of the FWM background. In epi-CARS geometry, images exhibited lower contrast due to the leakage of MOF-reflected FWM from the fiber core. Improvements concepts for the fiber probe are proposed for high contrast epi-CARS imaging to enable endoscopic implementation in clinical tissue assessment contexts, particularly in the early detection of endoluminal cancers and in tumor margin assessment. PMID:25401538

  2. In-Vivo Imaging of Cancer Implanted in Nude Mice by Two-Crystal Interferometer-Based Phase-Contrast X-Ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yoneyama, Akio; Wu, Jin; Lwin, Thet Thet; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2004-09-01

    Using the wave nature of X-rays, in-vitro phase-contrast X-ray imaging can clearly reveal the detailed inner structures of cancer in human and rabbit. In this study, using a newly developed imaging system with a two-crystal interferometer and the Fourier data acquisition technique, we presented, for the first time, in-vivo phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) images of cancer implanted in nude mice. The two-crystal interferometer, which helps to eliminate the distortion of the half mirror of an X-ray interferometer due to the heat from live animals, was the key device for successful in-vivo imaging. CT images obtained using the Fourier technique were available in approximately 40 min while the animal was still under anesthesia.

  3. Characterizing growth patterns in longitudinal MRI using image contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardhan, Avantika; Prastawa, Marcel; Vachet, Clement; Piven, Joseph; Gerig, Guido

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the growth patterns of the early brain is crucial to the study of neuro-development. In the early stages of brain growth, a rapid sequence of biophysical and chemical processes take place. A crucial component of these processes, known as myelination, consists of the formation of a myelin sheath around a nerve fiber, enabling the effective transmission of neural impulses. As the brain undergoes myelination, there is a subsequent change in the contrast between gray matter and white matter as observed in MR scans. In this work, gray-white matter contrast is proposed as an effective measure of appearance which is relatively invariant to location, scanner type, and scanning conditions. To validate this, contrast is computed over various cortical regions for an adult human phantom. MR (Magnetic Resonance) images of the phantom were repeatedly generated using different scanners, and at different locations. Contrast displays less variability over changing conditions of scan compared to intensity-based measures, demonstrating that it is less dependent than intensity on external factors. Additionally, contrast is used to analyze longitudinal MR scans of the early brain, belonging to healthy controls and Down's Syndrome (DS) patients. Kernel regression is used to model subject-specific trajectories of contrast changing with time. Trajectories of contrast changing with time, as well as time-based biomarkers extracted from contrast modeling, show large differences between groups. The preliminary applications of contrast based analysis indicate its future potential to reveal new information not covered by conventional volumetric or deformation-based analysis, particularly for distinguishing between normal and abnormal growth patterns.

  4. Acoustically modulated x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Theron J; Bailat, Claude J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2004-11-07

    We report the use of ultrasonic radiation pressure with phase contrast x-ray imaging to give an image proportional to the space derivative of a conventional phase contrast image in the direction of propagation of an ultrasonic beam. Intense ultrasound is used to exert forces on objects within a body giving displacements of the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Subtraction of images made with and without the ultrasound field gives an image that removes low spatial frequency features and highlights high frequency features. The method acts as an acoustic 'contrast agent' for phase contrast x-ray imaging, which in soft tissue acts to highlight small density changes.

  5. Gold nanorods: contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, C.; Gopal, R. Raja; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Manohar, S.

    2007-07-01

    Gold nanorods are seen as possible contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging since they have strong absorption peaks at near-infrared wavelengths. Also they are easy to conjugate with various proteins. If these particles can be conjugated with cancer affinity proteins then these particles can accumulate specifically at a tumor site. By detecting the presence of accumulation of gold nanorods inside the tissue the indirect detection of tumor can be realized. When these particles are irradiated with light pulses of appropriate temporal properties and energy the temperature around these particles can be high enough to induce apoptosis or necrosis in the surrounding cells. In order to use these particles at their full potential we must determine precisely their optical properties. We simulated the optical properties of gold nanorods synthesized by us using the DDSCAT code. The simulated spectra agree qualitatively with the spectra determined using spectrometry and also determined using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Further the values of molar extinction coefficient derived from the simulations were similar to the data measured experimentally by other groups. These results validated qualitatively the model used in the simulations. During simulations we found that the choice of the dielectric function used in simulations plays an important role in the results.

  6. Power constrained contrast enhancement based on brightness compensated contrast-tone mapping operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Cheolkon; Su, Haonan; Wang, Lu; Ke, Peng

    2016-09-01

    We propose power constrained contrast enhancement based on brightness compensated contrast-tone mapping operation (BCCTMO). We adopt brightness compensation to restore the original perceptual luminance and combine tone mapping with contrast enhancement to improve image quality. First, we increase pixel values to compensate for the reduced brightness caused by backlight dimming while maintaining the perceived luminance. Then we perform a contrast-tone mapping operation to reduce the information loss caused by the brightness compensation and enhance contrast in images. Finally, we conduct color scaling to reproduce natural colors. We implement BCCTMO on an Android tablet with an LCD display using mathematical approximation. Experimental results demonstrate that BCCTMO produces high-quality images while minimizing distortions and saving power compared with state-of-the-art methods.

  7. Clinical study in phase- contrast mammography: image-quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Longo, Renata; Tonutti, Maura; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Quai, Elisa; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Castelli, Edoardo; Tromba, Giuliana; Cova, Maria A

    2014-03-06

    The first clinical study of phase-contrast mammography (PCM) with synchrotron radiation was carried out at the Synchrotron Radiation for Medical Physics beamline of the Elettra synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy) in 2006-2009. The study involved 71 patients with unresolved breast abnormalities after conventional digital mammography and ultrasonography exams carried out at the Radiology Department of Trieste University Hospital. These cases were referred for mammography at the synchrotron radiation facility, with images acquired using a propagation-based phase-contrast imaging technique. To investigate the contribution of phase-contrast effects to the image quality, two experienced radiologists specialized in mammography assessed the visibility of breast abnormalities and of breast glandular structures. The images acquired at the hospital and at the synchrotron radiation facility were compared and graded according to a relative seven-grade visual scoring system. The statistical analysis highlighted that PCM with synchrotron radiation depicts normal structures and abnormal findings with higher image quality with respect to conventional digital mammography.

  8. Spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis for blood flow imaging with maximized speckle contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Weihua; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Hongyan; Luo, Qingming

    2010-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging is a technique used for imaging blood flow without scanning. Though several studies have attempted to combine spatial and temporal statistics of laser speckle images for reducing image noise as well as preserving acceptable spatiotemporal resolution, the statistical accuracy of these spatiotemporal methods has not been thoroughly compared. Through numerical simulation and animal experiments, this study investigates the changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise of the speckle contrast images computed by these methods with various numbers of frames and spatial windows. The simulation results show that the maximum relative error of the mean speckle contrast computed by the spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis (STLASCA) method, in which the speckle contrast images are computed by analyzing the 3-D spatiotemporal speckle image cube, is approximately 5%, while it is higher than 13% for other methods. Changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise computed by these methods for animal experiment data are consistent with the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that STLASCA achieves more accurate speckle contrast, and suggest that STLASCA most effectively utilizes the number of pixels, thus achieving maximized speckle contrast, and thereby maximizing the variation of the laser speckle contrast image.

  9. Spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis for blood flow imaging with maximized speckle contrast.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Weihua; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Hongyan; Luo, Qingming

    2010-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging is a technique used for imaging blood flow without scanning. Though several studies have attempted to combine spatial and temporal statistics of laser speckle images for reducing image noise as well as preserving acceptable spatiotemporal resolution, the statistical accuracy of these spatiotemporal methods has not been thoroughly compared. Through numerical simulation and animal experiments, this study investigates the changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise of the speckle contrast images computed by these methods with various numbers of frames and spatial windows. The simulation results show that the maximum relative error of the mean speckle contrast computed by the spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis (STLASCA) method, in which the speckle contrast images are computed by analyzing the 3-D spatiotemporal speckle image cube, is approximately 5%, while it is higher than 13% for other methods. Changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise computed by these methods for animal experiment data are consistent with the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that STLASCA achieves more accurate speckle contrast, and suggest that STLASCA most effectively utilizes the number of pixels, thus achieving maximized speckle contrast, and thereby maximizing the variation of the laser speckle contrast image.

  10. Phase-contrast imaging using radiation sources based on laser-plasma wakefield accelerators: state of the art and future development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboredo., D.; Cipiccia, S.; Grant, P. A.; Welsh, G. H.; Grant, D. W.; McKendrick, G.; Subiel, A.; Maneuski, D.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Both the laser-plasma wakefield accelerator (LWFA) and X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi) are promising technologies that are attracting the attention of the scientific community. Conventional X-ray absorption imaging cannot be used as a means of imaging biological material because of low contrast. XPCi overcomes this limitation by exploiting the variation of the refraction index of materials. The contrast obtained is higher than for conventional absorption imaging and requires a lower dose. The LWFA is a new concept of acceleration where electrons are accelerated to very high energy (~150 MeV) in very short distances (mm scale) by surfing plasma waves excited by the passage of an ultra-intense laser pulse (~1018 Wcm-2) through plasma. Electrons in the LWFA can undergo transverse oscillation and emit synchrotron-like (betatron) radiation in a narrow cone around the propagation axis. The properties of the betatron radiation produced by LWFA, such as source size and spectrum, make it an excellent candidate for XPCi. In this work we present the characterization of betatron radiation produced by the LWFA in the ALPHA-X laboratory (University of Strathclyde). We show how phase contrast images can be obtained using the betatron radiation in a free-space propagation configuration and we discuss the potential and limitation of the LWFA driven XPCi.

  11. Small-animal microangiography using phase-contrast X-ray imaging and gas as contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Westermark, Ulrica K.; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2014-03-01

    We use propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging with gas as contrast agent to visualize the microvasculature in small animals like mice and rats. The radiation dose required for absorption X-ray imaging is proportional to the minus fourth power of the structure size to be detected. This makes small vessels impossible to image at reasonable radiation doses using the absorption of conventional iodinated contrast agents. Propagation-based phase contrast gives enhanced contrast for high spatial frequencies by moving the detector away from the sample to let phase variations in the transmitted X-rays develop into intensity variations at the detector. Blood vessels are normally difficult to observe in phase contrast even with iodinated contrast agents as the density difference between blood and most tissues is relatively small. By injecting gas into the blood stream this density difference can be greatly enhanced giving strong phase contrast. One possible gas to use is carbon dioxide, which is a clinically accepted X-ray contrast agent. The gas is injected into the blood stream of patients to temporarily displace the blood in a region and thereby reduce the X-ray absorption in the blood vessels. We have shown that this method can be used to image blood vessels down to 8 μm in diameter in mouse ears. The low dose requirements of this method indicate a potential for live small-animal imaging and longitudinal studies of angiogenesis.

  12. Diffeomorphic Registration of Images with Variable Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Guillaume; Jacques, Laurent; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Geets, Xavier; Macq, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Nonrigid image registration is widely used to estimate tissue deformations in highly deformable anatomies. Among the existing methods, nonparametric registration algorithms such as optical flow, or Demons, usually have the advantage of being fast and easy to use. Recently, a diffeomorphic version of the Demons algorithm was proposed. This provides the advantage of producing invertible displacement fields, which is a necessary condition for these to be physical. However, such methods are based on the matching of intensities and are not suitable for registering images with different contrast enhancement. In such cases, a registration method based on the local phase like the Morphons has to be used. In this paper, a diffeomorphic version of the Morphons registration method is proposed and compared to conventional Morphons, Demons, and diffeomorphic Demons. The method is validated in the context of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients on several 4D respiratory-correlated CT scans of the thorax with and without variable contrast enhancement. PMID:21197460

  13. Diffeomorphic registration of images with variable contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Guillaume; Jacques, Laurent; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Geets, Xavier; Macq, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Nonrigid image registration is widely used to estimate tissue deformations in highly deformable anatomies. Among the existing methods, nonparametric registration algorithms such as optical flow, or Demons, usually have the advantage of being fast and easy to use. Recently, a diffeomorphic version of the Demons algorithm was proposed. This provides the advantage of producing invertible displacement fields, which is a necessary condition for these to be physical. However, such methods are based on the matching of intensities and are not suitable for registering images with different contrast enhancement. In such cases, a registration method based on the local phase like the Morphons has to be used. In this paper, a diffeomorphic version of the Morphons registration method is proposed and compared to conventional Morphons, Demons, and diffeomorphic Demons. The method is validated in the context of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients on several 4D respiratory-correlated CT scans of the thorax with and without variable contrast enhancement.

  14. X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping and microscopy to follow hepatic disposition of a Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Riccarda; Altissimo, Matteo; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Alberti, Roberto; Klatka, Tomasz; Frizzi, Tommaso; Longoni, Antonio; Salomè, Murielle; Tromba, Giuliana; Arfelli, Fulvia; Clai, Milan; Vaccari, Lisa; Lorusso, Vito; Tiribelli, Claudio; Pascolo, Lorella

    2011-12-01

    1. Spatially resolved X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is a technique that allows imaging and quantification of chemical elements in biological specimens with high sensitivity. In the present study, we applied XRF techniques at a macro and micro level to carry out drug distribution studies on ex vivo models to confirm the hepatobiliary disposition of the Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent B22956/1. 2. Gd presence was selectively quantified allowing the determination of the time dependent disappearance of the drug from blood and its hepatic accumulation in mice after administration. Elemental mapping highlighted the drug distribution differences between healthy and diseased livers. XRF microanalyses showed that in CCl(4) -induced hepatitis, B22956/1 has greatly reduced hepatic accumulation, shown as a 20-fold reduction of Gd presence. Furthermore, a significant increase of Fe presence was found in steatotic compared with healthy livers, in line with the disease features. 3. The present results show that XRF might be useful in preclinical pharmacological studies with drugs containing exogenous elements. Furthermore, quantitative and high-sensitivity elemental mapping allows simultaneous detection of chemical variation, showing pathological conditions. This approach was useful in suggesting reduced B22956/1 accumulation in steatotic livers, thus opening possible new diagnostic perspectives for this drug.

  15. Examination of contrast mechanisms in optoacoustic imaging of thermal lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christian; Spirou, Gloria; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Whelan, William M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2006-02-01

    Optoacoustic Imaging is based on the thermal expansion of tissue caused by a temperature rise due to absorption of short laser pulses. At constant laser fluence, optoacoustic image contrast is proportional to differences in optical absorption and the thermoacoustic efficiency, expressed by the Grueuneisen parameter, Γ. Γ is proportional to the thermal expansion coefficient, the sound velocity squared and the inverse heat capacity at constant pressure. In thermal therapies, these parameters may be modified in the treated area. In this work experiments were performed to examine the influence of these parameters on image contrast. A Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System (LOIS, Fairway Medical Technologies, Houston, Texas) was used to image tissue phantoms comprised of cylindrical Polyvinyl Chloride Plastisol (PVCP) optical absorbing targets imbedded in either gelatin or PVCP as the background medium. Varying concentrations of Black Plastic Color (BPC) and titanium dioxide (TiO II) were added to targets and background to yield desired tissue relevant optical absorption and effective scattering coefficients, respectively. In thermal therapy experiments, ex-vivo bovine liver was heated with laser fibres (805nm laser at 5 W for 600s) to create regions of tissue coagulation. Lesions formed in the liver tissue were visible using the LOIS system with reasonable correspondence to the actual region of tissue coagulation. In the phantom experiments, contrast could be seen with low optical absorbing targets (μ a of 0.50cm -1 down to 0.13cm-1) embedded in a gelatin background (see manuscript for formula). Therefore, the data suggest that small objects (< 5mm) with low absorption coefficients (in the range < 1cm -1) can be imaged using LOIS. PVCP-targets in gelatin were visible, even with the same optical properties as the gelatin, but different Γ. The enhanced contrast may also be caused by differences in the mechanical properties between the target and the surrounding medium

  16. Phase-contrast magnet resonance imaging reveals regional, transmural, and base-to-apex dispersion of mechanical dysfunction in patients with long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brado, Johannes; Dechant, Markus J; Menza, Marius; Komancsek, Adriana; Lang, Corinna N; Bugger, Heiko; Foell, Daniela; Jung, Bernd A; Stiller, Brigitte; Bode, Christoph; Odening, Katja E

    2017-09-01

    Regional dispersion of prolonged repolarization is a hallmark of long QT syndrome (LQTS). We have also revealed regional heterogeneities in mechanical dysfunction in transgenic rabbit models of LQTS. In this clinical pilot study, we investigated whether patients with LQTS exhibit dispersion of mechanical/diastolic dysfunction. Nine pediatric patients with genotyped LQTS (12.2 ± 3.3 years) and 9 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (10.6 ± 1.5 years) were subjected to phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to analyze radial (Vr) and longitudinal (Vz) myocardial velocities during systole and diastole in the left ventricle (LV) base, mid, and apex. Twelve-lead electrocardiograms were recorded to assess the heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval. The QTc interval was longer in patients with LQTS than in controls (469.1 ± 39.4 ms vs 417.8 ± 24.4 ms; P < .01). Patients with LQTS demonstrated prolonged radial and longitudinal time-to-diastolic peak velocities (TTP), a marker for prolonged contraction duration, in the LV base, mid, and apex. The longer QTc interval positively correlated with longer time-to-diastolic peak velocities (correlation coefficient 0.63; P < .01). Peak diastolic velocities were reduced in LQTS in the LV mid and apex, indicating impaired diastolic relaxation. In patients with LQTS, regional (TTPmax-min) and transmural (TTPVz-Vr) dispersion of contraction duration was increased in the LV apex (TTPVz_max-min: 38.9 ± 25.5 ms vs 20.2 ± 14.7 ms; P = .07; TTPVz-Vr: -21.7 ± 14.5 ms vs -8.7 ± 11.3 ms; P < .05). The base-to-apex longitudinal relaxation sequence was reversed in patients with LQTS compared with controls (TTPVz_base-apex: 14.4 ± 14.9 ms vs -10.1 ± 12.7 ms; P < .01). Patients with LQTS exhibit diastolic dysfunction with reduced diastolic velocities and prolonged contraction duration. Mechanical dispersion is increased in LQTS with an increased regional and transmural dispersion of contraction duration and altered apicobasal

  17. High Signal Intensity in Globus Pallidus and Dentate Nucleus on Unenhanced T1-weighted MR Images: Evaluation of Two Linear Gadolinium-based Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Joana; Castillo, Mauricio; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Nunes, Renato H; Ramalho, Miguel; Dale, Brian M; Semelka, Richard C

    2015-09-01

    To determine if a correlation exists between the number of previous enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations and high signal intensity in the globus pallidus (GP) and dentate nucleus (DN) in patients who received gadodiamide (Omniscan), a linear nonionic gadolinium-based contrast agent, and in those who received gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance), a linear ionic contrast agent. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this single-center retrospective study, with waiver of informed consent. The study population included 69 patients divided into two groups: Group 1 included patients who underwent gadodiamide-enhanced MR imaging, and group 2 included patients who underwent gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR imaging. Two radiologists conducted a quantitative analysis of unenhanced T1-weighted images by using region of interest measurements. The GP-to-thalamus (TH) signal intensity ratio, DN-to-middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) signal intensity ratio and relative percentage change (Rchange) between the first and last examinations for each patient were calculated. Relation between the signal intensity ratios and Rchange and the number of enhanced MR imaging examinations was analyzed by using a generalized additive model. Inter- and intraobserver agreement was evaluated with the Lin concordance correlation coefficient test. Group 1 included 23 patients (19 female), with a mean of 5.0 doses ± 2.4 (standard deviation) (range, 3-11 doses) administered. Group 2 included 46 patients (24 female) with a mean of 4.6 doses ± 2.2 (range, 3-11 doses) administered. The interval between the first and last examination was 1500.1 days ± 780.2 (range, 98-3097 days) for group 1 and 1086.2 days ± 582.9 (range, 94-2633) for group 2. All patients had normal liver and renal function. Gadodiamide showed a significant increase in DN:MCP and GP:TH (P < .001 for both) and in Rchange (P = .001 for GP:TH, P < .001 for DN:MCP). In group 2, there was no significant

  18. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  19. Effects of Image Contrast on Functional MRI Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Duthie, Kristen N.; Saad, Ziad S.; Chu, Carlton; Bandettini, Peter A.; Luh, Wen-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Lack of tissue contrast and existing inhomogeneous bias fields from multi-channel coils have the potential to degrade the output of registration algorithms; and consequently degrade group analysis and any attempt to accurately localize brain function. Non-invasive ways to improve tissue contrast in fMRI images include the use of low flip angles (FAs) well below the Ernst angle and longer repetition times (TR). Techniques to correct intensity inhomogeneity are also available in most mainstream fMRI data analysis packages; but are not used as part of the pre-processing pipeline in many studies. In this work, we use a combination of real data and simulations to show that simple-to-implement acquisition/pre-processing techniques can significantly improve the outcome of both functional-to-functional and anatomical-to-functional image registrations. We also emphasize the need of tissue contrast on EPI images to be able to appropriately evaluate the quality of the alignment. In particular, we show that the use of low FAs (e.g., θ≤40°), when physiological noise considerations permit such an approach, significantly improves accuracy, consistency and stability of registration for data acquired at relatively short TRs (TR≤2s). Moreover, we also show that the application of bias correction techniques significantly improves alignment both for array-coil data (known to contain high intensity inhomogeneity) as well as birdcage-coil data. Finally, improvements in alignment derived from the use of the first infinite-TR volumes (ITVs) as targets for registration are also demonstrated. For the purpose of quantitatively evaluating the different scenarios, two novel metrics were developed: Mean Voxel Distance (MVD) to evaluate registration consistency, and Deviation of Mean Voxel Distance (dMVD) to evaluate registration stability across successive alignment attempts. PMID:23128074

  20. Contrast agents for preclinical targeted X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Anton, Nicolas; Zuber, Guy; Vandamme, Thierry

    2014-09-30

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is an X-ray based instrument that it is specifically designed for biomedical research at a preclinical stage for live imaging of small animals. This imaging modality is cost-effective, fast, and produces remarkable high-resolution images of X-ray opaque skeleton. Administration of biocompatible X-ray opaque contrast agent allows delineation of the blood vessels, and internal organs and even detection of tumor metastases as small as 300 μm. However, the main limitation of micro-CT lies in the poor efficacy or toxicity of the contrast agents. Moreover, contrast agents for micro-CT have to be stealth nanoparticulate systems, i.e. preventing their rapid renal clearance. The chemical composition and physicochemical properties will condition their uptake and elimination pathways, and therefore all the biological fluids, organs, and tissues trough this elimination route of the nanoparticles will be contrasted. Furthermore, several technologies playing on the nanoparticle properties, aim to influence these biological pathways in order to induce their accumulation onto given targeted sites, organs of tumors. In function of the methodologies carried out, taking benefit or not of the action of immune system, of the natural response of the organism like hepatocyte uptake or enhanced permeation and retention effect, or even accumulation due to ligand/receptor interactions, the technologies are called passive or active targeted imaging. The present review presents the most recent advances in the development of specific contrast agents for targeted X-ray imaging micro-CT, discussing the recent advance of in vivo targeting of nanoparticulate contrast agents, and the influence of the formulations, nature of the nanocarrier, nature and concentration of the X-ray contrasting materials, effect of the surface properties, functionalization and bioconjugation. The pharmacokinetic and versatility of nanometric systems appear particularly advantageous

  1. [Place of contrast imaging in prostate cancer detection].

    PubMed

    Cornud, François; Rebillard, Xavier; Villers, Arnauld; Peyromaure, Michaël; Soulié, Michel; Sous-Comité de Prostate du CCAFU

    2006-06-01

    Contrast imaging of the prostate is based on rapid-sequence MRI after dynamic Gadolinium injection and contrast ultrasound after injection of microbubbles. MRI can be performed routinely on all available machines. Contrast ultrasound requires specific software not yet available on all machines. The two techniques are designed to improve the reliability of imaging, as a complement to MR spectroscopy, to localize prostate cancer MRI can detect suspicious enhancement in the peripheral zone, but especially in the transitional zone after one or a series of negative posterior biopsies to target a new series of biopsies. The sensitivity and specificity of the technique have yet to be determined. The objective of contrast ultrasound is to improve cancer detection on the first series of biopsies by multiplying sextant biopsies in sites where the contrast kinetics are suggestive of a primary lesion. However, this technique cannot yet be recommended in routine practice, as the modalities of injection of the latest generation of microbubbles (bolus or infusion) need to be evaluated.

  2. Gadolinium chloride as a contrast agent for imaging wood composite components by magnetic resonance

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Chi-Leung So; Andrea Protti; Po-Wah So

    2009-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have an established track record in medical uses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), only recently has a contrast agent been used for enhancing MRI images of solid wood specimens. Expanding on this concept, wood veneers were treated with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and used in a model system comprising three-ply plywood...

  3. Objective evaluation of acute adverse events and image quality of gadolinium-based contrast agents (gadobutrol and gadobenate dimeglumine) by blinded evaluation. Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Semelka, Richard C; Hernandes, Mateus de A; Stallings, Clifton G; Castillo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to objectively evaluate a recently FDA-approved gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) in comparison to our standard GBCA for acute adverse events and image quality by blinded evaluation. Evaluation was made of a recently FDA-approved GBCA, gadobutrol (Gadavist; Bayer), in comparison to our standard GBCA, gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance; Bracco), in an IRB- and HIPAA-compliant study. Both the imaging technologist and patient were not aware of the brand of the GBCA used. A total of 59 magnetic resonance studies were evaluated (59 patients, 31 men, 28 women, age range of 5-85 years, mean age of 52 years). Twenty-nine studies were performed with gadobutrol (22 abdominal and 7 brain studies), and 30 studies were performed with gadobenate dimeglumine (22 abdominal and 8 brain studies). Assessment was made of acute adverse events focusing on objective observations of vomiting, hives, and moderate and severe reactions. Adequacy of enhancement was rated as poor, fair and good by one of two experienced radiologists who were blinded to the type of agent evaluated. No patient experienced acute adverse events with either agent. The target minor adverse events of vomiting or hives, and moderate and severe reactions were not observed in any patient. Adequacy of enhancement was rated as good for both agents in all patients. Objective, blinded evaluation is feasible and readily performable for the evaluation of GBCAs. This proof-of-concept study showed that both GBCAs evaluated exhibited consistent good image quality and no noteworthy adverse events. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High Contrast Imaging with the JWST NIRCAM Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Joseph J.; Beichman, Charles; Basinger, Scott A.; Horner, Scott; Meyer, Michael; Redding, David C.; Rieke, Marcia; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Relative to ground-based telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a substantial sensitivity advantage in the 2.2-5pm wavelength range where brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters are thought to have significant brightness enhancements. To facilitate high contrast imaging within this band, the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCAM) will employ a Lyot coronagraph with an array of band-limited image-plane occulting spots. In this paper, we provide the science motivation for high contrast imaging with NIRCAM, comparing its expected performance to that of the Keck, Gemini and 30 m (TMT) telescopes equipped with Adaptive Optics systems of different capabilities. We then describe our design for the NIRCAM coronagraph that enables imaging over the entire sensitivity range of the instrument while providing significant operational flexibility. We describe the various design tradeoffs that were made in consideration of alignment and aberration sensitivities and present contrast performance in the presence of JWST's expected optical aberrations. Finally we show an example of a that can provide 10-5 companion sensitivity at sub-arcsecond separations.

  5. Optimal Phase Masks for High Contrast Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth J.

    2016-05-01

    Phase-only optical elements can provide a number of important functions for high-contrast imaging. This thesis presents analytical and numerical optical design methods for accomplishing specific tasks, the most significant of which is the precise suppression of light from a distant point source. Instruments designed for this purpose are known as coronagraphs. Here, advanced coronagraph designs are presented that offer improved theoretical performance in comparison to the current state-of-the-art. Applications of these systems include the direct imaging and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with high sensitivity. Several new coronagraph designs are introduced and, in some cases, experimental support is provided. In addition, two novel high-contrast imaging applications are discussed: the measurement of sub-resolution information using coronagraphic optics and the protection of sensors from laser damage. The former is based on experimental measurements of the sensitivity of a coronagraph to source displacement. The latter discussion presents the current state of ongoing theoretical work. Beyond the mentioned applications, the main outcome of this thesis is a generalized theory for the design of optical systems with one of more phase masks that provide precise control of radiation over a large dynamic range, which is relevant in various high-contrast imaging scenarios. The optimal phase masks depend on the necessary tasks, the maximum number of optics, and application specific performance measures. The challenges and future prospects of this work are discussed in detail.

  6. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  7. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  8. Signal Increase on Unenhanced T1-Weighted Images in the Rat Brain After Repeated, Extended Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Gregor; Lenhard, Diana Constanze; Sieber, Martin Andrew; Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this prospective preclinical study, we evaluated T1-weighted signal intensity in the deep cerebellar nuclei (CN) and globus pallidus (GP) up to 24 days after repeated administration of linear and macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) using homologous imaging and evaluation methods as in the recently published retrospective clinical studies. In a second part of the study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces were evaluated for contrast enhancement by fluid-attenuated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Sixty adult male Wistar-Han rats were randomly divided into a control and 5 GBCA groups (n = 10 per group). The administered GBCAs were gadodiamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadobenate dimeglumine (linear GBCAs) as well as gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine (macrocyclic GBCAs) and saline (control). Over a period of 2 weeks, the animals received 10 intravenous injections at a dose of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg body weight, each on 5 consecutive days per week. Before GBCA administration, as well as 3 and 24 days after the last injection, a whole-brain MRI was performed using a standard T1-weighted 3-dimensional turbo spin echo sequence on a clinical 1.5 T scanner. The ratios of signal intensities in deep CN to pons (CN/Po) and GP to thalamus (GP/Th) were determined. For the evaluation of the CSF spaces, 18 additional rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 3 per group) that received the same GBCAs as in the first part of the study. After MR cisternography for anatomical reference, a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence was performed before and 1 minute after intravenous injection of a dose of 1 mmol Gd/kg body weight GBCA or saline. Results A significantly increased signal intensity ratio of CN/Po was observed 3 and 24 days after the last injection of gadodiamide and gadobenate dimeglumine. No significant changes were observed between the 2 time points. Gadopentetate dimeglumine injection led to a moderately elevated

  9. In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.; Maruyama, K.; Oka, H.; Kimata, T.

    2008-03-01

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a "thick" biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

  10. Adaptive sigmoid function bihistogram equalization for image contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriaga-Garcia, Edgar F.; Sanchez-Yanez, Raul E.; Ruiz-Pinales, Jose; Garcia-Hernandez, Ma. de Guadalupe

    2015-09-01

    Contrast enhancement plays a key role in a wide range of applications including consumer electronic applications, such as video surveillance, digital cameras, and televisions. The main goal of contrast enhancement is to increase the quality of images. However, most state-of-the-art methods induce different types of distortion such as intensity shift, wash-out, noise, intensity burn-out, and intensity saturation. In addition, in consumer electronics, simple and fast methods are required in order to be implemented in real time. A bihistogram equalization method based on adaptive sigmoid functions is proposed. It consists of splitting the image histogram into two parts that are equalized independently by using adaptive sigmoid functions. In order to preserve the mean brightness of the input image, the parameter of the sigmoid functions is chosen to minimize the absolute mean brightness metric. Experiments on the Berkeley database have shown that the proposed method improves the quality of images and preserves their mean brightness. An application to improve the colorfulness of images is also presented.

  11. Impact of model-based iterative reconstruction on low-contrast lesion detection and image quality in abdominal CT: a 12-reader-based comparative phantom study with filtered back projection at different tube voltages.

    PubMed

    Euler, André; Stieltjes, Bram; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Eichenberger, Reto; Reisinger, Clemens; Hirschmann, Anna; Zaehringer, Caroline; Kircher, Achim; Streif, Matthias; Bucher, Sabine; Buergler, David; D'Errico, Luigia; Kopp, Sebastién; Wilhelm, Markus; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2017-04-03

    To evaluate the impact of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) on image quality and low-contrast lesion detection compared with filtered back projection (FBP) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) of simulated medium and large patients at different tube voltages. A phantom with 45 hypoattenuating lesions was placed in two water containers and scanned at 70, 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The 120-kVp protocol served as reference, and the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) was kept constant for all protocols. The datasets were reconstructed with MBIR and FBP. Image noise and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were assessed. Low-contrast lesion detectability was evaluated by 12 radiologists. MBIR decreased the image noise by 24% and 27%, and increased the CNR by 30% and 29% for the medium and large phantoms, respectively. Lower tube voltages increased the CNR by 58%, 46%, and 16% at 70, 80, and 100 kVp, respectively, compared with 120 kVp in the medium phantom and by 9%, 18% and 12% in the large phantom. No significant difference in lesion detection rate was observed (medium: 79-82%; large: 57-65%; P > 0.37). Although MBIR improved quantitative image quality compared with FBP, it did not result in increased low-contrast lesion detection in abdominal CT at different tube voltages in simulated medium and large patients. • MBIR improved quantitative image quality but not lesion detection compared with FBP. • Increased CNR by low tube voltages did not improve lesion detection. • Changes in image noise and CNR do not directly influence diagnostic accuracy.

  12. Fast recovery of compressed multi-contrast magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Alper; Kopanoǧlu, Emre; ćukur, Tolga; Güven, H. Emre

    2017-02-01

    In many settings, multiple Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans are performed with different contrast characteristics at a single patient visit. Unfortunately, MRI data-acquisition is inherently slow creating a persistent need to accelerate scans. Multi-contrast reconstruction deals with the joint reconstruction of different contrasts simultaneously. Previous approaches suggest solving a regularized optimization problem using group sparsity and/or color total variation, using composite-splitting denoising and FISTA. Yet, there is significant room for improvement in existing methods regarding computation time, ease of parameter selection, and robustness in reconstructed image quality. Selection of sparsifying transformations is critical in applications of compressed sensing. Here we propose using non-convex p-norm group sparsity (with p < 1), and apply color total variation (CTV). Our method is readily applicable to magnitude images rather than each of the real and imaginary parts separately. We use the constrained form of the problem, which allows an easier choice of data-fidelity error-bound (based on noise power determined from a noise-only scan without any RF excitation). We solve the problem using an adaptation of Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM), which provides faster convergence in terms of CPU-time. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the method on two MR image sets (numerical brain phantom images and SRI24 atlas data) in terms of CPU-time and image quality. We show that a non-convex group sparsity function that uses the p-norm instead of the convex counterpart accelerates convergence and improves the peak-Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (pSNR), especially for highly undersampled data.

  13. Spatial frequency, phase, and the contrast of natural images.

    PubMed

    Bex, Peter J; Makous, Walter

    2002-06-01

    We examined contrast sensitivity and suprathreshold apparent contrast with natural images. The spatial-frequency components within single octaves of the images were removed (notch filtered), their phases were randomized, or the polarity of the images was inverted. Of Michelson contrast, root-mean-square (RMS) contrast, and band-limited contrast, RMS contrast was the best index of detectability. Negative images had lower apparent contrast than their positives. Contrast detection thresholds showed spatial-frequency-dependent elevation following both notch filtering and phase randomization. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 0.5-2 cycles per degree (c/deg). Suprathreshold contrast matching functions also showed spatial-frequency-dependent contrast loss for both notch-filtered and phase-randomized images. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 1-3 c/deg. There was no detectable difference between the effects of phase randomization and notch filtering on contrast sensitivity. We argue that these observations are consistent with changes in the activity within spatial-frequency channels caused by the higher-order phase structure of natural images that is responsible for the presence of edges and specularities.

  14. Spatial frequency, phase, and the contrast of natural images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bex, Peter J.; Makous, Walter

    2002-06-01

    We examined contrast sensitivity and suprathreshold apparent contrast with natural images. The spatial-frequency components within single octaves of the images were removed (notch filtered), their phases were randomized, or the polarity of the images was inverted. Of Michelson contrast, root-mean-square (RMS) contrast, and band-limited contrast, RMS contrast was the best index of detectability. Negative images had lower apparent contrast than their positives. Contrast detection thresholds showed spatial-frequency-dependent elevation following both notch filtering and phase randomization. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 0.5-2 cycles per degree (c/deg). Suprathreshold contrast matching functions also showed spatial-frequency-dependent contrast loss for both notch-filtered and phase-randomized images. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 1-3 c/deg. There was no detectable difference between the effects of phase randomization and notch filtering on contrast sensitivity. We argue that these observations are consistent with changes in the activity within spatial-frequency channels caused by the higher-order phase structure of natural images that is responsible for the presence of edges and specularities.

  15. High Resolution X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    murine liver. 15. SUBJECT TERMS X-ray, ultrasound, phase contrast, imaging, elastography 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...of the veins in a mouse liver that was excised from an euthanized mouse, fixed in paraformaldehyde and subsequently dried. The vascular tree is...clearly visible in the x-ray image. Contrast agent injections into the portal vein of another mouse liver verified that the veins are imaged and not

  16. Imaging depth and multiple scattering in laser speckle contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mitchell A.; Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a powerful and simple method for full field imaging of blood flow. However, the depth dependence and the degree of multiple scattering have not been thoroughly investigated. We employ three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of photon propagation combined with high resolution vascular anatomy to investigate these two issues. We found that 95% of the detected signal comes from the top 700 μm of tissue. Additionally, we observed that single-intravascular scattering is an accurate description of photon sampling dynamics, but that regions of interest (ROIs) in areas free of obvious surface vessels had fewer intravascular scattering events than ROI over resolved surface vessels. Furthermore, we observed that the local vascular anatomy can strongly affect the depth dependence of LSCI. We performed simulations over a wide range of intravascular and extravascular scattering properties to confirm the applicability of these results to LSCI imaging over a wide range of visible and near-infrared wavelengths. PMID:25089945

  17. Pediatric Brain: Repeated Exposure to Linear Gadolinium-based Contrast Material Is Associated with Increased Signal Intensity at Unenhanced T1-weighted MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Flood, Thomas F; Stence, Nicholas V; Maloney, John A; Mirsky, David M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether repeated exposure of the pediatric brain to a linear gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) is associated with an increase in signal intensity (SI) relative to that in GBCA-naive control subjects at unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This single-center, retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. The authors evaluated 46 pediatric patients who had undergone at least three GBCA-enhanced MR examinations (30 patients for two-group analysis and 16 for pre- and post-GBCA exposure comparisons) and 57 age-matched GBCA-naive control subjects. The SI in the globus pallidus, thalamus, dentate nucleus, and pons was measured at unenhanced T1-weighted MR imaging. Globus pallidus-thalamus and dentate nucleus-pons SI ratios were calculated and compared between groups and relative to total cumulative gadolinium dose, age, sex, and number of and mean time between GBCA-enhanced examinations. Analysis included the Wilcoxon signed rank test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Patients who underwent multiple GBCA-enhanced examinations had increased SI ratios within the dentate nucleus (mean SI ratio ± standard error of the mean for two-group comparison: 1.007 ± 0.0058 for GBCA-naive group and 1.046 ± 0.0060 for GBCA-exposed group [P < .001]; mean SI ratio for pre- and post-GBCA comparison: 0.995 ± 0.0062 for pre-GBCA group and 1.035 ± 0.0063 for post-GBCA group [P < .001]) but not the globus pallidus (mean SI ratio for two-group comparison: 1.131 ± 0.0070 for GBCA-naive group and 1.014 ± 0.0091 for GBCA-exposed group [P = .21]; mean SI ratio for pre- and post-GBCA comparison: 1.068 ± 0.0094 for pre-GBCA group and 1.093 ± 0.0134 for post-GBCA group [P = .12]). There was a significant correlation between dentate nucleus SI and total cumulative gadolinium dose (r = 0.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03, 0.67; P = .03), but

  18. Separation of Gd-humic complexes and Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent in river water with QAE-Sephadex A-25 for the fractionation analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-10-01

    Gadolinium complexed with naturally occurring, negatively charged humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) was collected from 500 mL of sample solution onto a column packed with 150 mg of a strongly basic anion-exchanger (QAE-Sephadex A-25). A Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N″,N″-pentaacetato aquo gadolinium(III), Gd-DTPA(2-)) was simultaneously collected on the same column. The Gd-DTPA complex was desorbed by anion-exchange with 50mM tetramethylammonium sulfate, leaving the Gd-humic complexes on the column. The Gd-humic complexes were subsequently dissociated with 1M nitric acid to desorb the humic fraction of Gd. The two-step desorption with small volumes of the eluting agents allowed the 100-fold preconcentration for the fractionation analysis of Gd at low ng L(-1) levels by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). On the other hand, Gd(III) neither complexed with humic substances nor DTPA, i.e., free species, was not sorbed on the column. The free Gd in the effluent was preconcentrated 100-fold by a conventional solid-phase extraction with an iminodiacetic acid-type chelating resin and determined by ICP-MS. The proposed analytical fractionation method was applied to river water samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Solution and solid-state characterization of europium and gadolinium Schiff base complexes and assessment of their potential as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Morris, D.E.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R. )

    1989-09-13

    Two lanthanide Schiff base macrocyclic complexes, LnAM(OAc){sub 2}Cl{center dot}4H{sub 2}O (Ln = Eu, Gd; HAM - HexaAzaMacrocycle = C{sub 22}H{sub 26}N{sub 6}), have been characterized in view of the potential of the Gd complex as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The relaxivity of GdHAM(OAc){sub 2}Cl was measured at 300 and 20 MHz and is as high as that for the gadolinium aquo ion. The number of coordinated waters, q, was measured by comparison of the luminescent lifetimes of EuHAM(OAc){sub 2}Cl in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O and found to be between three and four. The complex GdHAM(OAc){sub 2}Cl{center dot}4H{sub 2}O was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in space group P{bar 1} with Z = 2, a = 10.032 (2) {angstrom}, b = 12.765 (2) {angstrom}, c = 13.668 (3) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 69.190{degree} (9){degree}, {beta} = 72.405{degree} (9){degree}, and {gamma} = 74.07{degree} (1){degree}.

  20. High contrast imaging in the presence of a bright background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake

    2015-05-01

    An adaptive spatial filtering technique is described for enhancing image contrast of objects viewed against the background of an intense light source, both in the transmitting and reflecting imaging modes. The spatial distribution of the source captured in the back focal plane of the imaging lens corresponds to the angular distribution of the source. The measured distribution of energy is used to adaptively control the transmittance of a spatial light modulator positioned in the back focal plane of the imaging lens. The spatial light modulator blocks the transmission of the high energy hot spots through to the image plane. Subsequently the image formed by the objective lens is free of the bright background. Thus, the digital image capture system can use the full dynamic range of the detector and the analog to digital converter, giving rise to a captured image with the highest contrast possible. Contrast enhanced images of MEMS accelerometer are presented.

  1. Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging of Shuttle Insulating Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Zhengwei

    2005-01-01

    X-ray radiation has been widely used for imaging applications since Rontgen first discovered X-rays over a century ago. Its large penetration depth makes it ideal for the nondestructive visualization of internal structure of materials or objects unobtainable otherwise. Currently widely used nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tools-X-ray radiography and tomography are absorption-based, and work well in highly absorbing materials where density or composition variations due to internal structure or defects are high enough to be spatially distinguished in terms of absorption contrast. However, in many cases where materials such as insulating foam are light-weight, the conventional absorption-based X-ray methods for NDE become less effective. Indeed, the low-density shuttle insulating foam used for flight mission poses a great challenge to the standard NDE tools in that the absorption contrast arising from internal defects of such a low- density material is either weak or indistinguishable. In this presentation, the latest progress in phase contrast X-ray imaging of internal defects of insulating foam will be presented and discussed, demonstrating new opportunities to solve challenging issues involved in advanced materials development and processing for space exploration.

  2. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  3. Learning Discriminative Subspaces on Random Contrasts for Image Saliency Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shu; Li, Jia; Tian, Yonghong; Huang, Tiejun; Chen, Xiaowu

    2017-05-01

    In visual saliency estimation, one of the most challenging tasks is to distinguish targets and distractors that share certain visual attributes. With the observation that such targets and distractors can sometimes be easily separated when projected to specific subspaces, we propose to estimate image saliency by learning a set of discriminative subspaces that perform the best in popping out targets and suppressing distractors. Toward this end, we first conduct principal component analysis on massive randomly selected image patches. The principal components, which correspond to the largest eigenvalues, are selected to construct candidate subspaces since they often demonstrate impressive abilities to separate targets and distractors. By projecting images onto various subspaces, we further characterize each image patch by its contrasts against randomly selected neighboring and peripheral regions. In this manner, the probable targets often have the highest responses, while the responses at background regions become very low. Based on such random contrasts, an optimization framework with pairwise binary terms is adopted to learn the saliency model that best separates salient targets and distractors by optimally integrating the cues from various subspaces. Experimental results on two public benchmarks show that the proposed approach outperforms 16 state-of-the-art methods in human fixation prediction.

  4. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  5. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  6. Advanced contrast modalities for X-ray radiology: Phase-contrast and dark-field imaging using a grating interferometer.

    PubMed

    Bech, Martin; Jensen, Torben H; Bunk, Oliver; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Weitkamp, Timm; Le Duc, Geraldine; Bravin, Alberto; Cloetens, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Here we review our recent progress in the field of X-ray dark-field and phase-contrast imaging using a grating interferometer. We describe the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary results obtained for simple test objects and biological specimens. Furthermore, we discuss how phase-contrast and dark-field radiography can be combined with the concept of computed tomography, and yield highly detailed three-dimensional insights into biomedical sample. Exemplary results obtained with standard X-ray tube sources and highly brilliant synchrotron sources are presented.

  7. Contrast-enhanced imaging of cerebral vasculature with laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, K.; Li, N.; Rege, A.; Jia, X.; All, A.; Thakor, N.

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution cerebral vasculature imaging has applications ranging from intraoperative procedures to basic neuroscience research. Laser speckle, with spatial contrast processing, has recently been used to map cerebral blood flow. We present an application of the technique using temporal contrast processing to image cerebral vascular structures with a field of view a few millimeters across and approximately 20 μm resolution through a thinned skull. We validate the images using fluorescent imaging and demonstrate a factor of 2-4 enhancement in contrast-to-noise ratios over reflectance imaging using white or spectrally filtered green light. The contrast enhancement enables the perception of approximately 10%-30% more vascular structures without the introduction of any contrast agent.

  8. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  9. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B. Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-23

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  10. Contrast medium enhanced susceptibility imaging signal mechanism; should we use contrast medium?

    PubMed

    Aydın, Ömer; Büyükkaya, Ramazan; Hakyemez, Bahattin

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial lesions exhibit clear contrast enhancement in T1-weighted imaging, but the mechanism whereby contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging (CE-SWI) generates signals remains unclear. Contrast enhancement patterns cannot be reliably predicted. To explore the mechanism of CE-SWI contrast enhancement. Fifty-five patients were retrospectively enrolled. All of the imaging employed a clinical 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system fitted with a 32-channel head coil. Minimum-intensity projection reformatted images were evaluated. Intracranial lesions and brain parenchymal intensities were explored using SWI and CE-SWI. signal intensity rates were calculated by dividing the lesional intensity by the white matter intensity, after which the SWI and CE-SWI signal intensity rate were compared. Two observers independently performed intralesional susceptibility signal analysis. After contrast medium administration, malignant and extra-axial tumors exhibited obvious contrast enhancement on CE-SWI (P < 0.001 and P = 0.013, respectively). The signal intensity of white matter was significantly reduced. The signal intensity rates rose significantly in the benign, malignant, and extra-axial groups (P < 0.001). Between-radiologist agreement in terms of intralesional susceptibility signal assessment was strong (kappa = 0.8, P < 0.001). Contrast media can either reduce or increase SWI signal intensities. The dual contrast feature of CE-SWI can be useful when exploring intracranial disorders. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2016.

  11. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  12. Contrast enhancement via texture region based histogram equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Vishwakarma, Dinesh K.; Singh Walia, Gurjit; Kapoor, Rajiv

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents two novel contrast enhancement approaches using texture regions-based histogram equalization (HE). In HE-based contrast enhancement methods, the enhanced image often contains undesirable artefacts because an excessive number of pixels in the non-textured areas heavily bias the histogram. The novel idea presented in this paper is to suppress the impact of pixels in non-textured areas and to exploit texture features for the computation of histogram in the process of HE. The first algorithm named as Dominant Orientation-based Texture Histogram Equalization (DOTHE), constructs the histogram of the image using only those image patches having dominant orientation. DOTHE categories image patches into smooth, dominant or non-dominant orientation patches by using the image variance and singular value decomposition algorithm and utilizes only dominant orientation patches in the process of HE. The second method termed as Edge-based Texture Histogram Equalization, calculates significant edges in the image and constructs the histogram using the grey levels present in the neighbourhood of edges. The cumulative density function of the histogram formed from texture features is mapped on the entire dynamic range of the input image to produce the contrast-enhanced image. Subjective as well as objective performance assessment of proposed methods is conducted and compared with other existing HE methods. The performance assessment in terms of visual quality, contrast improvement index, entropy and measure of enhancement reveals that the proposed methods outperform the existing HE methods.

  13. Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging versus Contrast-enhanced US: A Comparison in Glioblastoma Surgery by Using Intraoperative Fusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Prada, Francesco; Vitale, Valerio; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Boffano, Carlo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Pinzi, Valentina; Mauri, Giovanni; Solbiati, Luigi; Sakas, Georgios; Kolev, Velizar; D'Incerti, Ludovico; DiMeco, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To compare contrast material enhancement of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (US) versus that with preoperative gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging by using real-time fusion imaging. Materials and Methods Ten patients with GBM were retrospectively identified by using routinely collected, anonymized data. Navigated contrast-enhanced US was performed after intravenous administration of contrast material before tumor resection. All patients underwent tumor excision with navigated intraoperative US guidance with use of fusion imaging between real-time intraoperative US and preoperative MR imaging. With use of fusion imaging, glioblastoma contrast enhancement at contrast-enhanced US (regarding location, morphologic features, margins, dimensions, and pattern) was compared with that at gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging. Results Fusion imaging for virtual navigation enabled matching of real-time contrast-enhanced US scans to corresponding coplanar preoperative gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR images in all cases, with a positional discrepancy of less than 2 mm. Contrast enhancement of gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging and contrast-enhanced US was superimposable in all cases with regard to location, margins, dimensions, and morphologic features. The qualitative analysis of contrast enhancement pattern demonstrated a similar distribution in contrast-enhanced US and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging in nine patients: Seven lesions showed peripheral inhomogeneous ring enhancement, and two lesions showed a prevalent nodular pattern. In one patient, the contrast enhancement pattern differed between the two modalities: Contrast-enhanced US showed enhancement of the entire bulk of the tumor, whereas gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated peripheral contrast enhancement. Conclusion Glioblastoma contrast enhancement with contrast-enhanced US is

  14. Photo-magnetic imaging: resolving optical contrast at MRI resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely photo-magnetic imaging (PMI). PMI uses a laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of the optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite-element-based algorithm with an iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium are recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentrations are also recovered successfully.

  15. Photo-magnetic Imaging: Resolving Optical Contrast at MRI resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely Photo-magnetic Imaging (PMI). PMI uses laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite element-based algorithm with iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium is recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentration are also recovered successfully. PMID:23640084

  16. Does bicarbonate prevent contrast-induced nephropathy in cardiovascular patients undergoing contrast imaging?

    PubMed

    Dabare, Dilan; Banihani, Mohammed; Gibbs, Paul; Grewal, Perbinder

    2013-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiovascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether administering sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) prevents contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in cardiovascular patients undergoing contrast imaging. In total, 266 papers were found using the reported search, 16 of which represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. CIN is thought to occur as a result of ischaemic or oxidative injury to the kidney. It is postulated that NaHCO3attenuates this renal damage by alkanizing renal tubular fluid thus reducing the generation of contrast-induced free radicals, which damage the kidney. Of the 16 trials, 15 recruited patients with various degrees of renal dysfunction at baseline. The benefit of using NaHCO3 was demonstrated at all stages of chronic kidney disease. Apart from four studies, 12 studies used low toxicity, low-osmolar contrast. Merten et al. published the first trial of NaHCO3 vs (saline) NaCl in preventing CIN, demonstrated a significantly lower rate in the NaHCO3 group and advocated its widespread use. Subsequent trials using the same regimen have collaborated these results. However, more recently, Gomes et al. concluded that NaHCO3 is not superior to saline-based hydration. Similarly, Brar et al. randomized 323 patients with moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency to receive either an NaHCO3 or an NaCl infusion and observed no difference in CIN rates. Two studies investigated the effects of rapid urine alkanization with bolus injections of NaHCO3 prior to contrast and found significant reductions in CIN rates compared with NaCl-treated groups. One study observed that NaCl is superior to NaHCO3, while all other studies showed a beneficial effect or no difference between NaCl- and NaHCO3-based hydration. The most recent meta

  17. A Lipopeptide-Based αvβ₃ Integrin-Targeted Ultrasound Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Xu, Xiuxia; Chen, Yihan; Deng, Zhiting; Liu, Hongmei; Xu, Jianrong; Zhou, Jie; Tan, Guanghong; Wu, Junru; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-10-01

    The design and fabrication of targeted ultrasound contrast agents are key factors in the success of ultrasound molecular imaging applications. Here, we introduce a transformable αvβ3 integrin-targeted microbubble (MB) by incorporation of iRGD-lipopeptides into the MB membrane for non-invasive ultrasound imaging of tumor angiogenesis. First, the iRGD-lipopeptides were synthesized by conjugating iRGD peptides to distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine-polyethylene glycol 2000-maleimide. The resulting iRGD-lipopeptides were used for fabrication of the iRGD-carrying αvβ3 integrin-targeted MBs (iRGD-MBs). The binding specificity of iRGD-MBs for endothelial cells was found to be significantly stronger than that of control MBs (p < 0.01) under in vitro static and dynamic conditions. The binding of iRGD-MBs on the endothelial cells was competed off by pre-incubation with the anti-αv or anti-β3 antibody (p < 0.01). Ultrasound images taken of mice bearing 4T1 breast tumors after intravenous injections of iRGD-MBs or control MBs revealed strong contrast enhancement within the tumors from iRGD-MBs but not from the control MBs; the mean acoustic signal intensity was 10.71 ± 2.75 intensity units for iRGD-MBs versus 1.13 ± 0.18 intensity units for the control MBs (p < 0.01). The presence of αvβ3 integrin was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. These data indicate that iRGD-MBs can be used as an ultrasound imaging probe for the non-invasive molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis, and may have further implications for ultrasound image-guided tumor targeting drug delivery.

  18. Quantitative analysis of contrast to noise ratio using a phase contrast x-ray imaging prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Kang, Minhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) of the x-ray images taken with the phase contrast imaging mode and compare them with the CNR of the images taken under the conventional mode. For each mode, three images were taken under three exposure conditions of 100 kVp (2.8mAs), 120 kVp (1.9mAs) and 140kVp (1.42mAs). A 1.61cm thick contrast detail phantom was used as an imaging object. For phase contrast, the source to image detector distance (SID) was 182.88 cm and the source to object (SOD) distance was 73.15 cm. The SOD was the same as SID in the conventional imaging mode. A computed radiography (CR) plate was used as a detector and the output CR images were converted to linear form in relation with the incident x-ray exposure. To calculate CNR, an image processing software was used to determine the mean pixel value and the standard deviation of the pixels in the region of interest (ROI) and in the nearby background around ROI. At any given exposure condition investigated in this study, the CNR values for the phase contrast images were better as compared to the corresponding conventional mode images. The superior image quality in terms of CNR is contributed by the phase-shifts resulted contrast, as well as the reduced scatters due to the air gap between the object and the detector.

  19. A Multiwavelength Differential Imaging Experiment for the High Contrast Imaging Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Close, Laird; Kuhnert, Andreas; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Traub, Wesley A.; Kern, Brian

    2009-07-01

    We discuss the results of a multiwavelength differential imaging lab experiment with the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The HCIT combines a Lyot coronagraph with a Xinetics deformable mirror in a vacuum environment to simulate a space telescope in order to test technologies and algorithms for a future exoplanet coronagraph mission. At present, ground-based telescopes have achieved significant attenuation of speckle noise using the technique of spectral differential imaging (SDI). We test whether ground-based SDI can be generalized to a nonsimultaneous spectral differential imaging technique (NSDI) for a space mission. In our lab experiment, a series of five filter images centered around the O2(A) absorption feature at 0.762 μm were acquired at nominal contrast values of 10-6, 10-7, 10-8, and 10-9. Outside the dark hole, single differences of images improve contrast by a factor of ∼6. Inside the dark hole, we found significant speckle chromatism as a function of wavelength offset from the nulling wavelength, leading to a contrast degradation by a factor of 7.2 across the entire ∼80 nm bandwidth. This effect likely stems from the chromatic behavior of the current occulter. New, less chromatic occulters are currently in development; we expect that these new occulters will resolve the speckle chromatism issue.

  20. Targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Caruthers, Shelton D; Winter, Patrick M; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2006-01-01

    The era of personalized medicine is emerging as physicians attempt to diagnose disease in asymptomatic individuals and treat pathology early in its natural history. A novel tool in an emerging armamentarium, molecular imaging will allow noninvasive characterization and segmentation of patients for delivering custom-tailored therapy. Nanoparticulate agents, such as superparamagnetic agents, liposomes, perfluorocarbon nanoparticle emulsions, and dendrimers, are being intensively researched as formulation platforms for various targeted clinical applications. As exemplified by perfluorocarbon nanoparticles, these new agents, in combination with the rapid innovations in imaging hardware and software, will allow the emergence of new medical diagnostic and therapeutic paradigms.

  1. Color Contrast Metrics for Complex Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    viewer who is focused at infinity sees an image of the outside world with 4 the computer-generated imagery " watercolored " upon it. The reader has...raster is 2:1 positively interlaced and paints a complete image once every 1/30 s. The aspect ratio was adjusted to 1:1, yielding a (26 cm)2 -live...required approximately 5 s. Presentation of the HUDBACKs to subjects was synchronized with the monitor’s raster so that they were always painted

  2. Simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging by use of digital holography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2012-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance imaging technique provides a tool that allows high-throughput analysis and real-time kinetic measurement. A simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging method is presented. The amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast images are simultaneously obtained by use of digital holography. The detection sensitivity of amplitude-contrast imaging and phase-contrast imaging can compensate for each other. Thus, the detectable sample components may cover a wider range of refractive index values for the simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast imaging method than for the phase-contrast imaging method or amplitude-contrast imaging method. A detailed description of the theory and an experiment of monitoring the evaporation process of a drop of NaCl injection in real time are presented. In addition, the amplitude-contrast image has less coherent noise by digital holography. PMID:23243569

  3. Understanding the Phase Contrast Optics to Restore Artifact-free Microscopy Images for Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Kanade, Takeo; Chen, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Phase contrast, a noninvasive microscopy imaging technique, is widely used to capture time-lapse images to monitor the behavior of transparent cells without staining or altering them. Due to the optical principle, phase contrast microscopy images contain artifacts such as the halo and shade-off that hinder image segmentation, a critical step in automated microscopy image analysis. Rather than treating phase contrast microscopy images as general natural images and applying generic image processing techniques on them, we propose to study the optical properties of the phase contrast microscope to model its image formation process. The phase contrast imaging system can be approximated by a linear imaging model. Based on this model and input image properties, we formulate a regularized quadratic cost function to restore artifact-free phase contrast images that directly correspond to the specimen's optical path length. With artifacts removed, high quality segmentation can be achieved by simply thresholding the restored images. The imaging model and restoration method are quantitatively evaluated on microscopy image sequences with thousands of cells captured over several days. We also demonstrate that accurate restoration lays the foundation for high performance in cell detection and tracking. PMID:22386070

  4. Sequential contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the penis.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, K; De Mouy, E H; Lee, B E

    1994-04-01

    To determine the enhancement patterns of the penis at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Sequential contrast material-enhanced MR images of the penis in a flaccid state were obtained in 16 volunteers (12 with normal penile function and four with erectile dysfunction). Subjects with normal erectile function showed gradual and centrifugal enhancement of the corpora cavernosa, while those with erectile dysfunction showed poor enhancement with abnormal progression. Sequential contrast-enhanced MR imaging provides additional morphologic information for the evaluation of erectile dysfunction.

  5. Non-contrast enhanced MRI for evaluation of breast lesions: comparison of non-contrast enhanced high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) images vs. contrast enhanced fat-suppressed images

    PubMed Central

    Medved, Milica; Fan, Xiaobing; Abe, Hiroyuki; Newstead, Gillian M.; Wood, Abbie M.; Shimauchi, Akiko; Kulkarni, Kirti; Ivancevic, Marko K.; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES To evaluate high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI for diagnosis of breast cancer without injection of contrast media: to compare the performance of pre-contrast HiSS images to conventional contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images, based on image quality and in the task of classifying benign and malignant breast lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten benign and 44 malignant lesions were imaged at 1.5T with HiSS (pre-contrast administration) and conventional fat-suppressed imaging (3–10 min post-contrast). This set of 108 images, after randomization, was evaluated by three experienced radiologists blinded to the imaging technique. BIRADS morphologic criteria (lesion shape; lesion margin; internal signal intensity pattern) and final assessment were used to measure reader performance. Image quality was evaluated based on boundary delineation and quality of fat suppression. An overall probability of malignancy was assigned to each lesion for HiSS and conventional images separately. RESULTS On boundary delineation and quality of fat-suppression, pre-contrast HiSS scored similarly to conventional post-contrast MRI. On benign vs. malignant lesion separation, there was no statistically significant difference in ROC performance between HiSS and conventional MRI, and HiSS met a reasonable non-inferiority condition. CONCLUSION Pre-contrast HiSS imaging is a promising approach for showing lesion morphology without blooming and other artifacts caused by contrast agents. HiSS images could be used to guide subsequent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI scans, to maximize spatial and temporal resolution in suspicious regions. HiSS MRI without contrast agent injection may be particularly important for patients at risk for contrast-induced nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, or allergic reactions. PMID:21962476

  6. Experimental characterization, comparison and image quality assessment of two ultrasound contrast agents: Optison and Definity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Amy C.; Day, Steven W.; Linte, Cristian A.; Schwarz, Karl Q.

    2016-04-01

    Microbubble-based contrast agents are commonly used in ultrasound imaging to help differentiate the blood pool from the endocardial wall. It is essential to use an agent which produces high image intensity relative to the surrounding tissue, commonly referred to contrast effect. When exposed to ultrasound waves, microbubbles produce an intense backscatter signal in addition to the contrast produced by the fluctuating size of the microbubbles. However, over time, the microbubble concentration depletes, leading to reduced visual enhancement. The retention time associated with contrast effect varies according to the frequency and power level of the ultrasound wave, as well as the contrast agent used. The primary objective of this study was to investigate and identify the most appropriate image acquisition parameters that render optimal contrast effect for two intravenous contrast agents, Optison™ and Definity™. Several controlled in vitro experiments were conducted using an experimental apparatus that featured a perfused tissue-emulating phantom. A continuous flow of contrast agent was imaged using ultrasound at different frequencies and power levels, while a pulse wave Doppler device was used to monitor the concentration of the contrast agent solution. The contrast effect was determined based on the image intensity inside the flow pipe mimicking the blood-pool relative to the intensity of the surrounding phantom material mimicking cardiac tissue. To identify the combination of parameters that yielded optimal visualization for each contrast agent tested, the contrast effect was assessed at different microbubble concentrations and different ultrasound imaging frequencies and transmission power levels.

  7. Global and Regional Brain Assessment with Quantitative MR Imaging in Patients with Prior Exposure to Linear Gadolinium-based Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Hirofumi; Jara, Hernán; Buch, Karen; Qureshi, Muhammad Mustafa; Chapman, Margaret N; Sakai, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To assess the association of global and regional brain relaxation times in patients with prior exposure to linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this cross-sectional study. Thirty-five patients (nine who had received GBCA gadopentetate dimeglumine injections previously [one to eight times] and 26 patients who did not) who underwent brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a mixed fast spin-echo pulse sequence were assessed. The whole brain was segmented according to white and gray matter by using a dual-clustering algorithm. In addition, regions of interest were measured in the globus pallidus, dentate nucleus, thalamus, and pons. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess the difference between groups. Multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the association of T1 and T2 with prior GBCA exposure. Results T1 values of gray matter were significantly shorter for patients with than for patients without prior GBCA exposure (P = .022). T1 of the gray matter of the whole brain (P < .001), globus pallidus (P = .002), dentate nucleus (P = .046), and thalamus (P = .026) and T2 of the whole brain (P = .004), dentate nucleus (P = .023), and thalamus (P = .002) showed a significant correlation with the accumulated dose of previous GBCA administration. There was no significant correlation between T1 and the accumulated dose of previous GBCA injections in the white matter (P = .187). Conclusion Global and regional quantitative assessments of T1 and T2 demonstrated an association with prior GBCA exposure, especially for gray matter structures. The results of this study confirm previous research findings that there is gadolinium deposition in wider distribution throughout the brain. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  8. X-ray refraction-contrast computed tomography images using dark-field imaging optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2010-10-11

    If an x-ray beam containing internal information derived from sample soft tissue is incident upon a Laue-case analyzer, the beam will subsequently split into a forwardly diffracted beam and a separate diffracted beam. Using these beams acquired simultaneously, a refraction-contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging system for biomedical use with lower radiation dose can be easily realized, and has a high depicting capability on the soft tissues compared with conventional x-ray CT based on absorption contrast principles. In this paper, we propose an imaging system using dark-field imaging for CT measurement based on a tandem system of Bragg- and Laue-case crystals with two two-dimensional detectors, along with a data-processing method to extract information on refraction from the measured entangled intensities by use of rocking curve fitting with polynomial functions. Reconstructed images of soft tissues are presented and described.

  9. X-ray refraction-contrast computed tomography images using dark-field imaging optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2010-10-01

    If an x-ray beam containing internal information derived from sample soft tissue is incident upon a Laue-case analyzer, the beam will subsequently split into a forwardly diffracted beam and a separate diffracted beam. Using these beams acquired simultaneously, a refraction-contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging system for biomedical use with lower radiation dose can be easily realized, and has a high depicting capability on the soft tissues compared with conventional x-ray CT based on absorption contrast principles. In this paper, we propose an imaging system using dark-field imaging for CT measurement based on a tandem system of Bragg- and Laue-case crystals with two two-dimensional detectors, along with a data-processing method to extract information on refraction from the measured entangled intensities by use of rocking curve fitting with polynomial functions. Reconstructed images of soft tissues are presented and described.

  10. Manganese-based MRI contrast agents: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Schmieder, Anne H.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Paramagnetic and superparamagnetic metals are used as contrast materials for magnetic resonance (MR) based techniques. Lanthanide metal gadolinium (Gd) has been the most widely explored, predominant paramagnetic contrast agent until the discovery and association of the metal with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a rare but serious side effects in patients with renal or kidney problems. Manganese was one of the earliest reported examples of paramagnetic contrast material for MRI because of its efficient positive contrast enhancement. In this review, manganese based contrast agent approaches are discussed with a particular emphasis on their synthetic approaches. Both small molecules based typical blood pool contrast agents and more recently developed novel nanometer sized materials are reviewed focusing on a number of successful molecular imaging examples. PMID:22043109

  11. Contrast Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gap Adjustment for Histogram Equalization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Ting, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Image enhancement methods have been widely used to improve the visual effects of images. Owing to its simplicity and effectiveness histogram equalization (HE) is one of the methods used for enhancing image contrast. However, HE may result in over-enhancement and feature loss problems that lead to unnatural look and loss of details in the processed images. Researchers have proposed various HE-based methods to solve the over-enhancement problem; however, they have largely ignored the feature loss problem. Therefore, a contrast enhancement algorithm based on gap adjustment for histogram equalization (CegaHE) is proposed. It refers to a visual contrast enhancement algorithm based on histogram equalization (VCEA), which generates visually pleasing enhanced images, and improves the enhancement effects of VCEA. CegaHE adjusts the gaps between two gray values based on the adjustment equation, which takes the properties of human visual perception into consideration, to solve the over-enhancement problem. Besides, it also alleviates the feature loss problem and further enhances the textures in the dark regions of the images to improve the quality of the processed images for human visual perception. Experimental results demonstrate that CegaHE is a reliable method for contrast enhancement and that it significantly outperforms VCEA and other methods. PMID:27338412

  12. Gold nanoparticle based X-ray contrast agent for tumor imaging in mice and dog: a potential nano-platform for computer tomography theranostics.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Nripen; Upendran, Anandhi; Boote, Evan J; Zambre, Ajit; Axiak, Sandra; Selting, Kimberly; Katti, Kattesh V; Leevy, W Matthew; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Vimal, Jatin; Singh, Jason; Lattimer, Jimmy C; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2014-03-01

    The goal of our study was to demonstrate the utility of nanocrystalline gold as an X-ray contrast agent for imaging tumor in living subjects. Even though significant progress has been achieved in this area by researchers, clinical translation remains challenging. Here, we investigated biocompatible gum Arabic stabilized gold nanocrystals (GA-AuNPs) as X-ray contrast agent in tumor bearing mice and dog. Single intratumoral injections of GA-AuNP resulted in X-ray contrast change of -26 HU in the tumor region after 1 hour post-injection period. Subsequently, five intratumoral injections were performed in the mice. The change in CT number in tumor region is not progressive; rather it reaches a saturation point after fourth injection. These data suggested that accumulation of GA-AuNP reaches a threshold limit within a short time period (5 h), and is retained in the tumor tissue for the rest of the period of investigation. A pilot study was conducted in a client-owned dog presented with collision tumor of thyroid carcinoma and osteosarcoma. In this study, GA-AuNP was injected intratumorally in dog and a contrast enhancement of 12 deltaHU was observed. The CT images of both mice and dog clearly demonstrated that GA-AuNP was effectively distributed and retained throughout the tumor site. The CT data obtained by the present study would provide the crucial dosimetry information for strategic therapy planning using this construct. Both mice and dog did not show any clinical changes, thereby confirming that GA-AuNP did not induce toxicity and can be explored for future clinical applications.

  13. Intravascular contrast agents suitable for magnetic resonance imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Herzer, W.A.; Gibbs, S.J.; Price, A.C.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Two paramagnetic chelates, chromium EDTA and gadolinium DTPA, were evaluated as potential intravenous contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. After evaluating both agents in vitro, in vivo studies were conducted in dogs to document changes in renal appearance produced by contrast injection. Acute splenic and renal infarction were diagnosed with contrast-enhanced MR and confirmed by gamma camera imaging following administration of Tc-99m-labeled DMSA and sulfur colloid. The authors conclude that intravenous paramagnetic contrast agents presently offer the best mechanism for assessment of tissue function and changes in perfusion with MR.

  14. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation. PMID:23887204

  15. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a new Mn - Contrast agent for MR imaging of myocardium based on the DTPA-phenylpentadecanoic acid complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanin, Maxim L.; Stepanova, Elena V.; Valiev, Rashid R.; Filimonov, Victor D.; Usov, Vladimir Y.; Borodin, Oleg Y.; Ågren, Hans

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper we describe the first synthesis and evaluation of a novel Mn (II) complex (DTPA-PPDA Mn (II)) which contains a C-15 fatty acid moiety that has high affinity to the heart muscle. The complexation energy of DTPA-PPDA Mn (II) evaluated by quantum chemistry methodology indicates that it essentially exceeds the corresponding value for the known DTPA Mn (II) complex. Molecular docking revealed that the affinity of the designed complex to the heart-type transport protein H-FABP well exceeds that of lauric acid. Phantom experiments in low-field MRI the designed contrast agent provides MR imaging comparable to gadopentetic acid.

  16. Quantitative analysis of shape and volume changes in activated thrombocytes in real time by single-shot spatial light modulator-based differential interference contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saranjam; Jesacher, Alexander; Nussbaumer, Walter; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2011-09-01

    We suggest to use a combination of optical tweezers and single-image quantitative differential interference contrast (DIC) emulated by a spatial light modulator (SLM) to study physiological shape changes in thrombocytes after activation and demonstrate the effectiveness of this system for the given task. A specially designed phase mask displayed at the SLM enables quantitative phase calculation from only a single recording. The optical tweezers stabilize trapped thrombocytes for long-time monitoring of changes in the optical thickness profile of thrombocytes during activation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP).

  17. Laboratory test of a polarimetry imaging subtraction system for the high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Li, Rong

    2012-09-01

    We propose a polarimetry imaging subtraction test system that can be used for the direct imaging of the reflected light from exoplanets. Such a system will be able to remove the speckle noise scattered by the wave-front error and thus can enhance the high-contrast imaging. In this system, we use a Wollaston Prism (WP) to divide the incoming light into two simultaneous images with perpendicular linear polarizations. One of the images is used as the reference image. Then both the phase and geometric distortion corrections have been performed on the other image. The corrected image is subtracted with the reference image to remove the speckles. The whole procedure is based on an optimization algorithm and the target function is to minimize the residual speckles after subtraction. For demonstration purpose, here we only use a circular pupil in the test without integrating of our apodized-pupil coronagraph. It is shown that best result can be gained by inducing both phase and distortion corrections. Finally, it has reached an extra contrast gain of 50-times improvement in average, which is promising to be used for the direct imaging of exoplanets.

  18. Endoluminal contrast for abdomen and pelvis magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mohit K; Khatri, Gaurav; Bailey, April; Pinho, Daniella F; Costa, Daniel; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the abdomen and pelvis can be limited for assessment of different conditions when imaging inadequately distended hollow organs. Endoluminal contrast agents may provide improved anatomic definition and detection of subtle pathology in such scenarios. The available routes of administration for endoluminal contrast agents include oral, endorectal, endovaginal, intravesicular, and through non-physiologic accesses. Appropriate use of endoluminal contrast agents requires a thorough understanding of the clinical indications, available contrast agents, patient preparation, and interaction of the contrast agent with the desired MR imaging protocol. For example, biphasic oral enteric contrast agents are preferred in MR enterography as their signal properties on T1- and T2-weighted imaging allow for evaluation of both intraluminal and bowel wall pathology. In specific situations such as with MR enterography, MR defecography, and accurate local staging of certain pelvic tumors, the use of an endoluminal contrast agent is imperative in providing adequate diagnostic imaging. In other clinical scenarios, the use of an endoluminal contrast agent may serve as an indispensable problem-solving tool.

  19. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-respo