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Sample records for imaging guidelines implementation

  1. Diagnostic Imaging Guidelines Implementation Study for Spinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bussières, André E.; Laurencelle, Louis; Peterson, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Implementation strategies of imaging guidelines can assist in reducing the number of radiographic examinations. This study aimed to compare the perceived need for diagnostic imaging before and after an educational intervention strategy. Methods: One hundred sixty Swiss chiropractors attending a conference were randomized to either receive a radiology workshop, reviewing appropriate indications for diagnostic imaging for adult spine disorders (n = 80), or be in a control group (CG). One group of 40 individuals dropped out from the CG due to logistic reasons. Participants in the intervention group were randomly assigned to three subgroups to evaluate the effect of an online reminder at midpoint. All participants underwent a pretest and a final test at 14–16 weeks. A posttest was administered to two subgroups at 8–10 weeks. Results: There was no difference between baseline scores, and overall scores for the pretest and the final tests for all four groups were not significantly different. However, the subgroup provided with access to a reminder performed significantly better than the subgroup with whom they were compared (F = 4.486; df = 1 and 30; p = .043). Guideline adherence was 50.5% (95% CI, 39.1–61.8) for the intervention group and 43.7% (95% CI, 23.7–63.6) for the CG at baseline. Adherence at follow-up was lower, but mean group differences remained insignificant. Conclusions: Online access to specific recommendations while making a clinical decision may favorably influence the intention to either order or not order imaging studies. However, a didactic presentation alone did not appear to change the perception for the need of diagnostic imaging studies. PMID:20480010

  2. Summary of the proceedings of the international forum 2016: "Imaging referral guidelines and clinical decision support - how can radiologists implement imaging referral guidelines in clinical routine?"

    PubMed

    2017-02-01

    The International Forum is held once a year by the ESR and its international radiological partner societies with the aim to address and discuss selected subjects of global relevance in radiology. In 2016, the issue of implementing imaging referral guidelines in clinical routine was analysed. The legal environment in the USA requires that after January 1, 2017, physicians must consult government-approved, evidence-based appropriate-use criteria through a clinical decision support system when ordering advanced diagnostic imaging exams. The ESR and the National Decision Support Company are developing "ESR iGuide", a clinical decision support system for European imaging referral guidelines using ESR imaging referral guidelines based on ACR Appropriateness Criteria. In many regions of the world, the situation is different and quite diverse, depending on the specific features of health care systems in different countries, but there are, unlike in the USA and EU, no legal obligations to implement imaging referral guidelines into the clinical practice. Imaging referral guidelines and clinical decision support implementation is a complex issue everywhere and the legal environment surrounding it even more so; how they will be implemented into the clinical practice in different areas of the world needs yet to be decided.

  3. [DESIGN AND VALIDATION OF AN IMAGE FOR DISSEMINATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF CHILEAN DIETARY GUIDELINES].

    PubMed

    Olivares Cortés, Sonia; Zacarías Hasbún, Isabel; González González, Carmen Gloria; Fonseca Morán, Lilian; Mediano Stoltze, Fernanda; Pinheiro Fernandes, Anna Christina; Rodríguez Osiac, Lorena

    2015-08-01

    Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) are usually accompanied by an image for dissemination and implementation. to design and validate an image to represent the variety and proportions of the new Chilean dietary guidelines, include foods high in critical nutrients that should be avoided and physical activity guidelines. a panel of experts tested seven graphics and selected three that were validated with 12 focus groups of people aged 10-14 and 20-40 years, of both sexes, from different socioeconomic groups and from both rural and urban areas. We analyzed the perception of variety and proportions of the food groups for daily intake and motivation for action in diet and physical activity. We utilized the METAPLAN method used previously in the validation of FBDG. the final image was a circle that showed the variety and proportions of each food group for daily consumption (in pictures), included physical activity guidelines in a strip around the middle of the circle and a rectangle towards of bottom of the image with examples of foods high in critical nutrients in black and white. The chosen picture was modified using input from participants and validated with three additional focus groups, improving its understanding and acceptance. most participants understood that the image represented the relationship between healthy eating and daily physical activity, correctly identifying the food groups for which increased intake was suggested and those groups in which intake should be reduced or avoided. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Guideline Implementation: Preventing Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-03-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for prevention of unplanned patient hypothermia" provides guidance for identifying factors associated with intraoperative hypothermia, preventing hypothermia, educating perioperative personnel on this topic, and developing relevant policies and procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline, which addresses performing a preoperative assessment for factors that may contribute to hypothermia, measuring and monitoring the patient's temperature in all phases of perioperative care, and implementing interventions to prevent hypothermia. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  5. Guideline Implementation: Hand Hygiene.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Judith L

    2017-02-01

    Performing proper hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis is essential to reducing the rates of health care-associated infections, including surgical site infections. The updated AORN "Guideline for hand hygiene" provides guidance on hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, the wearing of fingernail polish and artificial nails, proper skin care to prevent dermatitis, the wearing of jewelry, hand hygiene product selection, and quality assurance and performance improvement considerations. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel make informed decisions about hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis. The key points address the necessity of keeping fingernails and skin healthy, not wearing jewelry on the hands or wrists in the perioperative area, properly performing hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, and involving patients and visitors in hand hygiene initiatives. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  6. Guideline implementation: Surgical attire.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Liz; Holm, Rebecca L

    2015-02-01

    Surgical attire helps protect patients from microorganisms that may be shed from the hair and skin of perioperative personnel. The updated AORN "Guideline for surgical attire" provides guidance on scrub attire, shoes, head coverings, and masks worn in the semirestricted and restricted areas of the perioperative setting, as well as how to handle personal items (eg, jewelry, backpacks, cell phones) that may be taken into the perioperative suite. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel adhere to facility policies and regulatory requirements for attire. The key points address the potential benefits of wearing scrub attire made of antimicrobial fabric, covering the arms when in the restricted area of the surgical suite, removing or confining jewelry when wearing scrub attire, disinfecting personal items that will be taken into the perioperative suite, and sending reusable attire to a health care-accredited laundry facility after use. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 10 CFR 960.3 - Implementation guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Implementation guidelines. 960.3 Section 960.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3 Implementation guidelines. The guidelines of this...

  8. 10 CFR 960.3 - Implementation guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Implementation guidelines. 960.3 Section 960.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3 Implementation guidelines. The guidelines of this...

  9. 10 CFR 960.3 - Implementation guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Implementation guidelines. 960.3 Section 960.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3 Implementation guidelines. The guidelines of this...

  10. 10 CFR 960.3 - Implementation guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Implementation guidelines. 960.3 Section 960.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3 Implementation guidelines. The guidelines of this...

  11. 10 CFR 960.3 - Implementation guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Implementation guidelines. 960.3 Section 960.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3 Implementation guidelines. The guidelines of this...

  12. GOSIP implementation guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Van Norman, H.J.

    1996-07-01

    GOSIP (Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile) is a subset of ISO`s OSI protocol standards relevant to US Government operations. As a Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS), GOSIP is required by law for all Federal agencies. Mandatory standards-based communications products are required when purchasing functionality equivalent to what is specified in GOSIP. This unprecedented requirement by the Federal government has caused considerable confusion concerning practical implementation of relatively immature and untested technologies. Many organizations already have substantial investment in one or more proprietary network architectures. This paper examines issues associated with conversion to the GOSIP system.

  13. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Guideline implementation: surgical instrument cleaning.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Liz; Holm, Rebecca L

    2015-05-01

    Cleaning, decontaminating, and handling instructions for instruments vary widely based on the type of instrument and the manufacturer. Processing instruments in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions can help prevent damage and keep devices in good working order. Most importantly, proper cleaning and disinfection may prevent transmission of pathogenic organisms from a contaminated device to a patient or health care worker. The updated AORN "Guideline for cleaning and care of surgical instruments" provides guidance on cleaning, decontaminating, transporting, inspecting, and storing instruments. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel implement appropriate instrument care protocols in their practice settings. The key points address timely cleaning and decontamination of instruments after use; appropriate heating, ventilation, and air conditioning parameters for the decontamination area; processing of ophthalmic instruments and laryngoscopes; and precautions to take with instruments used in cases of suspected prion disease. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  15. Implementation of technetium-99m MIBI SPECT imaging guidelines: optimizing the two day stress-rest protocol.

    PubMed

    Lavalaye, J M; Schroeder-Tanka, J M; Tiel-van Buul, M M; van der Wall, E E; Lie, K I; van Royen, E A

    1997-08-01

    In a previous study in 460 patients, we found that in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease undergoing stress-rest technetium-99m sestamibi (MIBI) SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging, rest SPECT imaging could be withhold in approximately 20% of patients because of a completely normal stress study. The present study was set up to evaluate the consequences of the implementation of this finding in a subsequent population of patients, and to set standards for the variety of protocols now used for MIBI SPECT imaging. Within a period of 4 months, 235 consecutive patients referred for MIBI SPECT scintigraphy were studied. All patients had stable cardiac chest pain and underwent symptom-limited exercise MIBI SPECT perfusion imaging. The stress SPECT images were reconstructed and evaluated immediately after acquisition of the images. In case of a clearly normal stress SPECT study, rest imaging was cancelled. Twenty-six of 235 patients (11%) had a completely normal stress MIBI SPECT study and the rest SPECT imaging procedure could be subsequently cancelled. In 20 patients (9%) the stress SPECT was inconclusive, and in 189 (80%) of patients stress imaging was clearly abnormal. In the first month of the study, the nuclear medicine physicians and cardiologists would interprete only 6% of the stress images as normal, while this number increased to 13% after 9 weeks, with a mean of 11% for the whole investigation period of 4 months. In patients undergoing stress MIBI SPECT imaging, it was found justified to cancel rest MIBI SPECT imaging in at least 11% of patients because of a completely normal stress SPECT. As 9% of the images were inconclusive, the number of normal stress images could theoretically increase to 20% if reliable measures are taken to improve reading accuracy. This number is in close agreement with the number of normal stress studies previously reported by our institution and would lead to a considerable reduction of radiation dose, costs, and

  16. Total quality management implementation guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

  17. Implementing the NICE OCD/BDD guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Karina; Bee, Penny

    2008-12-01

    The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) has produced a nationally coordinated programme of clinical guidelines which provide rigorous and systematically derived statements of best evidence to improve patient care. Successful implementation of the NICE guidelines into clinical practice is complex and challenging and this paper focuses on the specific barriers and facilitators of implementing the obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) guidelines. Particular challenges for this guideline are the very nature of OCD/BDD, the adoption of the stepped care model and specific treatment and training issues.

  18. Guidelines for Implementing Teletraining Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chute, Alan G.

    Designed to provide change agents with a framework for planning and implementing successful teletraining systems, this paper discusses strategies for the introduction of sophisticated teletraining technology into corporate training programs without adversely affecting a client organization's social environment. Teletraining is defined as an…

  19. Integrating guideline development and implementation: analysis of guideline development manual instructions for generating implementation advice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Guidelines are important tools that inform healthcare delivery based on best available research evidence. Guideline use is in part based on quality of the guidelines, which includes advice for implementation and has been shown to vary. Others hypothesized this is due to limited instructions in guideline development manuals. The purpose of this study was to examine manual instructions for implementation advice. Methods We used a directed and summative content analysis approach based on an established framework of guideline implementability. Six manuals identified by another research group were examined to enumerate implementability domains and elements. Results Manuals were similar in content but lacked sufficient detail in particular domains. Most frequently this was Accomodation, which includes information that would help guideline users anticipate and/or overcome organizational and system level barriers. In more than one manual, information was also lacking for Communicability, information that would educate patients or facilitate their involvement in shared decision making, and Applicability, or clinical parameters to help clinicians tailor recommendations for individual patients. Discussion Most manuals that direct guideline development lack complete information about incorporating implementation advice. These findings can be used by those who developed the manuals to consider expanding their content in these domains. It can also be used by guideline developers as they plan the content and implementation of their guidelines so that the two are integrated. New approaches for guideline development and implementation may need to be developed. Use of guidelines might be improved if they included implementation advice, but this must be evaluated through ongoing research. PMID:22824094

  20. Bridging the Guideline Implementation Gap: A Systematic, Document-Centered Approach to Guideline Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Richard N.; Michel, George; Essaihi, Abdelwaheb; Thornquist, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Objective: A gap exists between the information contained in published clinical practice guidelines and the knowledge and information that are necessary to implement them. This work describes a process to systematize and make explicit the translation of document-based knowledge into workflow-integrated clinical decision support systems. Design: This approach uses the Guideline Elements Model (GEM) to represent the guideline knowledge. Implementation requires a number of steps to translate the knowledge contained in guideline text into a computable format and to integrate the information into clinical workflow. The steps include: (1) selection of a guideline and specific recommendations for implementation, (2) markup of the guideline text, (3) atomization, (4) deabstraction and (5) disambiguation of recommendation concepts, (6) verification of rule set completeness, (7) addition of explanations, (8) building executable statements, (9) specification of origins of decision variables and insertions of recommended actions, (10) definition of action types and selection of associated beneficial services, (11) choice of interface components, and (12) creation of requirement specification. Results: The authors illustrate these component processes using examples drawn from recent experience translating recommendations from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's guideline on management of chronic asthma into a workflow-integrated decision support system that operates within the Logician electronic health record system. Conclusion: Using the guideline document as a knowledge source promotes authentic translation of domain knowledge and reduces the overall complexity of the implementation task. From this framework, we believe that a better understanding of activities involved in guideline implementation will emerge. PMID:15187061

  1. Implementation of Job Placement Services Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillicuddy (Shirley) & Associates, Sierra Madre, CA.

    The Implementation of Job Placement Services Guidelines Project was designed to strengthen placement programs and services for California community college vocational students, and for all students needing part-time employment to realize their educational goals. The project was designed to test the validity and relevance of quality indicators…

  2. Guidelines for Implementing Workplace Literacy Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jester, Marie H.

    This document provides guidelines for implementing workplace literacy programs. Project leadership selection, characteristics and skills, education and experience, and roles and responsibilities are reviewed. Community and business involvement, partnership development, and the voluntary advisory council components of a marketing workplace literacy…

  3. Implementation of Job Placement Services Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillicuddy (Shirley) & Associates, Sierra Madre, CA.

    The Implementation of Job Placement Services Guidelines Project was designed to strengthen placement programs and services for California community college vocational students, and for all students needing part-time employment to realize their educational goals. The project was designed to test the validity and relevance of quality indicators…

  4. Reporting guidelines for implementation and operational research.

    PubMed

    Hales, Simon; Lesher-Trevino, Ana; Ford, Nathan; Maher, Dermot; Ramsay, Andrew; Tran, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    In public health, implementation research is done to improve access to interventions that have been shown to work but have not reached many of the people who could benefit from them. Researchers identify practical problems facing public health programmes and aim to find solutions that improve health outcomes. In operational research, routinely-collected programme data are used to uncover ways of delivering more effective, efficient and equitable health care. As implementation research can address many types of questions, many research designs may be appropriate. Existing reporting guidelines partially cover the methods used in implementation and operational research, so we ran a consultation through the World Health Organization (WHO), the Alliance for Health Policy & Systems Research (AHPSR) and the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and developed guidelines to facilitate the funding, conduct, review and publishing of such studies. Our intention is to provide a practical reference for funders, researchers, policymakers, implementers, reviewers and editors working with implementation and operational research. This is an evolving field, so we plan to monitor the use of these guidelines and develop future versions as required.

  5. Reporting guidelines for implementation and operational research

    PubMed Central

    Lesher-Trevino, Ana; Ford, Nathan; Maher, Dermot; Ramsay, Andrew; Tran, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In public health, implementation research is done to improve access to interventions that have been shown to work but have not reached many of the people who could benefit from them. Researchers identify practical problems facing public health programmes and aim to find solutions that improve health outcomes. In operational research, routinely-collected programme data are used to uncover ways of delivering more effective, efficient and equitable health care. As implementation research can address many types of questions, many research designs may be appropriate. Existing reporting guidelines partially cover the methods used in implementation and operational research, so we ran a consultation through the World Health Organization (WHO), the Alliance for Health Policy & Systems Research (AHPSR) and the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and developed guidelines to facilitate the funding, conduct, review and publishing of such studies. Our intention is to provide a practical reference for funders, researchers, policymakers, implementers, reviewers and editors working with implementation and operational research. This is an evolving field, so we plan to monitor the use of these guidelines and develop future versions as required. PMID:26769997

  6. Implementing the Exercise Guidelines for Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Schwartz, Anna L.; Matthews, Charles E.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the American College of Sports Medicine convened an expert roundtable to issue guidelines on exercise for cancer survivors. This multidisciplinary group evaluated the strength of the evidence for the safety and benefits of exercise as a therapeutic intervention for survivors. The panel concluded that exercise is safe and offers myriad benefits for survivors including improvements in physical function, strength, fatigue, quality of life (QOL), and possibly recurrence and survival. Recommendations for situations in which deviations from the US Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are appropriate were provided. Here, we outline a process for implementing the guidelines in clinical practice, and provide recommendations for how the oncology care provider can interface with the exercise and physical therapy community. PMID:22579268

  7. Computer-based Guideline Implementation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Richard N.; Liaw, Yischon; Brandt, Cynthia A.; Corb, Geoffrey J.

    1999-01-01

    In this systematic review, the authors analyze the functionality provided by recent computer-based guideline implementation systems and characterize the effectiveness of the systems. Twenty-five studies published between 1992 and January 1998 were identified. Articles were included if the authors indicated an intent to implement guideline recommendations for clinicians and if the effectiveness of the system was evaluated. Provision of eight information management services and effects on guideline adherence, documentation, user satisfaction, and patient outcome were noted. All systems provided patient-specific recommendations. In 19, recommendations were available concurrently with care. Explanation services were described for nine systems. Nine systems allowed interactive documentation, and 17 produced paper-based output. Communication services were present most often in systems integrated with electronic medical records. Registration, calculation, and aggregation services were infrequently reported. There were 10 controlled trials (9 randomized) and 10 time-series correlational studies. Guideline adherence improved in 14 of 18 systems in which it was measured. Documentation improved in 4 of 4 studies. PMID:10094063

  8. Epilepsy Imaging Study Guideline Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, William D; Cross, J Helen; Duncan, John S; Stefan, Hermann; Theodore, William H

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of limited economic resources, as well as potential adverse effects of ‘over testing,’ has increased interest in ‘evidence-based’ assessment of new medical technology. This creates a particular problem for evaluation and treatment of epilepsy, increasingly dependent on advanced imaging and electrophysiology, since there is a marked paucity of epilepsy diagnostic and prognostic studies that meet rigorous standards for evidence classification. The lack of high quality data reflects fundamental weaknesses in many imaging studies but also limitations in the assumptions underlying evidence classification schemes as they relate to epilepsy, and to the practicalities of conducting adequately powered studies of rapidly evolving technologies. We review the limitations of current guidelines and propose elements for imaging studies that can contribute meaningfully to the epilepsy literature. PMID:21740417

  9. Developing and implementing dietary guidelines in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Kamala

    2008-01-01

    Single nutrients are no solution to the problem of malnutrition. It is essential that food based dietary guidelines (FBDG) are developed and implemented to overcome the diet related diseases and promote health in the population. A multidisciplinary group was constituted to develop FBDGs in India. A manual with scientific details and an abridged version were prepared with 6 goals and 14 dietary guidelines covering all age groups to overcome the public health nutritional problems. The guidelines are based on dietary patterns and specific outcomes of health and disease. Dietary diversification has been suggested as the practical approach. Diets from locally available and culturally accepted foods in household measures have been suggested to ensure optimal health. For successful implementation of FBDGs, political/bureaucratic commitment are essential. It must become a tool in the developmental plans for food, nutrition, agriculture, rural, educational and biotechnology policies. Workshops and meetings were organized to sensitise the administrative set-up. The intersectoral nature of FBDG for implementation was highlighted. The department of women and child development, which is responsible for implementing the National Nutritional Policy, was recognized as nodal agency. Meetings were organised for secondary target audiences. The press was invited to participate in popularization of the FBDGs. Social marketing strategies were used to match the local dietary and cultural aspects. Interpersonal communication and professional societies were used for better dissemination. Industry and legislative bodies were requested to take active action in this regard. The FBDGs have to be implemented to achieve food and nutrition security and the Millennium Development Goals.

  10. Guideline Implementation: Prevention of Retained Surgical Items.

    PubMed

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2016-07-01

    A surgical item unintentionally retained in a patient after an operative or other invasive procedure is a serious, preventable medical error with the potential to cause the patient great harm. Perioperative RNs play a key role in preventing retained surgical items (RSIs). The updated AORN "Guideline for prevention of retained surgical items" provides guidance for implementing a consistent, multidisciplinary approach to RSI prevention; accounting for surgical items; preventing retention of device fragments; reconciling count discrepancies; and using adjunct technologies to supplement manual count procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel provide optimal care during a procedure. Key points addressed include taking responsibility for RSI prevention as a team; minimizing distractions, noise, and interruptions during counts; using consistent counting methods; reconciling discrepancies; and participating in performance-improvement activities. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance in writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Developing clinical practice guidelines: reviewing, reporting, and publishing guidelines; updating guidelines; and the emerging issues of enhancing guideline implementability and accounting for comorbid conditions in guideline development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence). It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this third paper we discuss the issues of: reviewing, reporting, and publishing guidelines; updating guidelines; and the two emerging issues of enhancing guideline implementability and how guideline developers should approach dealing with the issue of patients who will be the subject of guidelines having co-morbid conditions. PMID:22762242

  12. Inpatient bronchiolitis guideline implementation and resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Vineeta; Darnell, Cindy; Walsh, Brian; Mehta, Amit; Badawy, Mohamed; Morse, Rustin; Pop, Rodica; Tidwell, Jerithea; Sheehan, Maeve; McDermott, Sandra; Cannon, Carolyn; Kahn, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Provider-dependent practice variation in children hospitalized with bronchiolitis is not uncommon. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) can streamline practice and reduce utilization however, CPG implementation is complex. A multidisciplinary team developed and implemented CPGs for management of bronchiolitis for children <2 years old. Children with comorbidities, ICU admissions, and outside hospital transfers were excluded. Implementation involved teamwork and collaboration, provider education, online access to CPGs, order sets, data sharing, and monthly team meetings. Resource utilization was defined as use of chest x-rays (CXRs), antibiotics, steroids, and more than 2 doses of inhaled bronchodilator use. Outcome metrics included length of stay (LOS) and readmission rate. Bronchiolitis season was defined as September to April. Data were collected for 2 seasons post implementation. The number CPG-eligible patients in the pre- and 2 postimplementation periods were similar (1244, preimplementation; 1159, postimplementation season 1; 1283 postimplementation season 2). CXRs decreased from 59.7% to 45.1% (P < .0001) in season 1 to 39% (P < .0001) in season 2. Bronchodilator use decreased from 27% to 20% (P < .01) in season 1 to 14% (P < .002) in season 2. Steroid use significantly reduced from 19% to 11% (P < .01). Antibiotic use did not change significantly (P = .16). LOS decreased from 2.3 to 1.8 days (P < .0001) in season 1 and 1.9 days (P < .05) in season 2. All-cause 7-day readmission rate did not change (P = .45). Bronchiolitis CPG implementation resulted in reduced use of CXRs, bronchodilators, steroids, and LOS without affecting 7-day all-cause readmissions.

  13. Implementing Guidelines One Patient at a Time.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Alex R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are an important component of health care delivery. Although guidelines can be viewed negatively, as "cookbook medicine," many guidelines have improved care delivery. Work is needed to refine guidelines in real-world settings and to assure that they are patient-centered.

  14. Guidelines for Implementing Training Effectiveness Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Clarence A.

    The document presents guidelines for planning, implementing, and documenting training effectiveness evaluations. The guidelines are intended to assist researchers in coping with many of the constraints associated with executing empirical research in operational settings. (NTIS)

  15. Guidelines for Implementing Training Effectiveness Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Clarence A.

    The document presents guidelines for planning, implementing, and documenting training effectiveness evaluations. The guidelines are intended to assist researchers in coping with many of the constraints associated with executing empirical research in operational settings. (NTIS)

  16. Reflections on Implementing the ITC's International Guidelines for Test Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, Cheryl D.

    2001-01-01

    Considers ways to implement the International Guidelines for Test Use (International Test Commission, 2001) to maximize their intended impact . The process calls for customizing the guidelines for specific assessment contexts and needs and using the guidelines to generate competency standards. (SLD)

  17. Implementing a radiology-information technology project: mobile image viewing use case and a general guideline for radiologist-information technology team collaboration.

    PubMed

    Walz-Flannigan, Alisa; Kotsenas, Amy L; Hein, Shelly; Persons, Kenneth R; Langer, Steve G; Erickson, Bradley J; Tjelta, Jason A; Luetmer, Patrick H

    2015-04-01

    This article illustrates the importance of radiologist engagement in the successful implementation of radiology-information technology (IT) projects through the example of establishing a mobile image viewing solution for health care professionals. With an understanding of the types of decisions that benefit from radiologist input, this article outlines an overall project framework to provide a context for how radiologists might engage in the project cycle.

  18. Hypertension guideline implementation: experiences of Finnish primary care nurses.

    PubMed

    Alanen, Seija; Ijäs, Jarja; Kaila, Minna; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Välimäki, Maritta

    2008-10-01

    Evidence-based guidelines on hypertension have been developed in many western countries. Yet, there is little evidence of their impact on the clinical practices of primary care nurses. We assessed the style of implementation and adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline (HT Guideline) in 32 Finnish health centres classified in a previous study as 'disseminators' (n = 13) or 'implementers' (n = 19). A postal questionnaire was sent to all nurses (n = 409) working in the outpatient services in these health centres. Additionally, senior nursing officers were telephoned to enquire if the implementation of the HT Guideline had led to a new division of labour between nurses and doctors. Questionnaires were returned from 327 nurses (80.0%), while all senior nursing officers (n = 32) were contacted. The majority of nurses were of the opinion that the HT Guideline has been adopted into clinical practice. The recommendations in the HT Guideline were adopted in clinical practice with varying success, and slightly more often in implementer health centres than in disseminator health centres. Nurses in implementer health centres more often agreed that multiple channels had been used in the implementation (P < 0.001). According to senior nursing officers the implementation of the HT Guideline had led to a new division of labour between nurses and doctors in about a half of the health centres, clearly more often in implementer health centres (P < 0.001). The HT Guideline was well adopted into clinical practice in Finland. The implementation of the HT Guideline had an impact on clinical practices, and on creating a new division of labour between nurses and doctors.

  19. Guideline implementation: preoperative patient skin antisepsis.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Liz; Holm, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Performing preoperative skin antisepsis to remove soil and microorganisms at the surgical site may help prevent patients from developing a surgical site infection. The updated AORN "Guideline for preoperative skin antisepsis" addresses the topics of preoperative patient bathing and hair removal, selection and application of skin antiseptics, and safe handling, storage, and disposal of skin antiseptics. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel develop protocols for patient skin antisepsis. The key points include the need for the patient to take a preoperative bath or shower and the need for perioperative personnel to manage hair at the surgical site, select a safe and effective antiseptic for the individual patient, perform a safe preoperative surgical site prep, and appropriately store skin antiseptics. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  20. Barriers and Strategies in Guideline Implementation-A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Florian; Lange, Kerstin; Klose, Kristina; Greiner, Wolfgang; Kraemer, Alexander

    2016-06-29

    Research indicates that clinical guidelines are often not applied. The success of their implementation depends on the consideration of a variety of barriers and the use of adequate strategies to overcome them. Therefore, this scoping review aims to describe and categorize the most important barriers to guideline implementation. Furthermore, it provides an overview of different kinds of suitable strategies that are tailored to overcome these barriers. The search algorithm led to the identification of 1659 articles in PubMed. Overall, 69 articles were included in the data synthesis. The content of these articles was analysed by using a qualitative synthesis approach, to extract the most important information on barriers and strategies. The barriers to guideline implementation can be differentiated into personal factors, guideline-related factors, and external factors. The scoping review revealed the following aspects as central elements of successful strategies for guideline implementation: dissemination, education and training, social interaction, decision support systems and standing orders. Available evidence indicates that a structured implementation can improve adherence to guidelines. Therefore, the barriers to guideline implementation and adherence need to be analysed in advance so that strategies that are tailored to the specific setting and target groups can be developed.

  1. Defining and Developing Proficiency. Guidelines, Implementations and Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Heidi, Ed.; Canale, Michael, Ed.

    This volume presents papers that dicusss the need for more systematic and rigorous research programs to monitor the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines and their various implementations. "A Progress Report on the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines, 1982-1986" (David V. Hiple), traces the…

  2. Guidelines for Implementing State Skill Standards Certificate Program in Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Workforce Development, Madison.

    This packet contains guidelines, a student competency checklist, and student evaluation sheet for use in a Wisconsin school-to-work state skill standards certificate program in construction. The guidelines provide a planning resource for implementing the program, which was created in partnership with unions, employers, the state Department of…

  3. Guidelines for Implementing State Skill Standards Certificate Program in Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Workforce Development, Madison.

    This packet contains guidelines, a student competency checklist, and student evaluation sheet for use in a Wisconsin school-to-work state skill standards certificate program in construction. The guidelines provide a planning resource for implementing the program, which was created in partnership with unions, employers, the state Department of…

  4. Creation and implementation of standardised craniofacial views for the Institute Of Medical Illustrators National Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Vetter (1) states, "Standardisation is the key word in all discussions of clinical photography". As part of clinical photography standardised guidelines form an integral part of providing a basis to obtaining standardised images. The Institute of Medical Illustrators (IMI) provides sets of standardised guidelines that have been developed in consultation with relevant clinicians, providing theory and standardised images that are to be considered as guides to good clinical photography practice. At the time of the study there were no official standardised IMI guidelines for craniofacial photography, for this reason, the primary objective of this project was to produce a set of standardised craniofacial guidelines that could be utilised by other clinical photographers for guidance on taking craniofacial images. This paper describes the development, evaluation and implementation of the guidelines.

  5. A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

    1989-06-01

    This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

  6. Overactive Bladder and Continence Guidelines: implementation, inaction or frustration?

    PubMed

    Wagg, A; Cardozo, L; Chapple, C; Diaz, D C; de Ridder, D; Espuna-Pons, M; Haab, F; Kelleher, C; Kolbl, H; Milsom, I; Van Kerrebroeck, P; Vierhout, M; Kirby, M

    2008-10-01

    Guidelines for the management of continence and overactive bladder are generally available across Europe. For a majority of countries, these have been adopted by professional societies in either urology or gynaecology for local use. There has, however, been little monitoring of formal implementation of these guidelines and seldom any attempt to audit their operation. The state of continence care therefore remains largely unknown. This article reviews current guidelines and their status across Europe and examines what might be relevant from other disease areas to promote successful implementation.

  7. Digital Imaging and Conservation: Model Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the intersection of conservation and digital imaging based on guidelines at the Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) library. Discusses the digitization of artifacts; assessing the condition prior to scanning; scanning considerations, including temperature and humidity, lighting, and security; stable storage of artifacts after scanning; and…

  8. Digital Imaging and Conservation: Model Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the intersection of conservation and digital imaging based on guidelines at the Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) library. Discusses the digitization of artifacts; assessing the condition prior to scanning; scanning considerations, including temperature and humidity, lighting, and security; stable storage of artifacts after scanning; and…

  9. State Laws and Guidelines for Implementing RTI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.; Thomas, Lisa B.

    2010-01-01

    The legal source of schools' use of response to intervention (RTI) is a matter of federal and state special education laws, although its implementation is largely a matter of general education practice. The only mention of RTI is in the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and it is limited to identification of students with…

  10. State Laws and Guidelines for Implementing RTI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.; Thomas, Lisa B.

    2010-01-01

    The legal source of schools' use of response to intervention (RTI) is a matter of federal and state special education laws, although its implementation is largely a matter of general education practice. The only mention of RTI is in the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and it is limited to identification of students with…

  11. A practical approach to implementing new CDC GBS guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hill, Shawna M; Bridges, Margie A; Knudsen, Alexis L; Vezeau, Toni M

    2013-01-01

    Group beta streptococcus (GBS) is a well-documented pathogen causing serious maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The CDC guidelines for managing clients who test positive for GBS in pregnancy were revised and published in 2010. However, CDC and extant literature provide limited guidance on implementation strategies for these new recommendations. Although several algorithms are included in the CDC (2010) document, none combine the maternal risk factors for practical and consistent implementation from pregnancy to newborn. In response to confusion upon initial education of these guidelines, we developed an algorithm for maternal intrapartum management. In addition, we clarified the CDC (2010) newborn algorithm in response to provider request. Without altering the recommendations, both algorithms provide clarification of the CDC (2010) guidelines. The nursing process provides an organizational structure for the discussion of our efforts to translate the complex guidelines into practice. This article could provide other facilities with tools for dealing with specific aspects of the complex clinical management of perinatal GBS.

  12. Guidelines for Implementing Change: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masekela, Belinda; Nienaber, Rita

    To attain and sustain a competitive advantage organizations are continually faced with the need to change their structures, processes and technologies. Converting to new technology and implementing a new information management system in an organization results in inevitable changes in organizational procedures impacting on the people involved. A major problem encountered during this process is resistance to change, which may contribute to total failure of this system. Change management is the process that can be used to negate this impact and assist employees in transitioning to a new way of doing things.

  13. Guideline adaptation and implementation planning: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adaptation of high-quality practice guidelines for local use has been advanced as an efficient means to improve acceptability and applicability of evidence-informed care. In a pan-Canadian study, we examined how cancer care groups adapted pre-existing guidelines to their unique context and began implementation planning. Methods Using a mixed-methods, case-study design, five cases were purposefully sampled from self-identified groups and followed as they used a structured method and resources for guideline adaptation. Cases received the ADAPTE Collaboration toolkit, facilitation, methodological and logistical support, resources and assistance as required. Documentary and primary data collection methods captured individual case experience, including monthly summaries of meeting and field notes, email/telephone correspondence, and project records. Site visits, process audits, interviews, and a final evaluation forum with all cases contributed to a comprehensive account of participant experience. Results Study cases took 12 to >24 months to complete guideline adaptation. Although participants appreciated the structure, most found the ADAPTE method complex and lacking practical aspects. They needed assistance establishing individual guideline mandate and infrastructure, articulating health questions, executing search strategies, appraising evidence, and achieving consensus. Facilitation was described as a multi-faceted process, a team effort, and an essential ingredient for guideline adaptation. While front-line care providers implicitly identified implementation issues during adaptation, they identified a need to add an explicit implementation planning component. Conclusions Guideline adaptation is a positive initial step toward evidence-informed care, but adaptation (vs. ‘de novo’ development) did not meet expectations for reducing time or resource commitments. Undertaking adaptation is as much about the process (engagement and capacity building) as it

  14. Guideline adaptation and implementation planning: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Margaret B; Graham, Ian D; van den Hoek, Joan; Dogherty, Elizabeth J; Carley, Meg E; Angus, Valerie

    2013-05-08

    Adaptation of high-quality practice guidelines for local use has been advanced as an efficient means to improve acceptability and applicability of evidence-informed care. In a pan-Canadian study, we examined how cancer care groups adapted pre-existing guidelines to their unique context and began implementation planning. Using a mixed-methods, case-study design, five cases were purposefully sampled from self-identified groups and followed as they used a structured method and resources for guideline adaptation. Cases received the ADAPTE Collaboration toolkit, facilitation, methodological and logistical support, resources and assistance as required. Documentary and primary data collection methods captured individual case experience, including monthly summaries of meeting and field notes, email/telephone correspondence, and project records. Site visits, process audits, interviews, and a final evaluation forum with all cases contributed to a comprehensive account of participant experience. Study cases took 12 to >24 months to complete guideline adaptation. Although participants appreciated the structure, most found the ADAPTE method complex and lacking practical aspects. They needed assistance establishing individual guideline mandate and infrastructure, articulating health questions, executing search strategies, appraising evidence, and achieving consensus. Facilitation was described as a multi-faceted process, a team effort, and an essential ingredient for guideline adaptation. While front-line care providers implicitly identified implementation issues during adaptation, they identified a need to add an explicit implementation planning component. Guideline adaptation is a positive initial step toward evidence-informed care, but adaptation (vs. 'de novo' development) did not meet expectations for reducing time or resource commitments. Undertaking adaptation is as much about the process (engagement and capacity building) as it is about the product (adapted guideline

  15. Implementation of study results in guidelines and adherence to guidelines in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Waldfahrer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines were introduced in hospital- and practice-based otorhinolaryngology in the 1990ies, and have been undergoing further development ever since. There are currently 20 guidelines on file at the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head & Neck Surgery. The society has cooperated in further 34 guidelines. The quality of the guidelines has been continuously improved by concrete specifications put forward by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften e.V., AWMF). Since increasing digitalization has made access to scientific publications quicker and simpler, relevant study results can be incorporated in guidelines more easily today than in the analog world. S2e and S3 guidelines must be based on a formal literature search with subsequent evaluation of the evidence. The consensus procedure for S2k guidelines is also regulated. However, the implementation of guidelines in routine medical practice must still be considered inadequate, and there is still a considerable need for improvement in adherence to these guidelines. PMID:28025601

  16. [Implementation of Study Results in Guidelines and Adherence to Guidelines in Clinical Practice].

    PubMed

    Waldfahrer, F

    2016-04-01

    Guidelines were introduced in hospital and practice-based otorhinolaryngology in the 1990s, and have been undergoing further development ever since. There are currently 20 guidelines on file at the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. The Society has cooperated in a further 34 guidelines. The quality of the guidelines has been continually improved by concrete specifications put forward by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany [Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften e.V.]. Since increasing digitalisation has made access to scientific publications quicker and more simple, relevant study results can be incorporated in guidelines more easily today than in the analogue world. S2e and S3 guidelines must be based on a formal literature search with subsequent evaluation of the evidence. The consensus procedure for S2k guidelines is also regulated. However, the implementation of guidelines in routine medical practice must still be considered inadequate, and there is still a considerable need for improvement in adherence to these guidelines. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Multisensor image fusion guidelines in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, C.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing delivers multimodal and -temporal data from the Earth's surface. In order to cope with these multidimensional data sources and to make the most of them, image fusion is a valuable tool. It has developed over the past few decades into a usable image processing technique for extracting information of higher quality and reliability. As more sensors and advanced image fusion techniques have become available, researchers have conducted a vast amount of successful studies using image fusion. However, the definition of an appropriate workflow prior to processing the imagery requires knowledge in all related fields - i.e. remote sensing, image fusion and the desired image exploitation processing. From the findings of this research it can be seen that the choice of the appropriate technique, as well as the fine-tuning of the individual parameters of this technique, is crucial. There is still a lack of strategic guidelines due to the complexity and variability of data selection, processing techniques and applications. This paper gives an overview on the state-of-the-art in remote sensing image fusion including sensors and applications. Putting research results in image fusion from the past 15 years into a context provides a new view on the subject and helps other researchers to build their innovation on these findings. Recommendations of experts help to understand further needs to achieve feasible strategies in remote sensing image fusion.

  18. Clinical guideline implementation strategies for common mental health disorders.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Eliana María; Moriana, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    There has been a considerable proliferation of clinical guidelines recently, but their practical application is low, and organisations do not always implement their own ones. The aim of this study is to analyse and describe key elements of strategies and resources designed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for the implementation of guidelines for common mental health disorders in adults, which are some of the most prevalent worldwide. A systematic review was performed following PRISMA model. Resources, tools and implementation materials where included and categorised considering type, objectives, target and scope. A total of 212 elements were analysed, of which 33.5 and 24.5% are related to the implementation of generalized anxiety and depression guidelines, respectively. Applied tools designed to estimate costs and assess the feasibility of the setting up at local level are the most frequent type of resource. The study highlights the important variety of available materials, classified into 3 main strategies: tools targeting the professionals (30.6%), structural (26.4%), and organizational (24%). Developing guidelines is not enough; it is also necessary to promote their implementation in order to encourage their application. The resources and strategies described in this study may be potentially applicable to other contexts, and helpful to public health managers and professionals in the design of programmes and in the process of informed decision making to help increase access to efficient treatments. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España.

  19. Dietary guidelines and implementation for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kupper, Cynthia

    2005-04-01

    Medical nutrition therapy is the only accepted treatment for celiac disease. This paper summarizes a review of scientific studies using the gluten-free diet, nutritional risk factors, controversial elements of the diet, and its implementation in treating celiac disease. Treatment for celiac disease requires elimination of the storage proteins found in wheat, rye, and barley. The inclusion of oats and wheat starch is controversial. Research supports that oats may be acceptable for patients with celiac disease and can improve the nutritional quality of the diet. However, use of oats is not widely recommended in the United States because of concerns of potential contamination of commercial oats. Studies assessing the contamination of commercial oats are limited. Research indicates no differences in patients choosing a strict wheat starch-containing, gluten-free diet vs. a naturally gluten-free diet. Factors other than trace gluten may be the cause of continued villous atrophy in some patients. The impact of nutrient malabsorption caused from untreated celiac disease is well documented. The diet and gluten-free products are often low in B vitamins, calcium, vitamin D, iron, zinc, magnesium, and fiber. Few gluten-free products are enriched or fortified, adding to the risk of nutrient deficiencies. Patients newly diagnosed or inadequately treated have low bone mineral density, imbalanced macronutrients, low fiber intake, and micronutrient deficiencies. Also troubling is the increased incidence of obesity seen in persons with celiac disease following a gluten-free diet. Because of the nutritional risks associated with celiac disease, a registered dietitian must be part of the health care team that monitors the patient's nutritional status and compliance on a regular basis.

  20. Successful implementation of spacer treatment guideline for acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C; Maskell, G; Marks, M; South, M; Robertson, C; LENNEY, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To develop and implement an evidence based guideline for the treatment of acute asthma using a metered dose inhaler and spacer combination.
METHODS—Defined strategies were used for the development and implementation of a guideline, assessed by a prospective, descriptive, study using notes review, and patient, nursing, and medical staff telephone contact. The setting was a tertiary referral hospital in Victoria, Australia with 25 000 yearly admissions, and asthma accounting for about 7% of total. The first 200 children and families to use the guideline after its introduction were evaluated.
RESULTS—A total of 191 (95.5%) children were treated according to the guideline. Six (3.0%) children were given nebulisers appropriately based on severity; five (2.5%) were given nebulisers at parental or child choice; and four (2.0 %) who did not have severe asthma, received nebulised treatment inappropriately.
CONCLUSIONS—Successful implementation of a new evidence based guideline can be achieved using specific strategies for promoting the application of research findings in the clinical arena.

 PMID:11159290

  1. School nutrition guidelines: overview of the implementation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gregorič, Matej; Pograjc, Larisa; Pavlovec, Alenka; Simčič, Marjan; Gabrijelčič Blenkuš, Mojca

    2015-06-01

    To holistically evaluate the extent of implementation of dietary guidelines in schools and present various monitoring systems. The study comprises three methods: (i) a cross-sectional survey (process evaluation); (ii) an indicator-based evaluation (menu quality); and (iii) a 5 d weighed food record of school lunches (output evaluation). Slovenian primary schools. A total 234 food-service managers from 488 schools completed a self-administrated questionnaire for process evaluation; 177 out of 194 randomly selected schools provided menus for menu quality evaluation; and 120 school lunches from twenty-four schools were measured and nutritionally analysed for output evaluation. The survey among food-service managers revealed high levels of implementation at almost all process evaluation areas of the guidelines. An even more successful implementation of these guidelines was found in relation to organization cultural issues as compared with technical issues. Differences found in some process evaluation areas were related to location, size and socio-economic characteristics of schools. Evaluation of school menu quality demonstrated that score values followed a normal distribution. Higher (better) nutrition scores were found in larger-sized schools and corresponding municipalities with higher socio-economic status. School lunches did not meet minimum recommendations for energy, carbohydrates or dietary fibre intake, nor for six vitamins and three (macro, micro and trace) elements. The implementation of the guidelines was achieved differently at distinct levels. The presented multilevel evaluation suggests that different success in implementation might be attributed to different characteristics of individual schools. System changes might also be needed to support and improve implementation of the guidelines.

  2. How to Implement the NCAA Financial Audit Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Lawrence C., Jr.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions for implementing new National Collegiate Athletic Association guidelines for intercollegiate athletics program financial audits include forming an internal task force, preparing an organization chart, choosing the type of audit, conducting a survey of booster groups, preparing a schedule of revenues and expenditures, selecting an…

  3. How to Implement the NCAA Financial Audit Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Lawrence C., Jr.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions for implementing new National Collegiate Athletic Association guidelines for intercollegiate athletics program financial audits include forming an internal task force, preparing an organization chart, choosing the type of audit, conducting a survey of booster groups, preparing a schedule of revenues and expenditures, selecting an…

  4. Provider education to promote implementation of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ockene, J K; Zapka, J G

    2000-08-01

    Although the interest in and promulgation of clinical practice guidelines have significantly increased in the past 2 decades, concern exists about their actual implementation. This article focuses on one strategy to encourage guideline implementation at the clinician level: clinician education. The objectives of the article are to review educational strategies, to consider them within the context of complementary strategies carried out at the organizational and clinic setting levels, and to outline challenges and recommendations for clinicians' continuing education. Experience and data from relevant randomized clinical trials within an educational framework are reviewed. Implementation of clinical practice guidelines requires a variety of skills, including assessment, appropriate delineation of a treatment and monitoring plan, patient tracking, and patient counseling and education skills. Continuing education strategies must reflect the content and teaching methods that best match the learning objectives. The pressures of current-day practices place limits on the resources, particularly clinician time, that are available for continuing education. Organizational resources must be committed to build the complementary supportive systems necessary for improved clinician practice. In addition to physicians, education must be directed at nonphysician clinicians, office staff, and administrators who also are responsible for guideline implementation. To meet the challenges of developing clinician motivation, balancing competing demands, and treating patients with complex medical conditions, all within time constraints, clinical leaders need to design education activities that have leadership support, reflect compelling evidence, use multiple strategies and teaching techniques, and engage learners in skill building and problem solving.

  5. Osteoporosis guideline implementation in family medicine using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Janet; Karampatos, Sarah; Ioannidis, George; Adachi, Jonathan; Thabane, Lehana; Nash, Lynn; Mehan, Upe; Kozak, Joseph; Feldman, Sid; Hirsch, Steve; Jovaisas, Algis V.; Cheung, Angela; Lohfeld, Lynne; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify family physicians’ learning needs related to osteoporosis care; determine family physicians’ preferred modes of learning; and identify barriers to using electronic medical records (EMRs) to implement osteoporosis guidelines in practice. Design Web-based survey. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians. Main outcome measures Quantitative and qualitative data about learning needs related to osteoporosis diagnosis and management; preferred mode of learning about guidelines; and barriers to using EMRs to implement guidelines. Results Of the 12 332 family physicians invited to participate in the survey, 8.5% and 7.0% provided partial or fully completed surveys, respectively. More than 80% of respondents agreed that the priority areas for education were as follows: selecting laboratory tests for secondary osteoporosis and interpreting the test results; interpreting bone mineral density results; determining appropriate circumstances for ordering anterior-posterior lumbar spine x-ray scans; and understanding duration, types, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy. Qualitative analysis revealed that managing moderate-risk patients was a learning need. Continuing medical education was the preferred mode of learning. Approximately 80% of respondents agreed that the scarcity of EMR tools to aid in guideline implementation was a barrier to using guidelines, and 50% of respondents agreed that if EMR-embedded tools were available, time would limit their ability to use them. Conclusion This survey identified key diagnostic- and treatment-related topics in osteoporosis care that should be the focus of future continuing professional development for family physicians. Developers of EMR tools, physicians, and researchers aiming to implement guidelines to improve osteoporosis care should consider the potential barriers indicated in this study.

  6. Implementing wound care guidelines: observations and recommendations from the bedside.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Vossen, Jan

    2009-06-01

    The successful implementation of wound care guidelines requires an appreciation for the frustrations experienced by nurses trying to incorporate these tools into clinical practice. These frustrations or barriers to best wound care practice implementation are examined from the perspective of: 1) the practice environment, which must be understood; 2) the potential adopters, predominantly nurses seeking the best fit between evidence and their clinical practice setting; and 3) the evidence-based innovation created to change wound care practice at the point of care. Barriers identified include lack of available resources, time constraints, prescriptive guidelines that incorrectly assume details of the practice environment, and wound care product confusion. Recommendations to facilitate implementation from the bedside are discussed and include expanding guidelines to incorporate detailed educational content and dissemination strategies that serve to increase relevancy to everyday practice. Additional suggestions include decreasing wound care product confusion by developing standardized, function-based product nomenclature and improving the quality of wound care research to increase nurses' confidence in the evidence and resultant recommendations. Resources currently used to develop guidelines also should be utilized to create accompanying educational material to support the transfer and uptake of knowledge.

  7. Vaccination of chemotherapy patients--effect of guideline implementation.

    PubMed

    Toleman, Michelle S; Herbert, Katharine; McCarthy, Noel; Church, David N

    2016-05-01

    Despite substantial morbidity and mortality of influenza and pneumococcal infections in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy, vaccination against both illnesses is infrequent. We evaluated the impact of implementation of clinical guidelines on vaccination of chemotherapy patients treated in our institute. We performed a prospective audit before (2012) and after (2013-2014) the introduction of immunisation guidelines for chemotherapy patients in a UK tertiary cancer centre. Guideline implementation was associated with a significant increase in the rate of pneumococcal vaccination compared to the 2012 baseline (47 vs. 25 %, P = 0.0018), though this was not sustained the following year (34 %, P = 0.13, vs. baseline). Influenza vaccine coverage was high (∼ 70 %) throughout. There was a marked disparity between patients aged ≤ 65 and those >65 years in the rate of pneumococcal vaccination in both 2013 and 2014 (38 vs. 68 % and 17 vs. 53 %, respectively, both P < 0.001), and, to a lesser extent, in the rate of influenza vaccination in the same period (64 vs. 82 %, P < 0.1, and 63 vs. 85 %, P = 0.009, respectively). The implementation of clinical vaccine guidelines was associated with a significant increase in pneumococcal vaccination, though continued effort appears required to deliver persistent improvement. Initiatives to increase vaccination uptake in patients aged ≤ 65 are merited.

  8. Cardiac advanced life support-surgical guideline: overview and implementation.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the immediate postoperative recovery period in a patient who underwent cardiac surgery is typically related to reversible causes-tamponade, bleeding, ventricular arrhythmias, or heart blocks associated with conduction problems. When treated promptly, 17% to 79% of patients who experience cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery survive to discharge. The Cardiac Advanced Life Support-Surgical (CALS-S) guideline provides a standardized algorithm approach to resuscitation of patients who experience cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. The purpose of this article is to discuss the CALS-S guideline and how to implement it.

  9. Imaging Guidelines for Enhancing Justifications for Radiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Justification in the field of radiology refers to the appropriate use of radiologic imaging modalities, and may be achieved by establishing clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs). Recently, CIGs have been shown to be useful in selecting the proper medical imaging modality, resulting in the reduction of inappropriate radiologic examinations, thereby enhancing justifications. However, the development of CIGs is both time-consuming and difficult as the methodology of evidence-based medicine should be adhered to. Thus, although the radiologic societies in developed countries such as the United Kingdom and USA are already developing and implementing CIGs in their clinical practices, CIGs are not yet readily available in many other countries owing to differences in medical circumstances and resources. In this review, we assess the role and limitations of CIGs by examining the current status of CIGs in developed countries, and also describe the specific efforts made to establish CIGs in Korea. PMID:26908986

  10. Imaging Guidelines for Enhancing Justifications for Radiologic Studies.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Baek, Jung Hwan; Jung, Seung Eun; Do, Kyung Hyun; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Min-Jeong; Choi, Miyoung; Lee, Min; Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A

    2016-02-01

    Justification in the field of radiology refers to the appropriate use of radiologic imaging modalities, and may be achieved by establishing clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs). Recently, CIGs have been shown to be useful in selecting the proper medical imaging modality, resulting in the reduction of inappropriate radiologic examinations, thereby enhancing justifications. However, the development of CIGs is both time-consuming and difficult as the methodology of evidence-based medicine should be adhered to. Thus, although the radiologic societies in developed countries such as the United Kingdom and USA are already developing and implementing CIGs in their clinical practices, CIGs are not yet readily available in many other countries owing to differences in medical circumstances and resources. In this review, we assess the role and limitations of CIGs by examining the current status of CIGs in developed countries, and also describe the specific efforts made to establish CIGs in Korea.

  11. Community Implementation of a Prehospital Spinal Immobilization Guideline.

    PubMed

    Jones Rhodes, Whitney; Steinbruner, David; Finck, Lani; Flarity, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to qualitatively describe the underpinnings of the successful implementation of a collaborative prehospital spinal immobilization guideline throughout the emergency medical services (EMS) community in two counties in Colorado. We also describe lessons learned that may be beneficial to other communities considering similar initiatives. Qualitative data were collected from key informants who were directly involved in the implementation of a new prehospital spinal immobilization guideline among four community hospitals in two different hospital systems and the associated EMS providers within the two counties. We interviewed a purposively selected sample of emergency department (ED) physicians and other ED staff, hospital decision makers, EMS educators as well as fire department and EMS medical directors. Data were collected and reviewed until saturation was achieved. We conducted qualitative analysis to summarize and synthesize themes. Ten key informants were interviewed, at which point saturation was achieved and several clear themes emerged. Participants described successful community-wide guideline implementation despite a history of competition, isolation, and conflict between the various EMS organizations and hospitals on past EMS and trauma initiatives. Factors related to success included the nearly universal perception that the initiative was "cutting edge" and thus an important paradigm shift in care for the community, as a whole. Participants reported the ability of community stakeholders to jointly assure a collaborative approach, characterized by intensive education for EMS personnel and others involved, and the ability of the community to together secure the new equipment required for success. Key informants described a convergence of factors as leading to the successful implementation of a prehospital spinal immobilization guideline. Lessons learned regarding how to overcome a tradition of competition and isolation to allow

  12. Implementation of Anaphylaxis Management Guidelines: A Register-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Grabenhenrich, Linus; Hompes, Stephanie; Gough, Hannah; Ruëff, Franziska; Scherer, Kathrin; Pföhler, Claudia; Treudler, Regina; Mahler, Vera; Hawranek, Thomas; Nemat, Katja; Koehli, Alice; Keil, Thomas; Worm, Margitta

    2012-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis management guidelines recommend the use of intramuscular adrenaline in severe reactions, complemented by antihistamines and corticoids; secondary prevention includes allergen avoidance and provision of self-applicable first aid drugs. Gaps between recommendations and their implementation have been reported, but only in confined settings. Hence, we analysed nation-wide data on the management of anaphylaxis, evaluating the implementation of guidelines. Methods Within the anaphylaxis registry, allergy referral centres across Germany, Austria and Switzerland provided data on severe anaphylaxis cases. Based on patient records, details on reaction circumstances, diagnostic workup and treatment were collected via online questionnaire. Report of anaphylaxis through emergency physicians allowed for validation of registry data. Results 2114 severe anaphylaxis patients from 58 centres were included. 8% received adrenaline intravenously, 4% intramuscularly; 50% antihistamines, and 51% corticoids. Validation data indicated moderate underreporting of first aid drugs in the Registry. 20% received specific instructions at the time of the reaction; 81% were provided with prophylactic first aid drugs at any time. Conclusion There is a distinct discrepancy between current anaphylaxis management guidelines and their implementation. To improve patient care, a revised approach for medical education and training on the management of severe anaphylaxis is warranted. PMID:22590513

  13. Implementing thrombolytic guidelines in stroke care: perceived facilitators and barriers.

    PubMed

    Stecksén, Anna; Lundman, Berit; Eriksson, Marie; Glader, Eva-Lotta; Asplund, Kjell

    2014-03-01

    We performed a qualitative study to identify facilitators of and barriers to the implementation of national guidelines on thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. We interviewed physicians and nurses at nine Swedish hospitals using 16 explorative, semistructured interviews, and selected hospitals based on their implementation rate of new stroke care methods according to data from the Swedish Stroke Register, Riks-Stroke. Through content analysis, we identified facilitators and barriers to implementation, which we classified into three categories: (a) individuals, (b) social interactions and context, and (c) organizational and resource issues. Insights obtained from this study can be used to identify target areas for improving the implementation of thrombolytic therapy and other new methods in stroke care.

  14. Automating Guidelines for Clinical Decision Support: Knowledge Engineering and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Tso, Geoffrey J.; Tu, Samson W.; Oshiro, Connie; Martins, Susana; Ashcraft, Michael; Yuen, Kaeli W.; Wang, Dan; Robinson, Amy; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Goldstein, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    As utilization of clinical decision support (CDS) increases, it is important to continue the development and refinement of methods to accurately translate the intention of clinical practice guidelines (CPG) into a computable form. In this study, we validate and extend the 13 steps that Shiffman et al.5 identified for translating CPG knowledge for use in CDS. During an implementation project of ATHENA-CDS, we encoded complex CPG recommendations for five common chronic conditions for integration into an existing clinical dashboard. Major decisions made during the implementation process were recorded and categorized according to the 13 steps. During the implementation period, we categorized 119 decisions and identified 8 new categories required to complete the project. We provide details on an updated model that outlines all of the steps used to translate CPG knowledge into a CDS integrated with existing health information technology. PMID:28269916

  15. [General Strategies for Implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Torres-Arreola, Laura Laura

    2015-01-01

    The need to use clinical practice guidelines (CPG) arises from the health conditions and problems that public health institutions in the country face. CPG are informative documents that help improve the quality of care processes and patient safety; having among its objectives, to reduce the variability of medical practice. The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social designed a strategic plan for the dissemination, implementation, monitoring and control of CPG to establish an applicable model in the medical units in the three levels of care at the Instituto. This paper summarizes some of the strategies of the plan that were made with the knowledge and experience of clinicians and managers, with which they intend to promote the adoption of the key recommendations of the guidelines, to promote a sense of belonging for health personnel, and to encourage changes in organizational culture.

  16. Overcoming the obstacles of implementing infection prevention and control guidelines.

    PubMed

    Birgand, G; Johansson, A; Szilagyi, E; Lucet, J-C

    2015-12-01

    Reasons for a successful or unsuccessful implementation of infection prevention and control (IPC) guidelines are often multiple and interconnected. This article reviews key elements from the national to the individual level that contribute to the success of the implementation of IPC measures and gives perspectives for improvement. Governance approaches, modes of communication and formats of guidelines are discussed with a view to improve collaboration and transparency among actors. The culture of IPC influences practices and varies according to countries, specialties and healthcare providers. We describe important contextual aspects, such as relationships between actors and resources and behavioural features including professional background or experience. Behaviour change techniques providing goal-setting, feedback and action planning have proved effective in mobilizing participants and may be key to trigger social movements of implementation. The leadership of international societies in coordinating actions at international, national and institutional levels using multidisciplinary approaches and fostering collaboration among clinical microbiology, infectious diseases and IPC will be essential for success. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Towards local implementation of Dutch health policy guidelines: a concept-mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Kuunders, Theo J M; van Bon-Martens, Marja J H; van de Goor, Ien A M; Paulussen, Theo G W M; van Oers, Hans A M

    2017-02-22

    To develop a targeted implementation strategy for a municipal health policy guideline, implementation targets of two guideline users [Regional Health Services (RHSs)] and guideline developers of leading national health institutes were made explicit. Therefore, characteristics of successful implementation of the guideline were identified. Differences and similarities in perceptions of these characteristics between RHSs and developers were explored. Separate concept mapping procedures were executed in two RHSs, one with representatives from partner local health organizations and municipalities, the second with RHS members only. A third map was conducted with the developers of the guideline. All mapping procedures followed the same design of generating statements up to interpretation of results with participants. Concept mapping, as a practical implementation tool, will be discussed in the context of international research literature on guideline implementation in public health. Guideline developers consider implementation successful when substantive components (health issues) of the guidelines, content are visible in local policy practice. RHSs, local organizations and municipalities view the implementation process itself within and between organizations as more relevant, and state that usability of the guideline for municipal policy and commitment by officials and municipal managers are critical targets for successful implementation. Between the RHSs, differences in implementation targets were smaller than between RHSs and guideline developers. For successful implementation, RHSs tend to focus on process targets while developers focus more on the thematic contents of the guideline. Implications of these different orientations for implementation strategies are dealt with in the discussion. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Implementation of Clinical Guidelines via a Computer Charting System

    PubMed Central

    Schriger, David L.; Baraff, Larry J.; Buller, Kelly; Shendrikar, Manali Ayatchit; Nagda, Sameer; Lin, Edward J.; Mikulich, Vladislav J.; Cretin, Shan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The authors have shown that clinical guidelines embedded in an electronic medical record improved the quality, while lowering the cost, of care for health care workers who incurred occupational exposures to body fluid. They seek to determine whether this system has similar effects on the emergency department care of young children with febrile illness. Design: Off-on-off, interrupted time series with intent-to-treat analysis. Setting: University hospital emergency department. Subjects: 830 febrile children less than 3 years of age and the physicians who treated them. Interventions: Implementation of an electronic medical record that provides real-time advice regarding the content of the history and physical examination and recommendations regarding laboratory testing, treatment, diagnosis, and disposition. Measurements: Documentation of essential items in the medical record and after-care instructions; compliance with guidelines regarding testing, treatment, and diagnosis; charges. Results: The computer was used in 64 percent of eligible cases. Mean percentage documentation of 21 essential history and physical examination items increased from 80 percent during the baseline period to 92 percent in the intervention phase (13 percent increase; 95 percent CI, 10-15 percent). Mean percentage documentation of ten items in the after-care instructions increased from 48 percent at baseline to 81 percent during the intervention phase (33 percent increase; 95 percent confidence interval, 28-38 percent). All documentation decreased to baseline when the computer system was removed. There were no demonstrable improvements in appropriateness of care, nor was there evidence that appropriateness worsened. Mean charges were not changed by the intervention. Conclusion: The intervention markedly improved documentation, had little effect on the appropriateness of the process of care, and had no effect on charges. Results for the febrile child module differ from those for the

  19. EANM 2012 guidelines for radionuclide imaging of phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Henri J.; Hindié, Elif; Guillet, Benjamin A.; Neumann, Hartmut P.; Walz, Martin K.; Opocher, Giuseppe; de Herder, Wouter W.; Boedeker, Carsten C.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Chiti, Arturo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Pacak, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radionuclide imaging of phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) involves various functional imaging techniques and approaches for accurate diagnosis, staging and tumour characterization. The purpose of the present guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in performing, interpreting and reporting the results of the currently available SPECT and PET imaging approaches. These guidelines are intended to present information specifically adapted to European practice. Methods Guidelines from related fields, issued by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine and the Society of Nuclear Medicine, were taken into consideration and are partially integrated within this text. The same was applied to the relevant literature, and the final result was discussed with leading experts involved in the management of patients with PCC/PGL. The information provided should be viewed in the context of local conditions, laws and regulations. Conclusion Although several radionuclide imaging modalities are considered herein, considerable focus is given to PET imaging which offers high sensitivity targeted molecular imaging approaches. PMID:22926712

  20. 48 CFR 47.403 - Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... implementation of the Fly America Act. 47.403 Section 47.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act. This section 47.403 is based on the Guidelines for Implementation of the Fly America Act (case number B-138942), issued by the Comptroller General of the...

  1. 48 CFR 47.403 - Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... implementation of the Fly America Act. 47.403 Section 47.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act. This section 47.403 is based on the Guidelines for Implementation of the Fly America Act (case number B-138942), issued by the Comptroller General of the...

  2. 48 CFR 47.403 - Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... implementation of the Fly America Act. 47.403 Section 47.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act. This section 47.403 is based on the Guidelines for Implementation of the Fly America Act (case number B-138942), issued by the Comptroller General of the...

  3. 48 CFR 47.403 - Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... implementation of the Fly America Act. 47.403 Section 47.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act. This section 47.403 is based on the Guidelines for Implementation of the Fly America Act (case number B-138942), issued by the Comptroller General of the...

  4. 48 CFR 47.403 - Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... implementation of the Fly America Act. 47.403 Section 47.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Guidelines for implementation of the Fly America Act. This section 47.403 is based on the Guidelines for Implementation of the Fly America Act (case number B-138942), issued by the Comptroller General of the...

  5. Clinical practice guidelines: barriers to durability after effective early implementation.

    PubMed

    Brand, C; Landgren, F; Hutchinson, A; Jones, C; Macgregor, L; Campbell, D

    2005-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines in general (General-CPG) may reduce variation in clinician performance and improve patient outcomes. Short-term evaluation is now routine, but demonstration of early successful implementation does not necessarily ensure longer-term effectiveness. To assess adherence to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-CPG recommendations at the Royal Melbourne Hospital (RMH), 2 years after successful implementation. To identify barriers to sustained success of General-CPG. A multi-faceted evaluation was performed to document: (i) current adherence to COPD management recommendations (medical record audit); (ii) awareness of attitudes towards and barriers for the use of COPD-CPG and General-CPG (staff survey, focus groups and key informant interviews) and (iii) access to and quality of available General-CPG (internet review and random sample General-CPG evaluation. Adherence to COPD-CPG recommendations was highly variable. Adherence was higher in the Emergency Department than the general wards and for specific therapeutic recommendations. It was lower for non-pharmacological therapy and for recommendations relating to processes of care. Most health professionals were in favour of General-CPG. Barriers to use of General-CPG were in keeping with previous literature reports. Organizational issues including high levels of staff turnover and lack of integration of General-CPG into hospital quality frameworks were highlighted as major barriers. Hospital intranet access and presentation of General-CPG identified lack of consistency in terminology and presentation. Short-term effectiveness of COPD-CPG implementation did not ensure sustained success. Departmental organizational behaviours and organizational system barriers are major factors influencing durability.

  6. Memoranda about Implementation of the Cancer Guidelines and Accompanying Supplemental Guidance - Science Policy Council Cancer Guidelines Implementation Workgroup Communication I and II

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Memoranda from the Chair of EPA's Science Policy Council to the Science Policy Council and the Science Policy Council Steering Committee regarding Implementation of the Cancer Guidelines and Accompanying Supplemental Guidance.

  7. [Prevention of perioperative hypothermia : Implementation of the S3 guideline].

    PubMed

    Horn, E-P; Klar, E; Höcker, J; Bräuer, A; Bein, B; Wulf, H; Torossian, A

    2017-01-09

    To improve perioperative quality and patient safety, the German S3 guideline should be consistently implemented to avoid perioperative hypothermia. Perioperative normothermia is a quality indicator and should be achieved by anesthesiologists and surgeons. To detect hypothermia early during the perioperative process, measuring body temperature should be started 1-2 h preoperatively. Patients should be actively warmed for 20-30 min before starting anesthesia. Prewarming is most effective and should be included in the preoperative process. Patients should be informed about the risks of perioperative hypothermia and members of the perioperative team should be educated. A standard operating procedure (SOP) to avoid hypothermia should be introduced in every operative unit. The incidence of postoperative hypothermia should be evaluated in operative patients every 3-6 months. The goals should be to measure body temperature in >80% of patients undergoing surgery and for >70% to exhibit a core temperature >36 °C at the end of surgery.

  8. Factors affecting speech pathologists' implementation of stroke management guidelines: a thematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Melissa; Power, Emma; O'Halloran, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Although clinical practice guidelines can facilitate evidence-based practice and improve the health outcomes of stroke patients, they continue to be underutilised. There is limited research into the reasons for this, especially in speech pathology. This study provides the first in-depth, qualitative examination of the barriers and facilitators that speech pathologists perceive and experience when implementing guidelines. A maximum variation sample of eight speech pathologists participated in a semi-structured interview concerning the implementation of the National Stroke Foundation's Clinical Guidelines for Stroke Management 2010. Interviews were transcribed, thematically analysed and member checked before overall themes were identified. Three main themes and ten subthemes were identified. The first main theme, making implementation explicit, reflected the necessity of accessing and understanding guideline recommendations, and focussing specifically on implementation in context. In the second theme, demand versus ability to change, the size of changes required was compared with available resources and collaboration. The final theme, Speech pathologist motivation to implement guidelines, demonstrated the influence of individual perception of the guidelines and personal commitment to improved practice. Factors affecting implementation are complex, and are not exclusively barriers or facilitators. Some potential implementation strategies are suggested. Further research is recommended. In most Western nations, stroke remains the single greatest cause of disability, including communication and swallowing disabilities. Although adherence to stroke clinical practice guidelines improves stroke patient outcomes, guidelines continue to be underutilised, and the reasons for this are not well understood. This is the first in-depth qualitative study identifying the complex barriers and facilitators to guideline implementation as experienced by speech pathologists in stroke care

  9. [Guideline implementation study on asthma: Results of a pragmatic implementation approach].

    PubMed

    Redaèlli, Marcus; Vollmar, Horst Christian; Simic, Dusan; Maly-Schürer, Cornelia; Löscher, Susanne; Koneczny, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge transfer from theory to practice in healthcare systems poses a challenge worldwide. Typical examples include national disease management guidelines. The present study contributes towards improving implementation strategies for an asthma guideline. A guideline implementation strategy was examined in a four-armed, non-randomised, controlled intervention study with an additional control group. The study participants were general practitioners and paediatricians recruited from primary care quality circles. All study participants attended an interactive seminar on the evidence-based recommendations for patients with asthma. In addition, the participants were asked to choose among the following options: no further intervention, additional e-learning, training of their practice nurses, or e-learning and training of their practice nurses. The success of the intervention was measured by questionnaire (and the success rate expressed as a percentage). About one third of all participants (n=313) opted for the combination of an interactive seminar and a training of practice nurses; two third preferred the classic way of continuing medical education with an interactive seminar without a further intervention. Just 10 % of the physicians participated in e-learning. Independently of their choice for continuing medical education, all participants demonstrated an increase in knowledge about asthma and an improvement in the management of asthma. The physicians exhibited an average increase in both categories of about 10 % of the percentage values, compared to an increase of about 28 % among the practice nurses without continuing medical education. The physicians' free choice of the educative modules might be an integral part of successful implementation strategies. However, this will require a change of focus from general continuing medical education packages to a more individualised culture of continuing professional development in Germany. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  10. Practical guidelines for radiographers to improve computed radiography image quality.

    PubMed

    Pongnapang, N

    2005-10-01

    Computed Radiography (CR) has become a major digital imaging modality in a modern radiological department. CR system changes workflow from the conventional way of using film/screen by employing photostimulable phosphor plate technology. This results in the changing perspectives of technical, artefacts and quality control issues in radiology departments. Guidelines for better image quality in digital medical enterprise include professional guidelines for users and the quality control programme specifically designed to serve the best quality of clinical images. Radiographers who understand technological shift of the CR from conventional method can employ optimization of CR images. Proper anatomic collimation and exposure techniques for each radiographic projection are crucial steps in producing quality digital images. Matching image processing with specific anatomy is also important factor that radiographers should realise. Successful shift from conventional to fully digitised radiology department requires skilful radiographers who utilise the technology and a successful quality control program from teamwork in the department.

  11. Translation of hypertension treatment guidelines into practice: a review of implementation.

    PubMed

    Handler, Joel; Lackland, Daniel T

    2011-01-01

    Compared with the history of national guideline development, the science attached to implementation of guidelines is relatively new. Effectiveness of a highly evidence-based guideline, such as the 8th Joint National Committee recommendations on the treatment of high blood pressure, depends on successful translation into clinical practice. Implementation relies on several steps: clear and executable guideline language, audit and feedback attached to education of practitioners charged with carrying out the guidelines, team-based care delivery, credibility of blood pressure measurement, and measures to address therapeutic inertia and medication adherence. An evolving role of the electronic health record and patient empowerment are developments that will further promote implementation of the hypertension guideline. Further research will be needed to assess the efficacy and cost effectiveness of various implementation tools and strategies. Copyright © 2011 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementing guidelines: Proposed definitions of neuropsychology services in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Baum, Katherine T; Powell, Stephanie K; Jacobson, Lisa A; Gragert, Marsha N; Janzen, Laura A; Paltin, Iris; Rey-Casserly, Celiane M; Wilkening, Greta N

    2017-08-01

    Several organizations have published guidelines for the neuropsychological care of survivors of childhood cancer. However, there is limited consensus in how these guidelines are applied. The model of neuropsychology service delivery is further complicated by the variable terminology used to describe recommended services. In an important first step to translate published guidelines into clinical practice, this paper proposes definitions for specific neuropsychological processes and services, with the goal of facilitating consistency across sites to foster future clinical program development and to clarify clinical practice guidelines. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A new impetus for guideline development and implementation: construction and evaluation of a toolbox.

    PubMed

    Hilbink, Mirrian A H W; Ouwens, Marielle M T J; Burgers, Jako S; Kool, Rudolf B

    2014-03-19

    In the last decade, guideline organizations faced a number of problems, including a lack of standardization in guideline development methods and suboptimal guideline implementation. To contribute to the solution of these problems, we produced a toolbox for guideline development, implementation, revision, and evaluation. All relevant guideline organizations in the Netherlands were approached to prioritize the topics. We sent out a questionnaire and discussed the results at an invitational conference. Based on consensus, twelve topics were selected for the development of new tools. Subsequently, working groups were composed for the development of the tools. After development of the tools, their draft versions were pilot tested in 40 guideline projects. Based on the results of the pilot tests, the tools were refined and their final versions were presented. The vast majority of organizations involved in pilot testing of the tools reported satisfaction with using the tools. Guideline experts involved in pilot testing of the tools proposed a variety of suggestions for the implementation of the tools. The tools are available in Dutch and in English at a web-based platform on guideline development and implementation (http://www.ha-ring.nl). A collaborative approach was used for the development and evaluation of a toolbox for development, implementation, revision, and evaluation of guidelines. This approach yielded a potentially powerful toolbox for improving the quality and implementation of Dutch clinical guidelines. Collaboration between guideline organizations within this project led to stronger linkages, which is useful for enhancing coordination of guideline development and implementation and preventing duplication of efforts. Use of the toolbox could improve quality standards in the Netherlands, and might facilitate the development of high-quality guidelines in other countries as well.

  14. A new impetus for guideline development and implementation: construction and evaluation of a toolbox

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the last decade, guideline organizations faced a number of problems, including a lack of standardization in guideline development methods and suboptimal guideline implementation. To contribute to the solution of these problems, we produced a toolbox for guideline development, implementation, revision, and evaluation. Methods All relevant guideline organizations in the Netherlands were approached to prioritize the topics. We sent out a questionnaire and discussed the results at an invitational conference. Based on consensus, twelve topics were selected for the development of new tools. Subsequently, working groups were composed for the development of the tools. After development of the tools, their draft versions were pilot tested in 40 guideline projects. Based on the results of the pilot tests, the tools were refined and their final versions were presented. Results The vast majority of organizations involved in pilot testing of the tools reported satisfaction with using the tools. Guideline experts involved in pilot testing of the tools proposed a variety of suggestions for the implementation of the tools. The tools are available in Dutch and in English at a web-based platform on guideline development and implementation (http://www.ha-ring.nl). Conclusions A collaborative approach was used for the development and evaluation of a toolbox for development, implementation, revision, and evaluation of guidelines. This approach yielded a potentially powerful toolbox for improving the quality and implementation of Dutch clinical guidelines. Collaboration between guideline organizations within this project led to stronger linkages, which is useful for enhancing coordination of guideline development and implementation and preventing duplication of efforts. Use of the toolbox could improve quality standards in the Netherlands, and might facilitate the development of high-quality guidelines in other countries as well. PMID:24641971

  15. Implementing healthier foodservice guidelines in hospital and federal worksite cafeterias: barriers, facilitators and keys to success.

    PubMed

    Jilcott Pitts, S B; Graham, J; Mojica, A; Stewart, L; Walter, M; Schille, C; McGinty, J; Pearsall, M; Whitt, O; Mihas, P; Bradley, A; Simon, C

    2016-12-01

    Healthy foodservice guidelines are being implemented in worksites and healthcare facilities to increase access to healthy foods by employees and public populations. However, little is known about the barriers to and facilitators of implementation. The present study aimed to examine barriers to and facilitators of implementation of healthy foodservice guidelines in federal worksite and hospital cafeterias. Using a mixed-methods approach, including a quantitative survey followed by a qualitative, in-depth interview, we examined: (i) barriers to and facilitators of implementation; (ii) behavioural design strategies used to promote healthier foods and beverages; and (iii) how implementation of healthy foodservice guidelines influenced costs and profitability. We used a purposive sample of five hospital and four federal worksite foodservice operators who recently implemented one of two foodservice guidelines: the United States Department of Health and Human Services/General Services Administration Health and Sustainability Guidelines ('Guidelines') in federal worksites or the Partnership for a Healthier America Hospital Healthier Food Initiative ('Initiative') in hospitals. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative survey data. Qualitative data were analysed using a deductive approach. Implementation facilitators included leadership support, adequate vendor selections and having dietitians assist with implementation. Implementation barriers included inadequate selections from vendors, customer complaints and additional expertise required for menu labelling. Behavioural design strategies used most frequently included icons denoting healthier options, marketing using social media and placement of healthier options in prime locations. Lessons learned can guide subsequent steps for future healthy foodservice guideline implementation in similar settings. © 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  16. Continuing Education, Guideline Implementation, and the Emerging Transdisciplinary Field of Knowledge Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses continuing education and the implementation of clinical practice guidelines or best evidence, quality improvement, and patient safety. Continuing education focuses on the perspective of the adult learner and is guided by well-established educational principles. In contrast, guideline implementation and related concepts…

  17. Factors influencing the implementation of the guideline triage in emergency departments: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Maaike A P; van Achterberg, Theo; Adriaansen, Marian J M; Kampshoff, Caroline S; Schalk, Donna M J; Mintjes-de Groot, Joke

    2012-02-01

    The objectives are: (1) to identify factors that influence the implementation of the guideline Triage in emergency departments [2004] in emergency departments in the Netherlands, and (2) to develop tailored implementation strategies for implementation of this guideline. Guideline dissemination is no guarantee for guideline implementation. In 2004 the guideline Triage in Emergency Departments was disseminated in Dutch hospitals. Guideline revision was scheduled in 2008. Prior to the revision, factors which influenced the implementation of the guideline [2004] were studied to be addressed at the implementation of the revised guideline. This is an exploratory study using a qualitative design including: a questionnaire sent to all emergency departments in the Netherlands (n = 108): four focus group interviews, including nurses and ward managers and in-depth interviews with ward managers and doctors. Based on the results, tailored implementation strategies and activities were suggested which target the identified influencing factors. Various factors at individual, social context and organisational level were identified as influencing the implementation of the 2004 version of the guideline, namely: level of knowledge; insight and skills; work preferences; motivation and/or commitment; support; informed doctors; preliminary work and arrangements for implementation; description of tasks and responsibilities; workload and resources. Ward managers, nurses and doctors mentioned similar as well as different factors. Consequently, tailored implementation strategies and activities related to education, maintenance of change, motivation and consensus-building, information, organisation and facilitation were suggested. Nurses, ward managers and doctors broadly indicated similar influencing factors, although the importance of these factors differed for the different groups. For nurses, resistance and lack of resources are most important, ward managers mentioned culture and doctors

  18. Developing and implementing health and sustainability guidelines for institutional food service.

    PubMed

    Kimmons, Joel; Jones, Sonya; McPeak, Holly H; Bowden, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Health and sustainability guidelines for institutional food service are directed at improving dietary intake and increasing the ecological benefits of the food system. The development and implementation of institutional food service guidelines, such as the Health and Human Services (HHS) and General Services Administration (GSA) Health and Sustainability Guidelines for Federal Concessions and Vending Operations (HHS/GSA Guidelines), have the potential to improve the health and sustainability of the food system. Institutional guidelines assist staff, managers, and vendors in aligning the food environment at food service venues with healthier and more sustainable choices and practices. Guideline specifics and their effective implementation depend on the size, culture, nature, and management structure of an institution and the individuals affected. They may be applied anywhere food is sold, served, or consumed. Changing institutional food service practice requires comprehensive analysis, engagement, and education of all relevant stakeholders including institutional management, members of the food supply chain, and customers. Current examples of food service guidelines presented here are the HHS and GSA Health and Sustainability Guidelines for Federal Concessions and Vending Operations, which translate evidence-based recommendations on health and sustainability into institutional food service practices and are currently being implemented at the federal level. Developing and implementing guidelines has the potential to improve long-term population health outcomes while simultaneously benefitting the food system. Nutritionists, public health practitioners, and researchers should consider working with institutions to develop, implement, and evaluate food service guidelines for health and sustainability.

  19. Developing and Implementing Health and Sustainability Guidelines for Institutional Food Service123

    PubMed Central

    Kimmons, Joel; Jones, Sonya; McPeak, Holly H.; Bowden, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Health and sustainability guidelines for institutional food service are directed at improving dietary intake and increasing the ecological benefits of the food system. The development and implementation of institutional food service guidelines, such as the Health and Human Services (HHS) and General Services Administration (GSA) Health and Sustainability Guidelines for Federal Concessions and Vending Operations (HHS/GSA Guidelines), have the potential to improve the health and sustainability of the food system. Institutional guidelines assist staff, managers, and vendors in aligning the food environment at food service venues with healthier and more sustainable choices and practices. Guideline specifics and their effective implementation depend on the size, culture, nature, and management structure of an institution and the individuals affected. They may be applied anywhere food is sold, served, or consumed. Changing institutional food service practice requires comprehensive analysis, engagement, and education of all relevant stakeholders including institutional management, members of the food supply chain, and customers. Current examples of food service guidelines presented here are the HHS and GSA Health and Sustainability Guidelines for Federal Concessions and Vending Operations, which translate evidence-based recommendations on health and sustainability into institutional food service practices and are currently being implemented at the federal level. Developing and implementing guidelines has the potential to improve long-term population health outcomes while simultaneously benefitting the food system. Nutritionists, public health practitioners, and researchers should consider working with institutions to develop, implement, and evaluate food service guidelines for health and sustainability. PMID:22585909

  20. [Insufficient implementation of guidelines for basic life support in Denmark].

    PubMed

    Steensen, Christian Overgaard; Krarup, Niels Henrik; Løfgren, Bo

    2008-08-25

    Early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival following out of hospital cardiac arrest. Bystanders perform basic life support in less than one third of witnessed cardiac arrests. Furthermore, the quality of CPR differs considerably. Unambiguous course material may improve education in resuscitation and further the provision and efficiency of CPR. In 2005 the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) published guidelines for adult basic life support. The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the adherence of Danish course material for laypeople to the ERC Guidelines. Printed Danish course material is compared to the ERC Guidelines with respect to algorithm, resuscitation techniques and illustrations. The majority of the investigated material does not adhere to the ERC Guidelines, especially with regard to resuscitation techniques and illustrations. There were considerable discrepancies concerning airway management, recognition of cardiac arrest, activation of emergency medical services and chest compressions. We demonstrate substantial differences between Danish course material and the ERC Guidelines. This may have implications for CPR provided by bystanders.

  1. Introducing the Canadian Thoracic Society framework for guideline dissemination and implementation, with concurrent evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samir; Licskai, Christopher; Van Dam, Anne; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) is leveraging its strengths in guideline production to enable respiratory guideline implementation in Canada. The authors describe the new CTS Framework for Guideline Dissemination and Implementation, with Concurrent Evaluation, which has three spheres of action: guideline production, implementation infrastructure and knowledge translation (KT) methodological support. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research 'Knowledge-to-Action' process was adopted as the model of choice for conceptualizing KT interventions. Within the framework, new evidence for formatting guideline recommendations to enhance the intrinsic implementability of future guidelines were applied. Clinical assemblies will consider implementability early in the guideline production cycle when selecting clinical questions, and new practice guidelines will include a section dedicated to KT. The framework describes the development of a web-based repository and communication forum to inventory existing KT resources and to facilitate collaboration and communication among implementation stakeholders through an online discussion board. A national forum for presentation and peer-review of proposed KT projects is described. The framework outlines expert methodological support for KT planning, development and evaluation including a practical guide for implementers and a novel 'Clinical Assembly-KT Action Team', and in-kind logistical support and assistance in securing peer-reviewed funding.

  2. Operational Earthquake Forecasting: Proposed Guidelines for Implementation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of operational earthquake forecasting (OEF) is to provide the public with authoritative information about how seismic hazards are changing with time. During periods of high seismic activity, short-term earthquake forecasts based on empirical statistical models can attain nominal probability gains in excess of 100 relative to the long-term forecasts used in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Prospective experiments are underway by the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) to evaluate the reliability and skill of these seismicity-based forecasts in a variety of tectonic environments. How such information should be used for civil protection is by no means clear, because even with hundredfold increases, the probabilities of large earthquakes typically remain small, rarely exceeding a few percent over forecasting intervals of days or weeks. Civil protection agencies have been understandably cautious in implementing formal procedures for OEF in this sort of “low-probability environment.” Nevertheless, the need to move more quickly towards OEF has been underscored by recent experiences, such as the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake sequence and other seismic crises in which an anxious public has been confused by informal, inconsistent earthquake forecasts. Whether scientists like it or not, rising public expectations for real-time information, accelerated by the use of social media, will require civil protection agencies to develop sources of authoritative information about the short-term earthquake probabilities. In this presentation, I will discuss guidelines for the implementation of OEF informed by my experience on the California Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council, convened by CalEMA, and the International Commission on Earthquake Forecasting, convened by the Italian government following the L’Aquila disaster. (a) Public sources of information on short-term probabilities should be authoritative, scientific, open, and

  3. Educating APNs for Implementing the Guidelines for Adolescents in "Bright Futures: Guidelines of Health Supervision of Infants, Children, and Adolescents."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Cornelia P.; Pender, Nola J.; Hayman, Laura L.; Armstrong, Myrna L.; Riesch, Susan K.; Lewis, Mary Ann

    1997-01-01

    Discusses recommendations for preparing advanced practice nurses (APNs) to implement guidelines of a health curriculum: (1) ensuring age-appropriate teaching; (2) emphasizing the complex relationships of race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender; (3) reinforcing the self-care and resilience of adolescents; and (4) examining transitions…

  4. Clinical imaging guidelines part 2: Risks, benefits, barriers, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Malone, James; del Rosario-Perez, Maria; Van Bladel, Lodewijk; Jung, Seung Eun; Holmberg, Ola; Bettmann, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    A recent international meeting was convened by two United Nations bodies to focus on international collaboration on clinical appropriateness/referral guidelines for use in medical imaging. This paper, the second of 4 from this technical meeting, addresses barriers to the successful development/deployment of clinical imaging guidelines and means of overcoming them. It reflects the discussions of the attendees, and the issues identified are treated under 7 headings: ■ Practical Strategy for Development and Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Governance Arrangements and Concerns with Deployment of Guidelines; ■ Finance, Sustainability, Reimbursement, and Related Issues; ■ Identifying Benefits and Radiation Risks from Radiological Examinations; ■ Information Given to Patients and the Public, and Consent Issues; ■ Special Concerns Related to Pregnancy; and ■ The Research Agenda. Examples of topics identified include the observation that guideline development is a global task and there is no case for continuing it as the project of the few professional organizations that have been brave enough to make the long-term commitment required. Advocacy for guidelines should include the expectations that they will facilitate: (1) better health care delivery; (2) lower cost of that delivery; with (3) reduced radiation dose and associated health risks. Radiation protection issues should not be isolated; rather, they should be integrated with the overall health care picture. The type of dose/radiation risk information to be provided with guidelines should include the uncertainty involved and advice on application of the precautionary principle with patients. This principle may be taken as an extension of the well-established medical principle of "first do no harm."

  5. [Graphic synopsis of implementation of German guideline clearing reports in national disease management guidelines].

    PubMed

    Thole, Henning

    2011-01-01

    While methods for the production of guidelines (evidence analysis, assessment, adaptation) have been continually refined throughout the past years, there is a lack of instruments for the production of easily understandable synopses. Definition of a methodological approach to encompass synopses by Spidernet diagrams. Tables of synopses can be generated with distinct information to bring down the main results in one Spidernet diagram. This is possible for both the entire synopsis and parts of it. Guideline comparisons require detailed analyses on the one hand and easily understandable presentations of their results on the other. Guideline synopses can be substantially supported by graphic presentation of the results of synopsis. Graphic synopsis is also helpful in other cases; it may be used, for example, to summarise HTA reports, systematic reviews or guidelines. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Guideline Implementation: Energy-Generating Devices, Part 1-Electrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Eder, Sheryl P

    2017-03-01

    Energy-generating devices are standard equipment in the surgical suite, with electrosurgical units being the most common type of electrical device used in the OR. Prevention of injuries to patients and personnel related to the use of energy-generating devices is a key component of the perioperative nurse's role. The AORN "Guideline for safe use of energy-generating devices" provides guidance on the use and maintenance of devices that deliver energy in the forms of radiofrequency waves, ultrasound waves, or lasers. This article focuses on key points of the guideline, which address precautions specific to electrosurgical units, patients with implanted electronic devices, and minimally invasive surgery, and documentation of the use of energy-generating devices. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  7. Implementing Thrombosis Guidelines in Cancer Patients: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Bounameaux, Henri; Brenner, Benjamin; Büller, Harry R.; Kakkar, Ajay; Pabinger, Ingrid; Streiff, Michael; Debourdeau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a frequent and serious complication in patients with cancer. It is an independent prognostic factor of death in cancer patients and the second leading cause of death, but physicians often underestimate its importance, as well as the need for adequate prevention and treatment. Management of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer requires the coordinated efforts of a wide range of clinicians, highlighting the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. However, a lack of consensus among various national and international clinical practice guidelines has contributed to knowledge and practice gaps among practitioners, and inconsistent approaches to venous thromboembolism. The 2013 international guidelines for thrombosis in cancer have sought to address these gaps by critically re-evaluating the evidence coming from clinical trials and synthesizing a number of guidelines documents. An individualized approach to prophylaxis is recommended for all patients. PMID:25386357

  8. Clinical Practice Guideline Implementation Strategy Patterns in Veterans Affairs Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Best, Richard G; Pugh, Jacqueline A

    2007-01-01

    Background The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) mandated the system-wide implementation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in the mid-1990s, arming all facilities with basic resources to facilitate implementation; despite this resource allocation, significant variability still exists across VA facilities in implementation success. Objective This study compares CPG implementation strategy patterns used by high and low performing primary care clinics in the VA. Research Design Descriptive, cross-sectional study of a purposeful sample of six Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) with high and low performance on six CPGs. Subjects One hundred and two employees (management, quality improvement, clinic personnel) involved with guideline implementation at each VAMC primary care clinic. Measures Participants reported specific strategies used by their facility to implement guidelines in 1-hour semi-structured interviews. Facilities were classified as high or low performers based on their guideline adherence scores calculated through independently conducted chart reviews. Findings High performing facilities (HPFs) (a) invested significantly in the implementation of the electronic medical record and locally adapting it to provider needs, (b) invested dedicated resources to guideline-related initiatives, and (c) exhibited a clear direction in their strategy choices. Low performing facilities exhibited (a) earlier stages of development for their electronic medical record, (b) reliance on preexisting resources for guideline implementation, with little local adaptation, and (c) no clear direction in their strategy choices. Conclusion A multifaceted, yet targeted, strategic approach to guideline implementation emphasizing dedicated resources and local adaptation may result in more successful implementation and higher guideline adherence than relying on standardized resources and taxing preexisting channels. PMID:17355583

  9. Why we do what we do: implementation of practice guidelines by family nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Martin, Frances

    2008-10-01

    To examine who or what influenced family nurse practitioner (FNP) students' implementation of Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of Blood Pressure (JNC-7) guidelines for hypertension management. Eleven FNP students in their final semester completed a clinical course assignment in which they each provided care to five patients with hypertension (N = 55). Written responses to a 10-item tool eliciting patient management data as well as perceived barriers or facilitators to using JNC-7 clinical guidelines in precepted clinical settings were analyzed. The extent to which JNC-7 guidelines predicted clinical management of hypertension by student FNPs in primary care settings was congruent with the literature findings, reflecting a wide variation in implementation of guidelines from evidence-based practice (EBP) data. The literature supports utilization of clinical guidelines in patient care. Yet, implementation of guidelines in clinical practice is a complex phenomenon. Practitioners are looking for reliable evidence on which to base decision making. In the long term, EBP addresses some of the complexities of effective care delivery. The current trend is toward increasing utilization of evidence in caring for our patients. Implementation of EBP guidelines by preceptors in the workplace should increase as NP preceptors serve as role models of EBP implementation. Rewards may be important factors in implementation.

  10. EANM/ESC guidelines for radionuclide imaging of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Hesse, B; Lindhardt, T B; Acampa, W; Anagnostopoulos, C; Ballinger, J; Bax, J J; Edenbrandt, L; Flotats, A; Germano, G; Stopar, T Gmeiner; Franken, P; Kelion, A; Kjaer, A; Le Guludec, D; Ljungberg, M; Maenhout, A F; Marcassa, C; Marving, J; McKiddie, F; Schaefer, W M; Stegger, L; Underwood, R

    2008-04-01

    Radionuclide imaging of cardiac function represents a number of well-validated techniques for accurate determination of right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV volumes. These first European guidelines give recommendations for how and when to use first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography, gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, gated PET, and studies with non-imaging devices for the evaluation of cardiac function. The items covered are presented in 11 sections: clinical indications, radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry, study acquisition, RV EF, LV EF, LV volumes, LV regional function, LV diastolic function, reports and image display and reference values from the literature of RVEF, LVEF and LV volumes. If specific recommendations given cannot be based on evidence from original, scientific studies, referral is given to "prevailing or general consensus". The guidelines are designed to assist in the practice of referral to, performance, interpretation and reporting of nuclear cardiology studies for the evaluation of cardiac performance.

  11. Could accreditation bodies facilitate the implementation of medical guidelines in laboratories?

    PubMed

    Aakre, Kristin M; Oosterhuis, Wytze P; Misra, Shivani; Langlois, Michel R; Joseph, Watine; Twomey, Patrick J; Barth, Julian H

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have shown that recommendations related to how laboratory testing should be performed and results interpreted are limited in medical guidelines and that the uptake and implementation of the recommendations that are available need improvement. The EFLM/UEMS Working Group on Guidelines conducted a survey amongst the national societies for clinical chemistry in Europe regarding development of laboratory-related guidelines. The results showed that most countries have guidelines that are specifically related to laboratory testing; however, not all countries have a formal procedure for accepting such guidelines and few countries have guideline committees. Based on this, the EFLM/UEMS Working Group on Guidelines conclude that there is still room for improvement regarding these processes in Europe and raise the question if the accreditation bodies could be a facilitator for an improvement.

  12. Guidelines for Implementing a Real Estate Cooperative Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Thomas R.

    Background information and guidelines are provided for the development of cooperative education programs for real estate industry personnel. The first section outlines the operation of cooperative education programs and presents two organizational plans: the alternating plan, where students attend class full-time and work full-time during…

  13. Implementing clinical guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: barriers and solutions.

    PubMed

    Overington, Jeff D; Huang, Yao C; Abramson, Michael J; Brown, Juliet L; Goddard, John R; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M; Yang, Ian A

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex chronic lung disease characterised by progressive fixed airflow limitation and acute exacerbations that frequently require hospitalisation. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of COPD are now widely available. However, the uptake of these COPD guidelines in clinical practice is highly variable, as is the case for many other chronic disease guidelines. Studies have identified many barriers to implementation of COPD and other guidelines, including factors such as lack of familiarity with guidelines amongst clinicians and inadequate implementation programs. Several methods for enhancing adherence to clinical practice guidelines have been evaluated, including distribution methods, professional education sessions, electronic health records (EHR), point of care reminders and computer decision support systems (CDSS). Results of these studies are mixed to date, and the most effective ways to implement clinical practice guidelines remain unclear. Given the significant resources dedicated to evidence-based medicine, effective dissemination and implementation of best practice at the patient level is an important final step in the process of guideline development. Future efforts should focus on identifying optimal methods for translating the evidence into everyday clinical practice to ensure that patients receive the best care.

  14. 2 CFR 180.35 - By when must a Federal agency implement these guidelines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false By when must a Federal agency implement these guidelines? 180.35 Section 180.35 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved OMB GUIDELINES TO AGENCIES ON GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT...

  15. 2 CFR 180.20 - What must a Federal agency do to implement these guidelines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must a Federal agency do to implement these guidelines? 180.20 Section 180.20 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved OMB GUIDELINES TO AGENCIES ON GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT...

  16. 2 CFR 180.30 - Where does a Federal agency implement these guidelines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Where does a Federal agency implement these guidelines? 180.30 Section 180.30 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved OMB GUIDELINES TO AGENCIES ON GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND...

  17. Implementing clinical guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: barriers and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Overington, Jeff D.; Huang, Yao C.; Abramson, Michael J.; Brown, Juliet L.; Goddard, John R.; Bowman, Rayleen V.; Fong, Kwun M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex chronic lung disease characterised by progressive fixed airflow limitation and acute exacerbations that frequently require hospitalisation. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of COPD are now widely available. However, the uptake of these COPD guidelines in clinical practice is highly variable, as is the case for many other chronic disease guidelines. Studies have identified many barriers to implementation of COPD and other guidelines, including factors such as lack of familiarity with guidelines amongst clinicians and inadequate implementation programs. Several methods for enhancing adherence to clinical practice guidelines have been evaluated, including distribution methods, professional education sessions, electronic health records (EHR), point of care reminders and computer decision support systems (CDSS). Results of these studies are mixed to date, and the most effective ways to implement clinical practice guidelines remain unclear. Given the significant resources dedicated to evidence-based medicine, effective dissemination and implementation of best practice at the patient level is an important final step in the process of guideline development. Future efforts should focus on identifying optimal methods for translating the evidence into everyday clinical practice to ensure that patients receive the best care. PMID:25478199

  18. Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Guidelines for Research Mentorship: Development and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, L. DiAnne; Wester, Kelly L.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Chang, Catherine Y.; Hays, Danica G.; Pepperell, Jennifer; Spurgeon, Shawn L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe guidelines endorsed by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision for research mentorship, including characteristics of mentors and mentees. Suggestions for implementing the guidelines at the individual, program, institution, and professional levels are focused on enhancing mentoring relationships as well as…

  19. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 224 - Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports C Appendix C to Part 224 Transportation Other Regulations... REFLECTORIZATION OF RAIL FREIGHT ROLLING STOCK Pt. 224, App. C Appendix C to Part 224—Guidelines for...

  20. 78 FR 17679 - Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical Association Guidelines for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical... the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals:...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 224 - Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports C Appendix C to Part 224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 224 - Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports C Appendix C to Part 224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENT THE NATIONAL GUIDELINES ON NEWBORN CARE IN A RURAL MOUNTAINOUS PROVINCE OF VIETNAM

    PubMed Central

    Thi, Le Minh; Ha, BuiThiThu; Hoa, Dinh Thi Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the disparity in neonatal health among regions to ensure every mother and her newborn receive the health care they need is a priority in Vietnam. This study was conducted to assess the barriers in implementing the National guidelines on newborn care in a rural mountainous province of Vietnam. Qualitative methods were applied with 28 in-depth interviews and 4 focus group discussions in DakNong province. The results showed that there exist many barriers in implementing the national guideline in newborn care services. There is a big gap between health policy development and policy implementation. The Vietnam government had approved a good strategy and guidelines. Efforts now need to focus on implementing the national guideline and improving quality of care. PMID:27516812

  4. Compressive Sensing Image Sensors-Hardware Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, Mohammadreza; Deen, M. Jamal; Shirani, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    The compressive sensing (CS) paradigm uses simultaneous sensing and compression to provide an efficient image acquisition technique. The main advantages of the CS method include high resolution imaging using low resolution sensor arrays and faster image acquisition. Since the imaging philosophy in CS imagers is different from conventional imaging systems, new physical structures have been developed for cameras that use the CS technique. In this paper, a review of different hardware implementations of CS encoding in optical and electrical domains is presented. Considering the recent advances in CMOS (complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor) technologies and the feasibility of performing on-chip signal processing, important practical issues in the implementation of CS in CMOS sensors are emphasized. In addition, the CS coding for video capture is discussed. PMID:23584123

  5. Radiologist compliance with institutional guidelines for use of nonroutine communication of diagnostic imaging results.

    PubMed

    Harvey, H Benjamin; Alkasab, Tarik K; Pandharipande, Pari V; Zhao, Jing; Halpern, Elkan F; Salazar, Gloria M; Abujudeh, Hani H; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Gazelle, G Scott

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate radiologist compliance with institutional guidelines for nonroutine communication of diagnostic imaging results. From July 2012 through September 2013, 7,401 completed advanced imaging cases were retrospectively reviewed by groups of 3 or more radiologists. The reviewing radiologists were asked to reach consensus on two questions related to nonroutine communication: (1) "Does the report describe a finding which requires nonroutine communication to the patient's physicians?" and if so, (2) "Were the department's guidelines for nonroutine communication followed?" Consensus judgments were aggregated and analyzed on the basis of subspecialty, level of acuity per the guidelines, and type of communication used. Of the 7,401 studies reviewed, 960 (13.0%) were deemed to require nonroutine results communication. The need for nonroutine communication was most frequent with CT (16.6%), followed by MRI (11.1%) and ultrasound (3.4%). For the divisions studied, nonroutine communication was most frequently needed in thoracic (37.9%), followed by neurologic (17.3%), emergency (15.8%), cardiac (13.7%), musculoskeletal (4.4%), and abdominal (0.7%) imaging. Of the cases requiring nonroutine communication, 39 (4%) yielded consensus that the guidelines were not appropriately followed: 21% (n = 8) involved level 1 findings (critical), 41% (n = 16) involved level 2 findings (acute), and 38% (n = 15) involved level 3 findings (nonacute). Failures of communication involving level 1 findings primarily involved neurologic imaging, including 4 cases of new cerebral infarct and 3 cases of new intracranial hemorrhage. Established guidelines for nonroutine communication are appropriately applied and durable, underscoring the high yield of formalizing and implementing these guidelines across practice settings. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A systematic approach to implementing and evaluating clinical guidelines: The results of fifteen years of Preventive Child Health Care guidelines in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Fleuren, Margot A H; van Dommelen, Paula; Dunnink, Trudy

    2015-07-01

    Preventive Child Health Care (PCHC) services are delivered to all children in the Netherlands by approximately 5500 doctors, nurses and doctor's assistants. In 1996, The Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports asked for the development of evidence-based PCHC guidelines. Since 1998, twenty-five guidelines have been published. Levels of implementation affect outcomes and so implementation and evaluation of the actual use of guidelines are essential. At the outset, there was a national implementation plan with six main activities: a) determinant analysis before the implementation of a guideline, b) innovation strategies tailored to the determinants, c) dissemination to all professionals, d) ongoing evaluation of the awareness and use of the guidelines, e) trained implementation coordinator(s) in each PCHC organization and f) a national help desk. The awareness and use of the guidelines in random samples of doctors, nurses and doctor's assistants were surveyed using questionnaires. The respondents stated (on a 7-point scale) the proportion of all children they had exposed to given core elements in a guideline. The aim is for at least 90% of the professionals to be aware of the guideline and for 80% to perform the core elements for all (or nearly all) children. The six main activities, with the exception of ongoing evaluation, were gradually put into place, albeit only gradually, between 1998 and 2015 for all guidelines. In 2012, the use of individual core elements in all guidelines, dating from before 2012, varied from 28% to 100%. One guideline met both criteria of 90% awareness and 80% use, and three guidelines nearly met these criteria. Looking back on fifteen years of PCHC guidelines, we may conclude that the guidelines produced recently are implemented in accordance with the national implementation plan. Unfortunately, the evaluation of guideline use continues to be a difficulty.

  7. The relationship between organizational culture and implementation of clinical practice guidelines: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Dodek, Peter; Cahill, Naomi E; Heyland, Daren K

    2010-01-01

    The context in which critical care providers work has been shown to be associated with adherence to recommendations of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Consideration of contextual factors such as organizational culture may therefore be important when implementing guidelines. Organizational culture has been defined simply as "how things are around here" and encompasses leadership, communication, teamwork, conflict resolution, and other domains. This narrative review highlights the results of recent quantitative and qualitative studies, including studies on adherence to nutrition guidelines in the critical care setting, which demonstrate that elements of organizational culture, such as leadership support, interprofessional collaboration, and shared beliefs about the utility of guidelines, influence adherence to guideline recommendations. Outside nutrition therapy, there is emerging evidence that strategies focusing on organizational change (eg, revision of professional roles, interdisciplinary teams, integrated care delivery, computer systems, and continuous quality improvement) can favorably influence professional performance and patient outcomes. Consequently, future interventions aimed at implementing nutrition guidelines should aim to measure and take into account organizational culture, in addition to considering the characteristics of the patient, provider, and guideline. Further high quality, multimethod studies are required to improve our understanding of how culture influences guideline implementation, and which organizational change strategies might be most effective in optimizing nutrition therapy.

  8. [The German program for disease management guidelines--implementation with pathways and quality management].

    PubMed

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Lelgemann, Monika; Kopp, Ina

    2007-07-15

    In Germany, physicians enrolled in disease management programs are legally obliged to follow evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. That is why a Program for National Disease Management Guidelines (German DM-CPG Program) was established in 2002 aiming at implementation of best-practice evidence-based recommendations for nationwide as well as regional disease management programs. Against this background the article reviews programs, methods and tools for implementing DM-CPGs via clinical pathways as well as regional guidelines for outpatient care. Special reference is given to the institutionalized program of adapting DM-CPGs for regional use by primary-care physicians in the State of Hesse.

  9. Incorporation of Pharmacogenomics into Routine Clinical Practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guideline Development Process

    PubMed Central

    Caudle, Kelly E.; Klein, Teri E.; Hoffman, James M.; Müller, Daniel J.; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M.; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F.; Schwab, Matthias; Agúndez, José A.G.; Freimuth, Robert R.; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Crews, Kristine R.; Scott, Stuart A.; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Stein, C. Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V.; Williams, Marc S.; Johnson, Samuel G.

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine’s Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines. PMID:24479687

  10. Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guideline development process.

    PubMed

    Caudle, Kelly E; Klein, Teri E; Hoffman, James M; Muller, Daniel J; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F; Schwab, Matthias; Agundez, Jose A G; Freimuth, Robert R; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F; Crews, Kristine R; Scott, Stuart A; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J; Tyndale, Rachel F; Stein, C Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V; Williams, Marc S; Johnson, Samuel G

    2014-02-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine's Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines.

  11. What influences the implementation of the New Zealand stroke guidelines for physiotherapists and occupational therapists?

    PubMed

    Mudge, Suzie; Hart, Anna; Murugan, Sankaran; Kersten, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To explore perceived barriers and facilitators to the use of the New Zealand (NZ) stroke guidelines by occupational therapists and physiotherapists. Methods A qualitative descriptive methodology was used. Eligible physiotherapists and occupational therapists (NZ registered, working in one of two hospitals, treating at least 10 patients with stroke in the previous year) were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews to elicit their perceptions of the utility and feasibility of the NZ stroke guidelines and identify barriers and facilitators to their implementation. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Conventional content analysis with constant comparative methods was used for coding and analysis. Results The main themes influencing guideline implementation were resources and characteristics of the guidelines, the organization, the patient and family and the therapist. Insufficient resources were a major barrier that crossed many of the themes. Participants suggested a range of strategies relating to the organization to improve therapists' alignment to the guidelines. Conclusion Alignment to the guidelines in NZ is influenced both positively and negatively by a range of interacting factors, consistent with other studies. Alignment might be improved by the introduction of some relatively simple strategies, such as ring-fencing time for access to resources and training in the use of the guidelines. Many of the barriers and related interventions are likely to be more complex. Implications for rehabilitation Alignment with stroke guidelines has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Therapist alignment with the implementation of the New Zealand stroke guidelines is influenced by guideline characteristics, organizational characteristics, resources, patient and family characteristics and therapist characteristics. Frequently encountered barriers related to limited resources, particularly time. Ring-fencing regular time for access to

  12. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis: an electronic guideline implementability appraisal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines are intended to improve healthcare. However, even if guidelines are excellent, their implementation is not assured. In subfertility care, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) guidelines have been inventoried, and their methodological quality has been assessed. To improve the impact of the ESHRE guidelines and to improve European subfertility care, it is important to optimise the implementability of guidelines. We therefore investigated the implementation barriers of the ESHRE guideline with the best methodological quality and evaluated the used instrument for usability and feasibility. Methods We reviewed the ESHRE guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis to assess its implementability. We used an electronic version of the guideline implementability appraisal (eGLIA) instrument. This eGLIA tool consists of 31 questions grouped into 10 dimensions. Seven items address the guideline as a whole, and 24 items assess the individual recommendations in the guideline. The eGLIA instrument identifies factors that influence the implementability of the guideline recommendations. These factors can be divided into facilitators that promote implementation and barriers that oppose implementation. A panel of 10 experts from three European countries appraised all 36 recommendations of the guideline. They discussed discrepancies in a teleconference and completed a questionnaire to evaluate the ease of use and overall utility of the eGLIA instrument. Results Two of the 36 guideline recommendations were straightforward to implement. Five recommendations were considered simply statements because they contained no actions. The remaining 29 recommendations were implementable with some adjustments. We found facilitators of the guideline implementability in the quality of decidability, presentation and formatting, apparent validity, and novelty or innovation of the recommendations. Vaguely defined actions, lack of

  13. Development, Adoption, and Implementation of Military Sentencing Guidelines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Sentencing Guidelines, 101 HARV. L. REv. 1938, 1940-41. (1988). 140 See Herbert J. Hoelter et. al., Practicing Law in the Americas: The New Hemispheric Reality...1251-53. 141 See Hoelter et. al., supra note 140, at 1078. 142 See Stith, supra note 136, at 1251-53. 30 Sentencing in the 20th Century was the...restitution came under 143 Id. 144 Id. 145 See Ogletree, supra note 139, at 1941-1942. 146 Id. 147 See Hoelter et. al., supra note 140, at 1075. 148 Exodus

  14. Multifaceted guideline implementation strategies improve early identification and management of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Cheryl M; Grimmer-Somers, Karen A

    2009-08-01

    Osteoporosis contributes significantly to fractures, subsequent disability and premature mortality in Australia. Better detection and management of osteoporosis will reduce unnecessary health expenditure. To evaluate, in one large tertiary metropolitan hospital, the orthopaedic health care team's approach to osteoporosis guideline implementation to improve early identification and management of osteoporosis. This paper describes the implementation of multifaceted strategies to improve health-promoting behaviours and the uptake of osteoporosis guidelines by staff in the orthopaedic outpatient clinic at one metropolitan hospital, reflecting organisational and individual commitment to embedding guideline recommendations into routine practice. Implementation strategies were aimed at the requirements and perspectives of different stakeholder groups. Five audit datasets were compared: 62 patient records in two baseline audits, and three post-implementation audits of 31 patient records, collected over the following 3-month periods (August 2006 to April 2007). All audits used the same criteria to assess compliance with clinical guidelines, and outcomes of implementation strategies. There was consistent improvement in compliance with osteoporosis guidelines over the audit periods. Comparing baseline and immediate post-implementation data, there was a significant improvement (P < 0.05) in the percentage of patients with likely fragility fractures who were identified with an osteoporotic fracture. The percentage of patients who had a likely fragility fracture, with whom staff communicated about their problems and how to deal with them, increased consistently over all post-implementation audit periods. For patients with established osteoporosis who presented with fragility fractures, there was sustained improvement over the audit periods in the percentage provided with guideline-based care. This study highlights that appropriate and targeted intervention strategies can be

  15. Use of theory to plan or evaluate guideline implementation among physicians: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Liang, Laurel; Bernhardsson, Susanne; Vernooij, Robin W M; Armstrong, Melissa J; Bussières, André; Brouwers, Melissa C; Gagliardi, Anna R

    2017-02-27

    Guidelines support health care decision-making and high quality care and outcomes. However, their implementation is sub-optimal. Theory-informed, tailored implementation is associated with guideline use. Few guideline implementation studies published up to 1998 employed theory. This study aimed to describe if and how theory is now used to plan or evaluate guideline implementation among physicians. A scoping review was conducted. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library were searched from 2006 to April 2016. English language studies that planned or evaluated guideline implementation targeted to physicians based on explicitly named theory were eligible. Screening and data extraction were done in duplicate. Study characteristics and details about theory use were analyzed. A total of 1244 published reports were identified, 891 were unique, and 716 were excluded based on title and abstract. Among 175 full-text articles, 89 planned or evaluated guideline implementation targeted to physicians; 42 (47.2%) were based on theory and included. The number of studies using theory increased yearly and represented a wide array of countries, guideline topics and types of physicians. The Theory of Planned Behavior (38.1%) and the Theoretical Domains Framework (23.8%) were used most frequently. Many studies rationalized choice of theory (83.3%), most often by stating that the theory described implementation or its determinants, but most failed to explicitly link barriers with theoretical constructs. The majority of studies used theory to inform surveys or interviews that identified barriers of guideline use as a preliminary step in implementation planning (76.2%). All studies that evaluated interventions reported positive impact on reported physician or patient outcomes. While the use of theory to design or evaluate interventions appears to be increasing over time, this review found that one half of guideline implementation studies were based on theory and many of those provided

  16. Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Guideline for Low Back Pain: Process-Evaluation Among Health Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Suman, Arnela; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Buchbinder, Rachelle; van Tulder, Maurits W; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-10-03

    Background To reduce the burden of low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands, a multidisciplinary guideline for LBP has been implemented in Dutch primary care using a multifaceted implementation strategy targeted at health care professionals (HCPs) and patients. The current paper describes the process evaluation of the implementation among HCPs. Methods The strategy aimed to improve multidisciplinary collaboration and communication, and consisted of 7 components. This process evaluation was performed using the Linnan and Steckler framework. Data were collected using a mixed methods approach of quantitative and qualitative data. Results 128 HCPs participated in the implementation study, of which 96 participated in quantitative and 21 participated in qualitative evaluation. Overall dose delivered for this study was 89 %, and the participants were satisfied with the strategy, mostly with the multidisciplinary approach, which contributed to the mutual understanding of each other's disciplines and perspectives. While the training sessions did not yield any new information, the strategy created awareness of the guideline and its recommendations, contributing to positively changing attitudes and aiding in improving guideline adherent behaviour. However, many barriers to implementation still exist, including personal and practical factors, confidence, dependence and distrust issues among the HCPs, as well as policy factors (e.g. reimbursement systems). Conclusions The data presented in this paper have shown that the strategy that was used to implement the guideline in a Dutch primary care setting was feasible, especially when using a multidisciplinary approach. However, identified barriers for implementation have been identified and should be addressed in future implementation.

  17. Implementation of National Guidelines for Healthy School Meals: The Relationship between Process and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holthe, Asle; Larsen, Torill; Samdal, Oddrun

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of policy interventions at the school level is often considered an organizational change process. The main goal of the present study was to examine the degree of implementation of Norwegian national guidelines for healthy school meals and how organizational capacity at the school level contributed to the degree of…

  18. Implementation of National Guidelines for Healthy School Meals: The Relationship between Process and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holthe, Asle; Larsen, Torill; Samdal, Oddrun

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of policy interventions at the school level is often considered an organizational change process. The main goal of the present study was to examine the degree of implementation of Norwegian national guidelines for healthy school meals and how organizational capacity at the school level contributed to the degree of…

  19. Implementation of Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The successful implementation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention guidelines relies heavily on primary care physicians (PCPs) providing risk factor evaluation, intervention and patient education. The aim of this study was to ascertain the degree of awareness and implementation of the Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines on CVD prevention in clinical practice (CEIPC guidelines) among PCPs. Methods A cross-sectional survey of PCPs was conducted in Spain between January and June 2011. A random sample of 1,390 PCPs was obtained and stratified by region. Data were collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Results More than half (58%) the physicians were aware of and knew the recommendations, and 62% of those claimed to use them in clinical practice, with general physicians (without any specialist accreditation) being less likely to so than family doctors. Most PCPs (60%) did not assess cardiovascular risk, with the limited time available in the surgery being cited as the greatest barrier by 81%. The main reason to be sceptical about recommendations, reported by 71% of physicians, was that there are too many guidelines. Almost half the doctors cited the lack of training and skills as the greatest barrier to the implementation of lifestyle and behavioural change recommendations. Conclusions Most PCPs were aware of the Spanish adaptation of the European guidelines on CVD prevention (CEIPC guidelines) and knew their content. However, only one third of PCPs used the guidelines in clinical practice and less than half CVD risk assessment tools. PMID:23506390

  20. Effective interventions to facilitate the uptake of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening: an implementation guideline

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Appropriate screening may reduce the mortality and morbidity of colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers. Several high-quality systematic reviews and practice guidelines exist to inform the most effective screening options. However, effective implementation strategies are warranted if the full benefits of screening are to be realized. We developed an implementation guideline to answer the question: What interventions have been shown to increase the uptake of cancer screening by individuals, specifically for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers? Methods A guideline panel was established as part of Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-based Care, and a systematic review of the published literature was conducted. It yielded three foundational systematic reviews and an existing guidance document. We conducted updates of these reviews and searched the literature published between 2004 and 2010. A draft guideline was written that went through two rounds of review. Revisions were made resulting in a final set of guideline recommendations. Results Sixty-six new studies reflecting 74 comparisons met eligibility criteria. They were generally of poor to moderate quality. Using these and the foundational documents, the panel developed a draft guideline. The draft report was well received in the two rounds of review with mean quality scores above four (on a five-point scale) for each of the items. For most of the interventions considered, there was insufficient evidence to support or refute their effectiveness. However, client reminders, reduction of structural barriers, and provision of provider assessment and feedback were recommended interventions to increase screening for at least two of three cancer sites studied. The final guidelines also provide advice on how the recommendations can be used and future areas for research. Conclusion Using established guideline development methodologies and the AGREE II as our methodological frameworks, we developed an

  1. Programming Support Library. Volume II. Guidelines for Implementation of Requirements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    8217 J 39 1.) DR1 : VP SRCFAK1 p J,39DFIVR . OAD1 F.’ J 39 1: R V R 8 . ( C R IF’T F’ J39DRVR2 13 C R I FT p J 39 11 R VR UR :’I: OG :’ J.395 R R (.,I’. A...STATMEN REPOR NUMBERc nae l lc 2,I lfeelfoo eo 8 .. SUPPLEENTAR NOTE TNUBE(- Prormng uppor Library . erne Structured Prgrming78C-1 205 ASaCTl H’ll...4. Job control data. 5. Test data. 6. Program Design Language statements. 7. Textual data. 8 . Other data. Chapter 3 which contains the guidelines for

  2. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A; Edmonson, H; Felmlee, J; Pooley, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  3. School-Based Management: Rationale and Implementation Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Lori Jo

    1995-01-01

    School-based management (SBM), the decentralization of decision-making authority to the school site, comes in many variations. However, all forms of SBM require a rethinking of how and where budgeting, curriculum, and personnel decisions are made. This bulletin provides an overview of what SBM is and how it is implemented by summarizing some of…

  4. Codifying Implementation Guidelines for a Collaborative Improvement Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlan, Paul; Coghlan, David

    2008-01-01

    The application of action learning in inter-organizational settings is largely undeveloped. This article presents a description of and reflection on an action learning approach to enabling collaborative improvement in the extended manufacturing enterprise. The article focuses in particular on implementing the action learning approach. However, the…

  5. Implementation of Pharmaceutical Practice Guidelines by a Project Model Based: Clinical and Economic Impact.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Laleh; Karamikhah, Razieh; Mahdavinia, Azadeh; Samiei, Hasan; Petramfar, Peyman; Niknam, Ramin

    2015-10-01

    All around the world a few studies have been found on the effect of guideline implementation on direct medications' expenditure. The goal of this study was to evaluate cost savings of guideline implementation among patients who had to receive 3 costly medications including albumin, enoxaparin, and pantoprazole in a tertiary hospital in Shiraz, Iran.An 8-month prospective study was performed in 2 groups; group 1 as an observational group (control group) in 4 months from June to September 2014 and group 2 as an interventional group from October 2014 to January 2015.For group 1 the pattern of costly medications usage was determined without any intervention. For group 2, after guideline implementation, the economic impact was evaluated by making comparisons between the data achieved from the 2 groups.A total of 12,680 patients were evaluated during this study (6470 in group 1; 6210 in group 2). The reduction in the total value of costly administered drugs was 56% after guideline implementation. Such reduction in inappropriate prescribing accounts for the saving of 85,625 United States dollars (USD) monthly and estimated 1,027,500 USD annually.Guideline implementation could improve the adherence of evidence-based drug utilization and resulted in significant cost savings in a major teaching medical center via a decrease in inappropriate prescribing of costly medications.

  6. DOE-EPRI On-Line Monitoring Implementation Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    E. Davis, R. Bickford

    2003-01-02

    Industry and EPRI experience at several plants has shown on-line monitoring to be very effective in identifying out-of-calibration instrument channels or indications of equipment-degradation problems. The EPRI implementation project for on-line monitoring has demonstrated the feasability of on-line monitoring at several participating nuclear plants. The results have been very enouraging, and substantial progress is anticipated in the coming years.

  7. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium Guidelines for HLA-B Genotype and Abacavir Dosing: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Martin, M A; Hoffman, J M; Freimuth, R R; Klein, T E; Dong, B J; Pirmohamed, M; Hicks, J K; Wilkinson, M R; Haas, D W; Kroetz, D L

    2014-05-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guidelines for HLA-B Genotype and Abacavir Dosing were originally published in April 2012. We reviewed recent literature and concluded that none of the evidence would change the therapeutic recommendations in the original guideline; therefore, the original publication remains clinically current. However, we have updated the Supplementary Material online and included additional resources for applying CPIC guidelines to the electronic health record. Up-to-date information can be found at PharmGKB (http://www.pharmgkb.org).

  8. Effectiveness of the implementation of guidelines for anxiety disorders in specialized mental health care.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, M K; Oosterbaan, D B; Verbraak, M J P M; Hoogendoorn, A W; Penninx, B W J H; van Balkom, A J L M

    2015-07-01

    To examine the effect of implementing anxiety disorders guidelines on guideline adherence and patient outcomes in specialized mental health care. A treatment setting in which guidelines were implemented (intervention condition) was compared with one in which guidelines were only disseminated (control condition). Of 61.7% of 81 intervention-condition patients received treatment according to the guidelines vs. 40.6% of 69 control-condition patients (P = 0.01). At 1-year follow-up, intervention-condition patients showed a greater decrease in anxiety symptoms (d = 0.48, P < 0.05); higher percentages of response (52.6% vs. 33.8%; P = 0.025) and remission (33.3% vs.16.9%; P = 0.026); and a greater decrease in the rate of phobic avoidance (d = 0.34, P < 0.05). At 2-year follow-up, control-condition patients had experienced a longer period of treatment, which had eroded most of these differences, except for phobic avoidance. Systematic guideline implementation results in earlier gains and shorter treatment times. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Multifamily recycling programs: Program data and implementation guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Portland, Oregon, and San Diego, California worked independently, but on similar tracks to implement and study multi-family recycling systems. This report examines the implementation and lessons learned from these programs. Each city adapted the program to fit their local environment. San Diego focussed their outreach on garbage haulers as well as property managers. San Diego worked to promote the participation of the private sector in multifamily recycling and to encourage haulers to duplicate the program with their other multifamily customers. Portland focussed its outreach on the property owners and managers because a new Oregon law requires that landlords provide recycling service and education to all their tenants. The end product in each city was onsite recycling systems and tenant education serving nearly 9,000 multi-family units combined. Newspapers comprised the largest material by volume and weight collected in each city and accounted for the majority of the estimated energy savings in each program. Although recycling is often thought of as being good from an environmental and resource perspective, results from the energy savings analyses show that there is also a considerable energy savings potential from multifamily recycling.

  10. Do guidelines influence the implementation of health programs? — Uganda’s experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A guideline contains processes and procedures intended to guide health service delivery. However, the presence of guidelines may not guarantee their implementation, which may be a result of weaknesses in the development process. This study was undertaken to describe the processes of developing health planning, services management, and clinical guidelines within the health sector in Uganda, with the goal of understanding how these processes facilitate or abate the utility of guidelines. Methods Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used to collect and analyze data. Data collection was undertaken at the levels of the central Ministry of Health, the district, and service delivery. Qualitative methods included review of documents, observations, and key informant interviews, as well as quantitative aspects included counting guidelines. Quantitative data were analyzed with Microsoft Excel, and qualitative data were analyzed using deductive content thematic analysis. Results There were 137 guidelines in the health sector, with programs related to Millennium Development Goals having the highest number (n = 83). The impetus for guideline development was stated in 78% of cases. Several guidelines duplicated content, and some conflicted with each other. The level of consultation varied, and some guidelines did not consider government-wide policies and circumstances at the service delivery level. Booklets were the main format of presentation, which was not tailored to the service delivery level. There was no framework for systematic dissemination, and target users were defined broadly in most cases. Over 60% of guidelines available at the central level were not available at the service delivery level, but there were good examples in isolated cases. There was no framework for systematic monitoring of use, evaluation, and review of guidelines. Suboptimal performance of the supervision framework that would encourage the use of guidelines, assess their

  11. Opening the black box: a study of the process of NICE guidelines implementation.

    PubMed

    Spyridonidis, Dimitrios; Calnan, Michael

    2011-10-01

    This study informs 'evidence-based' implementation by using an innovative methodology to provide further understanding of the implementation process in the English NHS using two distinctly different NICE clinical guidelines as exemplars. The implementation process was tracked retrospectively and prospectively using a comparative case-study and longitudinal design. 74 unstructured interviews were carried out with 48 key informants (managers and clinicians) between 2007 and 2009. This study has shown that the NICE guidelines implementation process has both planned and emergent components, which was well illustrated by the use of the prospective longitudinal design in this study. The implementation process might be characterised as strategic and planned to begin with but became uncontrolled and subject to negotiation as it moved from the planning phase to adoption in everyday practice. The variations in the implementation process could be best accounted for in terms of differences in the structure and nature of the local organisational context. The latter pointed to the importance of managers as well as clinicians in decision-making about implementation. While national priorities determine the context for implementation the shape of the process is influenced by the interactions between doctors and managers, which influence the way they respond to external policy initiatives such as NICE guidelines. NICE and other national health policy-makers need to recognise that the introduction of planned change 'initiatives' in clinical practice are subject to social and political influences at the micro level as well as the macro level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Guidelines for the implementation of an open source information system

    SciTech Connect

    Doak, J.; Howell, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    This work was initially performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to help with the Open Source Task of the 93 + 2 Initiative; however, the information should be of interest to anyone working with open sources. The authors cover all aspects of an open source information system (OSIS) including, for example, identifying relevant sources, understanding copyright issues, and making information available to analysts. They foresee this document as a reference point that implementors of a system could augment for their particular needs. The primary organization of this document focuses on specific aspects, or components, of an OSIS; they describe each component and often make specific recommendations for its implementation. This document also contains a section discussing the process of collecting open source data and a section containing miscellaneous information. The appendix contains a listing of various providers, producers, and databases that the authors have come across in their research.

  13. Implementing guidelines on reporting research using animals (ARRIVE etc.): new requirements for publication in BJP

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, John C; Lilley, Elliot

    2015-01-01

    The ARRIVE guidelines have been implemented in BJP for 4 years with the aim of increasing transparency in reporting experiments involving animals. BJP has assessed our success in implementing them and concluded that we could do better. This editorial discusses the issues and explains how we are changing our requirements for authors to report their findings in experiments involving animals. This is one of a series of editorials discussing updates to the BJP Instructions to Authors Video To view the video on the ARRIVE guidelines, visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYXoUAnhoPM PMID:25964986

  14. Effectiveness of multifaceted implementation strategies for the implementation of back and neck pain guidelines in health care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Suman, Arnela; Dikkers, Marije F; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; van Tulder, Maurits W; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-09-20

    For the optimal use of clinical guidelines in daily practice, mere distribution of guidelines and materials is not enough, and active implementation is needed. This review investigated the effectiveness of multifaceted implementation strategies compared to minimal, single, or no implementation strategy for the implementation of non-specific low back and/or neck pain guidelines in health care. The following electronic databases were searched from inception to June 1, 2015: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycInfo, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL. The search strategy was restricted to low back pain, neck pain, and implementation research. Studies were included if their design was a randomized controlled trial, reporting on patients (age ≥18 years) with non-specific low back pain or neck pain (with or without radiating pain). Trials were eligible if they reported patient outcomes, measures of healthcare professional behaviour, and/or outcomes on healthcare level. The primary outcome was professional behaviour. Guidelines that were evaluated in the studies had to be implemented in a healthcare setting. No language restrictions were applied, and studies had to be published full-text in peer-reviewed journals, thus excluding abstract only publications, conference abstracts, and dissertation articles. Two researchers independently screened titles and abstract, extracted data from included studies, and performed risk of bias assessments. After removal of duplicates, the search resulted in 4750 abstracts to be screened. Of 43 full-text articles assessed for eligibility, 12 were included in this review, reporting on 9 individual studies, and separate cost-effectiveness analyses of 3 included studies. Implementation strategies varied between studies. Meta-analyses did not reveal any differences in effect between multifaceted strategies and controls. This review showed that multifaceted strategies for the implementation of neck and/or back pain guidelines in health care do not

  15. Barriers to ESC guideline implementation: results of a survey from the European Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP).

    PubMed

    McKee, Gabrielle; Kerins, Mary; Hamilton, Glenys; Hansen, Tina; Hendriks, Jeroen; Kletsiou, Eleni; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Jennings, Catriona; Fitzsimons, Donna

    2017-05-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) has a comprehensive clinical guideline development programme, relevant for all clinicians. However, implementation of guidelines is not always optimal. The aim of this study was to determine nurses' and allied professionals' awareness and barriers regarding clinical guideline implementation. A cross-sectional survey was administrated online and in print at EuroHeartCare 2015. A questionnaire was developed which examined awareness and barriers to implementation of ESC guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice (2012) and ESC guidelines in general. Of the 298 respondents, 12% reported that the prevention guidelines were used in their practice area. Respondents identified, in order of magnitude, that lack of leadership, workload, time, resources and a perception that they were unable to influence current practice were barriers to the use of the prevention guidelines. When asked to rank barriers to use of any ESC guidelines, time (22%) and leadership (23%) were ranked highest. Implementation of ESC guidelines by nurses, the majority responders in this survey, is a serious problem, requiring urgent improvement to ensure patients receive optimal evidence based care. Issues of leadership, workload, time and resources are significant barriers to guideline implementation. It is of concern that these professionals perceive both that they have little influence on implementation decisions and lack of leadership regarding guideline implementation. Educational and organisational strategies to improve leadership skills are imperative. These will build self-efficacy and empower nurses and allied professionals to advocate for evidence-based care in the clinical environment.

  16. Disseminating and implementing guidelines: article 13 in Integrating and coordinating efforts in COPD guideline development. An official ATS/ERS workshop report.

    PubMed

    Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Schünemann, Holger J; Burgers, Jako; Cruz, Alvaro A; Heffner, John; Metersky, Mark; Cook, Deborah

    2012-12-01

    Professional societies, like many other organizations around the world, have recognized the need to use rigorous processes to ensure that health care recommendations are informed by the best available research evidence. This is the thirteenth of a series of 14 articles that were prepared to advise guideline developers in respiratory and other diseases. This article focuses on current concepts and research evidence about how to disseminate and implement guidelines optimally on a national and international level to improve quality of care. In this article we address the following questions: What frameworks can aid guideline dissemination and implementation; what are the effects of different guideline dissemination and implementation strategies; and, what is the role of guideline developers in guideline dissemination and implementation? We identified existing systematic reviews and relevant methodological research. Our conclusions are based on evidence from published literature, experience from guideline developers, and workshop discussions. The Knowledge to Action cycle proposed by Graham and colleagues (J Contin Educ Health Prof 2006;26:13-24) provides a useful framework for planning dissemination and implementation activities that emphasize the need for tailored approaches based on an assessment of local barriers. There are a broad range of interventions that are generally effective at improving the uptake of evidence. The best intervention depends on likely barriers, available resources, and other practical considerations. Financial interventions (such as pay for performance) appear to be as effective as other interventions that aim to change professional behavior. Guideline developers who do not have responsibility for guideline implementation in their jurisdiction should support those with responsibility for implementation by considering the "implementability" of their guidelines.

  17. Requirements for guidelines systems: implementation challenges and lessons from existing software-engineering efforts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hemant; Allard, Raymond D; Enberg, Robert; Krishnan, Ganesh; Williams, Patricia; Nadkarni, Prakash M

    2012-03-09

    A large body of work in the clinical guidelines field has identified requirements for guideline systems, but there are formidable challenges in translating such requirements into production-quality systems that can be used in routine patient care. Detailed analysis of requirements from an implementation perspective can be useful in helping define sub-requirements to the point where they are implementable. Further, additional requirements emerge as a result of such analysis. During such an analysis, study of examples of existing, software-engineering efforts in non-biomedical fields can provide useful signposts to the implementer of a clinical guideline system. In addition to requirements described by guideline-system authors, comparative reviews of such systems, and publications discussing information needs for guideline systems and clinical decision support systems in general, we have incorporated additional requirements related to production-system robustness and functionality from publications in the business workflow domain, in addition to drawing on our own experience in the development of the Proteus guideline system (http://proteme.org). The sub-requirements are discussed by conveniently grouping them into the categories used by the review of Isern and Moreno 2008. We cite previous work under each category and then provide sub-requirements under each category, and provide example of similar work in software-engineering efforts that have addressed a similar problem in a non-biomedical context. When analyzing requirements from the implementation viewpoint, knowledge of successes and failures in related software-engineering efforts can guide implementers in the choice of effective design and development strategies.

  18. Requirements for guidelines systems: implementation challenges and lessons from existing software-engineering efforts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A large body of work in the clinical guidelines field has identified requirements for guideline systems, but there are formidable challenges in translating such requirements into production-quality systems that can be used in routine patient care. Detailed analysis of requirements from an implementation perspective can be useful in helping define sub-requirements to the point where they are implementable. Further, additional requirements emerge as a result of such analysis. During such an analysis, study of examples of existing, software-engineering efforts in non-biomedical fields can provide useful signposts to the implementer of a clinical guideline system. Methods In addition to requirements described by guideline-system authors, comparative reviews of such systems, and publications discussing information needs for guideline systems and clinical decision support systems in general, we have incorporated additional requirements related to production-system robustness and functionality from publications in the business workflow domain, in addition to drawing on our own experience in the development of the Proteus guideline system (http://proteme.org). Results The sub-requirements are discussed by conveniently grouping them into the categories used by the review of Isern and Moreno 2008. We cite previous work under each category and then provide sub-requirements under each category, and provide example of similar work in software-engineering efforts that have addressed a similar problem in a non-biomedical context. Conclusions When analyzing requirements from the implementation viewpoint, knowledge of successes and failures in related software-engineering efforts can guide implementers in the choice of effective design and development strategies. PMID:22405400

  19. A PASCAL Implementation of the Image Algebra.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    RFIT/GE/ENO/0-59 UNCLARSSIFI:ED F/O 9/2 mhhhhmhmhmhlmE~hNGh hh h 1.8 7 11111.25 111 .4 111. CRCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART THESI A PASCAL IMPLEMENTATION...OF THEIMAGE ALGEBRAII"-E T 1 THESIS I Christopher J. TitusD Captain, USAF AFIT/GE/ENG/86D-59 &pvv-ed fo, public rleaso, SDl~tjbUtim UnUimted...DTIC ELECTE MAR! 7 ig .4. e.4 JD A PASCAL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE IMAGE ALGEBRA THESIS Christopher J. Titus Captain, USAF AFIT/GE/ENG/86D-59 Approved for

  20. Adherence to treatment guidelines for acute otitis media in children. The necessity of an effective strategy of guideline implementation.

    PubMed

    Célind, Jimmy; Södermark, Liv; Hjalmarson, Ola

    2014-07-01

    Acute otitis media is the single diagnosis responsible for most prescriptions of antibiotics in Sweden and the USA. The treatment of acute otitis media has significant impact on child health, healthcare costs, and the development of anti-microbial resistance. In the Swedish national guidelines from the year 2000, watchful waiting was recommended for most children over 2 years of age. The aims of the present study were to assess the degree of adherence to acute otitis media guidelines at a busy pediatric emergency department of a university hospital and to determine whether an information campaign changed the result. Audit of 91 patient records before and 80 patient records after an information campaign consisting of an oral presentation, posting of flow charts, and sending of educational material to prescribing physicians. Four endpoints were studied: choosing to use antibiotics, choice of antibiotic, dosage of antibiotic, and duration of treatment. Before the information campaign, adherence to guidelines was between 70% (dosage) and around 90% (duration). No significant change was seen after the information campaign. The endpoint choosing to use antibiotics showed a large divergence in adherence in children under 2 years (96%) compared to older children (39%). Overall adherence to recommendations was 70-90% but adherence to watchful waiting was poor. Information did not improve adherence, suggesting insufficient educational power or the existence of barriers other than lack of knowledge. Specific barriers should be identified, and implementation and follow-up should be part of producing guidelines in order to achieve the desired results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Knowledge and implementation of the S3 guideline on delirium management in Germany].

    PubMed

    Saller, T; V Dossow, V; Hofmann-Kiefer, K

    2016-10-01

    Delirium is a common complication in critical care. The syndrome is often underestimated due to its potentially no less dangerous course as a hypoactive delirium. Therefore, current guidelines ask for a structured, regular and routine screening in all intensive care units. If delirium is diagnosed, symptomatic therapy should be initiated promptly. The aim of the current study was to evaluate recent German anesthetists' strategies regarding delirium care compared to the German guidelines for sedation and delirium in intensive care. In an online survey German hospitals' senior anesthetists (n = 922) were interviewed anonymously between May and June 2015 regarding guideline use in delirium management in German intensive care units. In 33 direct questions the anesthetists were invited to answer items regarding the structure of their hospitals, intensive care and delirium therapy in order to review their knowledge of the German delirium guidelines that expired in 2014. The 249 senior anesthetists who responded to the survey, can be associated with (or represent) a quarter of German intensive care beds and cases, respectively. In every tenth clinic that runs an intensive care unit the guideline was unknown. In three of four intensive care units physicians specified a preferred delirium score, the CAM-ICU (49.4 %) is used most frequently. With knowledge of the guidelines more often a recommended delirium score is used (p = 0.017). However, only 53.6 % of the respondents ascertain a score every eight hours and 36 % have no facility for standardized documentation in the records. At intensive care rounds, a possible diagnosis of delirium is an inherent part in only 34.9 % of the responders even with guideline knowledge. The particular gold standard for the therapy of delirium (alphaagonists for vegetative symptoms; 89.6 %, benzodiazepines for anxiety, 77.5 %; antipsychotics in 86.7 % for psychotic symptoms) is implemented more often with growing knowledge of

  2. Machine Learning Algorithms Implemented in Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Renner, L.; Neuringer, M.; Cornea, A.

    2014-01-01

    A typical core facility is faced with a wide variety of experimental paradigms, samples, and images to be analyzed. They typically have one thing in common: a need to segment features of interest from the rest of the image. In many cases, for example fluorescence images with good contrast and signal to noise, intensity segmentation may be successful. Often, however, images may not be acquired in optimum conditions, or features of interest are not distinguished by intensity alone. Examples we encountered are: retina fundus photographs, histological stains, DAB immunohistochemistry, etc. We used machine learning algorithms as implemented in FIJI to isolate specific features in longitudinal retinal photographs of non-human primates. Images acquired over several years with different technologies, cameras and skills were analyzed to evaluate small changes with precision. The protocol used includes: Scale-Invariant feature Transform (SIFT) registration, Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) and Weka training. Variance of results for different images of the same time point and for different raters of the same images was less than 10% in most cases.

  3. Revision and Implementation of "Clinical Guideline for Tuberculosis and HIV in Prisons", Great Tehran Prison, Iran.

    PubMed

    Farhoudi, Behnam; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Mohraz, Minoo; Golrokhy, Raheleh; Farnia, Marzieh; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Alasvand, Ramin; Ebrahimi, Bahman; Esfehani, Jafar; Tashakoriyan, Mehrzad

    2017-05-17

    To evaluate the feasibility of the revised "Clinical Guideline for HIV and TB" in the Great Tehran Prison during October 2013 to June 2014. The guideline includes all aspects of HIV/TB diagnosis based on active case finding (ACF), treatment and care services. Before the implementation, a focus group discussion was conducted, and attended by experts on jail diseases. The objective was to identify defects and limitations of the guideline. After the discussion, the guideline was revised. The Great Tehran Prison contains three separate units. All prisoners are taken first to "reception and identification unit (quarantine)" and then send to two housing units according to their legal status. An HIV ACF strategy was employed in the quarantine, and two units through a voluntary provider-initiated HIV testing. Three staffs of the triangular clinic trained the prisoners about common routes of HIV transmission and the symptoms of TB in the units. In the quarantine, all prisoners were examined for HIV-risk factors and symptoms of TB, and offered HIV testing. In unit one, healthcare staff continued the ACF process, while in unit two, the trained prisoners were assigned as the healthcare communicators to proceed the strategy. When the test result was positive, then the process of care, treatment and follow ups were initiated. Also, the use of directly observed therapy (DOTs) for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and TB was initiated. There was a follow up for released prisoner to refer them to care and treatment services outside the prison. The guideline was implemented in the prison successfully. Regarding feasibility of the guideline, the investigators suggest that the guideline to be implemented in other prisons across the country. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. A constraint satisfaction approach to data-driven implementation of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kuziemsky, Craig; O'Sullivan, Dympna; Michalowski, Wojtek; Wilk, Szymon; Farion, Ken

    2008-11-06

    Despite significant research efforts, the implementation of computerized clinical practice guidelines (CPG) in practice remains problematic for a number of reasons. In particular most guideline representation models do not deal adequately with incomplete or inconsistent clinical data. We present a constraint satisfaction approach to address such shortcomings by focusing on CPG data rather than CPG representation. We model a CPG as a set of data-driven constraints which are used to generate complete solutions for describing a patient state from incomplete clinical data, where the patient state is confirmed by the user. Inconsistent input data can be temporarily eliminated and final feasible solutions (permitted complete solutions from a CPG) can pinpoint inconsistencies in original input data alongside allowable guideline data. We demonstrate a sample implementation of the approach for a pediatric asthma CPG.

  5. Identification of attributes that promote the adoption and implementation of 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As part of a larger study, this research was to identify attributes of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) that would promote their adoption and implementation by participants in a nutrition intervention. Project procedures were guided by the Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) theory. To identif...

  6. Web-Based Social Work Courses: Guidelines for Developing and Implementing an Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Beverly Araujo; Fenster, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Although web-based courses in schools of social work have proliferated over the past decade, the literature contains few guidelines on steps that schools can take to develop such courses. Using Knowles's framework, which delineates tasks and themes involved in implementing e-learning in social work education, this article describes the cultivation…

  7. Web-Based Social Work Courses: Guidelines for Developing and Implementing an Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Beverly Araujo; Fenster, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Although web-based courses in schools of social work have proliferated over the past decade, the literature contains few guidelines on steps that schools can take to develop such courses. Using Knowles's framework, which delineates tasks and themes involved in implementing e-learning in social work education, this article describes the cultivation…

  8. 75 FR 4769 - Availability of Grant Funds and Proposed Implementation Guidelines; Withdrawal of Solicitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... Proposed Implementation Guidelines; Withdrawal of Solicitation for the Marine Aquaculture Initiative AGENCY... solicitation of applications for the NOAA Marine Aquaculture Initiative 2010, which was published in the NOAA... notice, beginning on page 3110, was a solicitation of applications for the NOAA Marine Aquaculture...

  9. Determinants of implementation of maternal health guidelines in Kosovo: mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Straus, Sharon E; Moore, Julia E; Uka, Sami; Marquez, Christine; Gülmezoglu, A Metin

    2013-09-09

    One of the challenges to implementing clinical practice guidelines is the need to adapt guidelines to the local context and identify barriers to their uptake. Several models of framework are available to consider for use in guideline adaptation. We completed a multiphase study to explore the implementation of maternal health guidelines in Kosovo, focusing on determinants of uptake and methods to contextualize for local use. The study involved a survey, individual interviews, focus groups, and a consensus meeting with relevant stakeholders, including clinicians (obstetricians, midwives), managers, researchers, and policy makers from the national Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization office in Pristina, Kosovo. Participants identified several important barriers to implementation. First, lack of communication between clinicians and ministry representatives was seen as leading to duplication of effort in creating or adapting guidelines, as well as substantial mistrust between clinicians and policy makers. Second, there was a lack of communication across clinical groups that provide obstetric care and a lack of integration across the entire healthcare system, including rural and urban centers. This fragmentation was thought to have directly resulted from the war in 1998 - 1999. Third, the conflict substantially and adversely affected the healthcare infrastructure in Kosovo, which has resulted in an inability to monitor quality of care across the country. Furthermore, the impact on infrastructure has affected the ability to access required medications consistently and to smoothly transfer patients from rural to urban centers. Another issue raised during this project was the appropriateness of including guideline recommendations perceived to be 'aspirational'. Implementing clinical practice guidelines in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) requires consideration of several specific barriers. Particularly pertinent to this study were the effects of

  10. Determinants of implementation of maternal health guidelines in Kosovo: mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the challenges to implementing clinical practice guidelines is the need to adapt guidelines to the local context and identify barriers to their uptake. Several models of framework are available to consider for use in guideline adaptation. Methods We completed a multiphase study to explore the implementation of maternal health guidelines in Kosovo, focusing on determinants of uptake and methods to contextualize for local use. The study involved a survey, individual interviews, focus groups, and a consensus meeting with relevant stakeholders, including clinicians (obstetricians, midwives), managers, researchers, and policy makers from the national Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization office in Pristina, Kosovo. Results Participants identified several important barriers to implementation. First, lack of communication between clinicians and ministry representatives was seen as leading to duplication of effort in creating or adapting guidelines, as well as substantial mistrust between clinicians and policy makers. Second, there was a lack of communication across clinical groups that provide obstetric care and a lack of integration across the entire healthcare system, including rural and urban centers. This fragmentation was thought to have directly resulted from the war in 1998 – 1999. Third, the conflict substantially and adversely affected the healthcare infrastructure in Kosovo, which has resulted in an inability to monitor quality of care across the country. Furthermore, the impact on infrastructure has affected the ability to access required medications consistently and to smoothly transfer patients from rural to urban centers. Another issue raised during this project was the appropriateness of including guideline recommendations perceived to be ‘aspirational’. Conclusions Implementing clinical practice guidelines in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) requires consideration of several specific barriers. Particularly

  11. Implementation of WHO guidelines on management of severe malnutrition in hospitals in Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Deen, Jacqueline L.; Funk, Matthias; Guevara, Victor C.; Saloojee, Haroon; Doe, James Y.; Palmer, Ayo; Weber, Martin W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the problems, benefits, feasibility, and sustainability of implementation of WHO guidelines on management of severe malnutrition. METHODS: A postal survey invited staff from 12 African hospitals to participate in the study. Five hospitals were evaluated and two were selected to take part in the study: a district hospital in South Africa and a mission hospital in Ghana. At an initial visit, an experienced paediatrician reviewed the situation in the hospitals and introduced the principles of the guidelines through a participatory approach. During a second visit about six months later, the paediatrician reviewed the feasibility and sustainability of the introduced changes and helped find solutions to problems. At a final visit after one year, the paediatrician reassessed the overall situation. FINDINGS: Malnutrition management practices improved at both hospitals. Measures against hypoglycaemia, hypothermia, and infection were strengthened. Early, frequent feeding was established as a routine practice. Some micronutrients for inclusion in the diet were not locally available and needed to be imported. Problems were encountered with monitoring of weight gain and introducing a rehydration solution for malnutrition. CONCLUSION: Implementation of the main principles of the WHO guidelines on severe malnutrition was feasible, affordable, and sustainable at two African hospitals. The guidelines could be improved by including suggestions on how to adapt specific recommendations to local situations. The guidelines are well supported by experience and published reports, but more information is needed about some components and their impact on mortality. PMID:12764489

  12. Do guidelines on first impression make sense? Implementation of a chest pain guideline in primary care: a systematic evaluation of acceptance and feasibility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most guidelines concentrate on investigations, treatment, and monitoring instead of patient history and clinical examination. We developed a guideline that dealt with the different aetiologies of chest pain by emphasizing the patient's history and physical signs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the guideline's acceptance and feasibility in the context of a practice test. Methods The evaluation study was nested in a diagnostic cross-sectional study with 56 General Practitioners (GPs) and 862 consecutively recruited patients with chest pain. The evaluation of the guideline was conducted in a mixed method design on a sub-sample of 17 GPs and 282 patients. Physicians' evaluation of the guideline was assessed via standardized questionnaires and case record forms. Additionally, practice nursing staff and selected patients were asked for their evaluation of specific guideline modules. Quantitative data was analyzed descriptively for frequencies, means, and standard deviations. In addition, two focus groups with a total of 10 GPs were held to gain further insights in the guideline implementation process. The data analysis and interpretation followed the standards of the qualitative content analysis. Results The overall evaluation of the GPs participating in the evaluation study regarding the recommendations made in the chest pain guideline was positive. A total of 14 GPs were convinced that there was a need for this kind of guideline and perceived the guideline recommendations as useful. While the long version was partially criticized for a perceived lack of clarity, the short version of the chest pain guideline and the heart score were especially appreciated by the GPs. However, change of clinical behaviour as consequence of the guideline was inconsistent. While on a concrete patient related level, GPs indicated to have behaved as the guideline recommended, the feedback on a more general level was heterogeneous. Several suggestions to improve

  13. ASCI 2010 contrast media guideline for cardiac imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group.

    PubMed

    Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Chan, Carmen; Yu, Wei; Yong, Hwan Seok; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2010-12-01

    The use of contrast media for cardiac imaging becomes increasing as the widespread of cardiac CT and cardiac MR. A radiologist needs to carefully consider the indication and the injection protocol of contrast media to be used as well as the possibility of adverse effect. There are several guidelines for contrast media in western countries. However, these are focusing the adverse effect of contrast media. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and created a guideline, which summarizes the integrated knowledge of contrast media for cardiac imaging. In cardiac imaging, coronary artery evaluation is feasible by non-contrast MR angiography, which can be an alternative examination in high risk patients for the use of iodine contrast media. Furthermore, the body habitus of Asian patients is usually smaller than that of their western counterparts. This necessitates modifications in the injection protocol and in the formula for calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate. This guideline provided fundamental information for the use of contrast media for Asian patients in cardiac imaging.

  14. ASCI 2010 contrast media guideline for cardiac imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Chan, Carmen; Yu, Wei; Yong, Hwan Seok; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2010-01-01

    The use of contrast media for cardiac imaging becomes increasing as the widespread of cardiac CT and cardiac MR. A radiologist needs to carefully consider the indication and the injection protocol of contrast media to be used as well as the possibility of adverse effect. There are several guidelines for contrast media in western countries. However, these are focusing the adverse effect of contrast media. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and created a guideline, which summarizes the integrated knowledge of contrast media for cardiac imaging. In cardiac imaging, coronary artery evaluation is feasible by non-contrast MR angiography, which can be an alternative examination in high risk patients for the use of iodine contrast media. Furthermore, the body habitus of Asian patients is usually smaller than that of their western counterparts. This necessitates modifications in the injection protocol and in the formula for calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate. This guideline provided fundamental information for the use of contrast media for Asian patients in cardiac imaging. PMID:20931289

  15. Impact of guidelines implemented in a Paris university hospital: application to the use of antiemetics by cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Debrix, I; Flahault, A; Becker, A; Schwartz, L; Kanfer, A; Milleron, B

    1999-01-01

    Aims To assess the impact with time of guidelines on antiemetic use in an 850-bed Paris university hospital with a high proportion of cancer patients. Methods Guidelines on the use of antiemetics available in cancer chemotherapy were drafted according to the Delphi technique. Their implementation was based upon a patient-specific antiemetic prescription form. To assess the impact of guideline implementation over time, discrepancies between current practice and the guidelines were compared before guideline implementation (between March and August 1995) and after implementation (between March and August 1997, and March and August 1998). Results Before the Delphi panel’s guidelines were implemented, 5-HT3 antagonists were inappropriately administered in 70% of cases. After guideline implementation, this proportion dropped significantly (P <0.0001, Fisher’s exact test) to 22% between March and August 1997 and 28% between March and August 1998. Conclusions Implementation of guidelines seems to have resulted in significant changes with time, although a causal relationship has not been demonstrated. The development of guidelines by our hospital’s multidisciplinary working group helped the various consultants to adjust medical practices to take account of these changes. PMID:10583034

  16. The effectiveness of guideline implementation strategies on improving antipsychotic medication management for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Owen, Richard R; Hudson, Teresa; Thrush, Carol; Thapa, Purushottam; Armitage, Tracey; Landes, Reid D

    2008-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a conceptually-based, multicomponent "enhanced" strategy with a "basic" strategy for implementing antipsychotic management recommendations of VA schizophrenia guidelines. Two VA medical centers in each of 3 Veterans Integrated Service Networks were randomized to either a basic educational implementation strategy or the enhanced strategy, in which a trained nurse promoted provider guideline adherence and patient compliance. Patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia were enrolled and assessed at baseline and 6 months and their medical records were abstracted; 291 participants were included in analyses. Logistic regression models were developed for rates of: (1) switching patients from first-generation antipsychotics (FGA) to second-generation antipsychotics (SGA), and (2) guideline-concordant antipsychotic dose. Of participants prescribed FGAs at baseline, those at enhanced sites were significantly more likely than participants at basic sites to have an SGA added to the FGA during the study (29% vs. 8%; adjusted OR = 7.7; 95% CI: 2.0-30.1), but were not significantly more likely to be switched to monotherapy with an SGA (29% vs. 23%). Guideline-concordant antipsychotic dosing was not significantly affected by the intervention. The enhanced guideline implementation strategy increased addition of SGAs to FGA therapy, but did not significantly increase guideline-recommended switching from FGA to SGA monotherapy. Antipsychotic dosing was not significantly altered. The study illustrates the challenges of changing clinical behavior. Strategies to improve medication management for schizophrenia are needed, and must incorporate recommendations likely to emerge from recent research suggesting comparable effectiveness of SGAs and FGAs.

  17. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guideline for Pharmacogenetics-Guided Warfarin Dosing: 2017 Update.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J A; Caudle, K E; Gong, L; Whirl-Carrillo, M; Stein, C M; Scott, S A; Lee, M T; Gage, B F; Kimmel, S E; Perera, M A; Anderson, J L; Pirmohamed, M; Klein, T E; Limdi, N A; Cavallari, L H; Wadelius, M

    2017-09-01

    This document is an update to the 2011 Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guideline for CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotypes and warfarin dosing. Evidence from the published literature is presented for CYP2C9, VKORC1, CYP4F2, and rs12777823 genotype-guided warfarin dosing to achieve a target international normalized ratio of 2-3 when clinical genotype results are available. In addition, this updated guideline incorporates recommendations for adult and pediatric patients that are specific to continental ancestry. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  18. Implementation of the SSHAC Guidelines for Level 3 and 4 PSHAs - Experience Gained from Actual Applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, Thomas C.; Abrahamson, Norm A.; Boore, David M.; Coppersmith, Kevin J.; Knepprath, Nichole E.

    2009-01-01

    In April 1997, after four years of deliberations, the Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee released its report 'Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts' through the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as NUREG/CR-6372, hereafter SSHAC (1997). Known informally ever since as the 'SSHAC Guidelines', SSHAC (1997) addresses why and how multiple expert opinions - and the intrinsic uncertainties that attend them - should be used in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analyses (PSHA) for critical facilities such as commercial nuclear power plants. Ten years later, in September 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entered into a 13-month agreement with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) titled 'Practical Procedures for Implementation of the SSHAC Guidelines and for Updating PSHAs'. The NRC was interested in understanding and documenting lessons learned from recent PSHAs conducted at the higher SSHAC Levels (3 and 4) and in gaining input from the seismic community for updating PSHAs as new information became available. This study increased in importance in anticipation of new applications for nuclear power facilities at both existing and new sites. The intent of this project was not to replace the SSHAC Guidelines but to supplement them with the experience gained from putting the SSHAC Guidelines to work in practical applications. During the course of this project, we also learned that updating PSHAs for existing nuclear power facilities involves very different issues from the implementation of the SSHAC Guidelines for new facilities. As such, we report our findings and recommendations from this study in two separate documents, this being the first. The SSHAC Guidelines were written without regard to whether the PSHAs to which they would be applied were site-specific or regional in scope. Most of the experience gained to date from high-level SSHAC studies has been for site-specific cases, although three

  19. Symptom relief in patients with pneumonia and dementia: implementation of a practice guideline.

    PubMed

    van der Maaden, Tessa; van der Steen, Jenny T; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Doncker, Sarah M M M; Anema, Johannes R; Hertogh, Cees M P M; de Vet, Henrica C W

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the degree of implementation and barriers encountered in the use of a practice guideline for optimal symptom relief for patients with dementia and pneumonia in Dutch nursing homes. A process evaluation included assessment of reach, fidelity, and dose delivered using researcher's observations, and dose received was addressed in a question "use of the practice guideline," which the physicians completed for each patient included in the study. Perceived barriers were assessed with a structured questionnaire (response 69%) and semi-structured interviews (n = 14), which were subject to qualitative content analysis. Of the 55 physicians involved in the intervention phase, 87% attended an implementation meeting; 20 physicians joined the study later (reach). The intervention was implemented as planned, and all intervention components were delivered by the researchers (fidelity and dose delivered). Thirty-six physicians included 109 patients. For 81% of the patients, the treating physician stated to have used the guideline (dose received). The guideline was perceived as providing a good overview of current practice, but some physicians had expected a more directive protocol or algorithm. Further, recommended regular observations of symptoms were rarely performed. Physician's often felt that "this is not different from what we usually do," and with the acute illness, there was not always enough time to (re)familiarize with the contents. The physicians used the practice guideline frequently despite important barriers. Future implementation may involve strategies such as multiple interactive meetings. Further, the greatest potential to alter usual practice should be emphasized, such as using observational instruments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Adopting and implementing nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities: tensions between public health and corporate profitability.

    PubMed

    Olstad, Dana Lee; Raine, Kim D; McCargar, Linda J

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about how public entities can partner with industry to achieve public health goals. We investigated industry's perspective of factors that influenced their adoption and implementation of voluntary, government-issued nutrition guidelines (Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth, ANGCY) in recreational facilities. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using directed content analysis. Food services in recreational facilities. Seven managers from industry participated; five from companies that had adopted and implemented the ANGCY (adopters) in recreational facilities and two from companies that had not (non-adopters). Industry views nutrition guidelines through the lens of profitability. Non-adopters were unwilling to implement the ANGCY for fear of sacrificing short-term profitability, whereas adopters adhered to them in an attempt to position themselves for long-term profitability. Adopters faced barriers including few resources, no training, complex guidelines, low availability of and demand for ANGCY-compliant products, competitive pressures and substantial declines in revenue. Managers believed widespread voluntary adoption of the ANGCY was unlikely without government incentives and/or a mandate, as the environmental context for voluntary action was poor. All managers supported government-mandated implementation of the ANGCY to level the playing field upon which companies compete. Public-private partnerships in recreational facilities can embrace public health goals in the short term, provided industry perceives potential for long-term financial gain. Widespread uptake of voluntary nutrition guidelines in this setting is unlikely, however, as market mechanisms do not encourage industry to sell and promote healthier options. Government legislation may therefore be warranted.

  1. Effect of implementation of new resuscitation guidelines on quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival.

    PubMed

    Olasveengen, Theresa M; Vik, Eystein; Kuzovlev, Artem; Sunde, Kjetil

    2009-04-01

    During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), advanced life support (ALS) providers have been shown to deliver inadequate CPR with long intervals without chest compressions. Several changes made to the 2005 CPR Guidelines were intended to reduce unnecessary interruptions. We have evaluated if quality of CPR performed by the Oslo Emergency Medical System (EMS) improved after implementation of the modified 2005 CPR Guidelines, and if any such improvement would result in increased survival. Retrospective, observational study of all consecutive adult cardiac arrest patients treated during a 2-year period before (May 2003-April 2005), and after (January 2006-December 2007) implementation of the modified 2005 CPR Guidelines. CPR quality was assessed from continuous electronic recordings from LIFEPACK 12 defibrillators where ventilations and chest compressions were identified from transthoracic impedance changes. Ambulance run sheets, Utstein forms and hospital records were collected and outcome evaluated. Resuscitation was attempted in 435 patients before and 481 patients after implementation of the modified 2005 CPR Guidelines. ECGs usable for CPR quality evaluation were obtained in 64% and 76% of the cases, respectively. Pre-shock pauses decreased from median (interquartile range) 17s (11, 22) to 5s (2, 17) (p=0.000), overall hands-off ratios from 0.23+/-0.13 to 0.14+/-0.09 (p=0.000), compression rates from 120+/-9 to 115+/-10 (p=0.000) and ventilation rates from 12+/-4 to 10+/-4 (p=0.000). Overall survival to hospital discharge was 11% and 13% (p=0.287), respectively. Quality of CPR improved after implementation of the modified 2005 Guidelines with only a weak trend towards improved survival to hospital discharge.

  2. [Medico-economic assessment of two methods for implementing thyroid testing guidelines].

    PubMed

    Saillour-Glénisson, F; Michel, P; Daucourt, V

    2005-09-01

    To compare independent and combined effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two implementation interventions of guidelines for ordering thyroid function tests. The two implementation interventions were a Memorandum Pocket Card (MPC) and a Test Request Form (TRF). Intervention groups were wards. The study used an experimental 2*2 factorial design with matching hospitals according to size and activity and wards according to pre-intervention appropriateness for test ordering. Four ward groups were established: the dual intervention group, the order form group, the pocket card group and the control group. Physicians in all groups received guidelines and were invited to a local information meeting. The main outcome measure of effectiveness was the Guideline Conformity Rate (GCR). The cost-effectiveness ratio was the cost difference between the tested intervention and the control intervention upon effectiveness difference between the tested intervention and the control intervention. Six hospitals participated in the study (two middle-sized hospitals, two small-sized hospitals and two psychiatric hospitals). A total of 1412 orders for thyroid function tests were collected. GCR was 78% in the dual intervention group, 83% in the order form group, 73% in the pocket card group and 62% in the control group. The interaction between TRF and MPC was not significant (B=-0.70, p=0.21). Compared to simple information, TRF was effective in increasing GCR (OR=2.65, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.52-4.62), unlike MPC (OR=1.28, CI: 0.75-2.19). TRF was the less expensive and the most effective intervention. Using a robust design, our study shows a greater effectiveness of TRF than MPC and their association in implementing thyroid function test guidelines. The development of clinical practice improvement projects through the second procedure of accreditation in France is a good opportunity to develop a guidelines implementation research project.

  3. Policies and Procedures That Facilitate Implementation of Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines in U.S. Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Polk, Deborah E; Nolan, Beth A D; Shah, Nilesh H; Weyant, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the degree to which dental schools in the United States have policies and procedures in place that facilitate the implementation of evidence-based clinical guidelines. The authors sent surveys to all 65 U.S. dental schools in 2014; responses were obtained from 38 (58%). The results showed that, of the nine policies and procedures examined, only two were fully implemented by 50% or more of the responding schools: guidelines supported through clinical faculty education or available chairside (50%), and students informed of guidelines in both the classroom and clinic (65.8%). Although 92% of the respondents reported having an electronic health record, 80% of those were not using it to track compliance with guidelines. Five schools reported implementing more policies than the rest of the schools. The study found that the approach to implementing guidelines at most of the responding schools did not follow best practices although five schools had an exemplary set of policies and procedures to support guideline implementation. These results suggest that most dental schools are currently not implementing guidelines effectively and efficiently, but that the goal of schools' having a comprehensive implementation program for clinical guidelines is achievable since some are doing so. Future studies should determine whether interventions to improve implementation in dental schools are needed.

  4. [Evaluation of tools for the implementation of clinical practice guidelines on sexually transmitted infections].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Jaime Hernán Rodríguez; Romero Vergara, Antonio José; De Moya, Danilo De Jesús De Alba; Jaramillo Rojas, Hernán Javier; Díaz Rojas, Claudia Milena; Ciapponi, Agustín

    2017-05-25

    Determine the acceptability, perceived usefulness, and adoption of implementation tools and technical assistance provided by the Health Technology Assessment Institute (IETS) in hospitals in two regions of Colombia. Assistance was provided for implementation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in 24 hospitals (17 in Antioquia and seven in Cundinamarca) in areas with high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections, and for use of the implementation tools. Health professionals were given surveys and medical specialists were interviewed. Overall, 86% of respondents are familiar with the GPGs, 86% with the tracer recommendations, 79% with the interactive flow charts, and 82% with the evidence sheets, while 41% never used the implementation tools. Of the respondents who used the tools, 55% did so on their work computer, while 24% used their personal telephone. The most useful tools were the evidence sheets and flow charts (98%) and the tracer recommendations (92%). The least useful were the budgetary impact tools (81%). The implementation tools and technical assistance provided in hospitals in two regions of Colombia are perceived as useful and acceptable, although the degree of implementation is low. The findings of this research will help the different actors, such as the Ministry of Health and Social Protection, the IETS, and the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (Colciencias), among others, improve their programs for the implementation of clinical practice guidelines.

  5. [Implementation of a Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adults With Schizophrenia in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Díaz, Natalia; Duarte Osorio, Andrés; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia

    2016-01-01

    To present overall strategies and activities for the implementation process of the recommendations contained in the clinical practice guideline for the management of adults with schizophrenia (GPC_E) published by the Colombian Ministry of Health and Welfare (MSPS). Prioritize the proposed recommendations, identify barriers and solving strategies to implement the GPC_E, and develop a monitoring and evaluation system for the key recommendations. The Guideline Developer Group (GDG) included professionals with primary dedication to implementation issues that accompanied the entire process. During the GDG meetings implementation topics were identified and discussed, and later complemented by literature reviews concerning the experience of mental health guidelines implementation at national and international level. Additionally, feedback from the discussions raised during the socialization meetings, and joint meetings with the MSPS and the Institute of Technology Assessment in Health (IETS) were included. The prioritization of recommendations was made in conjunction with the GDG, following the proposed steps in the methodological guide for the development of Clinical Practice Guidelines with Economic Evaluation in the General System of Social Security in Colombian Health (GMEGPC) using the tools 13 and 14. the conclusions and final adjustments were discussed with the GPC_E leaders. The implementation chapter includes a description of the potential barriers, solution strategies, facilitators and monitoring indicators. The identified barriers were categorized in the following 3 groups: Cultural context, health system and proposed interventions. The issues related to solving strategies and facilitating education programs include community mental health, mental health training for health workers in primary care, decentralization and integration of mental health services at the primary care level, use of technologies information and communication and telemedicine. To monitor

  6. Improving manual oxygen titration in preterm infants by training and guideline implementation.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Henriëtte A; Pauws, Steffen C; Beks, Evelien C; Stenson, Ben J; Lopriore, Enrico; Te Pas, Arjan B

    2017-01-01

    To study oxygen saturation (SpO2) targeting before and after training and guideline implementation of manual oxygen titration, two cohorts of preterm infants <30 weeks of gestation needing respiratory support and oxygen therapy were compared. The percentage of the time spent with SpO2 within the target range (85-95%) was calculated (%SpO2-wtr). SpO2 was collected every minute when oxygen is >21%. ABCs where oxygen therapy was given were identified and analyzed. After training and guideline implementation the %SpO2-wtr increased (median interquartile range (IQR)) 48.0 (19.6-63.9) % vs 61.9 (48.5-72.3) %; p < 0.005, with a decrease in the %SpO2 > 95% (44.0 (27.8-66.2) % vs 30.8 (22.6-44.5) %; p < 0.05). There was no effect on the %SpO2 < 85% (5.9 (2.8-7.9) % vs 6.2 (2.5-8) %; ns) and %SpO2 < 80% (1.9 (1.0-3.0) % vs 1.7 (0.8-2.6) %; ns). In total, 186 ABCs with oxygen therapy before and 168 ABCs after training and guideline implementation occurred. The duration of SpO2 < 80% reduced (2 (1-2) vs 1 (1-2) minutes; p < 0.05), the occurrence of SpO2 > 95% did not decrease (73% vs 64%; ns) but lasted shorter (2 (0-7) vs 1 (1-3) minute; p < 0.004). Training and guideline implementation in manual oxygen titration improved SpO2 targeting in preterm infants with more time spent within the target range and less frequent hyperoxaemia. The durations of hypoxaemia and hyperoxaemia during ABCs were shorter. What is Known: • Oxygen saturation targeting in preterm infants can be challenging and the compliance is low when oxygen is titrated manually. • Hyperoxaemia often occurs after oxygen therapy for oxygen desaturation during apnoeas. What is New: • Training and implementing guidelines improved oxygen saturation targeting and reduced hyperoxaemia. • Training and implementing guidelines improved manual oxygen titration during ABC.

  7. Implementation of evidence based guidelines for paediatric asthma management in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Massie, J; Efron, D; Cerritelli, B; South, M; Powell, C; Haby, M M; Gilbert, E; Vidmar, S; Carlin, J; Robertson, C F

    2004-07-01

    To evaluate a systematic approach to the development and implementation of evidence based asthma management guidelines. Comparative study of children (2-18 years) with acute asthma; a control cohort (cohort 1) was recruited before implementation of the guidelines and two cohorts were recruited after implementation (cohorts 2 and 3). There was no difference in the proportion of patients who reattended in the six months following initial presentation for cohort 1 (21.5%), cohort 2 (27.8%), or cohort 3 (25.4%) and no difference in readmission rates (11.4%, 11.3%, 11.0% respectively). There was no difference in measures of asthma morbidity between the cohorts at 3 and 6 months across three domains: interval symptoms, exercise limitation, and bronchodilator use. Of those who did not have a management plan before presentation, one was provided to 46.9% of cohort 1, 74.8% of cohort 2, and 81.1% of cohort 3. There was no difference comparing cohort 2 or cohort 3 with cohort 1 regarding quality of life for either the subjects or their parents. Implementation of our evidence based guidelines was associated with the improved provision of asthma management plans, but there was no effect on reattendance or readmission to hospital, asthma morbidity, or quality of life. Future efforts to improve asthma management should target specific components of asthma care.

  8. Implementing nutritional guidelines -- the effect of systematic training for nurse nutrition practitioners.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Preben U; Tewes, Marianne; Bjerrum, Merete

    2012-03-01

    Approximately 40% of patients admitted to hospitals are undernourished. Implementing nutritional guidelines might reduce the incidence of malnutrition, and it requires education and training for the hospital staff. It was hypothesised that a training programme focusing on the staff behaviour would increase the identification of eating difficulties, improve patients' knowledge about appropriate food choices and increase the number of snacks eaten between meals and thereby to reduce the risk of undernutrition. A pre- and post-test design was used to evaluate the effect of the training programme for nurses. The training was conducted in five modules over 1 year and combined nutritional issues with issues on implementation and theories of planned change. The programme was based on experimental learning theories and the steps of look, think and act. The effect on the patients was measured by a patient questionnaire. After implementing the guidelines, more patients discussed their eating difficulties with the staff, received relevant assistance during the meal and were served the type of food they had ordered and could chew. The patients' knowledge of appropriate food choices from the menu increased, suggesting that the nutritional intake of the patients had improved. Our findings suggest that a strategy based on the principles of experimental learning theory and the phases in the look, think and act model facilitated the implementation of nutritional guidelines in a hospital setting. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging: challenges of implementation.

    PubMed

    Loch, Ronald; Fowler, Kathryn; Schmidt, Ryan; Ippolito, Joseph; Siegel, Cary; Narra, Vamsi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most common causes of cancer and cancer deaths in men. Screening methods and optimal treatments have become controversial in recent years. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gaining popularity as a tool to assist diagnosis, risk assessment, and staging. However, implementation into clinical practice can be difficult, with many challenges associated with image acquisition, postprocessing, interpretation, reporting, and radiologic-pathologic correlation. Although state-of-the-art technology is available at select sites for targeting tissue biopsy and interpreting multiparametric prostate MRI, many institutions struggle with adapting this new technology into an efficient multidisciplinary model of patient care. This article reviews several of the challenges that radiologists should be aware of when integrating prostate MRI into their clinical practice.

  10. Embedded Implementation of VHR Satellite Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Balla-Arabé, Souleymane; Ginhac, Dominique; Yang, Fan

    2016-05-27

    Processing and analysis of Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images provide a mass of crucial information, which can be used for urban planning, security issues or environmental monitoring. However, they are computationally expensive and, thus, time consuming, while some of the applications, such as natural disaster monitoring and prevention, require high efficiency performance. Fortunately, parallel computing techniques and embedded systems have made great progress in recent years, and a series of massively parallel image processing devices, such as digital signal processors or Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), have been made available to engineers at a very convenient price and demonstrate significant advantages in terms of running-cost, embeddability, power consumption flexibility, etc. In this work, we designed a texture region segmentation method for very high resolution satellite images by using the level set algorithm and the multi-kernel theory in a high-abstraction C environment and realize its register-transfer level implementation with the help of a new proposed high-level synthesis-based design flow. The evaluation experiments demonstrate that the proposed design can produce high quality image segmentation with a significant running-cost advantage.

  11. Embedded Implementation of VHR Satellite Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Balla-Arabé, Souleymane; Ginhac, Dominique; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Processing and analysis of Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images provide a mass of crucial information, which can be used for urban planning, security issues or environmental monitoring. However, they are computationally expensive and, thus, time consuming, while some of the applications, such as natural disaster monitoring and prevention, require high efficiency performance. Fortunately, parallel computing techniques and embedded systems have made great progress in recent years, and a series of massively parallel image processing devices, such as digital signal processors or Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), have been made available to engineers at a very convenient price and demonstrate significant advantages in terms of running-cost, embeddability, power consumption flexibility, etc. In this work, we designed a texture region segmentation method for very high resolution satellite images by using the level set algorithm and the multi-kernel theory in a high-abstraction C environment and realize its register-transfer level implementation with the help of a new proposed high-level synthesis-based design flow. The evaluation experiments demonstrate that the proposed design can produce high quality image segmentation with a significant running-cost advantage. PMID:27240370

  12. Simulation as an ethical imperative and epistemic responsibility for the implementation of medical guidelines in health care.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, Luciana; Stahl, James

    2017-03-01

    Guidelines orient best practices in medicine, yet, in health care, many real world constraints limit their optimal realization. Since guideline implementation problems are not systematically anticipated, they will be discovered only post facto, in a learning curve period, while the already implemented guideline is tweaked, debugged and adapted. This learning process comes with costs to human health and quality of life. Despite such predictable hazard, the study and modeling of medical guideline implementation is still seldom pursued. In this article we argue that to systematically identify, predict and prevent medical guideline implementation errors is both an epistemic responsibility and an ethical imperative in health care, in order to properly provide beneficence, minimize or avoid harm, show respect for persons, and administer justice. Furthermore, we suggest that implementation knowledge is best achieved technically by providing simulation modeling studies to anticipate the realization of medical guidelines, in multiple contexts, with system and scenario analysis, in its alignment with the emerging field of implementation science and in recognition of learning health systems. It follows from both claims that it is an ethical imperative and an epistemic responsibility to simulate medical guidelines in context to minimize (avoidable) harm in health care, before guideline implementation.

  13. Guidelines for Creating, Implementing, and Evaluating Mind-Body Programs in a Military Healthcare Setting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine; Firth, Kimberly; Smeeding, Sandra; Wolever, Ruth; Kaufman, Joanna; Delgado, Roxana; Bellanti, Dawn; Xenakis, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the development of mind-body skills can improve individual and family resilience, particularly related to the stresses of illness, trauma, and caregiving. To operationalize the research evidence that mind-body skills help with health and recovery, Samueli Institute, in partnership with experts in mind-body programming, created a set of guidelines for developing and evaluating mind-body programs for service members, veterans, and their families. The Guidelines for Creating, Implementing, and Evaluating Mind-Body Programs in a Military Healthcare Setting outline key strategies and issues to consider when developing, implementing, and evaluating a mind-body focused family empowerment approach in a military healthcare setting. Although these guidelines were developed specifically for a military setting, most of the same principles can be applied to the development of programs in the civilian setting as well. The guidelines particularly address issues unique to mind-body programs, such as choosing evidence-based modalities, licensure and credentialing, safety and contraindications, and choosing evaluation measures that capture the holistic nature of these types of programs. The guidelines are practical, practice-based guidelines, developed by experts in the fields of program development and evaluation, mind-body therapies, patient- and family-centered care, as well as, experts in military and veteran's health systems. They provide a flexible framework to create mind-body family empowerment programs and describe important issues that program developers and evaluators are encouraged to address to ensure the development of the most impactful, successful, evidence-supported programs possible.

  14. Implementing Recommendations From Web Accessibility Guidelines: Would They Also Provide Benefits to Nondisabled Users.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Sven; Sonderegger, Andreas; Sauer, Juergen

    2016-06-01

    We examined the consequences of implementing Web accessibility guidelines for nondisabled users. Although there are Web accessibility guidelines for people with disabilities available, they are rarely used in practice, partly due to the fact that practitioners believe that such guidelines provide no benefits, or even have negative consequences, for nondisabled people, who represent the main user group of Web sites. Despite these concerns, there is a lack of empirical research on the effects of current Web accessibility guidelines on nondisabled users. Sixty-one nondisabled participants used one of three Web sites differing in levels of accessibility (high, low, and very low). Accessibility levels were determined by following established Web accessibility guidelines (WCAG 2.0). A broad methodological approach was used, including performance measures (e.g., task completion time) and user ratings (e.g., perceived usability). A high level of Web accessibility led to better performance (i.e., task completion time and task completion rate) than low or very low accessibility. Likewise, high Web accessibility improved user ratings (i.e., perceived usability, aesthetics, workload, and trustworthiness) compared to low or very low Web accessibility. There was no difference between the very low and low Web accessibility conditions for any of the outcome measures. Contrary to some concerns in the literature and among practitioners, high conformance with Web accessibility guidelines may provide benefits to users without disabilities. The findings may encourage more practitioners to implement WCAG 2.0 for the benefit of users with disabilities and nondisabled users. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  15. Optimal Pain Assessment in Pediatric Rehabilitation: Implementation of a Nursing Guideline.

    PubMed

    Kingsnorth, Shauna; Joachimides, Nick; Krog, Kim; Davies, Barbara; Higuchi, Kathryn Smith

    2015-12-01

    In Ontario, Canada, the Registered Nurses' Association promotes a Best Practice Spotlight Organization initiative to enhance evidence-based practice. Qualifying organizations are required to implement strategies, evaluate outcomes, and sustain practices aligned with nursing clinical practice guidelines. This study reports on the development and evaluation of a multifaceted implementation strategy to support adoption of a nursing clinical practice guideline on the assessment and management of acute pain in a pediatric rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. Multiple approaches were employed to influence behavior, attitudes, and awareness around optimal pain practice (e.g., instructional resources, electronic reminders, audits, and feedback). Four measures were introduced to assess pain in communicating and noncommunicating children as part of a campaign to treat pain as the fifth vital sign. A prospective repeated measures design examined survey and audit data to assess practice aligned with the guideline. The Knowledge and Attitudes Survey (KNAS) was adapted to ensure relevance to the local practice setting and was assessed before and after nurses' participation in three education modules. Audit data included client demographics and pain scores assessed annually over a 3-year window. A final sample of 69 nurses (78% response rate) provided pre-/post-survey data. A total of 108 pediatric surgical clients (younger than 19 years) contributed audit data across the three collection cycles. Significant improvements in nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to optimal pain care for children with disabilities were noted following adoption of the pain clinical practice guideline. Targeted guideline implementation strategies are central to supporting optimal pain practice.

  16. Performance of Implementing Guideline Driven Cervical Cancer Screening Measures in an Inner City Hospital System

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Daryl L.; Reimers, Laura L.; Wu, Eijean; Nathan, Lisa M.; Gruenberg, Tammy; Abadi, Maria; Einstein, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In 2006, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP) updated evidence based guidelines recommending screening intervals for women with abnormal cervical cytology. In our low-income inner city population, we sought to improve performance by uniformly applying the guidelines to all patients. We report the prospective performance of a comprehensive tracking, evidence-based algorithmically driven call-back and appointment scheduling system for cervical cancer screening in a resource-limited inner city population. Materials and Methods Outreach efforts were formalized with algorithm-based protocols for triage to colposcopy, with universal adherence to evidence-based guidelines. During implementation from August 2006 through July 2008, we prospectively tracked performance using the electronic medical record with administrative and pathology reports to determine performance variables such as the total number of Pap tests, colposcopy visits, and the distribution of abnormal cytology and histology results, including all CIN 2,3 diagnoses. Results 86,257 gynecologic visits and 41,527 Pap tests were performed system-wide during this period of widespread and uniform implementation of standard cervical cancer screening guidelines. The number of Pap tests performed per month varied little. The incidence of CIN 1 significantly decreased from 117/171 (68.4%) the first tracked month to 52/95 (54.7%) the last tracked month (p=0.04). The monthly incidence rate of CIN 2,3, including incident cervical cancers did not change. The total number of colposcopy visits declined, resulting in a 50% decrease in costs related to colposcopy services and approximately a 12% decrease in costs related to excisional biopsies. Conclusions Adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines reduced the number of unnecessary colposcopies without increasing numbers of potentially missed CIN 2,3 lesions, including cervical cancer. Uniform implementation of administrative

  17. The Risks and Benefits of Implementing Glycemic Control Guidelines in Frail Elders with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sei J.; Boscardin, W. John; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Huang, Elbert S.; Rice-Trumble, Kathy; Eng, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES To determine the hypo- and hyper-glycemic outcomes associated with implementing the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) guideline for Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)<8% in frail older patients with diabets. DESIGN/SETTING Guideline Implementation in PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) PARTICIPANTS All patients in the Before (10/02–12/04, n=338), Early (1/05–6/06, n=289) and Late phases of guideline implementation (7/06–12/08, n=385) with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and at least one HbA1c measurement. INTERVENTION Clinician education in 2005 with annual monitoring of the proportion of each clinician’s patients with diabetes with HbA1c<8%. MEASUREMENTS Hypoglycemia (Blood sugar or BS<50), hyperglycemia (BS>400) and severe hypoglycemia (Emergency room or ER visit for hypoglycemia) RESULTS Before, Early and Late groups were similar in mean age, race/ethnicity, comorbidity and functional dependency. Antihyperglycemic medication use increased with more patients using metformin (28% Before versus 42% Late, p<0.001) and insulin (23% Before versus 34% Late, p<0.001), with more patients achieving the AGS glycemic target of HbA1c<8% (74% Before versus 84% Late, p<0.001). Episodes of hyperglycemia (per 100 person-years) decreased dramatically (159 Before versus 46 Late, p<0.001) and episodes of hypoglycemia were unchanged (10.1 versus 9.3, p=0.50). Episodes of severe hypoglycemia were increased in the Early period (1.1 Before versus 2.9 Early, p=0.03). CONCLUSION Implementing the AGS glycemic control guideline for frail elders led to fewer hyperglycemic episodes, but more severe hypoglycemic episodes requiring ER visits in the Early implementation period. Future glycemic control guideline implementation efforts should be coupled with close monitoring for severe hypoglycemia in the early implementation period. PMID:21480838

  18. Implementation and adherence to osteoporosis screening guidelines among coeliac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant; Garber, John J

    2016-12-01

    There are no studies evaluating the implementation of American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) guidelines on osteoporosis screening in coeliac disease. To investigate implementation of osteoporosis screening guidelines in coeliac disease patients and determine how often bone mineral density (BMD) assessment leads to therapeutic intervention. We screened all patients with biopsy-proven coeliac disease at our center from 2003 to 2013 and collected data on indication and results of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning (DXA) and therapeutic interventions. Of 222 adults with coeliac, only 80 (36%) underwent DXA after their diagnosis. Of those, 43 had DXA for osteoporosis screening specifically related to their coeliac diagnosis. Of these 43 patients, 28 (65.1%) had low BMD. A therapeutic intervention was made in the majority of these patients (21/28, 75%). Of 330 pediatric coeliac cases, 52 (15.8%) had DXA specifically in the context of the coeliac disease diagnosis with only 5 being complicated coeliac disease. Of these, 3 (5.8%) had low BMD and only 2 underwent therapeutic intervention. Osteoporosis screening guidelines are not followed in the majority of patients with coeliac disease but, when followed, frequently lead to therapeutic intervention. Osteoporosis screening guidelines in coeliac disease need to be updated, strengthened and publicized. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The cost of implementing the Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wish, J; Roberts, J; Besarab, A; Owen, W F

    1999-01-01

    For a clinical practice guideline to be accepted by the end-user, the system of reimbursement for the targeted service must be favorable. The National Kidney Foundation-Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-DOQI) Guideline recommendations were developed without primary concern for the costs of their execution. Arguably, an unfavorable financial environment and excessive mercantile behavior by providers and payers would offer a considerable hindrance to their implementation. Toward addressing these concerns, three leaders in the development of the DOQI Guidelines for the Treatment of Anemia of Chronic Renal Failure, Hemodialysis Adequacy, and Vascular Access, have evaluated the hypothesis that implementing the recommendations of the DOQI Guidelines will increase the treatment costs for dialysis providers but will effect savings in the entire end-stage renal disease (ESRD) program. Their analyses suggest that under the current reimbursement system, this assumption may be true. However, restructured global reimbursement in the ESRD program will permit financial incentives for dialysis providers and the payer to coincide.

  20. PRACTICAL BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTATION OF THYROID CANCER GUIDELINES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION.

    PubMed

    Yang, Samantha Peiling; Ying, Lee Suat; Saw, Stephanie; Tuttle, R Michael; Venkataraman, Kavita; Su-Ynn, Chia

    2015-11-01

    Numerous published guidelines have described the optimal management of thyroid cancer. However, these rely on the clinical availability of diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. We hypothesized that the availability of medical resources and economic circumstances vary in Asia-Pacific countries, making it difficult to implement guideline recommendations into clinical practice. We surveyed participants at the 2009 and 2013 Congresses of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Federation of Endocrine Societies by distributing questionnaires to attendees at registration. Responses were obtained from 268 respondents in 2009 and 163 respondents in 2013. Similar to the high prevalence of low-risk thyroid cancer observed in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, across the Asia-Pacific countries surveyed in 2009 and 2013, 50 to 100% of the respondents from the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, China, Taiwan, Thailand, Hong Kong, Korea, and Sri Lanka reported that more than 50% of the patients had low-risk thyroid cancer on follow-up. Importantly, there was much variation with regards to the perceived availability of investigation and treatment modalities. We found a wide variation in clinicians' perception of availability of diagnostic and therapeutic modalities in the face of a rise in thyroid cancer incidence and thyroid cancer management guidelines that emphasized their importance. The lack of availability of management tools and treatments will prove to be a major barrier to the implementation of thyroid cancer management guidelines in Southeast Asia, and likely in other parts of the world as well.

  1. Venous thromboembolism prevention guidelines for medical inpatients: mind the (implementation) gap.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Greg; Jenkins, Ian H; Merli, Geno J

    2013-10-01

    Hospital-associated nonsurgical venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important problem addressed by new guidelines from the American College of Physicians (ACP) and American College of Chest Physicians (AT9). Narrative review and critique. Both guidelines discount asymptomatic VTE outcomes and caution against overprophylaxis, but have different methodologies and estimates of risk/benefit. Guideline complexity and lack of consensus on VTE risk assessment contribute to an implementation gap. Methods to estimate prophylaxis benefit have significant limitations because major trials included mostly screening-detected events. AT9 relies on a single Italian cohort study to conclude that those with a Padua score ≥4 have a very high VTE risk, whereas patients with a score <4 (60% of patients) have a very small risk. However, the cohort population has less comorbidity than US inpatients, and over 1% of patients with a score of 3 suffered pulmonary emboli. The ACP guideline does not endorse any risk-assessment model. AT9 includes the Padua model and Caprini point-based system for nonsurgical inpatients and surgical inpatients, respectively, but there is no evidence they are more effective than simpler risk-assessment models. New VTE prevention guidelines provide varied guidance on important issues including risk assessment. If Padua is used, a threshold of 3, as well as 4, should be considered. Simpler VTE risk-assessment models may be superior to complicated point-based models in environments without sophisticated clinical decision support. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. A New Security Paradigm for Anti-Counterfeiting: Guidelines and an Implementation Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtonen, Mikko

    Product counterfeitingand piracy continue to plague brand and trademark owners across industry sectors. This chapter analyses the reasons for ineffectiveness of past technical anti-counterfeitingstrategies and formulates managerial guidelines for effective use of RFID in anti-counterfeiting. An implementation roadmap toward secure authentication of products tagged with EPC Gen-2 tags is proposed and possible supply chain locations for product checks are discussed.

  3. Using a knowledge translation framework to implement asthma clinical practice guidelines in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Licskai, Christopher; Sands, Todd; Ong, Michael; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Quality problem International guidelines establish evidence-based standards for asthma care; however, recommendations are often not implemented and many patients do not meet control targets. Initial assessment Regional pilot data demonstrated a knowledge-to-practice gap. Choice of solutions We engineered health system change in a multi-step approach described by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation framework. Implementation Knowledge translation occurred at multiple levels: patient, practice and local health system. A regional administrative infrastructure and inter-disciplinary care teams were developed. The key project deliverable was a guideline-based interdisciplinary asthma management program. Six community organizations, 33 primary care physicians and 519 patients participated. The program operating cost was $290/patient. Evaluation Six guideline-based care elements were implemented, including spirometry measurement, asthma controller therapy, a written self-management action plan and general asthma education, including the inhaler device technique, role of medications and environmental control strategies in 93, 95, 86, 100, 97 and 87% of patients, respectively. Of the total patients 66% were adults, 61% were female, the mean age was 35.7 (SD = ±24.2) years. At baseline 42% had two or more symptoms beyond acceptable limits vs. 17% (P< 0.001) post-intervention; 71% reported urgent/emergent healthcare visits at baseline (2.94 visits/year) vs. 45% (1.45 visits/year) (P< 0.001); 39% reported absenteeism (5.0 days/year) vs. 19% (3.0 days/year) (P< 0.001). The mean follow-up interval was 22 (SD = ±7) months. Lessons learned A knowledge-translation framework can guide multi-level organizational change, facilitate asthma guideline implementation, and improve health outcomes in community primary care practices. Program costs are similar to those of diabetes programs. Program savings offset costs in a ratio of 2.1:1 PMID:22893665

  4. Using a knowledge translation framework to implement asthma clinical practice guidelines in primary care.

    PubMed

    Licskai, Christopher; Sands, Todd; Ong, Michael; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Quality problem International guidelines establish evidence-based standards for asthma care; however, recommendations are often not implemented and many patients do not meet control targets. Initial assessment Regional pilot data demonstrated a knowledge-to-practice gap. Choice of solutions We engineered health system change in a multi-step approach described by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation framework. Implementation Knowledge translation occurred at multiple levels: patient, practice and local health system. A regional administrative infrastructure and inter-disciplinary care teams were developed. The key project deliverable was a guideline-based interdisciplinary asthma management program. Six community organizations, 33 primary care physicians and 519 patients participated. The program operating cost was $290/patient. Evaluation Six guideline-based care elements were implemented, including spirometry measurement, asthma controller therapy, a written self-management action plan and general asthma education, including the inhaler device technique, role of medications and environmental control strategies in 93, 95, 86, 100, 97 and 87% of patients, respectively. Of the total patients 66% were adults, 61% were female, the mean age was 35.7 (SD = ± 24.2) years. At baseline 42% had two or more symptoms beyond acceptable limits vs. 17% (P< 0.001) post-intervention; 71% reported urgent/emergent healthcare visits at baseline (2.94 visits/year) vs. 45% (1.45 visits/year) (P< 0.001); 39% reported absenteeism (5.0 days/year) vs. 19% (3.0 days/year) (P< 0.001). The mean follow-up interval was 22 (SD = ± 7) months. Lessons learned A knowledge-translation framework can guide multi-level organizational change, facilitate asthma guideline implementation, and improve health outcomes in community primary care practices. Program costs are similar to those of diabetes programs. Program savings offset costs in a ratio of 2.1:1.

  5. [Implementation of Italian guidelines on public health genomics in Italy: a challenging policy of the NHS].

    PubMed

    Boccia, Stefania; Federici, Antonio; Colotto, Marco; Villari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Genomics and related fields are becoming increasingly relevant in health care practice. Italy is the first European country that has a structured policy of Public Health Genomics. Nevertheless, what should be the role of genomics in a public health perspective and how public health professionals should engage with advances in genomics' knowledge and technology, is still not entirely clear. A description of the regulatory framework made-up by the Italian government in the last years is provided. In order to implement the national guidelines on Public Health Genomics published in 2013, key issues including the ethical, legal and social aspects within an evidence-based framework should be warranted and are herewith discussed. Genomics and predictive medicine are considered one of the main intervention areas by the National Prevention Plan 2010-2012, and dedicated guidelines were published in 2013. In order to implement such guidelines, we envisage a coordinated effort between stakeholders to guide development in genomic medicine, towards an impact on population health. There is also room to implement knowledge on how genomics can be integrated into health systems in an appropriate and sustainable way. Learning programs are needed to spread knowledge and awareness of genomics technology, in particular on genomic testing for complex diseases.

  6. Implementing distress management guidelines in ambulatory oncology: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Hammelef, Karen J; Friese, Christopher R; Breslin, Tara M; Riba, Michelle; Schneider, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Distress assessment and referral to psychosocial services is an essential component of evidence-based oncologic nursing care. Oncology nurses have an opportunity to address patient distress needs through leadership of implementation programs and support for the positive outcomes that engaging in psychosocial services provides. This quality improvement project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and utility of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network's distress management clinical practice guidelines in ambulatory oncology. A theoretical framework guided the process design that included staff education, screening, and management in a cohort implementation project with historical control.

  7. Guidelines for Implementing Advanced Distribution Management Systems-Requirements for DMS Integration with DERMS and Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianhui; Chen, Chen; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-08-01

    This guideline focuses on the integration of DMS with DERMS and microgrids connected to the distribution grid by defining generic and fundamental design and implementation principles and strategies. It starts by addressing the current status, objectives, and core functionalities of each system, and then discusses the new challenges and the common principles of DMS design and implementation for integration with DERMS and microgrids to realize enhanced grid operation reliability and quality power delivery to consumers while also achieving the maximum energy economics from the DER and microgrid connections.

  8. Implementation of treatment guidelines to support judicious use of antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Deuster, S; Roten, I; Muehlebach, S

    2010-02-01

    Judicious use of antibiotics is essential considering the growth of antimicrobial resistance and escalating costs in health care. This intervention study used treatment guidelines to improve antibiotic therapy by changing prescribing practice. A before-after intervention study was performed in a 550-bed tertiary care teaching hospital in Switzerland, with an additional follow-up analysis 1 year later. The pre-intervention phase included chart analysis of current antibiotic use in 100 consecutive patients from the representative medical and surgical wards included in the study. Treatment guidelines were defined, taking into account published guidelines, the local antibacterial sensitivity of the pathogens, and the hospital antibiotic formulary defined by the drug and therapeutics committee. The guidelines were presented to the medical residents on a pocket card. They were informed and educated by the pharmacist (intervention). In the post-intervention phase immediately after the instruction, and in the follow-up phase 1 year later, a prospective analysis of antibiotic prescription was performed by chart review of 100 antibacterial treatments in consecutive patients to detect changes in antibiotic prescribing (treatment) and to determine whether these changes were sustained. The pre-intervention review of antibiotic use showed the need for therapy improvements in urinary tract infections (UTI) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). In the post-intervention phase 100% of UTI were treated as recommended, compared to 30% before the intervention (P < 0.001). The follow-up analysis showed a decrease in guideline adherence to 39% in patients with UTI. Before implementation of the clinical guidelines, HAP was inappropriately treated like community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Immediately after the intervention, 50% of HAP patients were treated as recommended, and 1 year later (follow-up phase) 56% of HAP patients received the recommended antibiotic medication. This change in

  9. Adherence to guidelines on cervical cancer screening in general practice: programme elements of successful implementation.

    PubMed Central

    Hermens, R P; Hak, E; Hulscher, M E; Braspenning, J C; Grol, R P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is still only limited understanding of whether and why interventions to facilitate the implementation of guidelines for improving primary care are successful. It is therefore important to look inside the 'black box' of the intervention, to ascertain which elements work well or less well. AIM: To assess the associations of key elements of a nationwide multifaceted prevention programme with the successful implementation of cervical screening guidelines in general practice. DESIGN OF STUDY: A nationwide prospective cohort study. SETTING: A random sample of one-third of all 4,758 general practices in The Netherlands (n = 1,586). METHOD: General practitioners (GPs) in The Netherlands were exposed to a two-and-a-half-year nationwide multifaceted prevention programme to improve the adherence to national guidelines for cervical cancer screening. Adherence to guidelines at baseline and after the intervention and actual exposure to programme elements were assessed in the sample using self-administered questionnaires. RESULTS: Both baseline and post-measurement questionnaires were returned by 988 practices (response rate = 62%). No major differences in baseline practice characteristics between study population, non-responders, and all Netherlands practices were observed. After the intervention all practices improved markedly (P<0.001) in their incorporation of nine out of 10 guideline indicators for effective cervical screening into practice. The most important elements for successful implementation were: specific software modules (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervalsfor all nine indicators ranged from OR = 1.85 [95% CI = 1.24-2.77] to OR = 10.2 [95% CI = 7.58-14.1]); two or more 'practice visits' by outreach visitors (ORs and 95% CIs for six indicators ranged from OR = 1.46 [95% CI= 1.01-2.12] to OR = 2.35 [95% CI = 1.63-3.38]); and an educational programme for practice assistants (ORs and 95% CIs for four indicators ranged from OR = 1.57 [95% CI = 1

  10. Refining a taxonomy for guideline implementation: results of an exercise in abstract classification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To better understand the efficacy of various implementation strategies, improved methods for describing and classifying the nature of these strategies are urgently required. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot the feasibility of a taxonomy to classify the nature and content of implementation strategies. Methods A draft implementation taxonomy was developed based on the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) data collection checklist. The draft taxonomy had four domains (professional, financial, organisational and regulatory) covering 49 distinct strategies. We piloted the draft taxonomy by using it to classify the implementation strategies described in the conference abstracts of the implementation stream of the 2010 Guideline International Network Conference. Five authors classified the strategies in each abstract individually. Final categorisation was then carried out in a face-to-face consensus meeting involving three authors. Results The implementation strategies described in 71 conference abstracts were classified. Approximately 15.5% of abstracts utilised strategies that could not be categorised using the draft taxonomy. Of those strategies that could be categorised, the majority were professionally focused (57%). A total of 41% of projects used only one implementation strategy, with 29% using two and 31% three or more. The three most commonly used strategies were changes in quality assurance, quality improvement and/or performance measurement systems, changes in information and communication technology, and distribution of guideline materials (via hard-copy, audio-visual and/or electronic means). Conclusions Further refinement of the draft taxonomy is required to provide hierarchical dimensions and granularity, particularly in the areas of patient-focused interventions, those concerned with audit and feedback and quality improvement, and electronic forms of implementation, including electronic decision support. PMID

  11. Refining a taxonomy for guideline implementation: results of an exercise in abstract classification.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Danielle; Bairstow, Phillip; Buchan, Heather; Chakraborty, Samantha Paubrey; Van Hecke, Oliver; Grech, Cathy; Kunnamo, Ilkka

    2013-03-15

    To better understand the efficacy of various implementation strategies, improved methods for describing and classifying the nature of these strategies are urgently required. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot the feasibility of a taxonomy to classify the nature and content of implementation strategies. A draft implementation taxonomy was developed based on the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) data collection checklist. The draft taxonomy had four domains (professional, financial, organisational and regulatory) covering 49 distinct strategies. We piloted the draft taxonomy by using it to classify the implementation strategies described in the conference abstracts of the implementation stream of the 2010 Guideline International Network Conference. Five authors classified the strategies in each abstract individually. Final categorisation was then carried out in a face-to-face consensus meeting involving three authors. The implementation strategies described in 71 conference abstracts were classified. Approximately 15.5% of abstracts utilised strategies that could not be categorised using the draft taxonomy. Of those strategies that could be categorised, the majority were professionally focused (57%). A total of 41% of projects used only one implementation strategy, with 29% using two and 31% three or more. The three most commonly used strategies were changes in quality assurance, quality improvement and/or performance measurement systems, changes in information and communication technology, and distribution of guideline materials (via hard-copy, audio-visual and/or electronic means). Further refinement of the draft taxonomy is required to provide hierarchical dimensions and granularity, particularly in the areas of patient-focused interventions, those concerned with audit and feedback and quality improvement, and electronic forms of implementation, including electronic decision support.

  12. Oxytocin augmentation during labor: how to implement medical guidelines into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Stina; Silfver, Kristina Gren; Lind, Cecilia; Nordström, Lennart

    2011-11-01

    To describe an extensive process to implement guidelines for oxytocin use during labor and to report its effects on compliance to clinical practice guidelines after 1 year. A multifaceted strategy was developed to involve all obstetric staff and identify possible local barriers to change in advance. The process lasted for more than 1 year. To describe the implementation of oxytocin use according to the new guidelines, and to compare management in clinical practice with guideline recommendations from audits performed before and after the project. Identification of possible barriers to change, academic detailing, audits with feedback, and local opinion leaders were important factors for a successful process. Documentation of the indication for oxytocin use increased from 54% before, to 86% after the completion of the project (P<0.01). The percentage of incidents in which oxytocin augmentation was started before the diagnosis of labor dystocia was reduced from 40% to 11% (P<0.01). Improvement was found in the documentation of cardiotocography (from 5% to 58%, P<0.01) and contraction frequency at the start of the infusion (from 23% to 63%, P<0.01). Our multifaceted strategy involved all obstetric staff, lasted for more than a year, and improved management of oxytocin use according to clinical guidelines. Established rules for documentation were used as a check list to monitor oxytocin use. However, audits with feedback need to continue for medical safety, and have been planned to take place every 6 months. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Does nurse case management improve implementation of guidelines for cardiovascular disease risk reduction?

    PubMed

    Berra, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 5 decades, research has demonstrated that cardiovascular risk reduction mediated through medical and surgical therapies, as well as lifestyle change, reduces morbidity and mortality from diseases of the vascular system. Based on this extensive research, government and professional organizations publish evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with, or at risk of developing, cardiovascular disease. However, recommended interventions are frequently neither initiated nor adhered to, and when appropriate therapies are initiated, patient adherence is poor. This review sought to evaluate how nurse-based case management (NCM) according to recommended guidelines improves patient outcomes and enhances cardiovascular risk reduction. English-language articles (1950 to January 2009) were identified using a combination of the following terms: (case) management; nurse(-led) or nursing; guideline and/or implement or implementation; cardiovascular (disease) (risk); hypertension or dyslipidemia, or diabetes, or smoking (cessation), or nutritionist, or cardiac rehabilitation. Primary articles were reviewed for focus on modifiable risk factor management involving a nurse acting as a "case manager," having a prominent role within the management of a patient's cardiovascular health, and following scientifically based, published guidelines. From the Stanford Coronary Risk Intervention Project in the 1990 s to EUROACTION published 2008, NCM has appreciably evolved. The studies summarized demonstrate that individualized, systematic, and guideline-based NCM can translate into clinically meaningful reductions in cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the NCM model was effective for hospitalized patients, especially during the postdischarge period, in primary care, low-income clinics, and in the community including the workplace. Providing NCM for those at risk of or with cardiovascular disease may help toward reducing the related loss of

  14. Implementation of a Prolonged Infusion Guideline for Time-Dependent Antimicrobial Agents at a Tertiary Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hohlfelder, Benjamin; Kubiak, David W; Degrado, Jeremy R; Reardon, David P; Szumita, Paul M

    Administration of time-dependent beta-lactam antibiotic as a prolonged infusion may maximize the pharmacodynamic target of time above the minimum inhibitory concentration. We describe the implementation of a prolonged infusion at a tertiary academic medical center, and a 1-year compliance analysis with the guideline. After performing a thorough literature search, a guideline was developed by members of the Department of Infectious Diseases and Department of Pharmacy. Approval and endorsement of the guideline was obtained by the Antimicrobial Subcommittee and Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Physical champions were instrumental in the implementation of the guideline institution-wide. We then performed a 1-year retrospective analysis of guideline compliance from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011. Noncompliant administrations were obtained from smart infusion pumps. The total number of doses administered was taken from pharmacy information resources. In total, nearly 85,000 time-dependent doses were administered. Compliance with the prolonged infusion guideline was 89%. Rates of compliance did not significantly differ between medications (P = 0.555). Obtaining support from key stakeholders in collateral services and institutional leadership was vital for the success of this guideline. Compliance with the guideline 1 year after implementation was high. Implementation of a prolonged infusion guideline is feasible with institutional support and motivation.

  15. Monitoring of clinical imaging guidelines part 3: norms, standards, and regulations.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Neil; Ebdon-Jackson, Steve; Remedios, Denis; Holmberg, Ola; del Rosario Perez, Maria; Bettmann, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    It is known that the use of imaging in clinical situations is not always optimal, leading to suboptimal health care and potential radiation risk. There may be overuse of imaging, underuse, or use of the wrong modality. The use of clinical imaging guidelines is likely to improve the use of imaging, but roadblocks exist. Some of these relate to regulatory oversight and mandates. There is wide variation by country and region in the regulatory setting, ranging from actual absence of regulatory authorities to mandated availability of clinical imaging guidelines in the European Community. Collaborative efforts to ensure that clinical imaging guidelines are at least available is a good starting point. Regulatory oversight and support are necessary to ensure the use of clinical imaging guidelines. Regulations should address 3 areas: availability, clinical utilization, and adherence to and revision of guidelines. The use of both internal and external audits, with the aim of both use of and adherence to guidelines and quality improvement, is the best tool for enhancing use. The major challenges that need to be addressed, collaboratively, to ensure the dissemination and use of clinical imaging guidelines are the development of regulations, of regulatory structures that can be effectively deployed, and of benchmarks for adherence and for utility.

  16. Beyond recommendations: implementing food-based dietary guidelines for healthier populations.

    PubMed

    Smitasiri, Suttilak; Uauy, Ricardo

    2007-03-01

    To reduce the increased burden of diet-related disease and promote human potential through food and nutrition globally, harmonization of efforts is urgently needed. This article examines the concept of food-based dietary guidelines (FBDGs) and discusses the possibilities and challenges of harmonizing the process of developing and implementing dietary guidelines. The authors argue that while the development of FBDGs has contributed to the understanding of the role of nutrients and foods in achieving optimal health, the impact of these guidelines on human health has been limited. Science or evidence must be used in FBDG development; nevertheless, there are limitations in current nutrition science. FBDGs should address the health consequences of dietary insufficiency, excess, or imbalance with a broader perspective, considering the totality of the effects of a given dietary pattern, rather than focusing on single nutrients alone. Moreover, the food selection guideline should be seen as complementary to a strategic, comprehensive, and culturally appropriate dietary and health promoting intervention, and not only as a tool for providing nutrition policy and information. Technically, a single unified global set of FBDGs may be desirable and even achievable. This concept, however, presents novel challenges on how to address cultural diversity and the complex social, economic, and political interactions between humans and the food supply, not to mention the complexity of its communication and implementation. Therefore, global harmonized efforts in support of strategic dietary interventions, together with strong global scientific support and facilitation for the development and communication of FBDGs at national or regional levels, are proposed to implement FBDGs for healthier populations.

  17. Implementation of asthma guidelines to West Australian community pharmacies: an exploratory, quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Trevenen, Michelle; Murray, Kevin; Kendall, Peter A; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pharmacy assistants are often the first point of contact for patients presenting in community pharmacies. The current role of pharmacy assistants in the supply of asthma-reliever medications (short-acting β-agonists) was identified as a barrier to appropriate guideline-based care. The aim of this research was to devise and evaluate a team-based intervention to formalise the role of pharmacy assistants and to improve asthma guideline-based care in community pharmacy. Design A controlled pre-post intervention study was conducted in 336 metropolitan pharmacies located in Perth, Western Australia. Pharmacies were stratified into 2 groups (187 intervention and 149 control) based on known confounders for asthma control. The intervention was designed using a common-sense approach and resources developed included a checklist, videos and web page. Delivery was via workshops (25 pharmacies) or academic detailing (162 pharmacies). Pharmacy practice was assessed preintervention and postintervention via covert simulated patient methodology. Primary outcome measures included patient medical referral, device use demonstration and counselling, internal referral and/or direct involvement of a pharmacist in consultations. Results There was a significant increase in patient medical referral in intervention pharmacies from 32% to 47% (p=0.0007) from preintervention to postintervention, while control pharmacies showed a non-significant decrease from 50% to 44% (p=0.22). Device counselling was not routinely carried out at any stage or in any cohort of this research and no significant changes in internal referral were observed. Conclusions Increases in medical referral indicate that asthma guideline compliance can be improved in community pharmacy if implementation employs a team-based approach and involves pharmacy assistants. However, results were variable and the intervention did not improve practice related to device counselling or internal referral/pharmacist involvement

  18. Implementation of surveillance of invasive mosquitoes in Belgium according to the ECDC guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2012, the new guidelines for the surveillance of IMS in Europe, produced by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), were tested in Belgium. This study aimed at (1) testing the usefulness and applicability in the field of the ECDC guidelines for the surveillance of IMS in Europe and (2) surveying IMS throughout Belgium. Methods First, the scenarios, which Belgium is facing, were identified according to the ECDC guidelines. Second, the surveillance strategy and the methods were identified based on the guidelines and adjusted to the Belgium context. Two areas colonised by IMS and 20 potential points of entry (PoE) were selected. Mosquito Magnet Liberty Plus (CO2-baited) traps (23) and oviposition traps (147) were set-up, and larval sampling was performed monthly or bi-monthly from July till October 2012. Finally, the costs and workload of the surveillance activities were compared to the estimates provided by the ECDC guidelines. Results Surveillance at 20 potential PoE (complying with scenario 1) revealed that no new IMS were established in Belgium. Surveillance at two sites colonised by IMS (scenario 2) indicated that although control measures have drastically reduced the Ae. j. japonicus population this species is still present. Furthermore, Ae. koreicus is permanently established. For both scenarios, the problems encountered are discussed and recommendations are given. In addition, the actual workload was lower than the estimated workload, while the actual costs were higher than the estimated ones. Conclusions The ECDC guidelines are helpful, applicable and efficient to implement surveillance of IMS in Belgium. Recommendations were customised to the local context (political demands, salary and investment costs, and existing expertise). The workload and costs related to the preparatory phase (i.e., planning, contacts with the PoE, writing a protocol) were found to be missing in the cost evaluation suggested in the guidelines

  19. Implementation of surveillance of invasive mosquitoes in Belgium according to the ECDC guidelines.

    PubMed

    Deblauwe, Isra; Sohier, Charlotte; Schaffner, Francis; Rakotoarivony, Laurence Marrama; Coosemans, Marc

    2014-04-26

    In 2012, the new guidelines for the surveillance of IMS in Europe, produced by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), were tested in Belgium. This study aimed at (1) testing the usefulness and applicability in the field of the ECDC guidelines for the surveillance of IMS in Europe and (2) surveying IMS throughout Belgium. First, the scenarios, which Belgium is facing, were identified according to the ECDC guidelines. Second, the surveillance strategy and the methods were identified based on the guidelines and adjusted to the Belgium context. Two areas colonised by IMS and 20 potential points of entry (PoE) were selected. Mosquito Magnet Liberty Plus (CO2-baited) traps (23) and oviposition traps (147) were set-up, and larval sampling was performed monthly or bi-monthly from July till October 2012. Finally, the costs and workload of the surveillance activities were compared to the estimates provided by the ECDC guidelines. Surveillance at 20 potential PoE (complying with scenario 1) revealed that no new IMS were established in Belgium. Surveillance at two sites colonised by IMS (scenario 2) indicated that although control measures have drastically reduced the Ae. j. japonicus population this species is still present. Furthermore, Ae. koreicus is permanently established. For both scenarios, the problems encountered are discussed and recommendations are given. In addition, the actual workload was lower than the estimated workload, while the actual costs were higher than the estimated ones. The ECDC guidelines are helpful, applicable and efficient to implement surveillance of IMS in Belgium. Recommendations were customised to the local context (political demands, salary and investment costs, and existing expertise). The workload and costs related to the preparatory phase (i.e., planning, contacts with the PoE, writing a protocol) were found to be missing in the cost evaluation suggested in the guidelines. Updates on the occurrence of IMS in

  20. Implementation of nationwide image sharing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, SeungWook; Sim, Jungsuk; Ko, Wonsun; Park, ChanHyung; Lee, Jaeha; Lim, DongHyun; Lee, Juhyuk; Han, Jungu; Lee, Jongsu; Hong, HeonPyo; Choi, Bongsuk

    2003-05-01

    Korea is one of the leading countries in PACS implementation, and over 15% of all hospitals has been introducing and running in PACS. With the support of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, the National Computerization of Agency and National Cancer Center had a plan to try integration of PACS with a purpose of sharing medical image information. The target hospitals have been selected with over 500 beds, and the distance between hospitals from 40km and to 250km. As the vendors of PACS and HIS that had implemented in target hospitals were different, the 'sharing host' has been developed for the purpose of their integration, which enables communication through DICOM and HL7. In order to monitor the communication among the sharing hosts, the 'sharing center' also has been developed. This project was completed by November 2002. We expected that approximate of 100 doctors including 50 radiologists would use this project, high patient"s satisfaction and the decrease in national insurance fee for test and evaluation period. This project is the first attempt that the government has tried to integrate the independent PACS and HIS. On the model of this project, the government will try to expand it through all nation-wide.

  1. The Use of Systematic Reviews and Reporting Guidelines to Advance the Implementation of the 3Rs

    PubMed Central

    Avey, Marc T; Fenwick, Nicole; Griffin, Gilly

    2015-01-01

    In 1959, Russell and Burch published The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique, which included concrete advice on factors that they considered would govern progress in the implementation of these principles (enunciated as the 3Rs [Replacement, Reduction, and Refinement in animal-based studies]). One challenge to the implementation of the 3Rs was identified as information retrieval. Here, we further explore this challenge—the need for ‘research on research’—and the role that systematic reviews and reporting guidelines can play in implementation of the 3Rs. First, we examine the 2-fold nature of the challenge of information retrieval: 1) the identification of relevant publications spread throughout a large population of nonrelevant publications and 2) the incomplete reporting of relevant details within those publications. Second, we evaluate how systematic reviews and reporting guidelines can be used generally to address this challenge. Third, we assess the explicit reporting of the 3Rs in a cohort of preclinical animal systematic reviews. Our results show that Reduction methods are the most commonly reported by authors of systematic reviews but that, in general, reporting on how findings relate to the 3Rs is limited at best. Although systematic reviews are excellent tools for resolving the challenge of information retrieval, their utility for making progress in implementation of the 3Rs may be limited unless authors improve their reporting of these principles. PMID:25836961

  2. Examining the use of facilitation within guideline dissemination and implementation studies in nursing.

    PubMed

    Dogherty, Elizabeth J; Harrison, Margaret; Graham, Ian; Keeping-Burke, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    Facilitation is a mechanism for implementing practice guidelines in nursing. Facilitation aims to prepare clinicians and organisations for implementation and to provide support and help in problem-solving as implementation progresses. However, any evidence supporting its effectiveness is limited due to a lack of empirical testing. : To examine the presence and role of facilitation in studies included in an existing systematic review of guideline dissemination and implementation in nursing. Using a descriptive, exploratory approach, we examined 28 studies for elements of facilitation that were included in a review of the effectiveness of interventions to increase the use of practice guidelines in nursing. We conducted a content analysis of a subset of studies that included facilitation activity to gather descriptions of study interventions, characteristics and skills required, use of theory, and effectiveness. Extracted data were analysed using a previously developed taxonomy containing 53 activities related to facilitation. Ten of the 28 studies exhibited evidence of facilitation process and activity. Only two of the 10 studies explicitly referred to 'facilitators,' with just one indicating that facilitators were a part of the implementation intervention being tested. We identified facilitation processes in the eight remaining studies even though the authors did not report it as such. All studies used facilitation activities in combination with other interventions, the most common being educational meetings or distribution of educational materials. We found evidence related to facilitation for 37 of the 53 facilitation activities (70%) in the taxonomy in at least one study or across studies. An additional three novel facilitation-related activities were identified. Most studies exhibited evidence of external facilitation activity whereby researchers outside of the setting assisted nurses to implement guidelines. Theory informed the development or selection of

  3. Incorporating equity into developing and implementing for evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Sandoval-Vargas, Gisella; Mosquera, Paola

    2011-04-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPG) are useful tools for clinical decision making, processes standardization and quality of care improvements. The current General Social Security and Health System (GSSHS) in Colombia is promoting the initiative of developing and implementing CPG based on evidence in order to improve efficiency and quality of care. The reduction of inequalities in health should be an objective of the GSSHS. The main propose of this analysis is to argue why it is necessary to consider the incorporation of equity considerations in the development and implementation of clinical practice guidelines based on the evidence. A series of reflections were made. Narrative description was used for showing the arguments that support the main findings. Among them are: 1. Differential effectiveness by social groups of interventions could diminish final effectiveness of CPG in the GSSHS; 2. To not consider geographical, ethnic, socioeconomic, cultural and access diversity issues within the CPG could have a potential negative impacts of the CPG; 3. Overall effectiveness of GPC could be better if equity issues are included in the quality verification checklist of the guideline questions; 4. Incorporating equity issues in the process of developing CPG could be cost effective, because improve overall effectiveness of CPG. Conclusions To include equity issues in CPG can help in achieving more equitable health outcomes. From this point of view CPG could be key tools to promote equity in care and health outcomes.

  4. Manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines using RESRAD, Version 5.0

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.; Cheng, J.J.

    1993-09-01

    This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material. It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating doses, risks, and guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Two new pathways, radon inhalation and soil ingestion, have been added to RESRAD. Twenty-seven new radionuclides have also been added, and the cutoff half-life for associated radionuclides has been reduced to six months. Other major improvements to the RESRAD code include the ability to run sensitivity analyses, the addition of graphical output, user-specified dose factors, updated databases, an improved groundwater transport model, optional input of a groundwater concentration and a solubility constant, special models for tritium and carbon-14, calculation of cancer incidence risk, and the use of a mouse with menus.

  5. Implementation of cancer pain guidelines by acute care nurse practitioners using an audit and feedback strategy.

    PubMed

    Dulko, Dorothy; Hertz, Elisheva; Julien, Jerelyn; Beck, Susan; Mooney, Kathi

    2010-01-01

    Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for cancer pain, consistent integration of these principles into practice has not been achieved. The optimal method for implementing CPGs and the impact of guidelines on healthcare outcomes remain uncertain. This study evaluated the effect of an audit and feedback (A/F) intervention on nurse practitioner (NP) implementation of cancer pain CPGs and on hospitalized patients' self-report of pain and satisfaction with pain relief. Eight NPs and two groups of 96 patients were the sources of data. Eligible patients in both groups completed the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) within 24 h of admission and every 48 h until discharge. During A/F, NPs received weekly feedback on pain scores and guideline adherence. Nurse practitioner adherence to CPGs increased during A/F. Pain intensity did not significantly differ between groups. Intervention group patients reported significantly less overall pain interference (p < .0001), interference with general activity (p = .0003), and sleep (p = .006). Satisfaction with pain relief increased from 68.4% to 95.1% during A/F (p < .0001). A/F is an effective strategy to promote CPG use. Improved functional status in the absence of decreased pain severity underscores the need to consider symptom clusters when studying pain.

  6. Point-of-Care Estimated Radiation Exposure and Imaging Guidelines Can Reduce Pediatric Radiation Burden.

    PubMed

    Bunt, Christopher W; Burke, Harry B; Towbin, Alexander J; Hoang, Albert; Stephens, Mark B; Fontelo, Paul; Liu, Fang; Gimbel, Ronald W

    2015-01-01

    The steady increase in the use of computed tomography (CT) has particular concerns for children. Family physicians must often select pediatric imaging without any decision support. We hypothesized that point-of-care decision support would lead to the selection of imaging that lowered radiation exposure and improved guideline congruence. Our double-blind, randomized simulation included family physicians in the Military Health System. Participants initially reviewed a pediatric hematuria scenario and selected imaging without decision support. Participants were subsequently randomized to either receive imaging-appropriateness guidelines and then estimated radiation exposure information or receive estimated radiation information then guidelines; imaging selections were required after each step. The primary outcome was the selected imaging modality with point-of-care decision support. The first arm increased CT ordering after viewing the guidelines (P = .008) but then decreased it after reviewing radiation exposure information (P = .007). In the second arm radiation information decreased CT and plain film use (P = not significant), with a subsequent increase in ultrasound and CT after the guideline presentation (P = .05). Decision support during a simulated pediatric scenario helped family physicians select imaging that lowered radiation exposure and was aligned with current guidelines, especially when presented with radiation information after guideline review. This information could help inform electronic medical record design. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  7. Implementing the NICE guideline for schizophrenia recommendations for psychological therapies: a qualitative analysis of the attitudes of CMHT staff.

    PubMed

    Prytys, M; Garety, P A; Jolley, S; Onwumere, J; Craig, T

    2011-01-01

    Despite national guidelines recommending cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and family intervention (FI) in the treatment of schizophrenia, levels of implementation in routine care remain low. The present study investigates attitudinal factors amongst community mental health team (CMHT) staff affecting guideline implementation. CMHTs were audited to measure the capacity and delivery of CBT and FI, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff from the teams. Methods. Four CMHTs were audited, and five care coordinators from each team were interviewed. A purposive approach to sampling was used to represent the range of professional training of care coordinating staff. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Positive views towards guidelines were evident, although tempered by specific implementation issues. Employing simple psychological interventions and approaches as part of the care coordinating role also emerged as highly valued by staff. Severe workload, time pressure and the need for specialist staff were crucial barriers to implementation. Pessimistic views of recovery for clients with psychosis were also apparent and may affect implementation. Staff attitudes and knowledge are an important area of research when examining guideline implementation and require further study. Key themes that have emerged could inform future training agendas and should be considered when developing guideline implementation strategies for the updated 2009 guidelines. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and atrial fibrillation guidelines in practice: barriers to and strategies for optimal implementation.

    PubMed

    Camm, A John; Pinto, Fausto J; Hankey, Graeme J; Andreotti, Felicita; Hobbs, F D Richard

    2015-07-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an independent risk factor for stroke, increasing the risk five-fold. Strokes in patients with AF are more likely than other embolic strokes to be fatal or cause severe disability and are associated with higher healthcare costs, but they are also preventable. Current guidelines recommend that all patients with AF who are at risk of stroke should receive anticoagulation. However, despite this guidance, registry data indicate that anticoagulation is still widely underused. With a focus on the 2012 update of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the management of AF, the Action for Stroke Prevention alliance writing group have identified key reasons for the suboptimal implementation of the guidelines at a global, regional, and local level, with an emphasis on access restrictions to guideline-recommended therapies. Following identification of these barriers, the group has developed an expert consensus on strategies to augment the implementation of current guidelines, including practical, educational, and access-related measures. The potential impact of healthcare quality measures for stroke prevention on guideline implementation is also explored. By providing practical guidance on how to improve implementation of the ESC guidelines, or region-specific modifications of these guidelines, the aim is to reduce the potentially devastating impact that stroke can have on patients, their families and their carers.

  9. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and atrial fibrillation guidelines in practice: barriers to and strategies for optimal implementation

    PubMed Central

    Camm, A. John; Pinto, Fausto J.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Andreotti, Felicita; Hobbs, F.D. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an independent risk factor for stroke, increasing the risk five-fold. Strokes in patients with AF are more likely than other embolic strokes to be fatal or cause severe disability and are associated with higher healthcare costs, but they are also preventable. Current guidelines recommend that all patients with AF who are at risk of stroke should receive anticoagulation. However, despite this guidance, registry data indicate that anticoagulation is still widely underused. With a focus on the 2012 update of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the management of AF, the Action for Stroke Prevention alliance writing group have identified key reasons for the suboptimal implementation of the guidelines at a global, regional, and local level, with an emphasis on access restrictions to guideline-recommended therapies. Following identification of these barriers, the group has developed an expert consensus on strategies to augment the implementation of current guidelines, including practical, educational, and access-related measures. The potential impact of healthcare quality measures for stroke prevention on guideline implementation is also explored. By providing practical guidance on how to improve implementation of the ESC guidelines, or region-specific modifications of these guidelines, the aim is to reduce the potentially devastating impact that stroke can have on patients, their families and their carers. PMID:26116685

  10. Coordinated, Collaborative and Coherent: Developing and Implementing E-Learning Guidelines within a National Tertiary Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suddaby, Gordon; Milne, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to discusses two complementary initiatives focussed on developing and implementing e-learning guidelines to support good pedagogy in e-learning practice. Design/methodology/approach: The first initiative is the development of a coherent set of open access e-learning guidelines for the New Zealand tertiary sector. The second…

  11. Guidelines for Technology Infrastructure in Connecticut Schools: An Implementation Guide for the Connecticut Statewide Educational Technology Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Leadership and Technology, Inc., Marlborough, MA.

    This document presents guidelines and recommendations for development of a technology infrastructure in Connecticut public schools that conforms to national industry standards for voice, video, and data communications. The guidelines present information on the state statutes regarding facilities implementation and describe industry standards.…

  12. The effects of nutritional guideline implementation on nursing home staff performance: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Törmä, Johanna; Winblad, Ulrika; Saletti, Anja; Cederholm, Tommy

    2017-08-29

    Suboptimal nutritional practices in elderly care settings may be resolved by an efficient introduction of nutritional guidelines. To compare two different implementation strategies, external facilitation (EF) and educational outreach visits (EOVs), when introducing nutritional guidelines in nursing homes (NHs), and study the impact on staff performance. A quasi-experimental study with baseline and follow-up measurements. The primary outcome was staff performance as a function of mealtime ambience and food service routines. The EF strategy was a 1-year, multifaceted intervention that included support, guidance, practice audit and feedback in two NH units. The EOV strategy comprised one-three-hour lecture about nutritional guidelines in two other NH units. Both strategies were targeted to selected NH teams, which consisted of a unit manager, a nurse and 5-10 care staff. Mealtime ambience was evaluated by 47 observations using a structured mealtime instrument. Food service routines were evaluated by 109 food records performed by the staff. Mealtime ambience was more strongly improved in the EF group than in the EOV group after the implementation. Factors improved were laying a table (p = 0.03), offering a choice of beverage (p = 0.02), the serving of the meal (p = 0.02), interactions between staff and residents (p = 0.02) and less noise from the kitchen (p = 0.01). Food service routines remained unchanged in both groups. An EF strategy that included guidance, audit and feedback improved mealtime ambience when nutritional guidelines were introduced in a nursing home setting, whereas food service routines were unchanged by the EF strategy. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. Improvement in Adherence to Surgical Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Guidelines after Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Project

    PubMed Central

    Telfah, Shorouq; Nazer, Lama; Dirani, Manar; Daoud, Faiez

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to show the impact of a multidisciplinary quality improvement project on adherence to antimicrobial prophylaxis guidelines in oncological surgery. Methods: This pre- and post-intervention prospective observational study was carried out at the King Hussein Cancer Centre (KHCC) in Amman, Jordan, between August 2009 and February 2012. The quality improvement project consisted of revising the institutional guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis, assigning a clinical pharmacist to the surgical department, establishing an operating room satellite pharmacy and providing education regarding the appropriate utilisation of antibiotics. The medical records of adult cancer patients who underwent surgery were evaluated one month before and one month after the project was implemented to assess adherence to the guidelines with regards to antibiotics prescribed, drug doses and timing and treatment duration. Results: A total of 70 patients were evaluated before and 97 patients were evaluated after the intervention, of which 57 (81.4%) and 95 (97.9%) patients received antibiotics, respectively. In comparing the pre- and post-intervention groups, an improvement was observed in the proportion of patients who received antibiotics at the appropriate time (n = 12 versus n = 79; 21.1% versus 83.2%; P <0.01), for the appropriate duration of time (n = 22 versus n = 94; 38.6% versus 99.0%; P <0.01) and in the appropriate dose (n = 9 versus n = 87; 56.3% versus 98.9%; P <0.01). Conclusion: Adherence to the antimicrobial prophylaxis guidelines at KHCC improved significantly after the implementation of a quality improvement project. PMID:26629381

  14. Implementing Asthma Guidelines Using Practice Facilitation and Local Learning Collaboratives: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mold, James W.; Fox, Chester; Wisniewski, Angela; Lipman, Paula Darby; Krauss, Margot R.; Harris, D. Robert; Aspy, Cheryl; Cohen, Rachel A.; Elward, Kurt; Frame, Paul; Yawn, Barbara P.; Solberg, Leif I.; Gonin, René

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Guideline implementation in primary care has proven difficult. Although external assistance through performance feedback, academic detailing, practice facilitation (PF), and learning collaboratives seems to help, the best combination of interventions has not been determined. METHODS In a cluster randomized trial, we compared the independent and combined effectiveness of PF and local learning collaboratives (LLCs), combined with performance feedback and academic detailing, with performance feedback and academic detailing alone on implementation of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s Asthma Guidelines. The study was conducted in 3 primary care practice-based research networks. Medical records of patients with asthma seen during pre- and postintervention periods were abstracted to determine adherence to 6 guideline recommendations. McNemar’s test and multivariate modeling were used to evaluate the impact of the interventions. RESULTS Across 43 practices, 1,016 patients met inclusion criteria. Overall, adherence to all 6 recommendations increased (P ≤.002). Examination of improvement by study arm in unadjusted analyses showed that practices in the control arm significantly improved adherence to 2 of 6 recommendations, whereas practices in the PF arm improved in 3, practices in the LLCs improved in 4, and practices in the PF + LLC arm improved in 5 of 6 recommendations. In multivariate modeling, PF practices significantly improved assessment of asthma severity (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95% CI, 1.7–3.8) and assessment of asthma level of control (OR = 2.3, 95% CI, 1.5–3.5) compared with control practices. Practices assigned to LLCs did not improve significantly more than control practices for any recommendation. CONCLUSIONS Addition of PF to performance feedback and academic detailing was helpful to practices attempting to improve adherence to asthma guidelines. PMID:24821894

  15. [Atosiban treatment for preterm labor--financial considerations and savings by implementing clinical guidelines].

    PubMed

    Hadar, Eran; Mansur, Nariman; Ambar, Irit; Hod, Moshe

    2011-06-01

    Preterm delivery is a significant cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Pregnant women, with symptoms and signs consistent with preterm labor, can be treated with various tocolytic drugs. Atosiban is one of many drugs indicated to arrest imminent preterm labor. Various studies show that the efficacy of atosiban is similar to other tocolytic drugs. The main advantage of atosiban is a relativeLy low incidence of adverse maternal reactions. Its considerable shortcoming is the financial cost, compared to other available drugs. In view of its cost, we have decided to implement a strict protocol to direct the use of atosiban, with the intent to reduce costs, without hampering quality of care. The protocol was implemented from July 2009, and it outlines the medical and procedural terms to use atosiban. We compared similar time periods before and after implementation of the protocol. The outcomes compared included: treatment success, rates of preterm deliveries and financial costs. Within the timeframe that the protocol was implemented, we have been able to demonstrate a 40% reduction in atosiban related costs, compared to a parallel period, when the clinical guidelines were not implemented. This translates into savings of about NIS 40,000 (New Israeli Shekel) (approximately $10,000). This was achieved without an increase in the rate of preterm deliveries. Implementing and enforcing a simple protocol of supervision on the use of atosiban enables a considerable reduction of financial costs related to atosiban, without hampering medical care.

  16. [How to implement a guideline from theory to practice: the example of the venous thromboembolism prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Paiva, Edison F; Rocha, Ana T C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to discuss the existing barriers for the dissemination of medical guidelines, and to present strategies that facilitate the adaptation of the recommendations into clinical practice. The literature shows that it usually takes several years until new scientific evidence is adopted in current practice, even when there is obvious impact in patients' morbidity and mortality. There are some examples where more than thirty years have elapsed since the first case reports about the use of a effective therapy were published until its utilization became routine. That is the case of fibrinolysis for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Some of the main barriers for the implementation of new recommendations are: the lack of knowledge of a new guideline, personal resistance to changes, uncertainty about the efficacy of the proposed recommendation, fear of potential side-effects, difficulties in remembering the recommendations, inexistence of institutional policies reinforcing the recommendation and even economical restrains. In order to overcome these barriers a strategy that involves a program with multiple tools is always the best. That must include the implementation of easy-to-use algorithms, continuous medical education materials and lectures, electronic or paper alerts, tools to facilitate evaluation and prescription, and periodic audits to show results to the practitioners involved in the process. It is also fundamental that the medical societies involved with the specific medical issue support the program for its scientific and ethical soundness. The creation of multidisciplinary committees in each institution and the inclusion of opinion leaders that have pro-active and lasting attitudes are the key-points for the program's success. In this manuscript we use as an example the implementation of a guideline for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, but the concepts described here can be easily applied to any other guideline

  17. New guidelines on the use of iodinated contrast media: a report on an implementation project.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, M G; Vesprini, A; Concetti, M; Ventrella, S; Spagna, M F; Mancinelli, S; Santini, M; Romanelli, A; Pantanetti, P; Cameli, C; Bonanni, L; Baffoni, L

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to report on the implementation of new guidelines on the use of injectable iodinated contrast media (ICM) at our workplace and specific protocols for the preparation of patients at risk. Operators received training with continuing medical education (CME) credits. The new documentation (patient history/screening form and informed consent form) is available on the hospital Web site and requests serum creatinine determination with estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) for every patient. Additional tests are required for high-risk patients only. Attendance rates were 57.2% among referring physicians and 74.5% among Radiology Department personnel. The Cockcroft-Gault formula was used to estimate GFR in adults. The main problem encountered in the implementation process was that referring physicians failed to evaluate the GFR in 80% of patients, with low GFR being discovered in the Radiology Department on the day of examination in 20% of patients, resulting in a need to reschedule the examination. Although not an easy task, implementation of the new guidelines for ICM use is both feasible and necessary. An additional refresher training course for personnel and GFR evaluation of the patient on referral are indispensable to ensure proper preparation of patients at increased risk of adverse reactions to ICM.

  18. Chronic Kidney Disease Guideline Implementation in Primary Care: A Qualitative Report from the TRANSLATE CKD Study.

    PubMed

    Vest, Bonnie M; York, Trevor R M; Sand, Jessica; Fox, Chester H; Kahn, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) are optimally situated to identify and manage early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nonetheless, studies have documented suboptimal PCP understanding, awareness, and management of early CKD. The TRANSLATE CKD study is an ongoing national, mixed-methods, cluster randomized control trial that examines the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for CKD into primary care practice. As part of the mixed-methods process evaluation, semistructured interviews were conducted by phone with 27 providers participating in the study. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes. Themes were categorized according to the 4 domains of Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Identified themes illuminated the complex work undertaken to manage CKD in primary care practices. Barriers to guideline implementation were identified in each of the 4 NPT domains, including (1) lack of knowledge and understanding around CKD (coherence), (2) difficulties engaging providers and patients in CKD management (cognitive participation), (3) limited time and competing demands (collective action), and (4) challenges obtaining and using data to monitor progress (reflexive monitoring). Addressing the barriers to implementation with concrete interventions at the levels at which they occur, informed by NPT, will ultimately improve the quality of CKD patient care. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Chronic kidney disease guideline implementation in primary care: a qualitative report from the TRANSLATE CKD study

    PubMed Central

    Vest, Bonnie M.; York, Trevor R.M.; Sand, Jessica; Fox, Chester H.; Kahn, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) are optimally situated to identify and manage early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nonetheless, studies have documented suboptimal PCP understanding, awareness, and management of early CKD. The TRANSLATE CKD study is an ongoing national mixed-methods cluster randomized control trial that examines the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for CKD into primary care practice. Methods As part of mixed-methods process evaluation, semi-structured interviews were conducted by phone with 27 providers participating in the study. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes. Themes were categorized according to the four domains of Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Results Identified themes illuminated the complex work undertaken in primary care practices to manage CKD. Barriers to guideline implementation were identified in each of the four NPT domains, including: 1) lack of knowledge and understanding around CKD (coherence), 2) difficulties engaging providers and patients in CKD management (cognitive participation), 3) limited time and competing demands (collective action), and 4) challenges obtaining and utilizing data to monitor progress (reflexive monitoring). Conclusions Addressing the barriers to implementation with concrete interventions at the levels at which they occur, informed by NPT, will ultimately improve the quality of CKD patient care. PMID:26355134

  20. Changes to the school food and physical activity environment after guideline implementation in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High rates of childhood obesity have generated interest among policy makers to improve the school food environment and increase students’ levels of physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine school-level changes associated with implementation of the Food and Beverage Sales in Schools (FBSS) and Daily Physical Activity (DPA) guidelines in British Columbia, Canada. Methods Elementary and middle/high school principals completed a survey on the school food and physical activity environment in 2007–08 (N = 513) and 2011–12 (N = 490). Hierarchical mixed effects regression was used to examine changes in: 1) availability of food and beverages; 2) minutes per day of Physical Education (PE); 3) delivery method of PE; and 4) school community support. Models controlled for school enrollment and community type, education and income. Results After policy implementation was expected, more elementary schools provided access to fruits and vegetables and less to 100% fruit juice. Fewer middle/high schools provided access to sugar-sweetened beverages, French fries, baked goods, salty snacks and chocolate/candy. Schools were more likely to meet 150 min/week of PE for grade 6 students, and offer more minutes of PE per week for grade 8 and 10 students including changes to PE delivery method. School community support for nutrition and physical activity policies increased over time. Conclusion Positive changes to the school food environment occurred after schools were expected to implement the FBSS and DPA guidelines. Reported changes to the school environment are encouraging and provide support for guidelines and policies that focus on increasing healthy eating and physical activity in schools. PMID:24731514

  1. Changes to the school food and physical activity environment after guideline implementation in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Watts, Allison W; Mâsse, Louise C; Naylor, Patti-Jean

    2014-04-14

    High rates of childhood obesity have generated interest among policy makers to improve the school food environment and increase students' levels of physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine school-level changes associated with implementation of the Food and Beverage Sales in Schools (FBSS) and Daily Physical Activity (DPA) guidelines in British Columbia, Canada. Elementary and middle/high school principals completed a survey on the school food and physical activity environment in 2007-08 (N=513) and 2011-12 (N=490). Hierarchical mixed effects regression was used to examine changes in: 1) availability of food and beverages; 2) minutes per day of Physical Education (PE); 3) delivery method of PE; and 4) school community support. Models controlled for school enrollment and community type, education and income. After policy implementation was expected, more elementary schools provided access to fruits and vegetables and less to 100% fruit juice. Fewer middle/high schools provided access to sugar-sweetened beverages, French fries, baked goods, salty snacks and chocolate/candy. Schools were more likely to meet 150 min/week of PE for grade 6 students, and offer more minutes of PE per week for grade 8 and 10 students including changes to PE delivery method. School community support for nutrition and physical activity policies increased over time. Positive changes to the school food environment occurred after schools were expected to implement the FBSS and DPA guidelines. Reported changes to the school environment are encouraging and provide support for guidelines and policies that focus on increasing healthy eating and physical activity in schools.

  2. DoD Implementation Guidelines for Electronic Data Interchange (EDI). Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    LIN27 is re- quired. 13 If LIN28 is present, then LIN29 is re- quired. 1 4 If LIN30 is present, then LIN31 is re- quired. Data Element Summary Ref. Data...Service ID C AN 1/30 LIN28 235 Product/Service ID Qualifier 0 ID 2/2 L1N29 234 Product/Service ID C AN 1/30 LIN30 235 Product/Service ID Qualifier 0 ID...DEFENSE IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES 11 If LIN24 is present, then LIN25 is re- quired. 12 If LIN26 is present, then LIN27 is re- quired. 13 If LIN28 is

  3. DSP implementation of wavelet image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Wenruo; Zhang, Baofeng; Bai, Qianqian

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents a new Adaptive Gain calculating approach when using the Adaptive Image Enhancement algorithm based on Wavelet Transform. The basic technique is to select two different thresholds which divide the input into three parts after the wavelet coefficients are normalized. For the wavelet coefficients less than the smaller threshold, just make the output zero. And this provides a de-noise effect. The output remains unchanged when the wavelet coefficients are greater than the larger one. For the last part, find a function to make the output figure S shape. So the algorithm can give a clear contrast and the function is the key. The final goal is to use this method in the process of Online Vision Measure, we have chosen the TI TMS320 DM642 Digital Signal Processor or DSP because of its powerful multimedia processing capability. What's more, the TI corporation has provided a variety of software develop libraries as well as the 3rd party tools. All such tools make the development more rapid and convenient. After the technique this paper provides is implemented on DSP, a series of optimization will be performed to make it suitable for industry real-time usage.

  4. [Clinical practice guidelines: qualitative study of their implementation in the Chilean health system].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Paloma; Fajreldin, Valentina; Rodríguez, María Francisca; Kraemer, Patricia; Mendoza, Carolina; Pineda, Ignacio; Burdiles, Pamela; Cornejo, Marco; Villanueva, Julio; Tohá, María Dolores; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso

    2017-06-08

    Characterize the implementation process, barriers, and facilitators of evidence-based recommendations in the context of developing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) generated by the Ministry of Health of Chile, in order to make proposals to optimize the process. Qualitative "action-oriented research" study. Nineteen semi-structured interviews were conducted and nine discussion groups were organized at various levels of the Chilean public health system. The analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti® software and manually, in a content analysis framework, by categorizing and coding information according to pre-specified dimensions and with the inclusion of emerging categories where relevant. The main challenge mentioned with regard to implementing recommendations is the lack of an explicit and structured process. Actors in the health system recognize difficulties specific to the context in which the recommendations are followed. In this unprecedented institutional review, participants suggested a series of strategies that could be implemented to overcome these challenges, presented in a management flow chart optimized for the development and implementation of CPGs. This process has raised awareness of the importance of implementing CPGs in Chile. After characterizing the implementation process, barriers, and facilitators, a plan to implement recommendations was developed in order to guide and monitor the process. It would facilitate the implementation of strategies and the introduction of improvements to the CPG development process if key informants inside and outside of the Ministry of Health were included in the review process. Studies of this kind should be conducted with physicians and patients in order to complement the collected information.

  5. Measuring legal implementation of the international guidelines on HIV/AIDS and human rights.

    PubMed

    Watchirs, H

    2001-01-01

    With over 36 million people now living with the virus and over 21 million people dying of AIDS in the last two decades, HIV/AIDS is a global health and security problem. These shocking figures eclipse the human toll of many wars, and reveal in themselves that human rights are not being respected, protected, or fulfilled, either through negligent omissions or violations. A human rights approach to the epidemic was advocated early by advocates such as Jonathan Mann, who recognized that infections thrived in conditions of inequality. This approach was crystallized in the International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights that were developed at the Second International Consultation in 1996 convened by UNAIDS and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. The Guidelines cover three main areas: improving governmental responses in terms of multisectoral responsibility and accountability; widespread law reform and legal support services; and supporting increased private sector and community participation in effective responses to the epidemic. This article focuses on the half of the twelve Guidelines that concern rights that are justiciable and amenable to law reform. It highlights the responsibilities of States Parties to human rights treaties, as they bear the principal burden of the obligations to implement.

  6. WHO-ISH Guidelines for the management of hypertension: implementation in Africa--the Nigerian experience.

    PubMed

    Mabadeje, A F

    1999-01-01

    A 1990-91 country-wide survey in Nigeria showed the prevalence of hypertension to be 11.2% in those aged 15 years and above. The management, however, has been shown to be inadequate. At the instance of the Nigerian Hypertension Society a Consensus Meeting of National Medical Societies and other interest groups produced in 1996 Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension in Nigeria. Medical societies and the pharmaceutical industry have tried to increase awareness of the condition and its control through lectures, seminars, sponsor of essay competitions among secondary school and university students as well as canvassing against cigarette advertising and smoking in public places. However, their efforts are thwarted by luring advertisements by multinational tobacco companies driven from developed countries by anti-tobacco lobbies and legislation. A questionnaire survey showed that no other African country had produced similar guidelines in the past five years. In Sub-Saharan Africa there appears to be negligible implementation of the WHO-ISH Guidelines.

  7. Improving children's nutrition environments: A survey of adoption and implementation of nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the mandate of recreational facilities is to enhance well-being, many offer foods inconsistent with recommendations for healthy eating. Little is known regarding recreational facility food environments and how they might be improved, as few studies exist. The Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth (ANGCY) are intended to ensure access to healthy food choices in schools, childcare and recreational facilities. This study investigated awareness, adoption and implementation of the ANGCY among recreational facilities in Alberta, Canada, one year following their release. Methods A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted from June - December, 2009 (n = 151) with managers of publicly funded recreational facilities that served food. The questionnaire included 10 closed and 7 open ended questions to assess the organizational priority for healthy eating, awareness, adoption and implementation of the ANGCY. Chi-squared tests examined quantitative variables, while qualitative data were analysed using directed content analysis. Greenhalgh's model of diffusion of complex innovations within health service organizations constituted the theoretical framework for the study. Results One half of respondents had heard of the ANGCY, however their knowledge of them was limited. Although 51% of facilities had made changes to improve the nutritional quality of foods offered in the past year, only a small fraction (11%) of these changes were motivated by the ANGCY. At the time of the survey, 14% of facilities had adopted the ANGCY and 6% had implemented them. Barriers to adoption and implementation were primarily related to perceived negative attributes of the ANGCY, the inner (organizational) context, and negative feedback received during the implementation process. Managers strongly perceived that implementing nutrition guidelines would limit their profit-making ability. Conclusions If fully adopted and implemented, the ANGCY have the potential to

  8. Return of the pulmonary nodule: the radiologist's key role in implementing the 2015 BTS guidelines on the investigation and management of pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Graham, Richard N J; Baldwin, David R; Callister, Matthew E J; Gleeson, Fergus V

    2016-01-01

    The British Thoracic Society has published new comprehensive guidelines for the management of pulmonary nodules. These guidelines are significantly different from those previously published, as they use two malignancy prediction calculators to better characterize the risk of malignancy. There are recommendations for a higher nodule size threshold for follow-up (≥5 mm or ≥80 mm(3)) and a reduction of the follow-up period to 1 year for solid pulmonary nodules; both of these will reduce the number of follow-up CT scans. PET-CT plays a crucial role in characterization also, with an ordinal scale being recommended for reporting. Radiologists will be the key in implementing these guidelines, and routine use of volumetric image-analysis software will be required to manage patients with pulmonary nodules correctly.

  9. Return of the pulmonary nodule: the radiologist's key role in implementing the 2015 BTS guidelines on the investigation and management of pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, David R; Callister, Matthew E J; Gleeson, Fergus V

    2016-01-01

    The British Thoracic Society has published new comprehensive guidelines for the management of pulmonary nodules. These guidelines are significantly different from those previously published, as they use two malignancy prediction calculators to better characterize the risk of malignancy. There are recommendations for a higher nodule size threshold for follow-up (≥5 mm or ≥80 mm3) and a reduction of the follow-up period to 1 year for solid pulmonary nodules; both of these will reduce the number of follow-up CT scans. PET-CT plays a crucial role in characterization also, with an ordinal scale being recommended for reporting. Radiologists will be the key in implementing these guidelines, and routine use of volumetric image-analysis software will be required to manage patients with pulmonary nodules correctly. PMID:26781558

  10. The essence of the Japan Radiological Society/Japanese College of Radiology Imaging Guideline.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Murayama, Sadayuki; Okada, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kataoka, Masako; Kaji, Yasushi; Imamura, Keiko; Takehara, Yasuo; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Ohno, Kazuko; Awai, Kazuo; Hirai, Toshinori; Kojima, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Shuji; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Murakami, Takamichi; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Gabata, Toshifumi; Matsuzaki, Kenji; Tohno, Eriko; Kawahara, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Takeo; Monzawa, Shuichi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging is undoubtedly important in modern medicine, and final clinical decisions are often made based on it. Fortunately, Japan has the highest numbers of diagnostic imaging instruments, such as CT and MRI devices, and boasts easy access to them as well as a high level of diagnostic accuracy. In consequence, a very large number of imaging examinations are performed, but diagnostic instruments are installed in so many medical facilities that expert management of these examinations tends to be insufficient. Particularly, in order to avoid risks, clinicians have recently become indifferent to indications of imaging modalities and tend to rely on CT or MRI resulting in increasing the number of imaging examinations in Japan. This is a serious problem from the viewpoints of avoidance of unnecessary exposure and medical economy. Under these circumstances, the Japan Radiological Society and Japanese College of Radiology jointly initiated the preparation of new guidelines for diagnostic imaging. However, the field of diagnostic imaging is extremely wide, and it is impossible to cover all diseases. Therefore, in drafting the guidelines, we selected important diseases and focused on "showing evidence and suggestions in the form of clinical questions (CQs)" concerning clinically encountered questions and "describing routine imaging techniques presently considered to be standards to guarantee the quality of imaging examinations". In so doing, we adhered to the basic principles of assuming the readers to be "radiologists specializing in diagnostic imaging", "simultaneously respecting the global standards and attending to the situation in Japan", and "making the guidelines consistent with those of other scientific societies related to imaging". As a result, the guidelines became the largest ever, consisting of 152 CQs, nine areas of imaging techniques, and seven reviews, but no other guidelines in the world summarize problems concerning diagnostic imaging in the form

  11. Document imaging and management: Implementation of a geoscience image server with corporate scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Thrasher, T.S.; Baughman, S.A.; Grismore, J.R.; Carnell, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the process that resulted in the implementation of a document imaging and management system in the Research & Services Division of Phillips Petroleum. The purpose of this system is to capture the various documents maintained by the Reservoir, Geology, Geophysics and Production Technology branches into a master electronic fileroom. The system will facilitate sharing of data and information between groups and help reduce time required to search for and maintain project files. Many of the issues that were addressed are outlined in a format that serves as a case history example. These issues include system integration and alignment to existing Information Technology Architecture and Corporate Record specifications, adherence to Common Look/Feel and Client/Server guidelines, local and wide-area network compatibility, budget limitations, security and corporate scalability.

  12. Barriers to the implementation of practice guidelines in managing patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sean M; Murray, Suzanne; Dupuis, Martin; Dawes, Martin; Hawes, Ian A; Barkun, Alan N

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Guidelines for the management of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) are inconsistently applied by health care providers, potentially resulting in suboptimal care and patient outcomes. A needs assessment was performed to assess health care providers’ barriers to the implementation of these guidelines in Canada. METHODS: Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted by trained research personnel with 22 selectively sampled health care professionals actively treating and managing NVUGIB patients, including emergency room physicians (ER), intensivists (ICU), gastroenterologists (GI), gastroenterology nurses and hospital administrators. Participants were chosen from a representative sample of six Canadian community- and academic-based hospitals that participated in a national Canadian audit on the management of NVUGIB. RESULTS: Participants reported substantive gaps in the implementation of NVUGIB guidelines that included the following: lack of knowledge of the specifics of the NVUGIB guidelines (ER, ICU, nurses); limited belief in the value of guidelines, especially in areas where evidence is lacking (ER, ICU); limited belief in the value of available tools to support implementation of guidelines (GI); lack of knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of health care professions and disciplines, and lack of effective collaboration skills (ER, ICU and GI); variability of knowledge and skills of health care professionals within professions (eg, variability of nurses’ knowledge and skills in endoscopic procedures); and perceived overuse of intravenous proton pump inhibitor treatment, with limited concern regarding cost or side effect implications (all participants). CONCLUSIONS: In the present study population, ER, ICU and nurses did not adhere to NVUGIB guidelines because they were neither aware of nor familiar with them, whereas the GI lack of adherence to NVUGIB guidelines was influenced more by

  13. Implementing the Fatigue Guidelines at One NCCN Member Institution: Process and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Borneman, Tami; Piper, Barbara F.; Sun, Virginia Chih-Yi; Koczywas, Marianna; Uman, Gwen; Ferrell, Betty

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue, despite being the most common and distressing symptom in cancer, is often unrelieved because of numerous patient provider, and system barriers. The overall purpose of this 5-year prospective clinical trial is to translate the NCCN Cancer-Related Fatigue Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology and NCCN Adult Cancer Pain Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology into practice and develop a translational interventional model that can be replicated across settings. This article focuses on one NCCN member institution’s experience related to the first phase of the NCCN Cancer-Related Fatigue Guidelines implementation, describing usual care compared with evidence-based guidelines. Phase 1 of this 3-phased clinical trial compared the usual care of fatigue with that administered according to the NCCN guidelines. Eligibility criteria included age 18 years or older; English-speaking; diagnosed with breast, lung, colon, or prostate cancer; and fatigue and/or pain ratings of 4 or more on a 0 to 10 screening scale. Research nurses screened all available subjects in a cancer center medical oncology clinic to identify those meeting these criteria. Instruments included the Piper Fatigue Scale, a Fatigue Barriers Scale, a Fatigue Knowledge Scale, and a Fatigue Chart Audit Tool. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in data analysis. At baseline, 45 patients had fatigue only (≥4) and 24 had both fatigue and pain (≥4). This combined sample (N = 69) was predominantly Caucasian (65%), female (63%), an average of 60 years old, diagnosed with stage 3 or 4 breast cancer, and undergoing treatment (82%). The most common barriers noted were patients’ belief that physicians would introduce the subject of fatigue if it was important (patient barrier); lack of fatigue documentation (professional barrier); and lack of supportive care referrals (system barrier). Findings showed several patient, professional, and system barriers that distinguish usual care from that

  14. Implementation of clinical practice guidelines for prevention of thromboembolism in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Burns, Stephen P; Nelson, Audrey L; Bosshart, Helen T; Goetz, Lance L; Harrow, Jeffrey J; Gerhart, Kevin D; Bowers, Harriet; Krasnicka, Barbara; Guihan, Marylou

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether publication of the "Prevention of Thromboembolism in Spinal Cord Injury" clinical practice guideline (CPG) changed patient management and whether adherence to CPG recommendations improved after a targeted implementation strategy. Data were abstracted from medical records of 134 and 520 patients with acute and chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), respectively, from 6 Veterans Affairs medical centers over 3 time periods: prepublication (T1), preimplementation (T2), and postimplementation (T3) of the CPG. Targeted interventions were developed to address provider-perceived barriers to guideline adherence, based on findings from focus groups conducted at each site. The interventions incorporated two implementation strategies: standardized documentation templates/standing orders and social marketing/outreach visits. Use of the specified duration for pharmacologic prophylaxis increased from 60% to 65% to 75% of patients with acute SCI in T1, T2, and T3, respectively (P = 0.060 and 0.041 for T1 vs T2 and T2 vs T3, respectively). Rates of use for individual pharmacologic prophylaxis agents changed significantly over the course of the study, with use of low-molecular-weight heparin increasing from 7% in T1 to 42% in T3. Physical assessments for thrombosis on hospitalization days 1 and 30 improved between T2 and T3. Use of prophylaxis in chronically injured patients with new risk factors for thromboembolism increased from 16% to 31% to 34% during T1, T2, and T3 (P = 0.001 and 0.87, respectively). The CPG publication had only a modest effect on practice. Use of structured implementation further increased the adherence to some CPG recommendations for thromboembolism prophylaxis. Similar implementation strategies should be considered for CPG recommendations with low adherence and high potential for morbidity and mortality.

  15. Implementation of asthma guidelines to West Australian community pharmacies: an exploratory, quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Kim; Trevenen, Michelle; Murray, Kevin; Kendall, Peter A; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda

    2016-08-31

    Pharmacy assistants are often the first point of contact for patients presenting in community pharmacies. The current role of pharmacy assistants in the supply of asthma-reliever medications (short-acting β-agonists) was identified as a barrier to appropriate guideline-based care. The aim of this research was to devise and evaluate a team-based intervention to formalise the role of pharmacy assistants and to improve asthma guideline-based care in community pharmacy. A controlled pre-post intervention study was conducted in 336 metropolitan pharmacies located in Perth, Western Australia. Pharmacies were stratified into 2 groups (187 intervention and 149 control) based on known confounders for asthma control. The intervention was designed using a common-sense approach and resources developed included a checklist, videos and web page. Delivery was via workshops (25 pharmacies) or academic detailing (162 pharmacies). Pharmacy practice was assessed preintervention and postintervention via covert simulated patient methodology. Primary outcome measures included patient medical referral, device use demonstration and counselling, internal referral and/or direct involvement of a pharmacist in consultations. There was a significant increase in patient medical referral in intervention pharmacies from 32% to 47% (p=0.0007) from preintervention to postintervention, while control pharmacies showed a non-significant decrease from 50% to 44% (p=0.22). Device counselling was not routinely carried out at any stage or in any cohort of this research and no significant changes in internal referral were observed. Increases in medical referral indicate that asthma guideline compliance can be improved in community pharmacy if implementation employs a team-based approach and involves pharmacy assistants. However, results were variable and the intervention did not improve practice related to device counselling or internal referral/pharmacist involvement. Undertaking more workshops may have

  16. GUIDELINE IMPLEMENTATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: USE OF STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL CHARTS AS VISUAL FEEDBACK DEVICES

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussein, Fahad A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To use statistical control charts in a series of audits to improve the acceptance and consistant use of guidelines, and reduce the variations in prescription processing in primary health care. Methods: A series of audits were done at the main satellite of King Saud Housing Family and Community Medicine Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, where three general practitioners and six pharmacists provide outpatient care to about 3000 residents. Audits were carried out every fortnight to calculate the proportion of prescriptions that did not conform to the given guidelines of prescribing and dispensing. Simple random samples of thirty were chosen from a sampling frame of all prescriptions given in the two previous weeks. Thirty six audits were carried out from September 2004 to February 2006. P-charts were constructed around a parametric specification of non-conformities not exceeding 25%. Results: Of the 1081 prescriptions, the most frequent non-conformity was failure to write generic names (35.5%), followed by the failure to record patient's weight (16.4%), pharmacist's name (14.3%), duration of therapy (9.1%), and the use of inappropriate abbreviations (6.0%). Initially, 100% of prescriptions did not conform to the guidelines, but within a period of three months, this came down to 40%. Conclusions: A process of audits in the context of statistical process control is necessary for any improvement in the implementation of guidelines in primary care. Statistical process control charts are an effective means of visual feedback to the care providers. PMID:23012184

  17. Creative Implementation of 3Rs Principles within Industry Programs: Beyond Regulations and Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Bratcher, Natalie A; Reinhard, Gregory R

    2015-01-01

    The industry involved with using animals as an essential part of research has supported the theory and philosophy of the 3Rs for years. However, both the culture and approach surrounding the 3Rs is evolving rapidly, and many institutions are attempting to surpass the regulations and guidelines to implement the 3Rs for improved science and animal welfare. Regulatory documents and guidelines such as the Animal Welfare Act, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, and the US Government Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research, and Training clearly outline how the IACUC should address the 3Rs, but there are many additional paradigms and resources that an institution can use to promote the 3Rs creatively. We review the legal mandates and guidelines that institutions must or should follow, and we present some creative approaches toward their compliance, including the creation of full-time dedicated 3Rs roles as well as temporary 3Rs-focused positions such as visiting scientist and postdoctoral fellowships and internships. We also discuss how to creatively achieve 3Rs progress through internal committees and working groups, involvement in 3Rs consortia, recognizing 3Rs advances through awards programs, and creating 3Rs volunteer opportunities. Adherence to regulations and guidelines creates a solid foundation for good animal care and science, and creative 3Rs approaches enable the growth of a robust animal welfare culture that enhances the potential for 3Rs benefits to animals and science. PMID:25836958

  18. Creative implementation of 3Rs principles within industry programs: beyond regulations and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bratcher, Natalie A; Reinhard, Gregory R

    2015-03-01

    The industry involved with using animals as an essential part of research has supported the theory and philosophy of the 3Rs for years. However, both the culture and approach surrounding the 3Rs is evolving rapidly, and many institutions are attempting to surpass the regulations and guidelines to implement the 3Rs for improved science and animal welfare. Regulatory documents and guidelines such as the Animal Welfare Act, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, and the US Government Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research, and Training clearly outline how the IACUC should address the 3Rs, but there are many additional paradigms and resources that an institution can use to promote the 3Rs creatively. We review the legal mandates and guidelines that institutions must or should follow, and we present some creative approaches toward their compliance, including the creation of full-time dedicated 3Rs roles as well as temporary 3Rs-focused positions such as visiting scientist and postdoctoral fellowships and internships. We also discuss how to creatively achieve 3Rs progress through internal committees and working groups, involvement in 3Rs consortia, recognizing 3Rs advances through awards programs, and creating 3Rs volunteer opportunities. Adherence to regulations and guidelines creates a solid foundation for good animal care and science, and creative 3Rs approaches enable the growth of a robust animal welfare culture that enhances the potential for 3Rs benefits to animals and science.

  19. Clinical imaging guidelines part 4: challenges in identifying, engaging and collaborating with stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Bettmann, Michael A; Oikarinen, Helja; Rehani, Madan; Holmberg, Ola; del Rosario Perez, Maria; Naidoo, Anusha; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Dreyer, Keith; Ebdon-Jackson, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The effective development and use of clinical imaging guidelines requires an understanding of who the stakeholders are, what their interests in the process are, and what roles they should play. If the appropriate stakeholders are not engaged in the right roles, it is unlikely that clinical imaging guidelines will be successfully developed, relied on, and actually used. Some stakeholders are obvious: for the development of clinical imaging guidelines, both imagers and those who request examinations, such as general practitioners, internists, and medical specialists, must be involved. To gain acceptance, other relevant groups are stakeholders, including medical societies, other health care professionals, insurers, health IT experts and vendors, and patients. The role of stakeholders must be dictated by their specific interest. For some, involvement in the creation of guidelines is the right role. For others, such as regulators or insurers, reviews or invitations to comment are required, and for others, such as medical educators, it is probably sufficient to provide information and create awareness. Only through a careful consideration of who the stakeholders are and what are their interests are the successful development, acceptance, and use of clinical imaging guidelines likely to occur. Future efforts must focus on collaboration, particularly among groups that create clinical imaging guidelines and those that can support their use, and on regulatory roles and mandates.

  20. The adaptation and implementation of guidelines for responsible media reporting on suicide in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Tančič Grum, Alenka; Poštuvan, Vita; Podlesek, Anja; De Leo, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The existing literature provides evidence of the link between media reporting and suicide in terms of either preventive or provocative effects. Hence, working with media representatives on responsible reporting on suicide is of great importance. Until recently in Slovenia, there has been an obvious lack of communication between media representatives and suicidologists. The aims of the present study were twofold; firstly, to introduce the adaptation and dissemination of intervention on responsible media reporting, and secondly, to evaluate the effectiveness of the implemented intervention on suicide reporting. Methods We used a pre-post research design. Newspaper articles were retrieved over two 12-month periods: the baseline period and the follow-up period. In between, we had a year of implementation of our intervention program (launching and disseminating the Guidelines via workshops). Each retrieved article was rated qualitatively with respect to its adherence to the Guidelines. Results The comparison of baseline and follow-up periods revealed some significant differences. Reporting in the follow-up period was less sensationalistic, there was less reporting about specific cases of suicides and more about causes of suicide and pathways out of mental distress. Furthermore, in the follow-up period, there was a significant improvement related to headlines of media articles. Contact information about where to seek help was more often included in the articles. Conclusion The findings are promising, but working with the media needs to be continuous and ongoing if sustainable results are to be achieved. PMID:28289461

  1. Barriers to implementing evidence-based clinical guidelines: A survey of early adopters

    PubMed Central

    Spallek, Heiko; Song, Mei; Polk, Deborah E; Bekhuis, Tanja; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Aravamudhan, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to identify barriers that early-adopting dentists perceive as common and challenging when implementing recommendations from evidence-based (EB) clinical guidelines. Method This is a cross-sectional study. Dentists who attended the 2008 Evidence-based Dentistry Champion Conference were eligible for inclusion. Forty-three dentists (34%) responded to a 22-item questionnaire administered online. Two investigators independently coded and categorized responses to open-ended items. Descriptive statistics were computed to assess the frequency of barriers and perceived challenges. Results The most common barriers to implementation are difficulty in changing current practice model, resistance and criticism from colleagues, and lack of trust in evidence or research. Barriers perceived as serious problems have to do with lack of up-to-date evidence, lack of clear answers to clinical questions, and contradictory information in the scientific literature. Conclusions Knowledge of barriers will help improve translation of biomedical research for dentists. Information in guidelines needs to be current, clear, and simplified for use at chairside; dentists’ fears need to be addressed. PMID:21093800

  2. Development and implementation of a piperacillin-tazobactam extended infusion guideline.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Lynley S; Tokumaru, Sheri; Clark, Nina M; Garofalo, John; Paek, Jamie L; Grim, Shellee A

    2011-12-01

    Administration of β-lactam antibiotics by extended infusion optimizes the pharmacodynamic properties and bactericidal activity of these agents resulting in a potential improvement in patient outcomes and reduction in drug expenditure. Consequently, a pharmacist-led piperacillin-tazobactam extended 4-hour infusion guideline was implemented hospital-wide at a 500-bed academic medical center. Each piperacillin-tazobactam infusion was prospectively monitored for 5 weeks to ensure accurate administration and identify barriers to guideline adherence. Overall, a total of 103 patients received 1215 doses of piperacillin-tazobactam by extended infusions. In all, 98% of the doses were administered at the correct extended infusion rate and 94% of the doses were given at the scheduled time. There were a total of 20 missed doses and 53 delayed doses, accounting for 2% and 4% of the total administered doses, respectively. The primary barrier to adherence was the patient not being on the unit at the time of the scheduled dose followed by the piperacillin-tazobactam dose not being available on the floor. While insufficient power prevented meaningful evaluation of clinical outcomes, we anticipate a conservative annual estimated cost savings of $108,529. Key elements contributing to our success included consistent pharmacy leadership, multidisciplinary involvement, thorough inservicing to health care professionals, hospital-wide implementation, and extensive quality assurance monitoring.

  3. The adaptation and implementation of guidelines for responsible media reporting on suicide in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Roškar, Saška; Tančič Grum, Alenka; Poštuvan, Vita; Podlesek, Anja; De Leo, Diego

    2017-03-01

    The existing literature provides evidence of the link between media reporting and suicide in terms of either preventive or provocative effects. Hence, working with media representatives on responsible reporting on suicide is of great importance. Until recently in Slovenia, there has been an obvious lack of communication between media representatives and suicidologists. The aims of the present study were twofold; firstly, to introduce the adaptation and dissemination of intervention on responsible media reporting, and secondly, to evaluate the effectiveness of the implemented intervention on suicide reporting. We used a pre-post research design. Newspaper articles were retrieved over two 12-month periods: the baseline period and the follow-up period. In between, we had a year of implementation of our intervention program (launching and disseminating the Guidelines via workshops). Each retrieved article was rated qualitatively with respect to its adherence to the Guidelines. The comparison of baseline and follow-up periods revealed some significant differences. Reporting in the follow-up period was less sensationalistic, there was less reporting about specific cases of suicides and more about causes of suicide and pathways out of mental distress. Furthermore, in the follow-up period, there was a significant improvement related to headlines of media articles. Contact information about where to seek help was more often included in the articles. The findings are promising, but working with the media needs to be continuous and ongoing if sustainable results are to be achieved.

  4. Change in antihypertensive drug prescribing after guideline implementation: a controlled before and after study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antihypertensive drug choices and treatment levels are not in accordance with the existing guidelines. We aimed to assess the impact of a guideline implementation intervention on antihypertensive drug prescribing. Methods In this controlled before and after study, the effects of a multifaceted (education, audit and feedback, local care pathway) quality programme was evaluated. The intervention was carried out in a health centre between 2002 and 2003. From each health care unit (n = 31), a doctor-nurse pair was trained to act as peer facilitators in the intervention. All antihypertensive drugs prescribed by 25 facilitator general practitioners (intervention GPs) and 53 control GPs were retrieved from the nationwide Prescription Register for three-month periods in 2001 and 2003. The proportions of patients receiving specific antihypertensive drugs and multiple antihypertensive drugs were measured before and after the intervention for three subgroups of hypertension patients: hypertension only, with coronary heart disease, and with diabetes. Results In all subgroups, the use of multiple concurrent medications increased. For intervention patients with hypertension only, the odds ratio (OR) was 1.12 (95% CI 0.99, 1.25; p = 0.06) and for controls 1.13 (1.05, 1.21; p = 0.002). We observed no statistically significant differences in the change in the prescribing of specific antihypertensive agents between the intervention and control groups. The use of agents acting on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system increased in all subgroups (hypertension only intervention patients OR 1.19 (1.06, 1.34; p = 0.004) and controls OR 1.24 (1.15, 1.34; p < 0.0001). Conclusions A multifaceted guideline implementation intervention does not necessarily lead to significant changes in prescribing performance. Rigorous planning of the interventions and quality projects and their evaluation are essential. PMID:21849037

  5. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT: Joint EANM and SNMMI procedure guideline for prostate cancer imaging: version 1.0.

    PubMed

    Fendler, Wolfgang P; Eiber, Matthias; Beheshti, Mohsen; Bomanji, Jamshed; Ceci, Francesco; Cho, Steven; Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hope, Thomas A; Kopka, Klaus; Krause, Bernd J; Mottaghy, Felix M; Schöder, Heiko; Sunderland, John; Wan, Simon; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Fanti, Stefano; Herrmann, Ken

    2017-03-10

    The aim of this guideline is to provide standards for the recommendation, performance, interpretation and reporting of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer imaging. These recommendations will help to improve accuracy, precision, and repeatability of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer essentially needed for implementation of this modality in science and routine clinical practice.

  6. The methodological quality of economic evaluations of guideline implementation into clinical practice: a systematic review of empiric studies.

    PubMed

    Hoomans, Ties; Evers, Silvia M A A; Ament, André J H A; Hübben, Mariette W A; van der Weijden, Trudy; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Severens, Johan L

    2007-01-01

    Despite the emphasis on efficiency of health-care services delivery, there is an imperfect evidence base to inform decisions about whether and how to develop and implement guidelines into clinical practice. In general, studies evaluating the economics of guideline implementation lack methodological rigor. We conducted a systematic review of empiric studies to assess advances in the economic evaluations of guideline implementation. The Cochrane Effective Professional and Organisational Change Group specialized register and the MEDLINE database were searched for English publications between January 1998 and July 2004 that reported objective effect measures and implementation costs. We extracted data on study characteristics, quality of study design, and economic methodology. It was assessed whether the economic evaluations followed methodological guidance. We included 24 economic evaluations, involving 21 controlled trials and three interrupted time series designs. The studies involved varying settings, targeted professionals, targeted behaviors, clinical guidelines, and implementation strategies. Overall, it was difficult to determine the quality of study designs owing to poor reporting. In addition, most economic evaluations were methodologically flawed: studies did not follow guidelines for evaluation design, data collection, and data analysis. The increasing importance of the value for money of providing health care seems to be reflected by an increase in empiric economic evaluations of guideline implementation. Because of the heterogeneity and poor methodological quality of these studies, however, the resulting evidence is still of limited use in decision-making. There seems to be a need for more methodological guidance, especially in terms of data collection and data synthesis, to appropriately evaluate the economics of developing and implementing guidelines into clinical practice.

  7. Policy at play: The implementation of Healthy Eating and Active Living Guidelines in municipal child care settings.

    PubMed

    McKay, Kelly; Nigro, Sherry

    2017-03-01

    In 2012, Ottawa Public Health (OPH) partnered with the City of Ottawa Municipal Child Care (MCC) Services to develop Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) Guidelines. The Guidelines aim to promote consistent standards of practice in child care settings related to healthy environments and food, physical activity, physical literacy, decreased sedentary behaviours, and positive role modeling by staff. The Guidelines targeted 498 children aged 18 months to 5 years, attending MCC centres. Resources and training were provided to 10 supervisors, 63 child care educators and 9 cooks. Components of the Guidelines were piloted in 5 MCC sites prior to being launched in 10 MCC sites across Ottawa, Ontario. Two project Advisory Groups supported the development of the Guidelines. Staff training, resources, recipes and menus were provided. An evaluation was conducted and has informed the Guidelines' subsequent community implementation. In 2015, accompanying web-based resources and e-modules were developed. The evaluation demonstrated environmental and programming changes. Parent satisfaction was high and preliminary findings showed no real changes in food costs. Following implementation, the cooks reported high compliance to the 6-week menu plans provided, and the number of sites offering 120 minutes or more of daily physical activity increased. Through novel intersectoral partnerships, OPH was able to implement and evaluate HEAL Guidelines in tandem. The interdisciplinary project Advisory Groups, training of cooks, and engagement of the Ontario Coaches Association were all innovative elements of this project and may influence future public health activity in this area.

  8. EANM procedure guidelines for PET brain imaging using [18F]FDG, version 2.

    PubMed

    Varrone, Andrea; Asenbaum, Susanne; Vander Borght, Thierry; Booij, Jan; Nobili, Flavio; Någren, Kjell; Darcourt, Jacques; Kapucu, Ozlem L; Tatsch, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Van Laere, Koen

    2009-12-01

    These guidelines summarize the current views of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging Committee (ENC). The purpose of the guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in making recommendations, performing, interpreting, and reporting the results of fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) PET imaging of the brain. The aim is to help achieve a high standard of FDG imaging, which will increase the diagnostic impact of this technique in neurological and psychiatric practice. The present document replaces a former version of the guidelines that were published in 2002 [1] and includes an update in the light of advances in PET technology, the introduction of hybrid PET/CT systems and the broadening clinical indications for FDG brain imaging. These guidelines are intended to present information specifically adapted for European practice. The information provided should be taken in the context of local conditions and regulations.

  9. A review of current clinical photography guidelines in relation to smartphone publishing of medical images.

    PubMed

    Payne, Karl F B; Tahim, Arpan; Goodson, Alexander M C; Delaney, Margaret; Fan, Kathleen

    2012-12-01

    The rise in popularity of smartphones has seen a surge in the number of smartphone-specific software applications (apps) available. Among these apps, many are medical and healthcare related, of benefit to both the general public and healthcare staff. With this improved technology comes the ability to display full-colour images and videos, for which medical images could be utilised. We reviewed current clinical photography guidelines in relation to the publishing of medical images in smartphone apps. Of the 5 relevant guidelines, none discussed hand-held electronic media or smartphone app publishing. This creates confusion for clinicians as to how to interpret current guidelines for this purpose. Medical illustrators, clinicians and NHS Trusts need to be aware of the changes in technology and the ethical considerations of allowing medical images to be published within smartphones. We discuss the issues surrounding consent and provide practical tips for obtaining informed consent from patients to publish medical images in smartphone apps.

  10. Avoiding twisted pixels: ethical guidelines for the appropriate use and manipulation of scientific digital images.

    PubMed

    Cromey, Douglas W

    2010-12-01

    Digital imaging has provided scientists with new opportunities to acquire and manipulate data using techniques that were difficult or impossible to employ in the past. Because digital images are easier to manipulate than film images, new problems have emerged. One growing concern in the scientific community is that digital images are not being handled with sufficient care. The problem is twofold: (1) the very small, yet troubling, number of intentional falsifications that have been identified, and (2) the more common unintentional, inappropriate manipulation of images for publication. Journals and professional societies have begun to address the issue with specific digital imaging guidelines. Unfortunately, the guidelines provided often do not come with instructions to explain their importance. Thus they deal with what should or should not be done, but not the associated 'why' that is required for understanding the rules. This article proposes 12 guidelines for scientific digital image manipulation and discusses the technical reasons behind these guidelines. These guidelines can be incorporated into lab meetings and graduate student training in order to provoke discussion and begin to bring an end to the culture of "data beautification".

  11. Avoiding Twisted Pixels: Ethical Guidelines for the Appropriate Use and Manipulation of Scientific Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Digital imaging has provided scientists with new opportunities to acquire and manipulate data using techniques that were difficult or impossible to employ in the past. Because digital images are easier to manipulate than film images, new problems have emerged. One growing concern in the scientific community is that digital images are not being handled with sufficient care. The problem is twofold: (1) the very small, yet troubling, number of intentional falsifications that have been identified, and (2) the more common unintentional, inappropriate manipulation of images for publication. Journals and professional societies have begun to address the issue with specific digital imaging guidelines. Unfortunately, the guidelines provided often do not come with instructions to explain their importance. Thus they deal with what should or should not be done, but not the associated ‘why’ that is required for understanding the rules. This article proposes 12 guidelines for scientific digital image manipulation and discusses the technical reasons behind these guidelines. These guidelines can be incorporated into lab meetings and graduate student training in order to provoke discussion and begin to bring an end to the culture of “data beautification”. PMID:20567932

  12. Implementation of guidelines for sequential therapy with fluoroquinolones in a Belgian hospital.

    PubMed

    Buyle, Franky; Vogelaers, Dirk; Peleman, Renaat; Van Maele, Georges; Robays, Hugo

    2010-06-01

    This study measured the impact of three interventions for physicians, in order to implement guidelines for sequential therapy (intravenous to oral conversion) with fluoroquinolones. A Belgian university hospital with 1,065 beds. Method The first intervention consisted of the hospital-wide publication of guidelines in the local drug letter towards all prescribers. The consumption of fluoroquinolones was measured by means of an interrupted time-series (ITS) analysis 21 months before (period A) and 24 months after publication (period B). The second intervention was an educational interactive session, by infectious disease specialists, to the medical staff of orthopaedics and endocrinology. The third intervention comprised a proactive conversion programme on the abdominal surgery, gastro-enterology and plastic surgery wards, where pharmacists attached a pre-printed note with a suggestion to switch to an oral treatment every time a patient met the criteria for switching. The second and third intervention took place 6 months after the first intervention. Fluoroquinolone treatments were evaluated during a 2 month period before (group 1) and after the introduction of the second (group 2) and third (group 3) intervention. The monthly ratio of intravenous versus total fluoroquinolone consumption (daily defined doses per 1,000 bed days) was measured to assess the impact of the first intervention. The impact of the second and third intervention was measured in relation to the number of days that intravenous therapy continued beyond the day that the patient fulfilled the criteria for sequential therapy and the antibiotic cost. The ITS demonstrated a reduction of 3.3% in the ratio of intravenous versus total consumption after the publication of the guidelines (P = 0.011). In group 1, patients were treated intravenously for 4.1 days longer than necessary. This parameter decreased in group 2 to 3.5 days and in group 3 to 1.0 day (P = 0.006). The mean additional cost for longer

  13. Enhanced implementation of low back pain guidelines in general practice: study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines may improve treatment quality, but the uptake of guideline recommendations is often incomplete and slow. Recently new low back pain guidelines are being launched in Denmark. The guidelines are considered to reduce personal and public costs. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether a complex, multifaceted implementation strategy of the low back pain guidelines will reduce secondary care referral and improve patient outcomes compared to the usual simple implementation strategy. Methods/design In a two-armed cluster randomised trial, 100 general practices (clusters) and 2,700 patients aged 18 to 65 years from the North Denmark region will be included. Practices are randomly allocated 1:1 to a simple or a complex implementation strategy. Intervention practices will receive a complex implementation strategy, including guideline facilitator visits, stratification tools, and quality reports on low back pain treatment. Primary outcome is referral to secondary care. Secondary outcomes are pain, physical function, health-related quality of life, patient satisfaction with care and treatment outcome, employment status, and sick leave. Primary and secondary outcomes pertain to the patient level. Assessments of outcomes are blinded and follow the intention-to-treat principle. Additionally, a process assessment will evaluate the degree to which the intervention elements will be delivered as planned, as well as measure changes in beliefs and behaviours among general practitioners and patients. Discussion This study provides knowledge concerning the process and effect of an intervention to implement low back pain guidelines in general practice, and will provide insight on essential elements to include in future implementation strategies in general practice. Trial registration Registered as NCT01699256 on ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:24139140

  14. Guidelines for a graph-theoretic implementation of structural equation modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, James B.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Little, Amanda M.; Mitchell, Brian R.; Miller, Kathryn M.; Schweiger, E. William

    2012-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) is increasingly being chosen by researchers as a framework for gaining scientific insights from the quantitative analyses of data. New ideas and methods emerging from the study of causality, influences from the field of graphical modeling, and advances in statistics are expanding the rigor, capability, and even purpose of SEM. Guidelines for implementing the expanded capabilities of SEM are currently lacking. In this paper we describe new developments in SEM that we believe constitute a third-generation of the methodology. Most characteristic of this new approach is the generalization of the structural equation model as a causal graph. In this generalization, analyses are based on graph theoretic principles rather than analyses of matrices. Also, new devices such as metamodels and causal diagrams, as well as an increased emphasis on queries and probabilistic reasoning, are now included. Estimation under a graph theory framework permits the use of Bayesian or likelihood methods. The guidelines presented start from a declaration of the goals of the analysis. We then discuss how theory frames the modeling process, requirements for causal interpretation, model specification choices, selection of estimation method, model evaluation options, and use of queries, both to summarize retrospective results and for prospective analyses. The illustrative example presented involves monitoring data from wetlands on Mount Desert Island, home of Acadia National Park. Our presentation walks through the decision process involved in developing and evaluating models, as well as drawing inferences from the resulting prediction equations. In addition to evaluating hypotheses about the connections between human activities and biotic responses, we illustrate how the structural equation (SE) model can be queried to understand how interventions might take advantage of an environmental threshold to limit Typha invasions. The guidelines presented provide for

  15. Strategies to promote prudent antibiotic use: exploring the views of professionals who develop and implement guidelines and interventions.

    PubMed

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Yardley, Lucy; Coenen, Samuel; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Krawczyk, Jaroslaw; Touboul, Pia; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul

    2013-02-01

    A variety of interventions have been developed to promote prudent antibiotic use, especially for respiratory tract infections (RTIs); however, it is not yet clear which are most acceptable and feasible for implementation across a wide range of contexts. This study elicited the views of experts, professionals who develop and implement guidelines and interventions, from five countries, on the development of RTI guidelines and interventions for implementing them. The aim was to determine whether there are common features of interventions which experts consider useful in changing health professionals' behaviour, or whether there are important contextual differences in views. Fifty semi-structured interviews explored experts' views and experiences of strategies across five countries. Interviews were carried out in person or over the phone, transcribed verbatim and translated into English, if not already in English, for analysis. Themes were remarkably consistent across the countries, and these could be summarized as five sets of recommendations: guidelines should be developed by health care professionals to better fit GPs' needs; address GP concerns about recommendations and explain the need for guidelines; design flexible interventions to increase feasibility across primary care practice; provide interventions which engage GPs; and provide consistent messages about antibiotic use for patients, professionals and the public. Key features need to be addressed when developing future guidelines and interventions in order to improve their implementation. Consistency in experts' views across countries indicates the potential for the development of interventions which could be implemented on a multinational scale with widespread support from key opinion leaders.

  16. Developing a questionnaire to identify perceived barriers for implementing the Dutch physical therapy COPD clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines have been developed to assist healthcare practitioners in clinical decision making. Publication of clinical practice guidelines does not automatically lead to their uptake and barrier identification has been recognized as an important step in implementation planning. This study aimed at developing a questionnaire to identify perceived barriers for implementing the Dutch COPD guideline for physical therapists and its recommended measurement instruments. Methods An overall questionnaire, based on two existing questionnaires, was constructed to identify barriers and facilitators for implementing the COPD guideline. The construct of the questionnaire was assessed in a cross-sectional study among 246 chest physical therapists. Factor analysis was conducted to explore underlying dimensions. Psychometric properties were analyzed using Cronbach’s alpha. Barriers and facilitators were assessed using descriptive statistics. Results Some 139 physical therapists (57%) responded. Factor analysis revealed 4-factor and 5-factor solutions with an explained variance of 36% and 39% respectively. Cronbach’s alpha of the overall questionnaire was 0.90, and varied from 0.66 to 0.92 for the different factors. Underlying domains of the 5-factor solution were characterized as: attitude towards using measurement instruments, knowledge and skills of the physical therapist, applicability of the COPD guideline, required investment of time & money, and patient characteristics. Physical therapists showed a positive attitude toward using the COPD guideline. Main barriers for implementation were required time investment and financial constraints. Conclusions The construct of the questionnaire revealed relevant underlying domains for the identification of barriers and facilitators for implementing the COPD guideline. The questionnaire allowed for tailoring to the target group and may be used across health care professionals as basis for in-depth analysis

  17. Research and guidelines for implementing Fatigue Risk Management Systems for the French regional airlines.

    PubMed

    Cabon, Philippe; Deharvengt, Stephane; Grau, Jean Yves; Maille, Nicolas; Berechet, Ion; Mollard, Régis

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes research that aims to provide the overall scientific basis for implementation of a Fatigue Risk Management System (FRMS) for French regional airlines. The current research has evaluated the use of different tools and indicators that would be relevant candidates for integration into the FRMS. For the Fatigue Risk Management component, results show that biomathematical models of fatigue are useful tools to help an airline to prevent fatigue related to roster design and for the management of aircrew planning. The Fatigue Safety assurance includes two monitoring processes that have been evaluated during this research: systematic monitoring and focused monitoring. Systematic monitoring consists of the analysis of existing safety indicators such as Air Safety Reports (ASR) and Flight Data Monitoring (FDM). Results show a significant relationship between the hours of work and the frequency of ASR. Results for the FDM analysis show that some events are significantly related to the fatigue risk associated with the hours of works. Focused monitoring includes a website survey and specific in-flight observations and data collection. Sleep and fatigue measurements have been collected from 115 aircrews over 12-day periods (including rest periods). Before morning duties, results show a significant sleep reduction of up to 40% of the aircrews' usual sleep needs leading to a clear increase of fatigue during flights. From these results, specific guidelines are developed to help the airlines to implement the FRMS and for the airworthiness to oversight the implementation of the FRMS process.

  18. Randomized Controlled Trials in Music Therapy: Guidelines for Design and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Bradt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) plays a powerful role in today's healthcare industry. At the same time, it is important that multiple types of evidence contribute to music therapy's knowledge base and that the dialogue of clinical effectiveness in music therapy is not dominated by the biomedical hierarchical model of evidence-based practice. Whether or not one agrees with the hierarchical model of evidence in the current healthcare climate, RCTs can contribute important knowledge to our field. Therefore, it is important that music therapists are prepared to design trials that meet current methodological standards and, equally important, are able to respond appropriately to those design aspects that may not be feasible in music therapy research. To provide practical guidelines to music therapy researchers for the design and implementation of RCTs as well as to enable music therapists to be well-informed consumers of RCT evidence. This article reviews key design aspects of RCTs and discusses how to best implement these standards in music therapy trials. A systematic presentation of basic randomization methods, allocation concealment strategies, issues related to blinding in music therapy trials and strategies for implementation, the use of treatment manuals, types of control groups, outcome selection, and sample size computation is provided. Despite the challenges of meeting all key design demands typical of an RCT, it is possible to design rigorous music therapy RCTs that accurately estimate music therapy treatment benefits.

  19. Implementation of an Evidence Based Guideline for Assessment and Documentation of the Civil Commitment Process.

    PubMed

    Perrigo, Tabitha L; Williams, Kimberly A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to implement an evidence-based practice guideline for assessment and documentation of the civil commitment process. Participants included six civil commitment examiners who conduct court ordered psychiatric evaluations at two crisis intervention centers in rural area of southeaster state. Data collection was conducted utilizing a chart audit tool both pre and post intervention of 100 civil commitment evaluations. The intervention included the development of an evidenced based form for documentation of civil commitment evaluations and a one on one educational training session was conducted for each participant. Descriptive statistics (t test) was utilized to analyze the data collected. The project demonstrated a significant increase as 25.5 % of evaluations contained the America Psychiatric Association's recommended 11 domains of assessment prior to implementation compared to 65.6 % (p value = 0.018) post implementation. Moreover, participants with family practice training showed an increase in commitment rates from 60 to 77.3 % (p value = 0.066). Whereas, psychiatric trained participants showed a decrease from 83.75 to 77.66 % (p value = 0.38). Demonstrating that court ordered evaluations guided by a standardized form based on evidence affected examiners recommendations for commitments.

  20. Prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection: implementation strategies of international guidelines1

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Vera Lúcia Fonseca; Fernandes, Filipa Alexandra Veludo

    2016-01-01

    Objective to describe strategies used by health professionals on the implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for the prevention of urinary infection related to catheterism. Method systematic review on literature based on data from CINAHL(r), Nursing & Allied Health Collection, Cochrane Plus Collection, MedicLatina, MEDLINE(r), Academic Search Complete, ACS - American Chemical Society, Health Reference Center Academic, Nursing Reference Center, ScienceDirect Journals and Wiley Online Library. A sample of 13 articles was selected. Results studies have highlighted the decrease of urinary tract infection related to catheterism through reminder systems to decrease of people submitted to urinary catheterism, audits about nursing professionals practice and bundles expansion. Conclusion the present review systemizes the knowledge of used strategies by health professionals on introduction to international recommendations, describing a rate decrease of such infection in clinical practice. PMID:27027676

  1. [Electronic medical handbooks--are they suitable for implementation of guidelines in health care?].

    PubMed

    Grimsmo, Anders

    2006-09-21

    The Directorate for Health and Social Affairs commissioned a project to evaluate the distribution and use of a Norwegian electronic medical handbook (NEL). NEL uses multimedia techniques and is distributed on a CD twice a year. A questionnaire about the use of NEL was given to 91 medical students. Health professionals at two hospitals and 12 health centres were interviewed. The use of the electronic handbook differed more within than between groups of professionals. NEL is applied for three main purposes: decision support, quality assurance and as a source for information pamphlets designed for patients. The professionals believed that NEL has contributed to patients' receiving more information and more uniform treatment. Criticism was made about the price and for the lack of integration with the electronic patient record. The study has revealed some barriers to implementation and use of electronic information sources. Under certain circumstances an electronic handbook might be suitable way for authorities and others to distribute professional guidelines.

  2. Measure Guideline: Implementing a Plenum Truss for a Compact Air Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2013-10-01

    This Measure Guideline presents the steps to implement a compact duct system inside an attic bulkhead (plenum truss) of a one-story, slab-on-grade (SOG) home. In a compact duct design, ductwork runs are reduced in length to yield a smaller and more compact duct system. Less energy will be lost through ductwork if the ducts are contained within the thermal enclosure of the house. These measures are intended for the production builder working to meet the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) requirements and keep the ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house. This measure of bringing the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment and ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house is appropriate for the builder wishing to avoid cathedralizing the insulation in the attic space (i.e., locating it at the underside of the roof deck rather than along the attic floor) or adding dropped soffits.

  3. Measure Guideline: Implementing a Plenum Truss for a Compact Air Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2013-10-01

    This Measure Guideline presents the steps to implement a compact duct system inside an attic bulkhead (plenum truss) of a one-story, slab-on-grade home. In a compact duct design, ductwork runs are reduced in length to yield a smaller and more compact duct system. Less energy will be lost through ductwork if the ducts are contained within the thermal enclosure of the house. These measures are intended for the production builder working to meet the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) requirements and keep the ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house. This measure of bringing the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment and ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house is appropriate for the builder wishing to avoid cathedralizing the insulation in the attic space (i.e., locating it at the underside of the roof deck rather than along the attic floor) or adding dropped soffits.

  4. European Commission project: European Guideline for Target Group-Oriented Psychosocial Aftercare-Implementation.

    PubMed

    Vymetal, Stepan; Deistler, Albert; Bering, Robert; Schedlich, Claudia; Rooze, Magda; Orengo, Francisco; Zurek, Gisela; Krtickova, Michaela

    2011-06-01

    After disasters, the individual health and well-being of first responders and affected population are affected for years. Therefore, psychosocial help is needed. Although most victims recover on their own, a minority of survivors, members of rescue teams, or relatives develop long-term, disaster-related psychic disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This subgroup especially should receive timely and appropriate psychosocial help. Many European countries offer post-disaster psychosocial care from a variety of caregivers (i.e., professionals and volunteers, non-governmental organizations, church or commercial organizations). Therefore, European standards for providing post-disaster psychosocial support currently is required. This article describes the project European Guideline for Target Group-Oriented Psychosocial Aftercare-Implementation, supported by the European Commission.

  5. Visual Image Sensor Organ Replacement: Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, A. David (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Method and system for enhancing or extending visual representation of a selected region of a visual image, where visual representation is interfered with or distorted, by supplementing a visual signal with at least one audio signal having one or more audio signal parameters that represent one or more visual image parameters, such as vertical and/or horizontal location of the region; region brightness; dominant wavelength range of the region; change in a parameter value that characterizes the visual image, with respect to a reference parameter value; and time rate of change in a parameter value that characterizes the visual image. Region dimensions can be changed to emphasize change with time of a visual image parameter.

  6. Implementing the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research pain management pediatric guideline in a multicultural practice setting.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, L; Voigtman, J; Mills, H

    1997-02-01

    This article describes the implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of a clinical practice guideline for managing pediatric patient pain. The standard of care used was the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research acute pain management guideline. It was used to assess current levels of care and to make recommendations for improvements. Information was gathered from a sample of 240 pediatric patients aged 1 week to 14 years. Recommendations for improving care are given. The guideline was found to be clinically useful as a general standard of care, but more work needs to be done to individualize care for specific populations, age groups, and cultures.

  7. Guideline implementation and patient-tailoring strategies to improve medication adherence for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Teresa J; Owen, Richard R; Thrush, Carol R; Armitage, Tracey L; Thapa, Purushottam

    2008-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of an intervention to promote medication adherence. Data were collected for adults with exacerbation of schizophrenia who were treated at one of 6 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers (VAMCs) in 3 regional VA networks (Veterans Integrated Service Networks [VISNs]) from March 1999 to October 2000. All 6 VAMCs received a basic guideline implementation strategy for medication management of schizophrenia using usual VA procedures. One VAMC within each VISN was randomly selected to receive an enhanced implementation strategy designed to promote guideline-concordant prescribing by physicians and medication adherence by patients. In the enhanced strategy, a research nurse worked with study participants to identify medication adherence barriers and to develop patient-specific strategies to overcome those barriers. Participants (N = 349) were interviewed at enrollment and 6 months later, using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale, and the Schizophrenia Outcomes Module (SCHIZOM). Medication adherence was measured via subjects' self-report, using the SCHIZOM, and from data abstracted from medical records. Participants were primarily male (94%) and nonwhite (69%, primarily African American) with a mean age of 46 years. Medication adherence at follow-up was modeled using logistic regression, controlling for adherence at baseline, demographic characteristics, PANSS total score, akathisia at baseline, family history of mental illness, and substance abuse. A logistic regression model for adherence at follow-up was significant (likelihood ratio = 52.72, df = 14, p < .0001). Patients enrolled at sites receiving the enhanced intervention were almost twice as likely to be adherent at follow-up. Those who were nonadherent at baseline were significantly less likely to be adherent at follow-up. In addition, adherence at follow-up was significantly

  8. Implementation of EU discharge guidelines at IVAR's Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant of North Jaeren, Stavanger, Norway.

    PubMed

    Tornes, O

    2001-01-01

    Norway is a leading country on wastewater treatment comprising chemical precipitation processes. This is because Norwegian effluent standards to the North Sea have traditionally focused on phosphorus removal. In most cases, chemical treatment therefore has been considered to give lower investment and operating costs than biological treatment. Norwegian wastewater policy and management is based on the EU guidelines resulting from the EEA (European Economic Area) Agreement. According to the 1991 Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive, this will in most cases require secondary treatment. However, primary treatment can be accepted for plants larger than 10,000 PT with effluents to less sensitive coastal areas, if no negative environmental impacts can be proved. The main objective of the Regional Water, Sewerage and Waste Company (IVAR) is to comply with the prevailing effluent limits at lowest possible cost. During the past four years, IVAR has therefore undertaken comprehensive optimising of the precipitation process including full-scale experiments with different coagulant dosing control systems and different types of coagulants. IVAR also accomplished a feasibility study of introducing biological treatment as an alternative to chemical treatment. Under the prevailing frame conditions of discharge requirements and sludge deposit costs, it is not economically feasible to change to organic coagulants or biological treatment. This conclusion might have to be altered resulting from the implementation of new EU regulations and increasing sludge deposit costs. This paper presents results from full-scale experiments, extracts from the feasibility study and a comparison of costs. Furthermore, the practical consequences of implementing the EU-guidelines are discussed.

  9. From the EBM pyramid to the Greek temple: a new conceptual approach to Guidelines as implementation tools in mental health.

    PubMed

    Salvador-Carulla, L; Lukersmith, S; Sullivan, W

    2017-04-01

    Guideline methods to develop recommendations dedicate most effort around organising discovery and corroboration knowledge following the evidence-based medicine (EBM) framework. Guidelines typically use a single dimension of information, and generally discard contextual evidence and formal expert knowledge and consumer's experiences in the process. In recognition of the limitations of guidelines in complex cases, complex interventions and systems research, there has been significant effort to develop new tools, guides, resources and structures to use alongside EBM methods of guideline development. In addition to these advances, a new framework based on the philosophy of science is required. Guidelines should be defined as implementation decision support tools for improving the decision-making process in real-world practice and not only as a procedure to optimise the knowledge base of scientific discovery and corroboration. A shift from the model of the EBM pyramid of corroboration of evidence to the use of broader multi-domain perspective graphically depicted as 'Greek temple' could be considered. This model takes into account the different stages of scientific knowledge (discovery, corroboration and implementation), the sources of knowledge relevant to guideline development (experimental, observational, contextual, expert-based and experiential); their underlying inference mechanisms (deduction, induction, abduction, means-end inferences) and a more precise definition of evidence and related terms. The applicability of this broader approach is presented for the development of the Canadian Consensus Guidelines for the Primary Care of People with Developmental Disabilities.

  10. Implementation of national palliative care guidelines in Swedish acute care hospitals: A qualitative content analysis of stakeholders' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lind, S; Wallin, L; Brytting, T; Fürst, C J; Sandberg, J

    2017-09-21

    In high-income countries a large proportion of all deaths occur in hospitals. A common way to translate knowledge into clinical practice is developing guidelines for different levels of health care organisations. During 2012, national clinical guidelines for palliative care were published in Sweden. Later, guidance for palliative care was issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare. The aim of this study was two-fold: to investigate perceptions regarding these guidelines and identify obstacles and opportunities for implementation of them in acute care hospitals. Interviews were conducted with local politicians, chief medical officers and health professionals at acute care hospitals. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research was used in a directed content analysis approach. The results showed little knowledge of the two documents at all levels of the health care organisation. Palliative care was primarily described as end of life care and only few of the participants talked about the opportunity to integrate palliative care early in a disease trajectory. The environment and culture at hospitals, characterised by quick decisions and actions, were perceived as obstacles to implementation. Health professionals' expressed need for palliative care training is an opportunity for implementation of clinical guidelines. There is a need for further implementation of palliative care in hospitals. One option for further research is to evaluate implementation strategies tailored to acute care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of inpatient bronchiolitis clinical practice guideline implementation on testing and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Vineeta; Hall, Matt; Morse, Rustin; Wilson, Karen M; Mussman, Grant; Hain, Paul; Montalbano, Amanda; Parikh, Kavita; Mahant, Sanjay; Shah, Samir S

    2014-09-01

    To determine the association between institutional inpatient clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for bronchiolitis and the use of diagnostic tests and treatments. A multicenter retrospective cohort study of infants aged 29 days to 24 months with a discharge diagnosis of bronchiolitis was conducted between July 2011 and June 2012. An electronic survey was sent to quality improvement leaders to determine the presence, duration, and method of CPG implementation at participating hospitals. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to perform bivariate comparisons between hospitals with CPGs and those without CPGs. Multivariable analysis was used to determine associations between CPG characteristics and the use of tests and treatments; analyses were clustered by hospital. The response rate to our electronic survey was 77% (33 of 43 hospitals). The majority (85%) had an institutional bronchiolitis CPG in place. Hospitals with a CPG had universal agreement regarding recommendations against routine tests and treatments. The presence of a CPG was not associated with significant reductions in the use of tests and treatments (eg, complete blood count, chest radiography, bronchodilator use, steroid and antibiotic use). A longer interval duration since CPG implementation and presence of an easily accessible online CPG document were associated with significant reductions in the performance of complete blood count and chest radiography and the use of corticosteroids. Other implementation factors demonstrated mixed results. Most children's hospitals have an institutional bronchiolitis CPG in place. The content of these CPGs is largely uniform in practice recommendations against tests and treatments. The presence of institutional CPGs did not significantly reduce the ordering of tests and treatments. Online accessibility of a written CPG and prolonged duration of implementation reduce tests and treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Applying the knowledge to action framework to plan a strategy for implementing breast cancer screening guidelines: an interprofessional perspective.

    PubMed

    Munce, Sarah; Kastner, Monika; Cramm, Heidi; Lal, Shalini; Deschêne, Sarah-Maude; Auais, Mohammad; Stacey, Dawn; Brouwers, Melissa

    2013-09-01

    Integrated knowledge translation (IKT) interventions may be one solution to improving the uptake of clinical guidelines. IKT research initiatives are particularly relevant for breast cancer research and initiatives targeting the implementation of clinical guidelines and guideline implementation initiatives, where collaboration with an interdisciplinary team of practitioners, patients, caregivers, and policy makers is needed for producing optimum patient outcomes. The objective of this paper was to describe the process of developing an IKT strategy that could be used by guideline developers to improve the uptake of their new clinical practice guidelines on breast cancer screening. An interprofessional group of students as well as two faculty members met six times over three days at the KT Canada Summer Institute in 2011. The team used all of the phases of the action cycle in the Knowledge to Action Framework as an organizing framework. While the entire framework was used, the step involving assessing barriers to knowledge use was judged to be particularly relevant in anticipating implementation problems and being able to inform the specific KT interventions that would be appropriate to mitigate these challenges and to accomplish goals and outcomes. This activity also underscored the importance of group process and teamwork in IKT. We propose that an a priori assessment of barriers to knowledge use (i.e., level and corresponding barriers), along with the other phases of the Knowledge to Action Framework, is a strategic approach for KT strategy development, implementation, and evaluation planning and could be used in the future planning of KT strategies.

  13. Policy principles and implementation guidelines for private sector participation in the water sector--a step towards better results.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, D; Frei, U; Brugger, F

    2005-01-01

    To achieve the Millennium Development Goals, all partners (public, private, NGOs) must be engaged for improving and expanding the water supply and sanitation services. Yet, high transaction costs, unclear role allocation and lack of trust and commitment put Private Sector Participation (PSP) at risk. The initiative "Policy Principles and Implementation Guidelines for Private Sector Participation in Sustainable Water Supply and Sanitation" contributes to equitable, effective, ecological and efficient PSP projects. Based on a multi stakeholder process, the Policy Principles are offering an open and transparent framework for the negotiation of valid, widely accepted and action-oriented solutions, while the Implementation Guidelines focus on success factors for building partnerships on the operational level.

  14. Testing of hardware implementation of infrared image enhancing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulski, R.; Sosnowski, T.; PiÄ tkowski, T.; Trzaskawka, P.; Kastek, M.; Kucharz, J.

    2012-10-01

    The interpretation of IR images depends on radiative properties of observed objects and surrounding scenery. Skills and experience of an observer itself are also of great importance. The solution to improve the effectiveness of observation is utilization of algorithm of image enhancing capable to improve the image quality and the same effectiveness of object detection. The paper presents results of testing the hardware implementation of IR image enhancing algorithm based on histogram processing. Main issue in hardware implementation of complex procedures for image enhancing algorithms is high computational cost. As a result implementation of complex algorithms using general purpose processors and software usually does not bring satisfactory results. Because of high efficiency requirements and the need of parallel operation, the ALTERA's EP2C35F672 FPGA device was used. It provides sufficient processing speed combined with relatively low power consumption. A digital image processing and control module was designed and constructed around two main integrated circuits: a FPGA device and a microcontroller. Programmable FPGA device performs image data processing operations which requires considerable computing power. It also generates the control signals for array readout, performs NUC correction and bad pixel mapping, generates the control signals for display module and finally executes complex image processing algorithms. Implemented adaptive algorithm is based on plateau histogram equalization. Tests were performed on real IR images of different types of objects registered in different spectral bands. The simulations and laboratory experiments proved the correct operation of the designed system in executing the sophisticated image enhancement.

  15. Factors impeding the implementation of cardiovascular prevention guidelines: findings from a survey conducted by the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ian M; Stewart, Murray; Hertog, Michaël G L

    2006-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease mortality remains high in Europe and many patients have elevated risk factors, despite evidence-based targets and treatment guidelines. This survey examined barriers to implementing cardiovascular risk reduction guidelines. We conducted a semi-structured market research survey of physicians. The survey was conducted in six European countries among cardiologists and primary care physicians. In total, 67 questions were used: 35 had multiple choice answers (prompted) and 32 allowed any answer (unprompted). Respondents were working full-time in patient care (>or=3 years experience) and were in a position to initiate cardiovascular drug treatment. Of the 220 respondents (155 primary care physicians, 65 cardiologists), most (85%) based assessment of cardiovascular risk on all risk factors, reflecting a global approach to risk, rather than considering risk factors individually. A majority (62%) used subjective assessments for establishing global risk rather than guidelines or risk calculators. The most common unprompted barrier to guideline implementation was patient compliance (36%) and a lack of time (23%), and when prompted, the most important was government health policy (40%). The most common unprompted suggestion for improving implementation were financial opportunities (24%) and clear and easy to use guidelines (23%), while when prompted the most important change required was the development of simpler guidelines (46%). Although a majority of physicians are aware of the need to look at a combination of cardiovascular disease risk factors, less than half use guidelines or risk calculators to determine total risk. It is recommended that guidelines need to be simpler and easier to use and supplemented with (patient friendly) risk calculators.

  16. Assessment of quality guidelines implementation using a continuous quality improvement programme.

    PubMed

    Richards, Nick; Ayala, Juan Antonio; Cesare, Salvatore; Chazot, Charles; Di Benedetto, Attilio; Gassia, Jean-Paul; Merello, Jose-Ignacio; Rentero, Ramon; Scatizzi, Laura; Marcelli, Daniele

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) study suggest that the level of implementation of the European Best Practice Guidelines (EBPG) is at best partial. The main aim of this study is to describe the level of implementation of the EBPG in the European Fresenius Medical Care (FME) clinic network. Data presented in this investigation were gained through the FME database EuCliD (European Clinical Database). Patient data from 4 countries (Great Britain, France, Italy, Spain) were selected from the EuCliD database. The parameters chosen were haemodialysis adequacy, biocompatibility, anaemia control and serum phosphate control, which are surrogate indicators for quality of care. They were compared, by country, between the first quarter (Q1) 2002 and the fourth quarter (Q4) 2005. During Q1 2002 and Q4 2005, respectively, a total of 7,067 and 9,232 patients were treated in FME clinics located in France, Italy, Spain and the UK. This study confirms variations in haemodialysis practices between countries as already described by the DOPPS study. A large proportion of patients in each country achieved the targets recommended by the EBPG in Q4 2005 and this represented a significant improvement over the results achieved in Q1 2002. Differences in practices between countries still exist. The FME CQI programme allows some of these differences to be overcome leading to an improvement in the quality of the treatment delivered. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Developing and implementing the Active Design Guidelines in New York City.

    PubMed

    Lee, Karen K

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a leading cause of death in the United States and globally and is also associated with several additional leading causes of death, including obesity, high blood pressure and high blood glucose. The built environment plays a critical role in promoting or discouraging physical activity among adults and children. To create a healthier and more physically active city, a working group comprising several New York City agencies, including the Departments of Design and Construction, Health and Mental Hygiene, Transportation and City Planning, and in collaboration with design organizations and academics, published the Active Design Guidelines (ADG; ) in January 2010. The ADG is a manual of evidence-based and best-practice strategies for increasing physical activity in the design and construction of neighborhoods, streets and buildings. The commentary discusses key activities and events leading up to the publication as well as current implementation activities. It also shares the lessons learned that could assist other communities interested in improving their built environments in developing and implementing similar activities and initiatives. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Implementation and evaluation of vancomycin nomogram guidelines in a computerized prescriber-order-entry system.

    PubMed

    McCluggage, Lauren; Lee, Kimberly; Potter, Teresa; Dugger, Richard; Pakyz, Amy

    2010-01-01

    The implementation and evaluation of vancomycin nomogram guidelines in a computerized prescriber-order-entry (CPOE) system are described. Initial vancomycin orders for patients over age 18 years who received vancomycin between August 1 and September 30, 2006 (preimplementation), and between March 1 and April 30, 2007 (postimplementation), were compared with vancomycin nomogram recommendations to determine if the vancomycin regimen ordered coincided with the nomogram recommendation. The numbers of regimen changes and vancomycin serum concentrations measured during the first five days of therapy were also assessed. A multivariate logistic regression model assessed independent predictors of an initial vancomycin order that met the nomogram recommendation A total of 522 vancomycin orders were included in the analysis (279 in the preimplementation group and 243 in the postimplementation group). A significant difference was observed in the percentage of initial vancomycin orders that met nomogram recommendations in the postimplementation group compared with the preimplementation group (36% versus 24%, p = 0.0028). No difference was noted between the two groups in the number of regimen changes or serum vancomycin concentrations measured during the first five days of therapy. In a multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.02) and weight (p < 0.0001) were negatively associated with a vancomycin order that met nomogram recommendations, while the postimplementation group was positively associated with an order that met nomogram recommendations (p = 0.001). A vancomycin nomogram implemented into a CPOE system increased the likelihood of patients receiving an initial vancomycin regimen that coincided with the nomogram's recommendations.

  19. FPGA implementation of image enhancement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Karan; Jain, Aditya; Srivastava, Atul Kumar

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this paper is designing, modeling, simulation and synthesis of four Image Enhancement techniques on FPGA. Image Enhancement Algorithms can be classified as point processing Techniques, in which operation is done on pixel level and Spatial Filtering Technique, in which operation is performed within neighborhood of a pixel. Algorithms of all the techniques are studied and hardware circuits are realized for them. Then hardware logic is modeled in Matlab Simulink using Xilinx System Generator Block set and synthesized onto Virtex4 xc4vsx35-10ff668 FPGA chip. Using hardware co-simulation feature of FPGA kit, the algorithms developed are validated.

  20. Changing Current Practice in Urology: Improving Guideline Development and Implementation Through Stakeholder Engagement.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Sara J; MacLennan, Steven; Bex, Axel; Catto, James W F; De Santis, Maria; Glaser, Adam W; Ljungberg, Borje; N'Dow, James; Plass, Karin; Trapero-Bertran, Marta; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Wright, Penny; Giles, Rachel H

    2017-08-01

    Effective stakeholder integration for guideline development should improve outcomes and adherence to clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Connecting Marketing and Implementation Research and Library Program Development: A Case Study of the Implementation of [U.S.] National Guidelines and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Ken; Cavill, Pat

    This case study examined: (1) what market research is required for planning for the implementation of "Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning," the 1998 national guidelines for effective school library media programs; (2) what issues need to be addressed and what target audiences are required to effect change, as well as…

  2. Improved neurologic outcome after implementing evidence-based guidelines for cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Suojaranta-Ylinen, Raili Tuulikki; Roine, Risto Olavi; Vento, Antti Erland; Niskanen, Minnaliisa Marikki; Salmenperä, Markku Tapani

    2007-08-01

    A high incidence of neurologic complications was observed in the year 2001 in cardiac surgical patients in this department. This article attempts to show the impact of changing and optimizing management protocols on the incidence of neurologic morbidity after cardiac surgery. An observational study of cardiac surgical patients. University hospital. All cardiac surgical patients treated postoperatively in the cardiac surgical ICU in 2001 (n = 1,165, control group) and in 2003 (n = 1,222, intervention group) were evaluated. A quality improvement program started at the beginning of 2002, based on the Task Force Committee Guidelines, included surgical and cardiopulmonary bypass recommendations as well as peri- and postoperative care (eg, use of epiaortic echo and strict perfusion protocol, avoidance of hyperthermia and hyperglycemia, and minimization of cerebral edema). The number of neurologic complications decreased from 78 (6.7%) in 2001 to 33 (2.7%) in 2003 (p < 0.01), and corresponding numbers for ICU mortality were 44 (3.8%) and 24 (2.0%) (p < 0.01). The length of ICU stay also decreased (3.2 +/- 4.5 days in 2001 v 2.9 +/- 5.5 days in 2003, p < 0.001). In 2001, patients with neurologic complications consumed 853 ICU patient days (23% of all ICU patient days) and, in 2003, 549 (15% of all ICU patient days). According to logistic regression analysis that included 11 independent variables (treatment year, EuroSCORE, diabetes mellitus, history of stroke, and 7 different types of surgery), treatment in 2003 was independently associated with decreased risk for neurologic complications (odds ratio 0.30, 95% confidence intervals 0.19-0.47, p < 0.001). The occurrences of neurologic complications, mortality, and ICU resource consumption by this patient group decreased after implementation of an optimized management protocol and evidence-based guidelines.

  3. Implementation of clinical practice guidelines for upper respiratory infection in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Apisitwittaya, Wisit

    2004-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of implementing clinical practice guidelines (CPG) on antibiotic prescribing for adults with upper respiratory infection (URI) in terms of the changes in diagnosis and prevalence and patterns of antibiotic prescribing. The CPG on antibiotic treatments for adults with URI published in the Annals of Internal Medicine 2001; 134: 479-52 were considered to be of high quality and applicable to Thai patients. A one-page clinical practice protocol in Thai was prepared from these guidelines. The dissemination strategy provided CPG and clinical practice protocol to 12 general practitioners in Siriraj Social Security Program in Bangkok during interactive educational meetings in April 2001. The information on 837 URI episodes from January to March (pre-CPG phase) and 774 URI episodes during May to July (post-CPG phase) were extracted from the patients' medical records. Telephone follow up for patients without antibiotics in the post-CPG phase was also attempted. Changes in the post-CPG period included (1) The diagnosis of URI was used less frequently whereas the diagnosis of common cold, pharyngitis and acute bronchitis were used more frequently (p<0.05). (2) Antibiotic use fell from 74.0% to 44.1% (p<0.001). (3) Fewer prescriptions for amoxicillin, roxithromycin, co-trimoxazole and doxycycline, and more for penicillin V (p<0.05). Patients (n=97) not given antibiotics reported recovery in 83.5% and improvement in 16.5%. A locally prepared clinical practice protocol based on US CPG for appropriate antibiotic use for URI combined with interactive educational meetings is effective in promoting appropriate diagnosis and antibiotic therapy in an ambulatory setting in a tertiary care hospital in Thailand.

  4. [Guideline on diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis: imaging prior to appendectomy is recommended].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Olaf J; Go, Peter M N Y H; Puylaert, Julien B C M; Kazemier, Geert; Heij, Hugo A

    2010-01-01

    Every year, over 2500 unnecessary appendectomies are carried out in the Netherlands. At the initiative of the Dutch College of Surgeons, the evidence-based guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis was developed. This guideline recommends that appendectomy should not be carried out without prior imaging. Ultrasonography is the recommended imaging technique in patients with suspected appendicitis. After negative or inconclusive ultrasonography, a CT scan can be carried out. Appendectomy is the standard treatment for acute appendicitis; this can be done either by open or laparoscopic surgery. The first choice treatment of appendicular infiltrate is conservative treatment.

  5. Implementing treatment frequency and duration guidelines in a hospital-based pediatric outpatient setting: administrative case report.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Heather; Harrington, Ann Tokay; Nixon-Cave, Kim

    2015-04-01

    Determining treatment frequency and duration of physical therapist services is an important component of outpatient pediatric physical therapist practice, yet there is little research available to inform these decisions. Treatment frequency guidelines (TFG) can assist decision making in guiding pediatric physical therapy. The purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility and application of implementing TFG in hospital-based pediatric outpatient physical therapy. Previously developed TFG were modified for use in our pediatric outpatient physical therapy department to include duration and were referred to as treatment frequency and duration guidelines (TFDG). In order to successfully implement the TFDG, there were 2 phases to the project. In phase 1, the staff were provided the guidelines and procedures in a staff meeting and via email using a PowerPoint presentation. Phase 2 was initiated due to the poor response of the staff in implementing the guidelines in their practice after phase 1. The format was changed to include formal re-education via small-group and one-on-one education sessions (phase 2). Chart reviews were completed to assess therapists' adherence to using TFDG. Therapists' adherence to use of TFDG increased following re-education: phase 1 (n=225 charts, 31% adherence) and phase 2 (n=197 charts, 90% adherence). Treatment frequency and duration guidelines may assist in guiding frequency and duration decisions in pediatric physical therapy. Education via in-person meetings may improve adherence among staff. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  6. Implementation of the NCSS Guidelines for Teaching Science-Related Social Issues: Exemplar Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Robert A., Ed.

    This document contains the Guidelines for Teaching Science-Related Social Issues adopted in 1982 by the National Council for the Social Studies and 10 examplar lessons each keyed to particular guidelines and drawing upon contemporary issues. The premise upon which the guidelines are based is that science is a social issue and that the examination…

  7. Implementation of the NCSS Guidelines for Teaching Science-Related Social Issues: Exemplar Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Robert A., Ed.

    This document contains the Guidelines for Teaching Science-Related Social Issues adopted in 1982 by the National Council for the Social Studies and 10 examplar lessons each keyed to particular guidelines and drawing upon contemporary issues. The premise upon which the guidelines are based is that science is a social issue and that the examination…

  8. Comparison between two super-resolution implementations in PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guoping; Pan, Tinsu; Qiao, Feng; Clark, John W; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2009-04-01

    Super-resolution (SR) techniques are used in PET imaging to generate a high-resolution image by combining multiple low-resolution images that have been acquired from different points of view (POV). In this article, the authors propose a novel implementation of the SR technique whereby the required multiple low-resolution images are generated by shifting the reconstruction pixel grid during the image reconstruction process rather than being acquired from different POVs. The objective of this article is to compare the performances of the two SR implementations using theoretical and experimental studies. A mathematical framework is first provided to support the hypothesis that the two SR implementations have similar performance in current PET/CT scanners that use block detectors. Based on this framework, a simulation study, a point source study, and a NEMA/IEC phantom study were conducted to compare the performance of these two SR implementations with respect to contrast, resolution, noise, and SNR. For reference purposes, a comparison with a native reconstruction (NR) image using a high-resolution pixel grid was also performed. The mathematical framework showed that the two SR implementations are expected to achieve similar contrast and resolution but different noise contents. These results were confirmed by the simulation and experimental studies. The simulation study showed that the two SR implementations have an average contrast difference of 2.3%, while the point source study showed that their average differences in contrast and resolution were 0.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Comparisons between the SR and NR images for the point source study showed that the NR image exhibited averages of 30% and 8% lower contrast and resolution, respectively. The NEMA/IEC phantom study showed that the three images (two SR and NR) exhibited different noise structures. The SNR of the new SR implementation was, on average, 21.5% lower than the original implementation largely due to an

  9. Multifaceted implementation of stroke prevention guidelines in primary care: cluster‐randomised evaluation of clinical and cost effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John; Bibby, John; Eastham, Joe; Harrison, Stephen; McGeorge, Maureen; Patterson, Chris; Price, Nick; Russell, Daphne; Russell, Ian; Small, Neil; Walsh, Matt; Young, John

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical and cost effectiveness of implementing evidence‐based guidelines for the prevention of stroke. Design Cluster‐randomised trial Setting Three primary care organisations in the North of England covering a population of 400 000. Participants Seventy six primary care teams in four clusters: North, South & West, City I and City II. Intervention Guidelines for the management of patients with atrial fibrillation and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) were developed and implemented using a multifaceted approach including evidence‐based recommendations, audit and feedback, interactive educational sessions, patient prompts and outreach visits. Outcomes Identification and appropriate treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation or TIA, and cost effectiveness. Results Implementation led to 36% increase (95% CI 4% to 78%) in diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, and improved treatment of TIA (odds ratio of complying with guidelines 1.8; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.8). Combined analysis of atrial fibrillation and TIA estimates that compliance was significantly greater (OR 1.46 95% CI 1.10 to 1.94) in the condition for which practices had received the implementation programme. The development and implementation of guidelines cost less than £1500 per practice. The estimated costs per quality‐adjusted life year gained by patients with atrial fibrillation or TIA were both less than £2000, very much less than the usual criterion for cost effectiveness. Conclusions Implementation of evidence‐based guidelines improved the quality of primary care for atrial fibrillation and TIA. The intervention was feasible and very cost effective. Key components of the model include contextual analysis, strong professional support, clear recommendations based on robust evidence, simplicity of adoption, good communication and use of established networks and opinion leaders. PMID:17301206

  10. Guidelines to Update Images of Women in Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fjeldsted, Margaret, Ed.

    Input from 25 media groups, including the Screen Actors Guild and American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), considered the image of women on television and radio as part of public hearings held by the California Commission on the Status of Women. Presentations included here touch on the citizen's role in assuring fair treatment…

  11. "Choosing Wisely" Imaging Recommendations: Initial Implementation in New England Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Raja, Ali S; Venkatesh, Arjun; Mick, Nathan; Zabbo, Cristopher P; Hasegawa, Kohei; Espinola, Janice A; Bittner, Jane C; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-04-01

    In June 2016, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Emergency Quality Network began its Reduce Avoidable Imaging Initiative, designed to "reduce testing and imaging with low risk patients through the implementation of Choosing Wisely recommendations." However, it is unknown whether New England emergency departments (ED) have already implemented evidence-based interventions to improve adherence to ACEP Choosing Wisely recommendations related to imaging after their initial release in 2013. Our objective was to determine this, as well as whether provider-specific audit and feedback for imaging had been implemented in these EDs. This survey study was exempt from institutional review board review. In 2015, we mailed surveys to 195 hospital-affiliated EDs in all six New England states to determine whether they had implemented Choosing Wisely-focused interventions in 2014. Initial mailings included cover letters denoting the endorsement of each state's ACEP chapter, and we followed up twice with repeat mailings to non-responders. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and a comparison of state differences using Fisher's exact test. A total of 169/195 (87%) of New England EDs responded, with all individual state response rates >80%. Overall, 101 (60%) of responding EDs had implemented an intervention for at least one Choosing Wisely imaging scenario; 57% reported implementing a specific guideline/policy/clinical pathway and 28% reported implementing a computerized decision support system. The most common interventions were for chest computed tomography (CT) in patients at low risk of pulmonary embolism (47% of EDs) and head CT in patients with minor trauma (45% of EDs). In addition, 40% of EDs had implemented provider-specific audit and feedback, without significant interstate variation (range: 29-55%). One year after release of the ACEP Choosing Wisely recommendations, most New England EDs had a guideline/policy/clinical pathway related to at least

  12. Implementation of swept synthetic aperture imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenus, Nick; Jakovljevic, Marko; Boctor, Emad; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging of deep targets is limited by the resolution of current ultrasound systems based on the available aperture size. We propose a system to synthesize an extended effective aperture in order to improve resolution and target detectability at depth using a precisely-tracked transducer swept across the region of interest. A Field II simulation was performed to demonstrate the swept aperture approach in both the spatial and frequency domains. The adaptively beam-formed system was tested experimentally using a volumetric transducer and an ex vivo canine abdominal layer to evaluate the impact of clutter-generating tissue on the resulting point spread function. Resolution was improved by 73% using a 30.8 degree sweep despite the presence of varying aberration across the array with an amplitude on the order of 100 ns. Slight variations were observed in the magnitude and position of side lobes compared to the control case, but overall image quality was not significantly degraded as compared by a simulation based on the experimental point spread function. We conclude that the swept aperture imaging system may be a valuable tool for synthesizing large effective apertures using conventional ultrasound hardware.

  13. Taking the next step to privacy compliance for hospitals: implementing the OHA guidelines.

    PubMed

    Beardwood, John

    2003-01-01

    The recently released "Guidelines for Managing Privacy, Data Protection and Security for Ontario Hospitals," prepared by the Ontario Hospital eHealth Council Privacy and Security Working Group (the "Guidelines") are useful in that they provide a comprehensive overview of the types of issues raised for hospitals by existing and pending privacy legislation, and a very high-level framework for addressing same. However, the Guidelines are, as stated high-level guidelines only,--leaving hospital management to grapple with the next big step towards privacy compliance: how to operationalize the Guidelines within their particular hospital.

  14. The Contestation of Citizenship Education at Three Stages of the LINC 4 & 5 Curriculum Guidelines: Production, Reception, and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert, Pinet

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights how citizenship and citizenship education are sites of contestation. I have analyzed the process of curriculum making of the LINC 4 & 5 Curriculum Guidelines (TCDSB, 1999) through three stages: from production, through reception, to implementation. The production stage is investigated by contrasting commentaries from…

  15. Outcomes of an Independent Review and Guidelines for the Implementation of a Program Review Model. Volume II. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvell Education Managment Planning, Inc., Los Angeles, CA.

    The second part of a report on a comprehensive review of the credit instructional programs offered by Pasadena City College (PCC), this volume contains a technical description of the data collection and assembly procedures used in the program review and provides guidelines for the implementation of the program review model. The first section…

  16. Implementing a clinical practice guideline for the treatment of bronchiolitis in a high-risk Hispanic pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Flores, Dora; Busen, Nancy H; Smout, Randall; Velasquez, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization among infants and young children. Because of its frequency, a clinical practice guideline for bronchiolitis was implemented in this population in an effort to decrease costs and the number of diagnostic evaluations performed and medications used without increasing length of stay or transfers to the pediatric intensive care unit. A retrospective chart review of 322 pediatric admissions to a rural community hospital was conducted (169 before guideline implementation and 153 after guideline implementation), and data were categorically stratified into three groups for comparison purposes. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data, with a p value < .05 defining significance. During the project period, patients with a mean age of 9.6 months were admitted to the hospital with bronchiolitis. Statistically significant decreases in cost per day and decreases in use of antibiotics and chest radiographs were achieved without increasing length of stay or pediatric intensive care unit transfers. This project demonstrated feasibility in implementing an evidence-based clinical practice guideline in a rural hospital to improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. EANM procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT and SPECT/CT: 2015 revision.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Hein J; Acampa, Wanda; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Ballinger, Jim; Bengel, Frank; De Bondt, Pieter; Buechel, Ronny R; Cuocolo, Alberto; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Flotats, Albert; Hacker, Marcus; Hindorf, Cecilia; Kaufmann, Philip A; Lindner, Oliver; Ljungberg, Michael; Lonsdale, Markus; Manrique, Alain; Minarik, David; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Trägårdh, Elin; de Wit, Tim C; Hesse, Birger

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in 2005, many small and some larger steps of progress have been made, improving MPI procedures. In this paper, the major changes from the updated 2015 procedural guidelines are highlighted, focusing on the important changes related to new instrumentation with improved image information and the possibility to reduce radiation exposure, which is further discussed in relation to the recent developments of new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Introduction of the selective coronary vasodilator regadenoson and the use of coronary CT-contrast agents for hybrid imaging with SPECT/CT angiography are other important areas for nuclear cardiology that were not included in the previous guidelines. A large number of minor changes have been described in more detail in the fully revised version available at the EANM home page: http://eanm.org/publications/guidelines/2015_07_EANM_FINAL_myocardial_perfusion_guideline.pdf .

  18. Evaluation of PROforma as a language for implementing medical guidelines in a practical context.

    PubMed

    Sutton, David R; Taylor, Paul; Earle, Kenneth

    2006-04-05

    PROforma is one of several languages that allow clinical guidelines to be expressed in a computer-interpretable manner. How these languages should be compared, and what requirements they should meet, are questions that are being actively addressed by a community of interested researchers. We have developed a system to allow hypertensive patients to be monitored and assessed without visiting their GPs (except in the most urgent cases). Blood pressure measurements are performed at the patients' pharmacies and a web-based system, created using PROforma, makes recommendations for continued monitoring, and/or changes in medication. The recommendations and measurements are transmitted electronically to a practitioner with authority to issue and change prescriptions. We evaluated the use of PROforma during the knowledge acquisition, analysis, design and implementation of this system. The analysis focuses on the logical adequacy, heuristic power, notational convenience, and explanation support provided by the PROforma language. PROforma proved adequate as a language for the implementation of the clinical reasoning required by this project. However a lack of notational convenience led us to use UML activity diagrams, rather than PROforma process descriptions, to create the models that were used during the knowledge acquisition and analysis phases of the project. These UML diagrams were translated into PROforma during the implementation of the project. The experience accumulated during this study highlighted the importance of structure preserving design, that is to say that the models used in the design and implementation of a knowledge-based system should be structurally similar to those created during knowledge acquisition and analysis. Ideally the same language should be used for all of these models. This means that great importance has to be attached to the notational convenience of these languages, by which we mean the ease with which they can be read, written, and

  19. Evaluation of PROforma as a language for implementing medical guidelines in a practical context

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, David R; Taylor, Paul; Earle, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Background PROforma is one of several languages that allow clinical guidelines to be expressed in a computer-interpretable manner. How these languages should be compared, and what requirements they should meet, are questions that are being actively addressed by a community of interested researchers. Methods We have developed a system to allow hypertensive patients to be monitored and assessed without visiting their GPs (except in the most urgent cases). Blood pressure measurements are performed at the patients' pharmacies and a web-based system, created using PROforma, makes recommendations for continued monitoring, and/or changes in medication. The recommendations and measurements are transmitted electronically to a practitioner with authority to issue and change prescriptions. We evaluated the use of PROforma during the knowledge acquisition, analysis, design and implementation of this system. The analysis focuses on the logical adequacy, heuristic power, notational convenience, and explanation support provided by the PROforma language. Results PROforma proved adequate as a language for the implementation of the clinical reasoning required by this project. However a lack of notational convenience led us to use UML activity diagrams, rather than PROforma process descriptions, to create the models that were used during the knowledge acquisition and analysis phases of the project. These UML diagrams were translated into PROforma during the implementation of the project. Conclusion The experience accumulated during this study highlighted the importance of structure preserving design, that is to say that the models used in the design and implementation of a knowledge-based system should be structurally similar to those created during knowledge acquisition and analysis. Ideally the same language should be used for all of these models. This means that great importance has to be attached to the notational convenience of these languages, by which we mean the ease with

  20. The service context for clinical guidelines: supporting guideline implementation by assuring and improving the quality of service in which clinicians work.

    PubMed

    Worrall, Adrian

    2011-08-01

    This paper argues that accreditation schemes and quality networks promote good contexts for the implementation of clinical guidelines. It raises questions about how organizational standards should be developed, structured and focused, how clinical guidelines and organizational standards should connect, how to practically increase the number of such schemes and their scope, and the role of professional bodies in this. There is a considerable amount of administration involved in running an accreditation scheme or quality network and there are risks involved in starting in new areas. One way forward is for professional bodies to partner to share risks and to build a common operating platform for the administration of the work across the professional bodies. This platform could be guided by topic experts within the bodies.

  1. Longwave hyperspectral imaging spectrometer design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Harold, Jr.; Yokoyama, Karen E.; Rasmussen, Kent; Engler, Tom; Rupert, Jim; Flegal, Bruce; Jarecke, Peter J.

    2003-12-01

    Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST), using internal funding, has designed, built and is testing a Long Wave Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer (LWHIS) that operates in the 8 to 12.5 micron band. This instrument was designed to be compatible with aircraft platforms so that flight data in this wavelength band can be used for phenomenological analysis. The instrument provides up to 256 contiguous spectral channels with 17 nm of dispersion per pixel (pixels are binned in normal operation to provide 128 spectral channels). The entrance aperture is 3.5 cm and feeds a F2/5 reflective triplet front end. The focal plane is a 256 x 256 array of 40 micron pixels which can be binned to form an 80 micron superpixel. With a fixed frame rate of 60 Hz, the instrument provides a ground sample distance of 1m at 1.1km altitude. This paper describes the physical characteristics of the design and presents the predicted performance based on NGST internal models. Design trades and test data will be presented. A more detailed look at the characterization and calibration of this instrument will be presented in a companion paper "Long Wave Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer -- System Characterization and Calibration."

  2. Longwave hyperspectral imaging spectrometer design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Harold, Jr.; Yokoyama, Karen E.; Rasmussen, Kent; Engler, Tom; Rupert, Jim; Flegal, Bruce; Jarecke, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST), using internal funding, has designed, built and is testing a Long Wave Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer (LWHIS) that operates in the 8 to 12.5 micron band. This instrument was designed to be compatible with aircraft platforms so that flight data in this wavelength band can be used for phenomenological analysis. The instrument provides up to 256 contiguous spectral channels with 17 nm of dispersion per pixel (pixels are binned in normal operation to provide 128 spectral channels). The entrance aperture is 3.5 cm and feeds a F2/5 reflective triplet front end. The focal plane is a 256 x 256 array of 40 micron pixels which can be binned to form an 80 micron superpixel. With a fixed frame rate of 60 Hz, the instrument provides a ground sample distance of 1m at 1.1km altitude. This paper describes the physical characteristics of the design and presents the predicted performance based on NGST internal models. Design trades and test data will be presented. A more detailed look at the characterization and calibration of this instrument will be presented in a companion paper "Long Wave Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer -- System Characterization and Calibration."

  3. Implementation of antibiotic use guidelines for fresh traumatic wound at Siriraj Hospital.

    PubMed

    Sirijatuphat, Rujipas; Choochan, Tanatchon; Siritongtaworn, Preecha; Sripojtham, Vipaporn; Thamlikitkul, Visanu

    2015-03-01

    To determine the effectiveness of implementing a clinical practice guideline (CPG) on antibiotic use for adults with fresh traumatic wounds who attended the trauma center at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok. A prospective study of 600 adult patients who had fresh traumatic wounds (≤ 6 hours) was conducted at Siriraj Trauma Center from March 2013 to March 2014. The CPG was introduced to physicians, nurses and medical students by posting the CPG at the patient care areas of the trauma center. The outcomes were an appropriate classification of wounds according to the CPG recommendations, prevalence of antibiotic prescribing, incidence of wound infection and compliance with the CPG. Clean-contaminated wounds that did not need antibiotic treatment and clean-contaminated and contaminated wounds that required antibiotics were observed in 63.2, 6.7, and 30.1% ofthe patients, respectively. Antibiotics were given to 512 patients (85.3%). Infections occurred in six patients (1.0%). Antibiotic prescription according to CPG recommendations was observed for 243 patients (40.5%). The prevalence of antibiotic use in the CPG-compliant group (65.8%) was significantly less than that in the CPG-noncompliant group (98.6%) (p < 0.001). The patients in the CPG-compliant group had more contaminated wounds than those in the CPG-noncompliant group (51.4 vs. 15.7%, p < 0.001). The incidences of wound infection were very low in both groups and not significantly different (1.2 vs. 0.8%, p = 0.690). Antibiotic prophylaxis was necessary in less than 36.8% of adults with fresh traumatic wounds who attended Siriraj Trauma Center Compliance to CPG implementation using simple intervention seemed to be low. Adhering to CPG recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis in adults with fresh traumatic wounds can reduce the unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics without increasing the rate of wound infection.

  4. Barriers of Clinical Practice Guidelines Development and Implementation in Developing Countries: A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran-Seyed, Zahra; Nedjat, Sima; Yazdizadeh, Bahareh; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge products such as clinical practice guidelines (CPG) are vitally required for evidence-based medicine (EBM). Although the EBM, to some extent, has been attended during recent years, no result has achieved thus far. The current qualitative study is to identify the barriers to establishing development system and implementation of CPGs in Iran. Methods: Twelve semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of health policy and decision makers, the experts of development and or adaptation of CPGs, and the experts of EBM education and development. In addition, 11 policy-makers, decision-makers, and managers of the health system participated in a focus group discussion. The analysis of the study data was undertaken by thematic framework approach. Result: Six themes emerged in order of their frequency include practice environment, evidence-based health care system, individual professional, politician and political context, innovation (CPG) and patients. Most of the indications in the treatment environment focused on such sub-themes as regulations and rules, economical factors, organizational context, and social context. While the barriers related to the conditions of treatment environment, service provider and the features of innovation and patients had been identified before in other studies, very little attention has been paid to the evidence-based health care system and politician and political context Conclusion: The lack of an evidence-based healthcare system and a political macro support are mentioned as the key barriers in Iran as a developing country. The establishment of a system of development and implementation of CPGs as the evidence-based practice tools will not be possible, unless the barriers are removed. PMID:23626892

  5. Epidemiology and Changes in Mortality of Sepsis After the Implementation of Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Herrán-Monge, Rubén; Muriel-Bombín, Arturo; García-García, Marta M; Merino-García, Pedro A; Martínez-Barrios, Miguel; Andaluz, David; Ballesteros, Juan Carlos; Domínguez-Berrot, Ana María; Moradillo-Gonzalez, Susana; Macías, Santiago; Álvarez-Martínez, Braulio; Fernández-Calavia, M José; Tarancón, Concepción; Villar, Jesús; Blanco, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    To determine the epidemiology and outcome of severe sepsis and septic shock after 9 years of the implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) and to build a mortality prediction model. This is a prospective, multicenter, observational study performed during a 5-month period in 2011 in a network of 11 intensive care units (ICUs). We compared our findings with those obtained in the same ICUs in a study conducted in 2002. The current cohort included 262 episodes of severe sepsis and/or septic shock, and the 2002 cohort included 324. The prevalence was 14% (95% confidence interval: 12.5-15.7) with no differences to 2002. The population-based incidence was 31 cases/100 000 inhabitants/year. Patients in 2011 had a significantly lower Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II; 21.9 ± 6.6 vs 25.5 ± 7.07), Logistic Organ Dysfunction Score (5.6 ± 3.2 vs 6.3 ± 3.6), and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores on day 1 (8 ± 3.5 vs 9.6 ± 3.7; P < .01). The main source of infection was intraabdominal (32.5%) although microbiologic isolation was possible in 56.7% of cases. The 2011 cohort had a marked reduction in 48-hour (7% vs 14.8%), ICU (27.2% vs 48.2%), and in-hospital (36.7% vs 54.3%) mortalities. Most relevant factors associated with death were APACHE II score, age, previous immunosuppression and liver insufficiency, alcoholism, nosocomial infection, and Delta SOFA score. Although the incidence of sepsis/septic shock remained unchanged during a 10-year period, the implementation of the SSC guidelines resulted in a marked decrease in the overall mortality. The lower severity of patients on ICU admission and the reduced early mortality suggest an improvement in early diagnosis, better initial management, and earlier antibiotic treatment.

  6. Barriers of clinical practice guidelines development and implementation in developing countries: a case study in iran.

    PubMed

    Baradaran-Seyed, Zahra; Nedjat, Sima; Yazdizadeh, Bahareh; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge products such as clinical practice guidelines (CPG) are vitally required for evidence-based medicine (EBM). Although the EBM, to some extent, has been attended during recent years, no result has achieved thus far. The current qualitative study is to identify the barriers to establishing development system and implementation of CPGs in Iran. Twelve semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of health policy and decision makers, the experts of development and or adaptation of CPGs, and the experts of EBM education and development. In addition, 11 policy-makers, decision-makers, and managers of the health system participated in a focus group discussion. The analysis of the study data was undertaken by thematic framework approach. Six themes emerged in order of their frequency include practice environment, evidence-based health care system, individual professional, politician and political context, innovation (CPG) and patients. Most of the indications in the treatment environment focused on such sub-themes as regulations and rules, economical factors, organizational context, and social context. While the barriers related to the conditions of treatment environment, service provider and the features of innovation and patients had been identified before in other studies, very little attention has been paid to the evidence-based health care system and politician and political context. The lack of an evidence-based healthcare system and a political macro support are mentioned as the key barriers in Iran as a developing country. The establishment of a system of development and implementation of CPGs as the evidence-based practice tools will not be possible, unless the barriers are removed.

  7. The CLUES study: a cluster randomized clinical trial for the evaluation of cardiovascular guideline implementation in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The appropriate care for people with cardiovascular risk factors can reduce morbidity and mortality. One strategy for improving the care for these patients involves the implementation of evidence-based guidelines. To date, little research concerning the impact of such implementation strategies in our setting has been published. Aims. To evaluate the effectiveness of a multifaceted tailored intervention in the implementation of three cardiovascular risk-related guidelines (hypertension, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia) in primary care in the Basque Health Service compared with usual implementation. Methods/Design A two-year cluster randomized clinical trial in primary care in two districts in the Basque Health Service. All primary care units are randomized. Data from all patients with diabetes, hypertension and those susceptible to coronary risk screening will be analyzed. Interventions. The control group will receive standard implementation. The experimental group will receive a multifaceted tailored implementation strategy, including a specific web page and workshops for family physicians and nurses. Endpoints. Primary endpoints: annual request for glycosylated hemoglobin, basic laboratory tests for hypertension, cardiovascular risk screening (women between 45–74 and men between 40–74 years old). Secondary endpoints: other process and clinical guideline indicators. Analysis: Data will be extracted from centralized computerized medical records. Analysis will be performed at a primary care unit level weighted by cluster size. Discussion The main contribution of our study is that it seeks to identify an effective strategy for cardiovascular guideline implementation in primary care in our setting. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials, ISRCTN88876909 PMID:24156549

  8. Implementation of Multispectral Image Classification on a Remote Adaptive Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueiredo, Marco A.; Gloster, Clay S.; Stephens, Mark; Graves, Corey A.; Nakkar, Mouna

    1999-01-01

    As the demand for higher performance computers for the processing of remote sensing science algorithms increases, the need to investigate new computing paradigms its justified. Field Programmable Gate Arrays enable the implementation of algorithms at the hardware gate level, leading to orders of m a,gnitude performance increase over microprocessor based systems. The automatic classification of spaceborne multispectral images is an example of a computation intensive application, that, can benefit from implementation on an FPGA - based custom computing machine (adaptive or reconfigurable computer). A probabilistic neural network is used here to classify pixels of of a multispectral LANDSAT-2 image. The implementation described utilizes Java client/server application programs to access the adaptive computer from a remote site. Results verify that a remote hardware version of the algorithm (implemented on an adaptive computer) is significantly faster than a local software version of the same algorithm implemented on a typical general - purpose computer).

  9. Setting priorities in global child health research investments: guidelines for implementation of CHNRI method.

    PubMed

    Rudan, Igor; Gibson, Jennifer L; Ameratunga, Shanthi; El Arifeen, Shams; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Black, Maureen; Black, Robert E; Brown, Kenneth H; Campbell, Harry; Carneiro, Ilona; Chan, Kit Yee; Chandramohan, Daniel; Chopra, Mickey; Cousens, Simon; Darmstadt, Gary L; Meeks Gardner, Julie; Hess, Sonja Y; Hyder, Adnan A; Kapiriri, Lydia; Kosek, Margaret; Lanata, Claudio F; Lansang, Mary Ann; Lawn, Joy; Tomlinson, Mark; Tsai, Alexander C; Webster, Jayne

    2008-12-01

    This article provides detailed guidelines for the implementation of systematic method for setting priorities in health research investments that was recently developed by Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHNRI). The target audience for the proposed method are international agencies, large research funding donors, and national governments and policy-makers. The process has the following steps: (i) selecting the managers of the process; (ii) specifying the context and risk management preferences; (iii) discussing criteria for setting health research priorities; (iv) choosing a limited set of the most useful and important criteria; (v) developing means to assess the likelihood that proposed health research options will satisfy the selected criteria; (vi) systematic listing of a large number of proposed health research options; (vii) pre-scoring check of all competing health research options; (viii) scoring of health research options using the chosen set of criteria; (ix) calculating intermediate scores for each health research option; (x) obtaining further input from the stakeholders; (xi) adjusting intermediate scores taking into account the values of stakeholders; (xii) calculating overall priority scores and assigning ranks; (xiii) performing an analysis of agreement between the scorers; (xiv) linking computed research priority scores with investment decisions; (xv) feedback and revision. The CHNRI method is a flexible process that enables prioritizing health research investments at any level: institutional, regional, national, international, or global.

  10. Food waste in a school nutrition program after implementation of new lunch program guidelines.

    PubMed

    Byker, Carmen J; Farris, Alisha R; Marcenelle, Michael; Davis, George C; Serrano, Elena L

    2014-01-01

    To assess the amount of food waste by meal components according to the new National School Lunch Program guidelines among pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students. For 5 consecutive school days in 1 elementary school, the research team collected school lunch trays and separated meal components into bins relative to each food or beverage appearing on the school's daily menu. Bins were weighed in grams and converted to ounces and cups at the end of each lunch period. The researchers examined 304 meals from 1 pre-kindergarten class and 5 kindergarten classes. Of 4,988 oz of food and beverages served, 2,261 oz (45.3%) were wasted during 1 full school week, totaling 141 lb. The greatest amount of food waste was generated from vegetables, the main entree, and milk, respectively. Strategies to reduce food waste in school lunch should be researched and implemented. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Guideline implementation for breast healthcare in low-income and middle-income countries: overview of the Breast Health Global Initiative Global Summit 2007.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin O; Yip, Cheng-Har; Smith, Robert A; Shyyan, Roman; Sener, Stephen F; Eniu, Alexandru; Carlson, Robert W; Azavedo, Edward; Harford, Joe

    2008-10-15

    Breast cancer outcomes in low- and middle-income countries (LMCs) correlate with the degree to which 1) cancers are detected at early stages, 2) newly detected cancers can be diagnosed correctly, and 3) appropriately selected multimodality treatment can be provided properly in a timely fashion. The Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) invited international experts to review and revise previously developed BHGI resource-stratified guideline tables for early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and healthcare systems. Focus groups addressed specific issues in breast pathology, radiation therapy, and management of locally advanced disease. Process metrics were developed based on the priorities established in the guideline stratification. The groups indicated that cancer prevention through health behavior modification could influence breast cancer incidence in LMCs. Diagnosing breast cancer at earlier stages will reduce breast cancer mortality. Programs to promote breast self-awareness and clinical breast examination and resource-adapted mammographic screening are important early detection steps. Breast imaging, initially with ultrasound and, at higher resource levels with diagnostic mammography, improves preoperative diagnostic assessment and permits image-guided needle sampling. Multimodality therapy includes surgery, radiation, and systemic therapies. Government intervention is needed to address drug-delivery problems relating to high cost and poor access. Guideline dissemination and implementation research plays a crucial role in improving care. Adaptation of technology is needed in LMCs, especially for breast imaging, pathology, radiation therapy, and systemic treatment. Curricula for education and training in LMCs should be developed, applied, and studied in LMC-based learning laboratories to aid information transfer of evidence-based BHGI guidelines.

  12. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of Endoleaks following Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.; Cil, B.; Munneke, G.; Tsetis, D.

    2013-02-15

    Major concerns after aortic aneurysm repair are caused by the presence of endoleaks, which are defined as persistent perigraft flow within the aortic aneurysm sac. Diagnosis of endoleaks can be performed with various imaging modalities, and indications for treatment are based on further subclassifications. Early detection and correct classification of endoleaks are crucial for planning patient management. The vast majority of endoleaks can be treated successfully by interventional means. Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of endoleaks are described in this article.

  13. Insights about the process and impact of implementing nursing guidelines on delivery of care in hospitals and community settings

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Barbara; Edwards, Nancy; Ploeg, Jenny; Virani, Tazim

    2008-01-01

    Background Little is known about the impact of implementing nursing-oriented best practice guidelines on the delivery of patient care in either hospital or community settings. Methods A naturalistic study with a prospective, before and after design documented the implementation of six newly developed nursing best practice guidelines (asthma, breastfeeding, delirium-dementia-depression (DDD), foot complications in diabetes, smoking cessation and venous leg ulcers). Eleven health care organisations were selected for a one-year project. At each site, clinical resource nurses (CRNs) worked with managers and a multidisciplinary steering committee to conduct an environmental scan and develop an action plan of activities (i.e. education sessions, policy review). Process and patient outcomes were assessed by chart audit (n = 681 pre-implementation, 592 post-implementation). Outcomes were also assessed for four of six topics by in-hospital/home interviews (n = 261 pre-implementation, 232 post-implementation) and follow-up telephone interviews (n = 152 pre, 121 post). Interviews were conducted with 83/95 (87%) CRN's, nurses and administrators to describe recommendations selected, strategies used and participants' perceived facilitators and barriers to guideline implementation. Results While statistically significant improvements in 5% to 83% of indicators were observed in each organization, more than 80% of indicators for breastfeeding, DDD and smoking cessation did not change. Statistically significant improvements were found in > 50% of indicators for asthma (52%), diabetes foot care (83%) and venous leg ulcers (60%). Organizations with > 50% improvements reported two unique implementation strategies which included hands-on skill practice sessions for nurses and the development of new patient education materials. Key facilitators for all organizations included education sessions as well as support from champions and managers while key barriers were lack of time, workload

  14. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR): a useful theoretical framework for guiding and evaluating a guideline implementation process in a hospital-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Breimaier, Helga E; Heckemann, Birgit; Halfens, Ruud J G; Lohrmann, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Implementing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in healthcare settings is a complex intervention involving both independent and interdependent components. Although the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) has never been evaluated in a practical context, it appeared to be a suitable theoretical framework to guide an implementation process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the comprehensiveness, applicability and usefulness of the CFIR in the implementation of a fall-prevention CPG in nursing practice to improve patient care in an Austrian university teaching hospital setting. The evaluation of the CFIR was based on (1) team-meeting minutes, (2) the main investigator's research diary, containing a record of a before-and-after, mixed-methods study design embedded in a participatory action research (PAR) approach for guideline implementation, and (3) an analysis of qualitative and quantitative data collected from graduate and assistant nurses in two Austrian university teaching hospital departments. The CFIR was used to organise data per and across time point(s) and assess their influence on the implementation process, resulting in implementation and service outcomes. Overall, the CFIR could be demonstrated to be a comprehensive framework for the implementation of a guideline into a hospital-based nursing practice. However, the CFIR did not account for some crucial factors during the planning phase of an implementation process, such as consideration of stakeholder aims and wishes/needs when implementing an innovation, pre-established measures related to the intended innovation and pre-established strategies for implementing an innovation. For the CFIR constructs reflecting & evaluating and engaging, a more specific definition is recommended. The framework and its supplements could easily be used by researchers, and their scope was appropriate for the complexity of a prospective CPG-implementation project. The CFIR facilitated qualitative data

  15. Documenting the experiences of health workers expected to implement guidelines during an intervention study in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Nzinga, Jacinta; Mbindyo, Patrick; Mbaabu, Lairumbi; Warira, Ann; English, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Background Although considerable efforts are directed at developing international guidelines to improve clinical management in low-income settings they appear to influence practice rarely. This study aimed to explore barriers to guideline implementation in the early phase of an intervention study in four district hospitals in Kenya. Methods We developed a simple interview guide based on a simple characterisation of the intervention informed by review of major theories on barriers to uptake of guidelines. In-depth interviews, non-participatory observation, and informal discussions were then used to explore perceived barriers to guideline introduction and general improvements in paediatric and newborn care. Data were collected four to five months after in-service training in the hospitals. Data were transcribed, themes explored, and revised in two rounds of coding and analysis using NVivo 7 software, subjected to a layered analysis, reviewed, and revised after discussion with four hospital staff who acted as within-hospital facilitators. Results A total of 29 health workers were interviewed. Ten major themes preventing guideline uptake were identified: incomplete training coverage; inadequacies in local standard setting and leadership; lack of recognition and appreciation of good work; poor communication and teamwork; organizational constraints and limited resources; counterproductive health worker norms; absence of perceived benefits linked to adoption of new practices; difficulties accepting change; lack of motivation; and conflicting attitudes and beliefs. Conclusion While the barriers identified are broadly similar in theme to those reported from high-income settings, their specific nature often differs. For example, at an institutional level there is an almost complete lack of systems to introduce or reinforce guidelines, poor teamwork across different cadres of health worker, and failure to confront poor practice. At an individual level, lack of interest in the

  16. Building better guidelines with BRIDGE-Wiz: development and evaluation of a software assistant to promote clarity, transparency, and implementability

    PubMed Central

    Michel, George; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Davidson, Caryn

    2011-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the feasibility of capturing the knowledge required to create guideline recommendations in a systematic, structured, manner using a software assistant. Practice guidelines constitute an important modality that can reduce the delivery of inappropriate care and support the introduction of new knowledge into clinical practice. However, many guideline recommendations are vague and underspecified, lack any linkage to supporting evidence or documentation of how they were developed, and prove to be difficult to transform into systems that influence the behavior of care providers. Methods The BRIDGE-Wiz application (Building Recommendations In a Developer's Guideline Editor) uses a wizard approach to address the questions: (1) under what circumstances? (2) who? (3) ought (with what level of obligation?) (4) to do what? (5) to whom? (6) how and why? Controlled natural language was applied to create and populate a template for recommendation statements. Results The application was used by five national panels to develop guidelines. In general, panelists agreed that the software helped to formalize a process for authoring guideline recommendations and deemed the application usable and useful. Discussion Use of BRIDGE-Wiz promotes clarity of recommendations by limiting verb choices, building active voice recommendations, incorporating decidability and executability checks, and limiting Boolean connectors. It enhances transparency by incorporating systematic appraisal of evidence quality, benefits, and harms. BRIDGE-Wiz promotes implementability by providing a pseudocode rule, suggesting deontic modals, and limiting the use of ‘consider’. Conclusion Users found that BRIDGE-Wiz facilitates the development of clear, transparent, and implementable guideline recommendations. PMID:21846779

  17. Implementation of curriculum guidelines for pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics in FNP graduate programs: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Morris, N S; Possidente, C J; Muskus, C

    2001-01-01

    Model Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics Curriculum Guidelines were developed by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties and published in 1998. To date, no publication of evaluation of adoption or adherence to these guidelines is available. The purpose of this survey was to determine how family nurse practitioner programs incorporate the guidelines into their curriculum. A mailed self-report questionnaire to 193 schools yielded a 41% response rate. Eighty-five percent (n = 68) of the programs have not yet fully integrated the guidelines into their curriculum. Difficulties addressing the extensive content within a 3-credit course and the challenges of teaching students with varied clinical backgrounds and knowledge levels were frequently cited. Although further study of achievement of the guidelines is necessary, an increase in credit allocation, consideration of a conceptual approach to the topic, and use of varied teaching strategies may make achievement of the guidelines more realistic.

  18. Holographic Radar Imaging Privacy Techniques Utilizing Dual-Frequency Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Sheen, David M.

    2008-04-18

    Over the last 15 years, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has performed significant research and development activities to enhance the state of the art of holographic radar imaging systems to be used at security checkpoints for screening people for concealed threats hidden under their garments. These enhancement activities included improvements to privacy techniques to remove human features and providing automatic detection of body-worn concealed threats. The enhanced privacy and detection methods used both physical and software imaging techniques. The physical imaging techniques included polarization-diversity illumination and reception, dual-frequency implementation, and high-frequency imaging at 60 GHz. Software imaging techniques to enhance the privacy of the person under surveillance included extracting concealed threat artifacts from the imagery to automatically detect the threat. This paper will focus on physical privacy techniques using dual-frequency implementation.

  19. Making sense of complex data: a mapping process for analyzing findings of a realist review on guideline implementability.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Monika; Makarski, Julie; Hayden, Leigh; Durocher, Lisa; Chatterjee, Ananda; Brouwers, Melissa; Bhattacharyya, Onil

    2013-09-12

    Realist reviews offer a rigorous method to analyze heterogeneous data emerging from multiple disciplines as a means to develop new concepts, understand the relationships between them, and identify the evidentiary base underpinning them. However, emerging synthesis methods such as the Realist Review are not well operationalized and may be difficult for the novice researcher to grasp. The objective of this paper is to describe the development of an analytic process to organize and synthesize data from a realist review. Clinical practice guidelines have had an inconsistent and modest impact on clinical practice, which may in part be due to limitations in their design. This study illustrates the development of a transparent method for organizing and analyzing a complex data set informed by a Realist Review on guideline implementability to better understand the characteristics of guidelines that affect their uptake in practice (e.g., clarity, format). The data organization method consisted of 4 levels of refinement: 1) extraction and 2) organization of data; 3) creation of a conceptual map of guideline implementability; and 4) the development of a codebook of definitions. This new method is comprised of four steps: data extraction, data organization, development of a conceptual map, and operationalization vis-a-vis a codebook. Applying this method, we extracted 1736 guideline attributes from 278 articles into a consensus-based set of categories, and collapsed them into 5 core conceptual domains for our guideline implementability map: Language, Format, Rigor of development, Feasibility, Decision-making. This study advances analysis methods by offering a systematic approach to analyzing complex data sets where the goals are to condense, organize and identify relationships.

  20. Implementation of the national tuberculosis guidelines on culture and drug sensitivity testing in Guatemala, 2013.

    PubMed

    Samayoa-Peláez, Maritza; Ayala, Nancy; Yadon, Zaida E; Heldal, Einar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP) guidelines for culture and drug sensitivity testing (DST) in Guatemala were successfully implemented, particularly in cases of smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) or previously treated TB, by documenting notification rates by department (geographic area), disease type and category, and culture and DST results. Methods This was a cross-sectional, operational research study that merged and linked all patients registered by the NTP and the National Reference Laboratory in 2013, eliminating duplicates. The proportions with culture (for new smear negative pulmonary cases) and culture combined with DST (for previously treated patients) were estimated and analyzed by department. Data were analyzed using EpiData Analysis version 2.2. Results There were 3 074 patients registered with TB (all forms), for a case notification rate of 20/100 000 population. Of these, 2 842 had new TB, of which 2 167 (76%) were smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB), 385 (14%) were smear-negative PTB, and 290 (10%) were extrapulmonary TB. There were 232 (8%) previously treated cases. Case notification rates (all forms) varied by department from 2-68 per 100 000 population, with the highest rates seen in the southwest and northeast part of Guatemala. Of new TB patients, 136 had a culture performed and 55 had DST of which the results were 33 fully sensitive, 9 monoresistant, 3 polyresistant, and 10 multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB). Only 21 (5%) of new smear-negative PTB patients had cultures. Of 232 previously treated patients, 54 (23%) had a culture and 47 (20%) had DST, of which 29 were fully sensitive, 7 monoresistant, 2 polyresistant, and 9 MDR-TB. Of 22 departments (including the capital), culture and DST was performed in new smear-negative PTB in 7 departments (32%) and in previously treated TB in 13 departments (59%). Conclusions Despite national guidelines, only 5% of smear-negative PTB cases had a culture and only 20% of

  1. A qualitative evaluation of the implementation of guidelines and a support tool for asthma management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Kim; Fisher, Colleen; Misaghian, Jila; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Asthma management in Australia is suboptimal. The "Guidelines for provision of a Pharmacist Only medicine: short acting beta agonists" (SABA guidelines) and a novel West Australian "Asthma Action Plan card" (AAP card) were concurrently developed to improve asthma management. The aim of this qualitative research was to evaluate the collaborative, multidisciplinary and multifaceted implementation of these asthma resources and identify the lessons learnt to inform future initiatives. Feedback was sought about the implementation of the SABA guidelines and the AAP card using focus groups with key stakeholders including pharmacists (×2), pharmacy assistants, asthma educators, general practitioners, practice nurses and people with asthma (patients). Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed thematically using constant comparison. The common themes identified from the focus groups were categorised according to a taxonomy of barriers including barriers related to knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Seven focus group sessions were held with 57 participants. Knowledge barriers were identified included a lack of awareness and lack of familiarity of the resources. There was a significant lack of awareness of the AAP card where passive implementation methods had been utilised. Pharmacists had good awareness of the SABA guidelines but pharmacy assistants were unaware of the guidelines despite significant involvement in the sale of SABAs. Environmental barriers included time and workflow issues and the role of the pharmacy assistant in the organisation workflows of the pharmacy. The attitudes and behaviours of health professionals and patients with asthma were discordant and this undermined optimal asthma management. Suggestions to improve asthma management included the use of legislation, the use of electronic resources integrated into workflows and training pharmacists or practice nurses to provide patients with written asthma action plans. Greater

  2. Challenges for the implementation of World Health Organization guidelines for acute stress, PTSD, and bereavement: a qualitative study in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kane, Jeremy C; Adaku, Alex; Nakku, Juliet; Odokonyero, Raymond; Okello, James; Musisi, Seggane; Augustinavicius, Jura; Greene, M Claire; Alderman, Steve; Tol, Wietse A

    2016-03-15

    In 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) published new guidelines for the management of conditions specifically related to stress, including symptoms of acute stress, bereavement, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is important to evaluate potential challenges for the implementation of these guidelines in low-resource settings, however, there is a dearth of research in this area. The current qualitative study aimed to assess perspectives on the feasibility and acceptability of the new guidelines in four clinics that provide mental health services in post-conflict northern Uganda. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 mental health-care providers and program developers in northern Uganda to address three major research objectives: (1) describe the current standard practices and guidelines used for treating conditions related to stress in Uganda; (2) identify barriers and challenges associated with implementing the new WHO guidelines; and (3) identify and describe potential strategies for overcoming these barriers and challenges. An emergent thematic analysis was used to develop a coding scheme for the transcribed interviews. Practices for managing conditions related to stress included group psychological interventions, psychoeducation, and medication for clients with severe signs and symptoms. Several themes were identified from the interviews on barriers to guideline implementation. These included (1) a lack of trained and qualified mental health professionals to deliver WHO-recommended psychological interventions; (2) a perception that psychological interventions developed in high-income countries would not be culturally adaptable in Uganda; and (3) reluctance about blanket statements regarding medication for the management of acute stress symptoms and PTSD. Identified strategies for overcoming these barriers included (1) training and capacity building for current mental health staff; (2) a stepped care approach to mental health services; and

  3. Rethinking orbital imaging establishing guidelines for interpreting orbital imaging studies and evaluating their predictive value in patients with orbital tumors.

    PubMed

    Ben Simon, Guy J; Annunziata, Christine C; Fink, James; Villablanca, Pablo; McCann, John D; Goldberg, Robert A

    2005-12-01

    To establish guidelines for interpretation of orbital imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomography (CT), and to apply these guidelines and examine their predictive value in 131 patients with biopsy-proven orbital tumors. Prospective evaluation of imaging studies. Imaging studies (CT and/or MRI) from 131 cases with biopsy-proven orbital tumors. Guidelines for reviewing orbital imaging studies (MRI and/or CT) were established based on 5 major characteristics: (1) anatomic location, (2) bone and paranasal sinuses involvement, (3) content, (4) shape, and (5) associated features. In total, 84 features were established by an experienced orbital surgeon and a neuroradiologist. Applying these 84 features, imaging studies of 131 biopsy-proven orbital tumors were evaluated by 3 physicians. Imaging features: characteristics, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values in various groups of orbital tumors and kappa values. One hundred thirty-one cases of biopsy-proven orbital tumors were evaluated. Benign lesions were more likely to be smaller in size, round or oval in shape (29% of all benign tumors, 0% in malignant and inflammatory, P<0.001), and associated with hyperostosis (22% of all benign lesions, P<0.001). They were also more likely to be hyperdense or hypodense on CT imaging (15% and 11%, respectively; P<0.05 in comparison with inflammatory and malignant tumors). Inflammatory processes showed panorbital involvement (23% vs. 3%, and 0% in benign and malignant tumors, respectively; P<0.001). Orbital fat involvement and fat stranding were noticed only in inflammatory lesions (19% and 16%, respectively; P<0.001). None of the features occurred only in malignant tumors, but they tend to involve the anterior orbit more commonly (54% vs. 20%, and 29% in benign and malignant; P = 0.002), and were more likely to show bone erosion (31% vs. 6%, and 16% in benign and inflammatory tumors, respectively; P = 0.004) and molding around

  4. Developing Leadership in Managers to Facilitate the Implementation of National Guideline Recommendations: A Process Evaluation of Feasibility and Usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Tistad, Malin; Palmcrantz, Susanne; Wallin, Lars; Ehrenberg, Anna; Olsson, Christina B.; Tomson, Göran; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén; Gifford, Wendy; Eldh, Ann Catrine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous research supports the claim that managers are vital players in the implementation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), yet little is known about interventions aiming to develop managers’ leadership in facilitating implementation. In this pilot study, process evaluation was employed to study the feasibility and usefulness of a leadership intervention by exploring the intervention’s potential to support managers in the implementation of national guideline recommendations for stroke care in outpatient rehabilitation. Methods: Eleven senior and frontline managers from five outpatient stroke rehabilitation centers participated in a four-month leadership intervention that included workshops, seminars, and teleconferences. The focus was on developing knowledge and skills to enhance the implementation of CPG recommendations, with a particular focus on leadership behaviors. Each dyad of managers was assigned to develop a leadership plan with specific goals and leadership behaviors for implementing three rehabilitation recommendations. Feasibility and usefulness were explored through observations and interviews with the managers and staff members prior to the intervention, and then one month and one year after the intervention. Results: Managers considered the intervention beneficial, particularly the participation of both senior and frontline managers and the focus on leadership knowledge and skills for implementing CPG recommendations. All the managers developed a leadership plan, but only two units identified goals specific to implementing the three stroke rehabilitation recommendations. Of these, only one identified leadership behaviors that support implementation. Conclusion: Managers found that the intervention was delivered in a feasible way and appreciated the focus on leadership to facilitate implementation. However, the intervention appeared to have limited impact on managers’ behaviors or clinical practice at the units. Future

  5. Developing Leadership in Managers to Facilitate the Implementation of National Guideline Recommendations: A Process Evaluation of Feasibility and Usefulness.

    PubMed

    Tistad, Malin; Palmcrantz, Susanne; Wallin, Lars; Ehrenberg, Anna; Olsson, Christina B; Tomson, Göran; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén; Gifford, Wendy; Eldh, Ann Catrine

    2016-04-11

    Previous research supports the claim that managers are vital players in the implementation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), yet little is known about interventions aiming to develop managers' leadership in facilitating implementation. In this pilot study, process evaluation was employed to study the feasibility and usefulness of a leadership intervention by exploring the intervention's potential to support managers in the implementation of national guideline recommendations for stroke care in outpatient rehabilitation. Eleven senior and frontline managers from five outpatient stroke rehabilitation centers participated in a four-month leadership intervention that included workshops, seminars, and teleconferences. The focus was on developing knowledge and skills to enhance the implementation of CPG recommendations, with a particular focus on leadership behaviors. Each dyad of managers was assigned to develop a leadership plan with specific goals and leadership behaviors for implementing three rehabilitation recommendations. Feasibility and usefulness were explored through observations and interviews with the managers and staff members prior to the intervention, and then one month and one year after the intervention. Managers considered the intervention beneficial, particularly the participation of both senior and frontline managers and the focus on leadership knowledge and skills for implementing CPG recommendations. All the managers developed a leadership plan, but only two units identified goals specific to implementing the three stroke rehabilitation recommendations. Of these, only one identified leadership behaviors that support implementation. Managers found that the intervention was delivered in a feasible way and appreciated the focus on leadership to facilitate implementation. However, the intervention appeared to have limited impact on managers' behaviors or clinical practice at the units. Future interventions directed towards managers should have a

  6. CEOS Land Surface Imaging Constellation Mid-Resolution Optical Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyes, Jennifer P.; Killough, B.

    2011-01-01

    The LSI community of users is large and varied. To reach all these users as well as potential instrument contributors this document has been organized by measurement parameters of interest such as Leaf Area Index and Land Surface Temperature. These measurement parameters and the data presented in this document are drawn from multiple sources, listed at the end of the document, although the two primary ones are "The Space-Based Global Observing System in 2010 (GOS-2010)" that was compiled for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) by Bizzarro Bizzarri, and the CEOS Missions, Instruments, and Measurements online database (CEOS MIM). For each measurement parameter the following topics will be discussed: (1) measurement description, (2) applications, (3) measurement spectral bands, and (4) example instruments and mission information. The description of each measurement parameter starts with a definition and includes a graphic displaying the relationships to four general land surface imaging user communities: vegetation, water, earth, and geo-hazards, since the LSI community of users is large and varied. The vegetation community uses LSI data to assess factors related to topics such as agriculture, forest management, crop type, chlorophyll, vegetation land cover, and leaf or canopy differences. The water community analyzes snow and lake cover, water properties such as clarity, and body of water delineation. The earth community focuses on minerals, soils, and sediments. The geo-hazards community is designed to address and aid in emergencies such as volcanic eruptions, forest fires, and large-scale damaging weather-related events.

  7. Can An Academic Health Care System Overcome Barriers to Clinical Guideline Implementation?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Cardiology/ American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) practice guidelines state that the utilization of beta- blockers in patients with known coronary disease or...surgery: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines [American College of Cardiology

  8. Novice Designers' Myths about Usability Sessions: Guidelines To Implementing User-Centered Design Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William A.

    1999-01-01

    Details myths that illustrate novice instructional designers' perspectives on usability sessions and their users. Then offers suggestions for integrating creativity and developing enhanced perspective-taking. Two tables list the myths and guidelines, and potential effects of usability-session guidelines on novice designers' myths are charted. (AEF)

  9. ACC/AHA Special Report: Clinical Practice Guideline Implementation Strategies: A Summary of Systematic Reviews by the NHLBI Implementation Science Work Group: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wiley V; Pearson, Thomas A; Bennett, Glen C; Cushman, William C; Gaziano, Thomas A; Gorman, Paul N; Handler, Joel; Krumholz, Harlan M; Kushner, Robert F; MacKenzie, Thomas D; Sacco, Ralph L; Smith, Sidney C; Stevens, Victor J; Wells, Barbara L; Castillo, Graciela; Heil, Susan K R; Stephens, Jennifer; Vann, Julie C Jacobson

    2017-02-28

    In 2008, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened an Implementation Science Work Group to assess evidence-based strategies for effectively implementing clinical practice guidelines. This was part of a larger effort to update existing clinical practice guidelines on cholesterol, blood pressure, and overweight/obesity. Review evidence from the published implementation science literature and identify effective or promising strategies to enhance the adoption and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. This systematic review was conducted on 4 critical questions, each focusing on the adoption and effectiveness of 4 intervention strategies: (1) reminders, (2) educational outreach visits, (3) audit and feedback, and (4) provider incentives. A scoping review of the Rx for Change database of systematic reviews was used to identify promising guideline implementation interventions aimed at providers. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were developed a priori for each question, and the published literature was initially searched up to 2012, and then updated with a supplemental search to 2015. Two independent reviewers screened the returned citations to identify relevant reviews and rated the quality of each included review. Audit and feedback and educational outreach visits were generally effective in improving both process of care (15 of 21 reviews and 12 of 13 reviews, respectively) and clinical outcomes (7 of 12 reviews and 3 of 5 reviews, respectively). Provider incentives showed mixed effectiveness for improving both process of care (3 of 4 reviews) and clinical outcomes (3 reviews equally distributed between generally effective, mixed, and generally ineffective). Reminders showed mixed effectiveness for improving process of care outcomes (27 reviews with 11 mixed and 3 generally ineffective results) and were generally ineffective for clinical outcomes (18 reviews with 6 mixed and 9 generally ineffective results). Educational outreach visits (2 of 2

  10. Early statin therapy in acute coronary syndromes: the successful cycle of evidence, guidelines, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Waters, David D; Ku, Ivy

    2009-10-06

    That statins should be prescribed for patients before hospital discharge after an episode of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a Level of Evidence: 1A recommendation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Joint Task Force. This level of recommendation is based upon 2 clinical trials: the MIRACL (Myocardial Ischemia Reduction with Aggressive Cholesterol Lowering) and PROVE-IT (Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy) trials. In the MIRACL trial, 3,086 patients with unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction were randomized within 4 days of the event to atorvastatin 80 mg/day or to placebo and followed for 16 weeks. The primary composite end point occurred in 14.8% of atorvastatin patients and 17.4% of placebo patients, a 16% relative risk reduction (p = 0.048). In the PROVE-IT trial, 4,162 patients hospitalized with an ACS within the preceding 10 days were randomized to atorvastatin 80 mg/day or pravastatin 40 mg/day and were followed for a mean of 24 months. The primary event rate was 22.4% in the atorvastatin group and 26.3% in the pravastatin group, a 16% relative risk reduction (p = 0.005). A strong trend toward a reduction in total mortality was seen in the atorvastatin group (2.2% vs. 3.2%, p = 0.07). Using a composite end point of death, myocardial infarction, and rehospitalization for ACS, the difference between the treatment groups is already statistically significant at 30 days and remains so throughout the follow-up period. Comprehensive treatment programs in ACS patients that include initiation of statins before hospital discharge have been shown to improve outcomes such as recurrent myocardial infarction and total mortality at 1 year. Guidelines prove their utility when their implementation improves outcomes across a broad population at risk, such as in this instance.

  11. Radiation safety awareness among medical interns: are EU guidelines being implemented?

    PubMed

    Lee, A M; Lee, M J

    2016-11-14

    European recommendations suggest that medical students should be taught radiation safety before entering clinical practice. The aim of this study was to produce a summative assessment of radiation protection training in medical school in Ireland. A web-based questionnaire was distributed to the 2014 intern population (n = 683) via network intern-coordinators. The survey encompassed knowledge of radiation dose in X-ray investigations, laws governing the prescribing of radiation and complications of radiation exposure to staff and patients. Response rate was 14.2% (97/683) with all Irish medical schools represented. 64% of interns reported no formal training in radiation safety. 80% correctly identified MRI and 94% US as not posing a radiation risk. 54% identified CT PET as emitting the highest radiation dose to patients. Only 32% correctly identified one CT abdomen/pelvis as equivalent to the dose from 300 to 500 chest X-rays and 22% correctly identified the theoretical lifetime risk of cancer induction from CT abdomen/pelvis as 1 in 2000. While 71% thought it was very important that prescribers should be aware of patient radiation dose and 28% thought it was moderately important, 74% were not aware of any laws governing the prescribing of radiology investigations. Currently, there is little formal radiation safety training in Irish medical schools. Knowledge of radiation dose and the laws governing prescribing is limited among qualifying interns. Implementation of a formal radiation safety curriculum in Irish Medical Schools would adhere to EU guidelines and improve prescriber knowledge, patient, and personal radiation safety.

  12. Implementation of Early Diagnosis and Intervention Guidelines for Cerebral Palsy in a High-Risk Infant Follow-Up Clinic.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Rachel; Noritz, Garey; Maitre, Nathalie L

    2017-08-30

    Cerebral palsy is the most common physical disability in childhood, and is mostly diagnosed after age 2 years. Delays in diagnosis can have negative long-term consequences for children and parents. New guidelines for early cerebral palsy diagnosis and intervention were recently published, after systematic review of the evidence by international multidisciplinary experts aiming to decrease age at diagnosis. The current study tested the feasibility of implementing these guidelines in an American clinical setting. We designed a stepwise implementation process in a neonatal intensive care follow-up clinic. Efficacy was tested by comparing 10-month pre- and post-implementation periods. Clinic visit types, cerebral palsy diagnosis, provider competencies and perspectives, and balancing measures were analyzed. Changes to infrastructure, assessments, scheduling algorithms, documentation and supports in diagnosis or counseling were successfully implemented. Number of three- to four-month screening visits increased (255 to 499, P < 0.001); mean age at diagnosis decreased (18 to 13 months, P < 0.001). Clinic team awareness of early diagnosis and interventions increased (P < 0.001). There was no decrease in family satisfaction with overall clinic function. Opportunities for improvements included documentation for transitioning patients, generalizabilty across hospital clinics, systematic identification of high-risk status during hospitalization, and need for cerebral palsy care guidelines for infants under age 2 years. We demonstrated for the first time in a US clinical setting the feasibility of implementation of international early diagnosis and treatment guidelines for cerebral palsy. This process is adaptable to other settings and underscores the necessity of future research on cerebral palsy treatments in infancy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Challenges in the implementation of clinical practice guidelines in major public health institutions in Mexico: A multiple case study].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Alba, Gaudencio; González-Block, Miguel Ángel; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia

    2015-01-01

    To identify, prioritize and relate barriers and facilitators in the implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (GPC, in Spanish). We used qualitative methods to study and compare the introduction of GPC across the domains of the consolidated research implementation framework in hospitals of the three main public institutions in a state of Mexico. Authorities and hospital staff were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. The main barriers to implementation are the absence of standards, training, resources and incentives. The most important implementation facilitators are the characteristics of the GPC, which are perceived as properly designed and with simple language as well as with capacity to improve the work environment. The barriers to implementation must be solved to achieve the goal of standardizing the healthcare process across the sector; the positive perception of the GPC should promote the continuous actualization of the evidence and a sectoral view from their development stage to ensure adoption in the heterogeneous environments that characterize health institutions.

  14. Performance of implementing guideline-driven cervical cancer screening measures in an inner-city hospital system.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Daryl L; Reimers, Laura L; Wu, Eijean; Nathan, Lisa M; Gruenberg, Tammy; Abadi, Maria; Einstein, Mark H

    2011-10-01

    : In 2006, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology updated evidence-based guidelines recommending screening intervals for women with abnormal cervical cytology diagnosis. In our low-income inner-city population, we sought to improve performance by uniformly applying the guidelines to all patients. We report the prospective performance of a comprehensive tracking, evidence-based algorithmically driven call back, and appointment scheduling system for cervical cancer screening in a resource-limited inner-city population. : Outreach efforts were formalized with algorithm-based protocols for triage to colposcopy, with universal adherence to evidence-based guidelines. During implementation from August 2006 to July 2008, we prospectively tracked performance using the electronic medical record with administrative and pathology reports to determine performance variables such as the total number of Pap tests, colposcopy visits, and the distribution of abnormal cytology and histology results, including all cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2, 3 diagnoses. : A total of 86,257 gynecologic visits and 41,527 Pap tests were performed system-wide during this period of widespread and uniform implementation of standard cervical cancer screening guidelines. The number of Pap tests performed per month varied little. The incidence of CIN 1 significantly decreased from 117 (68.4%) of 171 during the first tracked month to 52 (54.7%) of 95 during the last tracked month (p = 0.04). The monthly incidence rate of CIN 2, 3, including incident cervical cancers, did not change. The total number of colposcopy visits declined, resulting in a 50% decrease in costs related to colposcopy services and approximately a 12% decrease in costs related to excisional biopsies. : Adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines reduced the number of unnecessary colposcopies without increasing numbers of potentially missed CIN 2, 3 lesions, including cervical cancer. Uniform implementation

  15. Benchmarking progress in the implementation of the Fourth Joint Societies' Task Force Guidelines on the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Karen; Burke, Helen; McGee, Hannah

    2013-02-01

    The Fourth Joint Societies' Task Force (4th JTF) Guidelines on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice are agreed, evidence-based standards of care across European countries and professions. In advance of the publication of the 5th JTF Guidelines in 2012, this work assesses the extent to which the 4th JTF guidelines have been implemented. Qualitative study of guideline implementation in 13 European countries, focusing on the themes of guideline implementation structures, processes, and outcomes. Key personnel in 13 selected countries completed interviews or comparable questionnaires: they were national coordinators for CVD prevention (n = 14) and representatives of the national cardiac society (n = 9), heart foundations (n = 11), health ministry (n = 8), and service providers (n = 3). Interview and service-related data from each country were compiled to provide a detailed overview. Ten of the 13 countries used European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on prevention at a national level, where three broad approaches to implementation were identified. In all 10 countries, multidisciplinary alliances oversaw implementation, but ongoing promotion of the guidelines was not evident, with just two of the 10 countries conducting evaluation of implementation. Barriers to implementation included weak health authority support, the unwieldy nature of the guidelines, guideline fatigue, and the lesser role of prevention in national healthcare systems. Substantial progress had been made in implementing the guidelines, but countries struggled with the task. Some rebalancing of the ESC focus may be warranted so that part of the effort dedicated to improving guidelines might be redirected at translating them into practice.

  16. Medical Physics Practice Guideline 4.a: Development, implementation, use and maintenance of safety checklists.

    PubMed

    Fong de Los Santos, Luis E; Evans, Suzanne; Ford, Eric C; Gaiser, James E; Hayden, Sandra E; Huffman, Kristina E; Johnson, Jennifer L; Mechalakos, James G; Stern, Robin L; Terezakis, Stephanie; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Pronovost, Peter J; Fairobent, Lynne A

    2015-05-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States.The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner.Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized.The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  17. Impact of implementing French antibiotic guidelines for acute respiratory-tract infections in a paediatric emergency department, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Angoulvant, F; Skurnik, D; Bellanger, H; Abdoul, H; Bellettre, X; Morin, L; Aptecar, M; Galli-Gibertini, G; Bourdon, O; Doit, C; Faye, A; Mercier, J-C; Cohen, R; Alberti, C

    2012-07-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are the main reason for antibiotic prescription in children. In 2005, the French Drug Agency published guidelines to minimise inappropriate use of antibiotics for ARTI. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of implementing these guidelines in a paediatric emergency department. We retrospectively analysed data collected prospectively in a French paediatric emergency department from November 2005 (date of guideline implementation) to October 2009. For each child diagnosed with ARTI, we collected age, diagnosis, and prescribed antibiotics. We computed antibiotic prescription rates in the study population. During the study period, 53,055 children were diagnosed with ARTI and 59% of the 22,198 antibiotic prescriptions given at discharge were related to ARTI. The proportion of ARTI patients given antibiotic prescriptions fell from 32.1% during the first year to 21% in year 4 (p<10(-4), Cochran-Armitage test). Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and amoxicillin accounted for 50% and 34% of antibiotic prescriptions for ARTI, respectively. French antibiotic guidelines led to significant decreases in antibiotic prescription for ARTI in our paediatric emergency department.

  18. Identifying and Intervening in Child Maltreatment and Implementing Related National Guidelines by Public Health Nurses in Finland and Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kayoko; Paavilainen, Eija; Helminen, Mika; Flinck, Aune; Hiroyama, Natsuko; Hirose, Taiko; Okubo, Noriko; Okamitsu, Motoko

    2017-01-01

    Aim. This study aimed to investigate how public health nurses identify, intervene in, and implement the guidelines on child maltreatment in Finland and Japan and to compare the data between the two countries. Method. This study employed a cross-sectional design. Public health nurses' knowledge and skills with respect to child maltreatment prevention were assessed using a questionnaire consisting of three categories: identification, intervention, and implementation of guidelines. Public health nurses working in the area of maternal and child health care in Finland (n = 193) and Japan (n = 440) were the participants. Results. A significantly higher percentage of Japanese public health nurses identified child maltreatment compared to Finnish public health nurses, while Finnish nurses intervened in child maltreatment better than their Japanese counterparts. In both countries, public health nurses who had read and used the guidelines dealt with child maltreatment better than those who did not. Conclusion. The results suggest that effective training on child maltreatment and the use of guidelines are important to increase public health nurses' knowledge and skills for identifying and intervening in child maltreatment.

  19. Identifying and Intervening in Child Maltreatment and Implementing Related National Guidelines by Public Health Nurses in Finland and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Eija; Helminen, Mika; Hiroyama, Natsuko; Hirose, Taiko; Okubo, Noriko; Okamitsu, Motoko

    2017-01-01

    Aim. This study aimed to investigate how public health nurses identify, intervene in, and implement the guidelines on child maltreatment in Finland and Japan and to compare the data between the two countries. Method. This study employed a cross-sectional design. Public health nurses' knowledge and skills with respect to child maltreatment prevention were assessed using a questionnaire consisting of three categories: identification, intervention, and implementation of guidelines. Public health nurses working in the area of maternal and child health care in Finland (n = 193) and Japan (n = 440) were the participants. Results. A significantly higher percentage of Japanese public health nurses identified child maltreatment compared to Finnish public health nurses, while Finnish nurses intervened in child maltreatment better than their Japanese counterparts. In both countries, public health nurses who had read and used the guidelines dealt with child maltreatment better than those who did not. Conclusion. The results suggest that effective training on child maltreatment and the use of guidelines are important to increase public health nurses' knowledge and skills for identifying and intervening in child maltreatment. PMID:28265469

  20. Incidence of infection after Mohs micrographic and dermatologic surgery before and after implementation of new sterilization guidelines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Austin; Lawrence, Naomi

    2014-06-01

    Clinical guidelines regarding surgical instrument sterilization established by accrediting organizations should be based on peer-reviewed scientific literature. Few data exist in the scientific literature to support the changes in sterilization protocols imposed by accrediting organizations. We sought to determine whether recently established guidelines for the sterilization of surgical instruments have had any clinical impact on postsurgical infection rates. Infections rates after excisional and Mohs micrographic surgery before and after implementation of new Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations sterilization guidelines were examined retrospectively. All surgeries were performed at an academic outpatient office. In all, 1415 patients underwent a total of 1688 surgeries. No significant differences were observed in mean patient age (P = .113), mean number of Mohs micrographic surgical levels (P = .067), final defect size (P = .305), patient gender (P = .072), repair type (P = .691), or infection rate (P = .453). No major differences in predisposing factors were identified in patients who developed postsurgical infections. This was a retrospective study conducted at a single academic institution. In our practice, recent changes in surgical instrument sterilization protocols have had no impact on postsurgical infection rates. The implementation of such guidelines places an additional burden on the health care system without providing any improvement in patient outcomes. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. International antiemetic guidelines on chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV): content and implementation in daily routine practice.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Karin; Gralla, Richard; Jahn, Franziska; Molassiotis, Alex

    2014-01-05

    Over the past decades major improvements in the management of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) were obtained. With the correct use of antiemetic drugs, CINV can be prevented in almost 70%, and even up to, 80% of patients. Treatment guidelines enable physicians to integrate the latest clinical research into their daily practice. The large volume of rapidly evolving clinical data has been summarised and incorporated into treatment recommendations by well-known and reliable institutions. These organisations include the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC), the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). However, despite the availability of these guidelines, there is an emerging evidence that adherence to, and implementation of, treatment recommendations is less than optimal. This review will especially focus on the content of the current antiemetic guidelines and will address the important question of how these guidelines are implemented in routine practice. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. IMPLEmenting a clinical practice guideline for acute low back pain evidence-based manageMENT in general practice (IMPLEMENT): Cluster randomised controlled trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Joanne E; French, Simon D; O'Connor, Denise A; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Mortimer, Duncan; Michie, Susan; Francis, Jill; Spike, Neil; Schattner, Peter; Kent, Peter M; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Green, Sally E

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence generated from reliable research is not frequently implemented into clinical practice. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are a potential vehicle to achieve this. A recent systematic review of implementation strategies of guideline dissemination concluded that there was a lack of evidence regarding effective strategies to promote the uptake of guidelines. Recommendations from this review, and other studies, have suggested the use of interventions that are theoretically based because these may be more effective than those that are not. An evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the management of acute low back pain was recently developed in Australia. This provides an opportunity to develop and test a theory-based implementation intervention for a condition which is common, has a high burden, and for which there is an evidence-practice gap in the primary care setting. Aim This study aims to test the effectiveness of a theory-based intervention for implementing a clinical practice guideline for acute low back pain in general practice in Victoria, Australia. Specifically, our primary objectives are to establish if the intervention is effective in reducing the percentage of patients who are referred for a plain x-ray, and improving mean level of disability for patients three months post-consultation. Methods/Design This study protocol describes the details of a cluster randomised controlled trial. Ninety-two general practices (clusters), which include at least one consenting general practitioner, will be randomised to an intervention or control arm using restricted randomisation. Patients aged 18 years or older who visit a participating practitioner for acute non-specific low back pain of less than three months duration will be eligible for inclusion. An average of twenty-five patients per general practice will be recruited, providing a total of 2,300 patient participants. General practitioners in the control arm will receive access

  3. Unconventional methods of imaging: computational microscopy and compact implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-07-01

    In the past two decades or so, there has been a renaissance of optical microscopy research and development. Much work has been done in an effort to improve the resolution and sensitivity of microscopes, while at the same time to introduce new imaging modalities, and make existing imaging systems more efficient and more accessible. In this review, we look at two particular aspects of this renaissance: computational imaging techniques and compact imaging platforms. In many cases, these aspects go hand-in-hand because the use of computational techniques can simplify the demands placed on optical hardware in obtaining a desired imaging performance. In the first main section, we cover lens-based computational imaging, in particular, light-field microscopy, structured illumination, synthetic aperture, Fourier ptychography, and compressive imaging. In the second main section, we review lensfree holographic on-chip imaging, including how images are reconstructed, phase recovery techniques, and integration with smart substrates for more advanced imaging tasks. In the third main section we describe how these and other microscopy modalities have been implemented in compact and field-portable devices, often based around smartphones. Finally, we conclude with some comments about opportunities and demand for better results, and where we believe the field is heading.

  4. 32 CFR 2004.11 - Agency Implementing Regulations, Internal Rules, or Guidelines [102(b)(3)].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM DIRECTIVE NO. 1 Implementation and Oversight § 2004.11 Agency Implementing...

  5. Implementation of GPU-accelerated back projection for EPR imaging.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhiwei; Redler, Gage; Epel, Boris; Qian, Yuhua; Halpern, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) Imaging (EPRI) is a robust method for measuring in vivo oxygen concentration (pO2). For 3D pulse EPRI, a commonly used reconstruction algorithm is the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm, in which the backprojection process is computationally intensive and may be time consuming when implemented on a CPU. A multistage implementation of the backprojection can be used for acceleration, however it is not flexible (requires equal linear angle projection distribution) and may still be time consuming. In this work, single-stage backprojection is implemented on a GPU (Graphics Processing Units) having 1152 cores to accelerate the process. The GPU implementation results in acceleration by over a factor of 200 overall and by over a factor of 3500 if only the computing time is considered. Some important experiences regarding the implementation of GPU-accelerated backprojection for EPRI are summarized. The resulting accelerated image reconstruction is useful for real-time image reconstruction monitoring and other time sensitive applications.

  6. Computerization of workflows, guidelines, and care pathways: a review of implementation challenges for process-oriented health information systems

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Objective There is a need to integrate the various theoretical frameworks and formalisms for modeling clinical guidelines, workflows, and pathways, in order to move beyond providing support for individual clinical decisions and toward the provision of process-oriented, patient-centered, health information systems (HIS). In this review, we analyze the challenges in developing process-oriented HIS that formally model guidelines, workflows, and care pathways. Methods A qualitative meta-synthesis was performed on studies published in English between 1995 and 2010 that addressed the modeling process and reported the exposition of a new methodology, model, system implementation, or system architecture. Thematic analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and data visualisation techniques were used to identify and cluster the underlying implementation ‘challenge’ themes. Results One hundred and eight relevant studies were selected for review. Twenty-five underlying ‘challenge’ themes were identified. These were clustered into 10 distinct groups, from which a conceptual model of the implementation process was developed. Discussion and conclusion We found that the development of systems supporting individual clinical decisions is evolving toward the implementation of adaptable care pathways on the semantic web, incorporating formal, clinical, and organizational ontologies, and the use of workflow management systems. These architectures now need to be implemented and evaluated on a wider scale within clinical settings. PMID:21724740

  7. A method for subdividing clinical guidelines into process modules with associated triggers and objectives to facilitate implementation.

    PubMed

    Luckmann, Roger S; Boxwala, Aziz A; Greenes, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    Representation of multi-step clinical guidelines (CG) and their implementation in computerized decision support (DS) systems are complex and logistically challenging tasks. However, many simple rules based on CGs (e.g., medical logic modules), have been successfully implemented through a few popular DS models (e.g., prevention reminders, order entry systems). To facilitate mapping of CGs to practical DS models, we propose an empirical method for sub-dividing CGs into modules according to the locus in a clinical process flow model where implementation would be most effective (e.g., post-encounter provider order entry). We further propose a classification of triggers and objectives for CG modules that provides a framework for a DS system to implement the module Successful application of the method to ten diverse CGs in the outpatient setting is described.

  8. A Method for Subdividing Clinical Guidelines into Process Modules with Associated Triggers and Objectives to Facilitate Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Luckmann, Roger; Boxwala, Aziz A.; Greenes, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Representation of multi-step clinical guidelines (CG) and their implementation in computerized decision support (DS) systems are complex and logistically challenging tasks. However, many simple rules based on CGs (e.g., medical logic modules), have been successfully implemented through a few popular DS models (e.g., prevention reminders, order entry systems). To facilitate mapping of CGs to practical DS models, we propose an empirical method for subdividing CGs into modules according to the locus in a clinical process flow model where implementation would be most effective (e.g., post-encounter provider order entry). We further propose a classification of triggers and objectives for CG modules that provides a framework for a DS system to implement the module Successful application of the method to ten diverse CGs in the outpatient setting is described. PMID:14728424

  9. The College of American Pathologists guidelines for whole slide imaging validation are feasible for pediatric pathology: a pediatric pathology practice experience.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michael A; Chenever, Emily; Baker, Peter B; Boué, Daniel R; Fung, Bonita; Hammond, Sue; Hendrickson, Brett W; Kahwash, Samir B; Pierson, Christopher R; Prasad, Vinay; Nicol, Kathleen K; Barr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Whole slide imaging (WSI) is rapidly transforming educational and diagnostic pathology services. Recently, the College of American Pathologists Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center (CAP-PLQC) published recommended guidelines for validating diagnostic WSI. We prospectively evaluated the guidelines to determine their utility in validating pediatric surgical pathology and cytopathology specimens. Our validation included varied pediatric specimen types, including complex or less common diagnoses, in accordance with the guidelines. We completed WSI review of 60 surgical pathology cases and attempted WSI review of 21 cytopathology cases. For surgical pathology cases, WSI diagnoses were highly concordant with glass slide diagnoses; a discordant diagnosis was observed in 1 of 60 cases (98.3% concordance). We found that nucleated red blood cells and eosinophilic granular bodies represented specific challenges to WSI review of pediatric specimens. Cytology specimens were more frequently discordant or failed for technical reasons, with overall concordance of 66.7%. Review of pediatric cytopathology specimens will likely require image capture in multiple focal planes. This study is the first to specifically evaluate WSI review for pediatric specimens and demonstrates that specimens representing the spectrum of pediatric surgical pathology practice can be reviewed using WSI. Our application of the proposed CAP-PLQC guidelines to pediatric surgical pathology specimens is, to our knowledge, the first prospective implementation of the CAP-PLQC guidelines.

  10. Recursive implementations of temporal filters for image motion computation.

    PubMed

    Clifford, C W; Langley, K

    2000-05-01

    Efficient algorithms for image motion computation are important for computer vision applications and the modelling of biological vision systems. Intensity-based image motion computation proceeds in two stages: the convolution of linear spatiotemporal filter kernels with the image sequence, followed by the non-linear combination of the filter outputs. If the spatiotemporal extent of the filter kernels is large, then the convolution stage can be very intensive computationally. One effective means of reducing the storage required and computation involved in implementing the temporal convolutions is the introduction of recursive filtering. Non-recursive methods require the number of frames of the image sequence stored at any given time to be equal to the temporal extent of the slowest temporal filter. In contrast, recursive methods encode recent stimulus history implicitly in the values of a small number of variables updated through a series of feedback equations. Recursive filtering reduces the number of values stored in memory during convolution and the number of mathematical operations involved in computing the filters' outputs. This paper extends previous recursive implementations of gradient- and correlation-based motion analysis algorithms [Fleet DJ, Langley K (1995) IEEE PAMI 17: 61-67; Clifford CWG, Ibbotson MR, Langley K (1997) Vis Neurosci 14: 741-749], describing a recursive implementation of causal band-pass temporal filters suitable for use in energy- and phase-based algorithms for image motion computation. It is shown that the filters' temporal frequency tuning curves fit psychophysical estimates of the temporal properties of human visual filters.

  11. Clinical Development and Implementation of an Institutional Guideline for Prospective EEG Monitoring and Reporting of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Carlos F; Shenoy, Apeksha V; OʼConnor, Kathryn L; Bechek, Sophia C; Boyle, Emily J; Guanci, Mary M; Tehan, Tara M; Zafar, Sahar F; Cole, Andrew J; Patel, Aman B; Westover, Michael B; Rosenthal, Eric S

    2016-06-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is the most common and disabling complication among patients admitted to the hospital for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Clinical and radiographic methods often fail to detect DCI early enough to avert irreversible injury. We assessed the clinical feasibility of implementing a continuous EEG (cEEG) ischemia monitoring service for early DCI detection as part of an institutional guideline. An institutional neuromonitoring guideline was designed by an interdisciplinary team of neurocritical care, clinical neurophysiology, and neurosurgery physicians and nursing staff and cEEG technologists. The interdisciplinary team focused on (1) selection criteria of high-risk patients, (2) minimization of safety concerns related to prolonged monitoring, (3) technical selection of quantitative and qualitative neurophysiologic parameters based on expert consensus and review of the literature, (4) a structured interpretation and reporting methodology, prompting direct patient evaluation and iterative neurocritical care, and (5) a two-layered quality assurance process including structured clinician interviews assessing events of neurologic worsening and an adjudicated consensus review of neuroimaging and medical records. The resulting guideline's clinical feasibility was then prospectively evaluated. The institutional SAH monitoring guideline used transcranial Doppler ultrasound and cEEG monitoring for vasospasm and ischemia monitoring in patients with either Fisher group 3 or Hunt-Hess grade IV or V SAH. Safety criteria focused on prevention of skin breakdown and agitation. Technical components included monitoring of transcranial Doppler ultrasound velocities and cEEG features, including quantitative alpha:delta ratio and percent alpha variability, qualitative evidence of new focal slowing, late-onset epileptiform activity, or overall worsening of background. Structured cEEG reports were introduced including verbal communication for findings concerning

  12. Effectiveness of an implementation strategy for a breastfeeding guideline in Primary Care: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The protection and promotion of breastfeeding is considered a priority in Europe where only 22% of infants less than 6 months old are exclusively breastfed. In Spain this percentage reaches 24.8% but in our city it falls to 18.26%. Various studies emphasise that the improvement of these results should be based upon the training of health professionals. Following the recommendations of a breastfeeding guide can modify the practice of health professionals and improve results with respect to exclusively or predominatly breastfed children at 6 months of age. Method/Design This study involves a community based cluster randomized trial in primary healthcare centres in Leganés (Madrid, Spain). The project aims to determine whether the use of an implementation strategy (including training session, information distribution, opinion leader) of a breastfeeding guideline in primary care is more effective than usual diffusion. The number of patients required will be 240 (120 in each arm). It will be included all the mothers of infants born during the study period (6 months) who come to the health centre on the first visit of the child care programme and who give their consent to participate. The main outcome variable is the exclusive o predominant breastfeeding at 6 moths of age.. Main effectiveness will be analyzed by comparing the percentage of infants with exclusive or predominant breastfeeding at 6 months between the intervention group and the control group. All statistical tests will be performed with intention to treat. Logistic regression with random effects will be used to adjust for prognostic factors. Confounding factors or factors that might alter the effect recorded will be taken into account in this analysis. Discussion Strategies need to be found which facilitate the giving of effective advice on breastfeeding by professionals and which provide support to women during the breastfeeding period. By applying the guide's recommendations, clinical

  13. Reducing the costs of paediatric antibiotic prescribing in the community by implementing guideline recommendations.

    PubMed

    Piovani, D; Clavenna, A; Sequi, M; Cartabia, M; Bortolotti, A; Fortino, I; Merlino, L; Bonati, M

    2013-10-01

    Italian children receive a high number of antibiotic prescriptions, and the use of second-choice antibiotics is common. A few studies in other countries have demonstrated that the implementation of international guidelines for the most common paediatric diseases may reduce the associated costs. A cost analysis of the expenditure for antibiotic prescriptions in outpatient children in the Lombardy region (Italy) and for each of the region's local health units (LHUs) was performed using a pharmacoepidemiological approach. The safety and cost impact associated with a quali-quantitative improvement in antibiotic prescribing was estimated. The data source was the Lombardy region's prescription database (year 2008) for outpatient children <14 years old. The average total expenditure for each package, and per capita, was calculated for each active substance considered and for each LHU. An estimate of the possible cost reduction was elaborated using, as a reference, the prescription profile of a group of paediatricians that has been involved in initiatives concerning care for years. The hospital admission rates for acute respiratory infections (ARI) and their major complications were evaluated at the regional level and in the group of children followed by the reference paediatricians. The cost reduction estimate reveals a possible decrease in antibiotic expenditure of about 3·6 million euros (-19·5%) in the Lombardy region. Large variability was observed between different LHUs (-33·3 to +9·2% of difference). The hospital admission rate was not different when comparing the group of children followed by the reference paediatricians to the rest of the study population, but the hospital admission rate for ARI was lower in the reference group (χ(2) = 16·4, P < 0·001). This is the first Italian study to evaluate the costs related to a specific prescription profile, which already exists in the real setting, hypothesizing its application in a large outpatient child

  14. Discursive gaps in the implementation of public health policy guidelines in India: the case of HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Kabir; Porter, John

    2010-12-01

    The implementation of standardized policy guidelines for care of diseases of public health importance has emerged as a subject of concern in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) globally. We conducted an empirical research study using the interpretive policy analysis approach to diagnose reasons for gaps in the implementation of national guidelines for HIV testing in Indian hospitals. Forty-six in-depth interviews were conducted with actors involved in policy implementation processes in five states of India, including practitioners, health administrators, policy-planners and donors. We found that actors' divergences from their putative roles in implementation were underpinned by their inhabitation of discrete 'systems of meaning' - frameworks for perceiving policy problems, acting and making decisions. Key gaps in policy implementation included conflicts between different actors' ideals of performance of core tasks and conformance with policy, and problems in communicating policy ideas across systems of meaning. These 'discursive' gaps were compounded by the lack of avenues for intellectual intercourse and by unaccounted interrelationships of power between implementing actors. Our findings demonstrate the importance of thinking beyond short-sighted ideals of aligning frontline practices with global policymakers' intentions. Recognising the deliberative nature of implementation, and strengthening discourse and communications between involved actors may be critical to the success of public health policies in Indian and comparable LMIC settings. Effective policy implementation in the long term also necessitates enhancing practitioners' contributions to the policy process, and equipping country public health functionaries to actualize their policy leadership roles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Implementing a Fetal Health Surveillance Guideline in Clinical Practice: A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial of Action Learning.

    PubMed

    Snelgrove-Clarke, Erna; Davies, Barbara; Flowerdew, Gordon; Young, David

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of an Action Learning intervention on nurses' use of a fetal health surveillance (FHS) guideline during labor of women who were low risk on admission for delivery. Using a pragmatic randomized controlled trial, nurses were randomized to Action Learning (n = 44) or Usual Care (n = 45). Low-risk women were assigned to either an Action Learning nurse (n = 122) or a Usual Care nurse (n = 148). Data on practices during an episode of care (nurses' FHS practices from admission through to delivery in low-risk women) were collected at three trial time points: 1 month prior, during 6 months, and 1 month following. Guideline adherence, women's perception of birth experience, and enablers and inhibitors to intermittent auscultation (IA) were collected. Multivariate logistic regression determined the variables (chosen by the nurses) that predicted Action Learning nurses' adherence to FHS practices. Statistically significant change was not evident between nurses' rate of FHS practices in the Action Learning group compared with Usual Care (Δ6.8%, odds ratio [OR] 0.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-2.83). Postpartum, women reported high satisfaction with no significant difference by study group. Two labor events, epidural and narcotic analgesia, most influenced guideline appropriate care (p = .000, OR -4.04; p = .000, OR = 2.89) within the experimental group. Despite lack of between-group significant changes in FHS practices, Action Learning nurses, who chose areas of practice that presented obstacles to their guideline adherence ability (epidurals and narcotics), significantly changed their FHS practices. Researchers need to consider whether practice is long-standing acceptance of the evidence by healthcare providers, and the provider's intentions for implementation effectiveness when choosing an implementation strategy. Supportive nurses, Doppler availability, and clear policies support adherence to an IA guideline

  16. Implementing Recommendations From Web Accessibility Guidelines: A Comparative Study of Nondisabled Users and Users With Visual Impairments.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Sven; Sonderegger, Andreas; Sauer, Juergen

    2017-09-01

    The present study examined whether implementing recommendations of Web accessibility guidelines would have different effects on nondisabled users than on users with visual impairments. The predominant approach for making Web sites accessible for users with disabilities is to apply accessibility guidelines. However, it has been hardly examined whether this approach has side effects for nondisabled users. A comparison of the effects on both user groups would contribute to a better understanding of possible advantages and drawbacks of applying accessibility guidelines. Participants from two matched samples, comprising 55 participants with visual impairments and 55 without impairments, took part in a synchronous remote testing of a Web site. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of three Web sites, which differed in the level of accessibility (very low, low, and high) according to recommendations of the well-established Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 (WCAG 2.0). Performance (i.e., task completion rate and task completion time) and a range of subjective variables (i.e., perceived usability, positive affect, negative affect, perceived aesthetics, perceived workload, and user experience) were measured. Higher conformance to Web accessibility guidelines resulted in increased performance and more positive user ratings (e.g., perceived usability or aesthetics) for both user groups. There was no interaction between user group and accessibility level. Higher conformance to WCAG 2.0 may result in benefits for nondisabled users and users with visual impairments alike. Practitioners may use the present findings as a basis for deciding on whether and how to implement accessibility best.

  17. Efficacy of clinical guideline implementation to improve the appropriateness of chest physiotherapy prescription among inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Cornuz, Jacques; Stoianov, Rebecca; Burnand, Bernard; Fitting, Jean-William; Yersin, Bertrand; Lamy, Olivier

    2008-09-01

    Although there is no strong evidence of benefit, chest physiotherapy (CP) seems to be commonly used in simple pneumonia. CP requires equipment and frequently involves the assistance of a respiratory therapist, engendering a significant medical workload and cost. To measure and compare the efficacy of two modalities of chest physiotherapy (CP) guideline implementation on the appropriateness of CP prescription among patients hospitalised for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We measured the CP prescription rate and duration in all consecutive CAP inpatients admitted in a division of general internal medicine at an urban teaching community hospital during three consecutive one-year time periods: (1) before any guideline implementation; (2) after a passive implementation by medical grand rounds and guideline diffusion through mailing; (3) after adding a one-page reminder in the CAP patient's medical chart highlighting our recommendations. Death and recurrent hospitalisation rates within one year after hospitalisation were recorded to assess whether CP prescription reduction, if any, impaired patient outcomes. During the three successive phases, 127, 157, and 147 patients with similar characteristics were included. Among all CAP inpatients, the CP prescription rate decreased from 68% (86/127) to 51% (80/157), and to 48% (71/147), respectively (P for trend <0.01 for trend). A significant reduction in CP duration was observed after the active guideline implementation (12.0, 11.0, 7.0days, respectively) and persisted after adjustment for length of stay. Reductions in CP prescription rate and duration were also observed among CAP patients with COPD CP prescription rate: 97% (30/31), 67% (24/36), 75% (35/47), respectively (P<0.01 for trend). The mean cost of CP per patient was reduced by 56%, from $709 to $481, and to $309, respectively. Neither the in-hospital deaths, the one-year overall recurrent hospitalisation nor the one-year CAP-specific recurrent hospitalisation

  18. Implementing KDOQI CKD definition and staging guidelines in Southern California Kaiser Permanente.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Mark; Mann, Wendy; Derose, Stephen; Selevan, David; Pascual, Noel; Diesto, Jean; Crooks, Peter

    2009-03-01

    We outline the experience of Southern California Kaiser Permanente, a large integrated health maintenance organization, in implementing the chronic kidney disease (CKD) definition and staging guidelines of the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) from 2002 to 2008, including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) implementation, algorithm for GFR range assignment and reassignment, and practical modifications of CKD staging for population management. We departed from the KDOQI CKD definition and staging as follows: for stages 1 to 2, we required "macroproteinuria" rather than "microalbuminuria" as the marker of kidney damage; for stage 3, we included individuals with macroproteinuria, diabetes mellitus based on diabetic registry, or eGFR + 1/2 age less than 85; and for stage 5, we included only individuals not receiving renal replacement therapy. In an adult population of 2.5 million members, we identified 2.9% (72,005) for CKD population management (0.1%, 0.2%, 1.7%, 0.15%, and 0.01% with stages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively). Outpatient visits with a nephrologist in the past 12 months for the prevalent CKD population increased modestly from 2003 to 2008 from 20% to 24%. Nephrologists see a higher risk subset, including 77% of patients with stages 4 to 5, 45% of prevalent patients with CKD stages 1 to 5 with the last urine protein level greater than approximately 1 g, and 21% of patients with stage 3 in the past 12 months, but only 4% of patients with eGFR of 30 to 59 mL/min/1.73 m(2) not meeting our criteria for stage 3. Primary care providers see the majority of patients with stages 1 to 5 in the course of a year (85%) and are aware of kidney disease (79% coded for kidney disease). Other quality indicators during the 12-month window include the following: for patients with prevalent CKD stages 1 to 5, a total of 56% with last blood pressure greater than 129/79 mm Hg, 21% missing qualitative proteinuria, 16% missing angiotensin

  19. Guidelines for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia and their implementation. The Spanish "Zero-VAP" bundle.

    PubMed

    Álvarez Lerma, F; Sánchez García, M; Lorente, L; Gordo, F; Añón, J M; Álvarez, J; Palomar, M; García, R; Arias, S; Vázquez-Calatayud, M; Jam, R

    2014-05-01

    "Zero-VAP" is a proposal for the implementation of a simultaneous multimodal intervention in Spanish intensive care units (ICU) consisting of a bundle of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) prevention measures. An initiative of the Spanish Societies of Intensive Care Medicine and of Intensive Care Nurses, the project is supported by the Spanish Ministry of Health, and participation is voluntary. In addition to guidelines for VAP prevention, the "Zero-VAP" Project incorporates an integral patient safety program and continuous online validation of the application of the bundle. For the latter, VAP episodes and participation indices are entered into the web-based Spanish ICU Infection Surveillance Program "ENVIN-HELICS" database, which provides continuous information about local, regional and national VAP incidence rates. Implementation of the guidelines aims at the reduction of VAP to less than 9 episodes per 1000 days of mechanical ventilation. A total of 35 preventive measures were initially selected. A task force of experts used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group methodology to generate a list of 7 basic "mandatory" recommendations (education and training in airway management, strict hand hygiene for airway management, cuff pressure control, oral hygiene with chlorhexidine, semi-recumbent positioning, promoting measures that safely avoid or reduce time on ventilator, and discouraging scheduled changes of ventilator circuits, humidifiers and endotracheal tubes) and 3 additional "highly recommended" measures (selective decontamination of the digestive tract, aspiration of subglottic secretions, and a short course of iv antibiotic). We present the Spanish VAP prevention guidelines and describe the methodology used for the selection and implementation of the recommendations and the organizational structure of the project. Compared to conventional guideline documents, the associated safety assurance program, the

  20. A qualitative study to understand guideline-discordant use of imaging to stage incident prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Sedlander, Erica; Braithwaite, R Scott; Sherman, Scott E; Zeliadt, Steven; Gross, Cary P; Curnyn, Caitlin; Shedlin, Michele

    2016-09-02

    Approximately half of veterans with low-risk prostate cancer receive guideline-discordant imaging. Our objective was to identify and describe (1) physician knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to the use of imaging to stage prostate cancer, (2) patient attitudes and behaviors related to use of imaging, and (3) to compare responses across three VA medical centers (VAMCs). A qualitative approach was used to explore patient and provider knowledge and behaviors relating to the use of imaging. We conducted 39 semi-structured interviews total-including 22 interviews with patients with newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 17 interviews with physicians caring for them-between September 2014 and July 2015 at three VAMCs representing a spectrum of inappropriate imaging rates. After core theoretical concepts were identified, the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was selected to explore linkages between themes within the dataset and existing domains within the framework. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and then coded and analyzed using Nvivo software. Themes from patient interviews were categorized within four TDF domains. Patients reported little interest in staging as compared to disease treatment (goals), and many could not remember if they had imaging at all (knowledge). Patients tended to trust their doctor to make decisions about appropriate tests (beliefs about capabilities). Some patients expressed a minor concern for radiation exposure, but anxiety about cancer outcomes outweighed these fears (emotion). Themes from physician interviews were categorized within five TDF domains. Most physicians self-reported that they know and trust imaging guidelines (knowledge) yet some were still likely to follow their own intuition, whether due to clinical suspicion or years of experience (beliefs about capabilities). Additionally, physicians reported that medico-legal concerns, fear of missing associated diagnoses (beliefs about consequences

  1. Semivariogram Analysis of Bone Images Implemented on FPGA Architectures.

    PubMed

    Shirvaikar, Mukul; Lagadapati, Yamuna; Dong, Xuanliang

    2017-03-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are a major concern for the healthcare of elderly and female populations. Early diagnosis of patients with a high risk of osteoporotic fractures can be enhanced by introducing second-order statistical analysis of bone image data using techniques such as variogram analysis. Such analysis is computationally intensive thereby creating an impediment for introduction into imaging machines found in common clinical settings. This paper investigates the fast implementation of the semivariogram algorithm, which has been proven to be effective in modeling bone strength, and should be of interest to readers in the areas of computer-aided diagnosis and quantitative image analysis. The semivariogram is a statistical measure of the spatial distribution of data, and is based on Markov Random Fields (MRFs). Semivariogram analysis is a computationally intensive algorithm that has typically seen applications in the geosciences and remote sensing areas. Recently, applications in the area of medical imaging have been investigated, resulting in the need for efficient real time implementation of the algorithm. A semi-variance, γ(h), is defined as the half of the expected squared differences of pixel values between any two data locations with a lag distance of h. Due to the need to examine each pair of pixels in the image or sub-image being processed, the base algorithm complexity for an image window with n pixels is O (n(2)) Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are an attractive solution for such demanding applications due to their parallel processing capability. FPGAs also tend to operate at relatively modest clock rates measured in a few hundreds of megahertz. This paper presents a technique for the fast computation of the semivariogram using two custom FPGA architectures. A modular architecture approach is chosen to allow for replication of processing units. This allows for high throughput due to concurrent processing of pixel pairs. The current

  2. Guideline Implementation: Energy-Generating Devices, Part 2-Lasers.

    PubMed

    Burlingame, Byron L

    2017-04-01

    Lasers have been used in the OR for many years and are essential tools in many different types of procedures. However, laser beams that come into contact with unintended targets directly or via reflection can cause injury to patients or personnel or pose other hazards, such as fires. The new AORN "Guideline for safe use of energy-generating devices" provides guidance on the use of all energy-generating devices in the OR. This article focuses on key points of the guideline that address the safe use of lasers. These include the components of the laser safety program, the responsibilities of the personnel in roles specific to use of a laser, laser safety measures, and documentation of laser use. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rural collaborative guideline implementation: Evaluation of a hub and spoke multidisciplinary team model of care for orthogeriatric inpatients - A before and after study of adherence to clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Drabsch, Tracey

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate whether adherence to orthogeriatric inpatient clinical practice guidelines increased after the implementation of an innovative hub and spoke multidisciplinary team, the Sub-Acute Care Team (SCT). This study used a before and after design and describes a medical record audit. Rural inpatient facilities with 20-50 inpatient beds. Inpatients aged 65 years and older who sustained a lower limb fracture from a fall were admitted to a regional facility and subsequent rural facility. The audit included 42 inpatients admitted before the SCT (April 2009-April 2010) and 35 inpatients admitted after the SCT (April 2011-April 2012). The SCT used interprofessional collaborative practice and orthogeriatric clinical practice guidelines to inform inpatient care. Adherence was measured by answering 10 questions representative of the guidelines. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used for each question to identify if the proportion of inpatients receiving guideline-based care changed significantly after SCT implementation. After SCT implementation, an increase in the adherence to guidelines was statistically significant (P < 0.05) for handover, nutrition support, falls prevention, bladder management and more than five guideline-based care questions. Adherence to orthogeriatric inpatient clinical practice guidelines increased after the implementation of the SCT. The mechanisms likely to have contributed include the comprehensive multidisciplinary handover and the opportunity for rural inpatient clinical follow-up. This model is likely to be effective in improving care for other frail rural inpatient populations. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  4. Implementation of concussion guidelines in community Australian Football and Rugby League-The experiences and challenges faced by coaches and sports trainers.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Joanne L; Newton, Joshua D; White, Peta E; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-04-01

    While guidelines outlining the appropriate management of sport-related concussion have been developed and adapted for use within community sport, it remains unknown how they are experienced by those responsible for implementing them. Longitudinal study. 111 coaches and sports trainers from community-level Australian Football and Rugby League teams completed pre- and post-season surveys assessing their attitudes towards using concussion guidelines. Participants also provided post-season feedback regarding their experiences in using the guidelines. 71% of participants reported using the guidelines in the preceding season. Post-season attitude was related to pre-season attitude (p=0.002), football code (p=0.015), and team role (p=0.045). An interaction between team role and guideline use (p=0.012) was also found, with coaches who had used the guidelines, and sports trainers who had not, reporting more positive post-season attitudes towards using the concussion guidelines. Implementation challenges included disputing of decisions about return-to-play by players, parents, and coaches, and a perceived lack of time. Recommendations for improved guideline materials included using larger fonts and providing for witnessing of advice given to players. This is the first study to examine the implementation of concussion guidelines in community sport. Training of coaches/sports trainers needs enhancement. In addition, new education should be developed for parents/players about the importance of the return-to-play advice given to them by those who follow these guidelines. Information provided by those who attempted to use the guidelines will assist the refinement of implementation and dissemination processes around concussion guidelines across sports. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effect of Education and Implementation of Evidence-Based Nursing Guidelines on Infants’ Weight Gaining in NICU

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Zahra; Nouri, Jamileh Mokhtari; Khademolhoseyni, Seyyed Mohammad; Ebadi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educating evidence-based guidelines influences increased quality of nursing cares effectively. Infant’s weight gaining is one of the most important indicators for measuring quality of nursing care in NICU. The research is conducted with the aim of surveying the effect of education and implementation of educating evidence-based guidelines on infants’ weight gaining in NICU. Methods: This two-group clinical trial study was conducted in 2013 on one hundred infants in Baqiyatallah (AJ) hospital of Tehran. It was performed by using non-probable and convenient sampling. Data collection tools included; infants’ demographic questionnaire and a researcher-made checklist to record infants’ weight by using a weighing scale. Infants’ weight was recorded before intervention and two months after implementation of the guidelines, then data were analyzed by using SPSS19 statistical software. Findings: Mean weight of the infants in the control group on admission and on discharge was respectively; 1771(41.71) and 1712(42.68), and mean weight of the infants in intervention group on admission and on discharge was respectively; 1697(37.63) and 1793(40.71). After two months, infants’ weight gaining in intervention group was more than control group and it was statistically significant (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Results of the present study showed that implementation of evidence-based instruction an effective and economical method regarding infants’ weight gaining. Therefore it is recommended to the authorities and managers of the hospitals and educational centers of the healthcare services to put education and implementation of educating evidence-based instruction the priority of their work plans. PMID:25716388

  6. Adopting and implementing nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities: public and private sector roles. A multiple case study.

    PubMed

    Olstad, Dana Lee; Raine, Kim D; McCargar, Linda J

    2012-05-25

    Recreational facilities are an important community resource for health promotion because they provide access to affordable physical activities. However, despite their health mandate, many have unhealthy food environments that may paradoxically increase the risk of childhood obesity. The Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth (ANGCY) are government-initiated, voluntary guidelines intended to facilitate children's access to healthy food and beverage choices in schools, childcare and recreational facilities, however few recreational facilities are using them. We used mixed methods within an exploratory multiple case study to examine factors that influenced adoption and implementation of the ANGCY and the nature of the food environment within three cases: an adopter, a semi-adopter and a non-adopter of the ANGCY. Diffusion of Innovations theory provided the theoretical platform for the study. Qualitative data were generated through interviews, observations, and document reviews, and were analysed using directed content analysis. Set theoretic logic was used to identify factors that differentiated adopters from the non-adopter. Quantitative sales data were also collected, and the quality of the food environment was scored using four complementary tools. The keys to adoption and implementation of nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities related to the managers' nutrition-related knowledge, beliefs and perceptions, as these shaped his decisions and actions. The manager, however, could not accomplish adoption and implementation alone. Intersectoral linkages with schools and formal, health promoting partnerships with industry were also important for adoption and implementation to occur. The food environment in facilities that had adopted the ANGCY did not appear to be superior to the food environment in facilities that had not adopted the ANGCY. ANGCY uptake may continue to falter under the current voluntary approach, as the environmental supports for

  7. An Implementation Strategy to Improve the Guideline Adherence of Insurance Physicians: A Process Evaluation Alongside an Experiment in a Controlled Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwerver, Feico; Bonefaas-Groenewoud, Karin; Schellart, Antonius J. M.; Anema, Johannes R.; van der Beek, Allard J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: We developed an implementation strategy for the insurance medicine guidelines for depression, which we implemented via a post-graduate course for insurance physicians (IPs). In this study we evaluate the physicians' experiences of the implementation strategy by measuring the following aspects: recruitment and reach, dose delivered and…

  8. Implementation of a Landscape Lighting System to Display Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gi-Ju; Cho, Sung-Jae; Kim, Chang-Beom; Moon, Cheol-Hong

    The system implemented in this study consists of a PC, MASTER, SLAVEs and MODULEs. The PC sets the various landscape lighting displays, and the image files can be sent to the MASTER through a virtual serial port connected to the USB (Universal Serial Bus). The MASTER sends a sync signal to the SLAVE. The SLAVE uses the signal received from the MASTER and the landscape lighting display pattern. The video file is saved in the NAND Flash memory and the R, G, B signals are separated using the self-made display signal and sent to the MODULE so that it can display the image.

  9. Guidelines for the Implementation of Programs for Pupils Who Are Orthopedically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Robert S.; Fusco, Carol B.

    Guidelines are provided for the development of programs in South Carolina for orthopedically handicapped (OH) pupils. Basic information is given concerning the definition of orthopedic handicap, the legal mandates on the education of OH pupils, funding sources, authorized programs (whether self-contained programs, resource rooms, or itinerant…

  10. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in an Autism Primary Care Practice: Which Guidelines to Implement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Susan G.; Peters, Brittany R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing is recommended for patients with ASD; however specific recommendations vary by specialty. American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Neurology guidelines recommend G-banded karyotype and Fragile X DNA. The American College of Medical Genetics recommends Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA). We determined the yield of…

  11. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in an Autism Primary Care Practice: Which Guidelines to Implement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Susan G.; Peters, Brittany R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing is recommended for patients with ASD; however specific recommendations vary by specialty. American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Neurology guidelines recommend G-banded karyotype and Fragile X DNA. The American College of Medical Genetics recommends Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA). We determined the yield of…

  12. Distributed Training for the Reserve Component: Course Conversion and Implementation Guidelines for Computer Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, H. A.; And Others

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide background and guidelines for course designers and instructional developers who will be developing Reserve Component training for the United States military using asynchronous computer conferencing techniques. The recommendations in this report are based on an international review of the literature in…

  13. A Model Policy Statement and Guidelines for Implementation: Equal Treatment of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This booklet offers a model policy statement that schools shall provide equal educational opportunities to all students regardless of sex. It includes stipulations and guidelines to achieve equal access in all areas of education. The following areas are considered: (1) Course offerings: every course shall be open to all students and schools should…

  14. Conscious sedation during endoscopic retrograde colangiopancreatography: implementation of SIED-SIAARTI-ANOTE guidelines in Belluno Hospital.

    PubMed

    Mazzon, D; Germanà, B; Poole, D; Celato, M; Bernardi, L; Calleri, G; Fant, F; Bernard, M; Lecis, P; Costan Biedo, F

    2005-03-01

    In this study we describe the results of adoption of local guidelines for conscious sedation (CS) during endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in Belluno Hospital. Local guidelines were created referring to SIED-SIAARTI-ANOTE guidelines for CS in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Between January 2002 and February 2004, 300 ERCPs to be performed under CS have been scheduled. According to local guidelines CS was performed by the gastroenterologist assisted by an anesthesia nurse. An anesthesiologist was always on call in the intensive care unit (ICU) for emergencies and could be on the site in less than 5 min. In 278 patients the procedure was performed safely and effectively by the gastroenterologist without any anesthesiological assistance. At follow-up controls patients had either positive or no recollection of the procedure. An anesthesiologist was called in 13 cases to perform deep sedation and in 9 cases to deal with undesired effects (arterial hypertension in 5 patients, 1 episode of bradycardia, 1 of ventricular tachycardia, 1 of atrial fibrillation and 1 of hypoxia). In our experience, CS during ERCP can be safely performed autonomously by a gastroenterologist in the majority of cases. Drug prescription protocol and the presence of an anesthesia nurse create ideal conditions for the operator, patient comfort and good results with a low incidence of undesired events and few calls for the anesthesiologist. To allow safe and effective performance of CS, the Department of Anesthesia should promote the in-service training and up dating of gastroenterologists and anesthesia nurses.

  15. Guidelines for the Development, Implementation and Operation of School Vocational Education Councils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of the Director for Vocational Education.

    This booklet is designed to assist teachers and/or coordinators of vocational/technical programs in the organization and operation of local advisory councils. It contains guidelines, directions, and sample materials that can be appropriately modified as the situation requires. Contents include a description of the purpose of advisory councils and…

  16. Guidelines on radiographic imaging as part of root canal treatment: a systematic review with a focus on review imaging after treatment.

    PubMed

    Mahasneh, S A; Horner, K; Cunliffe, J; Al-Salehi, S; Sengupta, A; AlHadidi, A

    2017-09-07

    To identify guidelines on endodontics which make recommendations relating to post-root canal treatment radiological review imaging, to make an objective assessment of their quality using the AGREE tool and to examine the evidence cited in support of their recommendations. The primary sources to identify published guidelines were MEDLINE (Ovid(®) ) and EMBASE. The search aim was to identify guidelines pertaining to the post-root canal treatment follow-up recommendations published from 1946 with the final search date being 26 June 2016. The primary search was supplemented by searching internet search engines and several websites that might have guidelines. The guidelines obtained from the search end-result were assessed for quality and scientific evidence using the AGREE II instrument. Similarities and differences in the recommendations were identified. Thirty guidelines were identified, seven of which met the inclusion criteria. Two guidelines used and clearly described the methods for obtaining scientific evidence from which the recommendations were set. The recommendations varied, particularly as regards the timing of the first review radiograph. Some guidelines lacked supporting evidence. The recommendations for post-endodontic treatment radiographic follow-up varied among the identified guidelines. However, the methodology for obtaining the scientific evidence was poorly described in most of the guidelines. Guideline development groups should use the AGREE II instrument as a guide to produce higher quality guidelines. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. The tools of an evidence-based culture: implementing clinical-practice guidelines in an Israeli HMO.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Natan R; Kahan, Ernesto; Waitman, Dan-Andrei; Kitai, Eliezer; Chintz, David P

    2009-09-01

    Although clinical-practice guidelines (CPGs) are implemented on the assumption that they will improve the quality, efficiency, and consistency of health care, they generally have limited effect in changing physicians' behavior. The purpose of this study was to design and implement an effective program for formulating, promulgating, and implementing CPGs to foster the development of an evidence-based culture in an Israeli HMO. The authors implemented a four-stage program of stepwise collaborative efforts with academic institutions composed of developing quantitative tools to evaluate prescribing patterns, updating CPGs, collecting MDs' input via focus groups and quantitative surveys, and conducting a randomized controlled trial of a two-stage, multipronged intervention. The test case for this study was the development, dissemination, and implementation of CPG for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis in adult women. Interventions in the form of a lecture at a conference and a letter with personalized feedback were implemented, both individually and combined, to improve physicians' rates of prescribing the first-line drug, nitrofurantoin, and, in the absence of nitrofurantoin, adhering to the recommended duration of three days of treatment with ofloxacin. The tools and data-generating capabilities designed and constructed in Stage I of the project were integral components of all subsequent stages of the program. Personalized feedback alone was sufficient to improve the rate of adherence to the guidelines by 19.4% (95% CI = 16.7, 22.1). This study provides a template for introducing the component of experimentation essential for cultivating an evidence-based culture. This process, composed of collaborative efforts between academic institutions and a managed care organization, may be beneficial to other health care systems.

  18. Guidelines from the Canadian Association of Pathologists for establishing a telepathology service for anatomic pathology using whole-slide imaging.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Chantal; Chandrakanth, S A; Cornell, Ian Scott; Dalton, James; Evans, Andrew; Garcia, Bertha M; Godin, Chris; Godlewski, Marek; Jansen, Gerard H; Kabani, Amin; Louahlia, Said; Manning, Lisa; Maung, Raymond; Moore, Lisa; Philley, Joanne; Slatnik, Jack; Srigley, John; Thibault, Alain; Picard, Donald Daniel; Cracower, Hanah; Tetu, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The use of telepathology for clinical applications in Canada has steadily become more attractive over the last 10 years, driven largely by its potential to provide rapid pathology consulting services throughout the country regardless of the location of a particular institution. Based on this trend, the president of the Canadian Association of Pathologists asked a working group consisting of pathologists, technologists, and healthcare administrators from across Canada to oversee the development of guidelines to provide Canadian pathologists with basic information on how to implement and use this technology. The guidelines were systematically developed, based on available medical literature and the clinical experience of early adopters of telepathology in Canada. While there are many different modalities and applications of telepathology, this document focuses specifically on whole-slide imaging as applied to intraoperative pathology consultation (frozen section), primary diagnosis, expert or second opinions and quality assurance activities. Applications such as hematopathology, microbiology, tumour boards, education, research and technical and/or standard-related issues are not covered.

  19. Guidelines from the Canadian Association of Pathologists for establishing a telepathology service for anatomic pathology using whole-slide imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Chantal; Chandrakanth, S. A.; Cornell, Ian Scott; Dalton, James; Evans, Andrew; Garcia, Bertha M.; Godin, Chris; Godlewski, Marek; Jansen, Gerard H.; Kabani, Amin; Louahlia, Said; Manning, Lisa; Maung, Raymond; Moore, Lisa; Philley, Joanne; Slatnik, Jack; Srigley, John; Thibault, Alain; Picard, Donald Daniel; Cracower, Hanah; Tetu, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The use of telepathology for clinical applications in Canada has steadily become more attractive over the last 10 years, driven largely by its potential to provide rapid pathology consulting services throughout the country regardless of the location of a particular institution. Based on this trend, the president of the Canadian Association of Pathologists asked a working group consisting of pathologists, technologists, and healthcare administrators from across Canada to oversee the development of guidelines to provide Canadian pathologists with basic information on how to implement and use this technology. The guidelines were systematically developed, based on available medical literature and the clinical experience of early adopters of telepathology in Canada. While there are many different modalities and applications of telepathology, this document focuses specifically on whole-slide imaging as applied to intraoperative pathology consultation (frozen section), primary diagnosis, expert or second opinions and quality assurance activities. Applications such as hematopathology, microbiology, tumour boards, education, research and technical and/or standard-related issues are not covered. PMID:24843826

  20. Implementation of Early Childhood Development Education Service Standard Guidelines on Physical Facilities in Public and Private Early Childhood Education Centres Kakamega County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitati, Emmily M.; Ndirangu, Mwangi; Kennedy, Bota; Rapongo, George S.

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, the Kenyan Ministry of Education (MoE) developed an early childhood development education (ECDE) service standard guidelines to guide the ECDE stakeholders in provision of early childhood education (ECE) programmes. The study sought to investigate the implementation of the ECDE service standard guidelines on provision of physical…

  1. The Pupil Nondiscrimination Guidelines for Athletics. Implementing Section 118.13 of the Wisconsin Statutes and PI 9 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association.

    This guide is designed to assist schools in fully implementing Wisconsin's pupil nondiscrimination guidelines which provide equal educational opportunity for all of its students. The guidelines focus on discrimination problems in interscholastic athletics and are based on sex equity. Following a foreword and acknowledgements, the document is…

  2. Implementation of Early Childhood Development Education Service Standard Guidelines on Physical Facilities in Public and Private Early Childhood Education Centres Kakamega County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitati, Emmily M.; Ndirangu, Mwangi; Kennedy, Bota; Rapongo, George S.

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, the Kenyan Ministry of Education (MoE) developed an early childhood development education (ECDE) service standard guidelines to guide the ECDE stakeholders in provision of early childhood education (ECE) programmes. The study sought to investigate the implementation of the ECDE service standard guidelines on provision of physical…

  3. The Pupil Nondiscrimination Guidelines for Athletics. Implementing Section 118.13 of the Wisconsin Statutes and PI 9 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association.

    This guide is designed to assist schools in fully implementing Wisconsin's pupil nondiscrimination guidelines which provide equal educational opportunity for all of its students. The guidelines focus on discrimination problems in interscholastic athletics and are based on sex equity. Following a foreword and acknowledgements, the document is…

  4. Management of anaemia and blood transfusion in critical care - implementing national guidelines in ICU.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sethina; Kendrick, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia in intensive care is common, with approximately 50% of patients receiving a red cell transfusion. Recognised complications from transfusion include 'transfusion associated lung injury', infection, and organ failure progression. Most cohort studies show a positive relationship between red cell transfusion and adverse outcomes. In 2012, the British Committee for Standards in Haematology issued guidelines for red cell (RBC) transfusion in critical care. They recommend a haemoglobin transfusion trigger of below 70 g/dL unless the patient is bleeding, has acute sepsis, neurological injury, or an acute coronary syndrome. RBC transfusions in a single intensive care unit (ICU) were prospectively assessed for compliance with national guidance. Each transfusion was categorised with a traffic light system: red for inappropriate, green for appropriate, and amber for those that were not clearly appropriate or inappropriate. The quality improvement project began with a clinical effectiveness audit of doctors' knowledge of critical care transfusion thresholds. Two quality improvement interventions were used: 1) a local blood transfusion guideline was produced and posters were placed in the ICU 2) this guidance was attached to the transfusion prescriptions. Data was collected after each intervention. A total of 30 random adult RBC transfusions were analysed between August 2013 and February 2014. Despite good results from the effectiveness audit an assessment of RBC transfusions demonstrated room for improvement. Prior to introduction of the guideline intervention, a total of two transfusions were green, one red and seven amber. Following both interventions there were seven green transfusions and three amber. No transfusions were classed as inappropriate. According to additional trust based ICU transfusion records, there was approximately a 50% reduction (41 to 18 RBC transfusions) in overall blood transfusions following the first intervention in October 2013. Simple

  5. Barriers to implementing infection prevention and control guidelines during crises: experiences of health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Timen, Aura; Hulscher, Marlies E J L; Rust, Laura; van Steenbergen, Jim E; Akkermans, Reinier P; Grol, Richard P T M; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2010-11-01

    Communicable disease crises can endanger the health care system and often require special guidelines. Understanding reasons for nonadherence to crisis guidelines is needed to improve crisis management. We identified and measured barriers and conditions for optimal adherence as perceived by 4 categories of health care professionals. In-depth interviews were performed (n = 26) to develop a questionnaire for a cross-sectional survey of microbiologists (100% response), infection preventionists (74% response), public health physicians (96% response), and public health nurses (82% response). The groups were asked to appraise barriers encountered during 4 outbreaks (severe acute respiratory syndrome [SARS], Clostridium difficile ribotype 027, rubella, and avian influenza) according to a 5-point Likert scale. When at least 33% of the participants responded "strongly agree," "agree," or "rather agree than disagree," a barrier was defined as "often experienced." The common ("generic") barriers were included in a univariate and multivariate model. Barriers specific to the various groups were studied as well. Crisis guidelines were found to have 4 generic barriers to adherence: (1) lack of imperative or precise wording, (2) lack of easily identifiable instructions specific to each profession, (3) lack of concrete performance targets, and (4) lack of timely and adequate guidance on personal protective equipment and other safety measures. The cross-sectional study also yielded profession-specific sets of often-experienced barriers. To improve adherence to crisis guidelines, the generic barriers should be addressed when developing guidelines, irrespective of the infectious agent. Profession-specific barriers require profession-specific strategies to change attitudes, ensure organizational facilities, and provide an adequate setting for crisis management. Copyright © 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  6. Healthcare Professionals’ and Policy Makers’ Views on Implementing a Clinical Practice Guideline of Hypertension Management: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ping Yein; Liew, Su May; Abdullah, Adina; Abdullah, Nurdiana; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Chia, Yook Chin; Lai, Pauline S. M.; Wong, Stalia S. L.; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Most studies have reported barriers to guideline usage mainly from doctors’ perspective; few have reported the perspective of other stakeholders. This study aimed to determine the views and barriers to adherence of a national clinical practice guideline (CPG) on management of hypertension from the perspectives of policymakers, doctors and allied healthcare professionals. Methods This study used a qualitative approach with purposive sampling. Seven in depth interviews and six focus group discussions were conducted with 35 healthcare professionals (policy makers, doctors, pharmacists and nurses) at a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February and June 2013. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and checked. Thematic approach was used to analyse the data. Results Two main themes and three sub-themes emerged from this study. The main themes were (1) variation in the use of CPG and (2) barriers to adherence to CPG. The three sub-themes for barriers were issues inherent to the CPG, systems and policy that is not supportive of CPG use, and attitudes and behaviour of stakeholders. The main users of the CPG were the primary care doctors. Pharmacists only partially use the guidelines, while nurses and policy makers were not using the CPG at all. Participants had suggested few strategies to improve usage and adherence to CPG. First, update the CPG regularly and keep its content simple with specific sections for allied health workers. Second, use technology to facilitate CPG accessibility and provide protected time for implementation of CPG recommendations. Third, incorporate local CPG in professional training, link CPG adherence to key performance indicators and provide incentives for its use. Conclusions Barriers to the use of CPG hypertension management span across all stakeholders. The development and implementation of CPG focused mainly on doctors with lack of involvement of other healthcare stakeholders. Guidelines

  7. Healthcare professionals' and policy makers' views on implementing a clinical practice guideline of hypertension management: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ping Yein; Liew, Su May; Abdullah, Adina; Abdullah, Nurdiana; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Chia, Yook Chin; Lai, Pauline S M; Wong, Stalia S L; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2015-01-01

    Most studies have reported barriers to guideline usage mainly from doctors' perspective; few have reported the perspective of other stakeholders. This study aimed to determine the views and barriers to adherence of a national clinical practice guideline (CPG) on management of hypertension from the perspectives of policymakers, doctors and allied healthcare professionals. This study used a qualitative approach with purposive sampling. Seven in depth interviews and six focus group discussions were conducted with 35 healthcare professionals (policy makers, doctors, pharmacists and nurses) at a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February and June 2013. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and checked. Thematic approach was used to analyse the data. Two main themes and three sub-themes emerged from this study. The main themes were (1) variation in the use of CPG and (2) barriers to adherence to CPG. The three sub-themes for barriers were issues inherent to the CPG, systems and policy that is not supportive of CPG use, and attitudes and behaviour of stakeholders. The main users of the CPG were the primary care doctors. Pharmacists only partially use the guidelines, while nurses and policy makers were not using the CPG at all. Participants had suggested few strategies to improve usage and adherence to CPG. First, update the CPG regularly and keep its content simple with specific sections for allied health workers. Second, use technology to facilitate CPG accessibility and provide protected time for implementation of CPG recommendations. Third, incorporate local CPG in professional training, link CPG adherence to key performance indicators and provide incentives for its use. Barriers to the use of CPG hypertension management span across all stakeholders. The development and implementation of CPG focused mainly on doctors with lack of involvement of other healthcare stakeholders. Guidelines should be made simple, current, reliable

  8. Alliance for a Healthier Generation's competitive beverage and food guidelines: do elementary school administrators know about them and do they report implementing them?

    PubMed

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Turner, Lindsey; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2012-10-01

    The availability of competitive foods in schools is a modifiable factor in efforts to prevent childhood obesity. The Alliance for a Healthier Generation launched the Healthy Schools Program in 2006 to encourage schools to create healthier food environments, including the adoption of nutritional guidelines for competitive beverages and foods. This study examines nationwide awareness and implementation of the guidelines in US public elementary schools. Data were collected from a nationally representative sample of elementary schools using mail-back surveys in 2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010. From 2006-2007 to 2009-2010, awareness of the Alliance's beverage guidelines increased from 35.0% to 51.8% among school administrators (p < .01); awareness of the food guidelines increased from 29.4% to 40.2% (p < .01). By 2009-2010, almost one third of the schools that sold competitive beverages and foods reported having implemented or being in the process of implementing the guidelines. Implementation was higher among schools from Southern states. Schools with a majority of Black or Latino students were less likely to implement the guidelines. Awareness and implementation of the Alliance's beverage and food guidelines has significantly increased since the 2006-2007 school year, indicating successful diffusion of the guidelines. However, many administrators at schools who sold competitive products were not aware of the guidelines, indicating a need for continued efforts. In addition, lower implementation among schools serving minority students suggests that the Alliance's targeted efforts to provide intensive technical assistance to such schools is warranted and necessary. © 2012, American School Health Association.

  9. AGA White Paper: Training and Implementation of Endoscopic Image Enhancement Technologies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neil; Brill, Joel V; Canto, Marcia; DeMarco, Daniel; Fennerty, Brian M; Laine, Loren; Lieberman, David; Lightdale, Charles; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Odze, Robert; Rex, Douglas; Sharma, Prateek; Tokar, Jeffrey L; Kochman, Michael L

    2017-06-01

    Endoscopic image-enhancement technologies provide opportunities to visualize normal and abnormal tissues within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in a manner that complements conventional white light endoscopic imaging. The additional information that is obtained enables the endoscopist to better identify, delineate, and characterize lesions and can facilitate targeted biopsies or, in some cases, eliminate the need to send samples for histologic analysis. Some of these technologies have been available for more than a decade, but despite this fact, there is limited use of these technologies by endoscopists. Lack of formalized training in their use and a scarcity of guidelines on implementation of these technologies into clinical practice are contributing factors. In November 2014, the American Gastroenterological Association's Center for GI Innovation and Technology conducted a 2-day workshop to discuss endoscopic image-enhancement technologies. This article represents the third of 3 separate documents generated from the workshop and discusses the published literature pertaining to training and outlines a proposed framework for the implementation of endoscopic image-enhancement technologies in clinical practice. There was general agreement among participants in the workshop on several key considerations. Training and competency assessment for endoscopic image-enhancement technologies should incorporate competency-based education paradigms. To facilitate successful training, multiple different educational models that can cater to variations in learning styles need to be developed, including classroom-style and self-directed programs, in-person and web-based options, image and video atlases, and endoscopic simulator programs. To ensure safe and appropriate use of these technologies over time, refresher courses, skill maintenance programs, and options for competency reassessment should be established. Participants also generally agreed that although early adopters of

  10. 78 FR 11059 - Examination Guidelines for Implementing the First Inventor To File Provisions of the Leahy-Smith...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ...The United States Patent and Trademark Office (Office) is publishing examination guidelines concerning the first inventor to file provisions of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (AIA). The AIA amends the patent laws pertaining to the conditions of patentability to convert the U.S. patent system from a ``first to invent'' system to a ``first inventor to file'' system, treats patents and patent application publications as prior art as of their earliest effective U.S., foreign, or international filing date, eliminates the requirement that a prior public use or sale activity be ``in this country'' to be a prior art activity, and treats commonly owned or joint research agreement patents and patent application publications as being by the same inventive entity for purposes of novelty, as well as nonobviousness. The changes to the conditions of patentability in the AIA result in greater transparency, objectivity, predictability, and simplicity in patentability determinations. The Office is providing these examination guidelines to Office personnel, and notifying the public of these guidelines, to assist in the implementation of the first inventor to file provisions of the AIA. These examination guidelines also clarify, in response to the public comment, that there is no requirement that the mode of disclosure by an inventor or joint inventor be the same as the mode of disclosure of an intervening disclosure (e.g., inventor discloses his invention at a trade show and the intervening disclosure is in a peer-reviewed journal). Additionally, there is no requirement that the disclosure by the inventor or a joint inventor be a verbatim or ipsissimis verbis disclosure of an intervening disclosure in order for the exception based on a previous public disclosure of subject matter by the inventor or a joint inventor to apply. These guidelines also clarify that the exception applies to subject matter of the intervening disclosure that is simply a more general description of the

  11. Burden of diabetic foot disorders, guidelines for management and disparities in implementation in Europe: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    van Acker, Kristien; Léger, Philippe; Hartemann, Agnes; Chawla, Abhineet; Siddiqui, Mohd Kashif

    2014-11-01

    The study aimed to assess the economic and quality of life burden of diabetic foot disorders and to identify disparities in the recommendations from guidelines and the current clinical practice across the EU5 (Spain, Italy, France, UK and Germany) countries. Literature search of electronic databases (MEDLINE®, Embase® and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews) was undertaken. English language studies investigating economic and resource burden, quality of life and management of diabetic foot disease in the EU5 countries were included. Additionally, websites were screened for guidelines and current management practices in diabetic foot complication in EU5. Diabetic foot complications accounted for a total annual cost of €509m in the UK and €430 per diabetic patient in Germany, during 2001. The cost of diabetic foot complications increased with disease severity, with hospitalizations (41%) and amputation (9%) incurring 50% of the cost. Medical devices (orthopaedic shoes, shoe lifts and walking aids) were the most frequently utilized resources. Patients with diabetic foot complications experienced worsened quality of life, especially in those undergoing amputations and with non-healed ulcers or recurrent ulcers. Although guidelines advocate the use of multidisciplinary foot care teams, the utilization of multidisciplinary foot care teams was suboptimal. We conclude that diabetic foot disorders demonstrated substantial economic burden and have detrimental effect on quality of life, with more impairment in physical domain. Implementation of the guidelines and set-up of multidisciplinary clinics for holistic management of the diabetic foot disorders varies across Europe and remains suboptimal. Hence, guidelines need to be reinforced to prevent diabetic foot complications and to achieve limb salvage if complications are unpreventable. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. General practitioners' reasons for the failure of a randomized controlled trial (The TIGER Trial) to implement epilepsy guidelines in primary care.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brian; Skinner, James; Dowell, Jon; Roberts, Richard; Crombie, Iain; Davis, Julian

    2007-07-01

    To explore reasons for the failure of a randomized controlled trial to influence implementation of epilepsy guidelines in primary care, and to generate theory about likely contexts in which guidelines would lead to changes in clinician behavior. Qualitative study based on focus groups and a single in-depth interview. Participants included 47 primary health care staff selected from a purposive sample of 13 urban and rural general practices. The key reason for the lack of implementation of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network epilepsy guideline was an established pattern of general practitioner behavior, supported by practice staff, with which there was little perceived need to change. Secondary to this was a lack of knowledge of the existence and/or content of the guideline and perceived difficulties in implementing them in practice stemming from resource constraints and possible patient resistance. The individual behavior of clinicians was therefore rooted in wider service structures and policies. Guidelines may be more likely to be implemented where there are perceived problems with current service delivery. Attempts to facilitate the implementation of guidelines could also focus on areas where there is already a perceived need for guidance or a disruption in one of the underlying variables that maintain the health professional's role and practice. They may also be more likely where initiatives are focused more widely than individual physician behavior and are more broadly directed toward redesigning the wider care delivery systems by incorporating other providers to provide care coordination, enhancing patient self-management, and using information technology tools.

  13. Knowledge on Irradiation, Medical Imaging Prescriptions, and Clinical Imaging Referral Guidelines among Physicians in a Sub-Saharan African Country (Cameroon).

    PubMed

    Moifo, Boniface; Tene, Ulrich; Moulion Tapouh, Jean Roger; Samba Ngano, Odette; Tchemtchoua Youta, Justine; Simo, Augustin; Gonsu Fotsin, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) are suitable tools to enhance justification of imaging procedures. To assess physicians' knowledge on irradiation, their self-perception of imaging prescriptions, and the use of CIGs. A questionnaire of 21 items was self-administered between July and August 2016 to 155 referring physicians working in seven university-affiliated hospitals in Yaoundé and Douala (Cameroon). This pretested questionnaire based on imaging referral practices, the use and the need of CIGs, knowledge on radiation doses of 11 specific radiologic procedures, and knowledge of injurious effects of radiation was completed in the presence of the investigator. Scores were allocated for each question. 155 questionnaires were completed out of 180 administered (86.1%). Participants were 90 (58%) females, 63 (40.64%) specialists, 53 (34.20%) residents/interns, and 39 (25.16%) general practitioners. The average professional experience was 7.4 years (1-25 years). The mean knowledge score was 11.5/59 with no influence of sex, years of experience, and professional category. CIGs users' score was better than nonusers (means 14.2 versus 10.6; p < 0.01). 80% of physicians (124/155) underrated radiation doses of routine imaging exams. Seventy-eight (50.3%) participants have knowledge on CIGs and half of them made use of them. "Impact on diagnosis" was the highest justification criteria follow by "impact on treatment decision." Unjustified requests were mainly for "patient expectation or will" or for "research motivations." 96% of interviewees believed that making available national CIGs will improve justification. Most physicians did not have appropriate awareness about radiation doses for routine imaging procedures. A small number of physicians have knowledge on CIGs but they believe that making available CIGs will improve justification of imaging procedures. Continuous trainings on radiation protection and implementation of national CIGs are therefore recommended.

  14. Translating knowledge into best practice care bundles: a pragmatic strategy for EBP implementation via moving postprocedural pain management nursing guidelines into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Hannele

    2015-07-01

    To describe quantitative and qualitative best evidence as sources for practical interventions usable in daily care delivery in order to integrate best evidence into clinical decision-making at local practice settings. To illustrate the development, implementation and evaluation of a pain management nursing care bundle based on a clinical practice guideline via a real-world clinical exemplar. Successful implementation of evidence-based practice requires consistent integration of best evidence into daily clinical decision-making. Best evidence comprises high-quality knowledge summarised in systematic reviews and translated into guidelines. However, consistent integration of guidelines into care delivery remains challenging, partly due to guidelines not being in a usable form for daily practice or relevant for the local context. A position paper with a clinical exemplar of a nurse-led, evidence-based quality improvement project to design, implement and evaluate a pain management care bundle translated from a national nursing guideline. A pragmatic approach to integrating guidelines into daily practice is presented. Best evidence from a national nursing guideline was translated into a pain management care bundle and integrated into daily practice in 15 medical-surgical (med-surg) units of nine hospitals of a large university hospital system in Finland. Translation of best evidence from guidelines into usable form as care bundles adapted to the local setting may increase implementation and uptake of guidelines and improve quality and consistency of care delivery. A pragmatic approach to translating a nursing guideline into a pain management care bundle to incorporate best evidence into daily practice may help achieve more consistent and equitable integration of guidelines into care delivery, and better quality of pain management and patient outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Computed Tomography Image Compressibility and Limitations of Compression Ratio-Based Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pambrun, Jean-François; Noumeir, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Finding optimal compression levels for diagnostic imaging is not an easy task. Significant compressibility variations exist between modalities, but little is known about compressibility variations within modalities. Moreover, compressibility is affected by acquisition parameters. In this study, we evaluate the compressibility of thousands of computed tomography (CT) slices acquired with different slice thicknesses, exposures, reconstruction filters, slice collimations, and pitches. We demonstrate that exposure, slice thickness, and reconstruction filters have a significant impact on image compressibility due to an increased high frequency content and a lower acquisition signal-to-noise ratio. We also show that compression ratio is not a good fidelity measure. Therefore, guidelines based on compression ratio should ideally be replaced with other compression measures better correlated with image fidelity. Value-of-interest (VOI) transformations also affect the perception of quality. We have studied the effect of value-of-interest transformation and found significant masking of artifacts when window is widened.

  16. Strategies to implement community guidelines on nutrition and their long-term clinical effects in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Törmä, J; Winblad, U; Saletti, A; Cederholm, T

    2015-01-01

    Studies on implementation techniques that focus on nutrition in the setting of elderly care are scarce. The aims of this study were to compare two implementation strategies i.e., external facilitation (EF) and educational outreach visits (EOVs), in order to introduce nutritional guidelines (e.g. screening, food quality and mealtime ambience), into a nursing home (NH) setting and to evaluate the clinical outcomes. A controlled study with baseline and follow-up measurements. Four NHs. A total of 101 NH residents. The EF was a one-year, multifaceted intervention that included support, guidance, practice audits, and feedback that were provided to two NHs. The EOVs performed at the other NHs consisted of one session of three hours of lectures about the guidelines. Both interventions targeted a team of the unit manager, the head nurse, and 5-10 of the care staff. The outcomes were nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form, MNA-SF), body mass index (BMI), functional ability (Barthel Index, BI), cognitive function (Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, SPMSQ, performed in a subgroup of communicative NH residents), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), and the levels of certain biochemical markers like for example vitamin D, albumin and insulin-like growth factor 1. After a median of 18 months, nutritional parameters (MNA-SF and BMI) remained unchanged in both groups. While there were no differences in most outcomes between the two groups, the cognitive ability of those in the EOV group deteriorated more than in individuals in the EF group (p=0.008). Multiple linear regression analyses indicated that the intervention group assignment (EF) was independently from other potentially related factors associated with less cognitive decline. An extended model of implementation of nutritional guidelines, including guidance and feedback to NH staff, did not affect nutritional status but may be associated with a delayed cognitive decline in communicative NH

  17. Implementation of a guideline for low back pain management in primary care: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Annette; Held, Heiko; Redaelli, Marcus; Chenot, Jean F; Leonhardt, Corinna; Keller, Stefan; Baum, Erika; Pfingsten, Michael; Hildebrandt, Jan; Basler, Heinz-Dieter; Kochen, Michael M; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Strauch, Konstantin

    2012-04-15

    Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a cluster randomized controlled trial. To study the cost-effectiveness of 2 low back pain guideline implementation (GI) strategies. Several evidence-based guidelines on management of low back pain have been published. However, there is still no consensus on the effective implementation strategy. Especially studies on the economic impact of different implementation strategies are lacking. This analysis was performed alongside a cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of 2 GI strategies (physician education alone [GI] or physician education in combination with motivational counseling [MC] by practice nurses)--both compared with the postal dissemination of the guideline (control group, C). Sociodemographic data, pain characteristics, and cost data were collected by interview at baseline and after 6 and 12 months. low back pain-related health care costs were valued for 2004 from the societal perspective. For the cost analysis, 1322 patients from 126 general practices were included. Both interventions showed lower direct and indirect costs as well as better patient outcomes during follow-up compared with controls. In addition, both intervention arms showed superiority of cost-effectiveness to C. The effects attenuated when adjusting for differences of health care utilization prior to patient recruitment and for clustering of data. Trends in cost-effectiveness are visible but need to be confirmed in future studies. Researchers performing cost-evaluation studies should test for baseline imbalances of health care utilization data instead of judging on the randomization success by reviewing non-cost parameters like clinical data alone.

  18. Implementation of Image-Guidance Techniques in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael; Clark, Brenda; MacPherson, Miller; Montgomery, Lynn; Gerig, Lee

    2008-06-01

    For more than 100 years, physicists have been a vital part of the medical team required to deliver radiation therapy. Their role encompasses the verification of dose accuracy to the development and implementation of new techniques, the most recent of which is the incorporation of daily image guidance to account for inter- and intra-fraction target changes. For example, computed tomography (CT) integrated into radiotherapy treatment units allows the image-guided treatment of the prostate where the target location depends on the degree of rectal filling--a parameter that changes on timescales from minutes to weeks. Different technology is required for the adequate treatment of small lung tumours since respiration occurs on timescales of seconds. This presentation will review current image-guided techniques.

  19. Implementation of aeronautic image compression technology on DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujing; Gao, Xueqiang; Wang, Mei

    2007-11-01

    According to the designed characteristics and demands of aeronautic image compression system, lifting scheme wavelet and SPIHT algorithm was selected as the key part of software implementation, which was introduced with details. In order to improve execution efficiency, border processing was simplified reasonably and SPIHT (Set Partitioning in Hierarchical Trees) algorithm was also modified partly. The results showed that the selected scheme has a 0.4dB improvement in PSNR(peak-peak-ratio) compared with classical Shaprio's scheme. To improve the operating speed, the hardware system was then designed based on DSP and many optimization measures were then applied successfully. Practical test showed that the system can meet the real-time demand with good quality of reconstruct image, which has been used in an aeronautic image compression system practically.

  20. Changing attitudes to infection management in primary care: a controlled trial of active versus passive guideline implementation strategies.

    PubMed

    Onion, C W; Bartzokas, C A

    1998-04-01

    When attempting to implement evidence-based medicine, such as through clinical guidelines, we often rely on passive educational tactics, for example didactic lectures and bulletins. These methods involve the recipient in relatively superficial processing of information, and any consequent attitude changes can be expected to be short-lived. However, active methods, such as practice-based discussion, should involve recipients in deep processing, with more enduring attitude changes. In this experiment, the aim was to assess the efficacy of an active strategy at promoting deep processing and its effectiveness, relative to a typical passive method, at changing attitudes between groups of GPs over 12 months across an English Health District. All 191 GPs operating from 69 practices in the Wirral Health District of Northwest England were assigned, with minimization of known confounding variables, to three experimental groups: active, passive and control. The groups were shown to have similar learning styles. The objective of the study was to impart knowledge of best management of infections as captured in a series of locally developed clinical guidelines. The passive group GPs were given a copy of the guidelines and were invited to an hour-long lecture event. The GPs in the deep group were given a copy of the guidelines and were invited to engage in an hour-long discussion about the guideline content at their own premises. The control group received neither the guidelines nor any educational contact regarding them. Three months before and 12 months after the interventions, all GPs were sent a postal questionnaire on their preferred empirical antibiotic for 10 common bacterial infections. The responses were compared in order to ascertain whether increased knowledge of best clinical practice was evident in each group. Seventy-five per cent (144/191) of GPs responded to the pre-intervention questionnaire, 62 % (119/191) post-intervention. Thirty-four per cent (22/64) of GPs

  1. Decreased neonatal jaundice readmission rate after implementing hyperbilirubinemia guidelines and universal screening for bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Alkalay, Arie L; Bresee, Catherine J; Simmons, Charles F

    2010-09-01

    Readmission rate for neonatal jaundice approximate 10 per 1000 live births. After applying hyperbilirubinemia guidelines and universal screening for bilirubin in term and near-term newborns, the readmission rate declined significantly from 24 to 3.7 per 1000 live births. Decreased readmission rate for neonatal jaundice may reduce kernicterus rate and health care costs. Further studies are necessary to explore these potential benefits.

  2. U.S. Army Environmental Center Guidelines for Implementation of ER 1110-1-263 for USAEC Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    USAEC to be the best general approach for implementing the requirements of ER 1110-1-263. Modifications to the requirements in this document may be made...not Requiring Validation 5.4 Method Development 6.0 General Laboratory Procedures 6.1 SOPs Laboratory 6.2 Laboratory Personnel Guidelines 6.3 USAEC...of sample to be collected. The choice of solvents shall be specified in the QAPjP (in general , a 1:4 acetone/hexane mixture should be used to wipe for

  3. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for cytochrome P450 2D6 genotype and codeine therapy: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Crews, K R; Gaedigk, A; Dunnenberger, H M; Leeder, J S; Klein, T E; Caudle, K E; Haidar, C E; Shen, D D; Callaghan, J T; Sadhasivam, S; Prows, C A; Kharasch, E D; Skaar, T C

    2014-04-01

    Codeine is bioactivated to morphine, a strong opioid agonist, by the hepatic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6); hence, the efficacy and safety of codeine are governed by CYP2D6 activity. Polymorphisms are a major cause of CYP2D6 variability. We summarize evidence from the literature supporting this association and provide therapeutic recommendations for codeine based on CYP2D6 genotype. This document is an update to the 2012 Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guidelines for CYP2D6 genotype and codeine therapy.

  4. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium Guidelines for Cytochrome P450 2D6 Genotype and Codeine Therapy: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Crews, K R; Gaedigk, A; Dunnenberger, H M; Leeder, J S; Klein, T E; Caudle, K E; Haidar, C E; Shen, D D; Callaghan, J T; Sadhasivam, S; Prows, C A; Kharasch, E D; Skaar, T C

    2014-01-01

    Codeine is bioactivated to morphine, a strong opioid agonist, by the hepatic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6); hence, the efficacy and safety of codeine are governed by CYP2D6 activity. Polymorphisms are a major cause of CYP2D6 variability. We summarize evidence from the literature supporting this association and provide therapeutic recommendations for codeine based on CYP2D6 genotype. This document is an update to the 2012 Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guidelines for CYP2D6 genotype and codeine therapy. PMID:24458010

  5. 32 CFR 2004.11 - Agency Implementing Regulations, Internal Rules, or Guidelines [102(b)(3)].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM DIRECTIVE NO. 1 Implementation and Oversight § 2004.11 Agency Implementing... should normally occur during routine oversight visits, when there is indication of a problem that...

  6. 32 CFR 2004.11 - Agency Implementing Regulations, Internal Rules, or Guidelines [102(b)(3)].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM DIRECTIVE NO. 1 Implementation and Oversight § 2004.11 Agency Implementing... should normally occur during routine oversight visits, when there is indication of a problem that...

  7. Measure Guideline. Five Steps to Implement the Public Housing Authority Energy-Efficient Unit Turnover Checklist

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, Christine

    2015-07-09

    Five Steps to Implementing the PHA Energy Efficient Unit Turnover Package (ARIES, 2014) is a guide to prepare for the installation of energy efficient measures during a typical public housing authority unit turnover. While a PHA is cleaning, painting and readying a unit for a new resident, there is an opportunity to incorporate energy efficiency measures to further improve the unit's performance. The measures on the list are simple enough to be implemented by in-house maintenance personnel, inexpensive enough to be folded into operating expenses without needing capital budget, and fast enough to implement without substantially changing the number of days between occupancies, a critical factor for organizations where the demand for dwelling units far outweighs the supply. The following guide lays out a five step plan to implement the EE Unit Turnover Package in your PHA, from an initial Self-Assessment through to Package Implementation.

  8. (18)F-NaF PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for bone imaging.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, M; Mottaghy, F M; Payche, F; Behrendt, F F F; Van den Wyngaert, T; Fogelman, I; Strobel, K; Celli, M; Fanti, S; Giammarile, F; Krause, B; Langsteger, W

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide minimum standards for the performance and interpretation of (18)F-NaF PET/CT scans. Standard acquisition and interpretation of nuclear imaging modalities will help to provide consistent data acquisition and numeric values between different platforms and institutes and to promote the use of PET/CT modality as an established diagnostic modality in routine clinical practice. This will also improve the value of scientific work and its contribution to evidence-based medicine.

  9. The Impact of Social Media on Dissemination and Implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines: A Longitudinal Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswami, Pushpa; Gronseth, Gary; Dubinsky, Richard; Penfold-Murray, Rebecca; Cox, Julie; Bever, Christopher; Martins, Yolanda; Rheaume, Carol; Shouse, Denise; Getchius, Thomas S D

    2015-08-13

    Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are statements that provide recommendations to optimize patient care for a specific clinical problem or question. Merely reading a guideline rarely leads to implementation of recommendations. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has a formal process of guideline development and dissemination. The last few years have seen a burgeoning of social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and newer methods of dissemination such as podcasts and webinars. The role of these media in guideline dissemination has not been studied. Systematic evaluation of dissemination methods and comparison of the effectiveness of newer methods with traditional methods is not available. It is also not known whether specific dissemination methods may be more effectively targeted to specific audiences. Our aim was to (1) develop an innovative dissemination strategy by adding social media-based dissemination methods to traditional methods for the AAN clinical practice guidelines "Complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis" ("CAM in MS") and (2) evaluate whether the addition of social media outreach improves awareness of the CPG and knowledge of CPG recommendations, and affects implementation of those recommendations. Outcomes were measured by four surveys in each of the two target populations: patients and physicians/clinicians ("physicians"). The primary outcome was the difference in participants' intent to discuss use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with their physicians or patients, respectively, after novel dissemination, as compared with that after traditional dissemination. Secondary outcomes were changes in awareness of the CPG, knowledge of CPG content, and behavior regarding CAM use in multiple sclerosis (MS). Response rates were 25.08% (622/2480) for physicians and 43.5% (348/800) for patients. Awareness of the CPG increased after traditional dissemination (absolute difference, 95% confidence

  10. Implementation Of Adaptive Filtration For Digital Chest Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, H. Page; Johnson, G. Allan; Suddarth, S. A.; Sheerrier, R. H.; Ravin, C. E.

    1987-07-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the potential for adaptive filtration in processing digital chest images. The technique uses the histogram of the image to determine the pixels (and regions) in which edge enhancement is applied. This paper extends that work by investigating the choice of parameters used in selectively enhancing the mediastinum. The image is separated into its low and high frequency components by convolution with a square kernel. The effect of kernel size was studied with a choice of 17 x 17 mm, which was found to be sufficient to include the frequencies of interest. A serious deficiency in previous implementations of this technique is the existence of ringing artifacts at the juncture of the lung and mediastinum. These result in part from the use of a step function to specify the low frequency image intensity above which high frequencies are amplified. By replacing this step with a smoother (cosine) function, the artifact can be removed. Finally, the amplification constant was examined in light of its effect on both structure and noise in the image.

  11. Request redirection paradigm in medical image archive implementation.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Dinu; Ivetić, Dragan

    2012-08-01

    It is widely recognized that the JPEG2000 facilitates issues in medical imaging: storage, communication, sharing, remote access, interoperability, and presentation scalability. Therefore, JPEG2000 support was added to the DICOM standard Supplement 61. Two approaches to support JPEG2000 medical image are explicitly defined by the DICOM standard: replacing the DICOM image format with corresponding JPEG2000 codestream, or by the Pixel Data Provider service, DICOM supplement 106. The latest one supposes two-step retrieval of medical image: DICOM request and response from a DICOM server, and then JPIP request and response from a JPEG2000 server. We propose a novel strategy for transmission of scalable JPEG2000 images extracted from a single codestream over DICOM network using the DICOM Private Data Element without sacrificing system interoperability. It employs the request redirection paradigm: DICOM request and response from JPEG2000 server through DICOM server. The paper presents programming solution for implementation of request redirection paradigm in a DICOM transparent manner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identifying the barriers and enablers in the implementation of the New Zealand and Australian Antenatal Corticosteroid Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mc Goldrick, E L; Crawford, T; Brown, J A; Groom, K M; Crowther, C A

    2016-10-28

    The ineffective implementation of evidence based practice guidelines can mean that the best health outcomes are not achieved. This study examined the barriers and enablers to the uptake and implementation of the new bi-national (Australia and New Zealand) antenatal corticosteroid clinical practice guidelines among health professionals, using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Semi-structured interviews or online questionnaires were conducted across four health professional groups and three district health boards in Auckland, New Zealand. The questions were constructed to reflect the 14 behavioural domains from the Theoretical Domains Framework. Relevant domains were identified by the presence of conflicting beliefs within a domain; the frequency of beliefs; and the likely strength of the impact of a belief on the behaviour using thematic analysis. The influence of health professional group and organisation on the different barriers and enablers identified were explored. Seventy-three health professionals completed either a semi-structured interview (n = 35) or on-line questionnaire (n = 38). Seven behavioural domains were identified as overarching enablers: belief about consequences; knowledge; social influences; environmental context and resource; belief about capabilities; social professional role and identity; and behavioural regulation. Five behavioural domains were identified as overarching barriers: environmental context and resources; knowledge; social influences; belief about consequences; and social professional role and identity. Differences in beliefs between individual health professional groups were identified within the domains: belief about consequences; social professional role and identity; and emotion. Organisational differences were identified within the domains: belief about consequences; social influences; and belief about capabilities. This study has identified some of the enablers and barriers to implementation of the New Zealand and

  13. Impact on clinical practice of the implementation of guidelines for the toxicity management of targeted therapies in kidney cancer. The protect-2 study.

    PubMed

    Lainez, Nuria; García-Donas, Jesús; Esteban, Emilio; Puente, Javier; Sáez, M Isabel; Gallardo, Enrique; Pinto-Marín, Álvaro; Vázquez-Estévez, Sergio; León, Luis; García-Carbonero, Icíar; Suárez-Rodríguez, Cristina; Molins, Carmen; Climent-Duran, Miguel A; Lázaro-Quintela, Martín; González Del Alba, Aranzazu; Méndez-Vidal, María José; Chirivella, Isabel; Afonso, Francisco J; López-Brea, Marta; Sala-González, Nuria; Domenech, Montserrat; Basterretxea, Laura; Santander-Lobera, Carmen; Gil-Arnáiz, Irene; Fernández, Ovidio; Caballero-Díaz, Cristina; Mellado, Begoña; Marrupe, David; García-Sánchez, José; Sánchez-Escribano, Ricardo; Fernández Parra, Eva; Villa Guzmán, José C; Martínez-Ortega, Esther; Belén González, María; Morán, Marina; Suarez-Paniagua, Beatriz; Lecumberri, María J; Castellano, Daniel

    2016-02-22

    The impact of such recommendations after their implementation of guidelines has not usually been evaluated. Herein, we assessed the impact and compliance with the Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group (SOGUG) Guidelines for toxicity management of targeted therapies in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in daily clinical practice. Data on 407 mRCC patients who initiated first-line targeted therapy during the year before and the year after publication and implementation of the SOGUG guideline program were available from 34 Spanish Hospitals. Adherence to SOGUG Guidelines was assessed in every cycle. Adverse event (AE) management was consistent with the Guidelines as a whole for 28.7% out of 966 post-implementation cycles compared with 23.1% out of 892 pre-implementation cycles (p = 0.006). Analysis of adherence by AE in non-compliant cycles showed significant changes in appropriate management of hypertension (33% pre-implementation vs. 44.5% post-implementation cycles; p < 0.0001), diarrhea (74.0% vs. 80.5%; p = 0.011) and dyslipemia (25.0% vs. 44.6%; p < 0.001). Slight but significant improvements in AE management were detected following the implementation of SOGUG recommendations. However, room for improvement in the management of AEs due to targeted agents still remains and could be the focus for further programs in this direction.

  14. Following a natural experiment of guideline adaptation and early implementation: a mixed-methods study of facilitation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Facilitation is emerging as an important strategy in the uptake of evidence. However, it is not entirely clear from a practical perspective how facilitation occurs to help move research evidence into nursing practice. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, also known as the 'Partnership,' is a Pan-Canadian initiative supporting knowledge translation activity for improved care through guideline use. In this case-series study, five self-identified groups volunteered to use a systematic methodology to adapt existing clinical practice guidelines for Canadian use. With 'Partnership' support, local and external facilitators provided assistance for groups to begin the process by adapting the guidelines and planning for implementation. Methods To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the nature of facilitation, we conducted a mixed-methods study. Specifically, we examined the role and skills of individuals actively engaged in facilitation as well as the actual facilitation activities occurring within the 'Partnership.' The study was driven by and builds upon a focused literature review published in 2010 that examined facilitation as a role and process in achieving evidence-based practice in nursing. An audit tool outlining 46 discrete facilitation activities based on results of this review was used to examine the facilitation noted in the documents (emails, meeting minutes, field notes) of three nursing-related cases participating in the 'Partnership' case-series study. To further examine the concept, six facilitators were interviewed about their practical experiences. The case-audit data were analyzed through a simple content analysis and triangulated with participant responses from the focus group interview to understand what occurred as these cases undertook guideline adaptation. Results The analysis of the three cases revealed that almost all of the 46 discrete, practical facilitation activities from the literature were evidenced. Additionally, case

  15. Trends in Opioid Dosing Among Washington State Medicaid Patients Before and After Opioid Dosing Guideline Implementation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Mark D; Bauer, Amy M; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Garg, Renu K; Turner, Judith A; Wickizer, Thomas; Franklin, Gary M

    2016-05-01

    By 2007, opioid-related mortality in Washington state (WA) was 50% higher than the national average, with Medicaid patients showing nearly 6 times the mortality of commercially-insured patients. In 2007, the WA Interagency Guideline on Opioid Dosing for Chronic Non-cancer Pain was released, which recommended caution in prescribing >120 mg morphine-equivalent dose per day for patients not showing clinically meaningful improvement in pain and function. We report on opioid dosing in the WA Medicaid fee-for-service population for 273,200 adults with a paid claim for an opioid prescription between April 1, 2006 and December 31, 2010. Linear regression was used to test for trends in dosing over that time period, with quarter-year as the independent variable and median daily dose as the dependent variable. Prescription opioid use among WA Medicaid adults peaked in 2009, as evidenced by the unique number of opioid users (105,232), the total number of prescriptions (556,712), and the total person-years of prescription opioid use (29,442). Median opioid dose was unchanged from 2006 to 2010 at 37.5 mg morphine-equivalent dose, but doses at the 75th, 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles declined significantly (P < .001). These results suggest that opioid treatment guidelines with dosing guidance may be able to reduce high-dose opioid use without affecting the median dose used. Some fear that opioid dosing guidelines might restrict access to opioid therapy for patients who could benefit. However, there is evidence that high-dose opioid therapy entails significant risks without demonstrated benefit. These findings indicate that high-dose opioid therapy can be reduced without altering median opioid dose in a Medicaid population. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The implementation of venous leg ulcer guidelines: process analysis of the intervention used in a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J L; Mead, P; Jones, K; Kaba, E; Roberts, A P

    2001-11-01

    The production and implementation of clinical practice guidelines is currently a high political priority and a rapidly developing field within healthcare in the United Kingdom (UK). Their purpose is to provide clinicians with a synthesis of the best available external evidence and operationalize the implementation of evidence-based practice. Despite indications that clinical guidelines can make a difference to the quality of patient care, there is some evidence that practitioners struggle with their application. The aim of this paper is to report one element of a trial undertaken by three collaborating universities in the Northern and Yorkshire Region of the UK health service during 1997-1998. The objective was to understand what makes guidelines acceptable and usable, or otherwise, to health professionals. The findings reported in this paper describe the process of care in those general practices that elected to implement guidelines for the management of patients with venous leg ulcers. We conclude that planning for training, resource and quality improvement processes must be built into a team's guidelines implementation procedures. A preliminary needs analysis of the contextual 'hurdles and levers' within each primary healthcare team is also necessary to identify individual issues that must be addressed if the process is to succeed. These findings provide some lessons for successful implementation of clinical guidelines in general. Recommendations for nursing policy makers, managers, practitioners and researchers are included.

  17. 75 FR 61504 - Global Implementation of the Veterinary Medicinal Products Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Global Implementation of the Veterinary Medicinal Products... OIE's services and activities that are needed to carry out OIE's Veterinary International Conference... level. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Program Contact: Merton V. Smith, Center for Veterinary...

  18. Implementing Best Practice Guidelines in Pain Assessment and Management on a Women's Psychiatric Inpatient Unit: Exploring Patients' Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Rolin-Gilman, Cheryl; Fournier, Bonnie; Cleverley, Kristin

    2017-06-01

    Assessing and managing chronic pain in women with histories of interpersonal trauma, mood disorders and co-morbid addiction is complex. The aim of this paper is to report on the findings from a quality improvement project exploring women's experiences who have co-occurring mental health issues, addiction and chronic pain. Exploring perceptions was an initial step in implementing the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario (RNAO) Best Practice Guideline (BPG) on the Assessment and Management of Pain. Focus group discussions were conducted using an exploratory design with 10 women who were hospitalized in an acute psychiatric unit. Our findings suggest that these women view their pain as complex and often feel powerless within an acute psychiatric setting resorting to coping through self management. The women expressed the importance of therapeutic relationships with clinicians in assessing and managing their pain. The implications of this study suggest that patients have a key role in informing the implementation and applicability of best practice guidelines. Validating the patient's personal pain management experience and particular psychological and physical therapies were suggested as strategies to enhance the patient's quality of life. Many clinicians working in mental health are knowledgeable about these therapies, but may not be aware of the application to managing physical pain. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical Practice Guideline Adherence Before and After Implementation of the HEARTFELT (HEART Failure Effectiveness & Leadership Team) Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Patricia C.; Acevedo, Kim; Boldrighini, Jodie; Boucher, Carole; Frumento, Katherine; Gray, Peggy; Hall, Danielle; Smith, Lisa; Swallow, Anne; Yarkoni, Alon; Bakken, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    HEART Failure Effectiveness & Leadership Team (HEARTFELT) is a multifaceted intervention designed to improve adherence with the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association practice guidelines for heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to assess differences in clinician adherence with clinical practice guidelines before and after implementation of HEARTFELT. A quasi-experimental, untreated control group design with separate pretest/posttest samples was employed at a community hospital in Connecticut. The untreated historical control group included patients aged 65 years or older with HF and a nonequivalent comparison group of patients with stroke. The posttest samples included patients with the diagnosis of HF and stroke admitted after implementation of the HEARTFELT intervention. The HEARTFELT intervention included automated pathway in electronic medical record (order sets, interdisciplinary plan of care, self-management plan), access to evidence for clinicians and patients, HF self-management education tools, and ongoing discipline-specific feedback regarding adherence. Data were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric methods. The HEARTFELT intervention significantly improved clinician adherence with addressing all self-management categories in the electronic medical record (P = .000) and adherence with self-management education given to the patient in writing at discharge (P = .000). There were no significant differences in adherence with medical interventions (P = .39). While guideline adherence is associated with less practice variation and improved processes, methods of integration into practice in community hospital settings have been largely unexplored. The multifaceted HEARTFELT intervention is promising for its potential to integrate evidence at the point of care, to reduce unwarranted variation in practice, and ultimately to improve the outcomes of individuals with HF. PMID:16141775

  20. DSP Implementation of the Multiscale Retinex Image Enhancement Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Glenn D.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.

    2004-01-01

    The Retinex is a general-purpose image enhancement algorithm that is used to produce good visual representations of scenes. It performs a non-linear spatial/ spectral transform that synthesizes strong local contrast enhancement and color constancy. A real-time, video frame rate implementation of the Retinex is required to meet the needs of various potential users. Retinex processing contains a relatively large number of complex computations, thus to achieve real-time performance using current technologies requires specialized hardware and software. In this paper we discuss the design and development of a digital signal processor (DSP) implementation of the Retinex. The target processor is a Texas Instruments TMS320C6711 floating point DSP. NTSC video is captured using a dedicated frame grabber card, Retinex processed, and displayed on a standard monitor. We discuss the optimizations used to achieve real-time performance of the Retinex and also describe our future plans on using alternative architectures.

  1. DSP Implementation of the Multiscale Retinex Image Enhancement Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Glenn D.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.

    2004-01-01

    The Retinex is a general-purpose image enhancement algorithm that is used to produce good visual representations of scenes. It performs a non-linear spatial/ spectral transform that synthesizes strong local contrast enhancement and color constancy. A real-time, video frame rate implementation of the Retinex is required to meet the needs of various potential users. Retinex processing contains a relatively large number of complex computations, thus to achieve real-time performance using current technologies requires specialized hardware and software. In this paper we discuss the design and development of a digital signal processor (DSP) implementation of the Retinex. The target processor is a Texas Instruments TMS320C6711 floating point DSP. NTSC video is captured using a dedicated frame grabber card, Retinex processed, and displayed on a standard monitor. We discuss the optimizations used to achieve real-time performance of the Retinex and also describe our future plans on using alternative architectures.

  2. DSP Implementation of the Retinex Image Enhancement Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Glenn; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Jobson, Daniel; Woodell, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    The Retinex is a general-purpose image enhancement algorithm that is used to produce good visual representations of scenes. It performs a non-linear spatial/spectral transform that synthesizes strong local contrast enhancement and color constancy. A real-time, video frame rate implementation of the Retinex is required to meet the needs of various potential users. Retinex processing contains a relatively large number of complex computations, thus to achieve real-time performance using current technologies requires specialized hardware and software. In this paper we discuss the design and development of a digital signal processor (DSP) implementation of the Retinex. The target processor is a Texas Instruments TMS320C6711 floating point DSP. NTSC video is captured using a dedicated frame-grabber card, Retinex processed, and displayed on a standard monitor. We discuss the optimizations used to achieve real-time performance of the Retinex and also describe our future plans on using alternative architectures.

  3. Implementation and Optimization of Image Processing Algorithms on Embedded GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Nitin; Yoo, Jin Woo; Choi, Ho Yeol; Park, In Kyu

    In this paper, we analyze the key factors underlying the implementation, evaluation, and optimization of image processing and computer vision algorithms on embedded GPU using OpenGL ES 2.0 shader model. First, we present the characteristics of the embedded GPU and its inherent advantage when compared to embedded CPU. Additionally, we propose techniques to achieve increased performance with optimized shader design. To show the effectiveness of the proposed techniques, we employ cartoon-style non-photorealistic rendering (NPR), speeded-up robust feature (SURF) detection, and stereo matching as our example algorithms. Performance is evaluated in terms of the execution time and speed-up achieved in comparison with the implementation on embedded CPU.

  4. Challenges in implementing the new BASHH guidelines for the management of gonorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, S; Murgatroyd, M; Perez, K; Kingston, M; Lee, V

    2014-02-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has progressively developed reduced sensitivity to different classes of antibiotics. The British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gonorrhoea in 2011. New recommendations include an increased dose of ceftriaxone with adjuvant use of azithromycin, as well as test of cure (TOC) in all cases. We present an audit of adherence to new antibiotic prescribing guidelines as well as TOC uptake in an inner city genitourinary medicine clinic. Among the 271 (242 male, 29 female) patients included, 96% (n = 260) received the new first-line treatment. Test of cure uptake was found to be suboptimal at 55% (n = 149) with the majority (67%) of these taking place within 20 days of treatment. The new first-line treatment for gonorrhoea is feasible and generally accepted by patients. However the TOC uptake is low, emphasising the need for robust follow-up and recall policies. Further study is required into the optimal timing for TOC.

  5. Implementation of a new clinical practice guideline regarding pain management during childhood vaccine injections

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Samson; Pielak, Karen; McIntyre, Cheryl; Deeter, Brittany; Taddio, Anna

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of a multifaceted knowledge translation strategy for a new vaccination pain management guideline on public health immunizers’ attitudes, beliefs and use of pain-relieving strategies during childhood vaccination. METHOD: Using a randomized controlled pre-post study design, public health nurses (PHNs) at intervention sites received a multifaceted knowledge translation intervention about new pain management guidelines incorporated in the British Columbia Immunization Program Manual, including education, supplies and online support. Attitudes and beliefs of PHNs toward immunization pain and pain management, and use of pain-relieving strategies were compared for the intervention sites between the pre- and postimplementation phases. RESULTS: A total of 516 children were immunized by 31 PHNs pre- and postimplementation in the intervention sites. Postimplementation, satisfaction and confidence with ability to manage pain and willingness to use newly recommended strategies were significantly more positive (P<0.05) in the intervention sites, and overall use of at least one newly recommended strategy increased from 49.8% preintervention to 77.6% postimplementation (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: The knowledge translation intervention improved PHN immunizers’ attitudes, beliefs and practices regarding paediatric vaccination pain management. Reducing pain may result in a better immunization experience for children, caregivers and immunizers. PMID:24421712

  6. Short Space Implementation of Wiener Filtering for Image Restoration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-05

    hi l TANPA lllt , A .......... MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LINCOLN LABORATORY SHORT SPACE IMPLEMENTATION OF WIENER FILTERING FOR IMAGE...in equation (5), the discussions in section II can be applied to estimate f1i(n1,n2 ) from Yij(nln 2). Since the essence of short space processing is...11 01 7. AUTORI~j . CONTRACT Oil GRANT MUMBERal Jae~~ S.Li F19628-8j-C-0702 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION MAUIE AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT

  7. Prior image constrained compressed sensing: Implementation and performance evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lauzier, Pascal Thériault; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) is an image reconstruction framework which incorporates an often available prior image into the compressed sensing objective function. The images are reconstructed using an optimization procedure. In this paper, several alternative unconstrained minimization methods are used to implement PICCS. The purpose is to study and compare the performance of each implementation, as well as to evaluate the performance of the PICCS objective function with respect to image quality. Methods: Six different minimization methods are investigated with respect to convergence speed and reconstruction accuracy. These minimization methods include the steepest descent (SD) method and the conjugate gradient (CG) method. These algorithms require a line search to be performed. Thus, for each minimization algorithm, two line searching algorithms are evaluated: a backtracking (BT) line search and a fast Newton-Raphson (NR) line search. The relative root mean square error is used to evaluate the reconstruction accuracy. The algorithm that offers the best convergence speed is used to study the performance of PICCS with respect to the prior image parameter α and the data consistency parameter λ. PICCS is studied in terms of reconstruction accuracy, low-contrast spatial resolution, and noise characteristics. A numerical phantom was simulated and an animal model was scanned using a multirow detector computed tomography (CT) scanner to yield the projection datasets used in this study. Results: For λ within a broad range, the CG method with Fletcher-Reeves formula and NR line search offers the fastest convergence for an equal level of reconstruction accuracy. Using this minimization method, the reconstruction accuracy of PICCS was studied with respect to variations in α and λ. When the number of view angles is varied between 107, 80, 64, 40, 20, and 16, the relative root mean square error reaches a minimum value for α ≈ 0.5. For

  8. Adopting and implementing nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities: Public and private sector roles. A multiple case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recreational facilities are an important community resource for health promotion because they provide access to affordable physical activities. However, despite their health mandate, many have unhealthy food environments that may paradoxically increase the risk of childhood obesity. The Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth (ANGCY) are government-initiated, voluntary guidelines intended to facilitate children’s access to healthy food and beverage choices in schools, childcare and recreational facilities, however few recreational facilities are using them. Methods We used mixed methods within an exploratory multiple case study to examine factors that influenced adoption and implementation of the ANGCY and the nature of the food environment within three cases: an adopter, a semi-adopter and a non-adopter of the ANGCY. Diffusion of Innovations theory provided the theoretical platform for the study. Qualitative data were generated through interviews, observations, and document reviews, and were analysed using directed content analysis. Set theoretic logic was used to identify factors that differentiated adopters from the non-adopter. Quantitative sales data were also collected, and the quality of the food environment was scored using four complementary tools. Results The keys to adoption and implementation of nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities related to the managers’ nutrition-related knowledge, beliefs and perceptions, as these shaped his decisions and actions. The manager, however, could not accomplish adoption and implementation alone. Intersectoral linkages with schools and formal, health promoting partnerships with industry were also important for adoption and implementation to occur. The food environment in facilities that had adopted the ANGCY did not appear to be superior to the food environment in facilities that had not adopted the ANGCY. Conclusions ANGCY uptake may continue to falter under the current voluntary

  9. [Motivations and barriers of chilean children; threats or opportunities for the implementation of 2013 food based dietary guidelines].

    PubMed

    Olivares, Sonia; Zacarías, Isabel; González, Carmen Gloria

    2014-08-01

    Implementation of the updated Food Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) for the Chilean population requires the design of innovative strategies and effective. To determine motivations and barriers for children and mothers of preschool-age children to follow new FBDG messages, aiming to identify challenges and opportunities for designing effective communication and implementation strategies. A qualitative study based on 12 focus groups of 9 to 13 age children and 6 focus groups of mothers of preschool-age children, living in the north, central and south regions of the country, to analyze their reaction to each one of the 2013 FBDG messages. Answers of children and mothers did not show differences by gender (in the case of the children) or region of the country. Results show the most frequent and representative comments regarding each message. Challenges to reducing the consumption of foods high in energy, fat, sugar and salt include advertisements and plentiful supply and low prices for these types of foods, both in the school environment and on the street. Opportunities identified included the advertisement of fruits, vegetables and dairy products to promote their consumption, as well as the coming implementation of Law 20.606, which is expected to be an effective way to support this initiative. The results of this study show that the design of strategies based on values, desires and needs of different groups will contribute to optimizing the implementation of the 2013 Chilean FBDG. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  10. The Sharper Image: Implementing a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to Enhance a Video-Captured Image.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    mathematical system to quantitatively analyze and compare complex wave forms. In 1307, Baron Jean - Baptiste - Joseph Fourier proved that any periodic wave can be...HOVEY ROAD, PENSACOLA, FL 32508-1046 NAMRL Special Report 94-1 THE SHARPER IMAGE: 16 IMPLEMENTING A FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM (FFT) TO ENHANCE A VIDEO...most visually impaired persons fail to discern the higher spatial frequencies present in an image. Based on the Fourier analysis of vision, Peli et al

  11. A hardware implementation of a relaxation algorithm to segment images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loda, Antonio G.; Ranganath, Heggere S.

    1988-01-01

    Relaxation labelling is a mathematical technique frequently applied in image processing algorithms. In particular, it is extensively used for the purpose of segmenting images. The paper presents a hardware implementation of a segmentation algorithm, for images consisting of two regions, based on relaxation labelling. The algorithm determines, for each pixel, the probability that it should be labelled as belonging to a particular region, for all regions in the image. The label probabilities (labellings) of every pixel are iteratively updated, based on those of the pixel's neighbors, until they converge. The pixel is then assigned to the region correspondent to the maximum label probability. The system consists of a control unit and of a pipeline of segmentation stages. Each segmentation stage emulates in the hardware an iteration of the relaxation algorithm. The design of the segmentation stage is based on commercially available digital signal processing integrated circuits. Multiple iterations are accomplished by stringing stages together or by looping the output of a stage, or string of stages, to its input. The system interfaces with a generic host computer. Given the modularity of the architecture, performance can be enhanced by merely adding segmentation stages.

  12. Data structures for multimodality imaging: concepts and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mealha, Oscar E. C.; Sousa Pereira, Antonio; Santos, Maria Beatriz S.

    1992-06-01

    The integration of data coming from different imaging modalities is something to take into account, due to the importance it can have in the development of a fast and reliable diagnosis by the health staff. In the medical imaging field, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are examples of devices that generate 3-D data. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) or ultrasound (US) output 2-D data, from which its possible to reconstruct 3-D data. An important fact is that 3-D space is common to all these devices and they are all capable of producing large amounts of data. Prior to display or even data integration, matching the various 3-D spaces has to be achieved with some specific technique, according to the anatomical region under examination. The augmented octree, an extension of the linear octree, is used for data integration; its properties can help to overcome s