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Sample records for imaging hsv-1 tk

  1. Assessment of α-Fetoprotein Targeted HSV1-tk Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma with In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hui; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Kyo Chul; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Chung, Wee Sup; Lim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tumor-specific enhancer/promoter is applicable for targeting gene expression in tumors and helpful for tumor-targeting imaging and therapy. We aimed to acquire α-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specific images using adenovirus containing HSV1-tk gene controlled by AFP enhancer/promoter and evaluate in vivo ganciclovir (GCV)-medicated therapeutic effects on AFP-targeted HSV1-tk expression with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET). Recombinant adenovirus expressing HSV1-tk under AFP enhancer/promoter was produced (AdAFP-TK) and the expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR and 125I-IVDU uptake. GCV-mediated HSV1-tk cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. After the mixture of AdAFP-fLuc and AdAFP-TK was administrated, bioluminescent images (BLIs) and 18F-FHBG PET images were obtained in tumor-bearing mice. In vivo therapeutic effects of AdAFP-TK and GCV in the HuH-7 xenograft model were monitored by 18F-FDG PET. When infected with AdAFP-TK, cell viability in HuH-7 was reduced, but those in HT-29 and SK-Hep-1 were not significantly decreased at any GCV concentration less than 100 μM. AFP-targeted fLuc and HSV1-tk expression were clearly visualized by BLI and 18F-FHBG PET images in AFP-producing HCC, respectively. In vivo GCV-mediated tumor growth inhibition by AFP-targeted HSV1-tk expression was monitored by 18F-FDG PET. Recombinant AdAFP-TK could be applied for AFP-targeted HCC gene therapy and imaging in AFP-producing HCC. PMID:25545853

  2. A cyclic HSV1-TK reporter for real-time PET imaging of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu; Wang, Zhe; Hida, Naoki; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Ma, Ying; Yang, Kai; Rong, Pengfei; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    The coordination of cell proliferation and programmed death (apoptosis) is essential for normal physiology, and imbalance in these two opposing processes is implicated in various diseases. Objective and quantitative noninvasive imaging of apoptosis would significantly facilitate rapid screening as well as validation of therapeutic chemicals. Herein, we molecularly engineered an apoptosis switch-on PET-based cyclic herpes simplex virus type 1–thymidine kinase reporter (cTK266) containing a caspase-3 recognition domain as the switch. Translation of the reporter and protein splicing in healthy mammalian cells produce an inactive cyclic chimera. Upon apoptosis, caspase-3–specific cleavage of the circular product occurs, resulting in the restoration of the thymidine kinase activity, which can be detected in living cells and animals by noninvasive PET imaging. Our results showed the high sensitivity of this reporter in dynamic and quantitative imaging of apoptosis in living subjects. This reporter could be applied as a valuable tool for high-throughput functional screening of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic compounds in preclinical models in drug development, and monitoring the destination of therapeutic cells in clinical settings. PMID:24706884

  3. Noninvasive theranostic imaging of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR/GCV-CB1954 dual-prodrug therapy in metastatic lung lesions of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Foygel, Kira; Ilovich, Ohad; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is an obdurate cancer type that is not amenable to chemotherapy regimens currently used in clinic. There is a desperate need for alternative therapies to treat this resistant cancer type. Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (GDEPT) is a superior gene therapy method when compared to chemotherapy and radiotherapy procedures, proven to be effective against many types of cancer in pre-clinical evaluations and clinical trials. Gene therapy that utilizes a single enzyme/prodrug combination targeting a single cellular mechanism needs significant overexpression of delivered therapeutic gene in order to achieve therapy response. Hence, to overcome this obstacle we recently developed a dual therapeutic reporter gene fusion that uses two different prodrugs, targeting two distinct cellular mechanisms in order to achieve effective therapy with a limited expression of delivered transgenes. In addition, imaging therapeutic reporter genes offers additional information that indirectly correlates gene delivery, expression, and functional effectiveness as a theranostic approach. In the present study, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion dual suicide gene therapy system that we recently developed, in MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer lung-metastatic lesions in a mouse model. We compared the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion with respective dual prodrugs GCV-CB1954 with HSV1-sr39TK/GCV and NTR/CB1954 single enzyme prodrug system in this highly resistant metastatic lesion of the lungs. In vitro optimization of dose and duration of exposure to GCV and CB1954 was performed in MDA-MB-231 cells. Drug combinations of 1 μg/ml GCV and 10 μM CB1954 for 3 days was found to be optimal regimen for induction of significant cell death, as assessed by FACS analysis. In vivo therapeutic evaluation in animal models showed a complete ablation of lung metastatic nodules of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells following

  4. PET Imaging of Oncolytic VSV Expressing the Mutant HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase Transgene in a Preclinical HCC Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Álvarez, Kim A; Altomonte, Jennifer; Laitinen, Iina; Ziegler, Sibylle; Steiger, Katja; Esposito, Irene; Schmid, Roland M; Ebert, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most predominant form of liver cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Due to the relative ineffectiveness of conventional HCC therapies, oncolytic viruses have emerged as novel alternative treatment agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated significant prolongation of survival in advanced HCC in rats after oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) treatment. In this study, we aimed to establish a reporter system to reliably and sensitively image VSV in a clinically relevant model of HCC for clinical translation. To this end, an orthotopic, unifocal HCC model in immune-competent Buffalo rats was employed to test a recombinant VSV vector encoding for an enhanced version of the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (sr39tk) reporter, which would allow the indirect detection of VSV via positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting data revealed specific tracer uptake in VSV-HSV1-sr39tk–treated tumors. Further characterization of the VSV-HSV1-sr39tk vector demonstrated its optimal detection time-point after application and its detection limit via PET. In conclusion, oncolytic VSV expressing the HSV1-sr39tk reporter gene allows for highly sensitive in vivo imaging via PET. Therefore, this imaging system may be directly translatable and beneficial in further clinical applications. PMID:25609160

  5. Long-term observation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in a child with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and a possible reactivation mechanism for thymidine kinase-negative HSV-1 in humans.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Tomoyuki; Kurane, Ichiro; Morikawa, Shigeru; Saijo, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections in a child with congenital immunodeficiency syndrome were observed over a 10-year period. The child suffered from recurrent and severe HSV-1 mucocutaneous infections. He frequently suffered from acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(r)) HSV-1 infection in the later phase of his life, especially after the episode of ACV(r) HSV-1 infection. Virological analyses on the HSV-1 isolates recovered from this patient revealed that all the ACV(r) HSV-1 isolates were thymidine kinase (TK)-negative (TK(-)) due to a single cytosine (C) deletion within the 4-C residues (positions 1061 to 1064) in the TK gene, indicating that the recurrent TK(-)/ACV(r) HSV-1 infections throughout the patient's life were due to the identical ACV(r) HSV-1 strain. Furthermore, it was found that the ACV-sensitive (ACV(s)) isolate recovered from the skin lesions that appeared between the episodes of ACV(r) infection at the ages of 8 and 9 contained ACV(r) HSV-1 with the same mutation in the TK gene. These results indicate that, although TK activity is required for reactivation of TK(+)/ACV(s) HSV-1 from latency and TK(-)/ACV(r) HSV-1 is unable to reactivate from latency, the TK(-)/ACV(r) HSV-1 strain isolated herein reactivated in this patient, possibly by using the TK activity induced by the latently co-infected TK(+)/ACV(s) HSV-1.

  6. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't just show ...

  7. IFI16 Restricts HSV-1 Replication by Accumulating on the HSV-1 Genome, Repressing HSV-1 Gene Expression, and Directly or Indirectly Modulating Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karen E.; Bottero, Virginie; Flaherty, Stephanie; Dutta, Sujoy; Singh, Vivek Vikram; Chandran, Bala

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-γ inducible factor 16 (IFI16) is a multifunctional nuclear protein involved in transcriptional regulation, induction of interferon-β (IFN-β), and activation of the inflammasome response. It interacts with the sugar-phosphate backbone of dsDNA and modulates viral and cellular transcription through largely undetermined mechanisms. IFI16 is a restriction factor for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), though the mechanisms of HSV-1 restriction are not yet understood. Here, we show that IFI16 has a profound effect on HSV-1 replication in human foreskin fibroblasts, osteosarcoma cells, and breast epithelial cancer cells. IFI16 knockdown increased HSV-1 yield 6-fold and IFI16 overexpression reduced viral yield by over 5-fold. Importantly, HSV-1 gene expression, including the immediate early proteins, ICP0 and ICP4, the early proteins, ICP8 and TK, and the late proteins gB and Us11, was reduced in the presence of IFI16. Depletion of the inflammasome adaptor protein, ASC, or the IFN-inducing transcription factor, IRF-3, did not affect viral yield. ChIP studies demonstrated the presence of IFI16 bound to HSV-1 promoters in osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells and fibroblasts. Using CRISPR gene editing technology, we generated U2OS cells with permanent deletion of IFI16 protein expression. ChIP analysis of these cells and wild-type (wt) U2OS demonstrated increased association of RNA polymerase II, TATA binding protein (TBP) and Oct1 transcription factors with viral promoters in the absence of IFI16 at different times post infection. Although IFI16 did not alter the total histone occupancy at viral or cellular promoters, its absence promoted markers of active chromatin and decreased those of repressive chromatin with viral and cellular gene promoters. Collectively, these studies for the first time demonstrate that IFI16 prevents association of important transcriptional activators with wt HSV-1 promoters and suggest potential mechanisms of IFI16

  8. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of the thymidine kinase of ACV-resistant HSV-1 derived from an acyclovir-sensitive herpes simplex virus type 1 strain.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Masayuki; Suzutani, Tatsuo; De Clercq, Erik; Niikura, Masahiro; Maeda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro

    2002-12-01

    Twenty-four strains of acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(r)) herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were generated from the HSV-1 TAS strain by exposure to ACV, and the genotype and phenotype of the thymidine kinase (TK) from these mutants were analyzed. The TK polypeptide of the ACV(r) HSV-1 strains was examined by Western blot using an anti-HSV-1 TK rabbit serum. The sensitivity of each strain to ACV, foscarnet and cidofovir (CDV) was also determined. A single guanine (G) insertion or a single cytosine (C) deletion was detected in 12 of the 24 ACV(r) strains at the G or C homopolymer stretches within the TK gene. Genotypic analysis predicted that two thirds of the ACV(r) HSV-1 strains expressed truncated TK polypeptides, while one third expressed viral TK polypeptide with a single amino acid substitution at various sites. Western blot abnormalities in the viral TK polypeptides were identified in 21 ACV(r) strains. There was an inverse correlation between the susceptibility of the HSV-1 mutant strains to ACV and that to CDV. Nucleotide sequencing of the TK gene and Western blot analysis of the viral TK polypeptides are considered to be one of the methods for predicting virus sensitivity to ACV and CDV.

  9. Genotypic detection of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1: characterization of 67 ACV-sensitive and 14 ACV-resistant viruses.

    PubMed

    Frobert, Emilie; Cortay, Jean-Claude; Ooka, Tadamasa; Najioullah, Fatiha; Thouvenot, Danielle; Lina, Bruno; Morfin, Florence

    2008-07-01

    Infections due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) resistant to acyclovir (ACV) represent an important clinical concern in immunocompromised patients. In order to switch promptly to an appropriate treatment, rapid viral susceptibility assays are required. We developed herein a genotyping analysis focusing on thymidine kinase gene (TK) mutations in order to detect acyclovir-resistant HSV in clinical specimens. A total of 85 HSV-1 positive specimens collected from 69 patients were analyzed. TK gene could be sequenced directly for 81 clinical specimens (95%) and 68 HSV-1 specimens could be characterized as sensitive or resistant by genotyping (84%). Genetic characterization of 67 susceptible HSV-1 specimens revealed 10 polymorphisms never previously described. Genetic characterization of 14 resistant HSV-1 revealed 12 HSV-1 with either TK gene additions/deletions (8 strains) or substitutions (4 strains) and 2 HSV-1 with no mutation in the TK gene. DNA polymerase gene was afterwards explored. With this rapid PCR-based assay, ACV-resistant HSV could be detected directly in clinical specimens within 24 h.

  10. Real-time dynamic optical imaging of ACC-M tumor cells killed by HSV-tk/ACV system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tao; Li, Yongjin; Li, Zhiyang; Xie, Xiangmo; Lu, Lisha

    2013-01-01

    HSV-tk/ACV induced and killed human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell (ACC-M) in vivo and in vitro, which were observed through optical imaging and green fluorescence protein (GFP) tagging technique. ACC-M was transfected with TK-GFP, and the single clone cell ACC-M-TK-GFP was selected by G418. With fluorescent stereomicroscope, whole-body fluorescent imaging system and fluorescent microscope, we could observe ACV treated ACC-M-TK-GFP cells in cell level and nude mice. The therapies of tumor were visualized clearly with optical imaging. This study proves that optical imaging is a very good approach for studying the effect of HSV-tk/ACV on the ACC-M tumor cells and decreasing the amount of vessel about tumors cell. Optical imaging will become a visual groundwork for monitoring tumor growth and evaluating in vivo curative effect of antitumor drugs.

  11. Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) activity of oxyresveratrol derived from Thai medicinal plant: mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy on cutaneous HSV-1 infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Chuanasa, Taksina; Phromjai, Jurairatana; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak; Suzuki, Mikiko; Pramyothin, Pornpen; Hattori, Masao; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2008-10-01

    Oxyresveratrol, a major compound purified from Artocarpus lakoocha, a Thai traditional medicinal plant, was evaluated for its mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy on cutaneous herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in mice. The inhibitory concentrations for 50% HSV-1 plaque formation of oxyresveratrol, three clinical isolates, thymidine kinase (TK)-deficient and phosphonoacetic acid (PAA)-resistant HSV-1 were 19.8, 23.3, 23.5, 24.8, 25.5 and 21.7microg/ml, respectively. Oxyresveratrol exhibited the inhibitory activity at the early and late phase of viral replication and inhibited the viral replication with pretreatment in one-step growth assay of HSV-1 and HSV-2. Oxyresveratrol inhibited late protein synthesis at 30microg/ml. The combination of oxyresveratrol and acyclovir (ACV) produced synergistic anti-HSV-1 effect, as characterized by the isobologram of plaque inhibition. Mice orally treated with oxyresveratrol (500mg/kg/dose) dose at 8 h before and three times daily had significant delay in herpetic skin lesion development (P<0.05). Topical application of 30% oxyresveratrol ointment five times daily significantly delayed the development of skin lesions and protected mice from death (P<0.0001).

  12. In vitro and in vivo characterization of a dual-function green fluorescent protein--HSV1-thymidine kinase reporter gene driven by the human elongation factor 1 alpha promoter.

    PubMed

    Luker, Gary D; Luker, Kathryn E; Sharma, Vijay; Pica, Christina M; Dahlheimer, Julie L; Ocheskey, Joe A; Fahrner, Timothy J; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2002-01-01

    Toward the goal of monitoring activity of native mammalian promoters with molecular imaging techniques, we stably transfected DU145 prostate carcinoma cells with a fusion construct of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and wild-type herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) as a reporter gene driven by the promoter for human elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha-EGFP-TK). Using this model system, expression of EGFP was quantified by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, while the HSV1-TK component of the reporter was quantified with 8-[3H]ganciclovir (8-[3H]GCV). As analyzed by flow cytometry, passage of EGFP-TK-DU145 transfected cells (ETK) in vitro resulted in populations of cells with high and low expression of EGFP over time. High and low ETK cells retained 23-fold and 5-fold more GCV, respectively, than control. While differences in uptake and retention of GCV corresponded to relative expression of the reporter gene in each subpopulation of cells as determined by both flow cytometry (EGFP) and quantitative RT-PCR, the correlation was not linear. Furthermore, in high ETK cells, net retention of various radiolabeled nucleoside analogues varied; the rank order was 8-[3H]GCV < 9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)guanine ([18F]FHBG) approximately 8-[3H]penciclovir (8-[3H]PCV) < 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-beta-D-arabinofuranoside (2-[14C]FIAU). Xenograft tumors of ETK cells in vivo accumulated 2.5-fold more 8-[3H]GCV per gram of tissue and showed greater fluorescence from EGFP than control DU145 cells, demonstrating that the reporter gene functioned in vivo. These data extend previous reports by showing that a human promoter can be detected in vitro and in vivo with a dual-function reporter exploiting optical and radiotracer techniques. PMID:12920846

  13. Inhibition of HSV-1 Replication by Gene Editing Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Shekarabi, Masoud; Wollebo, Hassen S.; Bellizzi, Anna; He, Lifan; Salkind, Julian; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    HSV-1 induced illness affects greater than 85% of adults worldwide with no permanent curative therapy. We used RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to specifically target for deletion of DNA sequences of the HSV-1 genome that span the region directing expression of ICP0, a key viral protein that stimulates HSV-1 gene expression and replication. We found that CRISPR/Cas9 introduced InDel mutations into exon 2 of the ICP0 gene profoundly reduced HSV-1 infectivity in permissive human cell culture models and protected permissive cells against HSV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 mediated targeting ICP0 prevented HSV-1-induced disintegration of promonocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, an intracellular event critical to productive HSV-1 infection that is initiated by interaction of the ICP0 N-terminus with PML. Combined treatment of cells with CRISPR targeting ICP0 plus the immediate early viral proteins, ICP4 or ICP27, completely abrogated HSV-1 infection. We conclude that RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 can be used to develop a novel, specific and efficacious therapeutic and prophylactic platform for targeted viral genomic ablation to treat HSV-1 diseases. PMID:27064617

  14. Engineering HSV-1 vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, William F; Huang, Shaohua; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Virus vectors have been employed as gene transfer vehicles for various preclinical and clinical gene therapy applications, and with the approval of Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec) as the first gene therapy product as a standard medical treatment (Yla-Herttuala, Mol Ther 20: 1831-1832, 2013), gene therapy has reached the status of being a part of standard patient care. Replication-competent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors that replicate specifically in actively dividing tumor cells have been used in Phase I-III human trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a fatal form of brain cancer, and in malignant melanoma. In fact, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly known as OncoVex GM-CSF) displayed efficacy in a recent Phase III trial when compared to standard GM-CSF treatment alone (Andtbacka et al. J Clin Oncol 31: sLBA9008, 2013) and may soon become the second FDA-approved gene therapy product used in standard patient care. In addition to the replication-competent oncolytic HSV vectors like T-VEC, replication-defective HSV vectors have been employed in Phase I-II human trials and have been explored as delivery vehicles for disorders such as pain, neuropathy, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Research during the last decade on the development of HSV vectors has resulted in the engineering of recombinant vectors that are totally replication defective, nontoxic, and capable of long-term transgene expression in neurons. This chapter describes methods for the construction of recombinant genomic HSV vectors based on the HSV-1 replication-defective vector backbones, steps in their purification, and their small-scale production for use in cell culture experiments as well as preclinical animal studies.

  15. HSV-1 Remodels Host Telomeres To Facilitate Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhong; Kim, Eui Tae; Vladimirova, Olga; Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wang, Zhuo; Newhart, Alyshia; Liu, Dongmei; Myers, Jaclyn L.; Hensley, Scott E.; Moffat, Jennifer; Janicki, Susan M.; Fraser, Nigel W.; Knipe, David M.; Weitzman, Matthew D.; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Telomeres protect the ends of cellular chromosomes. We show here that infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) results in chromosomal structural aberrations at telomeres and the accumulation of telomere dysfunction-induced DNA damage foci (TIFs). At the molecular level, HSV-1 induces transcription of telomere repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), followed by the proteolytic degradation of the telomere protein TPP1, and loss of the telomere repeat DNA signal. The HSV-1 encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase ICP0 is required for TERRA transcription and facilitates TPP1 degradation. shRNA depletion of TPP1 increases viral replication, arguing that TPP1inhibits viral replication. Viral replication protein ICP8 forms foci that coincide with telomeric proteins and ICP8 null virus failed to degrade telomere DNA signal. These findings suggest that HSV-1 reorganizes telomeres to form ICP8-associated pre-replication foci and promotes viral genomic replication. PMID:25497088

  16. Widespread disruption of host transcription termination in HSV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Andrzej J.; Erhard, Florian; L'Hernault, Anne; Bonfert, Thomas; Schilhabel, Markus; Crump, Colin; Rosenstiel, Philip; Efstathiou, Stacey; Zimmer, Ralf; Friedel, Caroline C.; Dölken, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is an important human pathogen and a paradigm for virus-induced host shut-off. Here we show that global changes in transcription and RNA processing and their impact on translation can be analysed in a single experimental setting by applying 4sU-tagging of newly transcribed RNA and ribosome profiling to lytic HSV-1 infection. Unexpectedly, we find that HSV-1 triggers the disruption of transcription termination of cellular, but not viral, genes. This results in extensive transcription for tens of thousands of nucleotides beyond poly(A) sites and into downstream genes, leading to novel intergenic splicing between exons of neighbouring cellular genes. As a consequence, hundreds of cellular genes seem to be transcriptionally induced but are not translated. In contrast to previous reports, we show that HSV-1 does not inhibit co-transcriptional splicing. Our approach thus substantially advances our understanding of HSV-1 biology and establishes HSV-1 as a model system for studying transcription termination. PMID:25989971

  17. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  18. HSV-1 ICP0: paving the way for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Smith, Miles C; Boutell, Chris; Davido, David J

    2011-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has two distinct phases of its viral life cycle: lytic and latent. One viral immediate-early protein that is responsible for determining the balance between productive lytic replication and reactivation from latency is infected cell protein 0 (ICP0). ICP0 is a 775-amino acid really interesting new gene (RING)-finger-containing protein that possesses E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, which is required for ICP0 to activate HSV-1 gene expression, disrupt nuclear domain (ND) 10 structures, mediate the degradation of cellular proteins, and evade the host cell's intrinsic and innate antiviral defenses. This article examines our current understanding of ICP0's transactivating, E3 ubiquitin ligase, and antihost defense activities and their inter-relationships to one another. Lastly, we will discuss how these properties of ICP0 may be utilized as possible targets for HSV-1 antiviral therapies. PMID:21765858

  19. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongzhi; Feng, Shuwei; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Jie; Yang, Mingxiao; Zhong, Zhendong; Li, Ying; Liang, Fanrong

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP). However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6) and Hegu (LI4) in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP.

  20. Modification of HSV-1 to an oncolytic virus.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-permissive viruses or oncolytic viruses consist of either genetically engineered or naturally occurring strains that possess relatively selective replicative and/or infection abilities for cancer vs. normal cells (Chiocca, Nat Rev Cancer 2: 938-950, 2002). They can also be armed with additional anticancer cDNAs (e.g., cytokines, prodrug-activating, anti-angiogenesis genes, and others) to extend therapeutic effects (Kaur et al., Curr Gene Ther 9: 341-355, 2009). Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) possesses several advantages as an oncolytic virus such as a rapid lytic cycle and a large capacity for insertion of heterologous DNA sequences (Wade-Martins et al., Nat Biotechnol, 19: 1067-1070, 2001). However, the technical nuances of genetic manipulation of the HSV-1 genome may still be relatively challenging. Here, we describe a system that has been durable and consistent in providing the ability to generate multiple recombinant HSV-1. The HsvQuik technology utilizes an HSV-1 genome cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome to recombine heterologous cDNAs in a relatively rapid and reliable manner (Terada et al., Gene Ther 13: 705-714, 2006). PMID:24671680

  1. Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression during HSV-1 infection in mouse cornea.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ge; Chen, Hao; Song, Zicheng; Yin, Hongmei; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Min

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the dynamic expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a common neural factor, in cornea and stromal cells during herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection. For each anesthetized BALB/c mouse, the cornea in one eye was inoculated with 1 × 10(5) plaque forming unit (PFU) of HSV-1, while the contralateral cornea was mock-infected as the control. At different timepoints post-infection, corneal lesion examination by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, corneal histology and HSV-1 DNA detection by real-time PCR were performed to estimate the different stage of HSV-1 infection. The expression of GFAP was examined using real-time PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. After infected with HSV-1 for 15 days, the mouse corneas began to become clear, the corneal pathology recovered to normal, and HSV-1 DNA almost could not be detected, indicating that HSV-1 was entering a relative quiescent state from the acute infection. The expression of GFAP in HSV-1-infected corneas was comparatively low on day 3, increased slightly on day 7, and further increased thereafter, higher than that in mock-infected corneas on day 15. GFAP detection on the cellular level also indicated that the expression was downregulated in acute HSV-1 infection. GFAP was found to be downregulated in HSV-1 acute infection in cornea and upregulated in late stage, suggesting that GFAP might play some role during HSV-1 infection in cornea.

  2. [Silencing HSV1 gD expression in cultured cells by RNA interference].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qin-Chang; Ren, Zhe; Zhang, Chun-Long; Zhang, Mei-Ying; Liao, Hong-Juan; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Zhuo; Li, Jiu-Xiang; Hu, Chao-Feng; Wang, Hua-Dong; Wang, Yi-Fei

    2007-01-01

    To explore the anti-HSV-1 effect of silencing gD gene expression by RNA interference, five 21-nucleotide duplex small interfering RNAs(siRNAs) targeting the HSV1 gD sequence were designed and the gD-EGFP fusion gene expression vector was constructed, then co-transfected into Vero cell, and screened the effective siRNA through analyzing the intensity of the EGFP fluorescence. Finally, the anti-HSV1 effect was confirmed by plaque reduction assay, real-time PCR and daughter virus titration of HSV1 infected Vero cells transfected with siRNAs. The study demonstrated that siRNAs could effectively and specifically inhibit gD gene expression in HSV1-infected cells, but only had a little effect on HSV1 infection, so taking gD as the target of siRNA against HSV1 needs further study.

  3. Analysis of the SUMO2 Proteome during HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Groslambert, Marine; Glass, Mandy; Orr, Anne; Hay, Ronald T.; Everett, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Covalent linkage to members of the small ubiquitin-like (SUMO) family of proteins is an important mechanism by which the functions of many cellular proteins are regulated. Sumoylation has roles in the control of protein stability, activity and localization, and is involved in the regulation of transcription, gene expression, chromatin structure, nuclear transport and RNA metabolism. Sumoylation is also linked, both positively and negatively, with the replication of many different viruses both in terms of modification of viral proteins and modulation of sumoylated cellular proteins that influence the efficiency of infection. One prominent example of the latter is the widespread reduction in the levels of cellular sumoylated species induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ubiquitin ligase ICP0. This activity correlates with relief from intrinsic immunity antiviral defence mechanisms. Previous work has shown that ICP0 is selective in substrate choice, with some sumoylated proteins such the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML being extremely sensitive, while RanGAP is completely resistant. Here we present a comprehensive proteomic analysis of changes in the cellular SUMO2 proteome during HSV-1 infection. Amongst the 877 potentially sumoylated species detected, we identified 124 whose abundance was decreased by a factor of 3 or more by the virus, several of which were validated by western blot and expression analysis. We found many previously undescribed substrates of ICP0 whose degradation occurs by a range of mechanisms, influenced or not by sumoylation and/or the SUMO2 interaction motif within ICP0. Many of these proteins are known or are predicted to be involved in the regulation of transcription, chromatin assembly or modification. These results present novel insights into mechanisms and host cell proteins that might influence the efficiency of HSV-1 infection. PMID:26200910

  4. Comparative Evaluation of AmpliVue HSV 1+2 Assay with ELVIS Culture for Detecting Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Alkins, Brenda R.; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Greene, Wallace H.; Connolly, Jessica; Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The AmpliVue HSV 1+2 assay was compared to the ELVIS HSV ID and D3 Typing Culture System for the qualitative detection and differentiation of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 DNA in 1,351 cutaneous and mucocutaneous specimens. Compared to ELVIS, AmpliVue had sensitivities of 95.7 and 97.6% for detecting HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. Following arbitration of discordant results by an independent molecular method, the AmpliVue assay had a resolved sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 and 99.7%, respectively, for both HSV-1 and HSV-2, whereas ELVIS had a resolved sensitivity of 87.1% for HSV-1 and 84.5% for HSV-2. PMID:26468497

  5. A case of relapsing-remitting facial palsy and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy caused by HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Alstadhaug, Karl B; Kvarenes, Hanne W; Prytz, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2016-05-01

    The etiologies of Bell's palsy and brachial neuritis remain uncertain, and the conditions rarely co-occur or reoccur. Here we present a woman in her twenties who had several relapsing-remitting episodes with left-sided facial palsy and brachial neuropathy. The episodes always started with painful left-sided oral blisters. Repeat PCRs HSV-1 DNA from oral vesicular lesions were positive. Extensive screening did not reveal any other underlying cause. Findings on MRI T2-weighted brachial plexus STIR images, using a 3.0-Tesla scanner during an episode, were compatible with brachial plexus neuritis. Except a mannose-binding lectin deficiency, a congenital complement deficiency that is frequently found in the general Caucasian population, no other immunodeficiency was demonstrated in our patient. In vitro resistance to acyclovir was tested negative, but despite prophylactic treatment with the drug in high doses, relapses recurred. To our knowledge, this is the first ever reported documentation of relapsing-remitting facial and brachial plexus neuritis caused by HSV-1. PMID:26991053

  6. An Attenuated Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV1) Encoding the HIV-1 Tat Protein Protects Mice from a Deadly Mucosal HSV1 Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sicurella, Mariaconcetta; Nicoli, Francesco; Gallerani, Eleonora; Volpi, Ilaria; Berto, Elena; Finessi, Valentina; Destro, Federica; Manservigi, Roberto; Cafaro, Aurelio; Ensoli, Barbara; Caputo, Antonella; Gavioli, Riccardo; Marconi, Peggy C.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2) are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat). In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ), induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1 infection and

  7. Visualization of mouse neuronal ganglia infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) using multimodal non-linear optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Houle, Marie-Andrée; Blache, Marie-Claire; Légaré, François; Pearson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry), which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives.

  8. Visualization of Mouse Neuronal Ganglia Infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Using Multimodal Non-Linear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Houle, Marie-Andrée; Blache, Marie-Claire; Légaré, François; Pearson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry), which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives. PMID:25133579

  9. The Role of Cyclooxygenase in Multiplication and Reactivation of HSV-1 in Vestibular Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuehong; Li, Shufeng; Wang, Zhengmin

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and nerve inflammation have been shown to be involved in vertigo-related vestibular pathogenesis. Treatments of such diseases have been less than perfect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to suppress reactivation of HSV-1 in trigeminal ganglions. However, whether this drug can affect reactivation of HSV-1 in vestibular ganglions is unclear. Due to the difficulties of constructing in vivo animal models, in this study, we developed a vestibular ganglion culture system, in which vestibular neurons were latently or lytically infected with HSV-1. Indomethacin and celecoxib were selected to measure their effects on HSV-1. Trichostatin A was used to reactivate HSV-1 in latently infected neurons. Cycloxygenase-2, which is the target of NSAIDs, was induced by HSV-1 in the lytically infected cultures, with an increase of 14-fold. Although it appeared that indomethacin and celecoxib showed limited but concentration-dependent inhibition effects on viral production under our condition, indomethacin decreased reactivation rate of HSV-1 by about 20%. Though more in vitro or in vivo studies are needed to confirm the effects of the drugs, our study may provide a potential way to investigate the mechanism of HSV-related vestibular pathogenesis as well as new treatments of vertigo-related diseases. PMID:24688447

  10. [18F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75+-selected donor T cells (1.0–13 × 105)/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-(18F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [18F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [18F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  11. Granulocytes in Ocular HSV-1 Infection: Opposing Roles of Mast Cells and Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Derek J.; Zheng, Min; Conrady, Christopher D.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The contributions of mast cells (MCs) to immunologic defense against pathogens in the eye are unknown. We have characterized pericorneal MCs as tissue-resident innate sentinels and determined their impact on the immune response to herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), a common ocular pathogen. Methods. The impact of mast cells on the immune response to HSV-1 infection was investigated using MC-deficient KitW-sh mice. Virus titers, inflammatory cytokine production, eicosanoid profiles, cellular immune responses, and ocular pathology were evaluated and compared with C57BL/6J mice during an acute corneal HSV-1 infection. Results. Corneas of KitW-sh mice have higher viral titers, increased edema, and greater leukocyte infiltration following HSV-1 infection. Following infection, cytokine profiles were slightly elevated overall in KitW-sh mice. Eicosanoid profiles were remarkably different only when comparing uninfected corneas from both groups. Neutrophils within infected corneas expressed HSV-1 antigen, lytic genes, and served as a disease-causing vector when adoptively transferred into immunocompromised animals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells did not infiltrate into the cornea or suppress the expansion, recruitment, or cytokine production by CD8+ T cells following acute HSV-1 infection. Conclusions. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into host defense in the cornea and the pathogenesis of HSV-1 infection by identifying previously unacknowledged MCs as protective innate sentinels for infection of the ocular surface and reinforcing that neutrophils are detrimental to corneal infection. PMID:26066745

  12. A role for 3-O-sulfotransferase isoform-4 in assisting HSV-1 entry and spread

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; O'Donnell, Christopher D.; Oh, Myung-Jin; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Shukla, Deepak . E-mail: dshukla@uic.edu

    2005-12-16

    Many heparan sulfate (HS) 3-O-sulfotransferase (3-OST) isoforms generate cellular receptors for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD). Interestingly, the ability of 3-OST-4 to mediate HSV-1 entry and cell-to-cell fusion has not been determined, although it is predominantly expressed in the brain, a primary target of HSV-1 infections. We report that expression of 3-OST-4 can render Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells susceptible to entry of wild-type and a mutant (Rid1) strain of HSV-1. Evidence for generation of gD receptors by 3-OST-4 was suggested by gD-mediated interference assay and the ability of 3-OST-4 expressing CHO-K1 cells to preferentially bind HSV-1 gD, which could be reversed by prior treatment of cells with HS lyases (heparinases-II/III). In addition, 3-OST-4 expressing CHO-K1 cells acquired the ability to fuse with cells-expressing HSV-1 glycoproteins. Demonstrating specificity, the cell fusion was inhibited by soluble 3-O-sulfated forms of HS, but not unmodified HS. Taken together our results suggest a role of 3-OST-4 in HSV-1 pathogenesis.

  13. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T. C.; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F. T.; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William

    2016-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light–inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation–dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell–depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. PMID:26941401

  14. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T C; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F T; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-05-26

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light-inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation-dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell-depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML.

  15. Establishment of HSV1 Latency in Immunodeficient Mice Facilitates Efficient In Vivo Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Chandran; Ferraioli, Adrianna; Calle, Aleth; Nguyen, Thanh K.; Openshaw, Harry; Lundberg, Patric S.; Lomonte, Patrick; Cantin, Edouard M.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of latent infections in sensory neurons is a remarkably effective immune evasion strategy that accounts for the widespread dissemination of life long Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV1) infections in humans. Periodic reactivation of latent virus results in asymptomatic shedding and transmission of HSV1 or recurrent disease that is usually mild but can be severe. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms regulating the maintenance of latency and reactivation are essential for developing new approaches to block reactivation. However, the lack of a reliable mouse model that supports efficient in vivo reactivation (IVR) resulting in production of infectious HSV1 and/or disease has hampered progress. Since HSV1 reactivation is enhanced in immunosuppressed hosts, we exploited the antiviral and immunomodulatory activities of IVIG (intravenous immunoglobulins) to promote survival of latently infected immunodeficient Rag mice. Latently infected Rag mice derived by high dose (HD), but not low dose (LD), HSV1 inoculation exhibited spontaneous reactivation. Following hyperthermia stress (HS), the majority of HD inoculated mice developed HSV1 encephalitis (HSE) rapidly and synchronously, whereas for LD inoculated mice reactivated HSV1 persisted only transiently in trigeminal ganglia (Tg). T cells, but not B cells, were required to suppress spontaneous reactivation in HD inoculated latently infected mice. Transfer of HSV1 memory but not OVA specific or naïve T cells prior to HS blocked IVR, revealing the utility of this powerful Rag latency model for studying immune mechanisms involved in control of reactivation. Crossing Rag mice to various knockout strains and infecting them with wild type or mutant HSV1 strains is expected to provide novel insights into the role of specific cellular and viral genes in reactivation, thereby facilitating identification of new targets with the potential to block reactivation. PMID:25760441

  16. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T C; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F T; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-05-26

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light-inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation-dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell-depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. PMID:26941401

  17. Imaging Transgene Expression with Radionuclide Imaging Technologies1

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, SS; Herschman, HR; Cherry, SR; Barrio, JR; Satyamurthy, N; Toyokuni, T; Phelps, ME; Larson, SM; Balaton, J; Finn, R; Sadelain, M; Tjuvajev, J

    2000-01-01

    Abstract A variety of imaging technologies are being investigated as tools for studying gene expression in living subjects. Noninvasive, repetitive and quantitative imaging of gene expression will help both to facilitate human gene therapy trials and to allow for the study of animal models of molecular and cellular therapy. Radionuclide approaches using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are the most mature of the current imaging technologies and offer many advantages for imaging gene expression compared to optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based approaches. These advantages include relatively high sensitivity, full quantitative capability (for PET), and the ability to extend small animal assays directly into clinical human applications. We describe a PET scanner (micro PET) designed specifically for studies of small animals. We review “marker/reporter gene” imaging approaches using the herpes simplex type 1 virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and the dopamine type 2 receptor (D2R) genes. We describe and contrast several radiolabeled probes that can be used with the HSV1-tk reporter gene both for SPECT and for PET imaging. We also describe the advantages/disadvantages of each of the assays developed and discuss future animal and human applications. PMID:10933072

  18. Mechanism of inhibition of HSV-1 replication by tumor necrosis factor and interferon gamma.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1991-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) synergizes with interferon (IFN gamma) in the blockade of HSV-1 replication. Antibodies against IFN beta block this synergism, implying a role of IFN beta in the antiviral activity of TNF plus IFN gamma. IFN beta 1 added exogenously to Hep-2 cells shows antiviral activity against HSV-1 only at high concentrations, whereas IFN beta 2 (also known as IL-6) alone has no effect on the replication of VSV or HSV-1 even when 1,000 U/ml are present. Our results are in accordance with the idea that TNF induces IFN beta 1 and that both cytokines must be present in the culture medium to synergize with IFN gamma in order to inhibit HSV-1 replication.

  19. How plausible is a link between HSV-1 infection and Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Agostini, Simone; Clerici, Mario; Mancuso, Roberta

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of dementia with a multifactorial and still barely understood etiology. A growing body of epidemiologic and experimental data support a role for infectious agents in this process; herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), in particular, is a strong suspect. We briefly summarize the data pointing at a pathogenic role for HSV-1 in the development of Alzheimer's disease and review results indicating that antiviral might be beneficial in the therapy of this condition.

  20. The Current State of Vaccine Development for Ocular HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Royer, DJ; Cohen, A; Carr, DJJ

    2015-01-01

    Summary HSV-1 continues to be the leading cause of infectious corneal blindness. Clinical trials for vaccines against genital HSV infection have been ongoing for more than three decades. Despite this, no approved vaccine exists, and no formal clinical trials have evaluated the impact of HSV vaccines on eye health. We review here the current state of development for an efficacious HSV-1 vaccine and call for involvement of ophthalmologists and vision researchers. PMID:25983856

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus-Type1 (HSV-1) Impairs DNA Repair in Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    De Chiara, Giovanna; Racaniello, Mauro; Mollinari, Cristiana; Marcocci, Maria Elena; Aversa, Giorgia; Cardinale, Alessio; Giovanetti, Anna; Garaci, Enrico; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Merlo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Several findings suggest that Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection plays a role in the neurodegenerative processes that characterize Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the underlying mechanisms have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we show that HSV-1 productive infection in cortical neurons causes the accumulation of DNA lesions that include both single (SSBs) and double strand breaks (DSBs), which are reported to be implicated in the neuronal loss observed in neurodegenerative diseases. We demonstrate that HSV-1 downregulates the expression level of Ku80, one of the main components of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway for the repair of DSBs. We also provide data suggesting that HSV-1 drives Ku80 for proteasomal degradation and impairs NHEJ activity, leading to DSB accumulation. Since HSV-1 usually causes life-long recurrent infections, it is possible to speculate that cumulating damages, including those occurring on DNA, may contribute to virus induced neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration, further suggesting HSV-1 as a risk factor for neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:27803664

  2. Innate lymphotoxin receptor mediated signaling promotes HSV-1 associated neuroinflammation and viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yong; Yang, Kaiting; Guo, Jingya; Wroblewska, Joanna; Fu, Yang-Xin; Peng, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Host anti-viral innate immunity plays important roles in the defense against HSV-1 infection. In this study, we find an unexpected role for innate LT/LIGHT signaling in promoting HSV-1 replication and virus induced inflammation in immunocompromised mice. Using a model of footpad HSV-1 infection in Rag1–/– mice, we observed that blocking LT/LIGHT signaling with LTβR-Ig could significantly delay disease progression and extend the survival of infected mice. LTβR-Ig treatment reduced late proinflammatory cytokine release in the serum and nervous tissue, and inhibited chemokine expression and inflammatory cells infiltration in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Intriguingly, LTβR-Ig treatment restricted HSV-1 replication in the DRG but not the footpad. These findings demonstrate a critical role for LT/LIGHT signaling in modulating innate inflammation and promoting HSV-1 replication in the nervous system, and suggest a new target for treatment of virus-induced adverse immune response and control of severe HSV-1 infection. PMID:25993659

  3. A simple procedure for expression and purification of selected non-structural (alpha and beta) herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) proteins.

    PubMed

    Kosovský, J; Durmanová, V; Kúdelová, M; Rezuchová, I; Tkáciková, L; Rajcáni, J

    2001-04-01

    The expression and isolation of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early (alpha) IE63 (ICP27) and of the early (beta) thymidine kinase (Tk) polypeptides in Escherichia coli JM 109 cells transformed with the PinPoint Xa-1 (Promega) plasmid construct carrying either the HSV-1 UL54 or UL23 genes are described. The resulting biotinylated fusion protein(s) could be easily induced and were purified in appropriate amounts by means of a monomeric avidin-conjugated resin (SoftLink Soft Release Avidin Resin, Promega) provided that: (1) the exponential growth of the selected transformed cells was monitored carefully; (2) the post-induction harvest interval was properly chosen; and (3) the period for adsorption to the avidin resin suitably adjusted. The isolated protein(s), although partially digested in the case of the IE63 polypeptide, were suitable antigen(s) for immunization of various animal species. Co-purification of trace amounts of endogenous biotinylated protein(s) produced in E. coli was eliminated by shortening the duration of adsorption to the avidin resin.

  4. Assessment of Anti HSV-1 Activity of Aloe Vera Gel Extract: an In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Alyaseri, Montazer

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is one of the most common and debilitating oral diseases; yet, there is no standard topical treatment to control it. The extract of Aloe vera leaves has been previously reported to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and also antiviral effects. There is no data on anti-Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) activity of Aloe vera gel. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in Vero cell line. Materials and Method In this study, gel extraction and cytotoxicity of various increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5%) was evaluated in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Having been washed with phosphate buffered saline, 50 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1 was added to each well. After 1 hour of incubation at 37°C, cell monolayers in 24 well plates were exposed to different increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel. The anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in different concentrations was assessed by plaque reduction assays. Data were analyzed by using One-way ANOVA. Results The cytotoxicity assay showed that Aloe vera in prearranged concentrations was cell-compatible. The inhibitory effect of various concentrations of Aloe vera was observed one hour after the Vero cell was infected with HSV-1. However, there was no significant difference between two serial concentrations (p> 0.05). One-way ANOVA also revealed no significant difference between the groups. The findings indicated a dose-dependent antiviral effect of Aloe vera. Conclusion The findings showed significant inhibitory effect of 0.2-5% Aloe vera gel on HSV-1 growth in Vero cell line. Therefore, this gel could be a useful topical treatment for oral HSV-1 infections without any significant toxicity. PMID:26966709

  5. Lychee flower extract inhibits proliferation and viral replication of HSV-1-infected corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chang-Min; Chiang, Samuel Tung-Hsing; Chang, Yuan-Yen; Chen, Yi-Chen; Yang, Deng-Jye; Chen, Ya-Yu; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is capable of causing a wide array of human ocular diseases. Herpes simplex virus keratitis (HSK)-induced cytopathogenicity together with the chronic immune-inflammatory reaction can trigger stromal scarring, thinning, and neovascularization which may lead to permanent vision impairment. Lychee flower extract (LFE) is known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the mechanism of the Statens Seruminstitut rabbit corneal (SIRC) epithelial cells infected by HSV-1 and examined the antiviral capabilities of LFE. Methods SIRC cells were pretreated with different concentrations of LFE (0.2, 0.1, and 0.05 μg/ml) and then infected with 1 MOI of HSV-1 for 24 h. The cell viability or morphology was evaluated in this study. In addition, the supernatants and cell extracts were collected for Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK), plaque assay, and western blotting. Results We found that HSV-1-induced cell proliferation is regulated through inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p70s6k phosphorylation in response to the LFE. In addition, the LFE enhanced the autophagy protein expression (Beclin-1 and light chain 3, LC3) and decreased the viral titers. Conclusions These results showed the antiviral capabilities and the protective effects of LFE. Taken together, our data indicate that LFE has potential as an anti-HSK (herpes simplex keratitis) for HSV-1 infection. PMID:26937165

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain HSZP host shutoff gene: nucleotide sequence and comparison with HSV-1 strains differing in early shutoff of host protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Vojvodová, A; Matis, J; Kúdelová, M; Rajcáni, J

    1997-01-01

    The UL41 gene of the HSZP strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) defective with respect to the early shutoff of host protein synthesis was sequenced and compared with the corresponding HSV-1 strain KOS and 17 gene sequences. In comparison with strain 17, nine mutations (base changes) were HSZP specific, five KOS specific and four were common for both strains. Nine mutations caused codon changes. Three of these mapped to the nonconserved regions and the others to the conserved regions of the functional map of UL41 gene. One KOS specific mutation mapped to the region responsible for the binding of the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein to the alpha-transinducing factor (VP16). The possible relationship between mutations and host shutoff function is discussed. The nucleotide sequence data of the UL41 gene of HSZP and KOS have been submitted to the Genbank nucleotide database and have been assigned the accession numbers Z72337 and Z72338.

  7. Neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of HSV-1 latency.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Pamela C; Katzenell, Sarah; Pesola, Jean M; North, Brian; Coen, Donald M; Leib, David A

    2016-10-01

    IFN responses control acute HSV infection, but their role in regulating HSV latency is poorly understood. To address this we used mice lacking IFN signaling specifically in neural tissues. These mice supported a higher acute viral load in nervous tissue and delayed establishment of latency. While latent HSV-1 genome copies were equivalent, ganglia from neuronal IFN signaling-deficient mice unexpectedly supported reduced reactivation. IFNβ promoted survival of primary sensory neurons after infection with HSV-1, indicating a role for IFN signaling in sustaining neurons. We observed higher levels of latency associated transcripts (LATs) per HSV genome in mice lacking neuronal IFN signaling, consistent with a role for IFN in regulating LAT expression. These data show that neuronal IFN signaling modulates the expression of LAT and may conserve the pool of neurons available to harbor latent HSV-1 genome. The data also show that neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of latency. PMID:27518540

  8. Neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of HSV-1 latency.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Pamela C; Katzenell, Sarah; Pesola, Jean M; North, Brian; Coen, Donald M; Leib, David A

    2016-10-01

    IFN responses control acute HSV infection, but their role in regulating HSV latency is poorly understood. To address this we used mice lacking IFN signaling specifically in neural tissues. These mice supported a higher acute viral load in nervous tissue and delayed establishment of latency. While latent HSV-1 genome copies were equivalent, ganglia from neuronal IFN signaling-deficient mice unexpectedly supported reduced reactivation. IFNβ promoted survival of primary sensory neurons after infection with HSV-1, indicating a role for IFN signaling in sustaining neurons. We observed higher levels of latency associated transcripts (LATs) per HSV genome in mice lacking neuronal IFN signaling, consistent with a role for IFN in regulating LAT expression. These data show that neuronal IFN signaling modulates the expression of LAT and may conserve the pool of neurons available to harbor latent HSV-1 genome. The data also show that neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of latency.

  9. Interference of the low-pH inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain HSZP with the early shutoff function of superinfecting HSV-1 strain KOS.

    PubMed

    Matis, J; Kúdelová, M; Rajcáni, J

    1999-03-01

    In former studies, we described that the HSZP strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was defective with respect to the early shutoff of host protein synthesis but was effective at interfering with the early shutoff function of the HSV-1 strain KOS, even when heat-inactivated or neutralized by antibody. However, the HSZP strain failed to interfere when inactivated with zinc ions or purified from cells treated with 2-deoxy-D-glucose. In this study, we provide evidence that the ability of the purified low-pH inactivated (citrate buffer, pH 3.0) and gel-filtered (Sephadex G-25) HSZP virions to adsorb host cells was not significantly affected. However, their ability to induce interference with the early shutoff function of the superinfecting HSV-1 strain KOS was restricted. In comparison with native virus, up to eight times more low-pH inactivated HSZP virions were needed to interfere with the shutoff by strain KOS. The interference was not due to exclusion of strain KOS by HSZP at the level of adsorption and/or penetration. The restriction was partially overcome by treatment of the cells with polyethylene glycol after adsorption of the low-pH inactivated HSZP virions. This observation indicates that the direct fusion of the virion envelope of low-pH inactivated HSZP with the plasma cell membrane was predominantly hampered.

  10. KSHV-TK is a tyrosine kinase that disrupts focal adhesions and induces Rho-mediated cell contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michael B; Turner, Rachel; Stevenson, Philip G; Way, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paradoxically, the thymidine kinase (TK) encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an extremely inefficient nucleoside kinase, when compared to TKs from related herpesviruses. We now show that KSHV-TK, in contrast to HSV1-TK, associates with the actin cytoskeleton and induces extensive cell contraction followed by membrane blebbing. These dramatic changes in cell morphology depend on the auto-phosphorylation of tyrosines 65, 85 and 120 in the N-terminus of KSHV-TK. Phosphorylation of tyrosines 65/85 and 120 results in an interaction with Crk family proteins and the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3-Kinase, respectively. The interaction of Crk with KSHV-TK leads to tyrosine phoshorylation of this cellular adaptor. Auto-phosphorylation of KSHV-TK also induces a loss of FAK and paxillin from focal adhesions, resulting in activation of RhoA-ROCK signalling to myosin II and cell contraction. In the absence of FAK or paxillin, KSHV-TK has no effect on focal adhesion integrity or cell morphology. Our observations demonstrate that by acting as a tyrosine kinase, KSHV-TK modulates signalling and cell morphology. PMID:25471072

  11. Meganuclease-mediated Inhibition of HSV1 Infection in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Stéphanie; Huot, Nicolas; Mahiet, Charlotte; Arnould, Sylvain; Barradeau, Sébastien; Clerre, Diane Le; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Jacqmarcq, Cécile; Chapellier, Benoît; Ergani, Ayla; Desseaux, Carole; Cédrone, Frédéric; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Pâques, Frédéric; Labetoulle, Marc; Smith, Julianne

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is a major health problem. As for most viral diseases, current antiviral treatments are based on the inhibition of viral replication once it has already started. As a consequence, they impair neither the viral cycle at its early stages nor the latent form of the virus, and thus cannot be considered as real preventive treatments. Latent HSV1 virus could be addressed by rare cutting endonucleases, such as meganucleases. With the aim of a proof of concept study, we generated several meganucleases recognizing HSV1 sequences, and assessed their antiviral activity in cultured cells. We demonstrate that expression of these proteins in African green monkey kidney fibroblast (COS-7) and BSR cells inhibits infection by HSV1, at low and moderate multiplicities of infection (MOIs), inducing a significant reduction of the viral load. Furthermore, the remaining viral genomes display a high rate of mutation (up to 16%) at the meganuclease cleavage site, consistent with a mechanism of action based on the cleavage of the viral genome. This specific mechanism of action qualifies meganucleases as an alternative class of antiviral agent, with the potential to address replicative as well as latent DNA viral forms. PMID:21224832

  12. Herpes simplex (HSV-1) infection of bovine aorta smooth muscle cells (SMC) inhibits matrix protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lashgari, M.S.; Friedman, H.M.; Kefalides, N.A.

    1986-03-01

    Studies from this laboratory have shown that HSV-1 infection suppresses matrix protein synthesis by endothelial cells in vitro. In this study the authors have investigated the effects of HSV-1 infection on SMC. Monolayers of SMC were infected with HSV-1 at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) ranging from 0.1 to 20. Viral replication and release to the medium was measured by plaque assay in Vero cells. At an MOI of 0.1, 10 or 20, viral replication occurred and maximum virus titers were achieved by 24 hrs. post-infection. Virus release in the medium began during the first 12 hrs. post-infection and reached maximum at 24 hrs. Infected and uninfected cultures of SMC were pulse labeled with either (/sup 14/C)proline or (/sup 35/S)-methionine at different hrs. post-infection. Incorporation of radioactivity into non-dialyzable protein was determined in fluorograms following SDS-PAGE of the cell-matrix or medium fractions. The synthesis of fibronectin and collagen Types I and III was suppressed and the degree of suppression was dependent on the duration of infection and on the virus dose. These data suggest that SMC can support HSV-1 replication in vitro and that such infection can lead to altered extracellular matrix synthesis.

  13. Prevalence and risk factors of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in European HIV infected women

    PubMed Central

    van Benthem, B H B; Spaargaren, J; van den Hoek, J A R; Merks, J; Coutinho, R; Prins, M

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in HIV infected women and the association between recurrent genital ulcerations and HIV disease progression in HSV-2 positive women. Methods: The presence of HSV antibodies was tested in 276 of the 487 women participating in a European cohort study of HIV infected women. Prevalence rate ratios described the association between HSV infection and its risk factors, using log binomial regression. Generalised estimating equations (GEE) analysis was performed to determine the impact of markers of HIV disease progression on recurrent genital ulcerations. Results: The prevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies was 76% (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 71–81) and 42% (95% CI: 36–50); 30% (95% CI: 24–35) of the women had antibodies against both HSV-1 and HSV-2. The prevalence of HSV-1 was 86% (95% CI: 80–92) in southern Europe compared with 69% (95% CI: 57–79) and 67% (95% CI: 55–77) in central and northern Europe (p=0.002). This geographical variation remained after adjustment for other risk factors. An increasing number of years of sexual activity (p=0.0002) and a history of prostitution (p=0.0001) were independently associated with HSV-2 prevalence. In HSV-2 positive women, symptomatic cases of HSV infection were minimal, but increased with decreasing CD4 count. Conclusion: In HIV infected women, the prevalence of HSV antibodies is high and symptomatic cases of HSV infection are minimal, but increase with decreasing CD4 count. HSV-2 but not HSV-1 was related to sexual behaviour (that is, a history of prostitution and the number of sexually active years) in this group of HIV infected women. Key Words: herpes simplex viruses; genital ulcerations; HIV infection; women; Europe PMID:11287691

  14. Construction and Characterization of Recombinant HSV-1 Expressing Early Growth Response-1.

    PubMed

    Bedadala, Gautam; Chen, Feng; Figliozzi, Robert; Balish, Matthew; Hsia, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Early Growth response-1 (Egr-1) is a transcription factor that possesses a variety of biological functions. It has been shown to regulate HSV-1 gene expression and replication in different cellular environments through the recruitment of distinct cofactor complexes. Previous studies demonstrated that Egr-1 can be induced by HSV-1 infection in corneal cells but the level was lower compared to other cell types. The primary goal of this report is to generate a recombinant HSV-1 constitutively expressing Egr-1 and to investigate the regulation of viral replication in different cell types or in animals with Egr-1 overexpression. The approach utilized was to introduce Egr-1 into the BAC system containing complete HSV-1 (F) genome. To assist in the insertion of Egr-1, a gene cassette was constructed that contains the Egr-1 gene flanked byloxP sites. In this clone Egr-1 is expressed under control of CMV immediate-early promoter followed by another gene cassette expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the elongation factor 1α (EF-1 α) promoter. The constructed recombinant viruses were completed containing the Egr-1 gene within the viral genome and the expression was characterized by qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Our results showed that Egr-1 transcript and protein can be generated and accumulated upon infection of recombinant virus in Vero and rabbit corneal cells SIRC. This unique virus therefore is useful for studying the effects of Egr-1 during HSV-1 replication and gene regulation in epithelial cells and neurons. PMID:25346859

  15. Detection of serum IgA to HSV1 and its diagnostic role in sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Guido; Palermo, Concetta Ilenia; Maiolino, Luigi; Costanzo, Carmela Maria; Zappal, Domenica; Grillo, Caterina; Martines, Anna Maria; Cocuzza, Salvatore; Russo, Raffaela; Serra, Agostino

    2013-01-01

    A viral etiology of sudden hearing loss has been hypothesized by many authors. HSV1 neurotropism and its involvement in sudden hearing loss has implicated HSV1 as one of the most accredited etiological agents. A non-invasive method such as the titration of HSV1-specific IgA was evaluated to determine the role of HSV1 as a possible cause sudden hearing loss. A prospective study was carried out by titration of serum IgA to HSV1 in 93 patients and in a control group of 50 healthy subjects and 35 subjects suffering from recent herpes labialis reactivation. Statistical analysis of the results disclosed that IgA titers to HSV1 higher than 1:80 are suggestive for the association of HSV1 infection and sudden hearing loss. Moreover, acyclovir therapy was effective in 81% of patients who showed high specific IgA titers. Overall, the titration of specific serum IgA to HSV1 can be a useful tool to determine the viral etiology of certain cases of sudden hearing loss. This method is simple to perform and minimally invasive. It can lead to a rapid presumptive diagnosis and to prompt specific therapy, reducing the need for corticosteroids.

  16. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Ying; Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Qihan

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  17. A designed equine herpes thymidine kinase (EHV4 TK) variant improves ganciclovir-induced cell-killing.

    PubMed

    McSorley, Theresa; Ort, Stephan; Monnerjahn, Christian; Konrad, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The limitations of the ganciclovir (GCV)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV1 TK: EC 2.7.1.21) system as a suicide gene therapy approach have been extensively studied over the years. In our study, we focused on improving the cytotoxic profile of the GCV/equine herpes virus-4 thymidine kinase (EHV4 TK: EC 2.7.1.21) system. Our approach involved the structure-guided mutagenesis of EHV4 TK in order to switch its ability to preferentially phosphorylate the natural substrate deoxythymidine (dT) to that of GCV. We performed steady-state kinetic analysis, genetic complementation in a thymidine kinase-deficient Escherichia coli strain, isothermal titration calorimetry, and analysis of GCV-induced cell killing through generation of HEK 293 stable cell-lines expressing EHV4 TK mutants and wild-type EHV4 TK. We found that the EHV4 TK S144H-GFP mutant preferentially phosphorylates GCV and confers increased GCV-induced cytotoxicity compared to wild-type EHV4 TK.

  18. Acyclovir-resistant corneal HSV-1 isolates from patients with herpetic keratitis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Rui; de Vries, Rory D; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Remeijer, Lies; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2008-09-01

    The prevalence and molecular characteristics of isolates from 173 immunocompetent patients with herpetic keratitis (HK) who were infected with acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(R)) corneal herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 was determined. Isolates from 11 (6.4%) of the patients were ACV(R), and 9 of these 11 patients were refractory to therapy with ACV; the ACV(R) isolates from 5 and 1 of these 9 patients were cross-resistant to gancyclovir and to both gancyclovir and foscarnet, respectively. Of the 11 ACV(R) isolates, 10 had, in the thymidine kinase gene, mutations that presumably conferred the ACV(R) phenotype. These data demonstrate a relatively high prevalence of corneal HSV-1 ACV(R) isolates in patients with HK, which emphasizes the need to monitor for ACV susceptibility in patients with HK who are refractory to therapy with ACV.

  19. The development of an improved murine iontophoresis reactivation model for the study of HSV-1 latency.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Y J; Araullo-Cruz, T P; Romanowski, E; Ruziczka, L; Balouris, C; Oren, J; Cheng, K P; Kim, S

    1986-08-01

    The present study reviews the development of an effective murine iontophoresis reactivation model for the study of HSV-1 latency. In a series of experiments, Balb C mice latently infected with HSV-1 McKrae strain were iontophoresed with epinephrine X 3 days (EPI X 3/ION) or 6-hydroxydopamine X 1 day followed by topical epinephrine (6-HD ION/EPI). Reactivation and recovery of latent HSV-1 was determined by daily ocular swabs, titration, and neutralization. Additional studies determined the effect of topical ocular steroids on viral recovery rate. The results demonstrated no recovery of McKrae strain in Balb C (0%) with EPI X 3/ION, and no enhancement with topical steroids. 6-HD ION/EPI demonstrated a low recovery rate in mice (8%). However, the recovery rate was significantly increased to 50% by the addition of topical steroids to form the 6-HD ION/EPI/STEROID model, a useful experimental tool. The substitution of a clinical isolate, W strain, for McKrae strain further improved the model. The results demonstrated that, following the acute infection in mice, W strain was associated with a significantly higher (P = .001) survival rate than McKrae strain (81% vs. 52%). There was no statistically significant difference between the two strains, W vs McKrae, in Balb C mice comparing keratitis, establishment of latency (by co-cultivation), spontaneous shedding rate, or induced ocular shedding following iontophoresis. The development of an effective murine iontophoresis model offers an economical method which is uniquely suited for immunological and genetic studies of HSV-1 latency.

  20. In vitro effect of phototherapy with low-intensity laser on HSV-1 and epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eduardo, Fernanda P.; Mehnert, Dolores U.; Monezi, Telma A.; Zezell, Denise M.; Schubert, Mark M.; Eduardo, Carlos P.; Marques, Márcia M.

    2007-02-01

    The effects of phototherapy on herpes lesions have been clinically demonstrated by either preventing the lesion formation or speeding their repair. The aim of this in vitro study was analyze the effect of phototherapy on epithelial cells and HSV-1 in culture. Cultures of HSV-1 and epithelial cells (Vero cell line) were used. The irradiations were done using a GaAlAs laser (660 e 780 nm, 4.0 mm2). One, two and three irradiations with 6 h-intervals were done. The experimental groups were: Control: non-irradiated; 660 nm and 3 J/cm2 (2.8 sec); 660 nm and 5 J/cm2 (3.8 sec); 780 nm and 3 J/cm2 (1.9 sec), and 780 nm and 5 J/cm2 (2.5 sec). The HSV-1 cytopatic effect and the cell viability of irradiated cultures and controls were analyzed in four different conditions: irradiation of non-infected epithelial cells; epithelial cells irradiated prior infection; virus irradiated prior infection; irradiation of HSV infected cells. The mitochondrial activity and cytopathic effects were assessed. The number of irradiations influenced the cell growth positively and proportionally, except for the 660 nm/ 3 J/cm2 group. Any variation in cytopathic effects was observed amongst the experimental groups. The viability of infected cells prior irradiation was significantly higher than that of non-irradiated cultures when 2 irradiations were done. Under the experimental conditions of this study we concluded that phototherapy is capable of enhancing epithelial cell growth and prolonging cell viability of HSV-1 infected cells. Positive benefits of phototherapy could be resultant from prolongation of infected cells viability, corroborating with host defenses.

  1. HSV-1 Glycoproteins Are Delivered to Virus Assembly Sites Through Dynamin-Dependent Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Albecka, Anna; Laine, Romain F; Janssen, Anne F J; Kaminski, Clemens F; Crump, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a large enveloped DNA virus that belongs to the family of Herpesviridae. It has been recently shown that the cytoplasmic membranes that wrap the newly assembled capsids are endocytic compartments derived from the plasma membrane. Here, we show that dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a major role in this process. Dominant-negative dynamin and clathrin adaptor AP180 significantly decrease virus production. Moreover, inhibitors targeting dynamin and clathrin lead to a decreased transport of glycoproteins to cytoplasmic capsids, confirming that glycoproteins are delivered to assembly sites via endocytosis. We also show that certain combinations of glycoproteins colocalize with each other and with the components of clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytosis pathways. Importantly, we demonstrate that the uptake of neutralizing antibodies that bind to glycoproteins when they become exposed on the cell surface during virus particle assembly leads to the production of non-infectious HSV-1. Our results demonstrate that transport of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane prior to endocytosis is the major route by which these proteins are localized to the cytoplasmic virus assembly compartments. This highlights the importance of endocytosis as a major protein-sorting event during HSV-1 envelopment.

  2. Induction of humoral responses to BHV-1 glycoprotein D expressed by HSV-1 amplicon vectors

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Andrea Maria; Berois, Mabel Beatriz; Tomé, Lorena Magalí; Epstein, Alberto L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are versatile and useful tools for transferring genes into cells that are capable of stimulating a specific immune response to their expressed antigens. In this work, two HSV-1-derived amplicon vectors were generated. One of these expressed the full-length glycoprotein D (gD) of bovine herpesvirus 1 while the second expressed the truncated form of gD (gDtr) which lacked the trans-membrane region. After evaluating gD expression in the infected cells, the ability of both vectors to induce a specific gD immune response was tested in BALB/c mice that were intramuscularly immunized. Specific serum antibody responses were detected in mice inoculated with both vectors, and the response against truncated gD was higher than the response against full-length gD. These results reinforce previous findings that HSV-1 amplicon vectors can potentially deliver antigens to animals and highlight the prospective use of these vectors for treating infectious bovine rhinotracheitis disease. PMID:22437537

  3. Isolation of the major herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-specific glycoprotein by hydroxylapatite chromatography and its use in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for titration of human HSV-1-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, B F; Grauballe, P C

    1979-12-01

    A 131,000 molecular weight herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein designated antigen number 6 (Ag-6) was previously shown to possess almost exclusively HSV-1-specific antigenic sites. Fused rocket and crossed immunoelectrophoresis of fractions obtained from hydroxylapatite chromatography of crude HSV-1 antigen (Triton X-100-solubilized, infected tissue culture cells) showed that a subfraction of Ag-6 could be separated from the other HSV antigens. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the isolated Ag-6 showed that sera from rabbits infected with HSV-1 and HSV-1 human antisera contained antibodies to Ag-6, whereas sera from HSV-2-infected rabbits and sera from patients with primary HSV-2 infections did not react with Ag-6. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of 852 human sera for antibodies to HSV type-common glycoproteins, Ag-6, and HSV 2-specific antigens showed that 139 sera which reacted negatively with HSV type-common glycoproteins also did not react with Ag-6 with HSV-2 specific antigens. The 713 sera reacting positively to HSV type-common antigens either reacted with Ag-6 (328 sera) or with HSV-2-specific antigens (31 sera) or both (354 sera). This means that Ag-6 might be useful in large-scale human serology for the detection of past infection with HSV-1, irrespective of whether or not past infection with HSV-2 has occurred.

  4. A Phospho-SIM in the Antiviral Protein PML is Required for Its Recruitment to HSV-1 Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Miles C.; Box, Andrew C.; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Lane, William S.; Davido, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a significant human pathogen that infects a large portion of the human population. Cells deploy a variety of defenses to limit the extent to which the virus can replicate. One such factor is the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein, the nucleating and organizing factor of nuclear domain 10 (ND10). PML responds to a number of stimuli and is implicated in intrinsic and innate cellular antiviral defenses against HSV-1. While the role of PML in a number of cellular pathways is controlled by post-translational modifications, the effects of phosphorylation on its antiviral activity toward HSV-1 have been largely unexplored. Consequently, we mapped phosphorylation sites on PML, mutated these and other known phosphorylation sites on PML isoform I (PML-I), and examined their effects on a number of PML’s activities. Our results show that phosphorylation at most sites on PML-I is dispensable for the formation of ND10s and colocalization between PML-I and the HSV-1 regulatory protein, ICP0, which antagonizes PML-I function. However, inhibiting phosphorylation at sites near the SUMO-interaction motif (SIM) of PML-I impairs its ability to respond to HSV-1 infection. Overall, our data suggest that PML phosphorylation regulates its antiviral activity against HSV-1. PMID:25513827

  5. Acyclovir or Aβ42 peptides attenuate HSV-1-induced miRNA-146a levels in human primary brain cells.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, Walter J; Cui, Jian Guo; Yuan, Li Yuan; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Corkern, Madelyn; Clement, Christian; Kammerman, Eli M; Ball, M J; Zhao, Yuhai; Sullivan, Patrick M; Hill, James M

    2010-10-01

    Human brains harbor herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) DNA, which normally remains quiescent throughout many decades of life. HSV-1 is associated with viral encephalopathy and with the amyloid beta 42 (Abeta42) peptide-enriched lesions that characterize Alzheimer's disease neuropathology. Here we report that infection of human neuronal-glial cells in primary co-culture with HSV-1 induces an irregular hypertrophy of human neuronal-glial cell bodies, an induction of HSV-1 DNA polymerase, and an up-regulation of micro-RNA-146a associated with altered innate-immune responses. Presence of the antiviral acyclovir or soluble Abeta42 peptide significantly attenuated these neuropathological responses. The inhibitory effects of Abeta42 peptide were also observed in an HSV-1-infected CV-1 cell-based viral plaque assay. The results suggest that soluble Abeta42 peptide can invoke non-pathological and anti-viral effects through inactivation of an HSV-1 challenge to human brain cells by simple viral sequestration, viral destruction, or by complex neurogenetic mechanisms.

  6. Inhibition of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) Kinase Suppresses Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Oleg; Donovan, Kelly; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Herpes keratitis (HK) remains the leading cause of cornea-derived blindness in the developed world, despite the availability of effective antiviral drugs. Treatment toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance highlight the need for additional therapeutic approaches. This study examined ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an apical kinase in the host DNA damage response, as a potential new target for the treatment of HK. Methods. Small molecule inhibitor of ATM (KU-55933) was used to treat herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in three experimental models: (1) in vitro—cultured human corneal epithelial cells, hTCEpi, (2) ex vivo—organotypically explanted human and rabbit corneas, and (3) in vivo—corneal infection in young C57BL/6J mice. Infection productivity was assayed by plaque assay, real-time PCR, Western blot, and disease scoring. Results. Robust ATM activation was detected in HSV-1-infected human corneal epithelial cells. Inhibition of ATM greatly suppressed viral replication in cultured cells and in explanted human and rabbit corneas, and reduced the severity of stromal keratitis in mice. The antiviral effect of KU-55933 in combination with acyclovir was additive, and KU-55933 suppressed replication of a drug-resistant HSV-1 strain. KU-55933 caused minimal toxicity, as monitored by clonogenic survival assay and fluorescein staining. Conclusions. This study identifies ATM as a potential target for the treatment of HK. ATM inhibition by KU-55933 reduces epithelial infection and stromal disease severity without producing appreciable toxicity. These findings warrant further investigations into the DNA damage response as an area for therapeutic intervention in herpetic ocular diseases. PMID:24370835

  7. Nicotine applied by transdermal patch induced HSV-1 reactivation and ocular shedding in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Myles, M E; Alack, C; Manino, P M; Reish, E R; Higaki, S; Maruyama, K; Mallakin, A; Azcuy, A; Barker, S; Ragan, F A; Thompson, H; Hill, James M

    2003-04-01

    The identification of factors involved in herpes virus latency and reactivation is critical to a better understanding of the mechanisms essential to viral neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence. Recurrent episodes of ocular herpes infections cause irreversible corneal scarring and are the primary cause of loss of vision due to an infectious agent in industrialized countries. In this study, we examined the ability of nicotine, a compound known to be involved in stress-associated immunomodulation and recognized as one of the most frequently used addictive agents, to induce ocular shedding in rabbits latently infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain McKrae. New Zealand white rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 at 3-4 weeks post-inoculation were randomly divided into two groups. The corneas of all rabbits were free of lesions as verified by slit lamp biomicroscopy. One group received nicotine by transdermal patch (21 mg/day) for 20 days and the other group served as the control. Reactivation data were obtained by detection of virus in tear film collected by ocular swabbing performed concurrently with the administration of nicotine. Compilation of data from three separate experiments demonstrated that 16.5% (258/1560) of the swabs taken from rabbits treated with nicotine were positive for virus, compared with 8.3% (53/639) of swabs taken from controls. Rabbits receiving nicotine exhibited a significantly (P < 0.0001) higher rate of ocular shedding than controls. The concentration of nicotine in the serum was determined at various times (0-24 hrs) after new patch replacement. Peak (average) serum level of nicotine was obtained 8 hours after patch replacement and exhibited a broad range of values (0.233 microg/mL-6.21 microg/mL). These results suggest that an initial systemic exposure to nicotine significantly increases HSV-1 reactivation. Further studies are needed to reveal any effects of nicotine dependency and nicotine withdrawal on herpesvirus

  8. Tromantadine inhibits HSV-1 induced syncytia formation and viral glycoprotein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ickes, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Tromantadine inhibits a late event in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) replication, visualized by the inhibition of both the size and number of syncytia. Tromantadine can be added at any time between 1 and 9 h post infection with complete inhibition of syncytia formation. Glycan synthesis of the viral glycoproteins, important for syncytia formation, is incomplete due to tromantadine treatment. Tromantadine does not inhibit the initiation of glycosylation, since viral glycoproteins, gX{sub t}, synthesized in the presence of tromantadine still incorporate {sup 3}H-glucosamine. Tromantadine does not inhibit the transport of t e viral glycoproteins to the cell surface, since glycoproteins B, C, and D are expressed, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence. Tromantadine inhibition of HSV-1 glycoprotein processing is demonstrated by an increase in mobility of the radioimmunoprecipitated gX{sub t}, on SDS-PAGE. The gX{sub t} of KOS, a non-syncytial strain of HSV-1, had a similar increase in mobility, suggesting that the block in glycoprotein processing is a general effect of tromantadine treatment. Fucose, which is incorporated into oligosaccharides in the medial Golgi, is incorporated into gX{sub t}, indicating that the tromantadine block in glycoprotein processing occurs after this step. Lectin binding studies and SDS-PAGE analysis of gC processed in the presence of tromantadine, gC{sub t}, indicates that it has terminal galactose residues in both N- and O-linked glycans (binds Peanut and Ricin Agglutinins, respectively). The inhibition of sialylation of N-linked glycans by tromantadine was indicated by the extent of the increase in SDS-PAGE mobility of the G protein from Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. O-glycanase digestion and SDS-PAGE analysis of gC{sub t} indicate that the O-linked disaccharide NAcGal-Galactose is present.

  9. Topical cream-based oxyresveratrol in the treatment of cutaneous HSV-1 infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipipun, Vimolmas; Sasivimolphan, Pattaraporn; Yoshida, Yoshihiro; Daikoku, Tohru; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Ritthidej, Garnpimol; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak; Pramyothin, Pornpen; Hattori, Masao; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2011-08-01

    Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) activities of oxyresveratrol in vitro and topical administration in cutaneous HSV-1 infection in mice were examined. The inhibitory concentrations for 50% plaque formation (IC(50)) of oxyresveratrol against HSV-1 clinical isolates and HSV-2 clinical isolates were 20.9-29.5 and 22.2-27.5 μg/ml, respectively. In topical administration in cutaneous HSV-1 infection in mice, 2.5%, 5%, 10% and 20% oxyresveratrol in cream vehicle applied three times daily for 7 days after infection were evaluated and 10% and 20% oxyresveratrol cream were significantly effective in delaying the development of skin lesions and protection from death (P < 0.01). The concentration of 10% oxyresveratrol in cream was significantly more effective than that of 30% oxyresveratrol in vaseline applied three times daily (P < 0.01). Oxyresveratrol cream at 20% was as effective as 5% ACV cream applied three times daily (P < 0.01). Both 10% and 20% oxyresveratrol cream were as effective as that of 5% ACV cream applied two times daily (P > 0.05). Therapeutic efficacy of oxyresveratrol in cream vehicle was dose-dependent and the maximum efficacy observed on day 6 after infection was shown at 10% oxyresveratrol in cream applied three times daily. The frequency of application of 10% oxyresveratrol cream at three, four and five times daily was as effective as that of 5% ACV cream applied five times daily (P > 0.05). These results demonstrated that topical administration of oxyresveratrol in novel cream vehicle reduced the concentration of oxyresveratrol to 10% and was suitable for cutaneous HSV infection.

  10. A single intramuscular vaccination of mice with the HSV-1 VC2 virus with mutations in the glycoprotein K and the membrane protein UL20 confers full protection against lethal intravaginal challenge with virulent HSV-1 and HSV-2 strains.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, Brent A; Stahl, Jacque; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Subramanian, Ramesh; Charles, Anu-Susan; Saied, Ahmad A; Walker, Jason D; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2014-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 (HSV-1) and type-2 (HSV-2) establish life-long infections and cause significant orofacial and genital infections in humans. HSV-1 is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the western world. Currently, there are no available vaccines to protect against herpes simplex infections. Recently, we showed that a single intramuscular immunization with an HSV-1(F) mutant virus lacking expression of the viral glycoprotein K (gK), which prevents the virus from entering into distal axons of ganglionic neurons, conferred significant protection against either virulent HSV-1(McKrae) or HSV-2(G) intravaginal challenge in mice. Specifically, 90% of the mice were protected against HSV-1(McKrae) challenge, while 70% of the mice were protected against HSV-2(G) challenge. We constructed the recombinant virus VC2 that contains specific mutations in gK and the membrane protein UL20 preventing virus entry into axonal compartments of neurons, while allowing efficient replication in cell culture, unlike the gK-null virus, which has a major defect in virus replication and spread. Intramuscular injection of mice with 107 VC2 plaque forming units did not cause any significant clinical disease in mice. A single intramuscular immunization with the VC2 virus protected 100% of mice against lethal intravaginal challenge with either HSV-1(McKrae) or HSV-2(G) viruses. Importantly, vaccination with VC2 produced robust cross protective humoral and cellular immunity that fully protected vaccinated mice against lethal disease. Quantitative PCR did not detect any viral DNA in ganglionic tissues of vaccinated mice, while unvaccinated mice contained high levels of viral DNA. The VC2 virus may serve as an efficient vaccine against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections, as well as a safe vector for the production of vaccines against other viral and bacterial pathogens.

  11. Dual-therapeutic reporter genes fusion for enhanced cancer gene therapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sekar, T V; Foygel, K; Willmann, J K; Paulmurugan, R

    2013-05-01

    Two of the successful gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies include herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) enzyme-ganciclovir prodrug and the Escherichia coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme-CB1954 prodrug strategies; these enzyme-prodrug combinations produce activated cytotoxic metabolites of the prodrugs capable of tumor cell death by inhibiting DNA synthesis and killing quiescent cells, respectively. Both these strategies also affect significant bystander cell killing of neighboring tumor cells that do not express these enzymes. We have developed a dual-combination gene strategy, where we identified HSV1-TK and NTR fused in a particular orientation can effectively kill tumor cells when the tumor cells are treated with a fusion HSV1-TK-NTR gene- along with a prodrug combination of GCV and CB1954. In order to determine whether the dual-system demonstrate superior therapeutic efficacy than either HSV1-TK or NTR systems alone, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft studies using triple negative SUM159 breast cancer cells, by evaluating the efficacy of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis upon treatment with the dual HSV1-TK genes-GCV-CB1954 prodrugs system, and compared the efficiency to HSV1-TK-GCV and NTR-CB1954. Our cell-based studies, tumor regression studies in xenograft mice, histological analyses of treated tumors and bystander studies indicate that the dual HSV1-TK-NTR-prodrug system is two times more efficient even with half the doses of both prodrugs than the respective single gene-prodrug system, as evidenced by enhanced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in vitro in culture and xenograft of tumor tissues in animals.

  12. Impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in human iPSC-derived TLR3-deficient CNS cells

    PubMed Central

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Pessach, Itai M.; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Herman, Melina; Abhyankar, Avinash; Ying, Shui-Wang; Keros, Sotirios; Goldstein, Peter A.; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Tu, Edmund; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Tardieu, Marc; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Daley, George Q.; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Studer, Lorenz; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2012-01-01

    In the course of primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), children with inborn errors of TLR3 immunity are prone to HSV-1 encephalitis (HSE) 1–3. We tested the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of HSE involves non hematopoietic central nervous system (CNS)-resident cells. We derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of TLR3- and UNC-93B-deficient patients and from controls. These iPSCs were differentiated into highly purified populations of neural stem cells (NSCs), neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The induction of IFN-β and/or IFN-γ1 in response to poly(I:C) stimulation was dependent on TLR3 and UNC-93B in all cells tested. However, the induction of IFN-β and IFN-γ1 in response to HSV-1 infection was impaired selectively in UNC-93B-deficient neurons and oligodendrocytes. These cells were also much more susceptible to HSV-1 infection than control cells, whereas UNC-93B-deficient NSCs and astrocytes were not. TLR3-deficient neurons were also found to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. The rescue of UNC-93B- and TLR3-deficient cells with the corresponding wild-type allele demonstrated that the genetic defect was the cause of the poly(I:C) and HSV-1 phenotypes. The viral infection phenotype was further rescued by treatment with exogenous IFN-α/β, but not IFN-γ1.Thus, impaired TLR3- and UNC-93B-dependent IFN-α/β intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in the CNS, in neurons and oligodendrocytes in particular, may underlie the pathogenesis of HSE in children with TLR3 pathway deficiencies. PMID:23103873

  13. Impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in human iPSC-derived TLR3-deficient CNS cells.

    PubMed

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Pessach, Itai M; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Herman, Melina; Abhyankar, Avinash; Ying, Shui-Wang; Keros, Sotirios; Goldstein, Peter A; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Tu, Edmund; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Tardieu, Marc; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Daley, George Q; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Studer, Lorenz; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2012-11-29

    In the course of primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), children with inborn errors of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) immunity are prone to HSV-1 encephalitis (HSE). We tested the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of HSE involves non-haematopoietic CNS-resident cells. We derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of TLR3- and UNC-93B-deficient patients and from controls. These iPSCs were differentiated into highly purified populations of neural stem cells (NSCs), neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and/or IFN-λ1 in response to stimulation by the dsRNA analogue polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) was dependent on TLR3 and UNC-93B in all cells tested. However, the induction of IFN-β and IFN-λ1 in response to HSV-1 infection was impaired selectively in UNC-93B-deficient neurons and oligodendrocytes. These cells were also much more susceptible to HSV-1 infection than control cells, whereas UNC-93B-deficient NSCs and astrocytes were not. TLR3-deficient neurons were also found to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. The rescue of UNC-93B- and TLR3-deficient cells with the corresponding wild-type allele showed that the genetic defect was the cause of the poly(I:C) and HSV-1 phenotypes. The viral infection phenotype was rescued further by treatment with exogenous IFN-α or IFN-β ( IFN-α/β) but not IFN-λ1. Thus, impaired TLR3- and UNC-93B-dependent IFN-α/β intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in the CNS, in neurons and oligodendrocytes in particular, may underlie the pathogenesis of HSE in children with TLR3-pathway deficiencies.

  14. Neddylation is required for herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1)-induced early phase interferon-beta production

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueying; Ye, Zhenjie; Pei, Yujun; Qiu, Guihua; Wang, Qingyang; Xu, Yunlu; Shen, Beifen; Zhang, Jiyan

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons such as interferon-beta (IFN-β) play essential roles in the host innate immune response to herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) infection. The transcription of type I interferon genes is controlled by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members including IRF3. NF-κB activation depends on the phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB (IκB), which triggers its ubiqitination and degradation. It has been reported that neddylation inhibition by a pharmacological agent MLN4924 potently suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production with the accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα. However, the role of neddylation in type I interferon expression remains unknown. Here, we report that neddylation inhibition with MLN4924 or upon UBA3 deficiency led to accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα, impaired IκBα degradation, and impaired NF-κB nuclear translocation in the early phase of HSV-1 infection even though phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 were not affected. The blockade of NF-κB nuclear translocation by neddylation inhibition becomes less efficient at the later time points of HSV-1 infection. Consequently, HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production significantly decreased upon MLN4924 treatment and UBA3 deficiency. NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 mimicked the effects of neddylation inhibition in the early phase of HSV-1 infection. Moreover, the effects of neddylation inhibition on HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production diminished in the presence of NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23. Thus, neddylation contributes to HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production through, at least partially, promoting NF-κB activation. PMID:27593482

  15. Neddylation is required for herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1)-induced early phase interferon-beta production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueying; Ye, Zhenjie; Pei, Yujun; Qiu, Guihua; Wang, Qingyang; Xu, Yunlu; Shen, Beifen; Zhang, Jiyan

    2016-09-01

    Type I interferons such as interferon-beta (IFN-β) play essential roles in the host innate immune response to herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) infection. The transcription of type I interferon genes is controlled by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members including IRF3. NF-κB activation depends on the phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB (IκB), which triggers its ubiqitination and degradation. It has been reported that neddylation inhibition by a pharmacological agent MLN4924 potently suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production with the accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα. However, the role of neddylation in type I interferon expression remains unknown. Here, we report that neddylation inhibition with MLN4924 or upon UBA3 deficiency led to accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα, impaired IκBα degradation, and impaired NF-κB nuclear translocation in the early phase of HSV-1 infection even though phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 were not affected. The blockade of NF-κB nuclear translocation by neddylation inhibition becomes less efficient at the later time points of HSV-1 infection. Consequently, HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production significantly decreased upon MLN4924 treatment and UBA3 deficiency. NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 mimicked the effects of neddylation inhibition in the early phase of HSV-1 infection. Moreover, the effects of neddylation inhibition on HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production diminished in the presence of NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23. Thus, neddylation contributes to HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production through, at least partially, promoting NF-κB activation. PMID:27593482

  16. Inflammatory effects of gene transfer into the CNS with defective HSV-1 vectors.

    PubMed

    Wood, M J; Byrnes, A P; Pfaff, D W; Rabkin, S D; Charlton, H M

    1994-09-01

    The use of viral vectors which infect and express genes in post-mitotic neurons is a potential strategy for the treatment of disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS). However, the inflammatory consequences of such strategies have yet to be systematically examined. Preparations of non-replicating defective herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors containing the lacZ gene were obtained by standard methods and stereotaxically injected into the adult rat dentate gyrus (DG). The consequent gene expression and inflammatory effects following microinjection were investigated. beta-Galactosidase activity was detected in neurons of the DG from 24 h to at least 12 days after vector injection. A strong inflammatory response developed within 2 days, characterized by diffuse up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens and the activation of microglia. After 4 days the recruitment of MHC class II+ cells, activated T lymphocytes and macrophages was detected. These features persisted for at least 31 days. Of importance was the finding of beta-galactosidase activity in a bilateral group of neurons in the supramammillary nuclei (SMN) of the posterior hypothalamus, known to send afferent projections to the DG. The onset of inflammation at this secondary site was delayed, but its cellular characteristics resembled those found at the primary site of injection. Thus, the use of preparations of defective HSV-1 vectors for gene transfer in the CNS has immunological implications both at primary and secondary sites within the CNS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7584093

  17. Increasing the Efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Precise Genome Editing of HSV-1 Virus in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chaolong; Li, Huanhuan; Hao, Mengru; Xiong, Dan; Luo, Yong; Huang, Chenghao; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified HSV-1 viruses serve as promising vectors for tumour therapy and vaccine development. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is one of the most powerful tools for precise gene editing of the genomes of organisms. However, whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system can precisely and efficiently make gene replacements in the genome of HSV-1 remains essentially unknown. Here, we reported CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the HSV-1 genome in human cells, including the knockout and replacement of large genes. In established cells stably expressing CRISPR/Cas9, gRNA in coordination with Cas9 could direct a precise cleavage within a pre-defined target region, and foreign genes were successfully used to replace the target gene seamlessly by HDR-mediated gene replacement. Introducing the NHEJ inhibitor SCR7 to the CRISPR/Cas9 system greatly facilitated HDR-mediated gene replacement in the HSV-1 genome. We provided the first genetic evidence that two copies of the ICP0 gene in different locations on the same HSV-1 genome could be simultaneously modified with high efficiency and with no off-target modifications. We also developed a revolutionized isolation platform for desired recombinant viruses using single-cell sorting. Together, our work provides a significantly improved method for targeted editing of DNA viruses, which will facilitate the development of anti-cancer oncolytic viruses and vaccines. PMID:27713537

  18. Anti HSV-1 Activity of Halistanol Sulfate and Halistanol Sulfate C Isolated from Brazilian Marine Sponge Petromica citrina (Demospongiae)

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa Guimarães, Tatiana; Quiroz, Carlos Guillermo; Rigotto, Caroline; de Oliveira, Simone Quintana; Rojo de Almeida, Maria Tereza; Bianco, Éverson Miguel; Moritz, Maria Izabel Goulart; Carraro, João Luís; Palermo, Jorge Alejandro; Cabrera, Gabriela; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Oliveira Simões, Cláudia Maria

    2013-01-01

    The n-butanol fraction (BF) obtained from the crude extract of the marine sponge Petromica citrina, the halistanol-enriched fraction (TSH fraction), and the isolated compounds halistanol sulfate (1) and halistanol sulfate C (2), were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on the replication of the Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1, KOS strain) by the viral plaque number reduction assay. The TSH fraction was the most effective against HSV-1 replication (SI = 15.33), whereas compounds 1 (SI = 2.46) and 2 (SI = 1.95) were less active. The most active fraction and these compounds were also assayed to determine the viral multiplication step(s) upon which they act as well as their potential synergistic effects. The anti-HSV-1 activity detected was mediated by the inhibition of virus attachment and by the penetration into Vero cells, the virucidal effect on virus particles, and by the impairment in levels of ICP27 and gD proteins of HSV-1. In summary, these results suggest that the anti-HSV-1 activity of TSH fraction detected is possibly related to the synergic effects of compounds 1 and 2. PMID:24172213

  19. Microglia-induced IL-6 protects against neuronal loss following HSV-1 infection of neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Conrady, Christopher; Zheng, Min; Kroll, Chandra M; Lane, Thomas E; Carr, Daniel J J

    2014-09-01

    Herpes virus type 1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread human pathogens and accounts for more than 90% of cases of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) causing severe and permanent neurologic sequelae among surviving patients. We hypothesize such CNS deficits are due to HSV-1 infection of neural progenitor cells (NPCs). In vivo, HSV-1 infection was found to diminish NPC numbers in the subventricular zone. Upon culture of NPCs in conditions that stimulate their differentiation, we found HSV-1 infection of NPCs resulted in the loss of neuronal precursors with no significant change in the percentage of astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. We propose this is due a direct effect of HSV-1 on neuronal survival without alteration of the differentiation process. The neuronal loss was prevented by the addition of microglia or conditioned media from NPC/microglia co-cultures. Using neutralizing antibodies and recombinant cytokines, we identified interleukin-6 (IL-6) as responsible for the protective effect by microglia, likely through its downstream Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) cascade.

  20. CD200R1 supports HSV-1 viral replication and licenses pro-inflammatory signaling functions of TLR2.

    PubMed

    Soberman, Roy J; MacKay, Christopher R; Vaine, Christine A; Ryan, Glennice Bowen; Cerny, Anna M; Thompson, Mikayla R; Nikolic, Boris; Primo, Valeria; Christmas, Peter; Sheiffele, Paul; Aronov, Lisa; Knipe, David M; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2012-01-01

    The CD200R1:CD200 axis is traditionally considered to limit tissue inflammation by down-regulating pro-inflammatory signaling in myeloid cells bearing the receptor. We generated CD200R1(-/-) mice and employed them to explore both the role of CD200R1 in regulating macrophage signaling via TLR2 as well as the host response to an in vivo, TLR2-dependent model, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection. CD200R1(-/-) peritoneal macrophages demonstrated a 70-75% decrease in the generation of IL-6 and CCL5 (Rantes) in response to the TLR2 agonist Pam(2)CSK(4) and to HSV-1. CD200R1(-/-) macrophages could neither up-regulate the expression of TLR2, nor assemble a functional inflammasome in response to HSV-1. CD200R1(-/-) mice were protected from HSV-1 infection and exhibited dysfunctional TLR2 signaling. Finally, both CD200R1(-/-) mice and CD200R1(-/-) fibroblasts and macrophages showed a markedly reduced ability to support HSV-1 replication. In summary, our data demonstrate an unanticipated and novel requirement for CD200R1 in "licensing" pro-inflammatory functions of TLR2 and in limiting viral replication that are supported by ex vivo and in vivo evidence.

  1. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  2. Anti-Viral Evaluation of Sesquiterpene Coumarins from Ferula assa-foetida against HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ghannadi, Alireza; Fattahian, Khadijeh; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Behbahani, Mandana; Shahnoush, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Several complications attributed with Herpes virus related infections and the emergence of drug resistant viruses prompt scientists to search for new drugs. Several terpenoids and coumarins have shown anti HSV effects while no sesquiterpene coumarins have been previously tested for HSV treatment. Three sesquiterpene coumarins badrakemin acetate (1), kellerin (2) and samarcandin diastereomer (3) were isolated from the gum resin of Ferula assa-foetida, a herbal medicine with antimicrobial, antiprotozoal and antiviral effects. Compounds were identified by 1D and 2D- NMR spectroscopies and comparison with literature data. A comparative evaluation of cytotoxicity and antiviral activity showed that kellerin (2) could significantly inhibit the cytopathic effects and reduce the viral titre of the herpes virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA viral strain KOS at concentrations of 10, 5 and 2.5 µg/mL. PMID:25237347

  3. Exercise effects on IFN-beta expression and viral replication in lung macrophages after HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kohut, M L; Davis, J M; Jackson, D A; Jani, P; Ghaffar, A; Mayer, E P; Essig, D A

    1998-12-01

    Mice exercised to fatigue and exposed to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) exhibit greater mortality than control mice. In this study, we examined lung macrophage resistance to HSV-1 after exercise in terms of both viral replication and interferon (IFN)-beta production. We utilized the reverse transcriptase-rapid polymerase chain reaction to measure the IFN-beta mRNA content in alveolar macrophages. IFN release was measured with a bioassay, and viral replication within the macrophage was assessed by plaque titration. Exercised (Ex) mice ran on a treadmill until fatigue while control (Con) mice remained in lanes above the treadmill. After exercise, alveolar macrophages were removed and incubated with HSV-1. Alveolar macrophage IFN-beta mRNA was greater in Ex than in Con mice. Culture supernatant from infected macrophages showed a higher degree of IFN release and a higher number of infectious viral particles in Ex vs. Con mice. It is likely that the increase in IFN-beta mRNA occurs in response to a higher degree of viral replication. These results suggest that macrophages from Ex mice are less resistant to infection with HSV-1.

  4. HSV-1-induced activation of NF-κB protects U937 monocytic cells against both virus replication and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Marino-Merlo, Francesca; Papaianni, Emanuela; Medici, Maria Antonietta; Macchi, Beatrice; Grelli, Sandro; Mosca, Claudia; Borner, Christoph; Mastino, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is a crucial player of the antiviral innate response. Intriguingly, however, NF-κB activation is assumed to favour herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection rather than restrict it. Apoptosis, a form of innate response to viruses, is completely inhibited by HSV in fully permissive cells, but not in cells incapable to fully sustain HSV replication, such as immunocompetent cells. To resolve the intricate interplay among NF-κB signalling, apoptosis and permissiveness to HSV-1 in monocytic cells, we utilized U937 monocytic cells in which NF-κB activation was inhibited by expressing a dominant-negative IκBα. Surprisingly, viral production was increased in monocytic cells in which NF-κB was inhibited. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB led to increased apoptosis following HSV-1 infection, associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization. High expression of late viral proteins and induction of apoptosis occurred in distinct cells. Transcriptional analysis of known innate response genes by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR excluded a contribution of the assayed genes to the observed phenomena. Thus, in monocytic cells NF-κB activation simultaneously serves as an innate process to restrict viral replication as well as a mechanism to limit the damage of an excessive apoptotic response to HSV-1 infection. This finding may clarify mechanisms controlling HSV-1 infection in monocytic cells. PMID:27584793

  5. HSV-1-induced activation of NF-κB protects U937 monocytic cells against both virus replication and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Marino-Merlo, Francesca; Papaianni, Emanuela; Medici, Maria Antonietta; Macchi, Beatrice; Grelli, Sandro; Mosca, Claudia; Borner, Christoph; Mastino, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is a crucial player of the antiviral innate response. Intriguingly, however, NF-κB activation is assumed to favour herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection rather than restrict it. Apoptosis, a form of innate response to viruses, is completely inhibited by HSV in fully permissive cells, but not in cells incapable to fully sustain HSV replication, such as immunocompetent cells. To resolve the intricate interplay among NF-κB signalling, apoptosis and permissiveness to HSV-1 in monocytic cells, we utilized U937 monocytic cells in which NF-κB activation was inhibited by expressing a dominant-negative IκBα. Surprisingly, viral production was increased in monocytic cells in which NF-κB was inhibited. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB led to increased apoptosis following HSV-1 infection, associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization. High expression of late viral proteins and induction of apoptosis occurred in distinct cells. Transcriptional analysis of known innate response genes by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR excluded a contribution of the assayed genes to the observed phenomena. Thus, in monocytic cells NF-κB activation simultaneously serves as an innate process to restrict viral replication as well as a mechanism to limit the damage of an excessive apoptotic response to HSV-1 infection. This finding may clarify mechanisms controlling HSV-1 infection in monocytic cells. PMID:27584793

  6. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Michael P; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E R; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir. PMID:27055281

  7. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Michael P.; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E. R.; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M.; Proença, João T.; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir. PMID:27055281

  8. DNA demethylating agents synergize with oncolytic HSV1 against malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Okemoto, Kazuo; Kasai, Kazue; Wagner, Benjamin; Haseley, Amy; Meisen, Hans; Bolyard, Chelsea; Mo, Xiaokui; Wehr, Allison; Lehman, Amy; Fernandez, Soledad; Kaur, Balveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Oncolytic viruses (OV) based on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) are being utilized in clinical trials for a variety of cancers. The OV, rQNestin34.5, utilizes a nestin promoter/enhancer to selectively drive robust viral replication in malignant glioma cells. We have discovered that this promoter becomes extensively methylated in infected glioma cells, reducing OV efficacy. Experimental Design We utilized demethylating drugs (5-azacytidine), Decitabine or Valproic Acid (VPA) in both in vitro and in vivo malignant glioma models to determine if they improved the efficacy of rQNestin34.5 therapy. Results Utilization of demethylating agents, such as 5-azacytidine (5-Aza), improved OV replication and tumor cell lysis in vitro and, in fact, synergized pharmacologically by Chou-Talalay analysis. In vivo the combination of the demethylating agents, 5-Aza or Decitabine, with rQNestin34.5 significantly prolonged the survivorship of athymic mice harboring intracranial human glioma xenografts over single agent alone. Conclusion These results thus provide further justification for the exploration of demethylating agents when combined with the OV, rQNestin34.5, in preclinical therapeutics and possibly clinical trials for malignant glioma. PMID:24056786

  9. Ethosomes for the delivery of anti-HSV-1 molecules: preparation, characterization and in vitro activity.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, R; Ravani, L; Zaid, A N; Menegatti, E; Romagnoli, R; Drechsler, M; Esposito, E

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the production, characterization and in vitro activity of ethosomes containing two molecules with antiviral activity, such as acyclovir (ACY) and N1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-pyrazole [3,4d]pyridazin-7(6p-chlorine-phenyl)-one nucleoside (N1CP). Ethosomes were prepared and morphologically characterized by Cryo-TEM. The encapsulation efficiency was 92.3 +/- 2.5% for ACY and 94.2 +/- 2.8% for N1CP. The release of the drug from vesicles, determined by a Franz cell method, indicated that both drugs were released in a controlled manner. In order to possibly guarantee the stability during long-term storage ethosome suspensions was freeze-dried. It was found that the freeze-dried ethosomes' cakes were compact, glassy characterized by low density and quick re-hydration. However, the storage time slightly influences the percentage of drug encapsulation within ethosomes showing a drug leakage after re-hydration around 10%. The antiviral activity against HSV-1 of both drugs was tested by plaque reduction assay in monolayer cultures of Vero cells. Data showed that ethosomes allowed a reduction of the ED50 of N1CP evidencing an increase of its antiviral activity. However, ACY remains more active than N1CP. No differences are appreciable between drug-containing ethosomes before and after freeze-drying. Taken together these results, ethosomal formulation could be possibly proposed as mean for topical administration of anti-herpetic molecules.

  10. Solid-to-fluid DNA transition inside HSV-1 capsid close to the temperature of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Sae-Ueng, Udom; Li, Dong; Zuo, Xiaobing; Huffman, Jamie B.; Homa, Fred L.; Rau, Donald; Evilevitch, Alex

    2014-10-01

    DNA in the human Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid is packaged to a tight density. This leads to tens of atmospheres of internal pressure responsible for the delivery of the herpes genome into the cell nucleus. In this study we show that, despite its liquid crystalline state inside the capsid, the DNA is fluid-like, which facilitates its ejection into the cell nucleus during infection. We found that the sliding friction between closely packaged DNA strands, caused by interstrand repulsive interactions, is reduced by the ionic environment of epithelial cells and neurons susceptible to herpes infection. However, variations in the ionic conditions corresponding to neuronal activity can restrict DNA mobility in the capsid, making it more solid-like. This can inhibit intranuclear DNA release and interfere with viral replication. In addition, the temperature of the human host (37 °C) induces a disordering transition of the encapsidated herpes genome, which reduces interstrand interactions and provides genome mobility required for infection.

  11. Ethosomes for the delivery of anti-HSV-1 molecules: preparation, characterization and in vitro activity.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, R; Ravani, L; Zaid, A N; Menegatti, E; Romagnoli, R; Drechsler, M; Esposito, E

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the production, characterization and in vitro activity of ethosomes containing two molecules with antiviral activity, such as acyclovir (ACY) and N1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-pyrazole [3,4d]pyridazin-7(6p-chlorine-phenyl)-one nucleoside (N1CP). Ethosomes were prepared and morphologically characterized by Cryo-TEM. The encapsulation efficiency was 92.3 +/- 2.5% for ACY and 94.2 +/- 2.8% for N1CP. The release of the drug from vesicles, determined by a Franz cell method, indicated that both drugs were released in a controlled manner. In order to possibly guarantee the stability during long-term storage ethosome suspensions was freeze-dried. It was found that the freeze-dried ethosomes' cakes were compact, glassy characterized by low density and quick re-hydration. However, the storage time slightly influences the percentage of drug encapsulation within ethosomes showing a drug leakage after re-hydration around 10%. The antiviral activity against HSV-1 of both drugs was tested by plaque reduction assay in monolayer cultures of Vero cells. Data showed that ethosomes allowed a reduction of the ED50 of N1CP evidencing an increase of its antiviral activity. However, ACY remains more active than N1CP. No differences are appreciable between drug-containing ethosomes before and after freeze-drying. Taken together these results, ethosomal formulation could be possibly proposed as mean for topical administration of anti-herpetic molecules. PMID:21105576

  12. Conformational analysis of a quinolonic ribonucleoside with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane D.; Velloso, Marcia Helena R.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. de V.; Sugiura, Makiko; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Santos, Fernanda da C.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V. de; Cunha, Anna Claudia; Seidl, Peter R.; Alencastro, Ricardo B. de; Ferreira, Vitor F.

    2011-01-01

    The infections caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus are one of the most common sources of diseases in adults and several natural nucleoside analogues are currently used in the treatment of these infections. In vitro tests of a series of quinolonic ribonucleosides derivatives synthesized by part of our group indicated that some of them have antiviral activity against HSV-1. The conformational analysis of bioactive compounds is extremely important in order to better understand their chemical structures and biological activity. In this work, we have carried out a nuclear relaxation NMR study of 6-Me ribonucleoside derivative in order to determine if the syn or anti conformation is preferential. The NMR analysis permits the determination of inter-atomic distances by using techniques which are based on nuclear relaxation and related phenomena. Those techniques are non-selective longitudinal or spin-lattice relaxation rates and NULL pulse sequence, which allow the determination of distances between pairs of hydrogen atoms. The results of NMR studies were compared with those obtained by molecular modeling.

  13. Optical imaging of reporter gene expression using a positron-emission-tomography probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Xiaofen; Chen, Luxi; Han, Peizhen; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-11-01

    Reporter gene/reporter probe technology is one of the most important techniques in molecular imaging. Lately, many reporter gene/reporter probe systems have been coupled to different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and optical imaging (OI). It has been recently found that OI techniques could be used to monitor radioactive tracers in vitro and in living subjects. In this study, we further demonstrate that a reporter gene/nuclear reporter probe system [herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and 9-(4-18F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl] butyl) guanine ([18F]FHBG)] could be successfully imaged by OI in vitro and in vivo. OI with radioactive reporter probes will facilitate and broaden the applications of reporter gene/reporter probe techniques in medical research.

  14. Autophagy enhances the presentation of endogenous viral antigens on MHC class I molecules during HSV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    English, Luc; Chemali, Magali; Duron, Johanne; Rondeau, Christiane; Laplante, Annie; Gingras, Diane; Alexander, Diane; Leib, David; Norbury, Christopher; Lippé, Roger; Desjardins, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Viral proteins are usually processed by the ‘classical’ major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation pathway. Here we showed that although macrophages infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) initially stimulated CD8+ T cells by this pathway, a second pathway involving a vacuolar compartment was triggered later during infection. Morphological and functional analyses indicated that distinct forms of autophagy facilitated the presentation of HSV-1 antigens on MHC class I molecules. One form of autophagy involved a previously unknown type of autophagosome that originated from the nuclear envelope. Whereas interferon-γ stimulated classical MHC class I presentation, fever-like hyperthermia and the pyrogenic cytokine interleukin 1β activated autophagy and the vacuolar processing of viral peptides. Viral peptides in autophagosomes were further processed by the proteasome, which suggests a complex interaction between the vacuolar and MHC class I presentation pathways. PMID:19305394

  15. Subcellular Trafficking and Functional Relationship of the HSV-1 Glycoproteins N and M

    PubMed Central

    Striebinger, Hannah; Funk, Christina; Raschbichler, Verena; Bailer, Susanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein N (gN/UL49.5) is a type I transmembrane protein conserved throughout the herpesvirus family. gN is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum that in the presence of gM is translocated to the trans Golgi network. gM and gN are covalently linked by a single disulphide bond formed between cysteine 46 of gN and cysteine 59 of gM. Exit of gN from the endoplasmic reticulum requires the N-terminal core of gM composed of eight transmembrane domains but is independent of the C-terminal extension of gM. Co-transport of gN and gM to the trans Golgi network also occurs upon replacement of conserved cysteines in gM and gN, suggesting that their physical interaction is mediated by covalent and non-covalent forces. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mutagenesis generated mutant viruses with wild-type growth behaviour, while full deletion of gM/UL10 resulted in an attenuated phenotype. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 in conjunction with various gM/UL10 mutants reduced average plaque sizes to the same extent as either single gM/UL10 mutant, indicating that gN is nonessential for the function performed by gM. We propose that gN functions in gM-dependent as well as gM-independent processes during which it is complemented by other viral factors. PMID:26999189

  16. Subcellular Trafficking and Functional Relationship of the HSV-1 Glycoproteins N and M.

    PubMed

    Striebinger, Hannah; Funk, Christina; Raschbichler, Verena; Bailer, Susanne M

    2016-03-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein N (gN/UL49.5) is a type I transmembrane protein conserved throughout the herpesvirus family. gN is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum that in the presence of gM is translocated to the trans Golgi network. gM and gN are covalently linked by a single disulphide bond formed between cysteine 46 of gN and cysteine 59 of gM. Exit of gN from the endoplasmic reticulum requires the N-terminal core of gM composed of eight transmembrane domains but is independent of the C-terminal extension of gM. Co-transport of gN and gM to the trans Golgi network also occurs upon replacement of conserved cysteines in gM and gN, suggesting that their physical interaction is mediated by covalent and non-covalent forces. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mutagenesis generated mutant viruses with wild-type growth behaviour, while full deletion of gM/UL10 resulted in an attenuated phenotype. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 in conjunction with various gM/UL10 mutants reduced average plaque sizes to the same extent as either single gM/UL10 mutant, indicating that gN is nonessential for the function performed by gM. We propose that gN functions in gM-dependent as well as gM-independent processes during which it is complemented by other viral factors. PMID:26999189

  17. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation

    PubMed Central

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Simpson, Jennifer L.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the explant TG induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT(+) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT(−) virus) were irradiated with UV-B and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT(−) virus, LAT(+) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B induced reactivation model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs are discussed. PMID:26002839

  18. Early activation of MyD88-mediated autophagy sustains HSV-1 replication in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Siracusano, Gabriel; Venuti, Assunta; Lombardo, Daniele; Mastino, Antonio; Esclatine, Audrey; Sciortino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that exerts numerous functions in vital biological processes. Among these, it contributes to both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, pathogens have evolved strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own advantage. By monitoring autophagic markers, we showed that HSV-1 transiently induced autophagosome formation during early times of the infection of monocytic THP-1 cells and human monocytes. Autophagy is induced in THP-1 cells by a mechanism independent of viral gene expression or viral DNA accumulation. We found that the MyD88 signaling pathway is required for HSV-1-mediated autophagy, and it is linked to the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological modulators or siRNA knockdown impaired viral replication in both THP-1 cells and human monocytes, suggest that the virus exploits the autophagic machinery to its own benefit in these cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that the early autophagic response induced by HSV-1 exerts a proviral role, improving viral production in a semi-permissive model such as THP-1 cells and human monocytes. PMID:27509841

  19. The function of temporally ordered viral gene expression in the intracellular replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1).

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Jun; Sasaki, Akira

    2009-11-01

    In the reproduction of HSV-1, the temporal profile of the viral gene expressions and the molecular mechanisms regulating the expressions are extensively studied. Functional roles of the temporally ordered gene expressions has not yet been clarified. We construct a simple mathematical model for the intracellular replication of HSV-1 to investigate the function of the ordered gene expressions. We obtain the condition for the 'explosion' of the virus from our model. The expression ratio of the early gene to the late gene must be higher than the ratio of the reaction rate of the encapsidation to that of the viral DNA replication for viruses to reproduce successfully. The preceded accumulation of the early gene product prevents the growth arrest. Further, as promoter activity of the early gene becomes higher, the replication speed of virus becomes faster. The structure of early gene promoter that has many binding motif to transcription factor accelerates the replication speed of HSV-1. This structure of the early gene promoter might be selectively maintained by allowing fast growth of the virus. With amino acid limitation, there exist finite optimal ratio of early/late gene promoter activity.

  20. Early collection of saliva specimens from Bell's palsy patients: quantitative analysis of HHV-6, HSV-1, and VZV.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Falasca, Francesca; Maida, Paola; Gaeta, Aurelia; De Vito, Corrado; Mancini, Patrizia; De Seta, Daniele; Covelli, Edoardo; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. Although it has been associated with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pregnancy, and preeclampsia, the etiology of Bell's palsy remains unknown. The reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) with subsequent inflammation and entrapment of the facial nerve in the narrow labyrinthine segment has been implicated as a cause of facial paralysis, but the active role of these viruses in Bell's palsy is still discussed. This study quantified HSV-1 DNA, VZV DNA, and HHV-6 DNA in 95 saliva samples collected from patients within 48 hr from the onset of paralysis. HSV-1, VZV, and HHV-6 were detected in 13%, 3%, and 61% of patients, respectively. The detection rate did not differ significantly between patients and a control group of healthy donors. Interestingly, however, the value of HHV-6 DNA copies was significantly higher than that detected in healthy donors. In addition, the mean value of HHV-6 DNA recorded in patients who had at least a one grade improvement of palsy at the first visit was significantly lower than that detected in patients who showed no change in facial palsy grade or an increase of at least one grade. These findings call into question the role of HSV-1 and VZV in the etiology of Bell's palsy, and suggest that HHV-6 may be involved in the development of the disease or that the underlying disease mechanism might predispose patients to HHV-6 reactivation.

  1. Early collection of saliva specimens from Bell's palsy patients: quantitative analysis of HHV-6, HSV-1, and VZV.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Falasca, Francesca; Maida, Paola; Gaeta, Aurelia; De Vito, Corrado; Mancini, Patrizia; De Seta, Daniele; Covelli, Edoardo; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. Although it has been associated with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pregnancy, and preeclampsia, the etiology of Bell's palsy remains unknown. The reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) with subsequent inflammation and entrapment of the facial nerve in the narrow labyrinthine segment has been implicated as a cause of facial paralysis, but the active role of these viruses in Bell's palsy is still discussed. This study quantified HSV-1 DNA, VZV DNA, and HHV-6 DNA in 95 saliva samples collected from patients within 48 hr from the onset of paralysis. HSV-1, VZV, and HHV-6 were detected in 13%, 3%, and 61% of patients, respectively. The detection rate did not differ significantly between patients and a control group of healthy donors. Interestingly, however, the value of HHV-6 DNA copies was significantly higher than that detected in healthy donors. In addition, the mean value of HHV-6 DNA recorded in patients who had at least a one grade improvement of palsy at the first visit was significantly lower than that detected in patients who showed no change in facial palsy grade or an increase of at least one grade. These findings call into question the role of HSV-1 and VZV in the etiology of Bell's palsy, and suggest that HHV-6 may be involved in the development of the disease or that the underlying disease mechanism might predispose patients to HHV-6 reactivation. PMID:24619963

  2. Ellagitannins as synergists of ACV on the replication of ACV-resistant strains of HSV 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Vilhelmova-Ilieva, N; Jacquet, R; Quideau, S; Galabov, A S

    2014-10-01

    The plant-derived polyphenolic compounds castalagin, vescalagin and grandinin (C-glucosidic ellagitannins containing nonahydroxyterphenoyl) manifested a strong inhibitory effect on the replication of acyclovir-resistant strains of herpes simplex viruses (HSV) type 1 and 2 in MDBK cells in focus forming units (i.e., microscopically registered microplaques) reduction assay and in two variants of cytopathic effect inhibition test. The effect on the acyclovir (ACV)-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain was markedly higher compared to that on the ACV-resistant herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). The three compounds showed comparable levels of antiviral activity against ACV-resistant HSV strains, in contrast with previous results where castalagin exerted the highest degree of activity against wild type HSV strains (Vilhelmova et al., 2011). Combinations of ellagitannins and ACV were tested on the ACV-resistant strains of both HSV-1 and 2 and produced synergistic effects that were revealed by applying the three-dimensional approach of Prichard and Shipman (1990). The ellagitannin(s)-ACV combination applied against ACV-resistant HSV-1 produced a much stronger synergistic effect compared to the effect observed against ACV-resistant HSV-2. The study of the effects of the combination ellagitannin(s)-ACF on intact cell monolayers did not show any toxicity resulting from interaction between the two substances. Altogether, the results obtained in this study demonstrate the highly promising potential of these plant polyphenols as antiherpetic agents.

  3. [HSV-1 and HSV-2 seropositivity rates in pregnant women admitted to Izmir Ataturk Research and Training Hospital, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Rahim; Er, Hakan; Baran, Nurten; Vural, Ahmet; Demirci, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    In this study, the seropositivity rates of herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and their distribution according to the age groups in the sera of asymptomatic pregnant women who were admitted to Gynecology and Obstetrics clinics of Izmir Ataturk Research and Training Hospital for routine control, were investigated. IgG and IgM antibodies specific for HSV-1 and HSV-2 were screened by commercial ELISA kits (RADIM SpA-Pomezia, Italia). Total IgG seropositivity rates for HSV-1 and HSV-2 were found as 94.7% (108/114) and 8.2% (13/158), while IgM seropositivities were 0 (0/114) and 1.4% (2/148), respectively. The distribution of HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgG seropositivity rates according to the age groups were as follows; 100% (8/8) and 10% (1/10) in 18-20; 92.9% (26/28) and 13.9% (5/36) in 21-25; 93.3% (42/45) and 3% (2/66) in 26-30; 96.6% (28/29) and 8.3% (3/36) in 31-35 and 100% (4/4) and 20% (2/10) in 36-40 years age groups, respectively. HSV-2 IgM antibodies were positive only in 21-25 years age group (2/35; 5.7%). The difference between seropositivity rates of HSV-1 IgG and HSV-2 IgG were found statistically significant (p = 0.000, p < 0.05); whereas the differences between both HSV-1 IgG and IgM and HSV-2 IgG and IgM seropositivity rates in the age groups didn't display statistical significance (p = 0.872, p> 0.05; p = 0.217, p> 0.05). The aim of this letter was to contribute to the seroepidemiological data of HSV prevalance in pregnant women in our region.

  4. Down-RANKing the Threat of HSV-1: RANKL Upregulates MHC-Class-I-Restricted Anti-Viral Immunity in Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Katja; Piguet, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is a major cause of viral skin infection in humans. Klenner and colleagues now show that the epidermal receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) is critical for the induction of anti-viral CD8(+) effector T cells (CTL) during cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Activation via RANKL prevents Langerhans cell apoptosis, thus leading to enhanced antigen transport to regional lymph nodes, increasing the CTL-priming capacity of lymph node dendritic cells.

  5. Down-RANKing the Threat of HSV-1: RANKL Upregulates MHC-Class-I-Restricted Anti-Viral Immunity in Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Katja; Piguet, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is a major cause of viral skin infection in humans. Klenner and colleagues now show that the epidermal receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) is critical for the induction of anti-viral CD8(+) effector T cells (CTL) during cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Activation via RANKL prevents Langerhans cell apoptosis, thus leading to enhanced antigen transport to regional lymph nodes, increasing the CTL-priming capacity of lymph node dendritic cells. PMID:26548487

  6. Nonthermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Suppresses Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Replication in Corneal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Oleg; Donovan, Kelly; Limonnik, Vladimir; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Herpes keratitis (HK) is the leading cause of cornea-derived and infection-associated blindness in the developed world. Despite the availability of effective antivirals, some patients develop refractory disease, drug-resistant infection, and topical toxicity. A nonpharmaceutical treatment modality may offer a unique advantage in the management of such cases. This study investigated the antiviral effect of nonthermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma, a partially ionized gas that can be applied to organic substances to produce various biological effects. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells and explanted corneas were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and exposed to culture medium treated with nonthermal DBD plasma. The extent of infection was measured by plaque assay, quantitative PCR, and Western blot. Corneal toxicity assessment was performed with fluorescein staining, histologic examination, and 8-OHdG detection. Results Application of DBD plasma–treated medium to human corneal epithelial cells and explanted corneas produced a dose-dependent reduction of the cytopathic effect, viral genome replication, and the overall production of infectious viral progeny. Toxicity studies showed lack of detrimental effects in explanted human corneas. Conclusions Nonthermal DBD plasma substantially suppresses corneal HSV-1 infection in vitro and ex vivo without causing pronounced toxicity. Translational Relevance Nonthermal plasma is a versatile tool that holds great biomedical potential for ophthalmology, where it is being investigated for wound healing and sterilization and is already in use for ocular microsurgery. The anti-HSV-1 activity of DBD plasma demonstrated here could be directly translated to the clinic for use against drug-resistant herpes keratitis. PMID:24757592

  7. Molecular modeling studies of 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline ribonucleosides with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Seidl, Peter Rudolf; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca

    2011-12-01

    Eight human herpes viruses ( e.g., herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, Kaposi's sarcoma) are responsible for several diseases from sub-clinic manifestations to fatal infections, mostly in immunocompromised patients. The major limitations of the currently available antiviral drug therapy are drug resistance, host toxicity, and narrow spectrum of activity. However, some non-nucleoside 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline derivatives ( e.g., PNU-183792) [4] shows broad spectrum antiviral activity. We have developed molecular modeling studies, including molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, based on a model proposed by Liu and co-workers [14] in order to understand the mechanism of action of a 6-chloro substituted 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline ribonucleoside, synthesized by the synthetic group, which showed anti-HSV-1 activity [9]. The molecular docking simulations confirmed the Liu's model showing that the ligand needs to dislocate template residues from the active site in order to interact with the viral DNA polymerase enzyme, reinforcing that the interaction with the Val823 residue is pivotal for the inhibitory activity of non-nucleoside 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline derivatives, such as PNU-183792, with the HSV-1. The molecular dynamics simulations showed that the 6-chloro-benzyl group of PNU-183792 maintains its interaction with residues of the HSV-1 DNA polymerase hydrophobic pocket, considered important according to the Liu's model, and also showed that the methyl group bounded to the nitrogen atom from PNU-183792 is probably contributing to a push-pull effect with the carbonyl group.

  8. Phosphoramidate derivatives of acyclovir: synthesis and antiviral activity in HIV-1 and HSV-1 models in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zakirova, Natalia F; Shipitsyn, Alexander V; Jasko, Maxim V; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Andronova, Valeria L; Galegov, Georgiy A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Kochetkov, Sergey N

    2012-10-01

    The antiviral activity against HIV and HSV and the chemical stability of ACV phosphoramidate derivatives were studied. The phosphoramidates of ACV demonstrated moderate activity. The best compound appeared to be 9-(2-hydroxymethyl)guanine phosphoromonomorpholidate (7), which inhibited virus replication in pseudo-HIV-1 particles by 50% at 50 μM. It also inhibited replication of wild-type HSV-1 (9.7 μM) as well as an acyclovir-resistant strain (25 μM). None of the synthesised compounds showed any cytotoxicity.

  9. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 1 (SOCS1) Mitigates Anterior Uveitis and Confers Protection Against Ocular HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Rong; Hayashi, Kozaburo; Lee, Yun Sang; Mahdi, Rashid M.; Shen, De Fen; Chan, Chi-Chao; Egwuagu, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Immunological responses to pathogens are stringently regulated in the eye to prevent excessive inflammation that damage ocular tissues and compromise vision. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) regulate intensity/duration of inflammatory responses. We have used SOCS1-deficient mice and retina-specific SOCS1 transgenic rats to investigate roles of SOCS1 in ocular herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) infection and non-infectious uveitis. We also genetically engineered cell-penetrating SOCS proteins (membrane-translocating sequence (MTS)-SOCS1, MTS-SOCS3) and examined whether they can be used to inhibit inflammatory cytokines. Overexpression of SOCS1 in transgenic rat eyes attenuated ocular HSV-1 infection while SOCS1-deficient mice developed severe non-infectious anterior uveitis, suggesting that SOCS1 may contribute to mechanism of ocular immune privilege by regulating trafficking of inflammatory cells into ocular tissues. Furthermore, MTS-SOCS1 inhibited IFN-γ-induced signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) activation by macrophages while MTS-SOCS3 suppressed expansion of pathogenic Th17 cells that mediate uveitis, indicating that MTS-SOCS proteins maybe used to treat ocular inflammatory diseases of infectious or autoimmune etiology. PMID:24993154

  10. Nutraceutical activators of AMPK/Sirt1 axis inhibit viral production and protect neurons from neurodegenerative events triggered during HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Leyton, Luis; Hott, Melissa; Acuña, Francisca; Caroca, Jorge; Nuñez, Magdalena; Martin, Carolina; Zambrano, Angara; Concha, Margarita I; Otth, Carola

    2015-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is ubiquitous and is able to establish a lifelong persistent latent infection in neurons of infected individuals. It has been estimated that in approximately 70% of the population over 50 years old, the virus enters the brain and infects neurons, and possibly undergoes recurrent reactivation episodes during lifetime, especially in immunodepressed individuals. We previously showed that the sensors AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) and Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), involved in survival pathways and neuroprotection, were affected during the course of HSV-1 infection. To evaluate if natural activators of the AMPK/Sirt1 axis, such as Resveratrol and Quercetin could reduce viral propagation and/or counteract the effects of neuronal infection, we analyzed progeny virion production, neuronal viability and neurodegenerative events during HSV-1 infection. We found that the activators of AMPK/Sirt1 axis, increased the viability of infected neurons, significantly reduced the viral titer in the supernatant and the expression of viral genes. More importantly, pretreatment of neurons with Resveratrol or Quercetin significantly reduced the levels of caspase-3 cleaved- and hyperphosphorylated tau associated with HSV-1 infection. These results suggest that activators of the AMPK/Sirt1 axis could be potentially useful in reducing the risk of HSV-1 productive infection in neurons and the cellular damage associated with reactivation episodes.

  11. Synthesis of heparan and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans by human endothelial cells is differentially affected by herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaner, R.J.; Iozzo, R.V.; Ziaie, Z.; Kefalides, N.A.

    1987-05-01

    Effects of HSV-1 infection on proteoglycan (PG) synthesis by human EC were studied as a model of EC injury. Confluent cultures of early passage umbilical vein EC were infected with HSV-1 at multiplicities of infection (MOI) from 0.001 to 1.0. In uninfected cultures, over 90% of the total (/sup 35/S)sulfate-labeled macromolecules were divided into two major peaks on ion-exchange chromatography. One contained heparan sulfate (HSPG) and the other chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DSPG) proteoglycan. HSV-1 infection produced a dose-dependent inhibition of total PG synthesis of up to 75%. There were widely divergent effects on individual PG species. Inhibition of CS/DSPG synthesis was much more marked than that of the HSPG. At a MOI of 1.0, CS/DSPG was present at 13% of control values, compared to 30% for HSPG. There was about one log difference in the dose of virus required to produce 50% inhibition of cell/matrix HSPG relative to CS/DSPG. HSV-1 did not inhibit the generation of an undersulfated HSPG, which contained shorter glycosaminoglycan chains than the predominant species. The authors conclude that HSV-1 infection of human EC produces complex differential effects on proteoglycan synthesis.

  12. The effect of mouse strain on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection of the central nervous system (CNS)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mice infected with HSV-1 can develop lethal encephalitis or virus induced CNS demyelination. Multiple factors affect outcome including route of infection, virus and mouse strain. When infected with a sub-lethal dose of HSV-1 strain 2 via the oral mucosa, susceptible SJL/J, A/J, and PL/J mice develop demyelinating lesions throughout the brain. In contrast, lesions are restricted to the brainstem (BST) in moderately resistant BALB/c mice and are absent in resistant BL/6 mice. The reasons for the strain differences are unknown. Methods In this study, we combine histology, immunohistochemistry, and in-situ hybridization to investigate the relationship between virus and the development of lesions during the early stage (< 24 days PI) of demyelination in different strains of mice. Results Initially, viral DNA and antigen positive cells appear sequentially in non-contiguous areas throughout the brains of BALB/c, SJL/J, A/J, and PL/J mice but are restricted to an area of the BST of BL/6 mice. In SJL/J, A/J, and PL/J mice, this is followed by the development of 'focal' areas of virus infected neuronal and non-neuronal cells throughout the brain. The 'focal' areas follow a hierarchical order and co-localize with developing demyelinating lesions. When antigen is cleared, viral DNA positive cells can remain in areas of demyelination; consistent with a latent infection. In contrast, 'focal' areas are restricted to the BST of BALB/c mice and do not occur in BL/6 mice. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that susceptible mouse strains, infected with HSV-1 via the oral mucosa, develop CNS demyelination during the first 24 days PI in several stages. These include: the initial spread of virus and infection of cells in non-contiguous areas throughout the brain, the development of 'focal' areas of virus infected neuronal and non-neuronal cells, the co-localization of 'focal' areas with developing demyelinating lesions, and latent infection in a number of the

  13. Long-term inducible expression in striatal neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors that contain the tetracycline-inducible promoter system

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qingshen; Sun, Mei; Wang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Geller, Alfred I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct gene transfer into neurons in the brain via a virus vector system has potential for both examining neuronal physiology and for developing gene therapy treatments for neurological diseases. Many of these applications require precise control of the levels of recombinant gene expression. The preferred method for controlling the levels of expression is by use of an inducible promoter system, and the tetracycline (tet)-inducible promoter system is the preferred system. Helper virus-free Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors have a number of the advantages, including their large size and efficient gene transfer. Also, we have reported long-term (14 months) expression from HSV-1 vectors that contain a modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter. A number of studies have reported short-term, inducible expression from helper virus-containing HSV-1 vector systems. However, long-term, inducible expression has not been reported using HSV-1 vectors. The goal of this study was to obtain long-term, inducible expression from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors. We examined two different vector designs for adapting the tet promoter system to HSV-1 vectors. One design was an autoregulatory design; one transcription unit used a tet-regulated promoter to express the tet-regulated transcription factor tet-off, and another transcription unit used a tet-regulated promoter to express the Lac Z gene. In the other vector design, one transcription unit used the modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter to express tet-off, and another transcription unit used a tet-regulated promoter to express the Lac Z gene. The results showed that both vector designs supported inducible expression in cultured fibroblast or neuronal cell lines and for a short time (4 days) in the rat striatum. Of note, only the vector design that used the modified neurofilament promoter to express tet-off supported long-term (2 months) inducible expression in striatal neurons. PMID:16545782

  14. OAS/PKR Pathways and α/β TCR+ T Cells are Required for Ad: IFN-γ Inhibition of HSV-1 in Cornea1

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Bobbie Ann; Halford, William P.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2007-01-01

    An adenoviral vector containing the muIFN-γ transgene (Ad:IFN-γ) was evaluated for its capacity to inhibit HSV-1. To measure effectiveness, viral titers were analyzed in cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during acute ocular HSV-1 infection. Ad: IFN-γ potently suppressed HSV-1 replication in a dose-dependent fashion, requiring IFN-γ R. Moreover, Ad:IFN-γ was effective when delivered -72 and -24 h prior to infection as well as 24 h post infection. Associated with anti-viral opposition, TG from Ad: IFN-γ transduced mice harbored fewer T cells. Also related to T cell involvement, Ad:IFN-γ was effective but attenuated in TG from α/β TCR deficient mice. In corneas, α/β TCR+ T cells were obligatory for protection against viral multiplication. Type I IFN involvement amid anti-viral efficacy of Ad: IFN-γ was further investigated because type I and II IFN pathways have synergistic anti-HSV-1 activity. Ad:IFN-γ inhibited viral reproduction in corneas and TG from IFN-α/β R deficient (CD118 −/−) mice, although viral titers were 2–3 fold higher in cornea and TG, compared to wild type. The absence of IFN-stimulated anti-viral proteins, 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L and ds RNA dependent protein kinase R, completely eliminated the anti-viral effectiveness of Ad:IFN-γ. Collectively, the results demonstrate: (1) nonexistence of type I IFN R does not abolish defense of Ad:IFN-γ against HSV-1; (2) anti-viral pathways, OAS/RNase L and PKR are mandatory; and (3) α/β TCR+ T cells are compulsory for Ad: IFN-γ effectiveness against HSV-1 in cornea but not in TG. PMID:17404299

  15. Cellular responses to HSV-1 infection are linked to specific types of alterations in the host transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Benxia; Li, Xin; Huo, Yongxia; Yu, Yafen; Zhang, Qiuping; Chen, Guijun; Zhang, Yaping; Fraser, Nigel W.; Wu, Dongdong; Zhou, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen invasion triggers a number of cellular responses and alters the host transcriptome. Here we report that the type of changes to cellular transcriptome is related to the type of cellular functions affected by lytic infection of Herpes Simplex Virus type I in Human primary fibroblasts. Specifically, genes involved in stress responses and nuclear transport exhibited mostly changes in alternative polyadenylation (APA), cell cycle genes showed mostly alternative splicing (AS) changes, while genes in neurogenesis, rarely underwent these changes. Transcriptome wide, the infection resulted in 1,032 cases of AS, 161 incidences of APA, 1,827 events of isoform changes, and up regulation of 596 genes and down regulations of 61 genes compared to uninfected cells. Thus, these findings provided important and specific links between cellular responses to HSV-1 infection and the type of alterations to the host transcriptome, highlighting important roles of RNA processing in virus-host interactions. PMID:27354008

  16. Cellular responses to HSV-1 infection are linked to specific types of alterations in the host transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Benxia; Li, Xin; Huo, Yongxia; Yu, Yafen; Zhang, Qiuping; Chen, Guijun; Zhang, Yaping; Fraser, Nigel W; Wu, Dongdong; Zhou, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen invasion triggers a number of cellular responses and alters the host transcriptome. Here we report that the type of changes to cellular transcriptome is related to the type of cellular functions affected by lytic infection of Herpes Simplex Virus type I in Human primary fibroblasts. Specifically, genes involved in stress responses and nuclear transport exhibited mostly changes in alternative polyadenylation (APA), cell cycle genes showed mostly alternative splicing (AS) changes, while genes in neurogenesis, rarely underwent these changes. Transcriptome wide, the infection resulted in 1,032 cases of AS, 161 incidences of APA, 1,827 events of isoform changes, and up regulation of 596 genes and down regulations of 61 genes compared to uninfected cells. Thus, these findings provided important and specific links between cellular responses to HSV-1 infection and the type of alterations to the host transcriptome, highlighting important roles of RNA processing in virus-host interactions. PMID:27354008

  17. A tale of two HSV-1 helicases: roles of phage and animal virus helicases in DNA replication and recombination.

    PubMed

    Marintcheva, B; Weller, S K

    2001-01-01

    Helicases play essential roles in many important biological processes such as DNA replication, repair, recombination, transcription, splicing, and translation. Many bacteriophages and plant and animal viruses encode one or more helicases, and these enzymes have been shown to play many roles in their respective viral life cycles. In this review we concentrate primarily on the roles of helicases in DNA replication and recombination with special emphasis on the bacteriophages T4, T7, and A as model systems. We explore comparisons between these model systems and the herpesviruses--primarily herpes simplex virus. Bacteriophage utilize various pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication during the replication of their genomes. In fact the study of recombination in the phage systems has greatly enhanced our understanding of the importance of recombination in the replication strategies of bacteria, yeast, and higher eukaryotes. The ability to "restart" the replication process after a replication fork has stalled or has become disrupted for other reasons is a critical feature in the replication of all organisms studied. Phage helicases and other recombination proteins play critical roles in the "restart" process. Parallels between DNA replication and recombination in phage and in the herpesviruses is explored. We and others have proposed that recombination plays an important role in the life cycle of the herpesviruses, and in this review, we discuss models for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA replication. HSV-1 encodes two helicases. UL9 binds specifically to the origins of replication and is believed to initiate HSV DNA replication by unwinding at the origin; the heterotrimeric helicase-primase complex, encoded by UL5, UL8, and UL52 genes, is believed to unwind duplex viral DNA at replication forks. Structure-function analyses of UL9 and the helicase-primase are discussed with attention to the roles these proteins might play during HSV replication. PMID

  18. High-Risk Corneal Graft Rejection in the Setting of Previous Corneal Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuffova, Lucia; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Yu, Tian; Medina, Carlos; Amescua, Guillermo; Rowe, Alexander M.; Hendricks, Robert L.; Forrester, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The “high-risk phenotype” of corneal graft recipients is considered to be related to preexisting vascularization such as that associated with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) keratitis (HSK). The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunologic mechanisms underlying accelerated corneal graft rejection using a mouse model of HSK. Methods Herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis was induced in BALB/c mice. Syngeneic and allogeneic (C57BL/6 mice) corneal grafts were performed in mice with HSK at different times after infection. Some grafts were performed on HSV-infected CD4 T cell–deficient BALB/c mice. Clinical, histologic, immunologic, and virus detection studies were performed on samples of cornea, draining lymph node (LN), and trigeminal ganglion (TG) cells. Results Corneal grafts in mice with HSK rejected with higher frequency and more rapid tempo compared with grafts in uninfected mice. In corneas with HSK and vascularization at the time of grafting, both syngeneic and allogeneic corneal grafts failed with similar frequency and tempo. However, in the absence of preexisting inflammation and vascularization, syngeneic grafts were accepted when the grafts were performed at a late time point after HSV infection (42 days), whereas allografts were rejected at this time. In contrast, syngeneic grafts in nonvascularized HSV-infected recipients failed if they were performed within 10 days of HSV infection, an effect that was dependent on CD4 T cells, as demonstrated using CD4 deficient mice. Importantly, a variably sustained but strongly positive anti-HSV T-cell response was detected in allografted HSK recipients with a similar but lesser response in syngeneic hosts. Conclusions A previous HSV-1 corneal infection predisposes donor grafts to a high risk of failure by both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms in which an anti-HSV CD4 T-cell response plays a prominent role. PMID:27050878

  19. Synthesis and antiviral activity of beta-carboline derivatives bearing a substituted carbohydrazide at C-3 against poliovirus and herpes simplex virus (HSV-1).

    PubMed

    Nazari Formagio, Anelise S; Santos, Patricia R; Zanoli, Karine; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Düsman Tonin, Lilian T; Nakamura, Celso V; Sarragiotto, Maria Helena

    2009-11-01

    Several novel 1,3-disubstituted beta-carboline derivatives bearing a substituted carbohydrazide group at C-3 were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral activity against vaccinal poliovirus (VP) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The cytotoxicity and selectivity index of the active compounds were also evaluated. Among the synthesized derivatives, compounds 10 and 11 displayed potent activity against both vaccinal poliovirus and HSV-1 virus. Compound 10 presented the highest selectivity index (SI=2446.8) against HSV-1 virus and low cytotoxicity (CC(50)=1150.0+/-67.3 microM). The virus yield inhibition assay showed that compound 10 was able to inhibit HSV-1 plaque formation before and during the virus adsorption. The characteristic small plaque pattern observed in compound-treated cells suggested that compound 10 inhibited viral dissemination to neighboring cells. A computational study for prediction of ADME properties of the novel synthesized beta-carbolines derivatives was performed by determination of lipophilicity, topological polar surface area (TPSA), absorption (% ABS) and simple molecular descriptors, using Lipinski's rule.

  20. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  1. Protection provided by a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein C and D subunit antigen vaccine against genital HSV-2 infection in HSV-1-seropositive guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Balliet, John W; Flynn, Jessica A; Lubinski, John M; Shaw, Carolyn E; DiStefano, Daniel J; Cai, Michael; Brown, Martha; Smith, Judith F; Kowalski, Rose; Swoyer, Ryan; Galli, Jennifer; Copeland, Victoria; Rios, Sandra; Davidson, Robert C; Salnikova, Maya; Kingsley, Susan; Bryan, Janine; Casimiro, Danilo R; Friedman, Harvey M

    2014-02-01

    A prophylactic vaccine for genital herpes disease remains an elusive goal. We report the results of two studies performed collaboratively in different laboratories that assessed immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)-seropositive guinea pigs immunized and subsequently challenged intravaginally with HSV-2. In study 1, HSV-2 glycoproteins C (gC2) and D (gD2) were produced in baculovirus and administered intramuscularly as monovalent or bivalent vaccines with CpG and alum. In study 2, gD2 was produced in CHO cells and given intramuscularly with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and alum, or gC2 and gD2 were produced in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris and administered intramuscularly as a bivalent vaccine with Iscomatrix and alum to HSV-1-naive or -seropositive guinea pigs. In both studies, immunization boosted neutralizing antibody responses to HSV-1 and HSV-2. In study 1, immunization with gC2, gD2, or both immunogens significantly reduced the frequency of genital lesions, with the bivalent vaccine showing the greatest protection. In study 2, both vaccines were highly protective against genital disease in naive and HSV-1-seropositive animals. Comparisons between gD2 and gC2/gD2 in study 2 must be interpreted cautiously, because different adjuvants, gD2 doses, and antigen production methods were used; however, significant differences invariably favored the bivalent vaccine. Immunization of naive animals with gC2/gD2 significantly reduced the number of days of vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA compared with that for mock-immunized animals. Surprisingly, in both studies, immunization of HSV-1-seropositive animals had little effect on recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA, despite significantly reducing genital disease. PMID:24284325

  2. HSV-1 Cgal+ Infection Promotes Quaking RNA Binding Protein Production and Induces Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Shuttling of Quaking I-5 Isoform in Human Hepatoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quiles, Virginia; Mora, María I.; Segura, Victor; Greco, Anna; Epstein, Alberto L.; Foschini, Maria Giovanna; Dayon, Loïc; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Prieto, Jesús; Corrales, Fernando J.; Santamaría, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Herpesvirus type 1 (HSV-1) based oncolytic vectors arise as a promising therapeutic alternative for neoplastic diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the mechanisms mediating the host cell response to such treatments are not completely known. It is well established that HSV-1 infection induces functional and structural alterations in the nucleus of the host cell. In the present work, we have used gel-based and shotgun proteomic strategies to elucidate the signaling pathways impaired in the nucleus of human hepatoma cells (Huh7) upon HSV-1 Cgal+ infection. Both approaches allowed the identification of differential proteins suggesting impairment of cell functions involved in many aspects of host-virus interaction such as transcription regulation, mRNA processing, and mRNA splicing. Based on our proteomic data and additional functional studies, cellular protein quaking content (QKI) increases 4 hours postinfection (hpi), when viral immediate-early genes such as ICP4 and ICP27 could be also detected. Depletion of QKI expression by small interfering RNA results in reduction of viral immediate-early protein levels, subsequent decrease in early and late viral protein content, and a reduction in the viral yield indicating that QKI directly interferes with viral replication. In particular, HSV-1 Cgal+ induces a transient increase in quaking I-5 isoform (QKI-5) levels, in parallel with an enhancement of p27Kip1 protein content. Moreover, immunofluorescence microscopy showed an early nuclear redistribution of QKI-5, shuttling from the nucleus to the cytosol and colocalizing with nectin-1 in cell to cell contact regions at 16–24 hpi. This evidence sheds new light on mechanisms mediating hepatoma cell response to HSV-1 vectors highlighting QKI as a central molecular mediator. PMID:21467216

  3. Interferon Regulator Factor 8 (IRF8) Limits Ocular Pathology during HSV-1 Infection by Restraining the Activation and Expansion of CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Rong; He, Chang; Mahdi, Rashid M.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C.; Egwuagu, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 (IRF8) is constitutively expressed in monocytes and B cell lineages and plays important roles in immunity to pathogens and cancer. Although IRF8 expression is induced in activated T cells, the functional relevance of IRF8 in T cell-mediated immunity is not well understood. In this study, we used mice with targeted deletion of Irf8 in T-cells (IRF8KO) to investigate the role of IRF8 in T cell-mediated responses during herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection of the eye. In contrast to wild type mice, HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice mounted a more robust anti-HSV-1 immune response, which included marked expansion of HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) and enhanced elimination of virus within the trigeminal ganglion. However, the consequence of the enhanced immunological response was the development of ocular inflammation, limbitis, and neutrophilic infiltration into the cornea of HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice. Surprisingly, we observed a marked increase in virus-specific memory precursor effector cells (MPEC) in IRF8KO mice, suggesting that IRF8 might play a role in regulating the differentiation of effector CD8+ T cells to the memory phenotype. Together, our data suggest that IRF8 might play a role in restraining excess lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, modulating IRF8 levels in T cells can be exploited therapeutically to prevent immune-mediated ocular pathology during autoimmune and infectious diseases of the eye. PMID:27171004

  4. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Aaron W; Lee, Kyubin; Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  5. APP processing induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) yields several APP fragments in human and rat neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    De Chiara, Giovanna; Marcocci, Maria Elena; Civitelli, Livia; Argnani, Rafaela; Piacentini, Roberto; Ripoli, Cristian; Manservigi, Roberto; Grassi, Claudio; Garaci, Enrico; Palamara, Anna Teresa

    2010-11-15

    Lifelong latent infections of the trigeminal ganglion by the neurotropic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are characterized by periodic reactivation. During these episodes, newly produced virions may also reach the central nervous system (CNS), causing productive but generally asymptomatic infections. Epidemiological and experimental findings suggest that HSV-1 might contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder is related to an overproduction of amyloid beta (Aβ) and other neurotoxic peptides, which occurs during amyloidogenic endoproteolytic processing of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). The aim of our study was to identify the effects of productive HSV-1 infection on APP processing in neuronal cells. We found that infection of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and rat cortical neurons is followed by multiple cleavages of APP, which result in the intra- and/or extra-cellular accumulation of various neurotoxic species. These include: i) APP fragments (APP-Fs) of 35 and 45 kDa (APP-F35 and APP-F45) that comprise portions of Aβ; ii) N-terminal APP-Fs that are secreted; iii) intracellular C-terminal APP-Fs; and iv) Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42). Western blot analysis of infected-cell lysates treated with formic acid suggests that APP-F35 may be an Aβ oligomer. The multiple cleavages of APP that occur in infected cells are produced in part by known components of the amyloidogenic APP processing pathway, i.e., host-cell β-secretase, γ-secretase, and caspase-3-like enzymes. These findings demonstrate that HSV-1 infection of neuronal cells can generate multiple APP fragments with well-documented neurotoxic potentials. It is tempting to speculate that intra- and extracellular accumulation of these species in the CNS resulting from repeated HSV-1 reactivation could, in the presence of other risk factors, play a co-factorial role in the development of AD.

  6. Microtubule plus end–associated CLIP-170 initiates HSV-1 retrograde transport in primary human cells

    PubMed Central

    Jovasevic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic microtubules (MTs) continuously explore the intracellular environment and, through specialized plus end–tracking proteins (+TIPs), engage a variety of targets. However, the nature of cargoes that require +TIP-mediated capture for their movement on MTs remains poorly understood. Using RNA interference and dominant-negative approaches, combined with live cell imaging, we show that herpes simplex virus particles that have entered primary human cells exploit a +TIP complex comprising end-binding protein 1 (EB1), cytoplasmic linker protein 170 (CLIP-170), and dynactin-1 (DCTN1) to initiate retrograde transport. Depletion of these +TIPs completely blocked post-entry long-range transport of virus particles and suppressed infection ∼5,000-fold, whereas transferrin uptake, early endosome organization, and dynein-dependent movement of lysosomes and mitochondria remained unaffected. These findings provide the first insights into the earliest stages of viral engagement of MTs through specific +TIPs, akin to receptors, with therapeutic implications, and identify herpesvirus particles as one of a very limited number of cargoes absolutely dependent on CLIP-170–mediated capture to initiate transport in primary human cells. PMID:26504169

  7. Antiviral Action of Hydromethanolic Extract of Geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica against Antiherpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Guilherme Rabelo; Mendonça, Ronaldo Zucatelli; Vilar, Karina de Senna; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Badari, Juliana Cuoco; Taniwaki, Noemi; Namiyama, Gisleine; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Curti, Suely Pires; Evelyn Silva, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The studies on chemical composition and biological activity of propolis had focused mainly on species Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). There are few studies about the uncommon propolis collected by stingless bees of the Meliponini tribe known as geopropolis. The geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica was collected in the region of Barra do Corda, Maranhão state, Brazil. The chemical analysis of hydromethanolic extract of this geopropolis (HMG) was carried out through HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and the main constituents found were pyrrolizidine alkaloids and C-glycosyl flavones. The presence of alkaloids in extracts of propolis is detected for the first time in this sample. The antiviral activity of HMG was evaluated through viral DNA quantification experiments and electron microscopy experiments. Quantification of viral DNA from herpes virus showed reduction of about 98% in all conditions and concentration tested of the HMG extract. The results obtained were corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, in which the images did not show particle or viral replication complex. The antiviral activity of C-glycosyl flavones was reported for a variety of viruses, being observed at different points in the viral replication. This work is the first report about the antiviral activity of geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica, in vitro, against antiherpes simplex virus (HSV). PMID:25861357

  8. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  9. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon.

    PubMed

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  10. Antiviral Action of Hydromethanolic Extract of Geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica against Antiherpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1).

    PubMed

    Coelho, Guilherme Rabelo; Mendonça, Ronaldo Zucatelli; Vilar, Karina de Senna; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Badari, Juliana Cuoco; Taniwaki, Noemi; Namiyama, Gisleine; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Curti, Suely Pires; Evelyn Silva, Patricia; Negri, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    The studies on chemical composition and biological activity of propolis had focused mainly on species Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). There are few studies about the uncommon propolis collected by stingless bees of the Meliponini tribe known as geopropolis. The geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica was collected in the region of Barra do Corda, Maranhão state, Brazil. The chemical analysis of hydromethanolic extract of this geopropolis (HMG) was carried out through HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and the main constituents found were pyrrolizidine alkaloids and C-glycosyl flavones. The presence of alkaloids in extracts of propolis is detected for the first time in this sample. The antiviral activity of HMG was evaluated through viral DNA quantification experiments and electron microscopy experiments. Quantification of viral DNA from herpes virus showed reduction of about 98% in all conditions and concentration tested of the HMG extract. The results obtained were corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, in which the images did not show particle or viral replication complex. The antiviral activity of C-glycosyl flavones was reported for a variety of viruses, being observed at different points in the viral replication. This work is the first report about the antiviral activity of geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica, in vitro, against antiherpes simplex virus (HSV). PMID:25861357

  11. Intravenous Administration Is an Effective and Safe Route for Cancer Gene Therapy Using the Bifidobacterium-Mediated Recombinant HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Ganciclovir

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huicong; He, Zhiliang; Wang, Changdong; Xie, Tingting; Liu, Lin; Liu, Chuanyang; Song, Fangzhou; Ma, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV TK/GCV) system is one of the best studied cancer suicide gene therapy systems. Our previous study showed that caspase 3 expression was upregulated and bladder tumor growth was significantly reduced in rats treated with a combination of Bifidobacterium (BF) and HSV TK/GCV (BF-rTK/GCV). However, it was raised whether the BF-mediated recombinant thymidine kinase combined with ganciclovir (BF-rTK/GCV) was safe to administer via venous for cancer gene therapy. To answer this question, the antitumor effects of BF-rTK/GCV were mainly evaluated in a xenograft nude mouse model bearing MKN-45 gastric tumor cells. The immune response, including analysis of cytokine profiles, was analyzed to evaluate the safety of intramuscular and intravenous injection of BF-rTK in BALB/c mice. The results suggested that gastric tumor growth was significantly inhibited in vivo by BF-rTK/GCV. However, the BF-rTK/GCV had no effect on mouse body weight, indicating that the treatment was safe for the host. The results of cytokine profile analysis indicated that intravenous injection of a low dose of BF-rTK resulted in a weaker cytokine response than that obtained with intramuscular injection. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed that intravenous administration did not affect the expression of immune-associated TLR2 and TLR4. Finally, the BF-rTK/GCV inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in mouse model, which is helpful for inhibiting of tumor angiogenesis. That meant intravenous administration of BF-rTK/GCV was an effective and safe way for cancer gene therapy. PMID:27275821

  12. Extensive mutagenesis of the HSV-1 gB ectodomain reveals remarkable stability of its postfusion form

    PubMed Central

    Vitu, Elvira; Sharma, Sapna; Stampfer, Samuel D.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2013-01-01

    Viral fusogens mediate the merger of the viral envelope and cellular membrane during viral entry. These proteins share little sequence similarity but all are thought to act by refolding through a series of conformational intermediates from the metastable prefusion form to the stable postfusion form. Crystal structures of both prefusion and postfusion forms have illuminated the conformational pathways of several viral fusogens. By contrast, only the structure of the postfusion form is available for glycoprotein B (gB), the conserved fusogen of herpesviruses. To gain insight into the nature of the fusogenic conformational changes in gB, we used several approaches aimed at engineering the prefusion form of the HSV-1 gB ectodomain, including modifications intended to stabilize the prefusion form and novel mutations aimed at destabilizing the postfusion form. We found that the postfusion conformation of gB is remarkably stable and resistant to perturbations. Several mutations successfully destabilized the gB trimer, identifying regions that are critical for the stability of the postfusion form. Yet, none of the constructs adopted the prefusion conformation. We propose that the soluble ectodomain of gB folds into the postfusion form without first adopting the prefusion intermediate. These results suggest that other regions of gB, including the transmembrane region and the cytoplasmic domain, may be necessary to establish and maintain the metastable prefusion conformation. PMID:23500487

  13. Experiences in effective use of Tcl/Tk

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    Tcl/Tk (Toot Command Language and Tool Kit, pronounced ``tickle tee-kay``) is a scripting language supporting Motifm style X Window interfaces. It is extendible, allowing developers to embed additional functionality as commands in the language. However, the power and flexibility of the system leads to many variations or possibilities in its usage. We describe effective methods for taking advantage of Tcl/Tk to increase productivity and enhance the flexibility and adaptability of applications: writing simple Tcl/Tk scripts, extending the Tcl/Tk widget set, wrapping Tcl commands around existing classes and functions, and building Tcl/Tk and 3GL coprocesses. Examples are presented from working applications.

  14. Immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces a CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and confers a level of protection comparable to that of wild-type HSV-1.

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, M A; Bonneau, R H; Knipe, D M; Tevethia, S S

    1997-01-01

    Replication-deficient viruses provide an attractive alternative to conventional approaches used in the induction of antiviral immunity. We have quantitatively evaluated both the primary and memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses elicited by immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). In addition, we have examined the potential role of these CTL in protection against HSV infection. Using bulk culture analysis and limiting-dilution analysis, we have shown that a replication-deficient virus, d301, generates a strong primary CTL response that is comparable to the response induced by the wild type-strain, KOS1.1. Furthermore, the CTL induced by d301 immunization recognized the immunodominant, H-2Kb-restricted, CTL recognition epitope gB498-505 to a level similar to that for CTL from KOS1.1-immunized mice. The memory CTL response evoked by d301 was strong and persistent, even though the frequencies of CTL were slightly lower than the frequencies of CTL induced by KOS1.1. Adoptive transfer studies indicated that both the CD8+ and the CD4+ T-cell responses generated by immunization with d301 and KOS1.1 were able to limit the extent of a cutaneous HSV infection to comparable levels. Overall, these results indicate that viral replication is not necessary to elicit a potent and durable HSV-specific immune response and suggest that replication-deficient viruses may be effective in eliciting protection against viral pathogens. PMID:9094625

  15. Fast gene transfer into the adult zebrafish brain by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and electroporation: methods and optogenetic applications

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ming; De Koninck, Paul; Neve, Rachael L.; Friedrich, Rainer W.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish has various advantages as a model organism to analyze the structure and function of neural circuits but efficient viruses or other tools for fast gene transfer are lacking. We show that transgenes can be introduced directly into the adult zebrafish brain by herpes simplex type I viruses (HSV-1) or electroporation. We developed a new procedure to target electroporation to defined brain areas and identified promoters that produced strong long-term expression. The fast workflow of electroporation was exploited to express multiple channelrhodopsin-2 variants and genetically encoded calcium indicators in telencephalic neurons for measurements of neuronal activity and synaptic connectivity. The results demonstrate that HSV-1 and targeted electroporation are efficient tools for gene delivery into the zebrafish brain, similar to adeno-associated viruses and lentiviruses in other species. These methods fill an important gap in the spectrum of molecular tools for zebrafish and are likely to have a wide range of applications. PMID:24834028

  16. Characterization of virus obtained from MDBK cells persistently infected with a variant of herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP [HSV-1(MP)].

    PubMed

    Bartoletti, A M; Tognon, M; Manservigi, R; Mannini-Palenzona, A

    1985-03-01

    Virus clones which express glycoprotein gC (gC+) were obtained from two persistently infected (p.i.) MDBK cell lines which had been independently established by infection with HSV-1(MP)10311, a gC- syncytial (syn) variant of herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP [HSV-1(MP)]. The gC+ revertants were syn in MDBK, HEp-2, and Vero cell lines and in primary human fibroblasts; this offers further evidence that glycoprotein gC does not inhibit cell fusion. The gC+ revertants represented from 70 to 100 percent of the virions present in the virus populations examined, thus suggesting a possible selective advantage of the gC+ revertants in this system of persistent infection.

  17. Neurons can be labeled with unique hues by helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors expressing Brainbow

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Zhao, Hua; Abdul-Muneer, P. M.; Cao, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Geller, Alfred I.

    2014-01-01

    Background A central problem in neuroscience is elucidating synaptic connections, the connectome. Because mammalian forebrains contain many neurons, labeling specific neurons with unique tags is desirable. A novel technology, Brainbow, creates hundreds of hues by combinatorial expression of multiple fluorescent proteins (FPs). New method We labeled small numbers of neurons, and their axons, with unique hues, by expressing Brainbow from a helper virus-free Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vector. Results The vector expresses a Brainbow cassette containing four FPs from a glutamatergic-specific promoter. Packaging HSV-brainbow produced arrays of seven to eight Brainbow cassettes, and using Cre, each FP gene was in a position to be expressed, in different cassettes. Delivery into rat postrhinal (POR) cortex or hippocampus labeled small numbers of neurons with different, often unique, hues. An area innervated by POR cortex, perirhinal (PER) cortex, contained axons with different hues. Specific axons in PER cortex were matched to specific cell bodies in POR cortex, using hue. Comparison with existing methods HSV-Brainbow is the only technology for labeling small numbers of neurons with unique hues. In Brainbow mice, many neurons contain the same hue. Brainbow-adeno-associated virus vectors require transduction of the same neuron with multiple vector particles, confounding neuroanatomical studies. Replication-competent Brainbow-pseudorabies virus vectors label multiple neurons with the same hue. Conclusions Attractive properties of HSV-Brainbow include each vector particle contains multiple cassettes, representing numerous hues, recombination products are stabile, and experimental control of the number of labeled neurons. Labeling neurons with unique hues will benefit mapping forebrain circuits. PMID:25448383

  18. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes.

  19. Specific patterns of defective HSV-1 gene transfer in the adult central nervous system: implications for gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Wood, M J; Byrnes, A P; Kaplitt, M G; Pfaff, D W; Rabkin, S D; Charlton, H M

    1994-11-01

    Viral vectors are a means by which genes can be delivered to specific sites in the adult central nervous system. Nevertheless, the interaction between the viral vector and cells of the nervous system, which forms the basis for specific gene transfer, is not well understood. In this study a nonreplicating defective herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, expressing the marker gene lacZ, was stereotaxically injected at varying titers into the rat central nervous system. Three sites were targeted: the caudate nucleus, dentate gyrus, and cerebellar cortex, and the resulting patterns of beta-galactosidase activity were examined. Many cells of neuronal and glial morphology, and of differing neuronal subtypes, expressed beta-galactosidase at each of the injection sites. However, beta-galactosidase activity was also detected in distant secondary brain areas, the neurons of which make afferent connections with the primary sites. This strongly suggested that the retrograde transport of defective virus was the basis for the enzyme activity observed at a distance. Moreover, retrograde transport to secondary sites was found to be highly selective and restricted to certain retrograde neuroanatomical pathways in a specific and titer dependent fashion. The pathways observed were predominantly, but not exclusively, monoaminergic in origin. This finding is supported by reports of specific tropism by HSV for monoaminergic circuits in experimental encephalitis and transneuronal tracing studies. Our observations suggest that certain functional neuronal populations, which are permissive for the retrograde transfer of defective HSV-1 vectors, might be specifically targeted for gene transfer using this approach. Conversely, a knowledge of the pathways permissive for viral uptake, retrograde transfer, and subsequent gene expression will be essential in order to predict the consequences of gene transfer using viral vectors. PMID:7821388

  20. Genome Wide Nucleosome Mapping for HSV-1 Shows Nucleosomes Are Deposited at Preferred Positions during Lytic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F.; Chen, Eric Z.; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W.; Isett, R. Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A.; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes. PMID:25710170

  1. Bortezomib-induced unfolded protein response increases oncolytic HSV-1 replication resulting in synergistic, anti-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Hurwitz, Brian S; Bolyard, Chelsea; Yu, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Jianying; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Rath, Kellie S; He, Shun; Bailey, Zachary; Eaves, David; Cripe, Timothy P; Parris, Deborah S.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Yu, Jianhua; Old, Matthew; Kaur, Balveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Bortezomib is an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) is a promising therapeutic approach for cancer. We tested the impact of combining bortezomib with oHSV for anti-tumor efficacy. Methods The synergistic interaction between oHSV and bortezomib was calculated using Chou-Talalay analysis. Viral replication was evaluated using plaque assay and immune fluorescence. Western-blot assays were used to evaluate induction of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Inhibitors targeting Hsp90 were utilized to investigate the mechanism of cell killing. Anti-tumor efficacy in vivo was evaluated using subcutaneous and intracranial tumor xenografts of glioma and head and neck cancer. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and two-sided log rank test. Results Combination treatment with bortezomib and oHSV, 34.5ENVE, displayed strong synergistic interaction in ovarian cancer, head & neck cancer, glioma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells. Bortezomib treatment induced ER stress, evident by strong induction of Grp78, CHOP, PERK and IRE1α (western blot analysis) and the UPR (induction of hsp40, 70 and 90). Bortezomib treatment of cells at both sublethal and lethal doses increased viral replication (p value <0.001), but inhibition of Hsp90 ablated this response, reducing viral replication and synergistic cell killing. The combination of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE significantly enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in multiple different tumor models in vivo. Conclusions The dramatic synergy of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE is mediated by bortezomib- induced UPR and warrants future clinical testing in patients. PMID:24815720

  2. Activation of caspase-3 noninvolved in the bystander effect of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV) system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Juqiang; Chu, Jun; Ma, Yan; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2008-01-01

    Use of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV) system is one of the promising approaches in the rapidly growing area of gene therapy. The "bystander effect," a phenomenon in which HSV-tk+ cells exposed to GCV are toxic to adjacent HSV-tk- cells, was reported to play an important role in suicide gene therapy. However, the mechanism by which HSV-tk/GCV induces the bystander effect is poorly understood. We monitored the activation of caspase-3 in living cells induced by the HSV-tk/GCV system using a genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe CD3, , a caspase-3 recognition site fused with a cyan fluorescent protien (CFP) and a red fluorescent protein (DsRed) which we reported and named in a previous paper. Fluorescence protein (FP)-based multicolor cellular labeling, combined with the multichannel fluorescence imaging and FRET imaging techniques, provides a novel and improved approach to directly determine whether the activation of caspase-3 involved in the HSV-tk/GCV system induces cell apoptosis in tk gene-expressing cells and their neighboring cells. FRET ratio images of CD3, and fluorescence images of the fusion protein of thymidine kinase linked with green fluorescent protein (TK-GFP), indicated that HSV-tk/GCV system-induced apoptosis in human adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC-M) cells was via a caspase-3 pathway, and the activation of caspase-3 was not involved in the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system.

  3. Identification of Replication-competent HSV-1 Cgal+ Strain Signaling Targets in Human Hepatoma Cells by Functional Organelle Proteomics*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría, Enrique; Mora, María I.; Potel, Corinne; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Carro-Roldán, Elvira; Hernández-Alcoceba, Rubén; Prieto, Jesús; Epstein, Alberto L.; Corrales, Fernando J.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, we have attempted a comprehensive analysis of cytosolic and microsomal proteomes to elucidate the signaling pathways impaired in human hepatoma (Huh7) cells upon herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; Cgal+) infection. Using a combination of differential in-gel electrophoresis and nano liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, 18 spots corresponding to 16 unique deregulated cellular proteins were unambiguously identified, which were involved in the regulation of essential processes such as apoptosis, mRNA processing, cellular structure and integrity, signal transduction, and endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation pathway. Based on our proteomic data and additional functional studies target proteins were identified indicating a late activation of apoptotic pathways in Huh7 cells upon HSV-1 Cgal+ infection. Additionally to changes on RuvB-like 2 and Bif-1, down-regulation of Erlin-2 suggests stimulation of Ca2+-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway results from a time-dependent multi-factorial impairment as inferred from the stepwise characterization of constitutive pro- and anti-apoptotic factors. Activation of serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) was also found in Huh7 cells upon HSV-1 Cgal+ infection. In addition, PP2A activation paralleled dephosphorylation and inactivation of downstream mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway (MEK½, ERK½) critical to cell survival and activation of proapoptotic Bad by dephosphorylation of Ser-112. Taken together, our results provide novel molecular information that contributes to define in detail the apoptotic mechanisms triggered by HSV-1 Cgal+ in the host cell and lead to the implication of PP2A in the transduction of cell death signals and cell survival pathway arrest. PMID:19098277

  4. HSV-1 amplicon vectors that direct the in situ production of foot-and-mouth disease virus antigens in mammalian cells can be used for genetic immunization.

    PubMed

    D'Antuono, Alejandra; Laimbacher, Andrea S; La Torre, Jose; Tribulatti, Virginia; Romanutti, Carina; Zamorano, Patricia; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel; Mattion, Nora

    2010-10-28

    HSV-1 amplicon vectors encoding heterologous antigens were capable to mediate in situ generation of protein synthesis and to generate a specific immune response to the corresponding antigens. In this study, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus antigens were used to generate a genetic vaccine prototype. The amplicons were designed to provide a high safety profile as they do not express any HSV-1 genes when packaged using a helper virus-free system, and they are able to encapsidate several copies of the transgene or allow the simultaneous expression of different genes. Virus-like particles were produced after cell processing of the delivered DNA. Inoculation of mice with 5 × 10(5) transducing units of amplicon vectors resulted in FMDV-specific humoral responses in the absence of adjuvants, which were dependent on the in situ de novo production of the vector-encoded antigens. Challenge of mice vaccinated with these amplicons with a high dose of live virus, resulted in partial protection, with a significant reduction of viremia. This work highlights the potential use of a HSV-1 amplicon vector platform for generation of safe genetic vaccines. PMID:20851082

  5. HSV-1 amplicon vectors that direct the in situ production of foot-and-mouth disease virus antigens in mammalian cells can be used for genetic immunization.

    PubMed

    D'Antuono, Alejandra; Laimbacher, Andrea S; La Torre, Jose; Tribulatti, Virginia; Romanutti, Carina; Zamorano, Patricia; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel; Mattion, Nora

    2010-10-28

    HSV-1 amplicon vectors encoding heterologous antigens were capable to mediate in situ generation of protein synthesis and to generate a specific immune response to the corresponding antigens. In this study, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus antigens were used to generate a genetic vaccine prototype. The amplicons were designed to provide a high safety profile as they do not express any HSV-1 genes when packaged using a helper virus-free system, and they are able to encapsidate several copies of the transgene or allow the simultaneous expression of different genes. Virus-like particles were produced after cell processing of the delivered DNA. Inoculation of mice with 5 × 10(5) transducing units of amplicon vectors resulted in FMDV-specific humoral responses in the absence of adjuvants, which were dependent on the in situ de novo production of the vector-encoded antigens. Challenge of mice vaccinated with these amplicons with a high dose of live virus, resulted in partial protection, with a significant reduction of viremia. This work highlights the potential use of a HSV-1 amplicon vector platform for generation of safe genetic vaccines.

  6. Multifunctional TK-VLPs nanocarrier for tumor-targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yachao; Mu, Yu; Jiang, Lei; Yu, Hui; Yang, Shuman; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Hunan; Xiao, Cuihong; Peng, Haisheng; Zhou, Yulong; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-04-11

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have been exploited for various biomedical applications, such as the monitoring, prevention, diagnosis and therapy of disease. In this study, a novel multifunctional VLPs nanocarrier (TK-VLPs) was prepared and used for tumor-targeted delivery. The SPR and cell uptake results indicated that the TK peptide is a "bi-functional ligand" with high affinity for Caco-2, HRT-18 and HUVEC cells through the integrin α6β1 and integrin αvβ3 receptors. The results of the direct immunofluorescence, SDS-PAGE and western blot assays demonstrated that the TK-VLPs were successfully prepared using the baculovirus expression system. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and the flow cytometry analysis validated that the TK-VLPs could target to Caco-2, HRT-18 and HUVEC cells. An in vivo study further confirmed that the TK-VLPs could target and efficiently deliver fluorescein to tumor cells and the tumor vasculature in mice bearing subcutaneous tumors. TK-VLPs-DOX displayed a uniform, spherical shape and an average size of approximately 28nm. The results of the cell uptake and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TK-VLPs-DOX could enhance the selectivity for colorectal cancer cells. Together, our studies provide strong evidence that TK-VLPs could target colon tumor cells and tumor angiogenesis with enhanced permeability and retention effects, suggesting that the TK-VLPs are a multifunctional nanocarrier with potential applications in a colon tumor-targeted drug delivery system. PMID:26915810

  7. Theranostic Imaging of Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) is a promising therapeutic approach for treating cancers of various phenotypes. This strategy is independent of various other chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating cancers where the drugs are mainly designed to target endogenous cellular mechanisms, which are different in various cancer subtypes. In GDEPT an external enzyme, which is different from the cellular proteins, is expressed to convert the injected prodrug in to a toxic metabolite, that normally kill cancer cells express this protein. Theranostic imaging is an approach used to directly monitor the expression of these gene therapy enzymes while evaluating therapeutic effect. We recently developed a dual-GDEPT system where we combined mutant human herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSV1sr39TK) and E. coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme, to improve therapeutic efficiency of cancer gene therapy by simultaneously injecting two prodrugs at a lower dose. In this approach we use two different prodrugs such as ganciclovir (GCV) and CB1954 to target two different cellular mechanisms to kill cancer cells. The developed dual GDEPT system was highly efficacious than that of either of the system used independently. In this chapter, we describe the complete protocol involved for in vitro and in vivo imaging of therapeutic cancer gene therapy evaluation. PMID:27424910

  8. Diet-induced obesity prolongs neuroinflammation and recruits CCR2(+) monocytes to the brain following herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 latency in mice.

    PubMed

    White, Katherine A; Hutton, Scott R; Weimer, Jill M; Sheridan, Patricia A

    2016-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 is a ubiquitous human infection, with increased prevalence in obese populations. Obesity has been linked to increased inflammation, susceptibility to infection, and higher rates of anxiety disorder and cognitive impairment. To determine how obesity alters neuroinflammation and behavior following infection, we infected weanling C57BL/6 or CCR2(RFP/+)/CX3CR1(GFP/+) mice with a very low dose of HSV-1. Following viral latency (14days post infection (d p.i.)), mice were randomly assigned to remain on the low fat (LF) diet or switched to a 45% high fat (HF) diet. Eight weeks post diet shift, latently infected mice on the HF diet (HSV-HF) had greater microglial activation and infiltration of inflammatory CCR2(+) monocytes in the hypothalamus and dentate gyrus, in comparison to both HSV-LF mice and uninfected mice on LF and HF diets. VCAM staining was present in hypothalamus and hippocampus of the HSV-HF mice in the areas of monocyte infiltration. Infiltrating monocytes also produced proinflammatory cytokines demonstrating that, along with activated microglia, monocytes contribute to sustained neuroinflammation in latently infected obese mice. Utilizing a light-dark preference test, we found that HSV-HF mice had increased anxiety-like behavior. In the marble-burying test, HF diet and HSV infection resulted in increased numbers of buried marbles. Together, these mice provide a useful, testable model to study the biobehavioral effects of obesity and latent HSV-1 infection in regards to anxiety and may provide a tool for studying diet intervention programs in the future. PMID:27311830

  9. Genetics Home Reference: TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form Enable Javascript to view ... Open All Close All Description TK2 -related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form ( TK2 -MDS) is an ...

  10. An Epigenetic Compound Library Screen Identifies BET Inhibitors That Promote HSV-1 and -2 Replication by Bridging P-TEFb to Viral Gene Promoters through BRD4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Ma, Yingyu; Dai, Yue; Fan, Yimei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The human HSV-1 and -2 are common pathogens of human diseases. Both host and viral factors are involved in HSV lytic infection, although detailed mechanisms remain elusive. By screening a chemical library of epigenetic regulation, we identified bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) as a critical player in HSV infection. We show that treatment with pan BD domain inhibitor enhanced both HSV infection. Using JQ1 as a probe, we found that JQ1, a defined BD1 inhibitor, acts through BRD4 protein since knockdown of BRD4 expression ablated JQ1 effect on HSV infection. BRD4 regulates HSV replication through complex formation involving CDK9 and RNAP II; whereas, JQ1 promotes HSV-1 infection by allocating the complex to HSV gene promoters. Therefore, suppression of BRD4 expression or inhibition of CDK9 activity impeded HSV infection. Our data support a model that JQ1 enhances HSV infection by switching BRD4 to transcription regulation of viral gene expression from chromatin targeting since transient expression of BRD4 BD1 or BD1/2 domain had similar effect to that by JQ1 treatment. In addition to the identification that BRD4 is a modulator for JQ1 action on HSV infection, this study demonstrates BRD4 has an essential role in HSV infection. PMID:27764245

  11. RIG-I is required for VSV-induced cytokine production by murine glia and acts in combination with DAI to initiate responses to HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Crill, Emma K; Furr-Rogers, Samantha R; Marriott, Ian

    2015-12-01

    A defining feature of viral central nervous system (CNS) infection is the rapid onset of severe neuroinflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying glial responses to replicative neurotropic viruses are only now becoming apparent with the discovery of a number of cytosolic sensors for viral nucleic acids. We have described the expression by murine and human glial cells of two disparate pattern recognition receptors, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factors (DAI), receptors for viral RNA and DNA moieties, respectively. In the present study, we demonstrate the functional significance of RIG-I expression in primary murine microglia and astrocytes. Our data indicate that murine glial immune responses to a model neurotropic RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, are RIG-I dependent and independent of levels of DAI expression or RNA polymerase III activity. In contrast, maximal glial inflammatory and antiviral responses to the DNA virus herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) are dependent on the expression of both RIG-I and DAI, and require RNA polymerase III activity. These findings indicate that the RNA sensor, RIG-I, acts in parallel with DAI in an RNA polymerase III-dependent manner to initiate glial responses to HSV-1. We therefore suggest that RIG-I plays a significant role in the detection of both RNA and DNA pathogens by microglia and astrocytes.

  12. HSV-1 Amplicon Vectors Launch the Production of Heterologous Rotavirus-like Particles and Induce Rotavirus-specific Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laimbacher, Andrea S; Esteban, Laura E; Castello, Alejandro A; Abdusetir Cerfoglio, Juan C; Argüelles, Marcelo H; Glikmann, Graciela; D'Antuono, Alejandra; Mattion, Nora; Berois, Mabel; Arbiza, Juan; Hilbe, Monika; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seyffert, Michael; Dresch, Christiane; Epstein, Alberto L; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2012-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates because they represent viral antigens in the authentic conformation of the virion and are therefore readily recognized by the immune system. As VLPs do not contain genetic material they are safer than attenuated virus vaccines. In this study, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors were constructed to coexpress the rotavirus (RV) structural genes VP2, VP6, and VP7 and were used as platforms to launch the production of RV-like particles (RVLPs) in vector-infected mammalian cells. Despite the observed splicing of VP6 RNA, full-length VP6 protein and RVLPs were efficiently produced. Intramuscular injection of mice with the amplicon vectors as a two-dose regimen without adjuvants resulted in RV-specific humoral immune responses and, most importantly, immunized mice were partially protected at the mucosal level from challenge with live wild-type (wt) RV. This work provides proof of principle for the application of HSV-1 amplicon vectors that mediate the efficient production of heterologous VLPs as genetic vaccines. PMID:22713696

  13. A conformational epitope mapped in the bovine herpesvirus type 1 envelope glycoprotein B by phage display and the HSV-1 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Greyciele R; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Bataus, Luiz A M; Japolla, Greice; Brito, Wilia M E D; Campos, Ivan T N; Ribeiro, Cristina; Souza, Guilherme R L

    2015-08-01

    The selected dodecapeptide (1)DRALYGPTVIDH(12) from a phage-displayed peptide library and the crystal structure of the envelope glycoprotein B (Env gB) from Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) led us to the identification of a new discontinuous epitope on the Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) Env gB. In silico analysis revealed a short BoHV-1 gB motif ((338)YKRD(341)) within a epitope region, with a high similarity to the motifs shared by the dodecapeptide N-terminal region ((5)YxARD(1)) and HSV-1 Env gB ((326)YARD(329)), in which the (328)Arg residue is described to be a neutralizing antibody target. Besides the characterization of an antibody-binding site of the BoHV-1 Env gB, we have demonstrated that the phage-fused peptide has the potential to be used as a reagent for virus diagnosis by phage-ELISA assay, which discriminated BoHV-1 infected serum samples from negative ones. PMID:26267086

  14. A TCL/TK widget for display of MEDM screens.

    SciTech Connect

    Soliday, R.; APS Operations Division

    2005-01-01

    A new Tcl/Tk widget has been created to display MEDM screens inside a Tcl/Tk application. Tcl/Tk parses the MEDM input files and the appropriate widgets are created and linked to the associated process variables. One advantage of this approach is that an X-Windows emulator is not required to view and manipulate the MEDM screen under a Windows operating system. Another benefit is that the MEDM screen can now be tightly integrated into a scripting language to attach higher-level logic to various process variable manipulations. Further details and examples of the new widget will be discussed.

  15. Using CamiTK for rapid prototyping of interactive Computer Assisted Medical Intervention applications

    PubMed Central

    Promayon, Emmanuel; Fouard, Celine; Bailet, Mathieu; Deram, Aurelien; Fiard, Gaelle; Hungr, Nikolai; Luboz, Vincent; Payan, Yohan; Sarrazin, Johan; Saubat, Nicolas; Selmi, Sonia Yuki; Voros, Sandrine; Cinquin, Philippe; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    Computer Assisted Medical Intervention (CAMI hereafter) is a complex multi-disciplinary field. CAMI research requires the collaboration of experts in several fields as diverse as medicine, computer science, mathematics, instrumentation, signal processing, mechanics, modeling, automatics, optics, etc. CamiTK1 is a modular framework that helps researchers and clinicians to collaborate together in order to prototype CAMI applications by regrouping the knowledge and expertise from each discipline. It is an open-source, cross-platform generic and modular tool written in C++ which can handle medical images, surgical navigation, biomedicals simulations and robot control. This paper presents the Computer Assisted Medical Intervention ToolKit (CamiTK) and how it is used in various applications in our research team. PMID:24110841

  16. Tubby regulates microglial phagocytosis through MerTK.

    PubMed

    Caberoy, Nora B; Alvarado, Gabriela; Li, Wei

    2012-11-15

    Immunologically-silent microglial phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and cellular debris is critical for CNS homeostasis and innate immune balance. The beneficial and detrimental effects of microglial phagocytosis on neurons remain controversial. Phagocytosis ligands are the key to selecting extracellular cargos, initiating the engulfment process, defining phagocyte functional roles and regulating phagocyte activities with therapeutic potentials. Here we characterized tubby as a new ligand to regulate microglial phagocytosis through MerTK receptor, which is well known for its immunosuppressive signaling. Tubby at 0.1nM significantly induced microglial phagocytosis of apoptotic cells with a maximal activity at 10nM. Tubby activated MerTK with receptor autophosphorylation in a similar dose range. Excessive soluble MerTK extracellular domain blocked tubby-mediated microglial phagocytosis of plasma membrane vesicles as cellular debris. Immunocytochemistry revealed that the ingested cargos were co-localized with MerTK-dependent non-muscle myosin II, whose rearrangement is necessary for cargo engulfment. Phagosome biomarker Rab7 was colocalized with cargos, suggesting that internalized cargos were targeted to phagocytic pathway. Tubby stimulated phagocytosis by neonatal and aged microglia with similar activities, but not by MerTK(-/-) microglia. These results suggest that tubby is a ligand to facilitate microglial phagocytosis through MerTK for the maintenance of CNS homeostasis.

  17. A spiroketal-enol ether derivative from Tanacetum vulgare selectively inhibits HSV-1 and HSV-2 glycoprotein accumulation in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Ángel L; Habtemariam, Solomon; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E; Melón, Santiago; Dalton, Kevin P; Parra, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    The inhibitory effects of Tanacetum vulgare rhizome extracts on HSV-1 and HSV-2 in vitro replication were assessed. Unlike extracts obtained from the aerial parts, adsorption inhibition and virucidal activities seemed not to be relevant for the observed antiviral action of tansy rhizome extracts. Instead, the most significant effects were the inhibition of virus penetration and a novel mechanism consisting of the specific arrest of viral gene expression and consequently the decrease of viral protein accumulation within infected cells. Through a bioactivity-guided fractionation protocol we isolated and identified the spiroketal-enol ether derivative (E)-2-(2,4-hexadiynyliden)-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]dec-3-ene as the active compound responsible for this inhibitory effect.

  18. Auto-associative heparin nanoassemblies: a biomimetic platform against the heparan sulfate-dependent viruses HSV-1, HSV-2, HPV-16 and RSV.

    PubMed

    Lembo, David; Donalisio, Manuela; Laine, Claire; Cagno, Valeria; Civra, Andrea; Bianchini, Elsa P; Zeghbib, Narimane; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2014-09-01

    A new, simple and green method was developed for the manufacturing of heparin nanoassemblies active against the heparan sulfate-dependent viruses HSV-1, HSV-2, HPV-16 and RSV. These nanoassemblies were obtained by the auto-association of O-palmitoyl-heparin and α-cyclodextrin in water. The synthesized O-palmitoyl-heparin derivatives mixed with α-cyclodextrin resulted in the formation of crystalline hexagonal nanoassemblies as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The nanoassembly mean hydrodynamic diameters were modulated from 340 to 659 nm depending on the type and the initial concentration of O-palmitoyl-heparin or α-cyclodextrin. The antiviral activity of the nanoassemblies was not affected by the concentration of the components. However, the method of the synthesis of O-palmitoyl-heparin affected the antiviral activity of the formulations. We showed that reduced antiviral activity is correlated with lower sulfation degree and anticoagulant activity.

  19. PD-L1/B7-H1 regulates the survival, but not the function of CD8+ T cells in HSV-1 latently infected Trigeminal Ganglia1

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sohyun; St Leger, Anthony J.; Cherpes, Thomas L.; Sheridan, Brian S.; Hendricks, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV)-specific CD8+ T cells provide immunosurveillance of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons that harbor latent HSV-1. In C57BL/6 mice the TG-resident CD8+ T cells are HSV-specific and maintain a 1:1 ratio of cells recognizing an immunodominant epitope on viral glycoprotein B (gB498–505-Tet+) and cells reactive to subdominant epitopes (gB-Tet−). The gB-Tet− CD8+ T cells maintain their frequency in TG by balancing a higher rate of proliferation with a correspondingly higher rate of apoptosis. The increased apoptosis is associated with higher expression of Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) on gB-Tet− CD8+ T cells, and the interaction with PD-1 ligand (PD-L1/B7H1). IFN-γ regulated expression of the PD-1 ligand (PD-L1/B7H1) on neurons bearing higher copies of latent viral genome. In latently infected TG of B7H1−/− mice, the number and frequency of PD-1+ gB-Tet− CD8+ T cells increases dramatically, but gB-Tet− CD8+ T cells remain largely non-functional, and do not provide increased protection from HSV-1 reactivation in ex vivo cultures of latently infected TG. Unlike observations in some chronic infection models, B7H1 blockade did not increase the function of exhausted gB-Tet− CD8 T cells in latently infected TG. PMID:23656736

  20. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces lividans TK24.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Christian; Albersmeier, Andreas; Busche, Tobias; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Winkler, Anika; Friðjónsson, Ólafur H; Hreggviðsson, Guðmundur Óli; Lambert, Christophe; Badcock, Daniel; Bernaerts, Kristel; Anne, Jozef; Economou, Anastassios; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-04-10

    Streptomyces lividans TK24 is the standard host for the heterologous expression of a number of different proteins and antibiotic-synthesizing enzymes. As such, it is often used as an experimental microbial cell factory for the production of secreted heterologous proteins including human cytokines and industrial enzymes, and of several antibiotics. It accepts methylated DNA and is an ideal Streptomyces cloning system. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of S. lividans TK24 that includes a plasmid-less genome of 8.345Mbp (72.24% G+C content).

  1. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces lividans TK24.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Christian; Albersmeier, Andreas; Busche, Tobias; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Winkler, Anika; Friðjónsson, Ólafur H; Hreggviðsson, Guðmundur Óli; Lambert, Christophe; Badcock, Daniel; Bernaerts, Kristel; Anne, Jozef; Economou, Anastassios; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-04-10

    Streptomyces lividans TK24 is the standard host for the heterologous expression of a number of different proteins and antibiotic-synthesizing enzymes. As such, it is often used as an experimental microbial cell factory for the production of secreted heterologous proteins including human cytokines and industrial enzymes, and of several antibiotics. It accepts methylated DNA and is an ideal Streptomyces cloning system. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of S. lividans TK24 that includes a plasmid-less genome of 8.345Mbp (72.24% G+C content). PMID:25680930

  2. Enzyme-Assisted Extraction of Bioactive Material from Chondrus crispus and Codium fragile and Its Effect on Herpes simplex Virus (HSV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Burlot, Anne-Sophie; Marty, Christel; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Bedoux, Gilles; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Codium fragile and Chondrus crispus are, respectively, green and red seaweeds which are abundant along the North Atlantic coasts. We investigated the chemical composition and antiviral activity of enzymatic extracts of C. fragile (CF) and C. crispus (CC). On a dry weight basis, CF consisted of 11% protein, 31% neutral sugars, 0.8% sulfate, 0.6% uronic acids, and 49% ash, while CC contained 27% protein, 28% neutral sugars, 17% sulfate, 1.8% uronic acids, and 25% ash. Enzyme-assisted hydrolysis improved the extraction efficiency of bioactive materials. Commercial proteases and carbohydrases significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) biomass yield (40%–70% dry matter) as compared to aqueous extraction (20%–25% dry matter). Moreover, enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced the recovery of protein, neutral sugars, uronic acids, and sulfates. The enzymatic hydrolysates exhibited significant activity against Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) with EC50 of 77.6–126.8 μg/mL for CC and 36.5–41.3 μg/mL for CF, at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.001 ID50/cells without cytotoxity (1–200 μg/mL). The extracts obtained from proteases (P1) and carbohydrases (C3) were also effective at higher virus MOI of 0.01 ID50/cells without cytotoxity. Taken together, these results indicate the potential application of enzymatic hydrolysates of C. fragile and C. crispus in functional food and antiviral drug discovery. PMID:25603348

  3. Lytic Gene Expression Is Frequent in HSV-1 Latent Infection and Correlates with the Engagement of a Cell-Intrinsic Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Joel Z.; Russell, Tiffany A.; Spelman, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are significant human pathogens that provide one of the best-described examples of viral latency and reactivation. HSV latency occurs in sensory neurons, being characterized by the absence of virus replication and only fragmentary evidence of protein production. In mouse models, HSV latency is especially stable but the detection of some lytic gene transcription and the ongoing presence of activated immune cells in latent ganglia have been used to suggest that this state is not entirely quiescent. Alternatively, these findings can be interpreted as signs of a low, but constant level of abortive reactivation punctuating otherwise silent latency. Using single cell analysis of transcription in mouse dorsal root ganglia, we reveal that HSV-1 latency is highly dynamic in the majority of neurons. Specifically, transcription from areas of the HSV genome associated with at least one viral lytic gene occurs in nearly two thirds of latently-infected neurons and more than half of these have RNA from more than one lytic gene locus. Further, bioinformatics analyses of host transcription showed that progressive appearance of these lytic transcripts correlated with alterations in expression of cellular genes. These data show for the first time that transcription consistent with lytic gene expression is a frequent event, taking place in the majority of HSV latently-infected neurons. Furthermore, this transcription is of biological significance in that it influences host gene expression. We suggest that the maintenance of HSV latency involves an active host response to frequent viral activity. PMID:25058429

  4. Brain dysmyelination and recovery assessment by noninvasive in vivo diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Harsan, Laura A; Poulet, Patrick; Guignard, Blandine; Steibel, Jérôme; Parizel, Nathalie; de Sousa, Paulo Loureiro; Boehm, Nelly; Grucker, Daniel; Ghandour, M Said

    2006-02-15

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) was applied for in vivo quantification of myelin loss and regeneration. A transgenic mouse line (Oligo-TTK) expressing a truncated form of the herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase gene (hsv1-tk) in oligodendrocytes was studied along with two induced phenotypes of myelin pathology. Myelin loss and axonal abnormalities differentially affect values of DT-MRI parameters in the brain of transgenic mice. Changes in the anisotropy of the white matter were assessed by calculating and mapping the radial (D perpendicular) and axial (D parallel) water diffusion to axonal tracts and fractional anisotropy (FA). A significant increase in D perpendicular attributed to the lack of myelin was observed in all selected brain white matter tracts in dysmyelinated mice. Lower D parallel values were consistent with the histological observation of axonal modifications, including reduced axonal caliber and overexpression of neurofilaments and III beta-tubulin. We show clearly that myelination and axonal changes play a role in the degree of diffusion anisotropy, because FA was significantly decreased in dysmyelinated brain. Importantly, myelin reparation during brain postnatal development induced a decrease in the magnitude of D( perpendicular) and an increase in FA compared with the same brain before recovery. The progressive increase in D parallel values was attributed to the gain in normal axonal morphology. This regeneration was confirmed by the detection of enlarged oligodendrocyte population, newly formed myelin sheaths around additional axons, and a gradual increase in axonal caliber.

  5. ImTK: an open source multi-center information management toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Adil; Ingeholm, Mary Lou; Padh, Shilpa; Dorobantu, Mihai; Desai, Mihir; Cleary, Kevin; Mun, Seong K.

    2008-03-01

    The Information Management Toolkit (ImTK) Consortium is an open source initiative to develop robust, freely available tools related to the information management needs of basic, clinical, and translational research. An open source framework and agile programming methodology can enable distributed software development while an open architecture will encourage interoperability across different environments. The ISIS Center has conceptualized a prototype data sharing network that simulates a multi-center environment based on a federated data access model. This model includes the development of software tools to enable efficient exchange, sharing, management, and analysis of multimedia medical information such as clinical information, images, and bioinformatics data from multiple data sources. The envisioned ImTK data environment will include an open architecture and data model implementation that complies with existing standards such as Digital Imaging and Communications (DICOM), Health Level 7 (HL7), and the technical framework and workflow defined by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Information Technology Infrastructure initiative, mainly the Cross Enterprise Document Sharing (XDS) specifications.

  6. miR-H28 and miR-H29 expressed late in productive infection are exported and restrict HSV-1 replication and spread in recipient cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xianjie; Chen, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Xusha; Du, Te; Roizman, Bernard; Zhou, Guoying

    2016-02-16

    We report on the properties and function of two herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) microRNAs (miRNAs) designated "miR-H28" and "miR-H29." Both miRNAs accumulate late in productive infection at a time when, for the most part, viral DNA and proteins have been made. Ectopic expression of miRNA mimics in human cells before infection reduced the accumulation of viral mRNAs and proteins, reduced plaque sizes, and at vey low multiplicities of infection reduced viral yields. The specificity of the miRNA mimics was tested in two ways. First, ectopic expression of mimics carrying mutations in the seed sequence was ineffective. Second, in similar tests two viral miRNAs made early in productive infection also had no effect. Both miR-H28 and miR-H29 are exported from infected cells in exosomes. A noteworthy finding is that both miR-H28 and miR-H29 were absent from murine ganglia harboring latent virus but accumulated in ganglia in which the virus was induced to reactivate. The significance of these findings rests on the principle that the transmission of HSV from person to person is by physical contact between the infected tissues of the donor and those of uninfected recipient. Diminished size of primary or recurrent lesions could be predicted to enhance person-to-person transmission. Reduction in the amount of reactivating latent virus would reduce the risk of retrograde transport to the CNS but would not interfere with anterograde transport to a site at or near the site of initial infection.

  7. miR-H28 and miR-H29 expressed late in productive infection are exported and restrict HSV-1 replication and spread in recipient cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xianjie; Chen, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Xusha; Du, Te; Roizman, Bernard; Zhou, Guoying

    2016-01-01

    We report on the properties and function of two herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) microRNAs (miRNAs) designated “miR-H28” and “miR-H29.” Both miRNAs accumulate late in productive infection at a time when, for the most part, viral DNA and proteins have been made. Ectopic expression of miRNA mimics in human cells before infection reduced the accumulation of viral mRNAs and proteins, reduced plaque sizes, and at vey low multiplicities of infection reduced viral yields. The specificity of the miRNA mimics was tested in two ways. First, ectopic expression of mimics carrying mutations in the seed sequence was ineffective. Second, in similar tests two viral miRNAs made early in productive infection also had no effect. Both miR-H28 and miR-H29 are exported from infected cells in exosomes. A noteworthy finding is that both miR-H28 and miR-H29 were absent from murine ganglia harboring latent virus but accumulated in ganglia in which the virus was induced to reactivate. The significance of these findings rests on the principle that the transmission of HSV from person to person is by physical contact between the infected tissues of the donor and those of uninfected recipient. Diminished size of primary or recurrent lesions could be predicted to enhance person-to-person transmission. Reduction in the amount of reactivating latent virus would reduce the risk of retrograde transport to the CNS but would not interfere with anterograde transport to a site at or near the site of initial infection. PMID:26831114

  8. Structural basis for the recognition of cellular mRNA export factor REF by herpes viral proteins HSV-1 ICP27 and HVS ORF57.

    PubMed

    Tunnicliffe, Richard B; Hautbergue, Guillaume M; Kalra, Priti; Jackson, Brian R; Whitehouse, Adrian; Wilson, Stuart A; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2011-01-06

    The herpesvirus proteins HSV-1 ICP27 and HVS ORF57 promote viral mRNA export by utilizing the cellular mRNA export machinery. This function is triggered by binding to proteins of the transcription-export (TREX) complex, in particular to REF/Aly which directs viral mRNA to the TAP/NFX1 pathway and, subsequently, to the nuclear pore for export to the cytoplasm. Here we have determined the structure of the REF-ICP27 interaction interface at atomic-resolution and provided a detailed comparison of the binding interfaces between ICP27, ORF57 and REF using solution-state NMR. Despite the absence of any obvious sequence similarity, both viral proteins bind on the same site of the folded RRM domain of REF, via short but specific recognition sites. The regions of ICP27 and ORF57 involved in binding by REF have been mapped as residues 104-112 and 103-120, respectively. We have identified the pattern of residues critical for REF/Aly recognition, common to both ICP27 and ORF57. The importance of the key amino acid residues within these binding sites was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. The functional significance of the ORF57-REF/Aly interaction was also probed using an ex vivo cytoplasmic viral mRNA accumulation assay and this revealed that mutants that reduce the protein-protein interaction dramatically decrease the ability of ORF57 to mediate the nuclear export of intronless viral mRNA. Together these data precisely map amino acid residues responsible for the direct interactions between viral adaptors and cellular REF/Aly and provide the first molecular details of how herpes viruses access the cellular mRNA export pathway.

  9. Structural Basis for the Recognition of Cellular mRNA Export Factor REF by Herpes Viral Proteins HSV-1 ICP27 and HVS ORF57

    PubMed Central

    Tunnicliffe, Richard B.; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Kalra, Priti; Jackson, Brian R.; Whitehouse, Adrian; Wilson, Stuart A.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2011-01-01

    The herpesvirus proteins HSV-1 ICP27 and HVS ORF57 promote viral mRNA export by utilizing the cellular mRNA export machinery. This function is triggered by binding to proteins of the transcription-export (TREX) complex, in particular to REF/Aly which directs viral mRNA to the TAP/NFX1 pathway and, subsequently, to the nuclear pore for export to the cytoplasm. Here we have determined the structure of the REF-ICP27 interaction interface at atomic-resolution and provided a detailed comparison of the binding interfaces between ICP27, ORF57 and REF using solution-state NMR. Despite the absence of any obvious sequence similarity, both viral proteins bind on the same site of the folded RRM domain of REF, via short but specific recognition sites. The regions of ICP27 and ORF57 involved in binding by REF have been mapped as residues 104–112 and 103–120, respectively. We have identified the pattern of residues critical for REF/Aly recognition, common to both ICP27 and ORF57. The importance of the key amino acid residues within these binding sites was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. The functional significance of the ORF57-REF/Aly interaction was also probed using an ex vivo cytoplasmic viral mRNA accumulation assay and this revealed that mutants that reduce the protein-protein interaction dramatically decrease the ability of ORF57 to mediate the nuclear export of intronless viral mRNA. Together these data precisely map amino acid residues responsible for the direct interactions between viral adaptors and cellular REF/Aly and provide the first molecular details of how herpes viruses access the cellular mRNA export pathway. PMID:21253573

  10. 2-Arachidonoyl-glycerol- and arachidonic acid-stimulated neutrophils release antimicrobial effectors against E. coli, S. aureus, HSV-1, and RSV

    PubMed Central

    Chouinard, François; Turcotte, Caroline; Guan, Xiaochun; Larose, Marie-Chantal; Poirier, Samuel; Bouchard, Line; Provost, Véronique; Flamand, Louis; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-AG is highly susceptible to its hydrolysis into AA, which activates neutrophils through de novo LTB4 biosynthesis, independently of CB activation. In this study, we show that 2-AG and AA stimulate neutrophils to release antimicrobial effectors. Supernatants of neutrophils activated with nanomolar concentrations of 2-AG and AA indeed inhibited the infectivity of HSV-1 and RSV. Additionally, the supernatants of 2-AG- and AA-stimulated neutrophils strongly impaired the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. This correlated with the release of a large amount (micrograms) of α-defensins, as well as a limited amount (nanograms) of LL-37. All the effects of AA and 2-AG mentioned above were prevented by inhibiting LTB4 biosynthesis or by blocking BLT1. Importantly, neither CB2 receptor agonists nor antagonists could mimic nor prevent the effects of 2-AG, respectively. In fact, qPCR data show that contaminating eosinophils express ~100-fold more CB2 receptor mRNA than purified neutrophils, suggesting that CB2 receptor expression by human neutrophils is limited and that contaminating eosinophils are likely responsible for the previously documented CB2 expression by freshly isolated human neutrophils. The rapid conversion of 2-AG to AA and their subsequent metabolism into LTB4 promote 2-AG and AA as multifunctional activators of neutrophils, mainly exerting their effects by activating the BLT1. Considering that nanomolar concentrations of AA or 2-AG were sufficient to impair viral infectivity, this suggests potential physiological roles for 2-AG and AA as regulators of host defense in vivo. PMID:23242611

  11. Increased Expression of Herpes Virus-Encoded hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9-5p in Cancer-Containing Prostate Tissue Compared to That in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Yan, Chunri; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Won Tae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jayoung; Cha, Eun-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Previously, we reported the presence of virus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) in the urine of prostate cancer (CaP) patients. In this study, we investigated the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs in prostate tissue. Methods: A total of 175 tissue samples from noncancerous benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 248 tissue samples from patients with CaP and BPH, and 50 samples from noncancerous surrounding tissues from these same patients were analyzed for the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunocytochemistry using nanoparticles as molecular beacons. Results: Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed significantly higher expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miRH9- 5p in surrounding noncancerous and CaP tissues than that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.001). Of note, these miRNA were expressed equivalently in the CaP tissues and surrounding noncancerous tissues. Moreover, immunocytochemistry clearly demonstrated a significant enrichment of both hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9 beacon-labeled cells in CaP and surrounding noncancerous tissue compared to that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.05 for hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2- miR-H9). Conclusions: These results suggest that increased expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H95p might be associated with tumorigenesis in the prostate. Further studies will be required to elucidate the role of these miRNAs with respect to CaP and herpes viral infections. PMID:27377944

  12. MicroRNA-H4-5p encoded by HSV-1 latency-associated transcript promotes cell proliferation, invasion and cell cycle progression via p16-mediated PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in SHSY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiliang; Zhang, Chunying; Hou, Guangjun; Song, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) microRNAs (miRNAs) mostly located in transcription-associated transcript (LAT) region have been identified that play critical roles in the intricate host-pathogen interaction networks. Increasing evidences throw new insight into the role of miRNA-mediated miRNA-mRNA cross-talk in HSV-1 latent or acute infection. In the present study, we found that hsv-1 miR-H4-5p (here termed as miR-H4b) can down-regulate the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A, p16) in neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cell lines. Decreased expression of miR-H4b was directly related to attenuated cell proliferation and invasion as well as malfunction of cell cycle in recombinant SHSY5Y cells that stably expressing miR-H4b. Bioinformatics analysis and luciferase assays demonstrated miR-H4b can directly target p16 mRNA. MiR-H4b exerts its pro-proliferation function through inhibition of the p16-related PI3K-Akt pathways. Our findings provide, for the first time, significant clues regarding the role of herpesvirus-encoded miRNAs as a viral modulator to host cells. PMID:26221296

  13. Structure, physiological role, and specific inhibitors of human thymidine kinase 2 (TK2): present and future.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Priego, Eva-María; Hernández, Ana-Isabel; Familiar, Olga; Camarasa, María-José; Negri, Ana; Gago, Federico; Balzarini, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Human mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) is a pyrimidine deoxynucleoside kinase (dNK) that catalyzes the phosphorylation of pyrimidine deoxynucleosides to their corresponding deoxynucleoside 5'-monophosphates by gamma-phosphoryl transfer from ATP. In resting cells, TK2 is suggested to play a key role in the mitochondrial salvage pathway to provide pyrimidine nucleotides for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) synthesis and maintenance. However, recently the physiological role of TK2turned out to have direct clinical relevance as well. Point mutations in the gene encoding TK2 have been correlated to mtDNA disorders in a heterogeneous group of patients suffering from the so-called mtDNA depletion syndrome (MDS). TK2 activity could also be involved in mitochondrial toxicity associated to prolonged treatment with antiviral nucleoside analogues like AZT and FIAU. Therefore, TK2 inhibitors can be considered as valuable tools to unravel the role of TK2 in the maintenance and homeostasis of mitochondrial nucleotide pools and mtDNA, and to clarify the contribution of TK2 activity to mitochondrial toxicity of certain antivirals. Highly selective TK-2 inhibitors having an acyclic nucleoside structure and efficiently discriminating between TK-2 and the closely related TK-1 have already been reported. It is actually unclear whether these agents efficiently reach the inner mitochondrial compartment. In the present review article,structural features of TK2, MDS-related mutations observed in TK2 and their role in MDS will be discussed. Also, an update on novel and selective TK2 inhibitors will be provided.

  14. Molecular imaging of temporal dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signal transduction activity in tumors in living mice.

    PubMed

    Serganova, Inna; Doubrovin, Michael; Vider, Jelena; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Soghomonyan, Suren; Beresten, Tatiana; Ageyeva, Ludmila; Serganov, Alexander; Cai, Shangde; Balatoni, Julius; Blasberg, Ronald; Gelovani, Juri

    2004-09-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a spatially and temporally heterogeneous phenomenon, which results from several tumor and host tissue-specific processes. To study the dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-specific transcriptional activity in tumors, we used repetitive noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of hypoxia-induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity in tumors in living mice. This approach uses a novel retroviral vector bearing a HIF-1-inducible "sensor" reporter gene (HSV1-tk/GFP fusion) and a constitutively expressed "beacon" reporter gene (DsRed2/XPRT). C6 glioma cells transduced with this multireporter system revealed dose-dependent patterns in temporal dynamics of HIF-1 transcriptional activity induced by either CoCl2 or decreased atmospheric oxygen concentration. Multicellular spheroids of C6 reporter cells developed a hypoxic core when >350 microm in diameter. 18F-2'-fluoro-2'deoxy-1beta-D-arabionofuranosyl-5-ethyl-uracil (FEAU) PET revealed spatial heterogeneity of HIF-1 transcriptional activity in reporter xenografts in mice as a function of size or ischemia-reperfusion injury. With increasing tumor diameter (>3 mm), a marked increase in HIF-1 transcriptional activity was observed in the core regions of tumors. Even a moderate ischemia-reperfusion injury in small C6 tumors caused a rapid induction of HIF-1 transcriptional activity, which persisted for a long time because of the inability of C6 tumors to rapidly compensate acute changes in tumor microcirculation.

  15. Human gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor exert a synergistic blockade on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Feduchi, E; Alonso, M A; Carrasco, L

    1989-01-01

    The replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is not inhibited in either HeLa or HEp-2 cells treated with human alpha interferon (HuIFN-alpha), particularly when high multiplicities of infection are used. However, HuIFN-gamma partially inhibits HSV-1 translation in HEp-2 cells infected at low multiplicities. Under these conditions, the transcription of genes alpha 22, TK, and gamma 0 is greatly diminished. The combined addition of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and HuIFN-gamma to HEp-2 cells exerts a synergistic inhibition of HSV-1 translation. Cells treated with both cytokines continue synthesizing cellular proteins, even 20 h after HSV-1 infection. As little as 10 U of IFN-gamma per ml blocked HSV-1 DNA replication, provided that TNF was also present in the medium. Analyses of HSV-1 gene transcription suggest that the action of both TNF and IFN-gamma blocked a step that comes at or prior to early HSV-1 gene expression. This early step in HSV-1 replication inhibited by TNF and IFN-gamma occurs after virus attachment and entry into cells, since the internalization of radioactive HSV-1 virion particles was not blocked by the presence of the two cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the synergistic action of TNF plus IFN-gamma affects a step in HSV-1 replication that comes after virus entry but before or at the transcription of immediate-early genes. Images PMID:2536838

  16. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Katherine A.; Yasseen, Akeel A.; McKerr, George; Downes, C. S.; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J.

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1+ and TK1- clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumor suppressor (TP53) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene regions, over 1 h after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1+ compared to TK1- cells, a trend also reflected to a lesser degree in genomic DNA repair between the cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK+ cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 min repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1+ cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents. PMID:25152750

  17. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Katherine A; Yasseen, Akeel A; McKerr, George; Downes, C S; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1(+) and TK1(-) clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumor suppressor (TP53) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene regions, over 1 h after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1(+) compared to TK1(-) cells, a trend also reflected to a lesser degree in genomic DNA repair between the cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK(+) cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 min repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1(+) cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents. PMID:25152750

  18. Tubby and tubby-like protein 1 are new MerTK ligands for phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Caberoy, Nora B; Zhou, Yixiong; Li, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Tubby and tubby-like protein 1 (Tulp1) are newly identified phagocytosis ligands to facilitate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and macrophage phagocytosis. Both proteins without classical signal peptide have been demonstrated with unconventional secretion. Here, we characterized them as novel MerTK ligands to facilitate phagocytosis. Tulp1 interacts with Tyro3, Axl and MerTK of the TAM receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily, whereas tubby binds only to MerTK. Excessive soluble MerTK extracellular domain blocked tubby- or Tulp1-mediated phagocytosis. Both ligands induced MerTK activation with receptor phosphorylation and signalling cascade, including non-muscle myosin II redistribution and co-localization with phagosomes. Tubby and Tulp1 are bridging molecules with their N-terminal region as MerTK-binding domain and C-terminal region as phagocytosis prey-binding domain (PPBD). Five minimal phagocytic determinants (MPDs) of K/R(X)(1-2)KKK in Tulp1 N-terminus were defined as essential motifs for MerTK binding, receptor phosphorylation and phagocytosis. PPBD was mapped to the highly conserved 54 amino acids at the C-terminal end of tubby and Tulp1. These data suggest that tubby and Tulp1 are novel bridging molecules to facilitate phagocytosis through MerTK.

  19. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY MUTAGENS IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY BROMATE AND N- ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE L YMPHOMA CELLS

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemical mutagens The Tk +1- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wide ra...

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of an rRNA operon in Streptomyces lividans TK21.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y; Ono, Y; Nagata, A; Yamada, T

    1988-01-01

    The number of rRNA genes in Streptomyces lividans was examined by Southern hybridization. Randomly labeled 23 and 16S rRNAs were hybridized with BamHI, BglII, PstI, SalI, or XhoI digests of S. lividans TK21 DNA. BamHi, BglII, SalI and XhoI digests yielded six radioactive bands each for the 23 and 16S rRNAs, whereas PstI digests gave one band for the 23S rRNA and one high-intensity band and six low-density bands for the 16S rRNA. The 7.4-kilobase-pair BamHI fragment containing one of the rRNA gene clusters was cloned into plasmid pBR322. The hybrid plasmid, pSLTK1, was characterized by physical mapping, Southern hybridization, and electron microscopic analysis of the R loops formed between pSLTK1 and the 23 and 16S rRNAs. There were at least six rRNA genes in S. lividans TK21. The 16 and 23S rRNA genes were estimated to be about 1.40 and 3.17 kilobase pairs, respectively. The genes for the rRNAs were aligned in the sequence 16S-23S-5S. tRNA genes were not found in the spacer region or in the context of the rRNA genes. The G + C content of the spacer region was calculated to be approximately 58%, in contrast to 73% for the chromosome as a whole. Images PMID:2832372

  1. Rapid application development using the Tcl/Tk language

    SciTech Connect

    van Zeijts, J.

    1995-12-31

    During the last year, high level applications at CEBAF were written using the Tcl/Tk scripting language. This language is rapidly gaining in popularity, in part due to ease of constructing programs with X11 graphical user interfaces, and in part to ease of adding compiled user code for specialized purposes. Extensions to the language provide object oriented programming, which was used to develop a hierarchy of classes relevant for high level accelerator control. We describe basic language features, some 3rd party add-on packages, and local additions to the toolbox. Next we describe features of the accelerator object hierarchy, and finally describe applications written using this toolbox such as the ModelServer prototype, Slow Orbit and Energy Lock, the Linac Energy Management System, and other applications.

  2. Caspase-3-independent pathways proceeding in bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juqiang; Ma, Yan; Zeng, Shaoqun; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-02-01

    HSV-tk/GCV system, which is the virus-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy of herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (tk) gene / the anti-viral reagent ganciclovir (GCV), is one of the promising approaches in the rapidly growing area of gene therapy. As gene therapy of cancer such as suicide gene therapy has entered the clinic, another therapy effect which is called 'bystander effect' was reported. Bystander effect can lead to killing of non-transduced tumor cells in the immediate vicinity of GCV-treated HSV-TK-positive cells. Now the magnitude of 'bystander effect' is an essential factor for this anti-tumor approach in vivo. However, the mechanism which HSV-tk/ACV brings "bystander effect" is poorly understood. In this study, we monitor the activation of caspase-3 in HSV-tk/GCV system by a FRET probe CD3, a FRET-based indicator for activity of caspase3, which is composed of an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, a caspase-sensitive linker, and a red fluorescent protein from Discosoma with efficient maturation property. Through application of CD3 we have visualized the activation of caspase-3 in tk gene positive human adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC-M) cells but not in bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system induced by GCV. This finding provides needed information for understanding the mechanisms by which suicide gene approaches actually kill cancer cells, and may prove to be helpful for the clinical treatment of cancers.

  3. Glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific, long-term expression in neocortical neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors containing the phosphate-activated glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter-1, or glutamic acid decarboxylase promoter.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Szabo, Gabor; Curthoys, Norman P; Geller, Alfred I

    2007-05-01

    Many potential uses of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to one of the two major types of forebrain neurons, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop virus vectors that contain either a glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific promoter. The brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the product of the GLS1 gene, produces the majority of the glutamate for release as neurotransmitter, and is a marker for glutamatergic neurons. A PAG promoter was partially characterized using a cultured kidney cell line. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are expressed in distinct populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) produces GABA; the two molecular forms of the enzyme, GAD65 and GAD67, are expressed in distinct, but largely overlapping, groups of neurons, and GAD67 is the predominant form in the neocortex. In transgenic mice, an approximately 9 kb fragment of the GAD67 promoter supports expression in most classes of GABAergic neurons. Here, we constructed plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors that placed the Lac Z gene under the regulation of putative PAG, VGLUT1, or GAD67 promoters. Helper virus-free vector stocks were delivered into postrhinal cortex, and the rats were sacrificed 4 days or 2 months later. The PAG or VGLUT1 promoters supported approximately 90% glutamatergic neuron-specific expression. The GAD67 promoter supported approximately 90% GABAergic neuron-specific expression. Long-term expression was observed using each promoter. Principles for obtaining long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors, based on these and other results, are discussed. Long-term glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific expression may benefit specific experiments on learning or specific gene therapy approaches. Of note, promoter analyses might identify regulatory elements that determine

  4. Influence of the treatment protocol upon the in vivo efficacy of cidofovir (HPMPC) and of acyclovir (ACV) formulations in topical treatment of cutaneous HSV-1 infection in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Afouna, M I; Mehta, S C; Ghanem, A H; Higuchi, W I; Kern, E R; DeClercq, E; El-Shattawy, H H

    1999-05-01

    In recent studies we found that the topical effectiveness of acyclovir (ACV) formulations was a single-valued function of C-the target site free drug concentration. The topical efficacy was the same when the therapy was initiated 0, 1, or 2 days after intracutaneous herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) inoculation in hairless mice. The purpose of the present study was to examine the hypothesis that the topical effectiveness of cidofovir (HPMPC) would not be a single valued function of C and that it would be dependent upon when the therapy was initiated relative to the time of viral infection. Formulations of HPMPC and ACV in 95% DMSO as a vehicle were used. Hairless mice intracutaneously infected with HSV-1 were used, and 20 microL of the test formulation was topically applied twice a day. In protocol A, the treatment was continued until the fourth day after virus inoculation, whereas in protocol B the treatment was terminated on the day of virus inoculation. Treatment was initiated on various days ranging from day -6 to day 4, and the lesions were scored on day 5. Treatment of ACV according to protocol A proved efficacious whether started as early as 6 days before virus inoculation or later, whereas the efficacy of ACV was annihilated if applied following protocol B. For HPMPC, on the other hand, the in vivo efficacies were found to be strongly dependent on how early the therapy was initiated, and significant efficacy was observed even when the treatment was terminated on the day of virus inoculation. This difference was attributed to the virus-independent intracellular phosphorylation of HPMPC and slow clearance of its metabolites from the cell. It was also noted that, similar to ACV, for HPMPC the topical efficacy is likely to be a function of C for a fixed protocol. However, unlike for ACV, for HPMPC the efficacy was not a single-valued function of C.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sp. Strain UCD-TK1 (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Koenigsaecker, Tynisha M.; Coil, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Gordonia sp. strain UCD-TK1. The assembly contains 5,470,576 bp in 98 contigs. This strain was isolated from a disinfected ambulatory surgery center. PMID:27738036

  6. Characterization of a TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159-ala Human Lymphoblast Clone

    SciTech Connect

    Chyall, L.: Gauny, S.; Kronenberg, A.

    2006-01-01

    TK6 cells are a well-characterized human B-lymphoblast cell line derived from WIL-2 cells. A derivative of the TK6 cell line that was stably transfected to express a mutated form of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL (TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159- ala clone #38) is compared with the parent cell line. Four parameters were evaluated for each cell line: growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency, and frequency of spontaneous mutation to 6‑thioguanine resistance (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase locus) or trifluorothymidine resistance (thymidine kinase locus). We conclude that the mutated Bcl-xL protein did not affect growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency or spontaneous mutation frequencies at the thymidine kinase (TK) locus. Results at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus were inconclusive. A mutant fraction for TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells exposed to 150cGy of 160kVp x-rays was also calculated. Exposure to x-irradiation increased the mutant fraction of TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells.

  7. Antitumor effects of HSV-TK-engineered donor lymphocytes after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara; Marktel, Sarah; Zappone, Elisabetta; Servida, Paolo; Bernardi, Massimo; Pescarollo, Alessandra; Bondanza, Attilio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Rossini, Silvano; Magnani, Zulma; Salomoni, Monica; Benati, Claudia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Callegaro, Luciano; Corradini, Paolo; Bregni, Marco; Traversari, Catia; Bordignon, Claudio

    2007-06-01

    The extensive exploitation of the antitumor effect of donor lymphocytes infused after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is limited by the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). To overcome this limitation, we investigated the therapeutic potential of donor lymphocytes engineered with the suicide gene thymidine kinase of herpes simplex virus (TK) in 23 patients experiencing recurrence of hematologic malignancies after allo-HSCT. Long-term follow-up of infused patients included analysis of engraftment of genetically engineered lymphocytes, in vivo assessment of antitumor effect, and control of GvHD by ganciclovir. All 17 patients evaluable for engraftment and graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) had circulating TK(+) cells detectable beginning at a median time of 18 days. Eleven patients (65%) experienced a substantial clinical benefit resulting in 6 (35%) complete remissions and 5 (29%) partial responses. The antitumor effect tightly correlated with the in vivo expansion of TK(+) cells. Seven patients received ganciclovir, resulting in elimination of TK(+) cells and effective and selective treatment of GvHD. Immunization against HSV-TK was observed in 7 patients but did not preclude an effective GvL. These data validate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of TK(+) cells in the context of allografting and represent the basis for a broader application of this technology. PMID:17327416

  8. An alternative mature form of subtilisin homologue, Tk-SP, from Thermococcus kodakaraensis identified in the presence of Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Sinsereekul, Nitat; Foophow, Tita; Yamanouchi, Mai; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2011-06-01

    Pro-Tk-SP from Thermococcus kodakaraensis consists of the four domains: N-propeptide, subtilisin (EC 3.4.21.62) domain, β-jelly roll domain and C-propeptide. To analyze the maturation process of this protein, the Pro-Tk-SP derivative with the mutation of the active-site serine residue to Cys (Pro-Tk-S359C), Pro-Tk-S359C derivatives lacking the N-propeptide (ProC-Tk-S359C) and both propeptides (Tk-S359C), and a His-tagged form of the isolated C-propeptide (ProC*) were constructed. Pro-Tk-S359C was purified mostly in an autoprocessed form in which the N-propeptide is autoprocessed but the isolated N-propeptide (ProN) forms a stable complex with ProC-Tk-S359C, indicating that the N-propeptide is autoprocessed first. The subsequent maturation process was analyzed using ProC-Tk-S359C, instead of the ProN:ProC-Tk-S359C complex. The C-propeptide was autoprocessed and degraded when ProC-Tk-S359C was incubated at 80 °C in the absence of Ca(2+). However, it was not autoprocessed in the presence of Ca(2+). Comparison of the susceptibility of ProC* to proteolytic degradation in the presence and absence of Ca(2+) suggests that the C-propeptide becomes highly resistant to proteolytic degradation in the presence of Ca(2+). We propose that Pro-Tk-SP derivative lacking N-propeptide (Val114-Gly640) represents a mature form of Pro-Tk-SP in a natural environment. The enzymatic activity of ProC-Tk-S359C was higher than (but comparable to) that of Tk-S359C, suggesting that the C-propeptide is not important for activity. However, the T(m) value of ProC-Tk-S359C determined by far-UV CD spectroscopy was higher than that of Tk-S359C by 25.9 °C in the absence of Ca(2+) and 7.5 °C in the presence of Ca(2+), indicating that the C-propeptide contributes to the stabilization of ProC-Tk-S359C.

  9. Cleavage of Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK) from the cell surface contributes to the regulation of retinal phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Law, Ah-Lai; Parinot, Célia; Chatagnon, Jonathan; Gravez, Basile; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Nandrot, Emeline F

    2015-02-20

    Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages and spent photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells requires several proteins, including MerTK receptors and associated Gas6 and protein S ligands. In the retina, POS phagocytosis is rhythmic, and MerTK is activated promptly after light onset via the αvβ5 integrin receptor and its ligand MFG-E8, thus generating a phagocytic peak. The phagocytic burst is limited in time, suggesting a down-regulation mechanism that limits its duration. Our previous data showed that MerTK helps control POS binding of integrin receptors at the RPE cell surface as a negative feedback loop. Our present results show that a soluble form of MerTK (sMerTK) is released in the conditioned media of RPE-J cells during phagocytosis and in the interphotoreceptor matrix of the mouse retina during the morning phagocytic peak. In contrast to macrophages, the two cognate MerTK ligands have an opposite effect on phagocytosis and sMerTK release, whereas the integrin ligand MFG-E8 markedly increases both phagocytosis and sMerTK levels. sMerTK acts as a decoy receptor blocking the effect of both MerTK ligands. Interestingly, stimulation of sMerTK release decreases POS binding. Conversely, blocking MerTK cleavage increased mostly POS binding by RPE cells. Therefore, our data suggest that MerTK cleavage contributes to the acute regulation of RPE phagocytosis by limiting POS binding to the cell surface.

  10. A HSV-1 variant (1720) generates four equimolar isomers despite a 9200-bp deletion from TRL and sequences between 9200 np and 97,000 np in inverted orientation being covalently bound to sequences 94,000-126,372 np.

    PubMed

    Harland, J; Brown, S M

    1992-08-01

    The genome structure of a spontaneously generated HSV-1 strain 17 variant, 1720, has been determined by restriction endonuclease and Southern blot analysis. The short segment of 1720 is unaltered compared to the parental strain 17 genome, whereas the long segment is extensively rearranged. Almost all of TRL (approximately 9.2 kb) has been deleted and consequently IRL is converted into unique sequence. Sequences from approximately 9200 nucleotide position (np) to 97,000 np are present in inverted orientation, covalently bound to sequences in the prototype orientation from approximately 94,000 np to the L/S junction at 126,372 np. Thus, sequences from 94,000 np to 97,000 np are now diploid, with one copy in the normal orientation and location, and the other at the long terminus as an inverted repeat; no inversion of the intervening unique sequences occurs about this novel inverted repeat. In contrast, normal inversions of the long and short segments occur to give four equimolar genomic isomers, indicating that the novel long terminus has gained an "a" sequence. The duplication of sequences between 94,000 np and 97,000 np results in a genome containing two copies of UL43 and one complete and one partial copy each of genes UL42 and UL44 encoding the 65 kD DNA-binding protein and glycoprotein C, respectively. The variant has been shown to grow normally in vitro following high multiplicity infection.

  11. The Syk Kinase SmTK4 of Schistosoma mansoni Is Involved in the Regulation of Spermatogenesis and Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Svenja; Buro, Christin; Dissous, Colette; Hirzmann, Jörg; Grevelding, Christoph G.

    2010-01-01

    The signal transduction protein SmTK4 from Schistosoma mansoni belongs to the family of Syk kinases. In vertebrates, Syk kinases are known to play specialized roles in signaling pathways in cells of the hematopoietic system. Although Syk kinases were identified in some invertebrates, their role in this group of animals has not yet been elucidated. Since SmTK4 is the first Syk kinase from a parasitic helminth, shown to be predominantly expressed in the testes and ovary of adult worms, we investigated its function. To unravel signaling cascades in which SmTK4 is involved, yeast two-/three-hybrid library screenings were performed with either the tandem SH2-domain, or with the linker region including the tyrosine kinase domain of SmTK4. Besides the Src kinase SmTK3 we identified a new Src kinase (SmTK6) acting upstream of SmTK4 and a MAPK-activating protein, as well as mapmodulin acting downstream. Their identities and colocalization studies pointed to a role of SmTK4 in a signaling cascade regulating the proliferation and/or differentiation of cells in the gonads of schistosomes. To confirm this decisive role we performed biochemical and molecular approaches to knock down SmTK4 combined with a novel protocol for confocal laser scanning microscopy for morphological analyses. Using the Syk kinase-specific inhibitor Piceatannol or by RNAi treatment of adult schistosomes in vitro, corresponding phenotypes were detected in the testes and ovary. In the Xenopus oocyte system it was finally confirmed that Piceatannol suppressed the activity of the catalytic kinase domain of SmTK4. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal role of SmTK4 in gametogenesis, a new function for Syk kinases in eukaryotes. PMID:20169182

  12. B Plant, TK-21-1, analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, L.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-09

    This document is the final laboratory report for B Plant Tk-21-1. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) sample was taken from Tk-21 -1 September 26, 1996. This sample was received at 222-S Analytical Laboratory on September 27, 1996. Analyses were performed in accordance with the accompanying Request for Sample Analysis (RSA) and Letter of Instruction B PLANT RCRA SAMPLES TO 222S LABORATORY, LETTER OF INSTRUCTION (LOI) 2B-96-LOI-012-01 (LOI) (Westra, 1996). LOI was issued subsequent to RSA and replaces Letter of Instruction 2C-96-LOI-004-01 referenced in RSA.

  13. Introducing point mutations into the ATGs of the putative open reading frames of the HSV-1 gene encoding the latency associated transcript (LAT) reduces its anti-apoptosis activity.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Dale; Henderson, Gail; Hsiang, Chinhui; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L

    2008-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) gene has anti-apoptosis activity that directly or indirectly enhances the virus's reactivation phenotype in small animal models. The first 1.5 kb of the primary 8.3 kb LAT is sufficient and some or all of it is necessary for LAT's anti-apoptosis in transient transfection assays and for LAT's ability to enhance the reactivation phenotype. Based on LAT's genomic sequence, the first 1.5 kb contains eight potential open reading frames (ORFs) defined as an ATG followed by an in frame termination codon. In this study, point mutations were introduced into the ATGs of ORFs present in the 1.5 kb fragment of LAT. Mutagenesis of all eight ATGs in LAT ORFs consistently reduced the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT in transiently transfected mouse neuroblastoma cells regardless of whether apoptosis was induced by caspase 8 or caspase 9. Mutation of the six ATGs located in the stable intron sequences within the 1.5 kb LAT had a dramatic effect on caspase 9, but not caspase 8, induced apoptosis. For both caspase 8 and caspase 9 induced apoptosis, mutating the two ATGs in the exon of the LAT 1.5 kb fragment reduced, but did not eliminate the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT. These studies suggest that altering the fine structure of regulatory RNA or expression of a putative LAT ORF regulates the anti-apoptosis activity of LAT. These studies also indicate that more than one function is present in the 1.5 kb LAT fragment.

  14. 242-A Evaporator Condensate Tank (TK-C-100) tie down evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hundal, T.S.

    1995-01-23

    The existing Condensate Tank (TK-C-100) in the 242-A Evaporator building is not anchored to the floor slab. This tank is a Safety Class 3 sitting in a Safety Class 2 building. The tank needed to be evaluated to withstand the seismic loads. Anchor bolts have been designed to hold the tank during the seismic event.

  15. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A HIGHLY THERMOSTABLE ALPHA-L-ARABINOFURANOSIDASE FROM GEOBACILLUS CALDOXYLOLYTICUS TK4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding an alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Geobacillus caldoxylolyticus TK4, AbfATK4, was isolated, cloned, and sequenced. The deduced protein had a molecular mass of about 58 kDa, and analysis of its amino acid sequence revealed significant homology and conservation of different catalyt...

  16. Genotoxicity of microcystin-LR in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Li; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Sakuraba, Mayumi; Wu, De Sheng; Zhang, Li Shi; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Makoto; Honma, Masamitsu

    2004-01-10

    Toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) water blooms have become a serious problem in several industrialized areas of the world. Microcystin-LR (MCLR) is a cyclic heptapeptidic toxin produced by the cyanobacteria. In the present study, we used human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 to investigate the in vitro genotoxicity of MCLR. In a standard 4h treatment, MCLR did not induce a significant cytotoxic response at <80 microg/ml. In a prolonged 24h treatment, in contrast, it induced cytotoxic as well as mutagenic responses concentration-dependently starting at 20 microg/ml. At the maximum concentration (80 microg/ml), the micronucleus frequency and the mutation frequency at the heterozygous thymidine kinase (TK) locus were approximately five-times the control values. Molecular analysis of the TK mutants revealed that MCLR specifically induced loss of heterozygosity at the TK locus, but not point mutations or other small structural changes. These results indicate that MCLR had a clastogenic effect. We discuss the mechanisms of MCLR genotoxicity and the possibility of its being a hepatocarcinogen. PMID:14706513

  17. Structural analysis of herpes simplex virus by optical super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Laine, Romain F; Albecka, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Rees, Eric J; Crump, Colin M; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread pathogens among humans. Although the structure of HSV-1 has been extensively investigated, the precise organization of tegument and envelope proteins remains elusive. Here we use super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with a model-based analysis of single-molecule localization data, to determine the position of protein layers within virus particles. We resolve different protein layers within individual HSV-1 particles using multi-colour dSTORM imaging and discriminate envelope-anchored glycoproteins from tegument proteins, both in purified virions and in virions present in infected cells. Precise characterization of HSV-1 structure was achieved by particle averaging of purified viruses and model-based analysis of the radial distribution of the tegument proteins VP16, VP1/2 and pUL37, and envelope protein gD. From this data, we propose a model of the protein organization inside the tegument.

  18. Structural analysis of herpes simplex virus by optical super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Romain F.; Albecka, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Rees, Eric J.; Crump, Colin M.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread pathogens among humans. Although the structure of HSV-1 has been extensively investigated, the precise organization of tegument and envelope proteins remains elusive. Here we use super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with a model-based analysis of single-molecule localization data, to determine the position of protein layers within virus particles. We resolve different protein layers within individual HSV-1 particles using multi-colour dSTORM imaging and discriminate envelope-anchored glycoproteins from tegument proteins, both in purified virions and in virions present in infected cells. Precise characterization of HSV-1 structure was achieved by particle averaging of purified viruses and model-based analysis of the radial distribution of the tegument proteins VP16, VP1/2 and pUL37, and envelope protein gD. From this data, we propose a model of the protein organization inside the tegument.

  19. Investigation of the apoptotic way induced by digallic acid in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The digallic acid (DGA) purified from Pistacia lentiscus. L fruits was investigated for its antiproliferative and apoptotic activities on human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Methods We attempt to characterize the apoptotic pathway activated by DGA. Apoptosis was detected by DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage and by evaluating caspase activities. Results The inhibition of lymphoblastoid cell proliferation was noted from 8.5 μg/ml of DGA. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by DNA fragmentation and PARP cleavage. We have demonstrated that DGA induces apoptosis by activating the caspase-8 extrinsic pathway. Caspase-3 was also activated in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion In summary, DGA exhibited an apoptosis inductor effect in TK6 cells revealing thus its potential as a cancer-preventive agent. PMID:22686580

  20. MerTK Is a Functional Regulator of Myelin Phagocytosis by Human Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Healy, Luke M; Perron, Gabrielle; Won, So-Yoon; Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Rezk, Ayman; Ludwin, Samuel K; Moore, Craig S; Hall, Jeffery A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2016-04-15

    Multifocal inflammatory lesions featuring destruction of lipid-rich myelin are pathologic hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. Lesion activity is assessed by the extent and composition of myelin uptake by myeloid cells present in such lesions. In the inflamed CNS, myeloid cells are comprised of brain-resident microglia, an endogenous cell population, and monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrate from the systemic compartment. Using microglia isolated from the adult human brain, we demonstrate that myelin phagocytosis is dependent on the polarization state of the cells. Myelin ingestion is significantly enhanced in cells exposed to TGF-β compared with resting basal conditions and markedly reduced in classically activated polarized cells. Transcriptional analysis indicated that TGF-β-treated microglia closely resembled M0 cells. The tyrosine kinase phagocytic receptor MerTK was one of the most upregulated among a select number of differentially expressed genes in TGF-β-treated microglia. In contrast, MerTK and its known ligands, growth arrest-specific 6 and Protein S, were downregulated in classically activated cells. MerTK expression and myelin phagocytosis were higher in CNS-derived microglia than observed in monocyte-derived macrophages, both basally and under all tested polarization conditions. Specific MerTK inhibitors reduced myelin phagocytosis and the resultant anti-inflammatory biased cytokine responses for both cell types. Defining and modulating the mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis has the potential to impact lesion and disease evolution in multiple sclerosis. Relevant effects would include enhancing myelin clearance, increasing anti-inflammatory molecule production by myeloid cells, and thereby permitting subsequent tissue repair. PMID:26962228

  1. MerTK Is a Functional Regulator of Myelin Phagocytosis by Human Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Healy, Luke M; Perron, Gabrielle; Won, So-Yoon; Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Rezk, Ayman; Ludwin, Samuel K; Moore, Craig S; Hall, Jeffery A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2016-04-15

    Multifocal inflammatory lesions featuring destruction of lipid-rich myelin are pathologic hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. Lesion activity is assessed by the extent and composition of myelin uptake by myeloid cells present in such lesions. In the inflamed CNS, myeloid cells are comprised of brain-resident microglia, an endogenous cell population, and monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrate from the systemic compartment. Using microglia isolated from the adult human brain, we demonstrate that myelin phagocytosis is dependent on the polarization state of the cells. Myelin ingestion is significantly enhanced in cells exposed to TGF-β compared with resting basal conditions and markedly reduced in classically activated polarized cells. Transcriptional analysis indicated that TGF-β-treated microglia closely resembled M0 cells. The tyrosine kinase phagocytic receptor MerTK was one of the most upregulated among a select number of differentially expressed genes in TGF-β-treated microglia. In contrast, MerTK and its known ligands, growth arrest-specific 6 and Protein S, were downregulated in classically activated cells. MerTK expression and myelin phagocytosis were higher in CNS-derived microglia than observed in monocyte-derived macrophages, both basally and under all tested polarization conditions. Specific MerTK inhibitors reduced myelin phagocytosis and the resultant anti-inflammatory biased cytokine responses for both cell types. Defining and modulating the mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis has the potential to impact lesion and disease evolution in multiple sclerosis. Relevant effects would include enhancing myelin clearance, increasing anti-inflammatory molecule production by myeloid cells, and thereby permitting subsequent tissue repair.

  2. Dimethyl sulfide biofiltration using immobilized Hyphomicrobium VS and Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m in sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Treto Fernández, H; Rodríguez Rico, I; Jover de la Prida, J; Van Langenhove, H

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a carrier material of microorganisms in two different biofilters used to remove dimethyl sulfide (DMS) from a gas stream. The first biofilter was inoculated with Hyphomicrobium VS and the second with Thiobacillus thioparus Tk-m. During the operation of the biofilters the empty bed residence time (EBRT) was varied from 90 to 180 seconds and the inlet concentration of DMS from 12 to 50 ppmv. The inlet load was varied in the range of 0.62 to 5.2 (g DMS/m3 h). The maximum elimination capacity (EC) of the biofilter inoculated with Hyphomicrobium VS was 5 g DMS/m3 h; however, for the biofilter inoculated with T. thioparus Tk-m the maximum EC was 3.9 g DMS/m3 h. For T. thioparus TK-m the maximum removal efficiency (RE) obtained was 85.1 +/- 5.2% at 12 ppmv DMS inlet concentration, inlet load of 0.62 g DMS/m3 h and 180 s EBRT. The highest removal efficiency for Hyphomicrobium VS was 97.6 + 4.8% at 12 ppmv DMS inlet concentration, load of 0.62 g DMS/m3 h and 180 s EBRT. PMID:23530338

  3. Comparison of the performance of TK system with LJ and MGIT methods in the diagnosis of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Feyzioglu, Bahadir; Dogan, Metin; Sanli, Ozlem O; Ozdemir, Mehmet; Baykan, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a common infectious disease caused by various strains of mycobacteria, usually Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). Various liquid or solid media are used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. TK Rapid Mycobacterial Culture System has been developed recently. In our study, we aimed to compare TK Rapid Mycobacterial Culture System with LJ and MGIT systems in the diagnosis of tuberculosis. 200 clinical specimens (152 sputum, 41 Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), 4 gastric aspirations, 2 urine and 1 wound) obtained from 192 patients from different clinics were included for the diagnosis of TB. All specimens were decontaminated by using the same-common procedure in all the methods. The obtained sediment was used for inoculation for the BACTEC MGIT 960, TK and LJ. Additionally, smears were prepared from the residual suspension for Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen (EZN) staining for microscopic examination. Contamination was observed in 23 sputum and 4 BAL samples. Contamination rates for TK, LJ, and BACTEC MGIT 960 systems were determined as 3 (1.5%), 13 (6.5%), and 18 (9%) respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth was determined as 15 (7.5%), 14 (7%) and 13 (6.5%) by TK culture system, MGIT and LJ, respectively. In our study, the total mean detection times of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the LJ, TK, and MGIT method were 20.1, 17.1, and 8.3 days, respectively. TK system showed a dramatically lower contamination rate than the others. There was no difference in growth rates for each of the three methods. We concluded that the TK culture system is disadvantageous in terms of turnaround time. PMID:24955186

  4. tkLayout: a design tool for innovative silicon tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, G.

    2014-03-01

    A new CMS tracker is scheduled to become operational for the LHC Phase 2 upgrade in the early 2020's. tkLayout is a software package developed to create 3d models for the design of the CMS tracker and to evaluate its fundamental performance figures. The new tracker will have to cope with much higher luminosity conditions, resulting in increased track density, harsher radiation exposure and, especially, much higher data acquisition bandwidth, such that equipping the tracker with triggering capabilities is envisaged. The design of an innovative detector involves deciding on an architecture offering the best trade-off among many figures of merit, such as tracking resolution, power dissipation, bandwidth, cost and so on. Quantitatively evaluating these figures of merit as early as possible in the design phase is of capital importance and it is best done with the aid of software models. tkLayout is a flexible modeling tool: new performance estimates and support for different detector geometries can be quickly added, thanks to its modular structure. Besides, the software executes very quickly (about two minutes), so that many possible architectural variations can be rapidly modeled and compared, to help in the choice of a viable detector layout and then to optimize it. A tracker geometry is generated from simple configuration files, defining the module types, layout and materials. Support structures are automatically added and services routed to provide a realistic tracker description. The tracker geometries thus generated can be exported to the standard CMS simulation framework (CMSSW) for full Monte Carlo studies. tkLayout has proven essential in giving guidance to CMS in studying different detector layouts and exploring the feasibility of innovative solutions for tracking detectors, in terms of design, performance and projected costs. This tool has been one of the keys to making important design decisions for over five years now and has also enabled project engineers

  5. Analysis of cellular response by exposure to acute or chronic radiation in human lymphoblastoid TK-6 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Yasumoto, J.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.

    To clarify the biological effects of low-dose rate radiation on human health for long-term stay in space, we analyzed the induction of apoptosis and apoptosis-related gene expression after irradiation with different dose-rate in human lymphoblastoid TK-6 cells harboring wild-type p53 gene. We irradiated TK-6 cells by X-ray at 1.5 Gy (1 Gy/min) and then sampled at 25 hr after culturing. We also irradiated by gamma-ray at 1.5 Gy (1 mGy/min) and then sampled immediately or 25 hr after irradiation. For DNA ladder analysis, we extracted DNA from these samples and electrophoresed with 2% agarose gel. In addition, we extracted mRNA from these samples for DNA-array analysis. mRNA from non-irradiated cells was used as a control. After labeling the cDNA against mRNA with [α -33P]-dCTP and hybridizing onto DNA array (Human Apoptosis Expression Array, R&D Systems), we scanned the profiles of the spots by a phosphorimager (BAS5000, FUJI FILM) and calculated using a NIH Image program. The data of each DNA-array were normalized with eight kinds of house keeping genes. We analyzed the expression level of apoptosis-related genes such as p53-related, Bcl-2 family, Caspase family and Fas-related genes. DNA ladders were obviously detected in the cells exposed to a high dose-rate radiation. We detected the induction of the gene expression of apoptosis-promotive genes. In contrast, almost no apoptosis was observed in the cells exposed to the chronic radiation at a low dose-rate. In addition, we detected the induction of the gene expression of apoptosis-suppressive genes as compared with apoptosis promotive-genes immediately after chronic irradiation. These results lead the importance of biological meaning of exposure to radiation at low dose-rate from an aspect of carcinogenesis. Finally, the effects of chronic irradiation become a highly important issue in space radiation biology for human health.

  6. Development and analysis of a transformation-defective mutant of Harvey murine sarcoma tk virus and its gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, M O; Hager, G L; Lowe, R; Scolnick, E M

    1985-01-01

    The Harvey murine sarcoma virus has been cloned and induces focus formation on NIH 3T3 cells. Recombinants of this virus have been constructed which include the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 in a downstream linkage with the p21 ras gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus. Harvey murine sarcoma tk virus rescued from cells transfected with this construct is both thymidine kinase positive and focus inducing in in vitro transmission studies. The hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine selectability of the thymidine kinase gene carried by this virus has been exploited to develop three mutants defective in the p21 ras sequence. All three are focus negative and thymidine kinase positive when transmitted to suitable cells. Of these, only one encodes a p22 that is immunologically related to p21. This mutant has been used to explore the relationship between the known characteristics of p21 and cellular transformation. Data presented herein indicate that the p21 of Harvey murine sarcoma virus consists of at least two domains, one which specifies the guanine nucleotide-binding activity of p21 and the other which is involved in p21-membrane association in transformed cells. Images PMID:2985821

  7. Responses of the L5178Y tk/sup +//tk/sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. II. 18 coded chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.; Cattanach, P.; Edwards, I.; McBride, D.; Caspary, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Eighteen chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L5178Y tk/sup +///sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay by the use of procedures based upon those described previously. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before plating in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 ..mu..g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Significant responses were obtained with benzofuran, benzyl chloride, bromodichloromethane, butylated hydroxytoluene, chlorendic acid, o-chlorobenzalmalonitrile, 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane, dimethyl formamide, dimethyl hydrogen phosphite, furfural, glutaraldehyde, hydroquinone, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and resorcinol. Apart from bromodichloromethane, butylated hydroxytoluene and dimethyl hydrogen phosphite, rat liver S9 mix was not a requirement for the activity of any of these compounds. Chemicals not identified as mutagens were water, tert-butyl alcohol, pyridine, and witch hazel.

  8. Crystal structure of a subtilisin homologue, Tk-SP, from Thermococcus kodakaraensis: requirement of a C-terminal beta-jelly roll domain for hyperstability.

    PubMed

    Foophow, Tita; Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2010-07-23

    Tk-SP is a hyperthermostable subtilisin-like serine protease from Thermococcus kodakaraensis and is autoprocessed from its precursor (Pro-Tk-SP) with N- and C-propeptides. The crystal structure of the active-site mutant of Pro-Tk-SP lacking C-propeptide, ProN-Tk-S359A, was determined at 2.0 A resolution. ProN-Tk-S359A consists of the N-propeptide, subtilisin, and beta-jelly roll domains. Two Ca(2+) ions bind to the beta-jelly roll domain. The overall structure of ProN-Tk-S359A without the beta-jelly roll domain is similar to that of the bacterial propeptide:subtilisin complex, except that it does not contain Ca(2+) ions. To analyze the role of the beta-jelly roll domain of Tk-SP, we constructed a series of the active-site mutants of Tk-SP with (Tk-S359A/C) and without (Tk-S359A/CDeltaJ) beta-jelly roll domain. Both Tk-S359C and Tk-S359CDeltaJ exhibited protease activities in gel assay, indicating that the beta-jelly roll domain is not required for folding or activity. However, the T(m) value of Tk-S359ADeltaJ determined by far-UV CD spectroscopy in the presence of 10-mM CaCl(2) was lower than that of Tk-S359A by 29.4 degrees C. The T(m) value of Tk-S359A was decreased by 29.5 degrees C by the treatment with 10 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, indicating that the beta-jelly roll domain contributes to the stabilization of Tk-S359A only in a Ca(2+)-bound form. Tk-SP highly resembles subtilisin-like serine proteases from Pyrococcus furiosus, Thermococcus gammatolerans, and Thermococcus onnurineus in size and amino acid sequence. We propose that attachment of a beta-jelly roll domain to the C-terminus is one of the strategies of the proteins from hyperthermophiles to adapt to high-temperature environment.

  9. Towards a consistent eddy-covariance processing: an intercomparison of EddyPro and TK3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, G.; Mauder, M.

    2014-07-01

    A comparison of two popular eddy-covariance software packages is presented, namely, EddyPro and TK3. Two approximately 1-month long test data sets were processed, representing typical instrumental setups (i.e., CSAT3/LI-7500 above grassland and Solent R3/LI-6262 above a forest). The resulting fluxes and quality flags were compared. Achieving a satisfying agreement and understanding residual discrepancies required several iterations and interventions of different nature, spanning from simple software reconfiguration to actual code manipulations. In this paper, we document our comparison exercise and show that the two software packages can provide utterly satisfying agreement when properly configured. Our main aim, however, is to stress the complexity of performing a rigorous comparison of eddy-covariance software. We show that discriminating actual discrepancies in the results from inconsistencies in the software configuration requires deep knowledge of both software packages and of the eddy-covariance method. In some instances, it may be even beyond the possibility of the investigator who does not have access to and full knowledge of the source code. Being the developers of EddyPro and TK3, we could discuss the comparison at all levels of details and this proved necessary to achieve a full understanding. As a result, we suggest that researchers are more likely to get comparable results when using EddyPro (v5.1.1) and TK3 (v3.11) - at least with the setting presented in this paper - than they are when using any other pair of EC software which did not undergo a similar cross-validation. As a further consequence, we also suggest that, to the aim of assuring consistency and comparability of centralized flux databases, and for a confident use of eddy fluxes in synthesis studies on the regional, continental and global scale, researchers only rely on software that have been extensively validated in documented intercomparisons.

  10. Improving the safety of cell therapy with the TK-suicide gene

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Raffaella; Oliveira, Giacomo; Stanghellini, Maria Teresa Lupo; Vago, Luca; Bondanza, Attilio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Cieri, Nicoletta; Marktel, Sarah; Mastaglio, Sara; Bordignon, Claudio; Bonini, Chiara; Ciceri, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    While opening new frontiers for the cure of malignant and non-malignant diseases, the increasing use of cell therapy poses also several new challenges related to the safety of a living drug. The most effective and consolidated cell therapy approach is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the only cure for several patients with high-risk hematological malignancies. The potential of allogeneic HSCT is strictly dependent on the donor immune system, particularly on alloreactive T lymphocytes, that promote the beneficial graft-versus-tumor effect (GvT), but may also trigger the detrimental graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). Gene transfer technologies allow to manipulate donor T-cells to enforce GvT and foster immune reconstitution, while avoiding or controlling GvHD. The suicide gene approach is based on the transfer of a suicide gene into donor lymphocytes, for a safe infusion of a wide T-cell repertoire, that might be selectively controlled in vivo in case of GvHD. The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) is the suicide gene most extensively tested in humans. Expression of HSV-TK in donor lymphocytes confers lethal sensitivity to the anti-herpes drug, ganciclovir. Progressive improvements in suicide genes, vector technology and transduction protocols have allowed to overcome the toxicity of GvHD while preserving the antitumor efficacy of allogeneic HSCT. Several phase I-II clinical trials in the last 20 years document the safety and the efficacy of HSV-TK approach, able to maintain its clear value over the last decades, in the rapidly progressing horizon of cancer cellular therapy. PMID:25999859

  11. A Zinc-Dependent Protease AMZ-tk from a Thermophilic Archaeon is a New Member of the Archaemetzincin Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Baolei; Li, Zhengqun; Liu, Jinliang; Sun, Ying; Jia, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Yuan Hu; Zhang, Jiayan; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-01-01

    A putative zinc-dependent protease (TK0512) in Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 shares a conserved motif with archaemetzincins, which are metalloproteases found in archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses showed that TK0512 and its homologues in Thermococcaceae represent new members in the archaemetzincins family, which we named AMZ-tk. We further confirmed its proteolytic activity biochemically by overexpression of the recombinant AMZ-tk in Escherichia coli and characterization of the purified enzyme. In the presence of zinc, the purified enzyme degraded casein, while adding EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. AMZ-tk also exhibited self-cleavage activity that required Zn2+. These results demonstrated that AMZ-tk is a zinc-dependent protease within the archaemetzincin family. The enzyme displayed activity at alkaline pHs ranging from 7.0 to 10.0, with the optimal pH being 8.0. The optimum temperature for the catalytic activity of AMZ-tk was 55°C. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that transcription of AMZ-tk was also up-regulated after exposing the cells to 55 and 65°C. Mutant analysis suggested that Zn2+ binding histidine and catalytic glutamate play key roles in proteolysis. AMZ-tk was thermostable on incubation for 4 h at 70°C in the presence of EDTA. AMZ-tk also retained >50% of its original activity in the presence of both laboratory surfactants and commercial laundry detergents. AMZ-tk further showed antibacterial activity against several bacteria. Therefore, AMZ-tk is of considerable interest for many purposes in view of its activity at alkaline pH, detergents, and thermostability. PMID:26733945

  12. A Zinc-Dependent Protease AMZ-tk from a Thermophilic Archaeon is a New Member of the Archaemetzincin Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Jia, Baolei; Li, Zhengqun; Liu, Jinliang; Sun, Ying; Jia, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Yuan Hu; Zhang, Jiayan; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-01-01

    A putative zinc-dependent protease (TK0512) in Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 shares a conserved motif with archaemetzincins, which are metalloproteases found in archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses showed that TK0512 and its homologues in Thermococcaceae represent new members in the archaemetzincins family, which we named AMZ-tk. We further confirmed its proteolytic activity biochemically by overexpression of the recombinant AMZ-tk in Escherichia coli and characterization of the purified enzyme. In the presence of zinc, the purified enzyme degraded casein, while adding EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. AMZ-tk also exhibited self-cleavage activity that required Zn(2+). These results demonstrated that AMZ-tk is a zinc-dependent protease within the archaemetzincin family. The enzyme displayed activity at alkaline pHs ranging from 7.0 to 10.0, with the optimal pH being 8.0. The optimum temperature for the catalytic activity of AMZ-tk was 55°C. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that transcription of AMZ-tk was also up-regulated after exposing the cells to 55 and 65°C. Mutant analysis suggested that Zn(2+) binding histidine and catalytic glutamate play key roles in proteolysis. AMZ-tk was thermostable on incubation for 4 h at 70°C in the presence of EDTA. AMZ-tk also retained >50% of its original activity in the presence of both laboratory surfactants and commercial laundry detergents. AMZ-tk further showed antibacterial activity against several bacteria. Therefore, AMZ-tk is of considerable interest for many purposes in view of its activity at alkaline pH, detergents, and thermostability. PMID:26733945

  13. B Plant canyon sample TK-21-1 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, F.H.

    1998-04-10

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for the TK-21-1 sample collected from the B Plant Canyon on February 18, 1998. The sample was analyzed in accordance with the Sampling and Analysis Plan for B Plant Solutions (SAP) (Simmons, 1997) in support of the B Plant decommissioning project. Samples were analyzed to provide data both to describe the material which would remain in the tanks after the B Plant transition is complete and to determine Tank Farm compatibility. The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1).

  14. Enzymatic activity of a subtilisin homolog, Tk-SP, from Thermococcus kodakarensis in detergents and its ability to degrade the abnormal prion protein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tk-SP is a member of subtilisin-like serine proteases from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. It has been known that the hyper-stable protease, Tk-SP, could exhibit enzymatic activity even at high temperature and in the presence of chemical denaturants. In this work, the enzymatic activity of Tk-SP was measured in the presence of detergents and EDTA. In addition, we focused to demonstrate that Tk-SP could degrade the abnormal prion protein (PrPSc), a protease-resistant isoform of normal prion protein (PrPC). Results Tk-SP was observed to maintain its proteolytic activity with nonionic surfactants and EDTA at 80°C. We optimized the condition in which Tk-SP functions efficiently, and demonstrated that the enzyme is highly stable in the presence of 0.05% (w/v) nonionic surfactants and 0.01% (w/v) EDTA, retaining up to 80% of its activity. Additionally, we also found that Tk-SP can degrade PrPSc to a level undetectable by western-blot analysis. Conclusions Our results indicate that Tk-SP has a great potential for technological applications, such as thermo-stable detergent additives. In addition, it is also suggested that Tk-SP-containing detergents can be developed to decrease the secondary infection risks of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). PMID:23448268

  15. Monitoring apoptosis of TK-GFP-expressing ACC-M cells induced by ACV using FRET technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Tao; Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Juqiang; Yang, Jie; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-09-01

    Apoptosis is an evolutionary conserved cellular process that plays an important role during development, but it is also involved in tissue homeostasis and in many diseases. To study the characteristics of suicide gene system of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene in tumor cells and explore the apoptosis phenomena in this system and its effect on the human adenoid cystic carcinoma line ACC-M cell, we detected apoptosis of CD3- (ECFP-CRS-DsRed) and TK-GFP-expressing ACC-M (ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3) cells induced by acyclovir (ACV) using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. CD3 is a FRET-based indicator for activity of caspase-3, which is composed of an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, a caspase-3 sensitive linker, and a red fluorescent protein from Discosoma with efficient maturation property. FRET from ECFP to DsRed could be detected in normal ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3 cells, and the FRET efficient was remarkably decreased and then disappeared during the cells apoptosis induced by ACV. It was due to the activated caspase-3 cleaved the CD3 fusion protein. In this study, the results suggested that the AVC-induced apoptosis of ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3 cells was through caspase-3 pathway.

  16. Monitoring apoptosis of TK-GFP-expressing ACC-M cells induced by ACV using FRET technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Tao; Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Juqiang; Yang, Jie; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-05-01

    Apoptosis is an evolutionary conserved cellular process that plays an important role during development, but it is also involved in tissue homeostasis and in many diseases. To study the characteristics of suicide gene system of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene in tumor cells and explore the apoptosis phenomena in this system and its effect on the human adenoid cystic carcinoma line ACC-M cell, we detected apoptosis of CD3- (ECFP-CRS-DsRed) and TK-GFP-expressing ACC-M (ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3) cells induced by acyclovir (ACV) using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. CD3 is a FRET-based indicator for activity of caspase-3, which is composed of an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, a caspase-3 sensitive linker, and a red fluorescent protein from Discosoma with efficient maturation property. FRET from ECFP to DsRed could be detected in normal ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3 cells, and the FRET efficient was remarkably decreased and then disappeared during the cells apoptosis induced by ACV. It was due to the activated caspase-3 cleaved the CD3 fusion protein. In this study, the results suggested that the ACV-induced apoptosis of ACC-M-TK-GFP-CD3 cells was through caspase-3 pathway.

  17. Design, synthesis and in vitro anti-proliferative activity of 4,6-quinazolinediamines as potent EGFR-TK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mowafy, Samar; Farag, Nahla A; Abouzid, Khaled A M

    2013-03-01

    4-Anilino-6-substituted-quinazolines were designed, synthesized and evaluated for EGFR-TK and tumor growth inhibitory activities. The target compounds were designed with enamine ester or urea moieties appended at the C-6 of quinazoline as additional hydrogen bond acceptor functions. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed potent EGFR-TK inhibitory activity at 10 μM and the 6-ureido-anilinoquinazoline derivative 7a showed IC50 value of 0.061 μM. Moreover, six compounds were tested by National Cancer Institute (NCI), USA for their anti-proliferative activity at 10 μM in full NCI 60 cell panel. Compound 7a was further assayed for five dose molar ranges in full NCI 60 cell panel and exhibited remarkable growth inhibitory activity pattern against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer EKVX (GI50 = 0.37 μM), NCI-H322M (GI50 = 0.36 μM), Renal Cancer A498 (GI50 = 0.46 μM), TK-10 (GI50 = 0.99 μM) and Breast Cancer MDA-MB-468 (GI50 = 1.096 μM) which are of high EGFR expression. Docking study was performed for the active compounds into ATP binding site of EGFR-TK which showed similar binding mode to gefitinib and additional binding with Cys-773 at the gatekeeper of EGFR-TK enzyme.

  18. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced apoptosis in TK6 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, W.; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1995-02-01

    Apoptosis has been measured in cells of the human TK6 lymphoblastoid cell line by recording the release of endonuclease-digested DNA from affected cells using flow cytometry. In asynchronously dividing cells, DNA degradation characteristic of apoptosis was first seen 12 h after irradiation as a defined DNA fluorescent peak of sub-G{sub 1}-phase content, reaching a maximum of 30-50% of the population by 24-72 h. Treating cells with 2 mM caffeine either before or up to 3 h after irradiation eliminated the degradation of DNA entirely. In addition, the percentage of cells in which apoptosis could be detected microscopically decreased from 62.4 {+-} 0.95% to 16.7 {+-} 1.5% 72 h after caffeine treatment. Delaying caffeine treatment for 12 h after irradiation reduced DNA degradation by approximately 50% compared to cells receiving radiation alone. DNA degradation induced by serum deprivation was unaffected by caffeine treatment. These data support the contention that irradiation of TK6 cells produces a long-lived cellular signal which triggers apoptosis. Apoptosis produced by serum deprivation does not operate through the same pathway. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  19. [Expression of 4"-O-isovaleryltransferase gene from Streptomyces thermotolerans in Streptomyces lividans TK24].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiahu; Zhong, Jingjing; Dai, Jianlu; Wang, Yiguang; Xia, Huanzhang; He, Weiqing

    2014-09-01

    4"-O-isovaleryltransferase gene (ist) was regulated by positive regulatory genes of midecamycin 4"-O-propionyltransferase gene (mpt) in Streptomyces lividans TK24. A BamH I ~8.0 kb fragment from Streptomyces mycarofaciens 1748 was proved that it contained mpt gene and linked with two positive regulatory genes, orf27 and orf28. Orf of mpt was replaced by orf of ist and linked with two regulatory genes or orf27 single, and individually cloned into the vectors pKC1139 or pWHM3 (high copy number), and then transformed into S. lividans TK24. The levels of mpt and ist expression were evaluated by the bio-tramsformation efficacy of spiramycin into 4"-O-acylspiramycins in these transformants. The results showed that 4"-O-isovalerylspiramycins could be detected only in the transformants containing the plasmids constructed with pWHM3. The efficacy of bio-transformation of the transformants containing two regulatory genes was higher than that of orf27 single. So, the positive regulatory genes system of mpt gene could enhance ist gene expression.

  20. Regulation of ppk expression and in vivo function of Ppk in Streptomyces lividans TK24.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Sofiane; Smirnov, Aleksey; Chouayekh, Hichem; Sperandio, Brice; Esnault, Catherine; Kormanec, Jan; Virolle, Marie-Joelle

    2006-09-01

    The ppk gene of Streptomyces lividans encodes an enzyme catalyzing, in vitro, the reversible polymerization of the gamma phosphate of ATP into polyphosphate and was previously shown to play a negative role in the control of antibiotic biosynthesis (H. Chouayekh and M. J. Virolle, Mol. Microbiol. 43:919-930, 2002). In the present work, some regulatory features of the expression of ppk were established and the polyphosphate content of S. lividans TK24 and the ppk mutant was determined. In Pi sufficiency, the expression of ppk was shown to be low but detectable. DNA gel shift experiments suggested that ppk expression might be controlled by a repressor using ATP as a corepressor. Under these conditions, short acid-soluble polyphosphates accumulated upon entry into the stationary phase in the wild-type strain but not in the ppk mutant strain. The expression of ppk under Pi-limiting conditions was shown to be much higher than that under Pi-sufficient conditions and was under positive control of the two-component system PhoR/PhoP. Under these conditions, the polyphosphate content of the cell was low and polyphosphates were reproducibly found to be longer and more abundant in the ppk mutant strain than in the wild-type strain, suggesting that Ppk might act as a nucleoside diphosphate kinase. In light of our results, a novel view of the role of this enzyme in the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. lividans TK24 is proposed.

  1. Wild Type p53 gene sensitizes rat C6 glioma cells to HSV-TK/ACV treatment in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiang; Xia, Zhibo; You, Yongping; Pu, Peiyu

    2010-12-01

    Suicide gene therapy using herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK)/ganciclovir (GCV), has been extensively tested for the treatment of glioma. Our previous study showed that exogenous wild type p53 (wt-p53) enhanced the anti-tumor effect of HSV-TK/GCV therapy. However, the use of GCV is hindered by its low penetration to the brain and its toxicity when used at higher dose. In the present study, we used another pro-drug, acyclovir (ACV), and examined the therapeutic efficacy of HSV-TK/ACV combining with wt-p53 in C6 glioma cells. We observed that wt-p53 combined with HSV-TK/ACV resulted in the super-additive anti-tumor effect in vitro. Exogenous wt-p53 significantly enhanced the sensitivity of TK positive C6 cells to ACV in vitro. Our in vivo experiment demonstrated that the effect of wt-p53 and HSV-TK/ACV combination therapy was better than that of HSV-TK/ACV alone. The survival time of tumor-bearing rats treated with wt-p53 in combination with HSV-TK/ACV was also significantly prolonged than those treated with HSV-TK/ACV alone. These results suggest that wt-p53 can enhance the therapeutic efficacy of HSV-TK/ACV both in vitro and in vivo. These findings are considerably valuable with the respect of using less toxic ACV as prodrug. This novel strategy could provide benefit to HSV-TK/prodrug gene therapy.

  2. Heterologous expression of human interleukin-6 in Streptomyces lividans TK24 using novel secretory expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Wang, Lifei; Du, Yu; Wang, Songmei; Yu, Tengfei; Hong, Bin

    2011-02-01

    Streptomyces is an attractive host for heterologous protein secretion. To further optimize its expression capacity, better expression vectors will be helpful. Here, based on pSGL1, a high copy number plasmid present in Streptomyces globisporus C-1027, we constructed a series of novel E. coli-Streptomyces shuttle expression vectors pIMB2-4. These vectors, which are compatible with pIJ-derived vectors, contain the strong promoter ermE*p and signal sequence SP (MelC1) of the first ORF of melanin operon in S. antibiotics (pIMB2), SP (CagA) of C-1027 apoprotein in S. globisporus C-1027 (pIMB3 and pIMB4). Using these vectors, human interleukin-6 (IL-6) could successfully be expressed and secreted using S. lividans TK24 as host. Furthermore, replacement of a rare leucine codon TTA with CTG in SP (CagA) enhanced IL-6 production.

  3. Auditing the TK and TPACK Confidence of Pre-Service Teachers: Are They Ready for the Profession?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamieson-Proctor, Romina; Finger, Glenn; Albion, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Teacher education graduates need appropriate levels of confidence and capabilities in relation to technological knowledge (TK) as a basis for having technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) to meet the challenges of learning and teaching in the 21st century. However, it should not be assumed that tomorrow's teachers enter the profession…

  4. Novel TK2 mutations as a cause of delayed muscle maturation in mtDNA depletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Termglinchan, Thanes; Hisamatsu, Seito; Ohmori, Junko; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Sumitomo, Noriko; Imataka, George; Arisaka, Osamu; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Minami, Narihiro; Akihiko, Ishiyama; Sasaki, Masayuki; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Nonaka, Ikuya; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-10-01

    Recessive mutations in TK2 cause a severe mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS),(1) characterized by severe myopathy from early infancy. Recent reports have suggested a wider clinical spectrum including encephalomyopathic form.(1,2) We report a patient with infantile-onset fatal encephalomyopathy presenting with extreme muscle fiber immaturity. PMID:27660820

  5. Histone and TK0471/TrmBL2 form a novel heterogeneous genome architecture in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hugo; Shin, Minsang; Oda, Toshiyuki; Matsumi, Rie; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L; Itoh, Takehiko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Yoshimura, Shige H; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-02-01

    Being distinct from bacteria and eukaryotes, Archaea constitute a third domain of living things. The DNA replication, transcription, and translation machineries of Archaea are more similar to those of eukaryotes, whereas the genes involved in metabolic processes show more similarity to their bacterial counterparts. We report here that TK0471/TrmB-like 2 (TrmBL2), in addition to histone, is a novel type of abundant chromosomal protein in the model euryarchaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis . The chromosome of T. kodakarensis can be separated into regions enriched either with histone, in which the genetic material takes on a “beads-on-a-string” appearance, or with TK0471/TrmBL2, in which it assumes a thick fibrous structure. TK0471/TrmBL2 binds to both coding and intergenic regions and represses transcription when bound to the promoter region. These results show that the archaeal chromosome is organized into heterogeneous structures and that TK0471/TrmBL2 acts as a general chromosomal protein as well as a global transcriptional repressor.

  6. Histone and TK0471/TrmBL2 form a novel heterogeneous genome architecture in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Hugo; Shin, Minsang; Oda, Toshiyuki; Matsumi, Rie; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L.; Itoh, Takehiko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Being distinct from bacteria and eukaryotes, Archaea constitute a third domain of living things. The DNA replication, transcription, and translation machineries of Archaea are more similar to those of eukaryotes, whereas the genes involved in metabolic processes show more similarity to their bacterial counterparts. We report here that TK0471/TrmB-like 2 (TrmBL2), in addition to histone, is a novel type of abundant chromosomal protein in the model euryarchaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. The chromosome of T. kodakarensis can be separated into regions enriched either with histone, in which the genetic material takes on a “beads-on-a-string” appearance, or with TK0471/TrmBL2, in which it assumes a thick fibrous structure. TK0471/TrmBL2 binds to both coding and intergenic regions and represses transcription when bound to the promoter region. These results show that the archaeal chromosome is organized into heterogeneous structures and that TK0471/TrmBL2 acts as a general chromosomal protein as well as a global transcriptional repressor. PMID:21148291

  7. Novel TK2 mutations as a cause of delayed muscle maturation in mtDNA depletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Termglinchan, Thanes; Hisamatsu, Seito; Ohmori, Junko; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Sumitomo, Noriko; Imataka, George; Arisaka, Osamu; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Minami, Narihiro; Akihiko, Ishiyama; Sasaki, Masayuki; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Nonaka, Ikuya; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-10-01

    Recessive mutations in TK2 cause a severe mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS),(1) characterized by severe myopathy from early infancy. Recent reports have suggested a wider clinical spectrum including encephalomyopathic form.(1,2) We report a patient with infantile-onset fatal encephalomyopathy presenting with extreme muscle fiber immaturity.

  8. The orbit of 2010 TK7: possible regions of stability for other Earth Trojan asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, R.; Lhotka, C.; Zhou, L.

    2012-05-01

    The first Earth Trojan has been observed and found to be on an interesting orbit close to the Lagrange point L4. In the present study, we therefore perform a detailed investigation of the stability of its orbit and moreover extend the study to give an idea of the probability of finding additional Earth Trojans. Our results are derived using three different approaches. In the first, we derive an analytical mapping in the spatial elliptic restricted three-body problem to find the phase space structure of the dynamical problem. We then explore the stability of the asteroid in the context of the phase space geometry, including the indirect influence of the additional planets of our Solar system. In the second approach, we use precise numerical methods to integrate the orbit forward and backward in time in different dynamical models. On the basis of a set of 400 clone orbits, we derive the probability of capture and escape of the Earth Trojan asteroid 2010 TK7. To this end, in the third approach we perform an extensive numerical investigation of the stability region of the Earth's Lagrangian points. We present a detailed parameter study of possible stable tadpole and horseshoe orbits of additional Earth Trojans, i.e. with respect to the semi-major axes and inclinations of thousands of fictitious Trojans. All three approaches lead to the conclusion that the Earth Trojan asteroid 2010 TK7 finds itself in an unstable region on the edge of a stable zone; additional Earth Trojan asteroids may be found in this regime of stability.

  9. Towards a consistent eddy-covariance processing: an intercomparison of EddyPro and TK3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, G.; Mauder, M.

    2014-03-01

    A comparison of two popular eddy-covariance (EC) software packages is presented, namely EddyPro and TK3. Two about one-month long test datasets were processed, representing typical instrumental setups, i.e. CSAT3/LI-7500 above grassland and Solent R3/LI-6262 above a forest. The resulting fluxes and quality flags were compared. Achieving a satisfying agreement and understanding residual discrepancies required several iterations and interventions of different nature, spanning from simple software reconfiguration to actual code manipulations. In this paper, we document our comparison exercise and show that the two software packages can provide utterly satisfying agreement when properly configured. Our main aim, however, is to stress the complexity of performing a rigorous comparison of EC software. We show that discriminating actual discrepancies in the results from inconsistencies in the software configuration requires deep knowledge of both software packages and of the eddy-covariance method itself. In some instances, it may be even beyond the possibility of the investigator who does not control the source code. Being the developers of EddyPro and TK3, we could discuss the comparison at all levels of details and this proved necessary to achieve a full understanding. As a further consequence, we also suggest that, to the aim of assuring consistency and comparability of centralized flux databases, and for a confident use of eddy fluxes in synthesis studies on the regional, continental and global scale, researchers rely on established software, notably those that have been extensively validated in documented intercomparisons.

  10. Effect of Chemical Mutagens and Carcinogens on Gene Expression Profiles in Human TK6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Godderis, Lode; Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E.; Tabish, Ali M.; Hoet, Peter; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.; Veulemans, Hendrik; McHale, Cliona M.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of toxicogenomic signatures of carcinogen exposure holds significant promise for mechanistic and predictive toxicology. In vitro transcriptomic studies allow the comparison of the response to chemicals with diverse mode of actions under controlled experimental conditions. We conducted an in vitro study in TK6 cells to characterize gene expression signatures of exposure to 15 genotoxic carcinogens frequently used in European industries. We also examined the dose-responsive changes in gene expression, and perturbation of biochemical pathways in response to these carcinogens. TK6 cells were exposed at 3 dose levels for 24 h with and without S9 human metabolic mix. Since S9 had an impact on gene expression (885 genes), we analyzed the gene expression data from cells cultures incubated with S9 and without S9 independently. The ribosome pathway was affected by all chemical-dose combinations. However in general, no similar gene expression was observed among carcinogens. Further, pathways, i.e. cell cycle, DNA repair mechanisms, RNA degradation, that were common within sets of chemical-dose combination were suggested by clustergram. Linear trends in dose–response of gene expression were observed for Trichloroethylene, Benz[a]anthracene, Epichlorohydrin, Benzene, and Hydroquinone. The significantly altered genes were involved in the regulation of (anti-) apoptosis, maintenance of cell survival, tumor necrosis factor-related pathways and immune response, in agreement with several other studies. Similarly in S9+ cultures, Benz[a]pyrene, Styrene and Trichloroethylene each modified over 1000 genes at high concentrations. Our findings expand our understanding of the transcriptomic response to genotoxic carcinogens, revealing the alteration of diverse sets of genes and pathways involved in cellular homeostasis and cell cycle control. PMID:22723965

  11. Histone markers identify the mode of action for compounds positive in the TK6 micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jennifer R; Dickinson, Donna A; Moss, Jocelyn; Schuler, Maik J; Spellman, Richard A; Heard, Pamela L

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro micronucleus assay with TK6 cells is frequently used as part of the genotoxicity testing battery for pharmaceuticals. Consequently, follow-up testing strategies are needed for positive compounds to determine their mode of action, which would then allow for deployment of appropriate in vivo follow-up strategies. We have chosen 3 micronucleus positive compounds, the clastogen etoposide, the aneugen noscapine and the cytotoxicant tunicamycin to evaluate different approaches to determine their aneugenic or clastogenic properties. Each of the three compounds were evaluated following 4 and 24h of continuous treatment by flow cytometry for micronucleus induction, the aneugenicity markers phosphorylated-histone 3 (p-H3) and polyploidy, the clastogenicity marker γH2AX and the apoptosis marker cleaved caspase 3. They were further evaluated by Western blot for mono-ubiquitinated and γH2AX. Results show that the clastogen etoposide produced a dose related increase in γH2AX and mono-ubiquitinated H2AX and a dose related decrease in p-H3 positive mitotic cells. Conversely, the aneugen produced increases in p-H3 and polyploidy with no significant increases seen in mono-ubiquitinated H2AX or γH2AX. Lastly, the cytotoxicant tunicamycin induced neither an increase in p-H3 nor γH2AX. All three compounds produced dose-related increases in cleaved caspase 3. The results from this study provide evidence that adding clastogenicity and aneugenicity markers to the in vitro micronucleus assay in TK6 cells could help to identify the mode of action of positive compounds. The combination of endpoints suggested here needs to be further evaluated by a broader set of test compounds. PMID:25726170

  12. Complete genome sequence of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus type strain (TK-6T)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeytun, Ahmet; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Ubler, Susanne; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Wirth, Reinhard; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenobacter thermophilus Kawasumi et al. 1984 is the type species of the genus Hydrogenobacter. H. thermophilus was the first obligate autotrophic organism reported among aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Strain TK-6T is of interest because of the unusually efficient hydrogen-oxidizing ability of this strain, which results in a faster generation time compared to other autotrophs. It is also able to grow anaerobically using nitrate as an electron acceptor when molecular hydrogen is used as the energy source, and able to aerobically fix CO2 via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. This is the fifth completed genome sequence in the family Aquificaceae, and the second genome sequence determined from a strain derived from the original isolate. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,742,932 bp long genome with its 1,899 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Deletion of xylR gene enhances expression of xylose isomerase in Streptomyces lividans TK24.

    PubMed

    Heo, Gun-Young; Kim, Won-Chan; Joo, Gil-Jae; Kwak, Yun-Young; Shin, Jae-Ho; Roh, Dong-Hyun; Park, Heui-Dong; Rhee, In-Koo

    2008-05-01

    Glucose (xylose) isomerases from Streptomyces sp. have been used for the production of high fructose corn syrup for industrial purposes. An 11-kb DNA fragment containing the xyl gene cluster was isolated from Streptomyces lividans TK24 and its nucleotide sequences were analyzed. It was found that the xyl gene cluster contained a putative transcriptional repressor (xylR), xylulokinase (xylB), and xylose isomerase (xylA) genes. The transcriptional directions of the xylB and xylA genes were divergent, which is consistent to those found in other streptomycetes. A gene encoding XylR was located downstream of the xylB gene in the same direction, and its mutant strain produced xylose isomerase regardless of xylose in the media. The enzyme expression level in the mutant was 4.6 times higher than that in the parent strain under xylose-induced condition. Even in the absence of xylose, the mutant strain produce over 60% of enzyme compared with the xylose-induced condition. Gel mobility shift assay showed that XylR was able to bind to the putative xyl promoter, and its binding was inhibited by the addition of xylose in vitro. This result suggested that XylR acts as a repressor in the S. lividans xylose operon.

  14. Coupling cytotoxicity biomarkers with DNA damage assessment in TK6 human lymphoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Springer, Sandra; Escobar, Patricia

    2010-02-01

    There is considerable discussion within the scientific community as to the appropriate measures of cytotoxicity to use when deciding on the maximum concentration of a substance to test in vitro for its ability to induce DNA damage using the Comet assay. Conventional cytotoxicity assessment methods, such as trypan blue dye exclusion or relative cell number (cell counts) may not be the most biologically relevant measurement for cytotoxicity in this assay. Thus, we evaluated for decreased levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and activation of Caspase-3/7 as well as relative cell number and trypan blue exclusion in order to understand the correlation among test compound concentration, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity outcomes in the Comet assay. We tested two non-genotoxic and non-cytotoxic compounds (d-glucose and ethanol), two non-genotoxic but cytotoxic compounds (2,4-dichlorophenol and tunicamycin) and four genotoxic and cytotoxic compounds (methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, etoposide and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide) in TK6 human lymphoblast cells. Our data show that measuring ATP and Caspase-3/7 levels provides more rapid and perhaps more biologically relevant measures of cytotoxicity compared with trypan blue dye exclusion and relative cell number. Furthermore, incorporating these two assays into the Comet assay also provided insight on the cytotoxic mode of action of the chemicals tested. By extrapolation, such assays may also be useful in other in vitro genotoxicity assays. PMID:20100597

  15. TK3 eBook software to author, distribute, and use electronic course content for medical education.

    PubMed

    Morton, David A; Foreman, K Bo; Goede, Patricia A; Bezzant, John L; Albertine, Kurt H

    2007-03-01

    The methods for authoring and distributing course content are undergoing substantial changes due to advancement in computer technology. Paper has been the traditional method to author and distribute course content. Paper enables students to personalize content through highlighting and note taking but does not enable the incorporation of multimedia elements. Computers enable multimedia content but lack the capability of the user to personalize the content. Therefore, we investigated TK3 eBooks as a potential solution to incorporate the benefits of both paper and computer technology. The objective of our study was to assess the utility of TK3 eBooks in the context of authoring and distributing dermatology course content for use by second-year medical students at the University of Utah School of Medicine during the spring of 2004. We incorporated all dermatology course content into TK3 eBook format. TK3 eBooks enable students to personalize information through tools such as "notebook," "hiliter," "stickies," mark pages, and keyword search. Students were given the course content in both paper and eBook formats. At the conclusion of the dermatology course, students completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the eBooks compared with paper. Students perceived eBooks as an effective way to distribute course content and as a study tool. However, students preferred paper over eBooks to take notes during lecture. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that eBooks provide a convenient method for authoring, distributing, and using course content but that students preferred paper to take notes during lecture.

  16. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhendong; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li; Li, Pengfei

    2009-09-04

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  17. Characteristics of genomic instability in clones of TK6 human lymphoblasts surviving exposure to 56Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, Mireya; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Genomic instability in the human lymphoblast cell line TK6 was studied in clones surviving 36 generations after exposure to accelerated 56Fe ions. Clones were assayed for 20 characteristics, including chromosome aberrations, plating efficiency, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequency at two loci. The primary effect of the 56Fe-ion exposure on the surviving clones was a significant increase in the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations compared to the very low spontaneous frequency, along with an increase in the phenotypic complexity of the unstable clones. The radiation-induced increase in the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations was much greater than that observed previously in clones of the related cell line, WTK1, which in comparison to the TK6 cell line expresses an increased radiation resistance, a mutant TP53 protein, and an increased frequency of spontaneous unstable chromosome aberrations. The characteristics of the unstable clones of the two cell lines also differed. Most of the TK6 clones surviving exposure to 56Fe ions showed unstable cytogenetic abnormalities, while the phenotype of the WTK1 clones was more diverse. The results underscore the importance of genotype in the characteristics of instability after radiation exposure.

  18. Altered levels of the Taraxacum kok-saghyz (Russian dandelion) small rubber particle protein, TkSRPP3, result in qualitative and quantitative changes in rubber metabolism.

    PubMed

    Collins-Silva, Jillian; Nural, Aise Taban; Skaggs, Amanda; Scott, Deborah; Hathwaik, Upul; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen; McMahan, Colleen; Whalen, Maureen; Cornish, Katrina; Shintani, David

    2012-07-01

    Several proteins have been identified and implicated in natural rubber biosynthesis, one of which, the small rubber particle protein (SRPP), was originally identified in Hevea brasiliensis as an abundant protein associated with cytosolic vesicles known as rubber particles. While previous in vitro studies suggest that SRPP plays a role in rubber biosynthesis, in vivo evidence is lacking to support this hypothesis. To address this issue, a transgene approach was taken in Taraxacum kok-saghyz (Russian dandelion or Tk) to determine if altered SRPP levels would influence rubber biosynthesis. Three dandelion SRPPs were found to be highly abundant on dandelion rubber particles. The most abundant particle associated SRPP, TkSRPP3, showed temporal and spatial patterns of expression consistent with patterns of natural rubber accumulation in dandelion. To confirm its role in rubber biosynthesis, TkSRPP3 expression was altered in Russian dandelion using over-expression and RNAi methods. While TkSRPP3 over-expressing lines had slightly higher levels of rubber in their roots, relative to the control, TkSRPP3 RNAi lines showed significant decreases in root rubber content and produced dramatically lower molecular weight rubber than the control line. Not only do results here provide in vivo evidence of TkSRPP proteins affecting the amount of rubber in dandelion root, but they also suggest a function in regulating the molecular weight of the cis-1, 4-polyisoprene polymer.

  19. TK Modeler version 1.0, a Microsoft® Excel®-based modeling software for the prediction of diurnal blood/plasma concentration for toxicokinetic use.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Alene T; Bartels, Michael J; Rick, David L; Saghir, Shakil A

    2012-07-01

    TK Modeler 1.0 is a Microsoft® Excel®-based pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling program created to aid in the design of toxicokinetic (TK) studies. TK Modeler 1.0 predicts the diurnal blood/plasma concentrations of a test material after single, multiple bolus or dietary dosing using known PK information. Fluctuations in blood/plasma concentrations based on test material kinetics are calculated using one- or two-compartment PK model equations and the principle of superposition. This information can be utilized for the determination of appropriate dosing regimens based on reaching a specific desired C(max), maintaining steady-state blood/plasma concentrations, or other exposure target. This program can also aid in the selection of sampling times for accurate calculation of AUC(24h) (diurnal area under the blood concentration time curve) using sparse-sampling methodologies (one, two or three samples). This paper describes the construction, use and validation of TK Modeler. TK Modeler accurately predicted blood/plasma concentrations of test materials and provided optimal sampling times for the calculation of AUC(24h) with improved accuracy using sparse-sampling methods. TK Modeler is therefore a validated, unique and simple modeling program that can aid in the design of toxicokinetic studies.

  20. Induction of centrosome amplification by formaldehyde, but not hydroquinone, in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiying; McHale, Cliona M; Bersonda, Jessica; Tung, Judy; Smith, Martyn T; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-07-01

    Benzene and formaldehyde (FA) are important industrial chemicals and environmental pollutants that cause leukemia by inducing DNA damage and chromosome aberrations in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the target cells for leukemia. Our previous studies showed that workers exposed to benzene and FA exhibit increased levels of aneuploidy in their blood cells. As centrosome amplification is a common phenomenon in human cancers, including leukemia, and is associated with aneuploidy in carcinogenesis, we hypothesized that benzene and FA would induce centrosome amplification in vitro. We treated human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells with a range of concentrations of hydroquinone (HQ, a benzene metabolite) or FA for 24 h, allowed the cells to recover in fresh medium for 24 h, and examined centrosome amplification; chromosomal gain, loss, and breakage; and cytotoxicity. We included melphalan and etoposide, chemotherapeutic drugs that cause therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and that have been shown to induce centrosome amplification as well as chromosomal aneuploidy and breakage, as positive controls. Melphalan and etoposide induced centrosome amplification and chromosome gain and breakage in a dose-dependent manner, at cytotoxic concentrations. HQ, though cytotoxic, did not induce centrosome amplification or any chromosomal aberration. FA-induced centrosome amplification and cytotoxicity, but did not induce chromosomal aberrations. Our data suggest, for the first time, that centrosome amplification is a potential mechanism underlying FA-induced leukemogenesis, but not benzene-induced leukemogenesis, as mediated through HQ. Future studies are needed to delineate the mechanisms of centrosome amplification and its association with DNA damage, chromosomal aneuploidy and carcinogenesis, following exposure to FA.

  1. Mitochondrial permeability and toxicity of diethylhexyl and monoethylhexyl phthalates on TK6 human lymphoblasts cells.

    PubMed

    Rosado-Berrios, Carlos A; Vélez, Christian; Zayas, Beatriz

    2011-12-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous compounds used in the manufacturing industry. Some are known endocrine disruptors, acting as xenoestrogens, others induce reproductive toxicity and damage to DNA among other effects. Studies on apoptosis induction and mitochondrial damage capacity of phthalates on the immune system are limited. This study aims to determine cell viability inhibition and apoptosis induction of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) on the human TK6 lymphoblast cell line at concentrations found in the environment. Key hallmark events, such as mitochondrial membrane permeability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of caspase 3 and 7 were measured. Concentrations that inhibit viability of 50% (IC50) of the cells were determined at 24, 48 and 72 h with doses ranging from 10 to 500 μM. Changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability, ROS generation and activation of caspases 3 and 7, were measured as part of the cell death mechanism. The IC50 at 24 h was approximately 250 μM for both phthalates; at 48 h were 234 and 196 μM for DEHP and MEHP, respectively and at 72 h IC50s were 100 and 80 μM for DEHP and MEHP, respectively. Overall the longer the time of exposure the lower the IC50's for both compounds. Both compounds affected mitochondrial membrane potential, promoted ROS generation and activated caspases 3 and 7. MEHP is more toxic, promotes higher level of ROS production and caspases activation. Our findings suggest that DEHP and MEHP have the capacity to induce apoptosis in cells of the immune system at concentrations found in the environment.

  2. Purification and biological evaluation of the metabolites produced by Streptomyces sp. TK-VL_333.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Alapati; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra

    2010-06-01

    An Actinobacterium strain isolated from laterite soils of the Guntur region was identified as Streptomyces sp. TK-VL_333 by 16S rRNA analysis. Cultural, morphological and physiological characteristics of the strain were recorded. The secondary metabolites produced by the strain cultured on galactose-tyrosine broth were extracted and concentrated followed by defatting of the crude extract with cyclohexane to afford polar and non-polar residues. Purification of the two residues by column chromatography led to isolation of five polar and one non-polar fraction. Bioactivity- guided fractions were rechromatographed on a silica gel column to obtain four compounds, namely 1H-indole-3-carboxylic acid, 2,3-dihydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl) benzaldehyde, 4-(4-hydroxyphenoxy) butan-2-one and acetic acid-2-hydroxy-6-(3-oxo-butyl)-phenyl ester from three active polar fractions and 8-methyl decanoic acid from one non-polar fraction. The structure of the compounds was elucidated on the basis of FT-IR, mass and NMR spectroscopy. The antimicrobial activity of the bioactive compounds produced by the strain was tested against the bacteria and fungi and expressed in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration. Antifungal activity of indole-3-carboxylic acid was further evaluated under in vitro and in vivo conditions. This is the first report of 2,3-dihydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl) benzaldehyde, 4-(4-hydroxyphenoxy) butan-2-one, acetic acid-2-hydroxy-6-(3-oxo-butyl)-phenyl ester and 8-methyl decanoic acid from the genus Streptomyces. PMID:20403429

  3. Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated with drug efficiency and clinical performance among VEGFR TK inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    McTigue, Michele; Murray, Brion William; Chen, Jeffrey H.; Deng, Ya-Li; Solowiej, James; Kania, Robert S.

    2012-09-17

    We performed analyses of compounds in clinical development which have shown that ligand efficient-molecules with privileged physical properties and low dose are less likely to fail in the various stages of clinical testing, have fewer postapproval withdrawals, and are less likely to receive black box safety warnings. However, detailed side-by-side examination of molecular interactions and properties within single drug classes are lacking. As a class, VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR TKIs) have changed the landscape of how cancer is treated, particularly in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is molecularly linked to the VEGF signaling axis. Despite the clear role of the molecular target, member molecules of this validated drug class exhibit distinct clinical efficacy and safety profiles in comparable renal cell carcinoma clinical studies. The first head-to-head randomized phase III comparative study between active VEGFR TKIs has confirmed significant differences in clinical performance [Rini BI, et al. (2011) Lancet 378:193–1939]. To elucidate how fundamental drug potency–efficiency is achieved and impacts differentiation within the VEGFR TKI class, we determined potencies, time dependence, selectivities, and X-ray structures of the drug–kinase complexes using a VEGFR2 TK construct inclusive of the important juxtamembrane domain. Collectively, the studies elucidate unique drug–kinase interactions that are dependent on distinct juxtamembrane domain conformations, resulting in significant potency and ligand efficiency differences. Finally, the identified structural trends are consistent with in vitro measurements, which translate well to clinical performance, underscoring a principle that may be broadly applicable to prospective drug design for optimal in vivo performance.

  4. Purification and biological evaluation of the metabolites produced by Streptomyces sp. TK-VL_333.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Alapati; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra

    2010-06-01

    An Actinobacterium strain isolated from laterite soils of the Guntur region was identified as Streptomyces sp. TK-VL_333 by 16S rRNA analysis. Cultural, morphological and physiological characteristics of the strain were recorded. The secondary metabolites produced by the strain cultured on galactose-tyrosine broth were extracted and concentrated followed by defatting of the crude extract with cyclohexane to afford polar and non-polar residues. Purification of the two residues by column chromatography led to isolation of five polar and one non-polar fraction. Bioactivity- guided fractions were rechromatographed on a silica gel column to obtain four compounds, namely 1H-indole-3-carboxylic acid, 2,3-dihydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl) benzaldehyde, 4-(4-hydroxyphenoxy) butan-2-one and acetic acid-2-hydroxy-6-(3-oxo-butyl)-phenyl ester from three active polar fractions and 8-methyl decanoic acid from one non-polar fraction. The structure of the compounds was elucidated on the basis of FT-IR, mass and NMR spectroscopy. The antimicrobial activity of the bioactive compounds produced by the strain was tested against the bacteria and fungi and expressed in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration. Antifungal activity of indole-3-carboxylic acid was further evaluated under in vitro and in vivo conditions. This is the first report of 2,3-dihydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl) benzaldehyde, 4-(4-hydroxyphenoxy) butan-2-one, acetic acid-2-hydroxy-6-(3-oxo-butyl)-phenyl ester and 8-methyl decanoic acid from the genus Streptomyces.

  5. Selective in vitro replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ICP34.5 null mutants in primary human CNS tumours--evaluation of a potentially effective clinical therapy.

    PubMed Central

    McKie, E. A.; MacLean, A. R.; Lewis, A. D.; Cruickshank, G.; Rampling, R.; Barnett, S. C.; Kennedy, P. G.; Brown, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    Primary tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) are an important cause of cancer-related deaths in adults and children. CNS tumours are mostly glial cell in origin and are predominantly astrocytomas. Conventional therapy of high-grade gliomas includes maximal resection followed by radiation treatment. The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy provides little improvement in survival time and hence assessment of novel therapies is imperative. We have evaluated the potential therapeutic use of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) mutant 1716 in the treatment of primary brain tumours. The mutant is deleted in the RL1 gene and fails to produce the virulence factor ICP34.5. 1716 replication was analysed in both established human glioma cell lines and in primary cell cultures derived from human tumour biopsy material. In the majority of cultures, virus replication occurred and consequential cell death resulted. In the minority of tumour cell lines which are non-permissive for mutant replication, premature shut-off of host cell protein synthesis was induced in response to lack of expression of ICP34.5. Hence RL1-negative mutants have the distinct advantage of providing a double hit phenomenon whereby cell death could occur by either pathway. Moreover, 1716, by virtue of its ability to replicate selectively within a tumour cell, has the potential to deliver a 'suicide' gene product to the required site immediately. It is our opinion that HSV which fails to express ICP34.5 could provide an effective tumour therapy. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8795577

  6. Fine-resolution analysis of products of intrachromosomal homeologous recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D; Waldman, A S

    1997-01-01

    Mouse Ltk- cell lines that contained a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (tk) gene with a 16-bp insertion mutation linked to either a defective HSV-2 tk gene or a hybrid tk sequence comprised of HSV-1 and HSV-2 tk sequences were constructed. HSV-1 and HSV-2 tk genes have 81% nucleotide identity and hence are homeologous. Correction of the insertion mutant HSV-1 tk gene via recombination with the hybrid tk sequence required an exchange between homeologous tk sequences, although recombination could initiate within a region of significant sequence identity. Seven cell lines containing linked HSV-1 and HSV-1-HSV-2 hybrid tk sequences gave rise to tk+ segregants at an average rate of 10(-8) events per cell division. DNA sequencing revealed that each recombinant from these lines displayed an apparent gene conversion which involved an accurate transfer of an uninterrupted block of information between homeologous tk sequences. Conversion tract lengths ranged from 35 to >330 bp. In contrast, cell lines containing linked HSV-1 and HSV-2 tk sequences with no significant stretches of sequence identity had an overall rate of homeologous recombination of <10(-9). One such cell line produced homeologous recombinants at a rate of 10(-8). Strikingly, all homeologous recombinants from this latter cell line were due to crossovers between the HSV-1 and HSV-2 tk genes. Our results, which provide the first detailed analysis of homeologous recombination within a mammalian genome, suggest that rearrangements in mammalian genomes are regulated by the degree of sequence divergence located at the site of recombination initiation. PMID:9199296

  7. Integration of metabolic activation with a predictive toxicogenomics signature to classify genotoxic versus nongenotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Buick, Julie K.; Moffat, Ivy; Williams, Andrew; Swartz, Carol D.; Recio, Leslie; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Li, Heng‐Hong; Fornace, Albert J.; Aubrecht, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated approaches in genetic toxicology, including the incorporation of gene expression data to determine the molecular pathways involved in the response, is becoming more common. In a companion article, a genomic biomarker was developed in human TK6 cells to classify chemicals as genotoxic or nongenotoxic. Because TK6 cells are not metabolically competent, we set out to broaden the utility of the biomarker for use with chemicals requiring metabolic activation. Specifically, chemical exposures were conducted in the presence of rat liver S9. The ability of the biomarker to classify genotoxic (benzo[a]pyrene, BaP; aflatoxin B1, AFB1) and nongenotoxic (dexamethasone, DEX; phenobarbital, PB) agents correctly was evaluated. Cells were exposed to increasing chemical concentrations for 4 hr and collected 0 hr, 4 hr, and 20 hr postexposure. Relative survival, apoptosis, and micronucleus frequency were measured at 24 hr. Transcriptome profiles were measured with Agilent microarrays. Statistical modeling and bioinformatics tools were applied to classify each chemical using the genomic biomarker. BaP and AFB1 were correctly classified as genotoxic at the mid‐ and high concentrations at all three time points, whereas DEX was correctly classified as nongenotoxic at all concentrations and time points. The high concentration of PB was misclassified at 24 hr, suggesting that cytotoxicity at later time points may cause misclassification. The data suggest that the use of S9 does not impair the ability of the biomarker to classify genotoxicity in TK6 cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the biomarker is also able to accurately classify genotoxicity using a publicly available dataset derived from human HepaRG cells. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:520–534, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25733247

  8. Amino acid uptake profiling of wild type and recombinant Streptomyces lividans TK24 batch fermentations.

    PubMed

    D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Lule, Ivan; Van Hove, Sven; Vercammen, Dominique; Wouters, Christine; Bernaerts, Kristel; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2011-04-10

    Streptomyces lividans is considered an interesting host for the secretory production of heterologous proteins. To obtain a good secretion yield of heterologous proteins, the availability of suitable nitrogen sources in the medium is required. Often, undefined mixtures of amino acids are used to improve protein yields. However, the understanding of amino acid utilization as well as their contribution to the heterologous protein synthesis is poor. In this paper, amino acid utilization by wild type and recombinant S. lividans TK24 growing on a minimal medium supplemented with casamino acids is profiled by intensive analysis of the exometabolome (metabolic footprint) as a function of time. Dynamics of biomass, substrates, by-products and heterologous protein are characterized, analyzed and compared. As an exemplary protein mouse Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (mTNF-α) is considered. Results unveil preferential glutamate and aspartate assimilation, together with glucose and ammonium, but the associated high biomass growth rate is unfavorable for protein production. Excretion of organic acids as well as alanine is observed. Pyruvate and alanine overflow point at an imbalance between carbon and nitrogen catabolism and biosynthetic fluxes. Lactate secretion is probably related to clump formation. Heterologous protein production induces a slowdown in growth, denser clump formation and a shift in metabolism, as reflected in the altered substrate requirements and overflow pattern. Besides glutamate and aspartate, most amino acids are catabolized, however, their exact contribution in heterologous protein production could not be seized from macroscopic quantities. The metabolic footprints presented in this paper provide a first insight into the impact and relevance of amino acids on biomass growth and protein production. Type and availability of substrates together with biomass growth rate and morphology affect the protein secretion efficiency and should be optimally controlled

  9. A development of chimeric VEGFR2 TK inhibitor based on two ligand conformers from PDB: 1Y6A complex--medicinal chemistry consequences of a TKs analysis.

    PubMed

    Lintnerová, Lucia; García-Caballero, Melissa; Gregáň, Fridrich; Melicherčík, Milan; Quesada, Ana R; Dobiaš, Juraj; Lác, Ján; Sališová, Marta; Boháč, Andrej

    2014-01-24

    VEGFR2 is an important mediator of angiogenesis and influences fate of some cancer stem cells. Here we analysed all 34 structures of VEGFR2 TK available from PDB database. From them a complex PDB: 1Y6A has an exceptional AAZ ligand bound to TK in form of two conformers (U- and S-shaped). This observation inspired us to develop three chimeric bispyridyl VEGFR2 inhibitors by combining structural features of both AAZ conformers and/or their relative ligand AAX (PDB: 1Y6B). Our most interesting inhibitor 22SYM has an enzymatic VEGFR2 TK activity (IC50: 15.1 nM) comparable or better to the active compounds from clinical drugs Nexavar and Sutent. 22SYM inhibits growth, migration and tube formation of endothelial cells (EC) and selectively induces EC apoptosis. 22SYM also inhibits in vivo angiogenesis in Zebrafish embryo assay. Additionally to the above results, we proved here that tyrosine kinases in an inactive form possessing Type I inhibitors can adopt both a closed or an opened conformation of kinase A-loop independently on their DFG-out arrangement. We proposed here that an activity of certain Type I inhibitors (e.g. 22SYM-like) in complex with DFG-out TK can be negatively influenced by collisions with a dynamically moving TK A-loop.

  10. The Anti-Tumor Effects of Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transduced with HSV-Tk Gene on U-87-Driven Brain Tumor

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Suely Maymone; Bittencourt, Simone; Ferrazoli, Enéas Galdini; da Silva, Clivandir Severino; da Cunha, Flavia Franco; da Silva, Flavia Helena; Stilhano, Roberta Sessa; Denapoli, Priscila Martins Andrade; Zanetti, Bianca Ferrarini; Martin, Priscila Keiko Matsumoto; Silva, Leonardo Martins; dos Santos, Adara Aurea; Baptista, Leandra Santos; Longo, Beatriz Monteiro; Han, Sang Won

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an infiltrative tumor that is difficult to eradicate. Treating GBM with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that have been modified with the HSV-Tk suicide gene has brought significant advances mainly because MSCs are chemoattracted to GBM and kill tumor cells via a bystander effect. To use this strategy, abundantly present adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) were evaluated for the treatment of GBM in mice. AT-MSCs were prepared using a mechanical protocol to avoid contamination with animal protein and transduced with HSV-Tk via a lentiviral vector. The U-87 glioblastoma cells cultured with AT-MSC-HSV-Tk died in the presence of 25 or 50 μM ganciclovir (GCV). U-87 glioblastoma cells injected into the brains of nude mice generated tumors larger than 3.5 mm2 after 4 weeks, but the injection of AT-MSC-HSV-Tk cells one week after the U-87 injection, combined with GCV treatment, drastically reduced tumors to smaller than 0.5 mm2. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tumors showed the presence of AT-MSC-HSV-Tk cells only within the tumor and its vicinity, but not in other areas of the brain, showing chemoattraction between them. The abundance of AT-MSCs and the easier to obtain them mechanically are strong advantages when compared to using MSCs from other tissues. PMID:26067671

  11. Characterization of Mre11 Loss Following HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Devon A.; Bachenheimer, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus induces the activation of the cellular DNA double strand break response pathway dependent upon initiation of viral DNA replication. The MRN complex, consisting of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1, is an essential component of the DNA double strand break response and other reports have documented its presence at sites of viral DNA replication, interaction with ICP8, and its contribution to efficient viral DNA replication. During our characterization of the DSB response following infection of normal human fibroblasts and telomerase-immortalized keratinocytes, we observed the loss of Mre11 protein at late times following infection. The loss was not dependent upon ICP0, the proteasome, or lysosomal protease activity. Like activation of the DSB response pathway, Mre11 loss was prevented under conditions which inhibited viral DNA replication. Analysis of a series of mutant viruses with defects in cleavage and packaging (UL6, UL15, UL17, UL25, UL28, UL32) of viral DNA or in the maturational protease (UL26), failed to identify a viral gene product necessary for Mre11 loss. Inactivation of ATM, a key effector kinase in the DNA double strand break response, had no effect on Mre11 loss and only a moderate effect on HSV yield. Finally, treatment of uninfected cells with the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin, to induce generation of free DNA ends, also resulted in Mre11 loss. These results suggest that Mre11 loss following infection is caused by the generation of free DNA ends during or following viral DNA replication. PMID:18177684

  12. Brain resistance to HSV-1 encephalitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Altavilla, G; Calistri, A; Cavaggioni, A; Favero, M; Mucignat-Caretta, C; Palù, G

    2002-06-01

    Brain resistance to intracerebral superinfections develops after a peripheral inoculation of neurovirulent viruses. Superinfection resistance combines specificity, toward the virus used for the peripheral inoculum, and short-term duration after the inoculum. In order to study this unusual combination, neurovirulent superinfections were made on albino Swiss mice previously infected with a nasal inoculum. A herpesvirus strain SC16, or a homologue recombinant virus carrying the reporter lac Z gene or a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) (a virus taxonomically unrelated to Herpesviridae) were used. The mice underwent a neurological examination and their survival rate was recorded. The brains superinfected with the reporter virus were stained for the beta-galactosidase reaction to trace the virus spread and the inflammatory infiltrates were characterized immunocytochemically. The results confirm and extend previous observations about virus specificity and short-term duration of superinfection resistance. They show, moreover, an enhanced brain inflammation with T-cells and macrophages infiltrating the tissue around microvessels, at a time when both neurovirulence and the spread of herpesvirus in the brain are reduced. The results suggest that the immune response to superinfection in the nervous tissue is enhanced by blood-brain barrier mechanisms that promote the timely extravasation of immune cells.

  13. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(cip1/waf1) enhances the cytotoxicity of ganciclovir in HSV-tk transfected ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ziller, Christelle; Lincet, Hubert; Muller, Christian D; Staedel, Cathy; Behr, Jean-Paul; Poulain, Laurent

    2004-08-20

    Suicide gene therapy could be an attractive addition to the treatment of ovarian carcinomas, for which acquired chemoresistance frequently results in treatment failure. Here we show that transfection of the HSV-tk gene, followed by incubation with up to 1 mM ganciclovir fails to induce cell death in SKOV3 chemoresistant human ovarian carcinoma cells. However, co-transfection of HSV-tk with Cip1/Waf1 encoding the p21(cip1/waf1) inhibitor of cdks, allows 100 microM ganciclovir to eradicate the population of tumor cells. Potentiation of a drug by co-transfer of HSV-tk with Cip1/Waf1could thus represent another therapeutic approach for tumours that are resistant to conventional therapy. PMID:15246560

  14. Radioimmunoassay for herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    McGuirt, P.V.; Keller, P.M.; Elion, G.B.

    1982-01-30

    A sensitive RIA for HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) has been developed. This assay is based on competition for the binding site of a rabbit antibody against purified HSV-1 TK, between a purified /sup 3/H-labeled HSV-1 TK and a sample containing an unknown amount of viral TK. The assay is capable of detecting 8 ng or more of the HSV enzyme. Purified HSV-1 TK denatured to <1% of its original kinase activity is as effective in binding to the antibody as is native HSV-1 TK. Viral TK is detectable at ranges of 150-460 ng/mg protein of cell extract from infected cells or cells transformed by HSV or HSV genetic material. HSV-2 TK appears highly cross-reactive, VZV TK is slightly less so, and the vaccinia TK shows little or no cross-reactivity. This RIA may serve as a tool for monitoring the expression of the HSV TK during an active herpes virus infection, a latent ganglionic infection, or in neoplastic cells which may have arisen by viral transformation.

  15. MUTANT FREQUENCIES AND LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY INDUCED BY N-ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA (ENU) IN THE THYMIDINE KINASE (TK) GENE OF L5178YTK+/-3.7.2C MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MUTANT FREQUENCIES AND LOSS HETEROZYGOSITY INDUCED BY N-ETHYK-N-NITROSOUREA (ENU) IN THE THYMIDINE KINASE (tk) GENE IF l5178Y/TK+/-3.7.2C MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) is a potent monofunctional-ethylating agent that has been found to be mutagenic in a w...

  16. Evaluation of a lipopeptide biosurfactant from Bacillus natto TK-1 as a potential source of anti-adhesive, antimicrobial and antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiao-Hong; Liao, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Chun-Ling; Yang, Wen-Yan; Lu, Mei-Fang

    2009-01-01

    A lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus natto TK-1 has a strong surface activity. The biosurfactant was found to be an anti-adhesive agent against several bacterial strains, and also showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. The biosurfactant induced a significant reduction in tumor cells viability in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24031375

  17. SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY N-ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK AND HPRT GENES OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemicals that are capable of inducing mutational damages. The Tk+/- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wider range of mutational events than the X-linked Hprt locus. However, chemical-induced muta...

  18. How TK-TD and population models for aquatic macrophytes could support the risk assessment for plant protection products.

    PubMed

    Hommen, Udo; Schmitt, Walter; Heine, Simon; Brock, Theo Cm; Duquesne, Sabine; Manson, Phil; Meregalli, Giovanna; Ochoa-Acuña, Hugo; van Vliet, Peter; Arts, Gertie

    2016-01-01

    This case study of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) workshop MODELINK demonstrates the potential use of mechanistic effects models for macrophytes to extrapolate from effects of a plant protection product observed in laboratory tests to effects resulting from dynamic exposure on macrophyte populations in edge-of-field water bodies. A standard European Union (EU) risk assessment for an example herbicide based on macrophyte laboratory tests indicated risks for several exposure scenarios. Three of these scenarios are further analyzed using effect models for 2 aquatic macrophytes, the free-floating standard test species Lemna sp., and the sediment-rooted submerged additional standard test species Myriophyllum spicatum. Both models include a toxicokinetic (TK) part, describing uptake and elimination of the toxicant, a toxicodynamic (TD) part, describing the internal concentration-response function for growth inhibition, and a description of biomass growth as a function of environmental factors to allow simulating seasonal dynamics. The TK-TD models are calibrated and tested using laboratory tests, whereas the growth models were assumed to be fit for purpose based on comparisons of predictions with typical growth patterns observed in the field. For the risk assessment, biomass dynamics are predicted for the control situation and for several exposure levels. Based on specific protection goals for macrophytes, preliminary example decision criteria are suggested for evaluating the model outputs. The models refined the risk indicated by lower tier testing for 2 exposure scenarios, while confirming the risk associated for the third. Uncertainties related to the experimental and the modeling approaches and their application in the risk assessment are discussed. Based on this case study and the assumption that the models prove suitable for risk assessment once fully evaluated, we recommend that 1) ecological scenarios be developed that are also

  19. How TK-TD and population models for aquatic macrophytes could support the risk assessment for plant protection products.

    PubMed

    Hommen, Udo; Schmitt, Walter; Heine, Simon; Brock, Theo Cm; Duquesne, Sabine; Manson, Phil; Meregalli, Giovanna; Ochoa-Acuña, Hugo; van Vliet, Peter; Arts, Gertie

    2016-01-01

    This case study of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) workshop MODELINK demonstrates the potential use of mechanistic effects models for macrophytes to extrapolate from effects of a plant protection product observed in laboratory tests to effects resulting from dynamic exposure on macrophyte populations in edge-of-field water bodies. A standard European Union (EU) risk assessment for an example herbicide based on macrophyte laboratory tests indicated risks for several exposure scenarios. Three of these scenarios are further analyzed using effect models for 2 aquatic macrophytes, the free-floating standard test species Lemna sp., and the sediment-rooted submerged additional standard test species Myriophyllum spicatum. Both models include a toxicokinetic (TK) part, describing uptake and elimination of the toxicant, a toxicodynamic (TD) part, describing the internal concentration-response function for growth inhibition, and a description of biomass growth as a function of environmental factors to allow simulating seasonal dynamics. The TK-TD models are calibrated and tested using laboratory tests, whereas the growth models were assumed to be fit for purpose based on comparisons of predictions with typical growth patterns observed in the field. For the risk assessment, biomass dynamics are predicted for the control situation and for several exposure levels. Based on specific protection goals for macrophytes, preliminary example decision criteria are suggested for evaluating the model outputs. The models refined the risk indicated by lower tier testing for 2 exposure scenarios, while confirming the risk associated for the third. Uncertainties related to the experimental and the modeling approaches and their application in the risk assessment are discussed. Based on this case study and the assumption that the models prove suitable for risk assessment once fully evaluated, we recommend that 1) ecological scenarios be developed that are also

  20. A combination hepatoma-targeted therapy based on nanotechnology: pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/131I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Jiang, Xingmao; Zhang, Jia; Yu, Hong; Ye, Jun; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Combination targeted therapy is a promising cancer therapeutic strategy. Here, using PEI-Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles (PEI-MZF-NPs) as magnetic media for MFH (magnetic fluid hyperthermia) and gene transfer vector for gene-therapy, a combined therapy, pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/131I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH, for hepatoma is developed. AntiAFPMcAb (Monoclonal antibody AFP) is exploited for targeting. The plasmids pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK are achieved by incorporation of pEgr1-HSV-TK and pHRE-Egr1-EGFP. Restriction enzyme digestion and PCR confirm the recombinant plasmids pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK are successfully constructed. After exposure to the magnetic field, PEI-MZF-NPs/pHRE-Egr1-EGFP fluid is warmed rapidly and then the temperature is maintained at 43 °C or so, which is quite appropriate for cancer treatment. The gene expression reaches the peak when treated with 200 μCi 131I for 24 hours, indicating that the dose of 200 μCi might be the optimal dose for irradiation and 24 h irradiation later is the best time to initiate MFH. The in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/131I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH can greatly suppress hepatic tumor cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis and necrosis and effectively inhibit the tumor growth, much better than any monotherapy does alone. Furthermore, the combination therapy has few or no adverse effects. It might be applicable as a strategy to treat hepatic cancer. PMID:27642033

  1. A combination hepatoma-targeted therapy based on nanotechnology: pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/131I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Jiang, Xingmao; Zhang, Jia; Yu, Hong; Ye, Jun; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-09-01

    Combination targeted therapy is a promising cancer therapeutic strategy. Here, using PEI-Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles (PEI-MZF-NPs) as magnetic media for MFH (magnetic fluid hyperthermia) and gene transfer vector for gene-therapy, a combined therapy, pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/131I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH, for hepatoma is developed. AntiAFPMcAb (Monoclonal antibody AFP) is exploited for targeting. The plasmids pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK are achieved by incorporation of pEgr1-HSV-TK and pHRE-Egr1-EGFP. Restriction enzyme digestion and PCR confirm the recombinant plasmids pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK are successfully constructed. After exposure to the magnetic field, PEI-MZF-NPs/pHRE-Egr1-EGFP fluid is warmed rapidly and then the temperature is maintained at 43 °C or so, which is quite appropriate for cancer treatment. The gene expression reaches the peak when treated with 200 μCi 131I for 24 hours, indicating that the dose of 200 μCi might be the optimal dose for irradiation and 24 h irradiation later is the best time to initiate MFH. The in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/131I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH can greatly suppress hepatic tumor cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis and necrosis and effectively inhibit the tumor growth, much better than any monotherapy does alone. Furthermore, the combination therapy has few or no adverse effects. It might be applicable as a strategy to treat hepatic cancer.

  2. A combination hepatoma-targeted therapy based on nanotechnology: pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/(131)I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Jiang, Xingmao; Zhang, Jia; Yu, Hong; Ye, Jun; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Combination targeted therapy is a promising cancer therapeutic strategy. Here, using PEI-Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles (PEI-MZF-NPs) as magnetic media for MFH (magnetic fluid hyperthermia) and gene transfer vector for gene-therapy, a combined therapy, pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/(131)I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH, for hepatoma is developed. AntiAFPMcAb (Monoclonal antibody AFP) is exploited for targeting. The plasmids pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK are achieved by incorporation of pEgr1-HSV-TK and pHRE-Egr1-EGFP. Restriction enzyme digestion and PCR confirm the recombinant plasmids pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK are successfully constructed. After exposure to the magnetic field, PEI-MZF-NPs/pHRE-Egr1-EGFP fluid is warmed rapidly and then the temperature is maintained at 43 °C or so, which is quite appropriate for cancer treatment. The gene expression reaches the peak when treated with 200 μCi (131)I for 24 hours, indicating that the dose of 200 μCi might be the optimal dose for irradiation and 24 h irradiation later is the best time to initiate MFH. The in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/(131)I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH can greatly suppress hepatic tumor cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis and necrosis and effectively inhibit the tumor growth, much better than any monotherapy does alone. Furthermore, the combination therapy has few or no adverse effects. It might be applicable as a strategy to treat hepatic cancer.

  3. A combination hepatoma-targeted therapy based on nanotechnology: pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/(131)I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Jiang, Xingmao; Zhang, Jia; Yu, Hong; Ye, Jun; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Combination targeted therapy is a promising cancer therapeutic strategy. Here, using PEI-Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles (PEI-MZF-NPs) as magnetic media for MFH (magnetic fluid hyperthermia) and gene transfer vector for gene-therapy, a combined therapy, pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/(131)I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH, for hepatoma is developed. AntiAFPMcAb (Monoclonal antibody AFP) is exploited for targeting. The plasmids pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK are achieved by incorporation of pEgr1-HSV-TK and pHRE-Egr1-EGFP. Restriction enzyme digestion and PCR confirm the recombinant plasmids pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK are successfully constructed. After exposure to the magnetic field, PEI-MZF-NPs/pHRE-Egr1-EGFP fluid is warmed rapidly and then the temperature is maintained at 43 °C or so, which is quite appropriate for cancer treatment. The gene expression reaches the peak when treated with 200 μCi (131)I for 24 hours, indicating that the dose of 200 μCi might be the optimal dose for irradiation and 24 h irradiation later is the best time to initiate MFH. The in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that pHRE-Egr1-HSV-TK/(131)I-antiAFPMcAb-GCV/MFH can greatly suppress hepatic tumor cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis and necrosis and effectively inhibit the tumor growth, much better than any monotherapy does alone. Furthermore, the combination therapy has few or no adverse effects. It might be applicable as a strategy to treat hepatic cancer. PMID:27642033

  4. Attenuation of Vaccinia Tian Tan Strain by Removal of Viral TC7L-TK2L and TA35R Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shifu; Wang, Yuhang; Sun, Lili; Jia, Peng; Qi, Yanxin; Su, Jiaqiang; Liu, Lei; Yang, Guohua; Liu, Liming; Wang, Zhuoyue; Wang, Jinhui; Liu, Guangchen; Jin, Ningyi; Li, Xiao; Ding, Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was attenuated by deletion of the TC7L-TK2L and TA35R genes to generate MVTT3. The mutant was generated by replacing the open reading frames by a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) flanked by loxP sites. Viruses expressing EGFP were then screened for and purified by serial plaque formation. In a second step the marker EGFP gene was removed by transfecting cells with a plasmid encoding cre recombinase and selecting for viruses that had lost the EGFP phenotype. The MVTT3 mutant was shown to be avirulent and immunogenic. These results support the conclusion that TC7L-TK2L and TA35R deletion mutants can be used as safe viral vectors or as platform for vaccines. PMID:22363781

  5. Attenuation of vaccinia Tian Tan strain by removal of viral TC7L-TK2L and TA35R genes.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shifu; Wang, Yuhang; Sun, Lili; Jia, Peng; Qi, Yanxin; Su, Jiaqiang; Liu, Lei; Yang, Guohua; Liu, Liming; Wang, Zhuoyue; Wang, Jinhui; Liu, Guangchen; Jin, Ningyi; Li, Xiao; Ding, Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was attenuated by deletion of the TC7L-TK2L and TA35R genes to generate MVTT3. The mutant was generated by replacing the open reading frames by a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) flanked by loxP sites. Viruses expressing EGFP were then screened for and purified by serial plaque formation. In a second step the marker EGFP gene was removed by transfecting cells with a plasmid encoding cre recombinase and selecting for viruses that had lost the EGFP phenotype. The MVTT3 mutant was shown to be avirulent and immunogenic. These results support the conclusion that TC7L-TK2L and TA35R deletion mutants can be used as safe viral vectors or as platform for vaccines.

  6. Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect in Human Lymphoblastoid TK6 Cells Following [13C2]-Acetaldehyde Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Swenberg, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The dose-response relationship for biomarkers of exposure (N2-ethylidene-dG adducts) and effect (cell survival and micronucleus formation) was determined across 4.5 orders of magnitude (50nM–2mM) using [13C2]-acetaldehyde exposures to human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells for 12h. There was a clear increase in exogenous N 2-ethylidene-dG formation at exposure concentrations ≥ 1µM, whereas the endogenous adducts remained nearly constant across all exposure concentrations, with an average of 3.0 adducts/107 dG. Exogenous adducts were lower than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≤ 10µM and were greater than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≥ 250µM. When the endogenous and exogenous adducts were summed together, statistically significant increases in total adduct formation over the endogenous background occurred at 50µM. Cell survival and micronucleus formation were monitored across the exposure range and statistically significant decreases in cell survival and increases in micronucleus formation occurred at ≥ 1000µM. This research supports the hypothesis that endogenously produced reactive species, including acetaldehyde, are always present and constitute the majority of the observed biological effects following very low exposures to exogenous acetaldehyde. These data can replace default assumptions of linear extrapolation to very low doses of exogenous acetaldehyde for risk prediction. PMID:23425604

  7. Noninvolvement of the X chromosome in radiation-induced chromosome translocations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization procedures were used to examine the influence of chromosome locus on the frequency and type of chromosome aberrations induced by [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Aberrations involving the X chromosome were compared to those involving the similarly sized autosome chromosome 7. When corrected for DNA content, acentric fragments were induced with equal frequency in the X and 7 chromosomes. Dose-dependent increases in chromosomal interchanges involving chromosome 7 were noted, and the frequencies of balanced translocations and dicentrics produced were approximately equal. Chromosome interchanges involving the X chromosome were rare and showed no apparent dose dependence. Thus, while chromosomes 7 and X are equally sensitive to the induction of chromosome breaks, the X chromosome is much less likely to interact with autosomes than chromosome 7. The noninvolvement of the X chromosome in translocations with autosomes may reflect a more peripheral and separate location for the X chromosome in the mammalian nucleus. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Heterologous production of paromamine in Streptomyces lividans TK24 using kanamycin biosynthetic genes from Streptomyces kanamyceticus ATCC12853.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Keshav Kumar; Oh, Tae-Jin; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2009-05-31

    The 2-deoxystreptamine and paromamine are two key intermediates in kanamycin biosynthesis. In the present study, pSK-2 and pSK-7 recombinant plasmids were constructed with two combinations of genes: kanABK and kanABKF and kacA respectively from kanamycin producer Streptomyces kanamyceticus ATCC12853. These plasmids were heterologously expressed into Streptomyces lividans TK24 independently and generated two recombinant strains named S. lividans Sk-2/SL and S. lividans SK-7/SL, respectively. ESI/ MS and ESI-LC/MS analysis of the metabolite from S. lividans SK-2/SL showed that the compound had a molecular mass of 163 [M + H]+, which corresponds to that of 2-deoxystreptamine. ESI/MS and MS/MS analysis of metabolites from S. lividans SK-7/SL demonstrated the production of paromamine with a molecular mass of 324 [M + H]+. In this study, we report the production of paromamine in a heterologous host for the first time. This study will evoke to explore complete biosynthetic pathways of kanamycin and related aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  9. Development and analysis of a transformation-defective mutant of Harvey murine sarcoma tk virus and its gene product.

    PubMed

    Weeks, M O; Hager, G L; Lowe, R; Scolnick, E M

    1985-05-01

    The Harvey murine sarcoma virus has been cloned and induces focus formation on NIH 3T3 cells. Recombinants of this virus have been constructed which include the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 in a downstream linkage with the p21 ras gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus. Harvey murine sarcoma tk virus rescued from cells transfected with this construct is both thymidine kinase positive and focus inducing in in vitro transmission studies. The hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine selectability of the thymidine kinase gene carried by this virus has been exploited to develop three mutants defective in the p21 ras sequence. All three are focus negative and thymidine kinase positive when transmitted to suitable cells. Of these, only one encodes a p22 that is immunologically related to p21. This mutant has been used to explore the relationship between the known characteristics of p21 and cellular transformation. Data presented herein indicate that the p21 of Harvey murine sarcoma virus consists of at least two domains, one which specifies the guanine nucleotide-binding activity of p21 and the other which is involved in p21-membrane association in transformed cells.

  10. Latent acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 in trigeminal ganglia of immunocompetent individuals.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Monique; van Loenen, Freek B; Meesters, Roland J W; de Graaf, Miranda; Remeijer, Lies; Luider, Theo M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2012-05-15

    Specific mutations within the hypervariable herpes simplex virus (HSV) gene thymidine kinase (TK) gene lead to acyclovir (ACV) resistance. To uncover the existence of latent ACV-resistant (ACV(R)) HSV-1, we determined the genetic and functional variability of the HSV-1 TK gene pool in paired trigeminal ganglia (TG) of 5 immunocompetent individuals. The latent virus pool consisted of a donor-specific HSV-1 quasispecies, including one major ACV-sensitive (ACV(S)) and multiple phylogenetic-related minor ACV(S) and ACV(R) TK variants. Contrary to minor variants, major TK variants were shared between paired TG. The data demonstrate the coexistence of phylogenetic-related ACV(S) and ACV(R) latent HSV-1 in human TG.

  11. Development and use of an in vitro HSV-tk forward mutation assay to study eukaryotic DNA polymerase processing of DNA alkyl lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, K A; Hile, S E; Vargo, P L

    1997-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro DNA polymerase forward mutation assay using damaged DNA templates that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene. The quantitative method uses complementary strand hybridization to gapped duplex DNA molecules and chloramphenicol selection. This design ensures exclusive analysis of mutations derived from the DNA strand produced during in vitro synthesis. We have examined the accuracy of DNA synthesis catalyzed by calf thymus polymerase alpha-primase, polymerase beta and exonuclease-deficient Klenow polymerase. Using unmodified DNA templates, polymerase beta displays a unique specificity for the loss of two bases in a dinucleotide repeat sequence within the HSV-tk locus. Treatment of the DNA template with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis concomitant with an increased mutation frequency. Similar dose-response curves were measured for the three polymerases examined; thus the identity of the DNA polymerase does not appear to affect the mutagenic potency of ethyl lesions. The HSV-tk system is unique in that damage-induced mutagenesis can be analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively in human cells, in bacterial cells and in in vitro DNA synthesis reactions at a single target sequence. PMID:9060443

  12. Safety and immunogenicity of a gE/gI/TK gene-deleted pseudorabies virus variant expressing the E2 protein of classical swine fever virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jian-Lin; Xia, Shui-Li; Wang, Yimin; Du, Mingliang; Xiang, Guang-Tao; Cong, Xin; Luo, Yuzi; Li, Lian-Feng; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Hu, Yonghao; Qiu, Hua-Ji; Sun, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) and pseudorabies (PR) are both major infectious diseases of pigs, causing enormous economic losses to the swine industry in many countries. A marker vaccine that enables differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) is highly desirable for control and eradication of these two diseases in endemic areas. Since late 2011, PR outbreaks have been frequently reported in many Bartha-K61-vaccinated pig farms in China. It has been demonstrated that a pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant with altered antigenicity and increased pathogenicity was responsible for the outbreaks. Previously, we showed that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI/TK, a gE/gI/TK-deleted PRV variant, was safe for susceptible animals and provided a complete protection against lethal PRV variant challenge, indicating that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI/TK can be used as an attractive vaccine vector. To develop a safe bivalent vaccine against CSF and PR, we generated a recombinant virus rPRVTJ-delgE/gI/TK-E2 expressing the E2 protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) based on rPRVTJ-delgE/gI/TK and evaluated its safety and immunogenicity in pigs. The results indicated that pigs (n=5) immunized with rPRVTJ-delgE/gI/TK-E2 of different doses did not exhibit clinical signs or viral shedding following immunization, the immunized pigs produced anti-PRV or anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies and the pigs immunized with 10(6) or 10(5) TCID50 rPRVTJ-delgE/gI/TK-E2 were completely protected against the lethal challenge with either CSFV Shimen strain or variant PRV TJ strain. These findings suggest that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI/TK-E2 is a promising bivalent DIVA vaccine candidate against CSFV and PRV coinfections. PMID:27113530

  13. Characterization of a novel highly thermostable esterase from the Gram-positive soil bacterium Streptomyces lividans TK64.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baojuan; Wang, Ao; Cao, Zhengyu; Zhu, Guoping

    2016-05-01

    A novel esterase gene (estW) from soil bacterium Streptomyces lividans TK64 was successfully cloned using a pair of homologous primers. The estW gene encoded a protein (EstW) of 289 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 31.43 kDa. Sequence alignment revealed that EstW show relatively high levels of homology to other lipolytic enzymes characterized from Streptomyces and phylogenetic analysis suggested EstW belongs to the bacterial lipase/esterase family I. The estW gene was expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity. The purified EstW was characterized via hydrolysis of various p-nitrophenyl esters and the best substrate was found to be p-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPA). Maximal activity of the recombinant protein was observed at pH 8.0 and 50 °C with pNPA as the substrate. The calculated activation energy (Ea ) of the esterase reaction was 9.12 kcal/mol. Half-life of EstW at 95 °C was approximately 12.5 H, making it the most thermostable esterase among all of the known lipolytic enzymes from Streptomyces, and the thermostability of EstW was similar to those of some enzymes characterized from the thermophilic bacteria. EstW exhibited relatively high tolerance to several detergents and required no cations for its maximal activity. The unique properties of EstW, namely its high thermostability and stability in the presence of organic solvents, may render it a potential candidate for industrial applications.

  14. Validation of a high throughput flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay including assessment of metabolic activation in TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Thougaard, Annemette V; Christiansen, Joan; Mow, Tomas; Hornberg, Jorrit J

    2014-12-01

    Genotoxicity is an unacceptable property for new drug candidates and we employ three screening assays during the drug discovery process to identify genotoxicity early and optimize chemical series. One of these methods is the flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay for which protocol optimizations have been described recently. Here, we report further validation of the assay in TK6 cells including assessment of metabolic activation. We first optimized assay conditions to allow for testing with and without metabolic activation in parallel in a 96-well plate format. Then, we tested a set of 48 compounds carefully selected to contain known in vivo genotoxins, nongenotoxins and drugs. Avoidance of irrelevant positives, a known issue with mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays, is important to prevent early deselection of potentially promising compounds. Therefore, we enriched the validation set with compounds that were previously reported to produce irrelevant positive results in mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays. The resulting dataset was used to set the relevant cut-off values for scoring a compound positive or negative, such that we obtained an optimal balance of high sensitivity (88%) and high specificity (87%). Finally, we tested an additional set of 16 drugs to further probe assay performance and 14 of them were classified correctly. To our knowledge, the present study is the most comprehensive validation of the in vitro flow cytometric micronucleus assay and the first to report parallel assessment with metabolic activation in reasonable throughput. The assay allows for rapidly screening novel compounds for genotoxicity and is therefore well-suited for use in early drug discovery projects. Environ.

  15. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging on a Cuda-Enabled Mobile Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatica, M.; Philllips, E.

    2014-12-01

    This talk will present the details of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging on the smallest CUDA-capable platform available, the Jetson TK1. The results indicate that GPU accelerated embedded platforms have considerable potential for this type of workload and in conjunction with low power consumption, light weight and standard programming tools, could open new horizons in the embedded space.

  16. Integration of metabolic activation with a predictive toxicogenomics signature to classify genotoxic versus non-genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Buick, Julie K.; Moffat, Ivy; Williams, Andrew; Swartz, Carol D.; Recio, Leslie; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Li, Heng-Hong; Fornace, Albert J.; Aubrecht, Jiri; Yauk, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated approaches in genetic toxicology, including the incorporation of gene expression data to determine the molecular pathways involved in the response, is becoming more common. In a companion paper, a genomic biomarker was developed in human TK6 cells to classify chemicals as genotoxic or non-genotoxic. Because TK6 cells are not metabolically competent, we set out to broaden the utility of the biomarker for use with chemicals requiring metabolic activation. Specifically, chemical exposures were conducted in the presence of rat liver S9. The ability of the biomarker to classify genotoxic (benzo[a]pyrene, BaP; aflatoxin B1, AFB1) and non-genotoxic (dexamethasone, DEX; phenobarbital, PB) agents correctly was evaluated. Cells were exposed to increasing chemical concentrations for 4h and collected 0h, 4h and 20h post-exposure. Relative survival, apoptosis, and micronucleus frequency were measured at 24h. Transcriptome profiles were measured with Agilent microarrays. Statistical modeling and bioinformatics tools were applied to classify each chemical using the genomic biomarker. BaP and AFB1 were correctly classified as genotoxic at the mid- and high concentrations at all three time points, whereas DEX was correctly classified as non-genotoxic at all concentrations and time points. The high concentration of PB was misclassified at 24h, suggesting that cytotoxicity at later time points may cause misclassification. The data suggest that the use of S9 does not impair the ability of the biomarker to classify genotoxicity in TK6 cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the biomarker is also able to accurately classify genotoxicity using a publicly available dataset derived from human HepaRG cells. PMID:25733247

  17. Identification of a novel fumarase C from Streptomyces lividans TK54 as a good candidate for L-malate production.

    PubMed

    Su, Rui-Rui; Wang, Ao; Hou, Song-Tao; Gao, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping; Wang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Fumarase is a key enzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of fumarate to L-malate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This reaction has been extensively utilized for industrial applications in producing L-malate. In this study, a fumarase C gene from Streptomyces lividans TK54 (slFumC) was cloned and expressed as a fused protein (SlFumC) in Escherichia coli. The molecular mass of SlFumC was about 49 kDa determined by SDS-PAGE. Kinetic studies showed that the K m value of SlFumC for L-malate increased by approximately 8.5-fold at pH 6.5 (6.7 ± 0.81 mM) to 8.0 (57.0 ± 1.12 mM), which was higher than some known fumarases. The catalytic efficiency (k cat) and the specific activity increased by about 9.5-fold at pH 6.5 (65 s(-1)) to 8.0 (620 s(-1)) and from 79 U/mg at pH 6.5 to 752 U/mg at pH 8.0, respectively. Therefore, SlFumC may acquire strong catalytic ability by increasing pH to partially compensate for the loss of substrate affinity. The enzyme also showed substrate inhibition phenomenon, which is pH-dependent. Specific activity of SlFumC was gradually enhanced with increasing phosphate concentrations. However, no inhibition was observed at high concentration of phosphate ion, which was distinctly different in case of other Class II fumarases. In industrial process, the reaction temperatures for L-malate production are usually set between 40 and 60 °C. The recombinant SlFumC displayed maximal activity at 45 °C and remained over 85 % of original activity after 48 h incubation at 40 °C, which was more thermostable than other fumarases from Streptomyces and make it an efficient enzyme for use in the industrial production of L-malate.

  18. Development of novel epidermal growth receptor-basedradiopharmaceuticals: Imaging agents for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Brocklin, Henry F.

    2001-09-25

    The goal of this research was to develop epidermal growthfactor receptor (EGFR) nuclear medicine breast cancer imaging agents. Ourapproach was to synthesize small molecule inhibitors of the EGFR tyrosinekinase (tk) suitable for labeling with single photon or positron-emittingradioisotopes and evaluate the imaging potential of these new molecules.We have synthesized and fully characterized 22 quinazoline compounds. Allcompounds inhibit EGFR tk phosphorylation activity in the nanomolarrange. All compounds tested exhibited specificity for the EGFR tk versusthe ErbB2 and ErbB4 tyrosine kinases. A radiometric binding assay usingan iodine-125 labeled quinazoline was developed to determine the affinityof the quinazolines for the EGFR tk ATP binding site. The affinitiesranged from 0.4-51 nM. The octanol/water partition coefficients (Log P;lipophilicity) of the new compounds ranged from 2.2-5.5. Six compoundshave been labeled with fluorine-18. Biodistribution in EGFRoverexpressing tumor bearing mice demonstrated tumor uptake buthighlighted delivery and metabolism issues. The 2-fluoro quinazoline wasnot metabolized in an in vitro hepatocyte study. From this work a breadthof agent characteristics was created establishing the foundation forfuture research toward the optimal EGFR imaging agent.

  19. Differential ganciclovir-mediated cell killing by glutamine 125 mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Drake, R R; Wilbert, T N; Hinds, T A; Gilbert, K M

    1999-12-24

    The therapeutic combination of the herpesvirus simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (TK) gene and the prodrug, ganciclovir (GCV), has found great utility for the treatment of many types of cancer. After initial phosphorylation of GCV by HSV-1 TK, cellular kinases generate the toxic GCV-triphosphate metabolite that is incorporated into DNA and eventually leads to tumor cell death. The cellular and pharmacological mechanisms by which metabolites of GCV lead to cell death are still poorly defined. To begin to address these mechanisms, different mutated forms of HSV-1 TK at residue Gln-125 that have distinct substrate properties were expressed in mammalian cell lines. It was found that expression of the Asn-125 HSV-1 TK mutant in two cell lines, NIH3T3 and HCT-116, was equally effective as wild-type HSV-1 TK for metabolism and sensitivity to GCV, bystander effect killing and induction of apoptosis. The major difference between the two enzymes was the lack of deoxypyrimidine metabolism in the Asn-125 TK-expressing cells. In HCT-116 cells expressing the Glu-125 TK mutant, GCV metabolism was greatly attenuated, yet at higher GCV concentrations, cell sensitivity to the drug and bystander effect killing were diminished but still effective. Cell cycle analysis, 4', 6'-diamidine-2'-phenylindoledihydrochloride staining, and caspase 3 activation assays indicated different cell death responses in the Glu-125 TK-expressing cells as compared with the wild-type HSV-1 TK or Asn-125 TK-expressing cells. A mechanistic hypothesis to explain these results based on the differences in GCV-triphosphate metabolite levels is presented.

  20. Expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 recombinant thymidine kinase and its application to a rapid antiviral sensitivity assay.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Tomoyuki; Lixin, Wang; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Iizuka, Itoe; Ogata, Momoko; Tsuji, Masanori; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Morikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Saijo, Masayuki

    2011-08-01

    Antiviral-resistant herpesvirus infection has become a great concern for immunocompromised patients. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections are treated with viral thymidine kinase (vTK)-associated drugs such as acyclovir (ACV), and most ACV-resistance (ACV(r)) is due to mutations in the vTK. The standard drug sensitivity test is usually carried out by the plaque reduction assay-based method, which requires over 10 days. To shorten the time required, a novel system was developed by the concept, in which 293T cells transiently expressing recombinant vTK derived from the test sample by transfection of the cells with an expression vector were infected with vTK-deficient and ACV(r) HSV-1 (TAR), and then cultured in a maintenance medium with or without designated concentrations of ACV, ganciclovir (GCV) and brivudine (BVdU). The replication of TAR was strongly inhibited by ACV, GCV and BVdU in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the ACV-sensitive HSV-1, whereas replication was not or slightly inhibited in cells expressing the recombinant vTK of highly resistant or intermediately resistant HSV-1, respectively. An inverse correlation was demonstrated in the 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s) and inhibitory effects of these compounds on the replication of TAR among ACV(s) and ACV(r) HSV-1 clones. These results indicate that the EC(50)s of the vTK-associated drugs including ACV can be assumed by measuring the inhibitory effect of drugs in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the target virus. The newly developed antiviral sensitivity assay system for HSV-1 makes it possible to estimate EC(50) for vTK-associated drugs, when whole vTK gene is available for use by gene amplification directly from lesion's samples or from virus isolates.

  1. Image

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Amber; Harsch, Tim; Pitt, Julie; Firpo, Mike; Lekin, April; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2007-08-31

    The computer side of the IMAGE project consists of a collection of Perl scripts that perform a variety of tasks; scripts are available to insert, update and delete data from the underlying Oracle database, download data from NCBI's Genbank and other sources, and generate data files for download by interested parties. Web scripts make up the tracking interface, and various tools available on the project web-site (image.llnl.gov) that provide a search interface to the database.

  2. Screening of herpes simplex virus type 1 isolates for acyclovir resistance using DiviTum® assay.

    PubMed

    Sauerbrei, Andreas; Vödisch, Susanne; Bohn, Kathrin; Schacke, Michael; Gronowitz, Simon

    2013-03-01

    Rapid alternative methods are required to evaluate easily acyclovir (ACV) sensitivity of clinical herpes simplex virus (HSV) isolates. The objective of this study was to screen 54 ACV-sensitive and 41 ACV-resistant clinical HSV-1 isolates, well characterized by phenotypic and genotypic methods, for the phosphorylation activity of the viral thymidine kinase (TK) using a commercially available and modified non-radioactive DiviTum® test on the basis of an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The ACV-sensitive HSV-1 isolates had high TK activity values between 31.5±6.4 DiviTum® Units per liter (DU/L) and 487.4±60.1 DU/L. The mean activity of all ACV-sensitive isolates was calculated as 212.3±15.7 DU/L. By contrast, the mean activity of all ACV-resistant HSV-1 isolates was significantly lower at 5.5±1.3 DU/L. Out of the 41 ACV-resistant HSV-1 isolates, 38 had no or very low phosphorylation activities of the viral TK between 0 DU/L and 9.3±3.2 DU/L. The remaining three ACV-resistant viral isolates had TK activities between 44.6±5.1 DU/L and 80.9±13.3D U/L. In conclusion, the modified DiviTum® test can be used to screen HSV-1 isolates for their sensitivity to ACV. Acyclovir-sensitive HSV-1 isolates show TK activities >30 DU/L and ACV-resistant isolates have activity values <10 DU/L. However, single ACV-resistant HSV-1 isolates can have TK activity values >30 DU/L. These strains are most likely ACV-resistant TK-altered mutants, but no evidence was provided for an alteration of the TK.

  3. Hydroquinone-induced malignant transformation of TK6 cells by facilitating SIRT1-mediated p53 degradation and up-regulating KRAS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuting; Chen, Jiajia; Yun, Lin; Xu, Longmei; Liu, Jiaxian; Xu, Yongchun; Yang, Hui; Liang, Hairong; Tang, Huanwen

    2016-09-30

    Hydroquinone (HQ), known as one of the metabolic products of benzene, causes a number of hematologic malignancies. The study evaluated the potential mechanism of Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in HQ-induced TK6 cell malignant transformation. The data of our study show that short term exposure of TK6 cells to HQ led to a decrease expression of SIRT1. Knockdown of SIRT1 sensitized to the HQ-induced apoptosis in vitro and increased the expression of p53, p21 and γ-H2AX. Furthermore, chronic HQ-treated (20μM once a week for 19 weeks) caused carcinogenic transformation and was confirmed by abnormal cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase 9(MMP9) and subcutaneous tumor formation in nude mice. SIRT1 increased KRAS expression, and decreased H3K9 and H3K18 acetylation, inhibited p53 signaling and the level of caspase-3 in HQ-induced transformation cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SIRT1 is involved in HQ-induced malignant transformation associated with suppressing p53 signaling and activation of KRAS. PMID:27515134

  4. Expression of CYP107Z13 in Streptomyces lividans TK54 catalyzes the oxidation of avermectin to 4″-oxo-avermectin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiliang; Liu, Weide; Ji, Ying; Niu, Jing; Li, Mei

    2012-03-01

    Streptomyces ahygroscopicus ZB01 has strong catalytic activity for the regiospecific oxidation of 4″-OH of avermectin to form 4″-oxo-avermectin. A cytochrome P450 gene from S. ahygroscopicus ZB01, cyp107z13, was cloned into pKC1139 to generate pKCZ1 and was transformed into Streptomyces lividans TK54, which does not have the ability to catalyze the conversion of avermectin. CYP107Z13, under the control of an ermE* promoter, was actively expressed in the TK54 recombinant strain as determined by a reduced CO difference spectrum analysis of the crude protein. Analysis of whole-cell biocatalytic activity by high-performance liquid chromatography revealed the recombinant to be able to oxidize avermectin regiospecifically to 4″-oxo-avermectin and CYP107Z13 to be a regioselective oxidase of avermectin. In addition, the whole-cell reaction conditions of the recombinant were optimized. Growth on medium ISP-2 at pH 6 was more conducive for the expression of CYP107Z13 than on medium PYG1 or at pH 7, and active cells of the recombinant strain had higher biocatalytic activity than resting cells.

  5. Application of speckle image correlation for real-time assessment of metabolic activity in herpes virus-infected cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A. P.; Malygin, A. S.; Mikhailova, J. A.; Borodin, E. M.; Bakharev, A. A.; Poryvayeva, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    Earlier we reported developing a speckle interferometry technique and a device designed to assess the metabolic activity of a cell monolayer cultivated on a glass substrate. This paper aimed at upgrading the technique and studying its potential for real-time assessment of herpes virus development process. Speckle dynamics was recorded in the image plane of intact and virus-infected cell monolayer. HLE-3, L-41 and Vero cells were chosen as research targets. Herpes simplex virus-1-(HSV-1)- infected cell cultures were studied. For 24 h we recorded the digital value of optical signal I in one pixel and parameter η characterizing change in the distribution of the optical signal on 10 × 10-pixel areas. The coefficient of multiple determination calculated by η time dependences for three intact cell cultures equals 0.94. It was demonstrated that the activity parameters are significantly different for intact and virus-infected cells. The difference of η value for intact and HSV-1-infected cells is detectable 10 minutes from the experiment start.

  6. Determination and characterization of destruxin production in Metarhizium anisopliae Tk6 and formulations for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes control at the field level.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Keppanan; Akutse, Komivi Senyo; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaperumal; Wang, Liande

    2016-09-15

    Destruxins, cyclic hexadepsipeptide toxins, secreted by the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae through extracellular synthesis. The present study reports a new approach for the analysis of DTXs produced by the fungal strain Metarhizium anisoliae Tk6, using FRIR-HPLC-LC-MS and H(1) NMR. The results also showed that production of the major DTXs A, B, C, and E have to be determined in Czapek Dextrose (CD) liquid culture filtrate from 9 to 12 days post-inoculation. Purified DTX were further tested in bioassays to assess their effects of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The four major purified DTX compounds were found to cause a toxic effect on the larval developmental stages of mosquitoes with high mortality rates. However, DTX E outperformed the other three DTXs by causing the highest mortality three days after inoculation. This result gives an alternative approach of using DTXs in mosquitoes control and used as a new method for other pest management.

  7. Determination and characterization of destruxin production in Metarhizium anisopliae Tk6 and formulations for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes control at the field level.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Keppanan; Akutse, Komivi Senyo; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaperumal; Wang, Liande

    2016-09-15

    Destruxins, cyclic hexadepsipeptide toxins, secreted by the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae through extracellular synthesis. The present study reports a new approach for the analysis of DTXs produced by the fungal strain Metarhizium anisoliae Tk6, using FRIR-HPLC-LC-MS and H(1) NMR. The results also showed that production of the major DTXs A, B, C, and E have to be determined in Czapek Dextrose (CD) liquid culture filtrate from 9 to 12 days post-inoculation. Purified DTX were further tested in bioassays to assess their effects of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The four major purified DTX compounds were found to cause a toxic effect on the larval developmental stages of mosquitoes with high mortality rates. However, DTX E outperformed the other three DTXs by causing the highest mortality three days after inoculation. This result gives an alternative approach of using DTXs in mosquitoes control and used as a new method for other pest management. PMID:27452930

  8. Human gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor exert a synergistic blockade on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Alonso, M A; Carrasco, L

    1989-03-01

    The replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is not inhibited in either HeLa or HEp-2 cells treated with human alpha interferon (HuIFN-alpha), particularly when high multiplicities of infection are used. However, HuIFN-gamma partially inhibits HSV-1 translation in HEp-2 cells infected at low multiplicities. Under these conditions, the transcription of genes alpha 22, TK, and gamma 0 is greatly diminished. The combined addition of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and HuIFN-gamma to HEp-2 cells exerts a synergistic inhibition of HSV-1 translation. Cells treated with both cytokines continue synthesizing cellular proteins, even 20 h after HSV-1 infection. As little as 10 U of IFN-gamma per ml blocked HSV-1 DNA replication, provided that TNF was also present in the medium. Analyses of HSV-1 gene transcription suggest that the action of both TNF and IFN-gamma blocked a step that comes at or prior to early HSV-1 gene expression. This early step in HSV-1 replication inhibited by TNF and IFN-gamma occurs after virus attachment and entry into cells, since the internalization of radioactive HSV-1 virion particles was not blocked by the presence of the two cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the synergistic action of TNF plus IFN-gamma affects a step in HSV-1 replication that comes after virus entry but before or at the transcription of immediate-early genes.

  9. Effects of Cationic Microbubble Carrying CD/TK Double Suicide Gene and αVβ3 Integrin Antibody in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiale; Zhou, Ping; Li, Lan; Zhang, Yan; Shao, Yang; Tang, Li; Tian, Shuangming

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mostly derived from hepatitis or cirrhosisis, is one of the most common types of liver cancer. T-cell mediated immune response elicited by CD/TK double suicide gene has shown a substantial antitumor effect in HCC. Integrin αVβ3 over expresssion has been suggested to regulate the biology behavior of HCC. In this study, we investigated the strategy of incorporating CD/TK double suicide gene and anti-αVβ3 integrin monoclonal antibodies into cationic microbubbles (CMBsαvβ3), and evaluated its killing effect in HCC cells. Methods To improve the transfection efficiency of targeted CD/TK double suicide gene, we adopted cationic microbubbles (CMBs), a cationic delivery agent with enhanced DNA-carrying capacity. The ultrasound and high speed shearing method was used to prepare the non-targeting cationic microbubbles (CMBs). Using the biotin-avidin bridge method, αVβ3 integrin antibody was conjugated to CMBs, and CMBsαvβ3 was generated to specifically target to HepG2 cells. The morphology and physicochemical properties of the CMBsαvβ3 was detected by optical microscope and zeta detector. The conjugation of plasmid and the antibody in CMBsαvβ3 were examined by immunofluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. The binding capacities of CMBsαvβ3 and CMBs to HCC HepG2 and normal L-02 cells were compared using rosette formation assay. To detect EGFP fluorescence and examine the transfection efficiencies of CMBsαvβ3 and CMBs in HCC cells, fluorescence microscope and contrast-enhanced sonography were adopted. mRNA and protein level of CD/TK gene were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. To evaluate the anti-tumor effect of CMBsαvβ3, HCC cells with CMBsαvβ3 were exposed to 5-flurocytosine / ganciclovir (5-FC/GCV). Then, cell cycle distribution after treatment were detected by PI staining and flow cytometry. Apoptotic cells death were detected by optical microscope and assessed by MTT assay and TUNEL

  10. In Vivo Image Analysis of BoHV-4-Based Vector in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Valentina; Stellari, Fabio Franco; Mangia, Carlo; Jacca, Sarah; Lavrentiadou, Sophia; Cavirani, Sandro; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Due to its biological characteristics bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) has been considered as an appropriate gene delivery vector. Its genomic clone, modified as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), is better genetically manipulable and can be used as an efficient gene delivery and vaccine vector. Although a large amount of data have been accumulated in vitro on this specific aspect, the same cannot be asserted for the in vivo condition. Therefore, here we investigated the fate of a recombinant BoHV-4 strain expressing luciferase (BoHV-4-A-CMVlucΔTK) after intraperitoneal or intravenous inoculation in mice, by generating a novel recombinant BoHV-4 expressing luciferase (BoHV-4-A-CMVlucΔTK) and by following the virus replication through in vivo imaging analysis. BoHV-4-A-CMVlucΔTK was first characterized in vitro where it was shown, on one hand that its replication properties are identical to those of the parental virus, and on the other that the transduced/infected cells strongly express luciferase. When BoHV-4-A-CMVlucΔTK was inoculated in mice, either intraperitoneally or intravenously, BoHV-4-A-CMVlucΔTK infection/transduction was exclusively localized to the liver, as detected by in vivo image analysis, and in particular almost exclusively in the hepatocytes, as determined by immuno-histochemistry. These data, that add a new insight on the biology of BoHV-4 in vivo, provide the first indication for the potential use of a BoHV-4-based vector in gene-transfer in the liver. PMID:24752229

  11. Imaging of Musculoskeletal Bacterial Infections by [124I]FIAU-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Luis A.; Endres, Christopher J.; Uzuner, Ovsev; Seyler, Thorsten M.; Ulrich, Slif D.; Conway, Janet; Bettegowda, Chetan; Agrawal, Nishant; Cheong, Ian; Zhang, Xiaosong; Ladenson, Paul W.; Vogelstein, Barry N.; Mont, Michael A.; Zhou, Shibin; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Pomper, Martin G.

    2007-01-01

    Background Traditional imaging techniques for the localization and monitoring of bacterial infections, although reasonably sensitive, suffer from a lack of specificity. This is particularly true for musculoskeletal infections. Bacteria possess a thymidine kinase (TK) whose substrate specificity is distinct from that of the major human TK. The substrate specificity difference has been exploited to develop a new imaging technique that can detect the presence of viable bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings Eight subjects with suspected musculoskeletal infections and one healthy control were studied by a combination of [124I]FIAU-positron emission tomography and CT ([124I]FIAU-PET/CT). All patients with proven musculoskeletal infections demonstrated positive [124I]FIAU-PET/CT signals in the sites of concern at two hours after radiopharmaceutical administration. No adverse reactions with FIAU were observed. Conclusions/Significance [124I]FIAU-PET/CT is a promising new method for imaging bacterial infections. PMID:17925855

  12. Application of the TGx-28.65 transcriptomic biomarker to classify genotoxic and non-genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells in the presence of rat liver S9.

    PubMed

    Yauk, Carole L; Buick, Julie K; Williams, Andrew; Swartz, Carol D; Recio, Leslie; Li, Heng-Hong; Fornace, Albert J; Thomson, Errol M; Aubrecht, Jiri

    2016-05-01

    In vitro transcriptional signatures that predict toxicities can facilitate chemical screening. We previously developed a transcriptomic biomarker (known as TGx-28.65) for classifying agents as genotoxic (DNA damaging) and non-genotoxic in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Because TK6 cells do not express cytochrome P450s, we confirmed accurate classification by the biomarker in cells co-exposed to 1% 5,6 benzoflavone/phenobarbital-induced rat liver S9 for metabolic activation. However, chemicals may require different types of S9 for activation. Here we investigated the response of TK6 cells to higher percentages of Aroclor-, benzoflavone/phenobarbital-, or ethanol-induced rat liver S9 to expand TGx-28.65 biomarker applicability. Transcriptional profiles were derived 3 to 4 hr following a 4 hr co-exposure of TK6 cells to test chemicals and S9. Preliminary studies established that 10% Aroclor- and 5% ethanol-induced S9 alone did not induce the TGx-28.65 biomarker genes. Seven genotoxic and two non-genotoxic chemicals (and concurrent solvent and positive controls) were then tested with one of the S9s (selected based on cell survival and micronucleus induction). Relative survival and micronucleus frequency was assessed by flow cytometry in cells 20 hr post-exposure. Genotoxic/non-genotoxic chemicals were accurately classified using the different S9s. One technical replicate of cells co-treated with dexamethasone and 10% Aroclor-induced S9 was falsely classified as genotoxic, suggesting caution in using high S9 concentrations. Even low concentrations of genotoxic chemicals (those not causing cytotoxicity) were correctly classified, demonstrating that TGx-28.65 is a sensitive biomarker of genotoxicity. A meta-analysis of datasets from 13 chemicals supports that different S9s can be used in TK6 cells, without impairing classification using the TGx-28.65 biomarker.

  13. Recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 strains with targeted mutations relevant for aciclovir susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Brunnemann, Anne-Kathrin; Liermann, Kristin; Deinhardt-Emmer, Stefanie; Maschkowitz, Gregor; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate; Fickenscher, Helmut; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Krumbholz, Andi

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a novel reliable method to assess the significance of individual mutations within the thymidine kinase (TK) gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to nucleoside analogue resistance. Eleven defined single nucleotide polymorphisms that occur in the TK gene of clinical HSV-1 isolates and a fluorescence reporter were introduced into the HSV-1 strain 17+ that had been cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. The susceptibility of these different strains to aciclovir, penciclovir, brivudin, and foscarnet was determined with a modified cytopathic effect reduction assay. The strains were also tested for their aciclovir susceptibility by measuring the relative fluorescence intensity as an indicator for HSV-1 replication and by quantifying the virus yield. Our data indicate that the amino acid substitutions R41H, R106H, A118V, L139V, K219T, S276R, L298R, S345P, and V348I represent natural polymorphisms of the TK protein, whereas G61A and P84L mediate broad cross-resistance against aciclovir, penciclovir, brivudin, and susceptibility to foscarnet. This method allows the definition of the resistance genotype of otherwise unclear mutations in the TK gene of HSV-1. Thus, it provides a scientific basis for antiviral testing in clinical isolates of patients suffering from serious diseases and will facilitate testing of new antivirals against HSV-1. PMID:27426251

  14. Thyroid Hormone-dependent Epigenetic Suppression of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Gene Expression and Viral Replication in Differentiated Neuroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Figliozzi, Robert W.; Chen, Feng; Balish, Matthew; Ajavon, Amakoe; Hsia, S. Victor

    2014-01-01

    A global HSV-1 gene repression occurs during latency in sensory neurons where most viral gene transcriptions are suppressed. The molecular mechanisms of gene silencing and how stress factors trigger the reactivation are not well understood. Thyroid hormones are known to be altered due to stress, and with its nuclear receptor impart transcriptional repression or activation depending upon the hormone level. Therefore we hypothesized that triiodothyronine (T3) treatment of infected differentiated neuron like cells would reduce the ability of HSV-1 to produce viral progeny compared to untreated infected cells. Previously we identified putative thyroid hormone receptor elements (TREs) within the promoter regions of HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) and other key genes. Searching for a human cell line that can model neuronal HSV-1 infection, we performed HSV-1 infection experiments on differentiated human neuroendocrine cells, LNCaP. Upon androgen deprivation these cells undergo complete differentiation and exhibit neuronal-like morphology and physiology. These cells were readily infected by our HSV-1 recombinant virus, expressing GFP and maintaining many processes iconic of dendritic morphology. Our results demonstrated that differentiated LNCaP cells produced suppressive effects on HSV-1 gene expression and replication compared to its undifferentiated counterpart and T3 treatment have further decreased the viral plaque counts compared to untreated cells. Upon washout of the T3 viral plaque counts were restored, indicating an increase of viral replication. The qRT-PCR experiments using primers for TK showed reduced expression under T3 treatment. ChIP assays using a panel of antibodies for H3 lysine 9 epigenetic marks showed increased repressive marks on the promoter regions of TK. In conclusion we have demonstrated a T3 mediated quiescent infection in differentiated LNCaP cells that has potential to mimic latent infection. In this HSV-1 infection model thyroid hormone

  15. Future Directions for Astronomical Image Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Eric

    1997-01-01

    In our "Future Directions for Astronomical Image Display" project, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) will evolve our existing image display software into a fully extensible, cross-platform image display server that can run stand-alone or be integrated seamlessly into astronomical analysis systems. We will build a Plug-in Image Extension (PIE) server for astronomy, consisting of a modular image display engine that can be customized using "plug-in" technology. We will create plug-ins that reproduce all the current functionality of SAOtng. We also will devise a messaging system and a set of distributed, shared data objects to support integrating the PIE server into astronomical analysis systems. Finally, we will migrate our PIE server, plug-ins, and messaging software from Unix and the X Window System to a platform-independent architecture that utilizes cross-platform technology such as Tcl/Tk or Java.

  16. Dual-modality imaging demonstrates the enhanced antitumoral effect of herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase/ganciclovir plus gemcitabine combination therapy on cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIANFENG; LI, ANG; JIN, MEI; ZHANG, FAN; LI, XIAOLING

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-TK/GCV) therapy is one of the most promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma, which is the second most common hepatobiliary cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the enhanced therapeutic effects of HSV-TK/GCV with gemcitabine on cholangiocarcinoma. QBC939 cholangiocarcinoma cells and mouse models of cholangiocarcinoma (established via tumor xenografts) received one of the following treatments: i) Gemcitabine therapy (3 µg/ml); ii) HSV-TK/GCV monotherapy; iii) HSV-TK/GCV + gemcitabine; and iv) control group, treated with phosphate-buffered saline. Cell proliferation was quantified using MTT assay and post-treatment tumor alterations were monitored using ultrasound imaging and optical imaging. For the in vitro experiments, the MTT assays demonstrated that the relative cell viabilities in the gene therapy, gemcitabine and gemcitabine + gene groups were 70.37±9.07, 52.64±8.28 and 34.21±6.63%, respectively. For the in vivo experiments, optical imaging indicated significantly decreased optical signals in the combination therapy group, as compared with the gemcitabine and gemcitabine + gene groups (1.68±0.74 vs. 2.27±0.58 and 2.87±0.82, respectively; Р<0.05). As demonstrated by ultrasound imaging, reduced tumor volumes were detected in the combination therapy group, as compared with the three control groups (114.32±17.17 vs. 159±23.74, 201.63±19.26 and 298.23±36.1 mm3, respectively; P<0.05). The results of the present study demonstrated that gemcitabine enhances the antitumoral effects of HSV-TK/GCV on cholangiocarcinoma, which may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the management and treatment of cholangiocarcinoma using gemcitabine and gene therapy. PMID:27347037

  17. Formation of the accumulative human metabolite and human-specific glutathione conjugate of diclofenac in TK-NOG chimeric mice with humanized livers.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi; Nozawa, Kohei; Nakamura, Shota; Chijiwa, Hiroyuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-ichiro; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Ohnishi, Yasuyuki; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Shin-ichi

    2015-03-01

    3'-Hydroxy-4'-methoxydiclofenac (VI) is a human-specific metabolite known to accumulate in the plasma of patients after repeated administration of diclofenac sodium. Diclofenac also produces glutathione-conjugated metabolites, some of which are human-specific. In the present study, we investigated whether these metabolites could be generated in humanized chimeric mice produced from TK-NOG mice. After a single oral administration of diclofenac to humanized mice, the unchanged drug in plasma peaked at 0.25 hour and then declined with a half-life (t1/2) of 2.4 hours. 4'-Hydroxydiclofenac (II) and 3'-hydroxydiclofenac also peaked at 0.25 hour and were undetectable within 24 hours. However, VI peaked at 8 hours and declined with a t1/2 of 13 hours. When diclofenac was given once per day, peak and trough levels of VI reached plateau within 3 days. Studies with administration of II suggested VI was generated via II as an intermediate. Among six reported glutathione-conjugated metabolites of diclofenac, M1 (5-hydroxy-4-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac) to M6 (2'-(glutathion-S-yl)monoclofenac), we found three dichlorinated conjugates [M1, M2 (4'-hydroxy-3'-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac), and M3 (5-hydroxy-6-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac)], and a single monochlorinated conjugate [M4 (2'-hydroxy-3'-(glutathion-S-yl)monoclofenac) or M5 (4'-hydroxy-2'-(glutathion-S-yl)monoclofenac)], in the bile of humanized chimeric mice. M4 and M5 are positional isomers and have been previously reported as human-specific in vitro metabolites likely generated via arene oxide and quinone imine-type intermediates, respectively. The biliary monochlorinated metabolite exhibited the same mass spectrum as those of M4 and M5, and we discuss whether this conjugate corresponded to M4 or M5. Overall, humanized TK-NOG chimeric mice were considered to be a functional tool for the study of drug metabolism of diclofenac in humans.

  18. Charge transfer efficiency measurements at low signal levels on STIS/SOHO TK1024 CCD's. [Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph / Solar Heliocentric Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orbock, J. D.; Murata-Seawalt, D.; Delamere, W. A.; Blouke, Morley M.

    1990-01-01

    Charge transfer efficiency (CTE) test methods are reviewed, and the results and conclusions of the tests are given. The test methods have been utilized to describe the CTE characteristics of the Tektronix 1024 by 1024 CCD to optimize low dark current, low readout noise, and high CTE at low signal levels. CTE modelling is described, and three test methods are set forth and compared. The Fe-55 X-ray response method utilizes the response of a CCD to X-ray photons from the radioactive source Fe-55. The extended pixel edge response method employs the measurement of the charge lost to successive pixels by a known initial signal as it is shifted through the array. The charge injection method consists of charge injection through the output amplifier reset transistor. These measurements were performed on several devices with known CTEs. The CTEs are found to be in agreement for the three methods, making application and test requirements the principal criteria for their use.

  19. Identification of a complex associated with processing and polyadenylation in vitro of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase precursor RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, F; Cole, C N

    1987-01-01

    Cleavage and polyadenylation of substrate RNAs containing the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (tk) gene polyadenylation signal region were examined in HeLa cell nuclear extract. 3'-End RNA processing was accurate and efficient and required ATP and Mg2+. Cleavage, but not polyadenylation, occurred in the presence of EDTA or when ATP was replaced with 3' dATP (cordycepin) or AMP(CH2)PP, a nonhydrolyzable analog of ATP. Processing in vitro and in vivo showed the same signal element requirements: a series of substrates containing linker scanning, internal deletion, and small insertion mutations was processed with the same relative efficiencies and at the same sites in vitro and in vivo. A complex involved in 3'-end RNA processing was identified by gel mobility shift analysis. This complex formed rapidly, reached a maximum level after 20 to 30 min, and was much reduced after 2 h. Very little complex was formed at 0 degree C or with substrates lacking a polyadenylation signal. Entry of 32P-labeled tk substrate into the complex could be prevented by addition of excess 35S-labeled tk or adenovirus L3 precursor RNAs. Competition was not observed with tk RNAs lacking a complete polyadenylation signal. Images PMID:2823124

  20. A high-resolution whole genome radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 17q22-q25.3 across the genes for GH and TK

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.W.; Schafer, A.J.; Critcher, R.

    1996-04-15

    We have constructed a whole genome radiation hybrid (WG-RH) map across a region of human chromosome 17q, from growth hormone (GH) to thymidine kinase (TK). A panel of 128 WG-RH hybrid cell lines generated by X-irradiation and fusion has been tested for the retention of 39 sequence-tagged site (STS) markers by the polymerase chain reaction. This genome mapping technique has allowed the integration of existing VNTR and microsatellite markers with additional new markers and existing STS markers previously mapped to this region by other means. The WG-RH map includes eight expressed sequence tag (EST) and three anonymous markers developed for this study, together with 23 anonymous microsatellites and five existing ESTs. Analysis of these data resulted in a high-density comprehensive map across this region of the genome. A subset of these markers has been used to produce a framework map consisting of 20 loci ordered with odds greater than 1000:1. The markers are of sufficient density to build a YAC contig across this region based on marker content. We have developed sequence tags for both ends of a 2.1-Mb YAC and mapped these using the WG-RH panel, allowing a direct comparison of cRay{sub 6000} to physical distance. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation: comparison to the induction by exposure to accelerated 56Fe particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts by exposure to (137)Cs gamma radiation was investigated by measuring the frequency and characteristics of unstable clones isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure. Clones surviving irradiation and control clones were analyzed for 17 characteristics including chromosomal aberrations, growth defects, alterations in response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the thymidine kinase and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase loci. Putative unstable clones were defined as those that exhibited a significant alteration in one or more characteristics compared to the controls. The frequency and characteristics of the unstable clones were compared in clones exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays or (56)Fe particles. The majority of the unstable clones isolated after exposure to either gamma rays or (56)Fe particles exhibited chromosomal instability. Alterations in growth characteristics, radiation response and mutant frequencies occurred much less often than cytogenetic alterations in these unstable clones. The frequency and complexity of the unstable clones were greater after exposure to (56)Fe particles than to gamma rays. Unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to gamma rays exhibited increases in the incidence of dicentric chromosomes but not of chromatid breaks, whereas unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited increases in both chromatid and chromosome aberrations.

  2. Potential Prophylactic Properties of Apple and Characterization of Potent Bioactive from cv. "Granny Smith" Displaying Strong Antimutagenicity in Models Including Human Lymphoblast TK6(+/-) Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sudhanshu; Verma, Jyoti; Gautam, Satyendra

    2016-02-01

    Potential prophylactic attributes in terms of antimutagenicity, antioxidant, and radioprotective properties were evaluated for 8 common apple cultivars namely "Fuji," "Golden Delicious," "Granny Smith," "Ambri Kashmiri," "Kinnaur," "Red Delicious," "Royal Gala," and "Shimla," where cultivar based significant variation was observed. Cv. "Granny Smith" displayed significantly higher and broad spectrum antimutagenicity in Escherichia coli rpoB based rifampicin resistance (Rif(R) ) assay, whereas, "Ambri Kashmiri," "Royal Gala," and "Shimla" showed lower antimutagenicity. Cultivars "Ambri Kashmiri," "Kinnaur," and "Red Delicious" exhibited strong antioxidant activity than cv. "Granny Smith" as assayed by radical scavenging, reducing potential and radioprotective property assays. The antioxidant and radioprotective properties were found to be better correlated than antimutagenicity. Suppression of error-prone DNA repair pathway (such as E. coli SOS response) was found to be one of the possible mechanisms contributing to its antimutagenicity. Phenolic extract of "Granny Smithˮ showing higher antimutagenicity was HPLC purified and the bioactive fraction (tR 35.4 min) contributing maximally (∼80%) to the observed antimutagenicity was identified as procyanidin dimer (PD) by ESI-MS/MS. The above observed antimutagenicity in bacterial assay system was well reproduced in Thymidine Kinase Mutation (TKM) assay performed using human lymphoblast cell line (TK6(+/-) ) cell line making the findings more prophylactically relevant.

  3. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase, EBV-PK, but not the thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), is required for ganciclovir and acyclovir inhibition of lytic viral production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiao; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S; Kenney, Shannon C

    2010-05-01

    Ganciclovir (GCV) and acyclovir (ACV) are guanine nucleoside analogues that inhibit lytic herpesvirus replication. GCV and ACV must be monophosphorylated by virally encoded enzymes to be converted into nucleotides and incorporated into viral DNA. However, whether GCV and/or ACV phosphorylation in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells is mediated primarily by the EBV-encoded protein kinase (EBV-PK), the EBV-encoded thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), or both is controversial. To examine this question, we constructed EBV mutants containing stop codons in either the EBV-PK or EBV-TK open reading frame and selected for stable 293T clones latently infected with wild-type EBV or each of the mutant viruses. Cells were induced to the lytic form of viral replication with a BZLF1 expression vector in the presence and absence of various doses of GCV and ACV, and infectious viral titers were determined by a green Raji cell assay. As expected, virus production in wild-type EBV-infected 293T cells was inhibited by both GCV (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] = 1.5 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 4.1 microM). However, the EBV-PK mutant (which replicates as well as the wild-type (WT) virus in 293T cells) was resistant to both GCV (IC(50) = 19.6 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 36.4 microM). Expression of the EBV-PK protein in trans restored GCV and ACV sensitivity in cells infected with the PK mutant virus. In contrast, in 293T cells infected with the TK mutant virus, viral replication remained sensitive to both GCV (IC(50) = 1.2 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 2.8 microM), although susceptibility to the thymine nucleoside analogue, bromodeoxyuridine, was reduced. Thus, EBV-PK but not EBV-TK mediates ACV and GCV susceptibilities.

  4. IMAGEP - A FORTRAN ALGORITHM FOR DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    IMAGEP is a FORTRAN computer algorithm containing various image processing, analysis, and enhancement functions. It is a keyboard-driven program organized into nine subroutines. Within the subroutines are other routines, also, selected via keyboard. Some of the functions performed by IMAGEP include digitization, storage and retrieval of images; image enhancement by contrast expansion, addition and subtraction, magnification, inversion, and bit shifting; display and movement of cursor; display of grey level histogram of image; and display of the variation of grey level intensity as a function of image position. This algorithm has possible scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications in material flaw studies, steel and ore analysis, and pathology, respectively. IMAGEP is written in VAX FORTRAN for DEC VAX series computers running VMS. The program requires the use of a Grinnell 274 image processor which can be obtained from Mark McCloud Associates, Campbell, CA. An object library of the required GMR series software is included on the distribution media. IMAGEP requires 1Mb of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 1600 BPI 9track magnetic tape in VAX FILES-11 format. It is also available on a TK50 tape cartridge in VAX FILES-11 format. This program was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, VMS, and TK50 are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.

  5. Amino acid substitutions in the thymidine kinase gene of induced acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussin, Ainulkhir; Nor, Norefrina Shafinaz Md; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    Acyclovir (ACV) is an antiviral drug of choice in healthcare setting to treat infections caused by herpes viruses, including, but not limited to genital herpes, cold sores, shingles and chicken pox. Acyclovir resistance has emerged significantly due to extensive use and misuse of this antiviral in human, especially in immunocompromised patients. However, it remains unclear about the amino acid substitutions in thymidine (TK) gene, which specifically confer the resistance-associated mutation in herpes simplex virus. Hence, acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 was selected at high concentration (2.0 - 4.5 μg/mL), and the TK-gene was subjected to sequencing and genotypic characterization. Genotypic sequences comparison was done using HSV-1 17 (GenBank Accesion no. X14112) for resistance-associated mutation determination whereas HSV-1 KOS, HSV-1 473/08 and HSV clinical isolates sequences were used for polymorphism-associated mutation. The result showed that amino acid substitutions at the non-conserved region (UKM-1: Gln34Lys, UKM-2: Arg32Ser & UKM-5: Arg32Cys) and ATP-binding site (UKM-3: Tyr53End & UKM-4: Ile54Leu) of the TK-gene. These discoveries play an important role to extend another dimension to the evolution of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 and suggest that selection at high ACV concentration induced ACV-resistant HSV-1 evolution. These findings also expand the knowledge on the type of mutations among acyclovir-resistant HSV-1. In conclusion, HSV-1 showed multiple strategies to exhibit acyclovir resistance, including amino acid substitutions in the TK gene.

  6. Combination of PEI-Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles and pHsp 70-HSV-TK/GCV with magnet-induced heating for treatment of hepatoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiusha; Lu, Mudan; Chen, Daozhen; Liu, Peidang

    2015-01-01

    Background To explore a new combination of thermal treatment and gene therapy for hepatoma, a heat-inducible herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-TK/GCV) gene therapy system was developed in which thermal energy generated by Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles (MZF-NPs) under an alternating magnetic field was used to activate gene expression. Methods First, a recombinant eukaryotic plasmid, pHsp 70-HSV-TK, was constructed as a target gene for therapy. This recombinant plasmid was used to transfect SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells and the gene expression was evaluated. Magnet-induced heating was then applied to cells to assess the antihepatoma effects of the polyethylenimine (PEI)-MZF-NPs/pHsp 70-HSV-TK/GCV complex, in vitro and in vivo. Results The results showed that cells were successfully transfected with pHsp 70-HSV-TK and that expression levels of HSV-TK remained stable. Both in vitro and in vivo results indicated that the combination of gene therapy and heat treatment resulted in better therapeutic effects than heating-alone group. The rates of apoptosis and necrosis in the combined treatment group were 49.0% and 7.21%, respectively. The rate of inhibition of cell proliferation in the combined treatment group was significantly higher (87.5%) than that in the heating-alone group (65.8%; P<0.01). The tumor volume and mass inhibition rates of the combined treatment group were 91.3% and 87.91%, respectively, and were significantly higher than the corresponding rates of the heating-alone group (70.41% and 57.14%; P<0.01). The expression levels of Stat3 and Bcl-xL messenger RNA and p-Stat3 and Bcl-xL protein in the combined treatment group were significantly lower than those in the other groups (P<0.01). The expression levels of Bax messenger RNA and protein in the recombinant plasmid group were significantly higher than those in the other groups (P<0.01). Conclusion It can therefore be concluded that the combined application of heat treatment and gene therapy

  7. Application of the TGx‐28.65 transcriptomic biomarker to classify genotoxic and non‐genotoxic chemicals in human TK6 cells in the presence of rat liver S9

    PubMed Central

    Buick, Julie K.; Williams, Andrew; Swartz, Carol D.; Recio, Leslie; Li, Heng‐Hong; Fornace, Albert J.; Thomson, Errol M.; Aubrecht, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    In vitro transcriptional signatures that predict toxicities can facilitate chemical screening. We previously developed a transcriptomic biomarker (known as TGx‐28.65) for classifying agents as genotoxic (DNA damaging) and non‐genotoxic in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Because TK6 cells do not express cytochrome P450s, we confirmed accurate classification by the biomarker in cells co‐exposed to 1% 5,6 benzoflavone/phenobarbital‐induced rat liver S9 for metabolic activation. However, chemicals may require different types of S9 for activation. Here we investigated the response of TK6 cells to higher percentages of Aroclor‐, benzoflavone/phenobarbital‐, or ethanol‐induced rat liver S9 to expand TGx‐28.65 biomarker applicability. Transcriptional profiles were derived 3 to 4 hr following a 4 hr co‐exposure of TK6 cells to test chemicals and S9. Preliminary studies established that 10% Aroclor‐ and 5% ethanol‐induced S9 alone did not induce the TGx‐28.65 biomarker genes. Seven genotoxic and two non‐genotoxic chemicals (and concurrent solvent and positive controls) were then tested with one of the S9s (selected based on cell survival and micronucleus induction). Relative survival and micronucleus frequency was assessed by flow cytometry in cells 20 hr post‐exposure. Genotoxic/non‐genotoxic chemicals were accurately classified using the different S9s. One technical replicate of cells co‐treated with dexamethasone and 10% Aroclor‐induced S9 was falsely classified as genotoxic, suggesting caution in using high S9 concentrations. Even low concentrations of genotoxic chemicals (those not causing cytotoxicity) were correctly classified, demonstrating that TGx‐28.65 is a sensitive biomarker of genotoxicity. A meta‐analysis of datasets from 13 chemicals supports that different S9s can be used in TK6 cells, without impairing classification using the TGx‐28.65 biomarker. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:243–260, 2016. © 2016 Her Majesty the

  8. Prodrug-activated gene therapy: involvement of an immunological component in the "bystander effect".

    PubMed

    Gagandeep, S; Brew, R; Green, B; Christmas, S E; Klatzmann, D; Poston, G J; Kinsella, A R

    1996-01-01

    The integration and expression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) gene in localized tumors results in tumor regression after the administration of the specific nucleoside analogue ganciclovir (GCV). Although only 10% to 20% of the tumor cells take up the HSV1-TK gene, the neighboring cells also die, a phenomenon termed "bystander effect.". In the present study, coinjection of the MC26 mouse colon carcinoma cell line and the HSV1-TK expressing retroviral packaging cell line followed after 7 days by the intraperitoneal administration of GCV resulted in almost total tumor regression in the immunocompetent BALB/c mice but not in immunocompromised athymic BALB/c mice. This suggested a strong cell-mediated immune component to the bystander effect.

  9. γH2AX and p53 responses in TK6 cells discriminate promutagens and nongenotoxicants in the presence of rat liver S9.

    PubMed

    Bernacki, Derek T; Bryce, Steven M; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Kirkland, David; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2016-08-01

    Previous work with a diverse set of reference chemicals suggests that an in vitro multiplexed flow cytometry-based assay (MultiFlow™ DNA Damage Kit-p53, γH2AX, Phospho-Histone H3) can distinguish direct-acting clastogens and aneugens from nongenotoxicants (Bryce SM et al. []: Environ Mol Mutagen 57:171-189). This work extends this line of investigation to include compounds that require metabolic activation to form reactive electrophiles. For these experiments, TK6 cells were exposed to 11 promutagens and 37 presumed nongenotoxicants in 96 well plates. Unless precipitation or foreknowledge about cytotoxicity suggested otherwise, the highest concentration was 1 mM. Exposure occurred for 4 hr after which time cells were washed to remove S9 and test article. Immediately following the wash and again at 24 hr, cell aliquots were added to wells of a microtiter plate containing the working detergent/stain/antibody cocktail. After a brief incubation, robotic sampling was employed for walk-away flow cytometric data acquisition. Univariate logistic regression analyses indicated that γH2AX induction and p53 activation provide the greatest degree of discrimination between clastogens and nongenotoxicants. Multivariate prediction algorithms that incorporated both of these endpoints, in each combination of time points, were evaluated. The best performing models correctly predicted 9 clastogens out of 11 and 36 nongenotoxicants out of 37. These results are encouraging as they suggest that an efficient and highly scalable multiplexed assay can effectively identify clastogenic chemicals that require bioactivation. More work is planned with a broader range of chemicals, additional cell lines, and other laboratories to further evaluate the merits and limitations of this approach. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:546-558, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27364561

  10. Bone marrow transplantation in a child with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome latently infected with acyclovir-resistant (ACV(r)) herpes simplex virus type 1: emergence of foscarnet-resistant virus originating from the ACV(r) virus.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Masayuki; Yasuda, Yukiharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Kato, Shunichi; Suzutani, Tatsuo; De Clercq, Erik; Niikura, Masahiro; Maeda, Akihiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2002-09-01

    A human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched unrelated bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed in a 13-year-old patient with the congenital immunodeficiency syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. The patient had a history of acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(r)) herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections prior to BMT. After BMT, the skin lesions caused by HSV-1 relapsed on the face and genito-anal areas. Ganciclovir (GCV) therapy was initiated, but the mucocutaneous lesions worsened. An HSV-1 isolate recovered from the lesions during this episode was resistant to both ACV and GCV. The ACV(r) isolate was confirmed to have the same mutation in the viral thymidine kinase (TK) gene as that of the previously isolated ACV(r) isolates from the patient. After treatment switch to foscarnet (PFA), there was a satisfactory remission but not a complete recovery. Although the mucocutaneous lesions improved, a PFA-resistant (PFA(r)) HSV-1 was isolated 1 month after the start of PFA therapy. The PFA(r) HSV-1 isolate coded for the same mutation in the viral TK gene as the ACV(r) HSV-1 isolates. Furthermore, the PFA(r) isolate also expressed a mutated viral DNA polymerase (DNA pol) with an amino acid (Gly) substitution for Val at position 715. This is the first report on the clinical course of a BMT-associated ACV(r) HSV-1 infection that subsequently developed resistance to foscarnet as well.

  11. Oncolytic HSV-1 Infection of Tumors Induces Angiogenesis and Upregulates CYR61

    PubMed Central

    Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Hardcastle, Jayson; Thakur, Roopa; Shroll, Joshua; Nowicki, Michal; Otsuki, Akihiro; Chiocca, E Antonio; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic viral therapy is under evaluation for toxicity and efficacy in clinical trials relating to several different tumors. We report a significant increase in the angiogenic index of oncolytic virus (OV)-treated glioma-matrigel implants (2.83-fold, P < 0.02). In a rat intracranial glioma model, large tumors from OV-treated animals were significantly more angiogenic than the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated control tumors (OV: 101 ± 21.6; PBS: 19.8 ± 10; P = 0.0037). Transcript profiling of OV-treated tumors revealed dysregulation of several transcripts involved in glioma angiogenesis. OV-mediated induction of CYR61 gene expression (8.94-fold, P = 0.001) correlated significantly with the presence of OV in tumor tissue in vivo (R = 0.7, P < 0.001). Further, induction of CYR61 mRNA and protein were confirmed in multiple human cancer cell lines and primary human tumor-derived cells in vitro, and in tumor lysate and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in vivo. Finally, we show that treatment of glioma cells with Cilengitide, known to counter CYR61-induced integrin activation, significantly suppressed the proangiogenic effect of OV treatment of gliomas (P < 0.05). PMID:18545226

  12. Enhanced Antitumor Efficacy of Vasculostatin (Vstat120) Expressing Oncolytic HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hardcastle, Jayson; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Dmitrieva, Nina; Sayers, Martin P; Ahmad, Sarwat; Waterman, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Chiocca, E Antonio; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy is a promising therapeutic modality for brain tumors. Vasculostatin (Vstat120) is the cleaved and secreted extracellular fragment of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1), a brain-specific receptor. To date, the therapeutic efficacy of Vstat120 delivery into established tumors has not been investigated. Here we tested the therapeutic efficacy of combining Vstat120 gene delivery in conjunction with OV therapy. We constructed RAMBO (Rapid Antiangiogenesis Mediated By Oncolytic virus), which expresses Vstat120 under the control of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) IE4/5 promoter. Secreted Vstat120 was detected as soon as 4 hours postinfection in vitro and was retained for up to 13 days after OV therapy in subcutaneous tumors. RAMBO-produced Vstat120 efficiently inhibited endothelial cell migration and tube formation in vitro (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.0184, respectively) and inhibited angiogenesis (P = 0.007) in vivo. There was a significant suppression of intracranial and subcutaneous glioma growth in mice treated with RAMBO compared to the control virus, HSVQ (P = 0.0021 and P < 0.05, respectively). Statistically significant reduction in tumor vascular volume fraction (VVF) and microvessel density (MVD) was observed in tumors treated with RAMBO. This is the first study to report the antitumor effects of Vstat120 delivery into established tumors and supports the further development of RAMBO as a possible cancer therapy. PMID:19844198

  13. STAT3 Activation Promotes Oncolytic HSV1 Replication in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Okemoto, Kazuo; Wagner, Benjamin; Meisen, Hans; Haseley, Amy; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies report that STAT3 signaling is a master regulator of mesenchymal transformation of gliomas and that STAT3 modulated genes are highly expressed in the mesenchymal transcriptome of gliomas. A currently studied experimental treatment for gliomas consists of intratumoral injection of oncolytic viruses (OV), such as oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). We have described one particular oHSV (rQNestin34.5) that exhibits potent anti-glioma activity in animal models. Here, we hypothesized that alterations in STAT3 signaling in glioma cells may affect the replicative ability of rQNestin34.5. In fact, human U251 glioma cells engineered to either over-express STAT3 or with genetic down-regulation of STAT3 supported oHSV replication to a significantly higher or lesser degree, respectively, when compared to controls. Administration of pharmacologic agents that increase STAT3 phosphorylation/activation (Valproic Acid) or increase STAT3 levels (Interleukin 6) also significantly enhanced oHSV replication. Instead, administration of inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation/activation (LLL12) significantly reduced oHSV replication. STAT3 led to a reduction in interferon signaling in oHSV infected cells and inhibition of interferon signaling abolished the effect of STAT3 on oHSV replication. These data thus indicate that STAT3 signaling in malignant gliomas enhances oHSV replication, likely by inhibiting the interferon response in infected glioma cells, thus suggesting avenues for possible potentiation of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:23936533

  14. Role of ND10 nuclear bodies in the chromatin repression of HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haidong; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a neurotropic virus that establishes lifelong latent infection in human ganglion sensory neurons. This unique life cycle necessitates an intimate relation between the host defenses and virus counteractions over the long course of infection. Two important aspects of host anti-viral defense, nuclear substructure restriction and epigenetic chromatin regulation, have been intensively studied in the recent years. Upon viral DNA entering the nucleus, components of discrete nuclear bodies termed nuclear domain 10 (ND10), converge at viral DNA and place restrictions on viral gene expression. Meanwhile the infected cell mobilizes its histones and histone-associated repressors to force the viral DNA into nucleosome-like structures and also represses viral transcription. Both anti-viral strategies are negated by various HSV countermeasures. One HSV gene transactivator, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a key player in antagonizing both the ND10 restriction and chromatin repression. On one hand, ICP0 uses its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity to target major ND10 components for proteasome-dependent degradation and thereafter disrupts the ND10 nuclear bodies. On the other hand, ICP0 participates in de-repressing the HSV chromatin by changing histone composition or modification and therefore activates viral transcription. Involvement of a single viral protein in two seemingly different pathways suggests that there is coordination in host anti-viral defense mechanisms and also cooperation in viral counteraction strategies. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the role of chromatin regulation and ND10 dynamics in both lytic and latent HSV infection. We focus on the new observations showing that ND10 nuclear bodies play a critical role in cellular chromatin regulation. We intend to find the connections between the two major anti-viral defense pathways, chromatin remodeling and ND10 structure, in order to achieve a better understanding of how host orchestrates a concerted defense and how HSV adapts with and overcomes the host immunity. PMID:27048561

  15. Anti HSV-1 flavonoid derivatives tethered with houttuynin from Houttuynia cordata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Dan; Li, Ting; Gao, Hao; Zhu, Qin-Chang; Lu, Chuan-Jian; Wu, Hong-Ling; Peng, Tao; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the phytochemical investigation of the 50% aq. EtOH extract of Houttuynia cordata, an effective TCM and functional food in China, which led to the isolation of 17 flavonoids including four new ones. The four new compounds were flavonoid derivatives tethered with houttuynin (3-oxododecanal). Each of the new compounds was obtained as a pair of inseparable diasteriomeric epimers due to the chiral carbon of hemiketal at C-3″. This phenomenon is rooted in the ring-chain tautomerism of the hemiketal functional group in solution, which was proved by dynamic NMR experiments. The new compounds 1-4 displayed inhibitory activities against herpes simplex virus 1, with respective IC50 values of 38.46, 14.10, 62.00 and 70.76 µM, which was associated with the medicinal functions of H. cordata. PMID:24288290

  16. Selective killing of CD4+ cells harboring a human immunodeficiency virus-inducible suicide gene prevents viral spread in an infected cell population.

    PubMed

    Caruso, M; Klatzmann, D

    1992-01-01

    We have stably expressed in CD4+ lymphoid cells the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) gene under the control of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter and transactivation response element sequences. Upon HIV infection these regulatory sequences were transactivated, switching on high-level expression of HSV1-TK. This in turn caused the death of HIV-infected cells when they were cultured in the presence of acyclovir, a nucleoside analog that becomes toxic after phosphorylation by HSV1-TK. The elimination of HIV-infected cells resulted in the arrest of HIV spreading in the culture. Complete protection of HSV1-TK-expressing cells was obtained using acyclovir concentrations that are commonly detected in the plasma of patients treated for HSV1 infection. Thus, expression of this DNA construct generates a pool of CD4+ booby-trapped cells that, as a population, are resistant to HIV infection. Our data provide a rationale for the use of suicide genes in the design of gene therapy of HIV infection. PMID:1346066

  17. Integrity assessment report of tanks TK-101 and TK-102

    SciTech Connect

    MCSHANE, D.S.

    1999-08-25

    This Integrity Assessment Report (IAR) is prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest (FDNW) for Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc., (WMH), the operations contractor; Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH), the Hanford Site Manager; and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the system owner. This IAR addresses the evaluation of Tanks 101 and 102 and other existing components located in the 219-S Waste Handling Facility. This report will be included in the Part B Permit for the 2226 Laboratory and is a portion of the integrity assessment of the overall 222-5 Laboratory radioactive liquid waste disposal system. This IAR is prepared in accordance with WAC 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations; Section 640(2), ''Assessment of Existing Tank Systems Integrity .''

  18. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  19. Toxicity studies in thymidine kinase-deficient herpes simplex virus therapy for malignant astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, W W; Tan, J; Redekop, G J; Goldie, J H

    1996-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that genetically engineered thymidine kinase (tk)-defective herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can effectively and selectively destroy gliomas in animal models. The consequences of viral infection and tumor regression must be characterized before this therapy can be applied in human trials. To study the potential for long-term toxicity, immunocompetent rats harboring 9L gliosarcomas were injected intratumorally with a tk-defective HSV-1, KOS-SB, at titers that previously have been demonstrated to cause tumor regression. In animals surviving 3 months or longer following viral treatment, there was no evidence of persistent infection or inflammation in peritumoral brain tissue or in remote systemic organs studied with routine histological and immunocytochemical analyses. Polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for HSV-1 detected HSV-1 DNA in peritumoral tissue only in animals sacrificed within 3 months of viral injection. There was no evidence of HSV-1 DNA in systemic tissues at any time after treatment. We conclude that stereotactic intratumoral injection of tk-deficient HSV can be attempted for the treatment of brain tumors without risk of systemic infection or significant toxicity to normal brain or remote proliferating tissues. PMID:8814171

  20. Sequence Analysis of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Thymidine Kinase and DNA Polymerase Genes from over 300 Clinical Isolates from 1973 to 2014 Finds Novel Mutations That May Be Relevant for Development of Antiviral Resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne; Bohn-Wippert, Kathrin; Schlattmann, Peter; Zell, Roland; Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    A total of 302 clinical herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strains, collected over 4 decades from 1973 to 2014, were characterized retrospectively for drug resistance. All HSV-1 isolates were analyzed genotypically for nonsynonymous mutations in the thymidine kinase (TK) and DNA polymerase (Pol) genes. The resistance phenotype against acyclovir (ACV) and/or foscarnet (FOS) was examined in the case of novel, unclear, or resistance-related mutations. Twenty-six novel natural polymorphisms could be detected in the TK gene and 69 in the DNA Pol gene. Furthermore, three novel resistance-associated mutations (two in the TK gene and one in the DNA Pol gene) were analyzed, and eight known but hitherto unclear amino acid substitutions (two encoded in TK and six in the DNA Pol gene) could be clarified. Between 1973 and 2014, the distribution of amino acid changes related to the natural gene polymorphisms of TK and DNA Pol remained largely stable. Resistance to ACV was confirmed phenotypically for 16 isolates, and resistance to ACV plus FOS was confirmed for 1 isolate. Acyclovir-resistant strains were observed from the year 1995 onwards, predominantly in immunosuppressed patients, especially those with stem cell transplantation, and the number of ACV-resistant strains increased during the last 2 decades. The data confirm the strong genetic variability among HIV-1 isolates, which is more pronounced in the DNA Pol gene than in the TK gene, and will facilitate considerably the rapid genotypic diagnosis of HSV-1 resistance.

  1. Sequence Analysis of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Thymidine Kinase and DNA Polymerase Genes from over 300 Clinical Isolates from 1973 to 2014 Finds Novel Mutations That May Be Relevant for Development of Antiviral Resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne; Bohn-Wippert, Kathrin; Schlattmann, Peter; Zell, Roland; Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    A total of 302 clinical herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strains, collected over 4 decades from 1973 to 2014, were characterized retrospectively for drug resistance. All HSV-1 isolates were analyzed genotypically for nonsynonymous mutations in the thymidine kinase (TK) and DNA polymerase (Pol) genes. The resistance phenotype against acyclovir (ACV) and/or foscarnet (FOS) was examined in the case of novel, unclear, or resistance-related mutations. Twenty-six novel natural polymorphisms could be detected in the TK gene and 69 in the DNA Pol gene. Furthermore, three novel resistance-associated mutations (two in the TK gene and one in the DNA Pol gene) were analyzed, and eight known but hitherto unclear amino acid substitutions (two encoded in TK and six in the DNA Pol gene) could be clarified. Between 1973 and 2014, the distribution of amino acid changes related to the natural gene polymorphisms of TK and DNA Pol remained largely stable. Resistance to ACV was confirmed phenotypically for 16 isolates, and resistance to ACV plus FOS was confirmed for 1 isolate. Acyclovir-resistant strains were observed from the year 1995 onwards, predominantly in immunosuppressed patients, especially those with stem cell transplantation, and the number of ACV-resistant strains increased during the last 2 decades. The data confirm the strong genetic variability among HIV-1 isolates, which is more pronounced in the DNA Pol gene than in the TK gene, and will facilitate considerably the rapid genotypic diagnosis of HSV-1 resistance. PMID:26055375

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Marie; Joore, Manuela; Whiting, Penny; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Armstrong, Nigel; Misso, Kate; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment with standard chemotherapy. Patients with NSCLC are therefore tested for EGFR-TK tumour gene mutations to inform treatment decisions. There are a variety of tests available to detect these mutations. The different tests vary in the specific mutations that they attempt to detect, the amount of tumour cells needed for the test to work, the time that it takes to give a result, the error rate of the test, and the cost of the test. OBJECTIVE To compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of EGFR-TK mutation tests used to identify previously untreated adults with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC, who may benefit from first-line treatment with TKIs. DATA SOURCES Twelve databases to August 2012 [including MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Daily Update (OvidSP), EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment database (HTA), Science Citation Index (SCI), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), BIOSIS Previews, NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme, PROSPERO (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews)], research registers and conference proceedings. A web-based survey gathered data on technical performance of EGFR-TK mutation tests. METHODS Randomised controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Diagnostic accuracy studies were assessed using QUADAS-2. There were insufficient data for meta-analysis. For accuracy studies, we calculated sensitivity and specificity together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Survival data were summarised

  3. Combined suicide and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene therapy induces complete tumor regression and generates antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Jones, R K; Pope, I M; Kinsella, A R; Watson, A J; Christmas, S E

    2000-12-01

    The use of prodrug-activated ("suicide") gene therapy has been shown to be effective in inducing tumor regression when only a small proportion of tumor cells contains the suicide gene. These experiments were designed to test whether additional therapeutic benefit may be obtained by stimulating the immune response. Murine MC26 colon carcinoma cells, either untransduced or transduced with genes for herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) or human GM-CSF, were injected subcutaneously into syngeneic BALB/c mice in various combinations. Inoculation of equal numbers of untransduced and HSV1-TK-containing cells followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment resulted in almost complete tumor regression, but by 7 weeks, tumors had recurred in all mice. A similar initial regression was obtained using equal numbers of cells containing HSV1-TK and GM-CSF genes, but >80% of these mice remained tumor-free after 3 months. Groups of tumor-free mice that had received GM-CSF-containing cells were left for different periods of time and rechallenged with unmodified MC26 cells on the opposite flank. Of the mice rechallenged 14, 28, and 108 days later, 100%, 88%, and 57%, respectively, showed complete resistance to unmodified tumor cells. In mice that showed tumor regrowth, tumor volume was much less than in control mice. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from resistant mice to naïve syngeneic mice resulted in partial resistance to challenge with unmodified tumor cells. Specific cytotoxicity against MC26 cells was only demonstrable in mice receiving GM-CSF- and HSV1-TK-containing tumor cells. These experiments show that the presence of cells secreting GM-CSF in HSV1-TK-containing, regressing tumor is able to induce complete or partial resistance to tumor rechallenge. This indicates the potential usefulness of GM-CSF in enhancing other antitumor therapies.

  4. Prevalence of Intrathecal Acyclovir Resistant Virus in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Mitterreiter, Johanna G; Titulaer, Maarten J; van Nierop, Gijsbert P; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; Aron, Georgina I; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M; Ouwendijk, Werner J D

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a life-threatening complication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Acyclovir (ACV) is the antiviral treatment of choice, but may lead to emergence of ACV-resistant (ACVR) HSV due to mutations in the viral UL23 gene encoding for the ACV-targeted thymidine kinase (TK) protein. Here, we determined the prevalence of intrathecal ACVR-associated HSV TK mutations in HSE patients and compared TK genotypes of sequential HSV isolates in paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blister fluid of mucosal HSV lesions. Clinical samples were obtained from 12 HSE patients, encompassing 4 HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and 8 HSV-2 encephalitis patients. HSV DNA load was determined by real-time PCR and complete HSV TK gene sequences were obtained by nested PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. All HSV-1 HSE patients contained viral TK mutations encompassing 30 unique nucleotide and 13 distinct amino acid mutations. By contrast, a total of 5 unique nucleotide and 4 distinct amino acid changes were detected in 7 of 8 HSV-2 patients. Detected mutations were identified as natural polymorphisms located in non-conserved HSV TK gene regions. ACV therapy did not induce the emergence of ACVR-associated HSV TK mutations in consecutive CSF and mucocutaneous samples of 5 individual patients. Phenotypic susceptibility analysis of these mucocutaneous HSV isolates demonstrated ACV-sensitive virus in 2 HSV-1 HSE patients, whereas in two HSV-2 HSE patients ACVR virus was detected in the absence of known ACVR-associated TK mutations. In conclusion, we did not detect intrathecal ACVR-associated TK mutations in HSV isolates obtained from 12 HSE patients.

  5. Prevalence of Intrathecal Acyclovir Resistant Virus in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Mitterreiter, Johanna G; Titulaer, Maarten J; van Nierop, Gijsbert P; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; Aron, Georgina I; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M; Ouwendijk, Werner J D

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a life-threatening complication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Acyclovir (ACV) is the antiviral treatment of choice, but may lead to emergence of ACV-resistant (ACVR) HSV due to mutations in the viral UL23 gene encoding for the ACV-targeted thymidine kinase (TK) protein. Here, we determined the prevalence of intrathecal ACVR-associated HSV TK mutations in HSE patients and compared TK genotypes of sequential HSV isolates in paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blister fluid of mucosal HSV lesions. Clinical samples were obtained from 12 HSE patients, encompassing 4 HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and 8 HSV-2 encephalitis patients. HSV DNA load was determined by real-time PCR and complete HSV TK gene sequences were obtained by nested PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. All HSV-1 HSE patients contained viral TK mutations encompassing 30 unique nucleotide and 13 distinct amino acid mutations. By contrast, a total of 5 unique nucleotide and 4 distinct amino acid changes were detected in 7 of 8 HSV-2 patients. Detected mutations were identified as natural polymorphisms located in non-conserved HSV TK gene regions. ACV therapy did not induce the emergence of ACVR-associated HSV TK mutations in consecutive CSF and mucocutaneous samples of 5 individual patients. Phenotypic susceptibility analysis of these mucocutaneous HSV isolates demonstrated ACV-sensitive virus in 2 HSV-1 HSE patients, whereas in two HSV-2 HSE patients ACVR virus was detected in the absence of known ACVR-associated TK mutations. In conclusion, we did not detect intrathecal ACVR-associated TK mutations in HSV isolates obtained from 12 HSE patients. PMID:27171421

  6. Prevalence of Intrathecal Acyclovir Resistant Virus in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mitterreiter, Johanna G.; Titulaer, Maarten J.; van Nierop, Gijsbert P.; van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; Aron, Georgina I.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Ouwendijk, Werner J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a life-threatening complication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Acyclovir (ACV) is the antiviral treatment of choice, but may lead to emergence of ACV-resistant (ACVR) HSV due to mutations in the viral UL23 gene encoding for the ACV-targeted thymidine kinase (TK) protein. Here, we determined the prevalence of intrathecal ACVR–associated HSV TK mutations in HSE patients and compared TK genotypes of sequential HSV isolates in paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blister fluid of mucosal HSV lesions. Clinical samples were obtained from 12 HSE patients, encompassing 4 HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and 8 HSV-2 encephalitis patients. HSV DNA load was determined by real-time PCR and complete HSV TK gene sequences were obtained by nested PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. All HSV-1 HSE patients contained viral TK mutations encompassing 30 unique nucleotide and 13 distinct amino acid mutations. By contrast, a total of 5 unique nucleotide and 4 distinct amino acid changes were detected in 7 of 8 HSV-2 patients. Detected mutations were identified as natural polymorphisms located in non-conserved HSV TK gene regions. ACV therapy did not induce the emergence of ACVR-associated HSV TK mutations in consecutive CSF and mucocutaneous samples of 5 individual patients. Phenotypic susceptibility analysis of these mucocutaneous HSV isolates demonstrated ACV-sensitive virus in 2 HSV-1 HSE patients, whereas in two HSV-2 HSE patients ACVR virus was detected in the absence of known ACVR-associated TK mutations. In conclusion, we did not detect intrathecal ACVR-associated TK mutations in HSV isolates obtained from 12 HSE patients. PMID:27171421

  7. Evidence for a novel regulatory pathway for herpes simplex virus gene expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kosz-Vnenchak, M; Jacobson, J; Coen, D M; Knipe, D M

    1993-01-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK)-negative (TK-) mutant strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) show reduced expression of alpha and beta viral genes during acute infection of trigeminal ganglion neurons following corneal infection (M. Kosz-Vnenchak, D. M. Coen, and D. M. Knipe, J. Virol. 64:5396-5402, 1990). It was surprising that a defect in a beta gene product would lead to decreased alpha and beta gene expression, given the regulatory pathways demonstrated for HSV infection of cultured cells. In this study, we have examined viral gene expression during reactivation from latent infection in explanted trigeminal ganglion tissue. In explant reactivation studies with wild-type virus, we observed viral productive gene expression over the first 48 h of explant incubation occurring in a temporal order (alpha, beta, gamma) similar to that in cultured cells. This occurred predominantly in latency-associated transcript-positive neurons but was limited to a fraction of these cells. In contrast, TK- mutant viruses showed greatly reduced alpha and beta gene expression upon explant of latently infected trigeminal ganglion tissue. An inhibitor of viral TK or an inhibitor of viral DNA polymerase greatly decreased viral lytic gene expression in trigeminal ganglion tissue latently infected with wild-type virus and explanted in culture. These results indicate that the regulatory mechanisms governing HSV gene expression are different in trigeminal ganglion neurons and cultured cells. We present a new model for viral gene expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons with implications for the nature of the decision process between latent infection and productive infection by HSV. Images PMID:8394454

  8. Hypertools in image and volume visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.

    1996-06-17

    This paper describes our experience in image and volume visualization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. After an introduction on visualization issues, we present a new software approach to the analysis and visualization of images and volumes. The efficiency of the visualization process is improved by letting the user combine small and reusable applications by the means of a machine-independent interpreted language such as Tcl/Tk. These hypertools can communicate with each other over a network, which has a direct impact on the design of graphical interfaces. We first describe the implementation of a flexible gray-scale image widget that can handle large data sets, provides complete control of the color palette and allows for manual and semi-interactive segmentation. This visualization tool can be embedded in a data-flow image processing environment to assess the quality of acquisition, preprocessing and filtering of raw data. This approach combines the simplicity of visual programming with the power of a high-level interpreted language. We show how hypertools can be used in surface and volume rendering and how they increase the interaction efficiency by performing complex or tedious tasks automatically. One biomedical application is presented.

  9. Cytosine methylation in CTF and Sp1 recognition sites of an HSV tk promoter: effects on transcription in vivo and on factor binding in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Hattar, J; Beard, P; Jiricny, J

    1989-01-01

    We methylated specific cytosine residues within or immediately around the CTF and Sp1 binding sites of the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. The efficiency of transcription in vivo was reduced at least 50-fold compared with transcription from the unmethylated promoter. However, methylation within the CTF recognition site had no effect on the affinity of CTF for this site in vitro. Methylation of the Sp1 site resulted in only a small decrease in the affinity of this factor for its recognition site. In vivo studies showed that the same gene inserted in different vector DNAs was regulated differently by methylation in the promoter. These results show that cytosine methylation can inhibit transcription by a mechanism other than directly blocking the binding of transcription factors. Images PMID:2557588

  10. Transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 couples the histone chaperone Asf1b to HSV-1 DNA replication components.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hua; Nogueira, Mauricio L; Vogel, Jodi L; Kristie, Thomas M

    2010-02-01

    The cellular transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 interacts with numerous transcription factors as well as other coactivators and is a component of multiple chromatin modulation complexes. The protein is essential for the expression of the immediate early genes of both herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella zoster virus and functions, in part, by coupling chromatin modification components including the Set1 or MLL1 histone methyltransferases and the histone demethylase LSD1 to promote the installation of positive chromatin marks and the activation of viral immediately early gene transcription. Although studies have investigated the role of HCF-1 in both cellular and viral transcription, little is known about other processes that the protein may be involved in. Here we demonstrate that HCF-1 localizes to sites of HSV replication late in infection. HCF-1 interacts directly and simultaneously with both HSV DNA replication proteins and the cellular histone chaperone Asf1b, a protein that regulates the progression of cellular DNA replication forks via chromatin reorganization. Asf1b localizes with HCF-1 in viral replication foci and depletion of Asf1b results in significantly reduced viral DNA accumulation. The results support a model in which the transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 is a component of the HSV DNA replication assembly and promotes viral DNA replication by coupling Asf1b to DNA replication components. This coupling provides a novel function for HCF-1 and insights into the mechanisms of modulating chromatin during DNA replication.

  11. Crystal Structure of the HSV-1 Fc Receptor Bound to Fc Reveals a Mechanism for Antibody Bipolar Bridging

    SciTech Connect

    Sprague, E.R.; Wang, C.; Baker, D.; Bjorkman, P.J.; /Caltech /Howard Hughes Med. Inst.

    2007-08-08

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 expresses a heterodimeric Fc receptor, gE-gI, on the surfaces of virions and infected cells that binds the Fc region of host immunoglobulin G and is implicated in the cell-to-cell spread of virus. gE-gI binds immunoglobulin G at the basic pH of the cell surface and releases it at the acidic pH of lysosomes, consistent with a role in facilitating the degradation of antiviral antibodies. Here we identify the C-terminal domain of the gE ectodomain (CgE) as the minimal Fc-binding domain and present a 1.78-{angstrom} CgE structure. A 5-{angstrom} gE-gI/Fc crystal structure, which was independently verified by a theoretical prediction method, reveals that CgE binds Fc at the C{sub H}2-C{sub H}3 interface, the binding site for several mammalian and bacterial Fc-binding proteins. The structure identifies interface histidines that may confer pH-dependent binding and regions of CgE implicated in cell-to-cell spread of virus. The ternary organization of the gE-gI/Fc complex is compatible with antibody bipolar bridging, which can interfere with the antiviral immune response.

  12. Embedded GPU implementation of anomaly detection for hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Gao, Lianru; Zhang, Bing; Yang, Bin; Chen, Zhengchao

    2015-10-01

    Anomaly detection is one of the most important techniques for remotely sensed hyperspectral data interpretation. Developing fast processing techniques for anomaly detection has received considerable attention in recent years, especially in analysis scenarios with real-time constraints. In this paper, we develop an embedded graphics processing units based parallel computation for streaming background statistics anomaly detection algorithm. The streaming background statistics method can simulate real-time anomaly detection, which refer to that the processing can be performed at the same time as the data are collected. The algorithm is implemented on NVIDIA Jetson TK1 development kit. The experiment, conducted with real hyperspectral data, indicate the effectiveness of the proposed implementations. This work shows the embedded GPU gives a promising solution for high-performance with low power consumption hyperspectral image applications.

  13. Comparative Analysis of T Cell Imaging with Human Nuclear Reporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Maxim A.; Zhang, Hanwen; Lee, Jason; Moroz, Ekaterina; Zurita, Juan; Shenker, Larissa; Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald; Ponomarev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring genetically altered T cells is an important component of adoptive T cell therapy in patients, and the ability to visualize their trafficking/targeting, proliferation/expansion, and retention/death using highly sensitive reporter systems that do not induce an immunologic response would provide useful information. Therefore, we focused on human reporter gene systems that have the potential for translation to clinical studies. The objective of the in vivo imaging studies was to determine the minimum number of T cells that could be visualized with the different nuclear reporter systems. We determined the imaging sensitivity (lower limit of T cell detection) of each reporter using appropriate radiolabeled probes for PET or SPECT imaging. Methods Human T cells were transduced with retroviral vectors encoding for the human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), human sodiumiodide symporter (hNIS), a human deoxycytidine kinase double mutant (hdCKDM), and herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (hsvTK) reporter genes. After viability and growth were assessed, 105 to 3 × 106 reporter T cells were injected subcutaneously on the shoulder area. The corresponding radiolabeled probe was injected intravenously 30 min later, followed by sequential PET or SPECT imaging. Radioactivity at the T cell injection sites and in the thigh (back-ground) was measured. Results The viability and growth of experimental cells were unaffected by transduction. The hNET/meta-18F-fluorobenzylguanidine (18F-MFBG) reporter system could detect less than 1 × 105 T cells because of its high uptake in the transduced T cells and low background activity. The hNIS/124I-iodide reporter system could detect approximately 1 × 106 T cells; 124I-iodide uptake at the T cell injection site was time-dependent and associated with high background. The hdCKDM/2′-18F-fluoro-5-ethyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (18F-FEAU) and hsvTK/18F-FEAU reporter systems detected approximately 3 × 105 T cells

  14. Expression of herpes simplex virus beta and gamma genes integrated in mammalian cells and their induction by an alpha gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Sandri-Goldin, R M; Goldin, A L; Holland, L E; Glorioso, J C; Levine, M

    1983-01-01

    The proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) form three kinetic groups termed alpha, beta, and gamma, whose synthesis is regulated in a cascade fashion. alpha products are synthesized first during infection, and they are required for synthesis of beta and gamma proteins. To examine the expression of several HSV-1 beta and gamma genes in the absence of alpha functions, we transferred into mammalian cells a plasmid containing a region of the HSV-1 genome that codes for only beta and gamma genes (0.315 to 0.421 map units). We found stable integration of at least one copy of the intact plasmid in each cell line. Four HSV-1 transcripts of the beta and gamma classes were transcribed constitutively in the cells, including the genes for glycoprotein B and DNA-binding protein. No constitutive synthesis of these two proteins could be demonstrated, however. The integrated HSV-1 genes responded to viral regulatory signals in that they could be induced by infection with HSV-1 mutants resulting in a high level of synthesis of both glycoprotein B and DNA-binding protein. The HSV-1 alpha gene product ICP4 was necessary for this induction, and it was found to be most efficient at a low multiplicity of infection. Functional expression of four genes was demonstrated in that the cell lines complemented infecting HSV-1 temperature-sensitive mutants. The same genes were not available for homologous recombination with infecting virus, however, since no recombinant wild-type virus could be detected. These data demonstrate that HSV-1 beta and gamma genes can be transcribed in the absence of alpha functions in mammalian cells, but that they still respond to HSV-1 regulatory signals such as the alpha gene product ICP4. Images PMID:6318078

  15. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  16. Indexing Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on access to digital image collections by means of manual and automatic indexing. Contains six sections: (1) Studies of Image Systems and their Use; (2) Approaches to Indexing Images; (3) Image Attributes; (4) Concept-Based Indexing; (5) Content-Based Indexing; and (6) Browsing in Image Retrieval. Contains 105 references. (AEF)

  17. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Ting, Gann; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/ tk-luc). A good correlation ( R2=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm 3 ( R2=0.907). γ Scintigraphy combined with [ 131I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  18. BIODISTRIBUTION AND PET IMAGING OF [18F]-FLUOROADENOSINE DERIVATIVES

    PubMed Central

    Alauddin, Mian M.; Shahinian, Antranik; Park, Ryan; Tohme, Michael; Fissekis, John D.; Conti, Peter S.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Many fluorinated analogues of adenosine nucleoside have been synthesized and studied as potential antitumor and antiviral agents. Earlier we reported radiosynthesis of 2′-deoxy-2′-[18F]fluoro-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-adenine ([18F]-FAA) and 3′-deoxy-3′-[18F]fluoro-1-β-D-xylofuranosyl-adenine ([18F]FXA). Now we report their in vivo studies including blood clearance, biodistribution and micro-PET imaging in tumor-bearing nude mice. Methods: Tumors were grown in six weeks old athymic nude mice (Harlan, Indianapolis, IN) by inoculation of HT-29 cells, wild type cells in the left flank and transduced cells with HSV-tk on the right flank. When the tumor was about 1 cm in size, animals were injected with these radiotracers for in vivo studies, including blood clearance, micro-PET imaging and biodistribution. Results: Uptake of [18F]FAA in tumor was 3.3-fold higher than blood, with highest uptake in the spleen. Maximum uptake of [18F]FXA was observed in the heart compared to other organs. There was no tumor uptake of [18F]FXA. Biodistribution results were supported by micro-PET images, which also showed very high uptake of [18F]FAA in spleen and visualization of tumors, and high uptake of [18F]FXA in the heart. Conclusion: These results suggest that [18F]FAA may be useful for tumor imaging, while [18F]FXA may have potential as a heart imaging agent with PET. PMID:17383576

  19. Latent herpes simplex virus type 1 transcripts in peripheral and central nervous system tissues of mice map to similar regions of the viral genome.

    PubMed Central

    Deatly, A M; Spivack, J G; Lavi, E; O'Boyle, D R; Fraser, N W

    1988-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA and RNA have been detected in peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) tissues of latently infected mice. However, explant methods are successful in reactivating HSV-1 only from latently infected PNS tissues. In this report, latent herpesvirus infections in mouse PNS and CNS tissues were compared by in situ hybridization to determine whether the difference in reactivation was at the level of the virus or the host tissue. It was demonstrated that the HSV-1 transcripts present during latency in the mouse PNS and CNS originated from the same region of the genome, the repeats which bracket the long unique sequence. Therefore, the difference in reactivation with PNS and CNS tissues cannot be accounted for by differences in the extent of the HSV-1 genome transcribed during herpesvirus latency. Latent HSV-1 RNA was detected in the trigeminal ganglia (PNS) and the trigeminal system in the CNS from the mesencephalon to the spinal cord as well as other regions of the CNS not noted previously. Latent HSV-1 RNA was found predominantly in neurons but also in a small number of cells which could not be identified as neuronal cells. It is suggested that host differences in CNS and PNS tissues, rather than differences in latent virus transcription, may be important determinants in the HSV-1 reactivation process in explanted tissues. Images PMID:2828670

  20. Photothermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitry; Antonishina, Elena

    1995-02-01

    An automated image analysis system with two imaging regimes is described. Photothermal (PT) effect is used for imaging of a temperature field or absorption structure of the sample (the cell) with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. In a cell study PT-technique enables imaging of live non-stained cells, and the monitoring of the cell shape/structure. The system includes a dual laser illumination unit coupled to a conventional optical microscope. A sample chamber provides automated or manual loading of up to 3 samples and cell positioning. For image detection a 256 X 256 10-bit CCD-camera is used. The lasers, scanning stage, and camera are controlled by PC. The system provides optical (transmitted light) image, probe laser optical image, and PT-image acquisition. Operation rate is 1 - 1.5 sec per cell for a cycle: cell positioning -- 3 images acquisition -- image parameters calculation. A special database provides image/parameters storage, presentation, and cell diagnostic according to quantitative image parameters. The described system has been tested during live and stained blood cell studies. PT-images of the cells have been used for cell differentiation. In experiments with the red blood cells (RBC) that originate from normal and anaemia blood parameters for disease differentiation have been found. For white blood cells in PT-images the details of cell structure have found that absent in their optical images.

  1. Discovering Molecules That Regulate Efferocytosis Using Primary Human Macrophages and High Content Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Santulli-Marotto, Sandra; Gervais, Alexis; Fisher, Jamie; Strake, Brandy; Ogden, Carol Anne; Riveley, Chelsea; Giles-Komar, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Defective clearance of apoptotic cells can result in sustained inflammation and subsequent autoimmunity. Macrophages, the “professional phagocyte” of the body, are responsible for efficient, non-phlogistic, apoptotic cell clearance. Controlling phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages is an attractive therapeutic opportunity to ameliorate inflammation. Using high content imaging, we have developed a system for evaluating the effects of antibody treatment on apoptotic cell uptake in primary human macrophages by comparing the Phagocytic Index (PI) for each antibody. Herein we demonstrate the feasibility of evaluating a panel of antibodies of unknown specificities obtained by immunization of mice with primary human macrophages and show that they can be distinguished based on individual PI measurements. In this study ~50% of antibodies obtained enhance phagocytosis of apoptotic cells while approximately 5% of the antibodies in the panel exhibit some inhibition. Though the specificities of the majority of antibodies are unknown, two of the antibodies that improved apoptotic cell uptake recognize recombinant MerTK; a receptor known to function in this capacity in vivo. The agonistic impact of these antibodies on efferocytosis could be demonstrated without addition of either of the MerTK ligands, Gas6 or ProS. These results validate applying the mechanism of this fundamental biological process as a means for identification of modulators that could potentially serve as therapeutics. This strategy for interrogating macrophages to discover molecules regulating apoptotic cell uptake is not limited by access to purified protein thereby increasing the possibility of finding novel apoptotic cell uptake pathways. PMID:26674639

  2. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  3. Proof Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidron, Ivy; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a proof image is often an important stage in a learner's construction of a proof. In this paper, we introduce, characterize, and exemplify the notion of proof image. We also investigate how proof images emerge. Our approach starts from the learner's efforts to construct a justification without (or before) attempting any…

  4. Image alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  5. Intracranial imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, M.; Cook, G.; Al-Kutoubi, A.

    1996-01-01

    This article concentrates on the imaging of intracranial structures and outlines some basic imaging strategies for common clinical presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:8935596

  6. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation: Part I. Reporter Gene Design, Characterization, and Optical in Vivo Imaging of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Ziv, Keren; Ito, Ken; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Jürgen K; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Swanson, Julia C; Merk, Denis R; Lyons, Jennifer K; Yerushalmi, David; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Kosuge, Hisanori; Dao, Catherine N; Ray, Pritha; Patel, Manishkumar; Chang, Ya-Fang; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Cohen, Jeff Eric; Goldstone, Andrew Brooks; Habte, Frezghi; Bhaumik, Srabani; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Robbins, Robert C; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Brinton, Todd J; Yock, Paul G; McConnell, Michael V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To use multimodality reporter-gene imaging to assess the serial survival of marrow stromal cells (MSC) after therapy for myocardial infarction (MI) and to determine if the requisite preclinical imaging end point was met prior to a follow-up large-animal MSC imaging study. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care. Mice (n = 19) that had experienced MI were injected with bone marrow-derived MSC that expressed a multimodality triple fusion (TF) reporter gene. The TF reporter gene (fluc2-egfp-sr39ttk) consisted of a human promoter, ubiquitin, driving firefly luciferase 2 (fluc2), enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp), and the sr39tk positron emission tomography reporter gene. Serial bioluminescence imaging of MSC-TF and ex vivo luciferase assays were performed. Correlations were analyzed with the Pearson product-moment correlation, and serial imaging results were analyzed with a mixed-effects regression model. Results Analysis of the MSC-TF after cardiac cell therapy showed significantly lower signal on days 8 and 14 than on day 2 (P = .011 and P = .001, respectively). MSC-TF with MI demonstrated significantly higher signal than MSC-TF without MI at days 4, 8, and 14 (P = .016). Ex vivo luciferase activity assay confirmed the presence of MSC-TF on days 8 and 14 after MI. Conclusion Multimodality reporter-gene imaging was successfully used to assess serial MSC survival after therapy for MI, and it was determined that the requisite preclinical imaging end point, 14 days of MSC survival, was met prior to a follow-up large-animal MSC study. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27308957

  7. A DNA vaccine encoding VP22 of herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) and OprF confers enhanced protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xian; Wang, Yan; Xia, Yifan; Zhang, Lijuan; Yang, Qin; Lei, Jun

    2016-08-17

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimicrobial resistance is a major therapeutic challenge. DNA vaccination is an attractive approach for antigen-specific immunotherapy against P. aeruginosa. We explored the feasibility of employing Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein, VP22, as a molecular tool to enhance the immunogenicity of an OprF DNA vaccine against P. aeruginosa. Recombinant DNA vaccines, pVAX1-OprF, pVAX1-OprF-VP22 (encoding a n-OprF-VP22-c fusion protein) and pVAX1-VP22-OprF (encoding a n-VP22-OprF-c fusion protein) were constructed. The humoral and cellular immune responses and immune protective effects of these DNA vaccines in mice were evaluated. In this report, we showed that vaccination with pVAX1-OprF-VP22 induced higher levels of IgG titer, T cell proliferation rate. It also provided better immune protection against the P. aeruginosa challenge when compared to that induced by pVAX1-OprF or pVAX1-VP22-OprF DNA vaccines. Molecular mechanistic analyses indicated vaccination with pVAX1-OprF-VP22 triggered immune responses characterized by a preferential increase in antigen specific IgG2a and IFN-γ in mice, indicating Th1 polarization. We concluded that VP22 is a potent stimulatory molecular tool for DNA vaccination when fused to the carboxyl end of OprF gene. Our study provides a novel strategy for prevention and treatment of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27449680

  8. Evaluation of the immune response to Anaplasma marginale MSP5 protein using a HSV-1 amplicon vector system or recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Carlos; Torioni de Echaide, Susana; Mattion, Nora

    2014-12-01

    Anaplasma marginale is an intraerythrocytic vector-borne infectious agent of cattle. Immunization with the current vaccine, based on parasitized erythrocytes with live Anaplasma centrale, shows some constraints and confers partial protection, suggesting the feasibility for the development of new generation of vaccines. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of sequential immunization of BALB/c mice, with herpesvirus amplicon vector-based vaccines combined with protein-based vaccines, on the quality of the immune response against the major surface protein 5 of A. marginale. The highest antibody titers against MSP5 were elicited in mice that received two doses of adjuvanted recombinant protein (p < 0.0001). Mice treated with a heterologous prime-boost strategy generated sustained antibody titers at least up to 200 days, and a higher specific cellular response. The results presented here showed that sequential immunization with HSV-based vectors and purified antigen enhances the quality of the immune response against A. marginale. PMID:25458492

  9. Evaluation of the immune response to Anaplasma marginale MSP5 protein using a HSV-1 amplicon vector system or recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Carlos; Torioni de Echaide, Susana; Mattion, Nora

    2014-12-01

    Anaplasma marginale is an intraerythrocytic vector-borne infectious agent of cattle. Immunization with the current vaccine, based on parasitized erythrocytes with live Anaplasma centrale, shows some constraints and confers partial protection, suggesting the feasibility for the development of new generation of vaccines. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of sequential immunization of BALB/c mice, with herpesvirus amplicon vector-based vaccines combined with protein-based vaccines, on the quality of the immune response against the major surface protein 5 of A. marginale. The highest antibody titers against MSP5 were elicited in mice that received two doses of adjuvanted recombinant protein (p < 0.0001). Mice treated with a heterologous prime-boost strategy generated sustained antibody titers at least up to 200 days, and a higher specific cellular response. The results presented here showed that sequential immunization with HSV-based vectors and purified antigen enhances the quality of the immune response against A. marginale.

  10. Antiviral Activity of a Cloned Peptide RC28 Isolated from the Higher Basidiomycetes Mushroom Rozites caperata in a Mouse Model of HSV-1 Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Naihong; He, Fen; Piraino, Frank F; Xiang, Haotian; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yun; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    An Escherichia coli-expressed peptide with a molecular weight of 28.26, derived from the complementary DNA of antiviral protein RC28 isolated from the mushroom Rozites caperata (=Cortinarius caperatus), demonstrated potent antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus-1 in Vero cells and in a herpes simplex virus-1 mouse keratitis model. Plaque assays in Vero cells showed that the peptide reduced viral yields by at least 1.2 logs; in the animal model the cloned peptide delayed the occurrence of stromal keratitis and alleviated the severity of the disease. We believe this is the first report of a cloned mushroom peptide with antiviral activity for the prevention and treatment of a viral disease.

  11. Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Electronic Imagery, Inc.'s ImageScale Plus software, developed through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Kennedy Space Flight Center for use on space shuttle Orbiter in 1991, enables astronauts to conduct image processing, prepare electronic still camera images in orbit, display them and downlink images to ground based scientists for evaluation. Electronic Imagery, Inc.'s ImageCount, a spin-off product of ImageScale Plus, is used to count trees in Florida orange groves. Other applications include x-ray and MRI imagery, textile designs and special effects for movies. As of 1/28/98, company could not be located, therefore contact/product information is no longer valid.

  12. Imaging genomics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Imaging genomics is an emerging field that is rapidly identifying genes that influence the brain, cognition, and risk for disease. Worldwide, thousands of individuals are being scanned with high-throughput genotyping (genome-wide scans), and new imaging techniques [high angular resolution diffusion imaging and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] that provide fine-grained measures of the brain’s structural and functional connectivity. Along with clinical diagnosis and cognitive testing, brain imaging offers highly reproducible measures that can be subjected to genetic analysis. Recent findings Recent studies of twin, pedigree, and population-based datasets have discovered several candidate genes that consistently show small to moderate effects on brain measures. Many studies measure single phenotypes from the images, such as hippocampal volume, but voxel-wise genomic methods can plot the profile of genetic association at each 3D point in the brain. This exploits the full arsenal of imaging statistics to discover and replicate gene effects. Summary Imaging genomics efforts worldwide are now working together to discover and replicate many promising leads. By studying brain phenotypes closer to causative gene action, larger gene effects are detectable with realistic sample sizes obtainable from meta-analysis of smaller studies. Imaging genomics has broad applications to dementia, mental illness, and public health. PMID:20581684

  13. Body Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computer-aided Tomography (CT) images are often complementary. In most cases, MRI is good for viewing soft tissue but not bone, while CT images are good for bone but not always good for soft tissue discrimination. Physicians and engineers in the Department of Radiology at the University of Michigan Hospitals are developing a technique for combining the best features of MRI and CT scans to increase the accuracy of discriminating one type of body tissue from another. One of their research tools is a computer program called HICAP. The program can be used to distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue in body images.

  14. Multispectral imaging and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Julie

    2014-02-01

    The color accuracy of conventional RGB cameras is not sufficient for many color-critical applications. One of these applications, namely the measurement of color defects in yarns, is why Prof. Til Aach and the Institute of Image Processing and Computer Vision (RWTH Aachen University, Germany) started off with multispectral imaging. The first acquisition device was a camera using a monochrome sensor and seven bandpass color filters positioned sequentially in front of it. The camera allowed sampling the visible wavelength range more accurately and reconstructing the spectra for each acquired image position. An overview will be given over several optical and imaging aspects of the multispectral camera that have been investigated. For instance, optical aberrations caused by filters and camera lens deteriorate the quality of captured multispectral images. The different aberrations were analyzed thoroughly and compensated based on models for the optical elements and the imaging chain by utilizing image processing. With this compensation, geometrical distortions disappear and sharpness is enhanced, without reducing the color accuracy of multispectral images. Strong foundations in multispectral imaging were laid and a fruitful cooperation was initiated with Prof. Bernhard Hill. Current research topics like stereo multispectral imaging and goniometric multispectral measure- ments that are further explored with his expertise will also be presented in this work.

  15. Blurred Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conde, Maryse

    1975-01-01

    The growing influence of Western culture has greatly affected African women's status and image in the traditional society. Working women are confronted with the dilemma of preserving family traditions while changing their behavior and image to become members of the labor force. (MR)

  16. Diagnostic Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    Diagnostic imaging lets doctors look inside your body for clues about a medical condition. A variety of machines and techniques can create pictures of the structures and activities inside your body. The type of imaging your doctor uses depends on your symptoms and ...

  17. Cerenkov imaging.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L J; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial structures. Imaging can basically be done using a sensitive camera optimized for low-light conditions, and it has a better resolution than any other nuclear imaging modality. CLI has been shown to effectively diagnose disease with regularly used PET isotope ((18)F-FDG) in clinical setting. Cerenkov luminescence tomography, Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy, and intraoperative Cerenkov imaging have also been explored with positive conclusions expanding the current range of applications. Cerenkov has also been used to improve PET imaging resolution since the source of both is the radioisotope being used. Smart imaging agents have been designed based on modulation of the Cerenkov signal using small molecules and nanoparticles giving better insight of the tumor biology. PMID:25287690

  18. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  19. Imaging Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tarkin, Jason M.; Dweck, Marc R.; Evans, Nicholas R.; Takx, Richard A.P.; Brown, Adam J.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in atherosclerosis imaging technology and research have provided a range of diagnostic tools to characterize high-risk plaque in vivo; however, these important vascular imaging methods additionally promise great scientific and translational applications beyond this quest. When combined with conventional anatomic- and hemodynamic-based assessments of disease severity, cross-sectional multimodal imaging incorporating molecular probes and other novel noninvasive techniques can add detailed interrogation of plaque composition, activity, and overall disease burden. In the catheterization laboratory, intravascular imaging provides unparalleled access to the world beneath the plaque surface, allowing tissue characterization and measurement of cap thickness with micrometer spatial resolution. Atherosclerosis imaging captures key data that reveal snapshots into underlying biology, which can test our understanding of fundamental research questions and shape our approach toward patient management. Imaging can also be used to quantify response to therapeutic interventions and ultimately help predict cardiovascular risk. Although there are undeniable barriers to clinical translation, many of these hold-ups might soon be surpassed by rapidly evolving innovations to improve image acquisition, coregistration, motion correction, and reduce radiation exposure. This article provides a comprehensive review of current and experimental atherosclerosis imaging methods and their uses in research and potential for translation to the clinic. PMID:26892971

  20. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  1. Cerenkov Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial structures. Imaging can basically be done using a sensitive camera optimized for low-light conditions, and it has a better resolution than any other nuclear imaging modality. CLI has been shown to effectively diagnose disease with regularly used PET isotope (18F-FDG) in clinical setting. Cerenkov luminescence tomography, Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy, and intraoperative Cerenkov imaging have also been explored with positive conclusions expanding the current range of applications. Cerenkov has also been used to improve PET imaging resolution since the source of both is the radioisotope being used. Smart imaging agents have been designed based on modulation of the Cerenkov signal using small molecules and nanoparticles giving better insight of the tumor biology. PMID:25287690

  2. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  3. Raman Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Shona; Priore, Ryan J.; Nelson, Matthew P.; Treado, Patrick J.

    2012-07-01

    The past decade has seen an enormous increase in the number and breadth of imaging techniques developed for analysis in many industries, including pharmaceuticals, food, and especially biomedicine. Rather than accept single-dimensional forms of information, users now demand multidimensional assessment of samples. High specificity and the need for little or no sample preparation make Raman imaging a highly attractive analytical technique and provide motivation for continuing advances in its supporting technology and utilization. This review discusses the current tools employed in Raman imaging, the recent advances, and the major applications in this ever-growing analytical field.

  4. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, C. Carl

    1982-01-01

    Describes principle imaging techniques, their applications, and their limitations in terms of diagnostic capability and possible adverse biological effects. Techniques include film radiography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography (PET), ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and digital radiography. PET has…

  5. Body Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images.

  6. Body Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images. In this photograph, a patient undergoes an open MRI.

  7. Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1100C Virtual Window is based on technology developed under NASA Small Business Innovation (SBIR) contracts to Ames Research Center. For example, under one contract Dimension Technologies, Inc. developed a large autostereoscopic display for scientific visualization applications. The Virtual Window employs an innovative illumination system to deliver the depth and color of true 3D imaging. Its applications include surgery and Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans, viewing for teleoperated robots, training, and in aviation cockpit displays.

  8. Diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Morris, Peter; Perkins, Alan

    2012-04-21

    Physical techniques have always had a key role in medicine, and the second half of the 20th century in particular saw a revolution in medical diagnostic techniques with the development of key imaging instruments: x-ray imaging and emission tomography (nuclear imaging and PET), MRI, and ultrasound. These techniques use the full width of the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to radio waves, and sound. In most cases, the development of a medical imaging device was opportunistic; many scientists in physics laboratories were experimenting with simple x-ray images within the first year of the discovery of such rays, the development of the cyclotron and later nuclear reactors created the opportunity for nuclear medicine, and one of the co-inventors of MRI was initially attempting to develop an alternative to x-ray diffraction for the analysis of crystal structures. What all these techniques have in common is the brilliant insight of a few pioneering physical scientists and engineers who had the tenacity to develop their inventions, followed by a series of technical innovations that enabled the full diagnostic potential of these instruments to be realised. In this report, we focus on the key part played by these scientists and engineers and the new imaging instruments and diagnostic procedures that they developed. By bringing the key developments and applications together we hope to show the true legacy of physics and engineering in diagnostic medicine. PMID:22516558

  9. Antigenic cross-reactions among herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, N; Oba, D E; Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1987-01-01

    Polyvalent rabbit antisera against herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), monospecific antisera against affinity-purified HSV-2 glycoproteins gB and gG, and a panel of monoclonal antibodies against HSV and EBV proteins were used to analyze cross-reactive molecules in cells infected with the four herpesviruses. A combination of immunoprecipitation and Western blotting with these reagents was used to determine that all four viruses coded for a glycoprotein that cross-reacted with HSV-1 gB. CMV coded for proteins that cross-reacted with HSV-2 gC, gD, and gE. Both CMV and EBV coded for proteins that cross-reacted with HSV-2 gG. Antigenic counterparts to the p45 nucleocapsid protein of HSV-2 were present in HSV-1 and CMV, and counterparts of the major DNA-binding protein and the ribonucleotide reductase of HSV-1 were present in all the viruses. The EBV virion glycoprotein gp85 was immunoprecipitated by antisera to HSV-1, HSV-2, and CMV. Antisera to CMV and EBV neutralized the infectivity of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 at high concentrations. This suggests that cross-reactivity between these four human herpesviruses may have pathogenic as well as evolutionary significance. Images PMID:3029407

  10. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  11. Medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Alex

    2005-07-01

    Diagnostic medical imaging is a fundamental part of the practice of modern medicine and is responsible for the expenditure of considerable amounts of capital and revenue monies in healthcare systems around the world. Much research and development work is carried out, both by commercial companies and the academic community. This paper reviews briefly each of the major diagnostic medical imaging techniques—X-ray (planar and CT), ultrasound, nuclear medicine (planar, SPECT and PET) and magnetic resonance. The technical challenges facing each are highlighted, with some of the most recent developments. In terms of the future, interventional/peri-operative imaging, the advancement of molecular medicine and gene therapy are identified as potential areas of expansion.

  12. Imaging Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Dominique; Raghunand, Natarajan; Gillies, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular permeability is a pharmacologic indicator of tumor response to therapy, and it is expected that this biomarker will evolve into a clinical surrogate endpoint and be integrated into protocols for determining patient response to antiangiogenic or antivascular therapies. This review discusses the physiological context of vessel permeability in an imaging setting, how it is affected by active and passive transport mechanisms, and how it is described mathematically for both theoretical and complex dynamic microvessel membranes. Many research groups have established dynamic-enhanced imaging protocols for estimating this important parameter. This review discusses those imaging modalities, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and how they compare in terms of their ability to deliver information about therapy-associated changes in microvessel permeability in humans. Finally, this review discusses future directions and improvements needed in these areas. PMID:18506397

  13. Angiographic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D. Christopher

    1986-01-01

    Angiographic imaging in 1986 employs not only conventional film arteriography and venography, but also digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Arteriography is still the best method of demonstrating pathology in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Transluminal angioplasty, its indications and results are discussed. Patients with suspected renovascular hypertension should be given intravenous DSA and, if pathology is demonstrated, renin sampling as well. Patients with severe, acute, life-threatening hemorrhage may have angiography not only to localize bleeding sites, but also to treat them by transcatheter embolization techniques. Various other angiographic techniques including venous sampling are discussed briefly. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:21267204

  14. Musculoskeletal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Douglas G.

    1986-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a significant portion of primary care medicine. Increase in the public awareness of physical fitness has led to an increase in both the incidence and appreciation of musculoskeletal disorders. This discussion considers the investigation of disorders involving the shoulder, wrist, foot, knee and pelvis. Emphasis is placed on new imaging techniques and their place in the investigation of these problems, as well as on their relationship to the more traditional modalities. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:21267198

  15. Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Eric; Bar-Ilan, Ofek; Illes, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience are increasingly intersecting with issues of ethical, legal, and social interest. This study is an analysis of press coverage of an advanced technology for brain imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging, that has gained significant public visibility over the past ten years. Discussion of issues of scientific validity and interpretation dominated over ethical content in both the popular and specialized press. Coverage of research on higher order cognitive phenomena specifically attributed broad personal and societal meaning to neuroimages. The authors conclude that neuroscience provides an ideal model for exploring science communication and ethics in a multicultural context. PMID:17330151

  16. Imaging sciences workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Biblical Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nir, Yeshayahu

    1987-01-01

    Responds to Marjorie Munsterberg's review of "The Bible and the Image: The History of Photography in the Holy Land 1839-1899." Claims that Munsterberg provided an incomplete and inaccurate knowledge of the book's content, and that she considered Western pictorial traditions as the only valid measure in the study of the history of photography.…

  18. [Endometrial imaging].

    PubMed

    Lemercier, E; Genevois, A; Dacher, J N; Benozio, M; Descargues, G; Marpeau, L

    2000-12-01

    The diagnostic value of endovaginal sonography in benign or malignant endometrial pathology is high, increased by sonohysterography. Sonohysterography is useful in the diagnosis of endometrial thickness and to determine further investigations. MRI is accurate in the uterine adenomyosis diagnosis and is the imaging modality of choice for the preoperative endometrial cancer staging. PMID:11173754

  19. Narrowband Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Don S.

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) captured the attention of the world when it released its astounding image in 1995 of the Eagle Nebula (Messier 16) often called "The Pillars of Creation" (Fig. 1). It contained dark, billowing towers of gas and dust rising majestically into a background of glowing radiation. It told a story of new star formation.

  20. Inner Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollhagen, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author states that she has always loved self portraits but most teenagers do not enjoy looking too closely at their own faces in an effort to replicate them. Thanks to a new digital camera, she was able to use this new technology to inspire students to take a closer look at their inner image. Prior to the self-portrait…

  1. Forest Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Technology Applications Center, with other government and academic agencies, provided technology for improved resources management to the Cibola National Forest. Landsat satellite images enabled vegetation over a large area to be classified for purposes of timber analysis, wildlife habitat, range measurement and development of general vegetation maps.

  2. Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications. PMID:25754364

  3. Activity and mechanism of action of HDVD, a novel pyrimidine nucleoside derivative with high levels of selectivity and potency against gammaherpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Coen, N; Singh, U; Vuyyuru, V; Van den Oord, J J; Balzarini, J; Duraffour, S; Snoeck, R; Cheng, Y C; Chu, C K; Andrei, G

    2013-04-01

    A novel nucleoside analogue, 1-[(2S,4S-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl]5-vinylpyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione, or HDVD, was evaluated against a wide variety of herpesviruses and was found to be a highly selective inhibitor of replication of the gammaherpesviruses Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). HDVD had also a pronounced inhibitory activity against murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). In contrast, replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS), HSV-2, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was weakly inhibited by the compound, and no antiviral activity was determined against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV). The HDVD-resistant virus phenotype contained point mutations in the viral thymidine kinase (TK) of HSV-1, MHV-68, and HVS isolates. These mutations conferred cross-resistance to other TK-dependent drugs, with the exception of an MHV-68 mutant (E358D) that exhibited resistance only to HDVD. HSV-1 and HVS TK-mutants isolated under selective pressure with bromovinyldeoxyuridine (BVDU) also showed reduced sensitivity to HDVD. Oral treatment with HDVD and BVDU was assessed in an intranasal model of MHV-68 infection in BALB/c mice. In contrast to BVDU treatment, HDVD-treated animals showed a reduction in viral DNA loads and diminished viral gene expression during acute viral replication in the lungs in comparison to levels in untreated controls. The valyl ester prodrug of HDVD (USS-02-71-44) suppressed the latent infection in the spleen to a greater extent than HDVD. In the present study, HDVD emerged as a highly potent antiviral with a unique spectrum of activity against herpesviruses, in particular, gammaherpesviruses, and may be of interest in the treatment of virus-associated diseases.

  4. Imaging bolometer

    DOEpatents

    Wurden, G.A.

    1999-01-19

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

  5. Imaging bolometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, Glen A.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

  6. Attosecond imaging.

    PubMed

    Vrakking, Marc J J

    2014-02-21

    The natural timescale for electron dynamics reaches down to the attosecond domain. Following the discovery of attosecond laser pulses, about a decade ago, attosecond science has developed into a vibrant, new research field, where the motion of single or multiple electrons and, in molecules, the coupling of electronic and nuclear motion, can be investigated, on attosecond to few-femtosecond timescales. Attosecond experiments require suitable observables. This review describes how "attosecond imaging", basing itself on kinetic energy and angle-resolved detection of photoelectrons and fragment ions using a velocity map imaging (VMI) spectrometer, has been exploited in a number of pump-probe experiments. The use of a VMI spectrometer in attosecond experiments has allowed the characterization of attosecond pulse trains and isolated attosecond pulses, the elucidation of continuum electron dynamics and wave packet interferometry in atomic photoionization and the observation of electron localization in dissociative molecular photoionization. PMID:24398785

  7. Molecular dissection of mutations at the heterozygous thymidine kinase locus in mouse lymphoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, M L; Moore, M M; Broder, C B; Burrell, A; Juhn, G; Kasweck, K L; Lin, P F; Wadhams, A; Hozier, J C

    1990-01-01

    The mouse lymphoma L5178Y TK+/- 3.7.2C cell line allows quantitation of induced TK(+/-)----TK-/- mutations at the heterozygous thymidine kinase (Tk) locus. TK-/- mutant colonies show a bimodal size distribution, reflecting a difference in the growth rates of the two size classes that is hypothesized to result from different degrees of genetic damage. The two homologous chromosomes 11 containing the alleles of the Tk gene in L5178Y 3.7.2C TK+/- cells are distinguishable at the cytogenetic level. We find, in addition, that the two alleles are distinguishable at the molecular level because of an Nco I restriction fragment length polymorphism at the 3' end of the gene. In a set of 51 large-colony and 48 small-colony TK-/- mutants induced by ionizing radiation or by chemical mutagens, we find that 78, including all except one of the small-colony mutants, have lost the Tk+ allele and that some of these have two to four copies of the remaining Tk- allele. Nineteen of the large-colony TK-/- mutants that do not show Tk+ allele loss show no other structural changes detectable at the level of Southern blot analysis. One shows a partial deletion. The variety of mutagenic lesions recorded at the heterozygous Tk locus may be representative of events observed in human malignancy and may include a wider range of mutagenic events than can be observed at hemizygous test loci. Images PMID:1967496

  8. Brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions.

  9. VLT Images the Horsehead Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    ://www.noao.edu/outreach/press/pr01/ir0101.html Bill Arnett's site : http://www.seds.org/billa/twn/b33x.html Technical information about the photos PR Photo 02a/02 was produced from three images, obtained on February 1, 2000, with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m KUEYEN Unit Telescope and extracted from the VLT Science Archive Facility. The frames were obtained in the B-band (600 sec exposure; wavelength 429 nm; FWHM 88 nm; here rendered as blue), V-band (300 sec; 554 nm; 112 nm; green) and R-band (120 sec; 655 nm; 165 nm; red) The original pixel size is 0.2 arcsec. The photo shows the full field recorded in all three colours, approximately 6.5 x 6.7 arcmin 2. The seeing was about 0.75 arcsec. PR Photo 02b/02 is an enlargement of a smaller area, measuring 3.8 x 4.1 arcmin 2. North is to the left and east is down (the usual orientation for showing this object). The frames were recorded with a TK2048 SITe CCD and the ESO-FIERA Controller, built by the Optical Detector Team (ODT). The images were prepared by Cyril Cavadore (ESO-ODT) , by means of Prism software. ESO PR Photos 02a-b/02 may be reproduced, if credit is given the European Southern Observatory (ESO).

  10. Imaging stress.

    PubMed

    Brielle, Shlomi; Gura, Rotem; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Recent innovations in cell biology and imaging approaches are changing the way we study cellular stress, protein misfolding, and aggregation. Studies have begun to show that stress responses are even more variegated and dynamic than previously thought, encompassing nano-scale reorganization of cytosolic machinery that occurs almost instantaneously, much faster than transcriptional responses. Moreover, protein and mRNA quality control is often organized into highly dynamic macromolecular assemblies, or dynamic droplets, which could easily be mistaken for dysfunctional "aggregates," but which are, in fact, regulated functional compartments. The nano-scale architecture of stress-response ranges from diffraction-limited structures like stress granules, P-bodies, and stress foci to slightly larger quality control inclusions like juxta nuclear quality control compartment (JUNQ) and insoluble protein deposit compartment (IPOD), as well as others. Examining the biochemical and physical properties of these dynamic structures necessitates live cell imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, and techniques to make quantitative measurements with respect to movement, localization, and mobility. Hence, it is important to note some of the most recent observations, while casting an eye towards new imaging approaches that offer the possibility of collecting entirely new kinds of data from living cells.

  11. Imaging Borrelly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Boice, D.C.; Britt, D.T.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Kirk, R.L.; Lee, M.; Nelson, R.M.; Oberst, J.; Sandel, B.R.; Stern, S.A.; Thomas, N.; Yelle, R.V.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleus, coma, and dust jets of short-period Comet 19P/Borrelly were imaged from the Deep Space 1 spacecraft during its close flyby in September 2001. A prominent jet dominated the near-nucleus coma and emanated roughly normal to the long axis of nucleus from a broad central cavity. We show it to have remained fixed in position for more than 34 hr, much longer than the 26-hr rotation period. This confirms earlier suggestions that it is co-aligned with the rotation axis. From a combination of fitting the nucleus light curve from approach images and the nucleus' orientation from stereo images at encounter, we conclude that the sense of rotation is right-handed around the main jet vector. The inferred rotation pole is approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the nucleus, consistent with a simple rotational state. Lacking an existing IAU comet-specific convention but applying a convention provisionally adopted for asteroids, we label this the north pole. This places the sub-solar latitude at ???60?? N at the time of the perihelion with the north pole in constant sunlight and thus receiving maximum average insolation. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging or a PET scan Ultrasound INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY Interventional radiologists are doctors that use imaging such as CT, ultrasound, MRI and fluoroscopy to help guide procedures. The imaging ...

  13. Molecular imaging of induced pluripotent stem cell immunogenicity with in vivo development in ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiqiang; Wen, Xinyu; Wang, Haibin; Zhou, Jin; Zhao, Mengge; Lin, Qiuxia; Wang, Yan; Li, Junjie; Li, Dexue; Du, Zhiyan; Yao, Anning; Cao, Feng; Wang, Changyong

    2013-01-01

    Whether differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in ischemic myocardium enhances their immunogenicity, thereby increasing their chance for rejection, is unclear. Here, we dynamically demonstrated the immunogenicity and rejection of iPSCs in ischemic myocardium using bioluminescent imaging (BLI). Murine iPSCs were transduced with a tri-fusion (TF) reporter gene consisting of firefly luciferase-red fluorescent protein-truncated thymidine kinase (fluc-mrfp-tTK). Ascorbic acid (Vc) were used to induce iPSCs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes (CM). iPSCs and iPS-CMs were intramyocardially injected into immunocompetent or immunosuppressed allogenic murine with myocardial infarction. BLI was performed to track transplanted cells. Immune cell infiltration was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Syngeneic iPSCs were also injected and evaluated. The results demonstrated that undifferentiated iPSCs survived and proliferated in allogenic immunocompetent recipients early post-transplantation, accompanying with mild immune cell infiltration. With in vivo differentiation, a progressive immune cell infiltration could be detected. While transplantation of allogenic iPSC-CMs were observed an acute rejection from receipts. In immune-suppressed recipients, the proliferation of iPSCs could be maintained and intramyocardial teratomas were formed. Transplantation of syngeneic iPSCs and iPSC-CMs were also observed progressive immune cell infiltration. This study demonstrated that iPSC immunogenicity increases with in vivo differentiation, which will increase their chance for rejection in iPSC-based therapy.

  14. Image Editing Via Searching Source Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Han; Deng, Liang-Jian

    Image editing has important applications by changing the image texture, illumination, target location, etc. As an important application of Poisson equation, Poisson image editing processes images on the gradient domain and has been applied to seamless clone, selection editing, image denoising, etc. In this paper, we present a new application of Poisson image editing, which is based on searching source image. The main feature of the new application is all modifying information comes from the source image. Experimental results show that the proposed application performs well.

  15. Chest Imaging.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Ruth G; Veltkamp, Marcel; Grutters, Jan C

    2015-12-01

    Chest imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and monitoring of sarcoidosis. For staging of pulmonary disease on chest radiograph, Scadding stages are still widely used. High-resolution CT (HRCT), however, is more accurate in visualizing the various manifestations of pulmonary sarcoidosis as well its complications. A generally accepted HRCT scoring system is lacking. Fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 positron emission tomography can visualize disease activity better than conventional makers in a significant proportion of patients. In patients with extensive changes on HRCT but no parenchymal fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 uptake, prudence with regard to initiation or intensification of immunosuppressive treatment is warranted. PMID:26593136

  16. Image Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Texas Instruments Programmable Remapper is a research tool used to determine how to best utilize the part of a patient's visual field still usable by mapping onto his field of vision with manipulated imagery. It is an offshoot of a NASA program for speeding up, improving the accuracy of pattern recognition in video imagery. The Remapper enables an image to be "pushed around" so more of it falls into the functional portions in the retina of a low vision person. It works at video rates, and researchers hope to significantly reduce its size and cost, creating a wearable prosthesis for visually impaired people.

  17. Scrotal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Studniarek, Michał; Modzelewska, Elza

    2015-01-01

    Pathological lesions within the scrotum are relatively rare in imaging except for ultrasonography. The diseases presented in the paper are usually found in men at the age of 15–45, i.e. men of reproductive age, and therefore they are worth attention. Scrotal ultrasound in infertile individuals should be conducted on a routine basis owing to the fact that pathological scrotal lesions are frequently detected in this population. Malignant testicular cancers are the most common neoplasms in men at the age of 20–40. Ultrasound imaging is the method of choice characterized by the sensitivity of nearly 100% in the differentiation between intratesticular and extratesticular lesions. In the case of doubtful lesions that are not classified for intra-operative verification, nuclear magnetic resonance is applied. Computed tomography, however, is performed to monitor the progression of a neoplastic disease, in pelvic trauma with scrotal injury as well as in rare cases of scrotal hernias involving the ureters or a fragment of the urinary bladder. PMID:26674847

  18. Automatic analysis of the micronucleus test in primary human lymphocytes using image analysis.

    PubMed

    Frieauff, W; Martus, H J; Suter, W; Elhajouji, A

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro micronucleus test (MNT) is a well-established test for early screening of new chemical entities in industrial toxicology. For assessing the clastogenic or aneugenic potential of a test compound, micronucleus induction in cells has been shown repeatedly to be a sensitive and a specific parameter. Various automated systems to replace the tedious and time-consuming visual slide analysis procedure as well as flow cytometric approaches have been discussed. The ROBIAS (Robotic Image Analysis System) for both automatic cytotoxicity assessment and micronucleus detection in human lymphocytes was developed at Novartis where the assay has been used to validate positive results obtained in the MNT in TK6 cells, which serves as the primary screening system for genotoxicity profiling in early drug development. In addition, the in vitro MNT has become an accepted alternative to support clinical studies and will be used for regulatory purposes as well. The comparison of visual with automatic analysis results showed a high degree of concordance for 25 independent experiments conducted for the profiling of 12 compounds. For concentration series of cyclophosphamide and carbendazim, a very good correlation between automatic and visual analysis by two examiners could be established, both for the relative division index used as cytotoxicity parameter, as well as for micronuclei scoring in mono- and binucleated cells. Generally, false-positive micronucleus decisions could be controlled by fast and simple relocation of the automatically detected patterns. The possibility to analyse 24 slides within 65h by automatic analysis over the weekend and the high reproducibility of the results make automatic image processing a powerful tool for the micronucleus analysis in primary human lymphocytes. The automated slide analysis for the MNT in human lymphocytes complements the portfolio of image analysis applications on ROBIAS which is supporting various assays at Novartis.

  19. Geospatial Analysis Using Remote Sensing Images: Case Studies of Zonguldak Test Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayık, Çağlar; Topan, Hüseyin; Özendi, Mustafa; Oruç, Murat; Cam, Ali; Abdikan, Saygın

    2016-06-01

    Inclined topographies are one of the most challenging problems for geospatial analysis of air-borne and space-borne imageries. However, flat areas are mostly misleading to exhibit the real performance. For this reason, researchers generally require a study area which includes mountainous topography and various land cover and land use types. Zonguldak and its vicinity is a very suitable test site for performance investigation of remote sensing systems due to the fact that it contains different land use types such as dense forest, river, sea, urban area; different structures such as open pit mining operations, thermal power plant; and its mountainous structure. In this paper, we reviewed more than 120 proceeding papers and journal articles about geospatial analysis that are performed on the test field of Zonguldak and its surroundings. Geospatial analysis performed with imageries include elimination of systematic geometric errors, 2/3D georeferencing accuracy assessment, DEM and DSM generation and validation, ortho-image production, evaluation of information content, image classification, automatic feature extraction and object recognition, pan-sharpening, land use and land cover change analysis and deformation monitoring. In these applications many optical satellite images are used i.e. ASTER, Bilsat-1, IKONOS, IRS-1C, KOMPSAT-1, KVR-1000, Landsat-3-5-7, Orbview-3, QuickBird, Pleiades, SPOT-5, TK-350, RADARSAT-1, WorldView-1-2; as well as radar data i.e. JERS-1, Envisat ASAR, TerraSAR-X, ALOS PALSAR and SRTM. These studies are performed by Departments of Geomatics Engineering at Bülent Ecevit University, at İstanbul Technical University, at Yıldız Technical University, and Institute of Photogrammetry and GeoInformation at Leibniz University Hannover. These studies are financially supported by TÜBİTAK (Turkey), the Universities, ESA, Airbus DS, ERSDAC (Japan) and Jülich Research Centre (Germany).

  20. Indexing Images: Testing an Image Description Template.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Corinne

    1996-01-01

    A template for pictorial image description to be used by novice image searchers in recording their descriptions of images was tested; image attribute classes derived in previous research were used to model the template. Results indicated that users may need training and/or more guidance to correctly assign descriptors to higher-level classes.…

  1. Speckle imaging algorithms for planetary imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E.

    1994-11-15

    I will discuss the speckle imaging algorithms used to process images of the impact sites of the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter. The algorithms use a phase retrieval process based on the average bispectrum of the speckle image data. High resolution images are produced by estimating the Fourier magnitude and Fourier phase of the image separately, then combining them and inverse transforming to achieve the final result. I will show raw speckle image data and high-resolution image reconstructions from our recent experiment at Lick Observatory.

  2. Image resampling effects in mammographic image simulation.

    PubMed

    Yip, M; Mackenzie, A; Lewis, E; Dance, D R; Young, K C; Christmas, W; Wells, K

    2011-11-21

    This work describes the theory of resampling effects within the context of image simulation for mammographic images. The process of digitization associated with using digital imaging technology needs to be correctly addressed in any image simulation process. Failure to do so can lead to overblurring in the final synthetic image. A method for weighted neighbourhood averaging is described for non-integer scaling factors in resampling images. The use of the method is demonstrated by comparing simulated and real images of an edge test object acquired on two clinical mammography systems. Images were simulated using two setups: from idealized images and from images obtained with clinical systems. A Gaussian interpolation method is proposed as a single-step solution to modelling blurring filters for the simulation process.

  3. Infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by herpes simplex and Epstein-Barr viruses. Differential induction of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, J; Flamand, L; D'Addario, M; Hiscott, J; Menezes, J

    1992-01-01

    Infection by herpesviruses can result in profound immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory effects. However, no significant information is available on the effect of such infections on the production of immunoregulatory cytokines. We studied the kinetics of production of two monocyte-derived cytokines, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), induced by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures and in fractionated cell populations. We observed that, when compared to HSV-1, EBV is a stronger inducer of IL-6. In EBV-infected cultures, IL-6 protein was detected at day 1 postinfection and gradually increased with time. In contrast, lower amounts of IL-6 were detected 5 d postinfection in HSV-1-infected cultures. HSV-1-infected cultures secreted significant amounts of TNF alpha protein after 5 d of culture and reached a maximal level of production at day 7, whereas EBV inhibited TNF alpha production. In fractionated cell populations, monocytic cells were found to be the main source of IL-6 synthesis after EBV or HSV-1 infection. However, TNF alpha synthesis in HSV-1-infected cultures was from both B and monocytic cells. By using the polymerase chain reaction technique we show that, after infection by these two herpesviruses, differences in cytokine gene products are also observed at the transcriptional level. These observations demonstrate that EBV and HSV-1 exert differential effects on IL-6 and TNF alpha gene transcription and on the resulting protein secretion in human mononuclear blood cells. Images PMID:1318324

  4. Reversible digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Keith T.

    1999-04-01

    A method has been developed to hide one image inside another with little loss in image quality. If the second image is a logo or watermark, then this method may be used to protect the ownership rights of the first image and to guarantee the authenticity of the image. The two images to be combined may be either black & white or color continuous tone images. A reversible image is created by incorporating the first image in the upper 4 bits and the second image in the lower 4 bits. When viewed normally, the reversible image appears to be the first image. To view the hidden image, the bits of the combined image are reversed, exchanging all of the lower and higher order bits. When viewed in the reversed mode, the image appears to be the second or hidden image. To maintain a high level of image quality for both images, two simultaneous error diffusion calculations are run to ensure that both views of the reversible image have the same visual appearance as the originals. Any alteration of one of the images locally destroys the other image at the site of the alterations. This provides a method to detect alterations of the original image.

  5. scikit-image: image processing in Python

    PubMed Central

    Schönberger, Johannes L.; Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Boulogne, François; Warner, Joshua D.; Yager, Neil; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Yu, Tony

    2014-01-01

    scikit-image is an image processing library that implements algorithms and utilities for use in research, education and industry applications. It is released under the liberal Modified BSD open source license, provides a well-documented API in the Python programming language, and is developed by an active, international team of collaborators. In this paper we highlight the advantages of open source to achieve the goals of the scikit-image library, and we showcase several real-world image processing applications that use scikit-image. More information can be found on the project homepage, http://scikit-image.org. PMID:25024921

  6. scikit-image: image processing in Python.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, Stéfan; Schönberger, Johannes L; Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Boulogne, François; Warner, Joshua D; Yager, Neil; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Yu, Tony

    2014-01-01

    scikit-image is an image processing library that implements algorithms and utilities for use in research, education and industry applications. It is released under the liberal Modified BSD open source license, provides a well-documented API in the Python programming language, and is developed by an active, international team of collaborators. In this paper we highlight the advantages of open source to achieve the goals of the scikit-image library, and we showcase several real-world image processing applications that use scikit-image. More information can be found on the project homepage, http://scikit-image.org.

  7. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  8. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2007-05-29

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  9. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2005-05-31

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  10. In vivo imaging and quantitation of adoptively transferred human antigen-specific T cells transduced to express a human norepinephrine transporter gene.

    PubMed

    Doubrovin, Mikhail M; Doubrovina, Ekaterina S; Zanzonico, Pat; Sadelain, Michel; Larson, Steven M; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2007-12-15

    Sequential imaging of genetically marked effector cells after adoptive transfer in vivo has greatly enhanced analyses of their biodistribution, growth, and activity both in animal models and in clinical trials of cellular immunotherapy. However, the immunogenicity of cells expressing xenogeneic reporter constructs limits their survival and clinical utility. To address this limitation, we have evaluated a human norepinephrine transporter (hNET) permitting imaging of transduced cells in vivo with a previously approved clinical grade radiolabeled probe, metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). The hNET gene cDNA was cloned from the SK-N-SH cell line and inserted into a bicistronic retroviral vector also encoding green fluorescent protein. Following transfection, human EBV-specific T lymphocytes seemed fully functional in vitro and also selectively accumulated [(123)I]MIBG. In nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing human EBV lymphoma xenografts, as few as 10(4) transduced T cells injected into the tumors could be imaged by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) after i.v. infusion of [(123)I]MIBG or [(124)I]MIBG, respectively. When hNET(+) EBV-specific T cells were infused i.v., their migration and specific accumulation in EBV(+) tumors expressing their restricting HLA allele could be imaged by SPECT or PET over 28 days. Image intensity was closely correlated with the number of T cells accumulated in targeted tumors. The use of two reporter probes (MIBG and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) permitted independent contemporaneous tracking of two distinct EBV-specific T-cell subpopulations expressing different reporter genes (hNET-CD4(+) T cells and HSV-TK-CD8(+) T cells) in the same animal using three-dimensional nuclear modalities (SPECT and PET). The hNET-based system described may thus have significant potential as a nonimmunogenic reporter for extended repeated quantitative in

  11. Analyses of herpes simplex virus type 1 latency and reactivation at the single cell level using fluorescent reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Proença, J T; Nelson, D; Nicoll, M P; Connor, V; Efstathiou, S

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) establishes a latent infection in sensory neurons from which the virus can periodically reactivate. Whilst latency establishment is thought to result from a failure to express immediate-early genes, we have previously shown that subpopulations of the latent neuronal reservoir have undergone lytic promoter activation prior to latency establishment. In the present study, we have investigated the biological properties of such latently infected neuronal subpopulations using Ai6 fluorescent reporter mice. Using this system we have determined that prior ICP0 or TK promoter activation does not correlate with increased latent virus DNA loads within individual cells and that neurons with evidence of historical lytic cycle promoter activity exhibit a comparable frequency of reactivation to that of the general latent cell population. Comparison of viral DNA content within cells harbouring latent HSV-1 genomes and those undergoing the earliest stages of reactivation has revealed that reactivation can initiate from cells harbouring a wide range of HSV-1 genome copies, but that exiting latency is biased towards cells bearing higher latent virus DNA loads. PMID:26694770

  12. Smart Image Enhancement Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Rahman, Zia-ur (Inventor); Woodell, Glenn A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Contrast and lightness measures are used to first classify the image as being one of non-turbid and turbid. If turbid, the original image is enhanced to generate a first enhanced image. If non-turbid, the original image is classified in terms of a merged contrast/lightness score based on the contrast and lightness measures. The non-turbid image is enhanced to generate a second enhanced image when a poor contrast/lightness score is associated therewith. When the second enhanced image has a poor contrast/lightness score associated therewith, this image is enhanced to generate a third enhanced image. A sharpness measure is computed for one image that is selected from (i) the non-turbid image, (ii) the first enhanced image, (iii) the second enhanced image when a good contrast/lightness score is associated therewith, and (iv) the third enhanced image. If the selected image is not-sharp, it is sharpened to generate a sharpened image. The final image is selected from the selected image and the sharpened image.

  13. What Is an Image?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The article helps to understand the interpretation of an image by presenting as to what constitutes an image. A common feature in all images is the basic physical structure that can be described with a common set of terms.

  14. To Image...or Not to Image?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruley, Karina

    1996-01-01

    Provides a checklist of considerations for installing document image processing with an electronic document management system. Other topics include scanning; indexing; the image file life cycle; benefits of imaging; document-driven workflow; and planning for workplace changes like postsorting, creating a scanning room, redeveloping job tasks and…

  15. Filter for biomedical imaging and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Rajan, K.; Ahmad, Imteyaz

    2006-07-01

    Image filtering techniques have numerous potential applications in biomedical imaging and image processing. The design of filters largely depends on the a priori, knowledge about the type of noise corrupting the image. This makes the standard filters application specific. Widely used filters such as average, Gaussian, and Wiener reduce noisy artifacts by smoothing. However, this operation normally results in smoothing of the edges as well. On the other hand, sharpening filters enhance the high-frequency details, making the image nonsmooth. An integrated general approach to design a finite impulse response filter based on Hebbian learning is proposed for optimal image filtering. This algorithm exploits the interpixel correlation by updating the filter coefficients using Hebbian learning. The algorithm is made iterative for achieving efficient learning from the neighborhood pixels. This algorithm performs optimal smoothing of the noisy image by preserving high-frequency as well as low-frequency features. Evaluation results show that the proposed finite impulse response filter is robust under various noise distributions such as Gaussian noise, salt-and-pepper noise, and speckle noise. Furthermore, the proposed approach does not require any a priori knowledge about the type of noise. The number of unknown parameters is few, and most of these parameters are adaptively obtained from the processed image. The proposed filter is successfully applied for image reconstruction in a positron emission tomography imaging modality. The images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm are found to be superior in quality compared with those reconstructed by existing PET image reconstruction methodologies.

  16. Imaging of testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Owens, E J; Kabala, J; Goddard, P

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis, pathology and imaging of testicular tumours, predominantly germ cell tumours. It will discuss the imaging techniques used in their diagnosis, staging and surveillance.

  17. Far Ultraviolet Imaging from the Image Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U.; Lampton, M.; Geller, S. P.; Stock, J. M.; Abiad, R.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Habraken, S.

    2000-01-01

    Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by the IMAGE spacecraft will be supplemented by observation of the global aurora. The IMAGE satellite instrument complement includes three Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instruments. The Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) will provide broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora for maximum spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the LBH N2 bands of the aurora. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a novel form of monochromatic imager, will image the aurora, filtered by wavelength. The proton-induced component of the aurora will be imaged separately by measuring the Doppler-shifted Lyman-a. Finally, the GEO instrument will observe the distribution of the geocoronal emission to obtain the neutral background density source for charge exchange in the magnetosphere. The FUV instrument complement looks radially outward from the rotating IMAGE satellite and, therefore, it spends only a short time observing the aurora and the Earth during each spin. To maximize photon collection efficiency and use efficiently the short time available for exposures the FUV auroral imagers WIC and SI both have wide fields of view and take data continuously as the auroral region proceeds through the field of view. To minimize data volume, the set of multiple images are electronically co-added by suitably shifting each image to compensate for the spacecraft rotation. In order to minimize resolution loss, the images have to be distort ion-corrected in real time. The distortion correction is accomplished using high speed look up tables that are pre-generated by least square fitting to polynomial functions by the on-orbit processor. The instruments were calibrated individually while on stationary platforms, mostly in vacuum chambers. Extensive ground-based testing was performed with visible and near UV simulators mounted on a rotating platform to emulate their performance on a rotating spacecraft.

  18. Comparative studies of types 1 and 2 herpes simplex virus infection of cultured normal keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Su, S J; Wu, H H; Lin, Y H; Lin, H Y

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the differences in biological properties, multiplication patterns, and cytopathic effects between type 1 and type 2 herpes simplex virus (HSV) through the replication of HSV in cultured normal human keratinocytes. METHODS--Keratinocytes were obtained from surgical specimens of normal gingiva, cervix, trunk skin, and newborn foreskin. They were cultured in serum free, chemically defined, culture medium and infected with a pool of HSV collected from clinical specimens. RESULTS--The reproductive patterns of HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV type 2 (HSV-2) differed from each other regardless of the anatomical source of the cultured cells. This was made evident by the dissimilarity of their growth curves and cytopathic effects. The growth curve of HSV-2 showed a more or less continuously rising titre, whereas HSV-1 titres varied substantially at different time intervals. The cytopathic effects induced by HSV-1 infection took 24 more incubation hours than those induced by HSV-2 infection to manifest. During the early stages, the cytopathic changes of the two viruses looked different. However, all cultured cells, whether cultured with HSV-1 or HSV-2, eventually became small and globular in shape. The infective titres of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 were higher in infected cultured cervix than in infected cultured normal gingiva. CONCLUSIONS--These data suggest that each serotype of HSV has its own unique replication pattern in human keratinocytes regardless of the cell origin. Images PMID:7706526

  19. Direction of transneuronal transport of herpes simplex virus 1 in the primate motor system is strain-dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, M C; Strick, P L; Dix, R D

    1991-01-01

    We examined the axonal transport of two strains of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) within the central nervous system of cebus monkeys. Each strain was injected into the "arm area" of the primary motor cortex. One strain, HSV-1(McIntyre-B), was transported transneuronally in the retrograde direction. It infected neurons at sites known to project to the arm area of the primary motor cortex (e.g., ventrolateral thalamus). In addition, "second-order" neurons were labeled in the deep cerebellar nuclei (dentate and interpositus) and in the globus pallidus (internal segment). This result supports the concept that the arm area of the primary motor cortex is a target of both cerebellar and basal ganglia output. In contrast, the other strain, HSV-1(H129), was transported transneuronally in the anterograde direction. It infected neurons at sites known to receive input from the arm area of the primary motor cortex (e.g., putamen, pontine nuclei). In addition, "third-order" neurons were labeled in the cerebellar cortex (granule and Golgi cells) and in the globus pallidus (largely the external segment). Our observations suggest that strain differences have an important impact on the direction of transneuronal transport of HSV-1. Furthermore, it should be possible to examine the organization of cerebellar and basal ganglia loops with cerebral cortex by exploiting transneuronal transport of HSV-1 and virus strain differences. Images PMID:1654557

  20. Image processing and recognition for biological images

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which will be useful to analyze bioimages. Although this paper does not provide their technical details, it will be possible to grasp their main tasks and typical tools to handle the tasks. Image processing is a large research area to improve the visibility of an input image and acquire some valuable information from it. As the main tasks of image processing, this paper introduces gray-level transformation, binarization, image filtering, image segmentation, visual object tracking, optical flow and image registration. Image pattern recognition is the technique to classify an input image into one of the predefined classes and also has a large research area. This paper overviews its two main modules, that is, feature extraction module and classification module. Throughout the paper, it will be emphasized that bioimage is a very difficult target for even state-of-the-art image processing and pattern recognition techniques due to noises, deformations, etc. This paper is expected to be one tutorial guide to bridge biology and image processing researchers for their further collaboration to tackle such a difficult target. PMID:23560739

  1. Modern Brain Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Cha, Soonmee

    2015-01-01

    The imaging and clinical management of patients with brain tumor continue to evolve over time and now heavily rely on physiologic imaging in addition to high-resolution structural imaging. Imaging remains a powerful noninvasive tool to positively impact the management of patients with brain tumor. This article provides an overview of the current state-of-the art clinical brain tumor imaging. In this review, we discuss general magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and their application to the diagnosis of, treatment planning and navigation, and disease monitoring in patients with brain tumor. We review the strengths, limitations, and pitfalls of structural imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging techniques, MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography/MR, and functional imaging. Overall this review provides a basis for understudying the role of modern imaging in the care of brain tumor patients. PMID:25977902

  2. Quantum ghost imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Ronald E.; Deacon, Keith S.

    2009-08-01

    Since the first experiment achieving quantum ghost imaging of an opaque object, performed by the authors at the Army Research Laboratory, ghost imaging research has increased. That physics experiment resulting in the image of toy soldier created a new imaging paradigm. Prior to that all images of opaque objects were made by receiving patterns of the object from reflection and scattering of the light into a camera. In the ghost imaging experiment light patterns only came from the light source and the image was made from coincidences of those and photon counts of reflected and scattered photons received from the object. Since that original ghost imaging experiment, approximately thirteen years after ghost imaging of transmissive objects was introduced, ghost imaging is providing a new and proweful quantum tool for future improved imaging missions in the environment.

  3. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  4. Image management research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of research issues are involved in image management systems with space station applications: image processing research and image perception research. The image processing issues are the traditional ones of digitizing, coding, compressing, storing, analyzing, and displaying, but with a new emphasis on the constraints imposed by the human perceiver. Two image coding algorithms have been developed that may increase the efficiency of image management systems (IMS). Image perception research involves a study of the theoretical and practical aspects of visual perception of electronically displayed images. Issues include how rapidly a user can search through a library of images, how to make this search more efficient, and how to present images in terms of resolution and split screens. Other issues include optimal interface to an IMS and how to code images in a way that is optimal for the human perceiver. A test-bed within which such issues can be addressed has been designed.

  5. The pseudorabies virus gII gene is closely related to the gB glycoprotein gene of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, A K; Dorney, D J; Wathen, M W; Whealy, M E; Gold, C; Watson, R J; Holland, L E; Weed, S D; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C

    1987-01-01

    known to be involved in the rate of virus entry into the cells and cell-cell fusion, as well as regions known to be associated with monoclonal antibody resistance, were highly homologous with the PRV protein sequence. Furthermore, monospecific antibody made against PRV gII immunoprecipitated HSV-1 gB from infected cells. Taken together, these findings suggest significant conservation of structure and function between the two proteins and may indicate a common evolutionary history. Images PMID:3039163

  6. An improved strategy for the synthesis of [18F]-labeled arabinofuranosyl nuclosides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanwen; Cantorias, Melchor V.; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Burnazi, Eva M.; Cai, Shangde; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    The expression of the herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene can be imaged efficaciously using a variety of 2′-[18F]fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-b-D-arabinofuranosyl-uracil derivatives [[18F]-FXAU, X= I(iodo), E(ethyl), and M(methyl)]. However, the application of these derivatives in clinical and translational studies has been impeded by their complicated and long syntheses (3–5 h). To remedy these issues, in the study at hand we have investigated whether microwave or combined catalysts could facilitate the coupling reaction between sugar and nucleobase and, further, have probed the feasibility of establishing a novel approach for [18F]-FXAU synthesis. We have demonstrated that the rate of the trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate (TMSOTf)-catalyzed coupling reaction between the 2-deoxy-sugar and uracil derivatives at 90°C can be significantly accelerated by microwave-driven heating or by the addition of Lewis acid catalyst (SnCl4). Further, we have observed that the stability of the α- and β-anomers of [18F]-FXAU derivatives differs during the hydrolysis step. Using the microwave-driven heating approach, overall decay-corrected radiochemical yields of 19–27% were achieved for [18F]-FXAU in 120 min at a specific activity of >22 MBq/nmol (595 Ci/mmol). Ultimately, we believe that these high yielding syntheses of [18F]-FIAU, [18F]-FMAU and [18F]-FEAU will facilitate routine production for clinical applications. PMID:22819195

  7. Pronounced cytostatic activity and bystander effect of a novel series of fluorescent tricyclic acyclovir and ganciclovir derivatives in herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene-transduced tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, J; Ostrowski, T; Goslinski, T; De Clercq, E; Golankiewicz, B

    2002-09-01

    A number of tricyclic acyclovir (ACV) and ganciclovir (GCV) derivatives substituted with bulky lipophilic groups have been identified as potent and highly selective cytostatic agents against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-thymidine kinase (TK) gene-transduced human osteosarcoma and murine mammary carcinoma tumor cells. Although their affinity for HSV-1 TK was inferior to that of ACV or GCV, their cytostatic potency and selectivity was at least as high as observed for the parental ACV and GCV compounds. The tricyclic ACV and GCV derivatives were also endowed with a very pronounced bystander effect in cell culture, albeit at relatively high drug concentrations. Unlike ACV and GCV, the tricyclic purine derivatives are endowed with intrinsically strong fluorescent properties, which allow simple and sensitive monitoring of drug concentrations in biological fluids and tissues. Also, the lipophilicity of the tricyclic purine derivatives is much higher than that of ACV and GCV, and this may allow better uptake of these derivatives from the blood into the central nervous system.

  8. Multiscale Image Processing of Solar Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C.; Myers, D. C.

    2001-12-01

    It is often said that the blessing and curse of solar physics is too much data. Solar missions such as Yohkoh, SOHO and TRACE have shown us the Sun with amazing clarity but have also increased the amount of highly complex data. We have improved our view of the Sun yet we have not improved our analysis techniques. The standard techniques used for analysis of solar images generally consist of observing the evolution of features in a sequence of byte scaled images or a sequence of byte scaled difference images. The determination of features and structures in the images are done qualitatively by the observer. There is little quantitative and objective analysis done with these images. Many advances in image processing techniques have occured in the past decade. Many of these methods are possibly suited for solar image analysis. Multiscale/Multiresolution methods are perhaps the most promising. These methods have been used to formulate the human ability to view and comprehend phenomena on different scales. So these techniques could be used to quantitify the imaging processing done by the observers eyes and brains. In this work we present several applications of multiscale techniques applied to solar image data. Specifically, we discuss uses of the wavelet, curvelet, and related transforms to define a multiresolution support for EIT, LASCO and TRACE images.

  9. Image processor development with synthetic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guivens, Norman R., Jr.; Henshaw, Philip D.

    1992-03-01

    Many impressive developments in image simulation technology have led to extensive use of synthetic images in the motion picture industry for special effects and animation, and also in applications such as aircraft flight simulators. Although these images appear correct to the human eye, they generally are not suitable for development of image processing and machine vision applications because the logarithmic response of the human eye does not match the linear response of most electronic detectors. Synthetic images must accurately represent the effects which are present in detected images, whether produced by the source(s) of illumination, the scene itself, the medium through which the sensor is viewing the scene, the sensor system, or electronic circuits between the detector array and the processing system if they are to be useful for development and analysis of image processing (and machine vision) systems. Recent developments have led to the use of laser sensors for various machine vision applications including collision avoidance, wire detection and avoidance, intrusion detection, and underwater imaging systems. With recent developments in low cost laser systems, the use of these sensors for numerous applications relating to machine vision is likely to continue to expand for the foreseeable future. SPARTA's work in the area of image synthesis began with the development of a coherent laser radar simulation running on IBM and compatible personal computers, and has since branched into modeling of incoherent active and passive systems as well. SPARTA's current optical imaging sensor simulation, SENSORSIM, is written in ANSI standard FORTRAN '77 to ensure portability.

  10. Biomedical image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.K.

    1981-01-01

    Biomedical image processing is a very broad field; it covers biomedical signal gathering, image forming, picture processing, and image display to medical diagnosis based on features extracted from images. This article reviews this topic in both its fundamentals and applications. In its fundamentals, some basic image processing techniques including outlining, deblurring, noise cleaning, filtering, search, classical analysis and texture analysis have been reviewed together with examples. The state-of-the-art image processing systems have been introduced and discussed in two categories: general purpose image processing systems and image analyzers. In order for these systems to be effective for biomedical applications, special biomedical image processing languages have to be developed. The combination of both hardware and software leads to clinical imaging devices. Two different types of clinical imaging devices have been discussed. There are radiological imagings which include radiography, thermography, ultrasound, nuclear medicine and CT. Among these, thermography is the most noninvasive but is limited in application due to the low energy of its source. X-ray CT is excellent for static anatomical images and is moving toward the measurement of dynamic function, whereas nuclear imaging is moving toward organ metabolism and ultrasound is toward tissue physical characteristics. Heart imaging is one of the most interesting and challenging research topics in biomedical image processing; current methods including the invasive-technique cineangiography, and noninvasive ultrasound, nuclear medicine, transmission, and emission CT methodologies have been reviewed.

  11. LandsatLook images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jonescheit, Linda

    2011-01-01

    LandsatLook images are full resolution JPEG files derived from Landsat Level 1 data products. The images are compressed and stretched to create an image optimized for image selection and visual interpretation; it is not recommended that they be used in digital analysis.

  12. Adolescence and Body Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinshenker, Naomi

    2002-01-01

    Discusses body image among adolescents, explaining that today's adolescents are more prone to body image distortions and dissatisfaction than ever and examining the historical context; how self-image develops; normative discontent; body image distortions; body dysmorphic disorder (BDD); vulnerability of boys (muscle dysmorphia); who is at risk;…

  13. Comparative cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Brundage, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This book is designed to compare all major cardiac imaging techniques. All major imaging techniques - including conventional angiography, digital angiography, echocardiography and Doppler imaging, conventional radioisotope techniques, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - are covered in this text as they apply to the major cardiovascular disorders. There is brief coverage of positron emission tomography and an extensive presentation of ultrafast computed tomography.

  14. Image-Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Apple Image-Processing Educator (AIPE) explores ability of microcomputers to provide personalized computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in digital image processing of remotely sensed images. AIPE is "proof-of-concept" system, not polished production system. User-friendly prompts provide access to explanations of common features of digital image processing and of sample programs that implement these features.

  15. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  16. Intravascular Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Su, Jimmy L.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Smalling, Richard W.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging is a catheter-based, minimally invasive, imaging modality capable of providing high-resolution optical absorption map of the arterial wall. Integrated with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging, combined IVPA and IVUS imaging can be used to detect and characterize atherosclerotic plaques building up in the inner lining of an artery. In this paper, we present and discuss various representative applications of combined IVPA/IVUS imaging of atherosclerosis, including assessment of the composition of atherosclerotic plaques, imaging of macrophages within the plaques, and molecular imaging of biomarkers associated with formation and development of plaques. In addition, imaging of coronary artery stents using IVPA and IVUS imaging is demonstrated. Furthermore, the design of an integrated IVUS/IVPA imaging catheter needed for in vivo clinical applications is discussed. PMID:21359138

  17. Image Processing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Ames digital image velocimetry technology has been incorporated in a commercially available image processing software package that allows motion measurement of images on a PC alone. The software, manufactured by Werner Frei Associates, is IMAGELAB FFT. IMAGELAB FFT is a general purpose image processing system with a variety of other applications, among them image enhancement of fingerprints and use by banks and law enforcement agencies for analysis of videos run during robberies.

  18. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  19. Image Enhancement, Image Quality, and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2005-01-01

    The Multiscale Retinex With Color Restoration (MSRCR) is a non-linear image enhancement algorithm that provides simultaneous dynamic range compression, color constancy and rendition. The overall impact is to brighten up areas of poor contrast/lightness but not at the expense of saturating areas of good contrast/brightness. The downside is that with the poor signal-to-noise ratio that most image acquisition devices have in dark regions, noise can also be greatly enhanced thus affecting overall image quality. In this paper, we will discuss the impact of the MSRCR on the overall quality of an enhanced image as a function of the strength of shadows in an image, and as a function of the root-mean-square (RMS) signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of the image.

  20. Lymphatic Imaging: Focus on Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    In view of the importance of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in tumor staging and patient management, sensitive and accurate imaging of SLNs has been intensively explored. Along with the advance of the imaging technology, various contrast agents have been developed for lymphatic imaging. In this review, the lymph node imaging agents were summarized into three groups: tumor targeting agents, lymphatic targeting agents and lymphatic mapping agents. Tumor targeting agents are used to detect metastatic tumor tissue within LNs, lymphatic targeting agents aim to visualize lymphatic vessels and lymphangionesis, while lymphatic mapping agents are mainly for SLN detection during surgery after local administration. Coupled with various signal emitters, these imaging agents work with single or multiple imaging modalities to provide a valuable way to evaluate the location and metastatic status of SLNs. PMID:25897334

  1. Asymptomatic herpes simplex type 1 virus infection of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Boggian, I; Buzzacaro, E; Calistri, A; Calvi, P; Cavaggioni, A; Mucignat-Caretta, C; Palu, G

    2000-08-01

    An asymptomatic and transitory brain infection takes place in adult Swiss CD-1 mice after intranasal inoculation of HSV-1 strain SC16. Time course and distribution of the infection in the brain are demonstrated, (i) by titration of the nasal tissue and olfactory bulbs for 16 days post-infection (p.i.), showing a maximum production yield on day 7 p.i. and no replicating virus on day 16 p. i.; (ii) expression in the brain of the lac Z reporter gene of HSV-1 strain SC16-DeltaUS5-lac Z consistent with a central spread of the virus through the central olfactory pathways and the trigeminal system as described in acute HSV-1 encephalitis models; (iii) PCR amplifications of a segment of the thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk) showing the persistence of viral genome in the nasal tissue and olfactory bulbs after clearance of infectious virus. The asymptomatic character of the infection is demonstrated over 2 months p.i. (i) by normal body weight; (ii) a neurological survey which excludes motor, sensory, balance and postural signs; (iii) two behavioral tests, the open-field test for exploratory activity and the cookie-finding test for olfactory search. On the other hand, intracerebral inocula cause encephalitis and death in a few days (LD50 ca. 14 p.f.u.). Intracranial, surgical transection of one olfactory nerve does not prevent infection of the corresponding bulb nor does it modify virus distribution, suggesting multiple entry routes from the nasal cavity to the brain. In conclusion, HSV-1 strain SC16 reaches the brain of CD-1 mice from the nasal cavity and replicates without neurological or behavioral signs.

  2. Image based performance analysis of thermal imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, D.; Repasi, E.

    2016-05-01

    Due to advances in technology, modern thermal imagers resemble sophisticated image processing systems in functionality. Advanced signal and image processing tools enclosed into the camera body extend the basic image capturing capability of thermal cameras. This happens in order to enhance the display presentation of the captured scene or specific scene details. Usually, the implemented methods are proprietary company expertise, distributed without extensive documentation. This makes the comparison of thermal imagers especially from different companies a difficult task (or at least a very time consuming/expensive task - e.g. requiring the execution of a field trial and/or an observer trial). For example, a thermal camera equipped with turbulence mitigation capability stands for such a closed system. The Fraunhofer IOSB has started to build up a system for testing thermal imagers by image based methods in the lab environment. This will extend our capability of measuring the classical IR-system parameters (e.g. MTF, MTDP, etc.) in the lab. The system is set up around the IR- scene projector, which is necessary for the thermal display (projection) of an image sequence for the IR-camera under test. The same set of thermal test sequences might be presented to every unit under test. For turbulence mitigation tests, this could be e.g. the same turbulence sequence. During system tests, gradual variation of input parameters (e. g. thermal contrast) can be applied. First ideas of test scenes selection and how to assembly an imaging suite (a set of image sequences) for the analysis of imaging thermal systems containing such black boxes in the image forming path is discussed.

  3. Image registration method for medical image sequences

    DOEpatents

    Gee, Timothy F.; Goddard, James S.

    2013-03-26

    Image registration of low contrast image sequences is provided. In one aspect, a desired region of an image is automatically segmented and only the desired region is registered. Active contours and adaptive thresholding of intensity or edge information may be used to segment the desired regions. A transform function is defined to register the segmented region, and sub-pixel information may be determined using one or more interpolation methods.

  4. Parallel MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deshmane, Anagha; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Parallel imaging is a robust method for accelerating the acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, and has made possible many new applications of MR imaging. Parallel imaging works by acquiring a reduced amount of k-space data with an array of receiver coils. These undersampled data can be acquired more quickly, but the undersampling leads to aliased images. One of several parallel imaging algorithms can then be used to reconstruct artifact-free images from either the aliased images (SENSE-type reconstruction) or from the under-sampled data (GRAPPA-type reconstruction). The advantages of parallel imaging in a clinical setting include faster image acquisition, which can be used, for instance, to shorten breath-hold times resulting in fewer motion-corrupted examinations. In this article the basic concepts behind parallel imaging are introduced. The relationship between undersampling and aliasing is discussed and two commonly used parallel imaging methods, SENSE and GRAPPA, are explained in detail. Examples of artifacts arising from parallel imaging are shown and ways to detect and mitigate these artifacts are described. Finally, several current applications of parallel imaging are presented and recent advancements and promising research in parallel imaging are briefly reviewed. PMID:22696125

  5. Optical image encryption based on diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2010-11-15

    In this Letter, we propose a method for optical image encryption based on diffractive imaging. An optical multiple random phase mask encoding system is applied, and one of the phase-only masks is selected and laterally translated along a preset direction during the encryption process. For image decryption, a phase retrieval algorithm is proposed to extract a high-quality plaintext. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical results. The proposed method can provide a new strategy instead of conventional interference methods, and it may open up a new research perspective for optical image encryption.

  6. Fast image decompression for telebrowsing of images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miaou, Shaou-Gang; Tou, Julius T.

    1993-01-01

    Progressive image transmission (PIT) is often used to reduce the transmission time of an image telebrowsing system. A side effect of the PIT is the increase of computational complexity at the viewer's site. This effect is more serious in transform domain techniques than in other techniques. Recent attempts to reduce the side effect are futile as they create another side effect, namely, the discontinuous and unpleasant image build-up. Based on a practical assumption that image blocks to be inverse transformed are generally sparse, this paper presents a method to minimize both side effects simultaneously.

  7. Multispectral imaging for biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Robert K.; Corcoran, Stephen P.; Nixon, Kristin A.; Ostrom, Robert E.

    2005-03-01

    Automated identification systems based on fingerprint images are subject to two significant types of error: an incorrect decision about the identity of a person due to a poor quality fingerprint image and incorrectly accepting a fingerprint image generated from an artificial sample or altered finger. This paper discusses the use of multispectral sensing as a means to collect additional information about a finger that significantly augments the information collected using a conventional fingerprint imager based on total internal reflectance. In the context of this paper, "multispectral sensing" is used broadly to denote a collection of images taken under different polarization conditions and illumination configurations, as well as using multiple wavelengths. Background information is provided on conventional fingerprint imaging. A multispectral imager for fingerprint imaging is then described and a means to combine the two imaging systems into a single unit is discussed. Results from an early-stage prototype of such a system are shown.

  8. Future generation CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Deborah; De Man, Bruno; Iatrou, Maria; Edic, Peter M

    2004-02-01

    X-ray CT technology has been available for more than 30 years, yet continued technological advances have kept CT imaging at the forefront of medical imaging innovation. Consequently, the number of clinical CT applications has increased steadily. Other imaging modalities might be superior to CT imaging for some specific applications, but no other single modality is more often used in chest imaging today. Future technological developments in the area of high-resolution detectors, high-capacity x-ray tubes, advanced reconstruction algorithms, and improved visualization techniques will continue to expand the imaging capability. Future CT imaging technology will combine improved imaging capability with advanced and specific computer-assisted tools, which will expand the usefulness of CT imaging in many areas.

  9. Subroutines For Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulcon, Nettie D.; Monteith, James H.; Miller, Keith W.

    1988-01-01

    Image Processing Library computer program, IPLIB, is collection of subroutines facilitating use of COMTAL image-processing system driven by HP 1000 computer. Functions include addition or subtraction of two images with or without scaling, display of color or monochrome images, digitization of image from television camera, display of test pattern, manipulation of bits, and clearing of screen. Provides capability to read or write points, lines, and pixels from image; read or write at location of cursor; and read or write array of integers into COMTAL memory. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, R.J.; Smith, P.H.; Lemmon, M.; Tanner, R.; Burkland, M.; Wegryn, E.; Weinberg, J.; Marcialis, R.; Britt, D.T.; Thomas, N.; Kramm, R.; Dummel, A.; Crowe, D.; Bos, B.J.; Bell, J.F.; Rueffer, P.; Gliem, F.; Johnson, J. R.; Maki, J.N.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Singer, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder returned over 16,000 high-quality images from the surface of Mars. The camera was well-calibrated in the laboratory, with <5% radiometric uncertainty. The photometric properties of two radiometric targets were also measured with 3% uncertainty. Several data sets acquired during the cruise and on Mars confirm that the system operated nominally throughout the course of the mission. Image calibration algorithms were developed for landed operations to correct instrumental sources of noise and to calibrate images relative to observations of the radiometric targets. The uncertainties associated with these algorithms as well as current improvements to image calibration are discussed. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. A hyperspectral image projector for hyperspectral imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Joseph P.; Brown, Steven W.; Neira, Jorge E.; Bousquet, Robert R.

    2007-04-01

    We have developed and demonstrated a Hyperspectral Image Projector (HIP) intended for system-level validation testing of hyperspectral imagers, including the instrument and any associated spectral unmixing algorithms. HIP, based on the same digital micromirror arrays used in commercial digital light processing (DLP*) displays, is capable of projecting any combination of many different arbitrarily programmable basis spectra into each image pixel at up to video frame rates. We use a scheme whereby one micromirror array is used to produce light having the spectra of endmembers (i.e. vegetation, water, minerals, etc.), and a second micromirror array, optically in series with the first, projects any combination of these arbitrarily-programmable spectra into the pixels of a 1024 x 768 element spatial image, thereby producing temporally-integrated images having spectrally mixed pixels. HIP goes beyond conventional DLP projectors in that each spatial pixel can have an arbitrary spectrum, not just arbitrary color. As such, the resulting spectral and spatial content of the projected image can simulate realistic scenes that a hyperspectral imager will measure during its use. Also, the spectral radiance of the projected scenes can be measured with a calibrated spectroradiometer, such that the spectral radiance projected into each pixel of the hyperspectral imager can be accurately known. Use of such projected scenes in a controlled laboratory setting would alleviate expensive field testing of instruments, allow better separation of environmental effects from instrument effects, and enable system-level performance testing and validation of hyperspectral imagers as used with analysis algorithms. For example, known mixtures of relevant endmember spectra could be projected into arbitrary spatial pixels in a hyperspectral imager, enabling tests of how well a full system, consisting of the instrument + calibration + analysis algorithm, performs in unmixing (i.e. de-convolving) the

  12. Simpler images, better results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  13. Photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghua; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (also called optoacoustic or thermoacoustic imaging) has the potential to image animal or human organs, such as the breast and the brain, with simultaneous high contrast and high spatial resolution. This article provides an overview of the rapidly expanding field of photoacoustic imaging for biomedical applications. Imaging techniques, including depth profiling in layered media, scanning tomography with focused ultrasonic transducers, image forming with an acoustic lens, and computed tomography with unfocused transducers, are introduced. Special emphasis is placed on computed tomography, including reconstruction algorithms, spatial resolution, and related recent experiments. Promising biomedical applications are discussed throughout the text, including (1) tomographic imaging of the skin and other superficial organs by laser-induced photoacoustic microscopy, which offers the critical advantages, over current high-resolution optical imaging modalities, of deeper imaging depth and higher absorption contrasts, (2) breast cancer detection by near-infrared light or radio-frequency-wave-induced photoacoustic imaging, which has important potential for early detection, and (3) small animal imaging by laser-induced photoacoustic imaging, which measures unique optical absorption contrasts related to important biochemical information and provides better resolution in deep tissues than optical imaging.

  14. SU-E-J-155: Automatic Quantitative Decision Making Metric for 4DCT Image Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kiely, J Blanco; Olszanski, A; Both, S; White, B; Low, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a quantitative decision making metric for automatically detecting irregular breathing using a large patient population that received phase-sorted 4DCT. Methods: This study employed two patient cohorts. Cohort#1 contained 256 patients who received a phasesorted 4DCT. Cohort#2 contained 86 patients who received three weekly phase-sorted 4DCT scans. A previously published technique used a single abdominal surrogate to calculate the ratio of extreme inhalation tidal volume to normal inhalation tidal volume, referred to as the κ metric. Since a single surrogate is standard for phase-sorted 4DCT in radiation oncology clinical practice, tidal volume was not quantified. Without tidal volume, the absolute κ metric could not be determined, so a relative κ (κrel) metric was defined based on the measured surrogate amplitude instead of tidal volume. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were used to quantitatively determine the optimal cutoff value (jk) and efficiency cutoff value (τk) of κrel to automatically identify irregular breathing that would reduce the image quality of phase-sorted 4DCT. Discriminatory accuracy (area under the ROC curve) of κrel was calculated by a trapezoidal numeric integration technique. Results: The discriminatory accuracy of ?rel was found to be 0.746. The key values of jk and tk were calculated to be 1.45 and 1.72 respectively. For values of ?rel such that jk≤κrel≤τk, the decision to reacquire the 4DCT would be at the discretion of the physician. This accounted for only 11.9% of the patients in this study. The magnitude of κrel held consistent over 3 weeks for 73% of the patients in cohort#3. Conclusion: The decision making metric, ?rel, was shown to be an accurate classifier of irregular breathing patients in a large patient population. This work provided an automatic quantitative decision making metric to quickly and accurately assess the extent to which irregular breathing is occurring during phase

  15. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  16. The Power of Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Vivian

    1977-01-01

    The role played by images in the course of human development is considered in this article; personal growth is defined at three different levels of imagery: the producer/consumer image, the humanistic, and the transpersonal. (JD)

  17. Weighted guided image filtering.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengguo; Zheng, Jinghong; Zhu, Zijian; Yao, Wei; Wu, Shiqian

    2015-01-01

    It is known that local filtering-based edge preserving smoothing techniques suffer from halo artifacts. In this paper, a weighted guided image filter (WGIF) is introduced by incorporating an edge-aware weighting into an existing guided image filter (GIF) to address the problem. The WGIF inherits advantages of both global and local smoothing filters in the sense that: 1) the complexity of the WGIF is O(N) for an image with N pixels, which is same as the GIF and 2) the WGIF can avoid halo artifacts like the existing global smoothing filters. The WGIF is applied for single image detail enhancement, single image haze removal, and fusion of differently exposed images. Experimental results show that the resultant algorithms produce images with better visual quality and at the same time halo artifacts can be reduced/avoided from appearing in the final images with negligible increment on running times. PMID:25415986

  18. Preclinical lymphatic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Niu, Gang; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-08-01

    Noninvasive in vivo imaging of lymphatic vessels and lymphatic nodes is expected to fulfill the purpose of analyzing lymphatic vessels and their function, understanding molecular mechanisms of lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic spread of tumors, and utilizing lymphatic molecular markers as a prognostic or diagnostic indicator. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of in vivo imaging modalities for detecting lymphatic vessels, lymphatic drainage, and lymphatic nodes, which include conventional lymphatic imaging techniques such as dyes and radionuclide scintigraphy as well as novel techniques for lymphatic imaging such as optical imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, positron emission tomography using lymphatic biomarkers, photoacoustic imaging, and combinations of multiple modalities. The field of lymphatic imaging is ever evolving, and technological advances, combined with the development of new contrast agents, continue to improve the research of lymphatic vascular system in health and disease states as well as to improve the accuracy of diagnosis in the relevant diseases.

  19. Multi Spectral Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An optical imaging system provides automatic co-registration of a plurality of multi spectral images of an object which are generated by a plurality of video cameras or other optical detectors. The imaging system includes a modular assembly of beam splitters, lens tubes, camera lenses and wavelength selective filters which facilitate easy reconfiguration and adjustment of the system for various applications. A primary lens assembly generates a real image of an object to be imaged on a reticle which is positioned at a fixed length from a beam splitter assembly. The beam splitter assembly separates a collimated image beam received from the reticle into multiple image beams, each of which is projected onto a corresponding one of a plurality of video cameras. The lens tubes which connect the beam splitter assembly to the cameras are adjustable in length to provide automatic co-registration of the images generated by each camera.

  20. Image tools for UNIX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, David C.

    1994-01-01

    This talk features two simple and useful tools for digital image processing in the UNIX environment. They are xv and pbmplus. The xv image viewer which runs under the X window system reads images in a number of different file formats and writes them out in different formats. The view area supports a pop-up control panel. The 'algorithms' menu lets you blur an image. The xv control panel also activates the color editor which displays the image's color map (if one exists). The xv image viewer is available through the internet. The pbmplus package is a set of tools designed to perform image processing from within a UNIX shell. The acronym 'pbm' stands for portable bit map. Like xv, the pbm plus tool can convert images from and to many different file formats. The source code and manual pages for pbmplus are also available through the internet. This software is in the public domain.

  1. Medical Image Databases

    PubMed Central

    Tagare, Hemant D.; Jaffe, C. Carl; Duncan, James

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Information contained in medical images differs considerably from that residing in alphanumeric format. The difference can be attributed to four characteristics: (1) the semantics of medical knowledge extractable from images is imprecise; (2) image information contains form and spatial data, which are not expressible in conventional language; (3) a large part of image information is geometric; (4) diagnostic inferences derived from images rest on an incomplete, continuously evolving model of normality. This paper explores the differentiating characteristics of text versus images and their impact on design of a medical image database intended to allow content-based indexing and retrieval. One strategy for implementing medical image databases is presented, which employs object-oriented iconic queries, semantics by association with prototypes, and a generic schema. PMID:9147338

  2. Aerial Image Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Robert E.

    1987-09-01

    Aerial images produce the best stereoscopic images of the viewed world. Despite the fact that every optic in existence produces an aerial image, few persons are aware of their existence and possible uses. Constant reference to the eye and other optical systems have produced a psychosis of design that only considers "focal planes" in the design and analysis of optical systems. All objects in the field of view of the optical device are imaged by the device as an aerial image. Use of aerial images in vision and visual display systems can provide a true stereoscopic representation of the viewed world. This paper discusses aerial image systems - their applications and designs and presents designs and design concepts that utilize aerial images to obtain superior visual displays, particularly with application to visual simulation.

  3. Preclinical Lymphatic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Niu, Gang; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging of lymphatic vessels and lymphatic nodes is expected to fulfill the purpose of analyzing lymphatic vessels and their function, understanding molecular mechanisms of lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic spread of tumors, and utilizing lymphatic molecular markers as a prognostic or diagnostic indicator. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of in vivo imaging modalities for detecting lymphatic vessels, lymphatic drainage, lymphatic nodes, which include conventional lymphatic imaging techniques such as dyes and radionuclide scintigraphy as well as novel techniques for lymphatic imaging such as optical imaging, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) using lymphatic biomarkers, photoacoustic imaging and combinations of multiple modalities. The field of lymphatic imaging is ever evolving, and technological advances, combined with the development of new contrast agents, continue to improve the research of lymphatic vascular system in health and disease states as well as to improve the accuracy of diagnosis in the relevant diseases. PMID:20862613

  4. Overview of Imaging Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mentioned In This Article Medical Dictionary Also of Interest (Quiz) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (Video) Ear Pressure ... Tap here for the Professional Version Also of Interest Test your knowledge Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  5. Spectrographic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Michael D.; Treado, Patrick J.

    1991-01-01

    An imaging system for providing spectrographically resolved images. The system incorporates a one-dimensional spatial encoding mask which enables an image to be projected onto a two-dimensional image detector after spectral dispersion of the image. The dimension of the image which is lost due to spectral dispersion on the two-dimensional detector is recovered through employing a reverse transform based on presenting a multiplicity of different spatial encoding patterns to the image. The system is especially adapted for detecting Raman scattering of monochromatic light transmitted through or reflected from physical samples. Preferably, spatial encoding is achieved through the use of Hadamard mask which selectively transmits or blocks portions of the image from the sample being evaluated.

  6. Video image position determination

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Wynn; Anderson, Forrest L.; Kortegaard, Birchard L.

    1991-01-01

    An optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

  7. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2–3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  8. Image quality analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Antoshkin, L. V.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Image quality analyzer (IQA) which used as device for efficiency analysis of adaptive optics application is described. In analyzer marketed possibility estimations quality of images on three different criterions of quality images: contrast, sharpnesses and the spectral criterion. At present given analyzer is introduced on Big Solar Vacuum Telescope in stale work that allows at observations to conduct the choice of the most contrasting images of Sun. Is it hereinafter planned use the analyzer in composition of the ANGARA adaptive correction system.

  9. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Beard, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2-3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  10. Coherent imaging at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.; Barty, A.; Benner, W. H.; Bogan, M. J.; Boutet, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Duesterer, S.; Frank, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Iwan, B.; Marchesini, S.; Sakdinawat, A.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Seibert, M. M.; Timneanu, N.; Treusch, R.; Woods, B. W.

    2009-09-01

    We have carried out high-resolution single-pulse coherent diffractive imaging at the FLASH free-electron laser. The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of an object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. In particular we are developing imaging of biological specimens beyond conventional radiation damage resolution limits, developing imaging of ultrafast processes, and testing methods to characterize and perform single-particle imaging.

  11. High compression image and image sequence coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunt, Murat

    1989-01-01

    The digital representation of an image requires a very large number of bits. This number is even larger for an image sequence. The goal of image coding is to reduce this number, as much as possible, and reconstruct a faithful duplicate of the original picture or image sequence. Early efforts in image coding, solely guided by information theory, led to a plethora of methods. The compression ratio reached a plateau around 10:1 a couple of years ago. Recent progress in the study of the brain mechanism of vision and scene analysis has opened new vistas in picture coding. Directional sensitivity of the neurones in the visual pathway combined with the separate processing of contours and textures has led to a new class of coding methods capable of achieving compression ratios as high as 100:1 for images and around 300:1 for image sequences. Recent progress on some of the main avenues of object-based methods is presented. These second generation techniques make use of contour-texture modeling, new results in neurophysiology and psychophysics and scene analysis.

  12. Image quality (IQ) guided multispectral image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Chen, Genshe; Wang, Zhonghai; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Image compression is necessary for data transportation, which saves both transferring time and storage space. In this paper, we focus on our discussion on lossy compression. There are many standard image formats and corresponding compression algorithms, for examples, JPEG (DCT -- discrete cosine transform), JPEG 2000 (DWT -- discrete wavelet transform), BPG (better portable graphics) and TIFF (LZW -- Lempel-Ziv-Welch). The image quality (IQ) of decompressed image will be measured by numerical metrics such as root mean square error (RMSE), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and structural Similarity (SSIM) Index. Given an image and a specified IQ, we will investigate how to select a compression method and its parameters to achieve an expected compression. Our scenario consists of 3 steps. The first step is to compress a set of interested images by varying parameters and compute their IQs for each compression method. The second step is to create several regression models per compression method after analyzing the IQ-measurement versus compression-parameter from a number of compressed images. The third step is to compress the given image with the specified IQ using the selected compression method (JPEG, JPEG2000, BPG, or TIFF) according to the regressed models. The IQ may be specified by a compression ratio (e.g., 100), then we will select the compression method of the highest IQ (SSIM, or PSNR). Or the IQ may be specified by a IQ metric (e.g., SSIM = 0.8, or PSNR = 50), then we will select the compression method of the highest compression ratio. Our experiments tested on thermal (long-wave infrared) images (in gray scales) showed very promising results.

  13. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  14. XVD Image Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Andres, Paul M.; Mortensen, Helen B.; Parizher, Vadim; McAuley, Myche; Bartholomew, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The XVD [X-Windows VICAR (video image communication and retrieval) Display] computer program offers an interactive display of VICAR and PDS (planetary data systems) images. It is designed to efficiently display multiple-GB images and runs on Solaris, Linux, or Mac OS X systems using X-Windows.

  15. Medical imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  16. Whole animal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Singh; Solorio, Luis; Broome, Ann-Marie; Salem, Nicolas; Kolthammer, Jeff; Shah, Tejas; Flask, Chris; Duerk, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Translational research plays a vital role in understanding the underlying pathophysiology of human diseases, and hence development of new diagnostic and therapeutic options for their management. After creating an animal disease model, pathophysiologic changes and effects of a therapeutic intervention on them are often evaluated on the animals using immunohistologic or imaging techniques. In contrast to the immunohistologic techniques, the imaging techniques are noninvasive and hence can be used to investigate the whole animal, oftentimes in a single exam which provides opportunities to perform longitudinal studies and dynamic imaging of the same subject, and hence minimizes the experimental variability, requirement for the number of animals, and the time to perform a given experiment. Whole animal imaging can be performed by a number of techniques including x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, fluorescence imaging, and bioluminescence imaging, among others. Individual imaging techniques provide different kinds of information regarding the structure, metabolism, and physiology of the animal. Each technique has its own strengths and weaknesses, and none serves every purpose of image acquisition from all regions of an animal. In this review, a broad overview of basic principles, available contrast mechanisms, applications, challenges, and future prospects of many imaging techniques employed for whole animal imaging is provided. Our main goal is to briefly describe the current state of art to researchers and advanced students with a strong background in the field of animal research. PMID:20836038

  17. Digital Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, Casimir; Renz, Uwe; Bamberger, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Methods to visualize the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of molecules by mass spectrometric imaging evolve rapidly and yield novel applications in biology, medicine, and material surface sciences. Most mass spectrometric imagers acquire high mass resolution spectra spot-by-spot and thereby scan the object's surface. Thus, imaging is slow and image reconstruction remains cumbersome. Here we describe an imaging mass spectrometer that exploits the true imaging capabilities by ion optical means for the time of flight mass separation. The mass spectrometer is equipped with the ASIC Timepix chip as an array detector to acquire the position, mass, and intensity of ions that are imaged by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) directly from the target sample onto the detector. This imaging mass spectrometer has a spatial resolving power at the specimen of (84 ± 35) μm with a mass resolution of 45 and locates atoms or organic compounds on a surface area up to ~2 cm2. Extended laser spots of ~5 mm2 on structured specimens allows parallel imaging of selected masses. The digital imaging mass spectrometer proves high hit-multiplicity, straightforward image reconstruction, and potential for high-speed readout at 4 kHz or more. This device demonstrates a simple way of true image acquisition like a digital photographic camera. The technology may enable a fast analysis of biomolecular samples in near future.

  18. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  19. Cancer imaging archive available

    Cancer.gov

    NCI’s Cancer Imaging Program has inaugurated The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA), a web-accessible and unique clinical imaging archive linked to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) tissue repository. It contains a large proportion of original, pre-surgical MRIs from cases that have been genomically characterized in TCGA.

  20. Image Acquisition Context

    PubMed Central

    Bidgood, W. Dean; Bray, Bruce; Brown, Nicolas; Mori, Angelo Rossi; Spackman, Kent A.; Golichowski, Alan; Jones, Robert H.; Korman, Louis; Dove, Brent; Hildebrand, Lloyd; Berg, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To support clinically relevant indexing of biomedical images and image-related information based on the attributes of image acquisition procedures and the judgments (observations) expressed by observers in the process of image interpretation. Design: The authors introduce the notion of “image acquisition context,” the set of attributes that describe image acquisition procedures, and present a standards-based strategy for utilizing the attributes of image acquisition context as indexing and retrieval keys for digital image libraries. Methods: The authors' indexing strategy is based on an interdependent message/terminology architecture that combines the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard, the SNOMED (Systematized Nomenclature of Human and Veterinary Medicine) vocabulary, and the SNOMED DICOM microglossary. The SNOMED DICOM microglossary provides context-dependent mapping of terminology to DICOM data elements. Results: The capability of embedding standard coded descriptors in DICOM image headers and image-interpretation reports improves the potential for selective retrieval of image-related information. This favorably affects information management in digital libraries. PMID:9925229

  1. Interpretation of Image Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersson, Rune

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments and studies which investigated perception and image interpretation on different cognitive levels. Subjects were asked to name, describe, index, and assess image contents; write legends; create images; complete stories; illustrate stories; and produce informative materials. Results confirmed the theory of a dual stage…

  2. Intellectual Access to Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsin-Liang; Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1999-01-01

    The increased availability of digital images is accompanied by a need for solutions to the problems inherent in indexing them for retrieval. Problems in image description and access are discussed, with a perspective on traditional and new solutions. Recent developments in intellectual access to images are surveyed and contrasted with…

  3. What Is Optical Imaging?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hespos, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a promising new methodology called optical imaging. Optical imaging is used for measuring changes in cortical blood flow due to functional activation. The article outlines the pros and cons of using optical imaging for studying the brain correlates of perceptual, cognitive, and language development in infants and young…

  4. Displaying Images Of Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Michael D.; Evans, Frank; Nakamura, Daniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Interactive Image Display Program (IMDISP) is interactive image-displaying utility program for IBM personal computer (PC, XT, and AT models) and compatibles. Magnifications, contrasts, and/or subsampling selected for whole or partial images. IMDISP developed for use with CD-ROM (Compact Disk Read-Only Memory) storage system. Written in C language (94 percent) and Assembler (6 percent).

  5. Hyperspectral image processing methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral image processing refers to the use of computer algorithms to extract, store and manipulate both spatial and spectral information contained in hyperspectral images across the visible and near-infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. A typical hyperspectral image processing work...

  6. Methods in Astronomical Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörsäter, S.

    A Brief Introductory Note History of Astronomical Imaging Astronomical Image Data Images in Various Formats Digitized Image Data Digital Image Data Philosophy of Astronomical Image Processing Properties of Digital Astronomical Images Human Image Processing Astronomical vs. Computer Science Image Processing Basic Tools of Astronomical Image Processing Display Applications Calibration of Intensity Scales Calibration of Length Scales Image Re-shaping Feature Enhancement Noise Suppression Noise and Error Analysis Image Processing Packages: Design of AIPS and MIDAS AIPS MIDAS Reduction of CCD Data Bias Subtraction Clipping Preflash Subtraction Dark Subtraction Flat Fielding Sky Subtraction Extinction Correction Deconvolution Methods Rebinning/Combining Summary and Prospects for the Future

  7. SWNT Imaging Using Multispectral Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blades, Michael; Pirbhai, Massooma; Rotkin, Slava V.

    2012-02-01

    A flexible optical system was developed to image carbon single-wall nanotube (SWNT) photoluminescence using the multispectral capabilities of a typical CCD camcorder. The built in Bayer filter of the CCD camera was utilized, using OpenCV C++ libraries for image processing, to decompose the image generated in a high magnification epifluorescence microscope setup into three pseudo-color channels. By carefully calibrating the filter beforehand, it was possible to extract spectral data from these channels, and effectively isolate the SWNT signals from the background.

  8. An image processing algorithm for PPCR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, Arnold R.; Giles, Anthony; Davies, Andrew G.; Workman, A.

    1993-09-01

    During 1990 The UK Department of Health installed two Photostimulable Phosphor Computed Radiography (PPCR) systems in the General Infirmary at Leeds with a view to evaluating the clinical and physical performance of the technology prior to its introduction into the NHS. An issue that came to light from the outset of the projects was the radiologists reservations about the influence of the standard PPCR computerized image processing on image quality and diagnostic performance. An investigation was set up by FAXIL to develop an algorithm to produce single format high quality PPCR images that would be easy to implement and allay the concerns of radiologists.

  9. Herpes Simplex Virus Dances with Amyloid Precursor Protein while Exiting the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shi-Bin; Ferland, Paulette; Webster, Paul; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV1) replicates in epithelial cells and secondarily enters local sensory neuronal processes, traveling retrograde to the neuronal nucleus to enter latency. Upon reawakening newly synthesized viral particles travel anterograde back to the epithelial cells of the lip, causing the recurrent cold sore. HSV1 co-purifies with amyloid precursor protein (APP), a cellular transmembrane glycoprotein and receptor for anterograde transport machinery that when proteolyzed produces A-beta, the major component of senile plaques. Here we focus on transport inside epithelial cells of newly synthesized virus during its transit to the cell surface. We hypothesize that HSV1 recruits cellular APP during transport. We explore this with quantitative immuno-fluorescence, immuno-gold electron-microscopy and live cell confocal imaging. After synchronous infection most nascent VP26-GFP-labeled viral particles in the cytoplasm co-localize with APP (72.8+/−6.7%) and travel together with APP inside living cells (81.1+/−28.9%). This interaction has functional consequences: HSV1 infection decreases the average velocity of APP particles (from 1.1+/−0.2 to 0.3+/−0.1 µm/s) and results in APP mal-distribution in infected cells, while interplay with APP-particles increases the frequency (from 10% to 81% motile) and velocity (from 0.3+/−0.1 to 0.4+/−0.1 µm/s) of VP26-GFP transport. In cells infected with HSV1 lacking the viral Fc receptor, gE, an envelope glycoprotein also involved in viral axonal transport, APP-capsid interactions are preserved while the distribution and dynamics of dual-label particles differ from wild-type by both immuno-fluorescence and live imaging. Knock-down of APP with siRNA eliminates APP staining, confirming specificity. Our results indicate that most intracellular HSV1 particles undergo frequent dynamic interplay with APP in a manner that facilitates viral transport and interferes with normal APP transport and distribution. Such dynamic

  10. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats.

  11. Future Imaging Sensor Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Ando, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced imaging sensor technologies that are being developed for future NASA earth observation missions are discussed. These include the multilinear array, the Shuttle imaging spectrometer, and the Shuttle imaging radar. The principal specifications and functional descriptions of the instruments are presented, and it is shown that the advanced technologies will enable a synergistic approach to the use of VIS/IR and microwave imaging sensors for remote sensing research and applications. The key problems posed by these future imaging sensor technologies are discussed, with particular attention given to data rates, power consumption, and data processing.

  12. Imaging of the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul E; Zee, Chi Shing

    2007-07-01

    The history of the development of cerebral imaging is a complex combination of the forces of innovation at both the individual and industrial levels. Principal paradigms of neuroimaging shifted as a result of technological breakthroughs, beginning with the discovery of x-rays and continuing with the development of computerized imaging to the latest imaging paradigm, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. We discuss these landmarks in neuroimaging in historical context, with emphasis on the particularly rapid development of imaging technology during the past 30 to 40 years, including the most recent emerging technologies.

  13. Imaging of pericardial disease.

    PubMed

    Glockner, James F

    2003-02-01

    Pericardial pathology is most often identified by its effect on cardiac function. Echocardiography is usually performed first in evaluation of pericardial disease, but is occasionally limited or indeterminate. MR imaging is often helpful in these cases, offering superior soft tissue contrast and the ability to image the entire pericardium and its relationship to cardiac structure and function. Many of the techniques recently developed for myocardial imaging are equally applicable to the pericardium and frequently assist in the diagnosis of pericardial disease. In this article, the authors review MR imaging techniques for pericardial imaging, discuss the appearance of the normal pericardium, and illustrate pathologic and congenital conditions of the pericardium.

  14. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats. PMID:24338090

  15. Sinusoidal ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Khamoushi, S M Mahdi; Nosrati, Yaser; Tavassoli, S Hassan

    2015-08-01

    We introduce sinusoidal ghost imaging (SGI), which uses 2D orthogonal sinusoidal patterns instead of random patterns in "computational ghost imaging" (CGI). Simulations and experiments are performed. In comparison with the"differential ghost imaging" algorithm that was used to improve the SNR of ghost imaging, results of SGI show about 3 orders of magnitude higher SNR, which can be reconstructed even with a much smaller number of patterns. More importantly, based on the results, SGI provides the great opportunity to generate innate processed images by predefined selection of patterns. This can speed up detection process considerably and paves the way for real applications. PMID:26258330

  16. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.