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Sample records for imaging hsv-1 tk

  1. [Autoradiography reporter gene (Ad5-tk carrying HSV1-tk gene) expression imaging in rat myocardium].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lan, Xiao-li; Wu, Tao; Yin, Xiao-hua; Zhang, Yong-xue

    2009-10-01

    Radionuclide imaging of reporter gene expression holds promise for noninvasive monitoring of gene therapy. Herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) has been successfully applied to the tumor tissue.We explored the feasibility of the expression imaging of HSV1-tk reporter gene in rat myocardium by using SPECT reporter probe (131)I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ((131)I-FIAU) and autoradiography (ARG). The recombinant Ad5-tk carrying HSV1-tk gene and adenovirus (Ad5-null) as vector were constructed and intramyocardially injected into SD rats. Experiment was grouped for different aims as follows: (1) Influence of time on the imaging after transfection reporter gene: rats were injected with (131)I-FIAU at day 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 after transfection of 1 x 10(8)pfu Ad5-tk; (2) Influence of various titers on the imaging: rats underwent intramyocardial injection with various titers of Ad5-tk (5 x 10(8), 1 x 10(8), 5 x 10(7), 1 x 10(7)pfu). After 2 days, rats were injected with (131)I-FIAU in tail vein. Equal volume Ad-nulls was intramyocardially injected to control rats. Rats were killed 24 h after injection of (131)I-FIAU and the hearts were rapidly dissected for gamma counts measurement. The total myocardial (131)I-FIAU accumulation was quantified in percent of injected dose per gram myocardium (%ID/g). The myocardial reporter gene expression was semi-quantitatively determined by ARG and RT-PCR. ARG and RT-PCR showed that the local expression of reporter gene increased in proportion with increasing titer and decreased in proportion with time post injection. The semi-quantitative assay showed there were significant correlations among %ID/g, RT-PCR and ARG: r(2) = 0.963, P < 0.05 for RT-PCR and ARG; r(2) = 0.996, P < 0.01 for %ID/g and ARG in rats received various reporter gene titers at identical time point post injection; r(2) = 0.950, P < 0.05 for RT-PCR and ARG; r(2) = 0.980, P < 0.01 for %ID/g and ARG for rats received identical

  2. Cytoplasmically Retargeted HSV1-tk/GFP Reporter Gene Mutants for Optimization of Noninvasive Molecular-Genetic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarev, Vladimir; Doubrovin, Michael; Serganova, Inna; Beresten, Tatiana; Vider, Jelena; Shavrin, Aleksander; Ageyeva, Ludmila; Balatoni, Julius; Blasberg, Ronald; Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani

    2003-01-01

    Abstract To optimize the sensitivity of imaging HSV1-tk/GFP reporter gene expression, a series of HSV1-tk/GFP mutants was developed with altered nuclear localization and better cellular enzymatic activity, compared to that of the native HSV1-tk/GFP fusion protein (HSV1-tk/GFP). Several modifications of HSV1-tk/GFP reporter gene were performed, including targeted inactivating mutations in the nuclear localization signal (NLS), the addition of a nuclear export signal (NES), a combination of both mutation types, and a truncation of the first 135 bp of the native hsv1-tk coding sequence containing a “cryptic” testicular promoter and the NLS. A recombinant HSV1-tk/GFP protein and a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for HSV1-tk/GFP were developed to quantitate the amount of reporter gene product in different assays to allow normalization of the data. These different mutations resulted in various degrees of nuclear clearance, predominant cytoplasmic distribution, and increased total cellular enzymatic activity of the HSV1-tk/GFP mutants, compared to native HSV1-tk/GFP when expressed at the same levels. This appears to be the result of improvedmetabolic bioavailability of cytoplasmically retargeted mutant HSV1-tk/GFP enzymes for reaction with the radiolabeled probe (e.g., FIAU). The analysis of enzymatic properties of different HSV1-tk/GFP mutants using FIAU as a substrate revealed no significant differences from that of the native HSV1-tk/GFP. Improved total cellular enzymatic activity of cytoplasmically retargeted HSV1-tk/GFP mutants observed in vitro was confirmed by noninvasive imaging of transduced subcutaneous tumor xenografts bearing these reporters using [131I]FIAU and a γ-camera. PMID:12869307

  3. Cytoplasmically retargeted HSV1-tk/GFP reporter gene mutants for optimization of noninvasive molecular-genetic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Vladimir; Doubrovin, Michael; Serganova, Inna; Beresten, Tatiana; Vider, Jelena; Shavrin, Aleksander; Ageyeva, Ludmila; Balatoni, Julius; Blasberg, Ronald; Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani

    2003-01-01

    To optimize the sensitivity of imaging HSV1-tk/GFP reporter gene expression, a series of HSV1-tk/GFP mutants was developed with altered nuclear localization and better cellular enzymatic activity, compared to that of the native HSV1-tk/GFP fusion protein (HSV1-tk/GFP). Several modifications of HSV1-tk/GFP reporter gene were performed, including targeted inactivating mutations in the nuclear localization signal (NLS), the addition of a nuclear export signal (NES), a combination of both mutation types, and a truncation of the first 135 bp of the native hsv1-tk coding sequence containing a "cryptic" testicular promoter and the NLS. A recombinant HSV1-tk/GFP protein and a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for HSV1-tk/GFP were developed to quantitate the amount of reporter gene product in different assays to allow normalization of the data. These different mutations resulted in various degrees of nuclear clearance, predominant cytoplasmic distribution, and increased total cellular enzymatic activity of the HSV1-tk/GFP mutants, compared to native HSV1-tk/GFP when expressed at the same levels. This appears to be the result of improved metabolic bioavailability of cytoplasmically retargeted mutant HSV1-tk/GFP enzymes for reaction with the radiolabeled probe (e.g., FIAU). The analysis of enzymatic properties of different HSV1-tk/GFP mutants using FIAU as a substrate revealed no significant differences from that of the native HSV1-tk/GFP. Improved total cellular enzymatic activity of cytoplasmically retargeted HSV1-tk/GFP mutants observed in vitro was confirmed by noninvasive imaging of transduced subcutaneous tumor xenografts bearing these reporters using [(131)I]FIAU and a gamma-camera.

  4. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Dharmin; de Jong, Marion; Vogels, Ronald; Havenga, Menzo; Driesse, Maarten; Bakker, Willem; Bijster, Magda; Avezaat, Cees; Cox, Peter; Morin, Kevin; Naimi, Ebrahim; Knaus, Edward; Wiebe, Leonard; Smitt, Peter Sillevis

    2002-07-01

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives. The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy--D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy--D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of 123I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with 123I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). 123I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy--D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with 123I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after 123I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with the transgene in the former E1 region, driven

  5. Molecular-genetic PET imaging using an HSV1-tk mutant reporter gene with enhanced specificity to acycloguanosine nucleoside analogs.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Amer M; Nishii, Ryuichi; Maxwell, David S; Volgin, Andrei; Mukhopadhyay, Uday; Bornmann, William G; Tong, William; Alauddin, Mian; Gelovani, Juri G

    2009-03-01

    Imaging 2 different molecular-genetic events in a single subject by PET is essential in a variety of in vivo applications. Using herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) mutants with narrower substrate specificities in combination with wild-type HSV1-tk (wtHSV1-tk) would enable differential imaging with corresponding radiotracers, namely 2'-deoxy-2'-(18)F-fluoro-5-ethyl-1-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl-uracil ((18)F-FEAU) and the acycloguanosine derivative 9-(4-(18)F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl]butyl)guanine ((18)F-FHBG). In this study, we evaluated wtHSV1-tk and the A168H mutant, which has been reported to exhibit enhanced acycloguanosine substrate catalytic activity and diminished pyrimidine phosphorylating activity, as PET reporter genes. Computational analysis was performed to assess the binding mode of FHBG and FEAU to wtHSV1-tk and the A168H variant. U87 cells were stably transduced with wtHSV1-tk or HSV1-tk(A168H) fused with green fluorescent protein and sorted to obtain equivalent transgene expression. In vitro uptake studies were performed to determine rates of substrate accumulation and retention. Nude mice bearing tumors expressing HSV1-tk variants were subsequently imaged using (18)F-FHBG and (18)F-FEAU. Docking results indicate that binding of FHBG to the A168H variant is unaffected whereas the binding of FEAU is hindered because of a steric clash with the bulkier mutant residues. U87 cells expressing HSV1-tk(A168H) accumulated (18)F-FHBG in in vitro uptake studies at a 3-fold higher rate than did cells expressing wtHSV1-tk without any detectable accumulation of (3)H-FEAU. Furthermore, HSV1-tk(A168H) demonstrated no thymidine phosphorylation activity. In contrast, U87 cells expressing wtHSV1-tk preferentially accumulated (3)H-FEAU at an 18-fold higher rate than they did (18)F-FHBG. Tumors expressing wtHSV1-tk or HSV1-tk(A168H) were distinctly imaged with (18)F-FEAU or (18)F-FHBG, respectively. Hence, tumors expressing HSV1-tk(A168H) accumulated 8.4-fold

  6. Radiolabeled nucleoside analogues for PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression.

    PubMed

    Alauddin, Mian M; Gelovani, Juri G

    2010-01-01

    The HSV1-tk gene has been explored as a reporter and/or suicide gene in molecular imaging of gene expression. Gene therapy with HSV1-tk and the use of this gene as a marker have been applied in patients with various forms of cancer. However, the conditions for clinical gene therapy protocols have yet to be optimized. A method to monitor the activity of HSV-tk in vivo would be extremely useful to optimize clinical gene therapy protocols. Positron emission tomography (PET) with a suitable probe can offer information about both the extent of gene expression and its distribution, provided that an appropriate reporter gene is included in the therapeutic cassette. PET imaging provides higher resolution and sensitivity and allows noninvasive quantification of biological processes. Several radiolabeled pyrimidine (thymidine) and purine (acycloguanosine) derivatives have been developed as reporter probes for imaging of HSV-TK enzyme activity with PET. In this review, information on radiolabeling and PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression with various nucleoside analogues is presented.

  7. PET imaging of HSV1-tk mutants with acquired specificity toward pyrimidine- and acycloguanosine-based radiotracers.

    PubMed

    Likar, Yury; Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shenker, Larissa; Cai, Shangde; Hricak, Hedvig; Ponomarev, Vladimir

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to create an alternative mutant of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene with reduced phosphorylation capacity for acycloguanosine derivatives, but not pyrimidine-based compounds that will allow for successful PET imaging. A new mutant of HSV1-tk reporter gene, suitable for PET imaging using pyrimidine-based radiotracers, was developed. The HSV1-tk mutant contains an arginine-to-glutamine substitution at position 176 (HSV1-R176Qtk) of the nucleoside binding region of the enzyme. The mutant-gene product showed favorable enzymatic characteristics toward pyrimidine-based nucleosides, while exhibiting reduced activity with acycloguanosine derivatives. In order to enhance HSV1-R176Qtk reporter activity with pyrimidine-based radiotracers, we introduced the R176Q substitution into the more active HSV1-sr39tk mutant. U87 human glioma cells transduced with the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk double mutant reporter gene showed high (3)H-FEAU pyrimidine nucleoside and low (3)H-penciclovir acycloguanosine analog uptake in vitro. PET imaging also demonstrated high (18)F-FEAU and low (18)F-FHBG accumulation in HSV1-R176Qsr39tk+ xenografts. The feasibility of imaging two independent nucleoside-specific HSV1-tk mutants in the same animal with PET was demonstrated. Two opposite xenografts expressing the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk reporter gene and the previously described acycloguanosine-specific mutant of HSV1-tk, HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, were imaged using a short-lived pyrimidine-based (18)F-FEAU and an acycloguanosine-based (18)F-FHBG radiotracer, respectively, administered on 2 consecutive days. We conclude that in combination with acycloguanosine-specific HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, a HSV1-tk mutant containing the R176Q substitution could be used for PET imaging of two different cell populations or concurrent molecular biological processes in the same living subject.

  8. Autoradiography study and SPECT imaging of reporter gene HSV1-tk expression in heart.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiaoli; Liu, Ying; He, Yong; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Binqing; Gao, Zairong; An, Rui; Zhang, Yongxue

    2010-04-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and optimal conditions of imaging herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene transferred into hearts with (131)I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ((131)I-FIAU) using autoradiography (ARG) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in animal models. HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and adenovirus (Ad5-null) was prepared. Rats or rabbits were divided into a study group receiving intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk, and a control group receiving Ad-null injection. In the study group of rats, two sets of experiments, time-course study and dose-dependence study, were performed. In time-course experiments, rats were injected with (131)I-FIAU on Days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7, after transfection of 1x10(8) pfu Ad5-tk, to study the feasibility and suitable time course for reporter gene imaging. In dose-dependence study, various titers of Ad5-tk (5x10(8), 1x10(8), 5x10(7) and 1x10(7) pfu) were used to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. The gamma counts of hearts were measured. The rat myocardium was analyzed by ARG and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SPECT whole-body planar imaging and cardiac tomographic imaging were performed in the rabbit models. From the ARG images, rats injected with Ad5-tk showed significant (131)I-FIAU activity in the anterolateral wall compared with background signals seen in the control Ad5-null rats. In time-course study, the highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium could be seen on Day 1, and then progressively declined with time. In dose-dependence study, the level of (131)I-FIAU accumulation in the transfected myocardium declined with the decrease of Ad viral titers. From the ARG analysis and gamma counting, the threshold viral titer was 5x10(7) pfu, and the optimal Ad titer was 1x10(8) pfu. The ARG images in region of interest-derived semi-quantitative study correlated well

  9. PET imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) or mutant HSV1-sr39tk reporter gene expression in mice and humans using [18F]FHBG.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2006-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene (PRG) or its mutant HSV1-sr39tk are used to investigate intracellular molecular events in cultured cells and to image intracellular molecular events and cell trafficking in living subjects. The expression of these PRGs can be imaged using 18F- or 124I-radiolabeled acycloguanosine or pyrimidine analog PET reporter probes (PRPs). This protocol describes the procedures for imaging HSV1-tk or HSV1-sr39tk PRG expression in living subjects with the acycloguanosine analog 9-4-[18F]fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG). [18F]FHBG is a high-affinity substrate for the HSV1-sr39TK enzyme with relatively low affinity for mammalian TK enzymes, resulting in improved detection sensitivity. Furthermore, [18F]FHBG is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an investigational new imaging agent and has been shown to detect HSV1-tk transgene expression in the liver tumors of patients. MicroPET imaging of each small animal can be completed in approximately 1.5 h, and each patient imaging session takes approximately 3 h.

  10. Assessment of α-Fetoprotein Targeted HSV1-tk Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma with In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hui; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Kyo Chul; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Chung, Wee Sup; Lim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tumor-specific enhancer/promoter is applicable for targeting gene expression in tumors and helpful for tumor-targeting imaging and therapy. We aimed to acquire α-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specific images using adenovirus containing HSV1-tk gene controlled by AFP enhancer/promoter and evaluate in vivo ganciclovir (GCV)-medicated therapeutic effects on AFP-targeted HSV1-tk expression with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET). Recombinant adenovirus expressing HSV1-tk under AFP enhancer/promoter was produced (AdAFP-TK) and the expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR and 125I-IVDU uptake. GCV-mediated HSV1-tk cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. After the mixture of AdAFP-fLuc and AdAFP-TK was administrated, bioluminescent images (BLIs) and 18F-FHBG PET images were obtained in tumor-bearing mice. In vivo therapeutic effects of AdAFP-TK and GCV in the HuH-7 xenograft model were monitored by 18F-FDG PET. When infected with AdAFP-TK, cell viability in HuH-7 was reduced, but those in HT-29 and SK-Hep-1 were not significantly decreased at any GCV concentration less than 100 μM. AFP-targeted fLuc and HSV1-tk expression were clearly visualized by BLI and 18F-FHBG PET images in AFP-producing HCC, respectively. In vivo GCV-mediated tumor growth inhibition by AFP-targeted HSV1-tk expression was monitored by 18F-FDG PET. Recombinant AdAFP-TK could be applied for AFP-targeted HCC gene therapy and imaging in AFP-producing HCC. PMID:25545853

  11. Assessment of α-fetoprotein targeted HSV1-tk expression in hepatocellular carcinoma with in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Hui; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Kyo Chul; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Chung, Wee Sup; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Tumor-specific enhancer/promoter is applicable for targeting gene expression in tumors and helpful for tumor-targeting imaging and therapy. We aimed to acquire α-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specific images using adenovirus containing HSV1-tk gene controlled by AFP enhancer/promoter and evaluate in vivo ganciclovir (GCV)-medicated therapeutic effects on AFP-targeted HSV1-tk expression with (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET). Recombinant adenovirus expressing HSV1-tk under AFP enhancer/promoter was produced (AdAFP-TK) and the expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR and (125)I-IVDU uptake. GCV-mediated HSV1-tk cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. After the mixture of AdAFP-fLuc and AdAFP-TK was administrated, bioluminescent images (BLIs) and (18)F-FHBG PET images were obtained in tumor-bearing mice. In vivo therapeutic effects of AdAFP-TK and GCV in the HuH-7 xenograft model were monitored by (18)F-FDG PET. When infected with AdAFP-TK, cell viability in HuH-7 was reduced, but those in HT-29 and SK-Hep-1 were not significantly decreased at any GCV concentration less than 100 μM. AFP-targeted fLuc and HSV1-tk expression were clearly visualized by BLI and (18)F-FHBG PET images in AFP-producing HCC, respectively. In vivo GCV-mediated tumor growth inhibition by AFP-targeted HSV1-tk expression was monitored by (18)F-FDG PET. Recombinant AdAFP-TK could be applied for AFP-targeted HCC gene therapy and imaging in AFP-producing HCC.

  12. Feasibility of sodium/iodide symporter gene as a new imaging reporter gene: comparison with HSV1-tk.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Chung, June-Key; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Kim, Chul Woo; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2004-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reporter genes, such as HSV1-tk and D(2) receptor genes, make it possible to visualise gene expression non-invasively and repetitively in vivo. However, these systems require the synthesis of complicated substrates and the availability of expensive PET equipment. Expression of the sodium/iodide symporter ( NIS) gene can be easily monitored with radioiodines and technetium-99m using a gamma camera. To evaluate the possibility of using NIS as an imaging reporter gene, we compared its characteristics with those of the conventional HSV1-tk gene. The CM cell line was made by transfecting the HSV1-tk gene into CT-26 (mouse colon carcinoma cell line). The CTN and CMN cell lines were then made by transfecting the NIS gene into CT-26 and CM. We measured the uptake of iodine-125 iodovinyldeoxyuridine ([(125)I]IVDU) and (125)I to evaluate the expression of the HSV1-tk and NIS genes, respectively. Each cell line was injected into four flank sites in Balb/c mice. The biodistribution study was performed after intravenously injecting [(125)I]IVDU and (131)I, and (131)I scintigraphy was performed for the evaluation of NIS expression. In vitro studies indicated that CTN and CMN had 40- to 79-fold and 150- to 256-fold higher uptake of (125)I than CT-26 and CM, respectively. Furthermore, CM and CMN showed 57- to 69-fold higher uptake of [(125)I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. NIS gene expression and (125)I accumulation were found to be directly correlated ( R(2)=0.923), as were HSV1-tk gene expression and [(125)I]IVDU accumulation ( R(2)=0.956). Calculated signal per unit NIS and HSV1-tk mRNA expression was 23,240+/-3,755 cpm and 34,039+/-5,346 cpm, respectively. In vivo study indicated that CTN and CMN had 2.3- and 5.8-fold higher uptake of (131)I than CT-26 and CM, and 1.8- and 3.5-fold higher uptake of [(125)I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. Scintigraphy using (131)I easily visualised CTN and CMN tumours. In conclusion, the NIS gene may be viewed as an

  13. Semiautomated radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of [18F]FEAU: a novel PET imaging agent for HSV1-tk/sr39tk reporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chin, Frederick T; Namavari, Mohammed; Levi, Jelena; Subbarayan, Murugesan; Ray, Pritha; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2008-01-01

    2'-deoxy-2'-[(18)F]fluoro-5-ethyl-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyluracil ([(18)F]FEAU) is a promising radiolabeled nucleoside designed to monitor Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene expression with positron emission tomography (PET). However, the challenging radiosynthesis creates problems for being able to provide [(18)F]FEAU routinely. We have developed a routine method using a commercial GE TRACERlab FX-FN radiosynthesis module with customized equipment to provide [(18)F]FEAU. All radiochemical yields are decay corrected to end-of-bombardment and reported as means +/- SD. Radiofluorination (33 +/- 8%; n = 4), bromination (85 +/- 8%; n = 4), coupling reaction (83 +/- 6%; n = 4), base hydrolysis steps, and subsequent high-performance liquid chromatography purification afforded purified [(18)F]FEAU beta-anomer in 5 +/- 1% overall yield (n = 3 runs) after approximately 5.5 h and a beta/alpha-anomer ratio of 7.4. Radiochemical/chemical purities and specific activity exceeded 99% and 1.3 Ci/micromol (48 GBq/micromol), respectively. In cell culture, [(18)F]FEAU showed significantly (P < 0.05) higher accumulation in C6 cells expressing HSV1-tk/sr39tk as compared to wild-type C6 cells. Furthermore, [(18)F]FEAU showed slightly higher accumulation than 9-[4-[(18)F]fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butylguanine ([(18)F]FHBG) in cells expressing HSV1-tk (P < 0.05), whereas [(18)F]FHBG showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) accumulation than [(18)F]FEAU in HSV1-sr39tk-expressing cells. micro-PET imaging of mice carrying tumor xenografts of C6 cells stably expressing HSV1-tk or HSV1-sr39tk are consistent with the cell uptake results. The [(18)F]FEAU mouse images also showed very low gastrointestinal signal with predominant renal clearance as compared to [(18)F]FHBG. The routine radiosynthesis of [(18)F]FEAU was successfully semiautomated using a commercial module along with customized equipment to provide the beta-anomer in modest yields. Although further

  14. Comparison of radiolabeled nucleoside probes (FIAU, FHBG, and FHPG) for PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani; Doubrovin, Mikhail; Akhurst, Timothy; Cai, Shangde; Balatoni, Julius; Alauddin, Mian M; Finn, Ronald; Bornmann, William; Thaler, Howard; Conti, Peter S; Blasberg, Ronald G

    2002-08-01

    The efficacy of 3 radiolabeled probes of current interest for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) expression in vivo with PET, including (124)I- or (131)I-labeled 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (FIAU), (18)F-labeled 9-[4-fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl]guanine (FHBG), and (18)F-labeled 9-[3-fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxymethyl]guanine (FHPG), was compared. Two established rat glioma cell lines, stably transduced RG2TK+ and wild-type RG2, were used for paired comparisons of probe accumulation in vitro and for paired comparisons of subcutaneous xenografts produced from these cell lines in athymic rnu/rnu rats. The in vitro paired probe uptake (0-3 h) comparisons in RG2TK+ cells showed that FIAU accumulation was 15-fold greater than that of FHBG and 41-fold greater than that of FHPG. The net accumulation rate values (+/-SD) calculated for RG2TK+ cells were 0.317 +/- 0.066, 0.022 +/- 0.001, and 0.0077 +/- 0.0003 mL/min/g cells for FIAU, FHBG, and FHPG, respectively. These results and similar uptake studies in RG2 wild-type cells suggest a possible cell membrane transport limitation for FHBG and FHPG. The paired 2-h in vivo uptake studies produced similar differences in RG2TK+ xenografts for FIAU and FHBG (1.22 +/- 0.21 vs. 0.074 +/- 0.49 %dose/g) and for FIAU and FHPG (1.27 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.023 +/- 0.008 %dose/g). These differences were clearly visible on the images. FIAU accumulation at 24 h was 1.53 +/- 0.40 %dose/g. Plasma clearance was FHBG > FHPG > FIAU. The FIAU images showed significant stomach and some intestinal background radioactivities, whereas hepatobiliary and intestinal background activities were very high for the guanosine analogs (FHBG > FHPG). Dynamic imaging showed early ( approximately 10 min) selective localization of FIAU in RG2TK+ xenografts, whereas FHBG and FHPG are being cleared from the HSV1-tk transduced and wild-type xenografts over the initial 2-h imaging period. The in vitro and in vivo

  15. Design of a functional cyclic HSV1-TK reporter and its application to PET imaging of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Fu; Hida, Naoki; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Tian, Jie; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a sensitive and noninvasive imaging method that is widely used to explore molecular events in living subjects. PET can precisely and quantitatively evaluate cellular apoptosis, which has a crucial role in various physiological and pathological processes. In this protocol, we describe the design and use of an engineered cyclic herpes simplex virus 1–thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) PET reporter whose kinase activity is specifically switched on by apoptosis. The expression of cyclic TK (cTK) in healthy cells leads to inactive product, whereas the activation of apoptosis through the caspase-3 pathway cleaves cTK, thus restoring its activity and enabling PET imaging. In addition to detailing the design and construction of the cTK plasmid in this protocol, we include assays for evaluating the function and specificity of the cTK reporter in apoptotic cells, such as assays for measuring the cell uptake of PET tracer in apoptotic cells, correlating doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cell apoptosis to cTK function recovery, and in vivo PET imaging of cancer cell apoptosis, and we also include corresponding data acquisition methods. The time to build the entire cTK reporter is ~2–3 weeks. The selection of a stable cancer cell line takes ~4–6 weeks. The time to implement assays regarding cTK function in apoptotic cells and the in vivo imaging varies depending on the experiment. The cyclization strategy described in this protocol can also be adapted to create other reporter systems for broad biomedical applications. PMID:25927390

  16. Non-invasive imaging of cardiac transgene expression with PET: comparison of the human sodium/iodide symporter gene and HSV1-tk as the reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Masao; Anton, Martina; Wagner, Bettina; Haubner, Roland; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Gansbacher, Bernd; Schwaiger, Markus; Bengel, Frank M

    2005-09-01

    Genes encoding for intracellular enzymes or transmembrane proteins are suitable as reporters, but may differ in terms of applicability for cardiac imaging. The aim of this study was to compare the human sodium iodide symporter gene (hNIS) with the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (HSV1-tk) as the reporter gene in non-invasive imaging of cardiac transgene expression with positron emission tomography (PET). Equal doses of adenoviral vectors encoding for hNIS, wild-type HSV1-tk, mutant HSV1-sr39tk or LacZ as the control gene were directly injected into the myocardium of 34 animals. Two days later, dynamic PET was performed with a clinical scanner, using reporter probes specific for the respective reporter gene. Imaging with (13)N-ammonia was also performed to identify cardiac regions of interest. Kinetics differed significantly: (124)I as the probe for hNIS showed rapid early uptake, remaining stable over time. Maximal myocardial concentration was 3.61+/-1.15%. The nucleoside (18)F-FHBG, as the specific probe for HSV1-sr39tk, showed increasing uptake over time, but maximal accumulation was significantly lower (1.45+/-0.54%, P=0.0009). (124)I-FIAU, as the specific probe for wild-type HSV1-tk, showed early uptake with subsequent washout. Maximal accumulation was lowest (0.63+/-0.23%, P<0.0001). Post-mortem analysis by autoradiography and gamma counting confirmed the in vivo data. Reporter genes encoding for transporter proteins such as hNIS are an attractive alternative to overexpression of intracellular enzymes for cardiac gene product imaging. hNIS yielded higher signal intensity and imaging contrast for PET than did HSV1-tk and HSV1-sr39tk. Therefore, this approach may be preferable for the future monitoring of cardiac gene- or cell-based therapy.

  17. Comparison of [18F]FHBG and [14C]FIAU for imaging of HSV1-tk reporter gene expression: adenoviral infection vs stable transfection.

    PubMed

    Min, Jung-Jun; Iyer, Meera; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2003-11-01

    Earlier studies involving comparison of different reporter probes have shown conflicting results between pyrimidine nucleosides [e.g., 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta- d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (FIAU)] and acycloguanosine derivatives [e.g., penciclovir (PCV), 9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)guanine (FHBG)]. We hypothesized that this reported discrepancy may be related to how the reporter gene is delivered to the cells-stably transfected vs adenoviral infection. We directly compared the uptake characteristics of [(18)F]FHBG, [(3)H]PCV, and [(14)C]FIAU in cell culture and in vivo using an adenoviral mediated gene transfer model and stably transfected cells. We further compared the uptake of three reporter probes using both HSV1-tk and a mutant HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells to assess the optimal reporter probe/reporter gene combination. [(14)C]FIAU accumulation was greater than that of [(3)H]PCV and [(18)F]FHBG in control cells and in HSV1-tk stably transfected cells ( P<0.001). After infection of C6 cells with AdCMV- HSV1-tk (1.5x10(8) pfu), [(18)F]FHBG and [(3)H]PCV accumulation was significantly greater than that of [(14)C]FIAU ( P<0.01). [(18)F]FHBG and [(3)H]PCV accumulated to a significantly greater extent than [(14)C]FIAU in C6-stb-sr39tk+ and AdCMV- HSV1-sr39tk infected C6 cells ( P<0.001). Results from the nude mice supported the results in cell culture. [(14)C]FIAU led to significantly higher %ID/g in C6-stb-tk+ xenografts than [(18)F]FHBG ( P<0.05); however, compared with [(14)C]FIAU, [(18)F]FHBG led to as high %ID/g in HSV1-tk expressing hepatocytes and to significantly greater %ID/g in C6-stb-sr39tk+ xenografts and HSV1-sr39tk expressing hepatocytes. Dynamic sequential images showed that [(18)F]FHBG was well retained in HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells (C6-stb-sr39tk+) for at least 4 h after injection, while it was rapidly cleared from HSV1-tk expressing cells (MH3924A-stb-tk+). [(14)C]FIAU accumulated in HSV1-tk stably expressing cells to a greater extent

  18. Different strategies for reducing intestinal background radioactivity associated with imaging HSV1-tk expression using established radionucleoside probes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Brader, Peter; Serganova, Inna; Zanzonico, Pat; Cai, Shangde; Lipman, Neil S.; Hricak, Hedvig; Blasberg, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    One limitation of HSV1-tk reporter PET imaging with nucleoside analogues is the high background radioactivity in the intestine. We hypothesized that endogenous expression of thymidine kinase in bacterial flora could phosphorylate and trap such radiotracers, contributing to the high radioactivity levels in the bowel and therefore explored different strategies to increase fecal elimination of radiotracer. Methods Intestinal radioactivity was assessed by in vivo microPET imaging and ex vivo tissue sampling following intravenous injection of 18F-FEAU, 124I-FIAU or 18F-FHBG in a germ-free mouse strain. We also explored the use of an osmotic laxative agent and/or a 100% enzymatically hydrolyzed liquid diet. Results No significant differences in intestinal radioactivity were observed between germ-free and normal mice. 18F-FHBG-derived intestinal radioactivity levels were higher than those of 18F-FEAU and 124I-FIAU; the intestine-to-blood ratio was more than 20-fold higher for 18F-FHBG than for 18F-FEAU and 124I-FIAU. The combination of Peptamen and Nulytely lowered intestinal radioactivity levels and increased (2.2-fold) the HSV1-tk transduced xenograft-to-intestine ratio for 18F-FEAU. Conclusions Intestinal bacteria in germ-free mice do not contribute to the high intestinal levels of radioactivity following injection of radionucleoside analogs. The combination of Peptamen and Nulytely increased radiotracer elimination by increasing bowel motility without inducing dehydration. PMID:20128998

  19. 8-[18F]Fluoropenciclovir: an improved reporter probe for imaging HSV1-tk reporter gene expression in vivo using PET.

    PubMed

    Iyer, M; Barrio, J R; Namavari, M; Bauer, E; Satyamurthy, N; Nguyen, K; Toyokuni, T; Phelps, M E; Herschman, H R; Gambhir, S S

    2001-01-01

    We have synthesized and evaluated 8-[18F]fluoropenciclovir (FPCV) and compared it with 8-[18F]fluoroganciclovir (FGCV) for monitoring the expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1 -tk) reporter gene in cell culture and in vivo. C6 rat glioma cells stably transfected with HSV1-tk (C6-stb-tk+) and control C6 cells were evaluated for their ability to accumulate FGCV versus FPCV. For in vivo studies, 15 mice were injected by tail vein with increasing levels of an adenoviral vector carrying HSV1-tk. Forty-eight hours later the mice were injected with FPCV and killed 3 h later. The percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) liver was then determined. Two additional mice were studied by microPET and autoradiography using FPCV to image adenoviral-mediated hepatic HSV1-tk reporter gene expression. A tumor-bearing mouse (C6 control and C6-stb-tk+) was imaged with FDG, FGCV, and FPCV. Two mice carrying tumors expressing two different reporter genes, HSV1-tk and dopamine type 2 receptor (D2R), were also imaged by microPET using FPCV (day 1) and 3-(2'-[18F]fluoroethyl)spiperone (FESP) (day 2). FPCV shows a significantly greater accumulation in C6-stb-tk+ cells than does FGCV (P < 0.05). Over identical ranges of adenoviral administration, mouse liver shows a higher %ID/g liver for FPCV (0%-9%) compared with our previously reported results with FGCV (0%-3%). In C6 control and C6-stb-tk+ tumor-bearing mice, FPCV has a greater accumulation than does FGCV for equal levels of HSV1-tk gene expression. In mice carrying tumors expressing either HSV1-tk or D2R reporter genes, there is a corresponding retention of FPCV and FESP, respectively. These results indicate that FPCV is a better reporter probe than is FGCV for imaging lower levels of HSV1 -tk gene expression in vivo. The results also reveal the ability to monitor the expression of two distinct reporter genes in the same animal using reporter probes specific for each gene.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of a C-6 alkylated pyrimidine derivative for the in vivo imaging of HSV1-TK gene expression.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ursina; Martić, Miljen; Kraljević, Tatjana Gazivoda; Krištafor, Svjetlana; Ross, Tobias L; Ranadheera, Charlene; Müller, Adrienne; Born, Mariana; Krämer, Stefanie D; Raić-Malić, Silvana; Ametamey, Simon M

    2012-02-01

    We report on the synthesis, radiolabeling, in vitro and in vivo characterization of N-Me-[(18)F]FHBT (6-(3-[(18)F]fluoro-2-(hydroxymethyl)propyl)-1,5-dimethylpyrimidin-2,4(1H,3H)-dione), a C-6-substituted N-1-methylated pyrimidine derivative as a reporter probe for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) expression. N-Me-[(18)F]FHBT was synthesized via a standard nucleophilic substitution reaction followed by acidic cleavage of the methoxytrityl protecting group. Cell uptake was studied in vitro with control HEK293 (human embryonic kidney cells) and HEK293 cells stably transfected with nonmutant HSV1-tk (HEK293TK+ cells). Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies of N-Me-[(18)F]FHBT or [(18)F]FHBG were performed in nude mice bearing xenografts of HEK293 control and TK+ cells. N-Me-[(18)F]FHBT was obtained in a two-step reaction in an overall maximal radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) of 5% and a radiochemical purity >96%. The tracer uptake in HSV1-TK containing HEK293TK+ cells was 14.5 times (at 30 min) and 55.4 times (at 240 min) higher than in control HEK293 cells. In mice, N-Me-[(18)F]FHBT and [(18)F]FHBG accumulated significantly and exhibited similar radioactivity levels in the HEK293TK+ xenografts; however, standardized uptake values ratios between HEK293TK+ and HEK293 control xenografts were higher for [(18)F]FHBG than for N-Me-[(18)F]FHBT. Both tracers showed high gall bladder and abdominal activity. The biological evaluations demonstrated the feasibility of using N-methylated C-6-substituted pyrimidine derivative N-Me-[(18)F]FHBT as a PET radiotracer for monitoring HSV1-TK expression in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A cyclic HSV1-TK reporter for real-time PET imaging of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu; Wang, Zhe; Hida, Naoki; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Ma, Ying; Yang, Kai; Rong, Pengfei; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    The coordination of cell proliferation and programmed death (apoptosis) is essential for normal physiology, and imbalance in these two opposing processes is implicated in various diseases. Objective and quantitative noninvasive imaging of apoptosis would significantly facilitate rapid screening as well as validation of therapeutic chemicals. Herein, we molecularly engineered an apoptosis switch-on PET-based cyclic herpes simplex virus type 1–thymidine kinase reporter (cTK266) containing a caspase-3 recognition domain as the switch. Translation of the reporter and protein splicing in healthy mammalian cells produce an inactive cyclic chimera. Upon apoptosis, caspase-3–specific cleavage of the circular product occurs, resulting in the restoration of the thymidine kinase activity, which can be detected in living cells and animals by noninvasive PET imaging. Our results showed the high sensitivity of this reporter in dynamic and quantitative imaging of apoptosis in living subjects. This reporter could be applied as a valuable tool for high-throughput functional screening of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic compounds in preclinical models in drug development, and monitoring the destination of therapeutic cells in clinical settings. PMID:24706884

  2. Evaluation of (76)Br-FBAU as a PET reporter probe for HSV1-tk gene expression imaging using mouse models of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Steve Y; Ravasi, Laura; Szajek, Lawrence P; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V; Fine, Howard A; Eckelman, William C

    2005-11-01

    The utility of 5-(76)Br-bromo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine ((76)Br-FBAU), a uracil analog, as a PET reporter probe for use with the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene system for gene expression imaging was evaluated in vivo and in vitro using human and rat glioma cells. Human glioma cell lines U87 and U251 were transduced with replication-defective adenovirus constitutively expressing HSV1-tk (Ad.TK) or a control expressing green fluorescent protein (Ad.GFP). These cells were incubated with (76)Br-FBAU for 20-120 min to determine the percentage of total dose uptake. In vitro uptake of equimolar concentrations (1.8 x 10(-8) mol/L) of (76)Br-FBAU and 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-beta-d-arabinofuranoside ((14)C-FIAU) was also determined in RG2-TK rat glioma cells stably expressing HSV1-tk and in control RG2 cells at 30-120 min. In vivo uptake of (76)Br-FBAU was determined in subcutaneous U87 tumor intratumorally transduced with Ad.TK by ex vivo biodistribution. Uptake in intracranial U87 tumors transduced with Ad.TK expressing HSV1-tk was measured by brain autoradiography. In vivo PET was performed on subcutaneous and intracranial U87 tumors transduced with Ad.TK and on subcutaneous and intracranial stably expressing RG2-TK tumors. U87 and U251 cells transduced with Ad.TK had significantly increased uptake of (76)Br-FBAU compared with cells transduced with Ad.GFP over 20-120 min. In stably expressing cells at 120 min, (14)C-FIAU uptake in RG2-TK tumor cells was 11.3 %ID (percentage injected dose) and in RG2 control cells was 1.7 %ID, and (76)Br-FBAU uptake in RG2-TK tumor cells was 14.2 %ID and in RG2 control cells was 1.5 %ID. Ex vivo biodistribution of subcutaneous U87 tumors transduced with Ad.TK accumulated (76)Br-FBAU significantly more than in the control Ad.GFP transduced tumor and normal tissue, with the lowest uptake in brain. Autoradiography showed localized uptake in intracranial U87 and U251 cells transduced with Ad.TK

  3. [Molecular imaging for PET-CT reporter gene in breast adenocarcinoma (HSV1-tk) of subcutaneous xenografts in living nude mice].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-gui; Dai, Dong; Fang, Na; Song, Xiu-yu; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Yan-jia; Men, Xiao-yuan

    2009-12-29

    To study the in vitro accumulation of (18)F-FHBG, its in vivo distribution and (18)F-FHBG PET-CT imaging for reporter gene (HSV1-tk) in nude mice with a xenograft of breast adenocarcinoma. The in vitro uptake of (18)F-FHBG in tumor cells of T47D and T47D-tk and the distribution of (18)F-FHBG in normal Kunming mice and nude mice with breast adenocarcinoma xenograft were detected by well-type gamma counter. Reporter gene PET-CT imaging with (18)F-FHBG was performed in nude mice with a xenograft of breast adenocarcinoma. And the expression location of HSV1-tk gene could be monitored by observing the in vitro and in vivo accumulation of (18)F-FHBG. The in vitro uptake of (18)F-FHBG in T47D-tk cells (143.67 dpm/10(4) +/- 5.82 dpm/10(4) cells) was significantly higher than that in T47D cells (2.23 dpm/10(4) +/- 0.23 dpm/10(4) cells) at 60 and 120 min post-injection (P < 0.001) and reaches a plateau at 60 min. In normal Kunming mice, (18)F-FHBG was mainly distributed in liver, intestine, kidney and bladder while there was no obvious radioactive accumulation in brain. (18)F-FHBG accumulated at a significantly higher level in T47D-tk tumors than in T47D tumors and its accumulation yielded the best image effect at 2 h by PET-CT imaging in nude mice. The in vitro uptake of (18)F-FHBG in T47D-tk cells is significantly higher than that in T47D cells. (18)F-FHBG is mainly excreted by digestive tract and urinary tract in mice. It agrees with the expression pattern of HSV1-tk gene. (18)F-FHBG can determine the localization of HSV1-tk gene expression in an efficient way. This study will offer a monitoring method and scientific base for (18)F-FHBG reporter gene imaging and HSV1-tk gene therapy in tumors.

  4. Molecular PET imaging of HSV1-tk reporter gene expression using [18F]FEAU.

    PubMed

    Soghomonyan, Suren; Hajitou, Amin; Rangel, Roberto; Trepel, Martin; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Gelovani, Juri G; Alauddin, Mian M

    2007-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging of transgene expression requires the appropriate combination of a reporter gene and a reporter probe. [18F]FEAU positron emission tomography (PET) is used for the assessment of herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase gene expression. Hybrid AAV phage (termed AAVP) can be adapted to transduce mammalian cells by targeting to a specific receptor. We evaluated a targeted AAVP vector using [18F]FEAU PET. This protocol describes [18F]FEAU production and dosing, micro-PET imaging and image analysis. 2-Deoxy-2-trifluoromethanesulfonyl-1,3,5-tri-O-benzoyl-alpha-D-ribofuranose is radio-fluorinated, converted into its 1-bromo derivative and coupled with protected 5-ethyl uracil. The coupled product is hydrolyzed and purified using HPLC. Tumor-bearing animals targeted with either retroviral or AAVP vectors are anesthetized and injected with [18F]FEAU (0.1 mCi per mouse); this is followed 2 h after injection by imaging on a micro-PET. Production of [18F]FEAU requires approximately 3.5 h from the end of bombardment. PET imaging studies require 2-3 h (depending on the number of animals) after synthesis of [18F]FEAU.

  5. Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of a new C-6 alkylated pyrimidine derivative as a PET imaging agent for HSV1-tk gene expression.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ursina; Ross, Tobias L; Ranadheera, Charlene; Slavik, Roger; Müller, Adrienne; Born, Mariana; Trauffer, Evelyn; Sephton, Selena Milicevic; Scapozza, Leonardo; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    [(18)F]FHOMP (6-((1-[(18)F]-fluoro-3-hydroxypropan-2-yloxy)methyl)-5-methylpyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione), a C-6 substituted pyrimidine derivative, has been synthesized and evaluated as a potential PET agent for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene expression. [(18)F]FHOMP was prepared by the reaction of the tosylated precursor with tetrabutylammonium [(18)F]-fluoride followed by acidic cleavage of the protecting groups. In vitro cell accumulation of [(18)F]FHOMP and [(18)F]FHBG (reference) was studied with HSV1-tk transfected HEK293 (HEK293TK+) cells. Small animal PET and biodistribution studies were performed with HEK293TK+ xenograft-bearing nude mice. The role of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) in the transport and uptake of [(18)F] FHOMP was also examined in nude mice after treatment with ENT1 inhibitor nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside phosphate (NBMPR-P). [(18)F]FHOMP was obtained in a radiochemical yield of ~25% (decay corrected) and the radiochemical purity was greater than 95%. The uptake of [(18)F]FHOMP in HSV1-TK containing HEK293TK+ cells was 52 times (at 30 min) and 244 times (at 180 min) higher than in control HEK293 cells. The uptake ratios between HEK293TK+ and HEK293 control cells for [(18)F]FHBG were significantly lower i.e. 5 (at 30 min) and 81 (240 min). In vivo, [(18)F]FHOMP accumulated to a similar extend in HEK293TK+ xenografts as [(18)F]FHBG but with a higher general background. Blocking of ENT1 reduced [(18)F]FHOMP uptake into brain from a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 0.10±0.01 to 0.06±0.02, but did not reduce the general background signal in PET. Although [(18)F]FHOMP does not outperform [(18)F]FHBG in its in vivo performance, this novel C-6 pyrimidine derivative may be a useful probe for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression in vivo.

  6. Direct comparison of radiolabeled probes FMAU, FHBG, and FHPG as PET imaging agents for HSV1-tk expression in a human breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Alauddin, Mian M; Shahinian, Atranik; Gordon, Erlinda M; Conti, Peter S

    2004-04-01

    2'-Deoxy-2'-fluoro-5-methyl-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (FMAU), 9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxy-methyl-butyl)guanine (FHBG) and 9-[(3-fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]-guanine (FHPG) have been evaluated in a human breast cancer model as potential radiotracers for PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression. In vitro accumulation of [14C]FMAU, [18F]FHBG, and [18F]FHPG in HSV1-tk-expressing cells was 14- to 16-fold (p <.001), 9- to 13-fold (p <.001), and 2- to 3-fold (p <.05) higher than tk-negative control cells, respectively, between 30 and 240 min. Accumulation of FMAU and FHBG in vector-transduced cells was 10- to 14-fold and 6- to 10-fold higher than wild-type cells, respectively. At 2 hr, uptake of [(14)C]FMAU in tkpositive cells was 6.3-fold and 60-fold higher than [18F]FHBG and [18F]FHPG, respectively. In vivo, tumor uptake of [14C]FMAU in HSV1-tk-expressing cells was 3.7-fold and 5.5-fold (p <.001) higher than tk-negative control cells at 1 and 2 hr, respectively. Tumor uptake of [18F]FHBG was 4.2-fold and 12.6-fold higher (p <.001) than tk-negative cells at the same time points. Incorporation of [14C]FMAU in tk-positive tumor was 18-fold and 24-fold higher (p <.001) than [18F]FHBG at 1 and 2 hr, respectively. Micro-PET images support the biodistribution results and indicate that both [18F]FMAU and [18F]FHBG are useful for imaging HSV1-tk expression in breast cancer. Although FMAU demonstrates higher total incorporation (%dose/g) in tumor tissue compared with the other tracers, FHBG is superior in terms of specific accumulation in transfected cells at later time points.

  7. Titration of variant HSV1-tk gene expression to determine the sensitivity of 18F-FHBG PET imaging in a prostate tumor.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mai; Karanikolas, Breanne D W; Priceman, Saul J; Powell, Russell; Black, Margaret E; Wu, Hsiao-Ming; Czernin, Johannes; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Wu, Lily

    2009-05-01

    Because of its high selectivity and specificity for the imaging reporter probe 9-(4-(18)F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl]butyl)guanine ((18)F-FHBG), the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) variant sr39tk is actively being studied as a PET reporter gene. We recently demonstrated the capability of using a prostate-specific transcriptional amplification PET reporter vector, AdTSTA-sr39tk, to target prostate cancer lymph node metastasis. However, one area that warrants further study is the examination of the sensitivity of PET by determining the minimum percentage of cells expressing the sr39tk transgene needed for detection. Addressing this question could determine the sensitivity of vector-mediated sr39tk PET in cancer-targeting strategies. DU-145, PC-3, and CWR22Rv.1 prostate cancer cell lines (a total of 1 x 10(6) cells) were studied, of which 7%, 10%, 25%, 50%, or 70% were transduced with the lentiviral vector constitutively expressing HSV1-sr39tk-IRES-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Cells were subcutaneously implanted into the left shoulder of severe combined immunodeficient mice and evaluated. Tumor cells comparably transduced with an EGFP control vector were implanted on the right shoulder. Mice were imaged using PET with (18)F-FHBG at 8, 15, and 22 d after tumor implant. On day 23, tumors were isolated and analyzed for sr39tk transgene expression by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry for EGFP expression. Results showed a linear relationship between the level of sr39tk expression and the quantity of tracer accrual in DU-145, with the minimal value for PET detection at 10%. The magnitude of tracer retention in sr39tk-expressing cells was amplified over time as the tumor grew. Protein levels in the stepwise titration increased with the percentage of sr39tk-transduced cells. The stepwise titration of prostate cancer cells transduced with the lenti

  8. Imaging grafted cells with [18F]FHBG using an optimized HSV1-TK mammalian expression vector in a brain injury rodent model.

    PubMed

    Salabert, Anne-Sophie; Vaysse, Laurence; Beaurain, Marie; Alonso, Mathieu; Arribarat, Germain; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Tafani, Mathieu; Payoux, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Cell transplantation is an innovative therapeutic approach after brain injury to compensate for tissue damage. To have real-time longitudinal monitoring of intracerebrally grafted cells, we explored the feasibility of a molecular imaging approach using thymidine kinase HSV1-TK gene encoding and [18F]FHBG as a reporter probe to image enzyme expression. A stable neuronal cell line expressing HSV1-TK was developed with an optimised mammalian expression vector to ensure long-term transgene expression. After [18F]FHBG incubation under defined parameters, calibration ranges from 1 X 104 to 3 X 106 Neuro2A-TK cells were analysed by gamma counter or by PET-camera. In parallel, grafting with different quantities of [18F]FHBG prelabelled Neuro2A-TK cells was carried out in a rat brain injury model induced by stereotaxic injection of malonate toxin. Image acquisition of the rats was then performed with PET/CT camera to study the [18F]FHBG signal of transplanted cells in vivo. Under the optimised incubation conditions, [18F]FHBG cell uptake rate was around 2.52%. In-vitro calibration range analysis shows a clear linear correlation between the number of cells and the signal intensity. The PET signal emitted into rat brain correlated well with the number of cells injected and the number of surviving grafted cells was recorded via the in-vitro calibration range. PET/CT acquisitions also allowed validation of the stereotaxic injection procedure. Technique sensitivity was evaluated under 5 X 104 grafted cells in vivo. No [18F]FHBG or [18F]metabolite release was observed showing a stable cell uptake even 2 h post-graft. The development of this kind of approach will allow grafting to be controlled and ensure longitudinal follow-up of cell viability and biodistribution after intracerebral injection.

  9. [Construction and expression of recombinant adeno-associated virus vector containing HSV1-TK gene].

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhi-xiang; Tan, Qian; Liu, Shuang-zhen; Liu, Dan; Li, Zhong-qing; Peng, Jian-qiang

    2008-03-01

    To construct the recombinant adeno-associated virus(rAAV) vector plasmid pSNAV2.0-TK containing HSV1-TK gene, to produce recombinant adeno-associated virus rAAV2/HSV1-TK, and to detect the integration and expression of HSV1-TK gene in lens epithelial cells transfected by rAAV2/HSV1-TK, and to provide foundation for gene therapy of posterior capsular opacification. The recombinant vector plasmid constructed by gene recombinant technology was analyzed by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. The cell strain BHK-21/TK was screened by G418 after the plasmid was transfected into BHK-21 cells,with the helper virus HSV1-rc/UL2 to produce the recombinant virus rAAV2/HSV1-TK. The purity of rAAV2/HSV1-TK was detected by SDS-PAGE and HPLC, and the titre of rAAV2/HSV1-TK was observed by dot blot hybridization. The HSV1-TK gene in lens epithelial cells transfected by rAAV2/HSV-TK was investigated by PCR and RT-PCR. The recombinant plasmid proved successful by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. The recombinant virus rAAV2/HSV1-TK was produced successfully and its titre was 1 x 10(12) v.g./mL by dot blot hybridization. The HSV1-TK gene was integrated and expressed in lens epithelial cells. The recombinant adeno-associated virus vector plasmid containing HSV1-TK gene is successfully constructed, and high titre recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV2/HSV1-TK) is obtained. The HSV1-TK gene in lens epithelial cells is expressed after being transfected by rAAV2/HSV1-TK.

  10. Gene therapy with HSV1-sr39TK/GCV exhibits a stronger therapeutic efficacy than HSV1-TK/GCV in rat C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei-qing; Shen, Fang; Xu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng; Liu, Wei-guo

    2013-01-01

    Although the combination of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (TK) with ganciclovir (GCV) has been shown as a promising suicide gene treatment strategy for glioma, the almost immunodepressive dose of GCV required for its adequate in vivo efficacy has hampered its further clinical application. Therefore, In order to reduce the GCV dose required, we aim to compare the therapeutic efficacy of HSV1-sr39TK, an HSV1-TK mutant with increased GCV prodrug catalytic activity, with wildtype TK in C6 glioma cells. Accordingly, rat C6 glioma cells were first transfected with pCDNA-TK and pCDNA-sr39TK, respectively, and the gene transfection efficacy was verified by immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis. Then the in vivo sensitivity of these transfected C6-TK and C6-sr39TK cells to GCV was determined by 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo-(-z-y1)-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and Hoechst-propidium iodide (PI) staining. Finally, a subcutaneously C6 xenograft tumor model was established in the nude mice to test the in vitro efficacy of TK/GCV gene therapy. Our results showed that, as compared with wildtype TK, HSV1-sr39TK/GCV demonstrated a stronger therapeutic efficacy against C6 glioma both in vitro and in vivo, which, by reducing the required GCV dose, might warrant its future use in the treatment of glioma under clinical setting.

  11. Synthesis of 99mTc(CO)3-deoxyuridine derivatives as potential HSV1-tk gene expression imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Young Kim, Jung; Jun Oh, Seung; Sook Ryu, Jin; Choi, Seon-Joo; Ha, Hyun-Joon; Hyuk Moon, Dae

    2008-04-01

    In this study, we synthesized (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-2'-aminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((99m)Tc(CO)(3)-AMPDU) and (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-aminoethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((99m)Tc(CO)(3)-AEPDU) as potential agents for imaging the expression of the non-invasive herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase. AMPDU and AEPDU were synthesized from uridine in five chemical steps and then labeled with [(99m)Tc(CO)(3)(H(2)O)(3)](+) (370MBq/0.5 mL) at 100 degrees C for 10 min. Under optimal conditions (0.5 and 1.0mg for AMPDU and AEPDU and heating for 10 min), the labeling efficiency was 95.3+/-2.8% for AMPDU and 94.2+/-5.1% for AEPDU. To validate the chemical structure of (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-labeled compounds, we also synthesized ReBr(CO)(3)-AMPDU and ReBr(CO)(3)-AEPDU by reacting [Et(4)N][ReBr(3)(CO)(3)] and AMPDU or AEPDU in methanol at 25 degrees C for 6h. (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-AMPDU and (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-AEPDU had the same retention time on HPLC analysis as ReBr(CO)(3)-AMPDU and ReBr(CO)(3)-AEPDU. (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-AMPDU and (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-AEPDU had high radiochemical stabilities of 98.1+/-1.5% and 98.0+/-1.7% for 6h, respectively.

  12. Noninvasive theranostic imaging of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR/GCV-CB1954 dual-prodrug therapy in metastatic lung lesions of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Foygel, Kira; Ilovich, Ohad; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is an obdurate cancer type that is not amenable to chemotherapy regimens currently used in clinic. There is a desperate need for alternative therapies to treat this resistant cancer type. Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (GDEPT) is a superior gene therapy method when compared to chemotherapy and radiotherapy procedures, proven to be effective against many types of cancer in pre-clinical evaluations and clinical trials. Gene therapy that utilizes a single enzyme/prodrug combination targeting a single cellular mechanism needs significant overexpression of delivered therapeutic gene in order to achieve therapy response. Hence, to overcome this obstacle we recently developed a dual therapeutic reporter gene fusion that uses two different prodrugs, targeting two distinct cellular mechanisms in order to achieve effective therapy with a limited expression of delivered transgenes. In addition, imaging therapeutic reporter genes offers additional information that indirectly correlates gene delivery, expression, and functional effectiveness as a theranostic approach. In the present study, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion dual suicide gene therapy system that we recently developed, in MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer lung-metastatic lesions in a mouse model. We compared the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion with respective dual prodrugs GCV-CB1954 with HSV1-sr39TK/GCV and NTR/CB1954 single enzyme prodrug system in this highly resistant metastatic lesion of the lungs. In vitro optimization of dose and duration of exposure to GCV and CB1954 was performed in MDA-MB-231 cells. Drug combinations of 1 μg/ml GCV and 10 μM CB1954 for 3 days was found to be optimal regimen for induction of significant cell death, as assessed by FACS analysis. In vivo therapeutic evaluation in animal models showed a complete ablation of lung metastatic nodules of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells following

  13. Noninvasive Theranostic Imaging of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR/GCV-CB1954 Dual-Prodrug Therapy in Metastatic Lung Lesions of MDA-MB-231 Triple Negative Breast Cancer in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Thillai V.; Foygel, Kira; Ilovich, Ohad; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is an obdurate cancer type that is not amenable to chemotherapy regimens currently used in clinic. There is a desperate need for alternative therapies to treat this resistant cancer type. Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (GDEPT) is a superior gene therapy method when compared to chemotherapy and radiotherapy procedures, proven to be effective against many types of cancer in pre-clinical evaluations and clinical trials. Gene therapy that utilizes a single enzyme/prodrug combination targeting a single cellular mechanism needs significant overexpression of delivered therapeutic gene in order to achieve therapy response. Hence, to overcome this obstacle we recently developed a dual therapeutic reporter gene fusion that uses two different prodrugs, targeting two distinct cellular mechanisms in order to achieve effective therapy with a limited expression of delivered transgenes. In addition, imaging therapeutic reporter genes offers additional information that indirectly correlates gene delivery, expression, and functional effectiveness as a theranostic approach. In the present study, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion dual suicide gene therapy system that we recently developed, in MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer lung-metastatic lesions in a mouse model. We compared the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion with respective dual prodrugs GCV-CB1954 with HSV1-sr39TK/GCV and NTR/CB1954 single enzyme prodrug system in this highly resistant metastatic lesion of the lungs. In vitro optimization of dose and duration of exposure to GCV and CB1954 was performed in MDA-MB-231 cells. Drug combinations of 1 μg/ml GCV and 10 μM CB1954 for 3 days was found to be optimal regimen for induction of significant cell death, as assessed by FACS analysis. In vivo therapeutic evaluation in animal models showed a complete ablation of lung metastatic nodules of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells following

  14. Study of [18F]FLT and [123I]IaraU for cellular imaging in HSV1 tk-transfected murine fibrosarcoma cells: evaluation of the tracer uptake using 5-fluoro, 5-iodo and 5-iodovinyl arabinosyl uridines as competitive probes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ho-Lien; Chiang, Li-Wu; Chen, Jia-Rong; Yang, Wen K; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Chen, Jenn-Tzong; Duh, Ting-Shien; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Farn, Shiou-Shiow; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Huang, Chia-Wen; Lin, Kun-I; Yu, Chung-Shan

    2012-04-01

    As one of the most intensively studied probes for imaging of the cellular proliferation, [(18)F]FLT was investigated whether the targeting specificity of thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) dependency could be enhanced through a synergistic effect mediated by herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV1) tk gene in terms of the TK1 or TK2 expression. 5-[(123)I]Iodo arabinosyl uridine ([(123)I]IaraU) was prepared in a radiochemical yield of 8% and specific activity of 21 GBq/μmol, respectively. Inhibition of the cellular uptake of these two tracers was compared by using the arabinosyl uridine analogs such as 5-iodo, 5-fluoro and 5-(E)-iodovinyl arabinosyl uridine along with 2'-fluoro-5-iodo arabinosyl uridine (FIAU). Due to potential instability of the iodo group, accumulation index of 1.6 for [(123)I]IaraU by HSV1-TK vs. control cells could virtually be achieved at 1.5 h, but dropped to 0.2 compared to 2.0 for [(18)F]FLT at 5 h. The results from competitive inhibition by these nucleosides against the accumulation of [(18)F]FLT implied that FLT exerted a mixed TK1- and TK2-dependent inhibition with HSV1-tk gene transfection because of the shifting of thymidine kinase status. Taken together, the combination of [(18)F]FLT and HSV1-TK provides a synergistic imaging potency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a C6 nucleoside analogue for the in vivo imaging of the gene expression of herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1 TK).

    PubMed

    Johayem, Anass; Raić-Malić, Silvana; Lazzati, Katia; Schubiger, Pius A; Scapozza, Leonardo; Ametamey, Simon M

    2006-03-01

    The synthesis and biological evaluation of '6-(1,3-dihydroxyisobutyl)thymine' (DHBT; 1), which corresponds to 6-[3-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)propyl]-5-methylpyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione, is reported. DHBT (1) was designed as a new substrate for herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1 TK). The compound was found to be exclusively phosphorylated by HSV1 TK, and to exhibit good binding affinity (Ki = 35.3+/-1.3 microM). Cell-proliferation assays with HSV1-TK-transduced human osteosarcoma cells (143B-TK+-HSV1-WT) and with both human-thymidine-kinase-1-negative (143B-TK-) and non-transduced parental (MG-63) cells indicate that 1 is less cytotoxic than the standard drug Ganciclovir. Thus, DHBT (1) represents a promising precursor of a nontoxic reporter probe for the monitoring of HSV1 TK gene expression by means of positron-emission tomography (PET).

  16. Study on the effect of BMSCs-EGFP-tk as mediator of HSV1-tk/GCV suicide gene therapy directed against A549 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Xu, Wen-Gui; Liu, Yong-Zhe; Meng, Xiang-Rui; Chen, Peng; Wu, Li-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to observe the expression of HSV1-tk in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs-EGFP-tk) and detect the inhibition and killing effects of BMSCs as mediator of HSV1-tk/GCV on A549 cells in vitro, which can provide the experimental basis for gene therapy of lung cancer. We constructed the recombinant plasmid Vector pDON-AI-2 Neo-HSV1-tk-IRES2-EGFP with genetic engineering methods. Then we obtained the virus-like particles with infection ability after packaging the virus. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. The expressions of EGFP in cells were observed by fluorescence microscopy and HSV1-tk gene was detected with RT-PCR. At last, the A549 cells and BMSCs-EGFP-tk cells were co-cultured with in vitro contact method, and the effect of BMSCs-EGFP-tk/GCV system was determined by MTT. Results indicated that the biological characteristics of BMSCs-EGFP-tk were consistent with those of BMSCs and fluorescent light expression and HSV1-tk gene expression can persist at least 15 days. The A549 cells and BMSCs-EGFP-tk cells were co-cultured and BMSCs-EGFP-tk:A549 = 2:1, adding 1 μg/mL GCV, the theory mortality is 58.44%, but actually the mortality is 90%. There is almost no difference between BMSCs-EGFP-tk and BMSCs cells in biological characteristics. The growth of A549 cells have an obviously inhibition and the bystander effect is outstanding in vitro after co-culture and this experiment lays solid foundation for the future research.

  17. Preparation and biological evaluation of 2-amino-6-[18F]fluoro-9-(4-hydroxy-3-hydroxy-methylbutyl) purine (6-[18F]FPCV) as a novel PET probe for imaging HSV1-tk reporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hancheng; Yin, Duanzhi; Zhang, Lan; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Weiguo; Zheng, Xuesheng; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jing; Xu, Yuhong; Cheng, Dengfeng; Zheng, Mingqiang; Han, Yanjiang; Wu, Mingxing; Wang, Yongxian

    2007-08-01

    2-Amino-6-[(18)F]fluoro-9-(4-hydroxy-3-hydroxy-methylbutyl) purine (6-[(18)F]FPCV) was prepared via a one-step nucleophilic substitution and evaluated as a novel probe for imaging the expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene. Log P of 6-[(18)F]FPCV was calculated in octanol/phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Stability studies were performed in PBS and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Cell uptake was performed at various time points in wild-type cells and transduced cells. For in vivo studies, tumors were grown in nude mice by inoculation with C6 cells, wild type and tk positive. The radiotracer was intravenously injected to animals, and micro-PET imaging was performed. Biodistribution of 6-[(18)F]FPCV was performed on another group of animals at different time points. Log P of 6-[(18)F]FPCV was -0.517. 6-[(18)F]FPCV was fairly stable in PBS and BSA at 6 h. The tracer uptake in C6-tk cells was 5.5-18.8 times higher than that in wild-type cells. The plasma half-life of 6-[(18)F]FPCV was as follows: alpha t(1/2)=1.2 min and beta t(1/2)=73.7 min. The average ratio of tumor uptake between the transduced tumor and the wild-type tumor was 1.69 at 15 min. Biological evaluation showed that 6-[(18)F]FPCV is a potential probe for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression. However, its in vivo defluorination may limit its application in PET imaging of gene expression.

  18. Comparative study of cellular kinetics of reporter probe [(131)I]FIAU in neonatal cardiac myocytes after transfer of HSV1-tk reporter gene with two vectors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiaoli; Yin, Xiaohua; Wang, Ruihua; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yongxue

    2009-02-01

    Reporter gene imaging is a promising approach for noninvasive monitoring of cardiac gene therapy. In this study, HSV1-tk (herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase) and FIAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) were used as the reporter gene and probe, respectively. Cellular uptakes of radiolabeled FIAU of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes transferred with HSV1-tk were compared between two vectors, adenovirus and liposome. The aims of this study were to choose the better vector and to provide a theoretical basis for good nuclide images. Neonatal cardiac myocytes were obtained from rat heart by single collagenase digestion. HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (recombinant adenovirus type 5, Ad5-tk) and plasmid (pDC316-tk) coated with Lipofectamine 2000 (pDC316-tk/lipoplex) were developed; thus, HSV1-tk could be transferred into neonatal cardiac myocytes. FAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-d-arabinofuranosyluracil) was labeled with (131)I, and the product was assessed after purification with reversed-phase Sep-Pak C-18 column. The uptake rates of [(131)I]FIAU in the transferred cardiac myocytes at different times (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h) were detected. Furthermore, mRNA expression and protein expression of HSV1-tk were detected by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. FAU could be labeled with (131)I, and the labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity rates were 53.82+/-2.05% and 94.85+/-1.76%, respectively. Time-dependent increase of the accumulation of [(131)I]FIAU was observed in both the Ad5-tk group and the pDC316/lipoplex group, and the highest uptake rate occurred at 5 h, with peak values of 12.55+/-0.37% and 2.09+/-0.34%, respectively. Greater uptakes of [(131)I]FIAU in Ad5-tk-infected cells compared with pDC316/lipoplex-transfected ones occurred at all the time points (t=12.978-38.253, P<.01). The exogenous gene expression by polymerase chain reaction in adenovirus vector

  19. Accumulated HSV1-TK proteins interfere with spermatogenesis through a disruption of the integrity of Sertoli-germ cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Li-Yi; Kato, Takako; Chen, Mo; Wang, HongHua; Sekine, Ei-ichiro; Izumi, Shun-ichiro; Kato, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic rats show spermatid-specific ectopic expression of the reporter gene, herpes simplex virus type1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK), in the testes and have demonstrated male infertility. However, the disruption of spermatogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanisms in these transgenic animals have not been well clarified. In this study, light and electron microscopic observations were performed to characterize the morphological changes in the testes. To explore the molecular mechanisms of male infertility in the HSV1-TK transgenic rat, cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed. The seminiferous tubules of 3-month-old transgenic rats showed morphological alterations including seminiferous epithelial sloughing, vacuolization, and degeneration of spermatogenic cells, suggesting a failure of Sertoli-germ cell interaction. Components of the epididymal lumen from transgenic rats included abnormal spermatozoa, degenerating round spermatids and abnormal elongated spermatids indicating an appearance of direct impairment of spermiogenesis. cDNA microarray and real-time PCRanalyses revealed significant changes (P<0.05) in the gene expression level in six genes, testin, versican, mamdc1, fgf7, ostf1 and cnot7. Among them, testin drew most of our attention, since the testin gene is a sensitive marker for disruption of Sertoli-germ cell adhesion. Thus, our results suggest that the accumulation of HSV1-TK in the spermatids not only directly interferes with spermiogenesis but also disrupts spermatogenesis through a disruption of Sertoli-germ cell adhesions. It is important to explore the testicular actions of the HSV1-TK protein in transgenic experimental models and thereby gain clues to find an appropriate treatment for HSV-infected patients exhibiting human male infertility, as has been recently observed.

  20. Synthesis of a probe for monitoring HSV1-tk reporter gene expression using chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Liu, Guanshu; Greenberg, Marc M; Bulte, Jeff W M; Gilad, Assaf A

    2013-01-01

    In experiments involving transgenic animals or animals treated with transgenic cells, it is important to have a method to monitor the expression of the relevant genes longitudinally and noninvasively. An MRI-based reporter gene enables monitoring of gene expression in the deep tissues of living subjects. This information can be co-registered with detailed high-resolution anatomical and functional information. We describe here the synthesis of the reporter probe, 5-methyl-5,6-dihydrothymidine (5-MDHT), which can be used for imaging of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene expression in rodents by MRI. The protocol also includes data acquisition and data processing routines customized for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast mechanisms. The dihydropyrimidine 5-MDHT is synthesized through a catalytic hydrogenation of the 5,6-double bond of thymidine to yield 5,6-dihydrothymidine, which is methylated on the C-5 position of the resulting saturated pyrimidine ring. The synthesis of 5-MDHT can be completed within 5 d, and the compound is stable for more than 1 year. PMID:24177294

  1. Synthesis of a probe for monitoring HSV1-tk reporter gene expression using chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Liu, Guanshu; Greenberg, Marc M; Bulte, Jeff W M; Gilad, Assaf A

    2013-12-01

    In experiments involving transgenic animals or animals treated with transgenic cells, it is important to have a method to monitor the expression of the relevant genes longitudinally and noninvasively. An MRI-based reporter gene enables monitoring of gene expression in the deep tissues of living subjects. This information can be co-registered with detailed high-resolution anatomical and functional information. We describe here the synthesis of the reporter probe, 5-methyl-5,6-dihydrothymidine (5-MDHT), which can be used for imaging of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene expression in rodents by MRI. The protocol also includes data acquisition and data processing routines customized for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast mechanisms. The dihydropyrimidine 5-MDHT is synthesized through a catalytic hydrogenation of the 5,6-double bond of thymidine to yield 5,6-dihydrothymidine, which is methylated on the C-5 position of the resulting saturated pyrimidine ring. The synthesis of 5-MDHT can be completed within 5 d, and the compound is stable for more than 1 year.

  2. PET imaging of oncolytic VSV expressing the mutant HSV-1 thymidine kinase transgene in a preclinical HCC rat model.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Álvarez, Kim A; Altomonte, Jennifer; Laitinen, Iina; Ziegler, Sibylle; Steiger, Katja; Esposito, Irene; Schmid, Roland M; Ebert, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most predominant form of liver cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Due to the relative ineffectiveness of conventional HCC therapies, oncolytic viruses have emerged as novel alternative treatment agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated significant prolongation of survival in advanced HCC in rats after oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) treatment. In this study, we aimed to establish a reporter system to reliably and sensitively image VSV in a clinically relevant model of HCC for clinical translation. To this end, an orthotopic, unifocal HCC model in immune-competent Buffalo rats was employed to test a recombinant VSV vector encoding for an enhanced version of the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (sr39tk) reporter, which would allow the indirect detection of VSV via positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting data revealed specific tracer uptake in VSV-HSV1-sr39tk-treated tumors. Further characterization of the VSV-HSV1-sr39tk vector demonstrated its optimal detection time-point after application and its detection limit via PET. In conclusion, oncolytic VSV expressing the HSV1-sr39tk reporter gene allows for highly sensitive in vivo imaging via PET. Therefore, this imaging system may be directly translatable and beneficial in further clinical applications.

  3. [Molecular-genetic analysis of DNA pol and TK of HSV-1 population using NGS technology].

    PubMed

    Gus'kova, A A; Skoblov, M Iu; Lavrov, A V; Zubtsov, D A; Andronova, V L; Gol'dshteĭn, D V; Galegov, G A; Skoblov, Iu S

    2013-01-01

    It was determined the ratio of viral DNA and DNA from Vero cells using the polymerase chain reaction in real time in Vero cell lysate, infected with L2 strain of the herpes simplex virus type 1. Copy number of the virus reached a maximum after 24 hours of incubation of infection. Total DNA was isolated and sequenced using NGS technology by Ion Torrent device. Nucleotide sequences of the thymidine kinase gene (UL23) and DNA polymerase (UL30) were determined for a population of HSV-1 strain L2. Comparison of the primary structure of these genes with the corresponding nucleotide sequences of known strains of HSV-1 KOS and 17 was conducted. Differences in the structure of genes UL23 and UL30 between strain L2 and reference strains KOS and 17 are not important, because changes are found in non-conservative regions.

  4. Stable transgenic expression of IL-2 and HSV1-tk by single and fusion tumor cell lines bearing EWS/FLI-1 chimeric genes.

    PubMed

    Staege, Martin S; Gorelov, Victor; Bulankin, Andrej; Fischer, Ute; Dumon, Kristoffel; Hohndorf, Lars; Hattenhorst, Uwe; Kramm, Christof; Burdach, Stefan

    2003-03-01

    In augmenting systemic anti-tumor immune response, the authors evaluated the genetic modification of Ewing family tumor (EFT) cell lines for use as allogeneic vaccines. EFT cell lines A673 and RD-ES were transfected with cDNAs for human interleukin (IL)-2 and/or HSV1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk), respectively. Clones with high and stable secretion of IL-2 alone or with coexpression of functional HSV1-tk were obtained and their features were analyzed. IL-2 expressing clones derived from the A673 cell line demonstrated decreased expression of HLA class I molecules compared with the parental cell line and corresponding clones derived from RD-ES. However, IFN-gamma could upregulate the expression of HLA class I antigens by IL-2 transfected A673 cells. Ganciclovir induced apoptosis in double-transfected cell clones. IL-2/HSV1-tk cells continued to produce and release IL-2 after initial ganciclovir treatment. After gamma-irradiation, transfected clones released bioactive IL-2 in a quantity sufficient to activate T and natural killer cells in culture. A polyvalent allogeneic vaccine was also obtained using fusion of two different transgenic cell lines. The resulting hybrids inherited antigenic and transgenic characteristics of both parental cell lines. It is presumed that the cell lines generated here could be used as allogeneic vaccines for treatment of patients with EFTs.

  5. Functional Coexpression of HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Green Fluorescent Protein: Implications for Noninvasive Imaging of Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Andreas; Dubrovin, Michael; Hewett, Jeff; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Tan, Cui-Wen; Slack, Mark; Sadelain, Michele; Breakefield, Xandra O; Tjuvajev, Juri G

    1999-01-01

    Abstract Current gene therapy technology is limited by the paucity of methodology for determining the location and magnitude of therapeutic transgene expression in vivo. We describe and validate a paradigm for monitoring therapeutic transgene expression by noninvasive imaging of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) marker gene expression. To test proportional coexpression of therapeutic and marker genes, a model fusion gene comprising green fluorescent protein (gfp) and HSV-1-tk genes was generated (tkgfp gene) and assessed for the functional coexpression of the gene product, TKGFP fusion protein, in rat 9L gliosarcoma, RG2 glioma, and W256 carcinoma cells. Analysis of the TKGFP protein demonstrated that it can serve as a therapeutic gene by rendering tkgfp transduced cells sensitive to ganciclovir or as a screening marker useful for identifying transduced cells by fluorescence microscopy or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). TK and GFP activities in the TKGFP fusion protein were similar to corresponding wild-type proteins and accumulation of the HSV-1-tk-specific radiolabeled substrate, 2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-1β-d-arabino-furanosyl-5-iodo-uracil (FIAU), in stability transduced clones correlated with gfp-fluorescence intensity over a wide range of expression levels. The tkgfp fusion gene itself may be useful in developing novel cancer gene therapy approaches. Valuable information about the efficiency of gene transfer and expression could be obtained by non-invasive imaging of tkgfp expression with FIAU and clinical imaging devices (gamma camera, positron-emission tomography [PET], single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]), and/or direct visualization of gfp expression in situ by fluorescence microscopy or endoscopy. PMID:10933050

  6. Imaging of HSV-tk Reporter gene expression: comparison between [18F]FEAU, [18F]FFEAU, and other imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Tadashi; Gogiberidze, George; Serganova, Inna; Cai, Shangde; Balatoni, Julius A; Thaler, Howard T; Ageyeva, Lyudmila; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Finn, Ronald D; Blasberg, Ronald G

    2008-04-01

    Herpes virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and the mutant HSV1-sr39tk are the 2 most widely used "reporter genes" for radiotracer-based imaging. Two pyrimidine nucleoside analogs, [18F]FEAU (1-(2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl)-5-ethyluridine) and [18F]FFEAU (1-(2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl)-5-(2-fluoroethyl)uridine), have generated recent interest as potential new probes for imaging HSV1-tk and HSV1-sr39tk gene expression. We compared [18F]FEAU and [18F]FFEAU with a series of other pyrimidine nucleoside derivatives (including 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodouridine [FIAU]) and with acycloguanosine analogs using a stable HSV1-tk transduced cell line (RG2TK+) and wild-type RG2 cells. The in vitro accumulation data and the calculated and normalized clearance constant, nKi, as well as sensitivity and selectivity indices indicated that 2 pyrimidine nucleoside probes, [18F]FEAU and [18F]FFEAU, had the best uptake characteristics. These probes were selected for further dynamic PET studies in nude rats bearing subcutaneous RG2TK+ and RG2 tumors. The 2-h postinjection [18F]FEAU uptake levels were 3.3% +/- 1.0% and 0.28% +/- 0.07% dose/cm3 in subcutaneous RG2TK+ and RG2 tumors, respectively, and 2.3% +/- 0.2% and 0.19% +/- 0.01% dose/cm3, respectively, for [18F]FFEAU. The corresponding RG2TK+/RG2 uptake ratios were 11.5 +/- 1.5 and 12.2 +/- 1.4, respectively. The inherent problem of comparing different radiolabeled pyrimidine nucleoside and guanosine-based probes for imaging HSV1-tk expression using different transduced cell lines and assay systems in the absence of an independent thymidine kinase-enzyme assay is discussed. For HSV1-tk reporter systems that require a 1- to 4-h PET paradigm, HSV1-tk-[18F]FEAU is the current top contender.

  7. Comparison of Cell-Labeling Methods with 124I-FIAU and 64Cu-PTSM for Cell Tracking Using Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Expressing HSV1-tk and Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Jun; Son, Jin-Ju; Chun, Kwon-Soo; Song, In-Ho; Park, Yong-Serk; Kim, Kwang-Il; Lee, Yong-Jin; Kang, Joo-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cell-tracking methods with molecular-imaging modality can monitor the biodistribution of cells. In this study, the direct-labeling method with 64Cu-pyruvaldehyde-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (64Cu-PTSM), indirect cell-labeling methods with herpes simplex virus type 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk)-mediated 124I-2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (124I-FIAU) were comparatively investigated in vitro and in vivo for tracking of human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells. K562-TL was established by retroviral transduction of the HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase gene in the K562 cell. K562-TL cells were labeled with 64Cu-PTSM or 124I-FIAU. Cell labeling efficiency, viability, and radiolabels retention were compared in vitro. The biodistribution of radiolabeled K562-TL cells with each radiolabel and small-animal positron emission tomography imaging were performed. Additionally, in vivo and ex vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and tissue reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis were used for confirming those results. K562-TL cells were efficiently labeled with both radiolabels. The radiolabel retention (%) of 124I-FIAU (95.2%±1.1%) was fourfold higher than 64Cu-PTSM (23.6%±0.7%) at 24 hours postlabeling. Viability of radiolabeled cells was statistically nonsignificant between 124I-FIAU and 64Cu-PTSM. The radioactivity of each radiolabeled cells was predominantly accumulated in the lungs and liver at 2 hours. Both the radioactivity of 64Cu-PTSM- and 124I-FIAU-labeled cells was highly accumulated in the liver at 24 hours. However, the radioactivity of 124I-FIAU-labeled cells was markedly decreased from the body at 24 hours. The K562-TL cells were dominantly localized in the lungs and liver, which also verified by BLI and RT-PCR analysis at 2 and 24 hours postinjection. The 64Cu-PTSM-labeled cell-tracking method is more efficient than 124I-FIAU-labeled cell tracking, because of markedly decrease of radioactivity and

  8. Long-term observation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in a child with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and a possible reactivation mechanism for thymidine kinase-negative HSV-1 in humans.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Tomoyuki; Kurane, Ichiro; Morikawa, Shigeru; Saijo, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections in a child with congenital immunodeficiency syndrome were observed over a 10-year period. The child suffered from recurrent and severe HSV-1 mucocutaneous infections. He frequently suffered from acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(r)) HSV-1 infection in the later phase of his life, especially after the episode of ACV(r) HSV-1 infection. Virological analyses on the HSV-1 isolates recovered from this patient revealed that all the ACV(r) HSV-1 isolates were thymidine kinase (TK)-negative (TK(-)) due to a single cytosine (C) deletion within the 4-C residues (positions 1061 to 1064) in the TK gene, indicating that the recurrent TK(-)/ACV(r) HSV-1 infections throughout the patient's life were due to the identical ACV(r) HSV-1 strain. Furthermore, it was found that the ACV-sensitive (ACV(s)) isolate recovered from the skin lesions that appeared between the episodes of ACV(r) infection at the ages of 8 and 9 contained ACV(r) HSV-1 with the same mutation in the TK gene. These results indicate that, although TK activity is required for reactivation of TK(+)/ACV(s) HSV-1 from latency and TK(-)/ACV(r) HSV-1 is unable to reactivate from latency, the TK(-)/ACV(r) HSV-1 strain isolated herein reactivated in this patient, possibly by using the TK activity induced by the latently co-infected TK(+)/ACV(s) HSV-1.

  9. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) A A A What's in this article? ... or around a person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't ...

  10. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when you were a kid — most likely from direct contact with someone who has it or getting ... person with HSV-1. The virus spreads through direct_contact — through skin contact or contact with oral ...

  11. Imaging of Sleeping Beauty-Modified CD19-Specific T Cells Expressing HSV1-Thymidine Kinase by Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Amer M; Manuri, Pallavi R; Olivares, Simon; Flores, Leo; Mi, Tiejuan; Huls, Helen; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Turkman, Nashaat; Paolillo, Vincenzo; Roszik, Jason; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A; Alauddin, Mian; Gelovani, Juri; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-12-01

    We have incorporated a positron emission tomography (PET) functionality in T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to non-invasively monitor the adoptively transferred cells. We engineered T cells to express CD19-specific CAR, firefly luciferase (ffLuc), and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (TK) using the non-viral-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system adapted for human application. Electroporated primary T cells were propagated on CD19(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells. After 4 weeks, 90 % of cultured cells exhibited specific killing of CD19(+) targets in vitro, could be ablated by ganciclovir, and were detected in vivo by bioluminescent imaging and PET following injection of 2'-deoxy-2'-[(18)F]fluoro-5-ethyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-uracil ([(18)F]FEAU). This is the first report demonstrating the use of SB transposition to generate T cells which may be detected using PET laying the foundation for imaging the distribution and trafficking of T cells in patients treated for B cell malignancies.

  12. Imaging of Sleeping Beauty-Modified CD19-Specific T Cells Expressing HSV1-Thymidine Kinase by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Amer M.; Manuri, Pallavi R; Olivares, Simon; Flores, Leo; Mi, Tiejuan; Huls, Helen; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Champlin, Richard E.; Turkman, Nashaat; Paolillo, Vincenzo; Roszik, Jason; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A.; Alauddin, Mian; Gelovani, Juri; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We have incorporated a positron emission tomography (PET) functionality in T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to non-invasively monitor the adoptively transferred cells. Procedures We engineered T cells to express CD19-specific CAR, firefly luciferase (ffLuc), and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (TK) using the non-viral-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system adapted for human application. Electroporated primary T cells were propagated on CD19+ artificial antigen-presenting cells. Results After 4 weeks, 90 % of cultured cells exhibited specific killing of CD19+ targets in vitro, could be ablated by ganciclovir, and were detected in vivo by bioluminescent imaging and PET following injection of 2′-deoxy-2′-[18F]fluoro-5-ethyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-uracil ([18F]FEAU). Conclusion This is the first report demonstrating the use of SB transposition to generate T cells which may be detected using PET laying the foundation for imaging the distribution and trafficking of T cells in patients treated for B cell malignancies. PMID:27246312

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of the thymidine kinase of ACV-resistant HSV-1 derived from an acyclovir-sensitive herpes simplex virus type 1 strain.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Masayuki; Suzutani, Tatsuo; De Clercq, Erik; Niikura, Masahiro; Maeda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro

    2002-12-01

    Twenty-four strains of acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(r)) herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were generated from the HSV-1 TAS strain by exposure to ACV, and the genotype and phenotype of the thymidine kinase (TK) from these mutants were analyzed. The TK polypeptide of the ACV(r) HSV-1 strains was examined by Western blot using an anti-HSV-1 TK rabbit serum. The sensitivity of each strain to ACV, foscarnet and cidofovir (CDV) was also determined. A single guanine (G) insertion or a single cytosine (C) deletion was detected in 12 of the 24 ACV(r) strains at the G or C homopolymer stretches within the TK gene. Genotypic analysis predicted that two thirds of the ACV(r) HSV-1 strains expressed truncated TK polypeptides, while one third expressed viral TK polypeptide with a single amino acid substitution at various sites. Western blot abnormalities in the viral TK polypeptides were identified in 21 ACV(r) strains. There was an inverse correlation between the susceptibility of the HSV-1 mutant strains to ACV and that to CDV. Nucleotide sequencing of the TK gene and Western blot analysis of the viral TK polypeptides are considered to be one of the methods for predicting virus sensitivity to ACV and CDV.

  14. Genotypic detection of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1: characterization of 67 ACV-sensitive and 14 ACV-resistant viruses.

    PubMed

    Frobert, Emilie; Cortay, Jean-Claude; Ooka, Tadamasa; Najioullah, Fatiha; Thouvenot, Danielle; Lina, Bruno; Morfin, Florence

    2008-07-01

    Infections due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) resistant to acyclovir (ACV) represent an important clinical concern in immunocompromised patients. In order to switch promptly to an appropriate treatment, rapid viral susceptibility assays are required. We developed herein a genotyping analysis focusing on thymidine kinase gene (TK) mutations in order to detect acyclovir-resistant HSV in clinical specimens. A total of 85 HSV-1 positive specimens collected from 69 patients were analyzed. TK gene could be sequenced directly for 81 clinical specimens (95%) and 68 HSV-1 specimens could be characterized as sensitive or resistant by genotyping (84%). Genetic characterization of 67 susceptible HSV-1 specimens revealed 10 polymorphisms never previously described. Genetic characterization of 14 resistant HSV-1 revealed 12 HSV-1 with either TK gene additions/deletions (8 strains) or substitutions (4 strains) and 2 HSV-1 with no mutation in the TK gene. DNA polymerase gene was afterwards explored. With this rapid PCR-based assay, ACV-resistant HSV could be detected directly in clinical specimens within 24 h.

  15. Identification and characterization of acyclovir-resistant clinical HSV-1 isolates from children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Qi; Zhu, Qinchang; Zhou, Rong; Liu, Jinsong; Peng, Tao

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) with acyclovir (ACV) resistance is a cause for concern due to the frequent use of ACV for treatment, suppressive therapy, and prophylaxis of HSV infection. Although HSV infection is prevalent among children, very little is known about the drug susceptibility of HSV circulating in this patient population. To determine the status of ACV resistant HSV-1 among children. A reporter cell-based HSV infection assay (mVILA) was developed to conveniently evaluate the ACV susceptibility of HSV-1 clinical strains and used to analyze 68 HSV-1 primary isolates from oral lesions in children. Compared with PRA, mVILA is easier to perform. Using mVILA, HSV-1 isolates C106, C153, and C174 were found completely resistant to ACV, with a greater than 100-fold increase in IC50s. Sequence analysis of thymidine kinase (TK) and DNA polymerase (DNA POL) genes identified 11 new mutations. Structural modeling of the TK and DNA POL proteins suggested structural changes that might alter their interactions with ACV and ACV triphosphate, respectively. The insertion of a single G in a seven-guanine homopolymeric repeat sequence generated a truncated TK protein in C106. This study provides preliminary data on the ACV susceptibility status of HSV-1 in children. The prevalence rate of ACV-resistant HSV-1 in children was higher than predicted. Moreover, multiple mechanisms leading to the resistance were identified. These results suggest that new anti-herpetics with different working mechanisms should be valuable. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. HSV-1 biology and life cycle.

    PubMed

    Everett, Roger D

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a common and important human pathogen that has been studied in a wide variety of contexts for several decades. This book presents chapters on protocols on many strands of HSV-1 research that are currently in use in leading laboratories. This chapter gives a brief overview of HSV-1 biology and life cycle, covering basic aspects of the virus and its replication in cultured cells, the diseases caused by the virus, viral latency, antiviral defenses, and the mechanisms that the virus uses to counteract these defenses.

  17. Real-time dynamic optical imaging of ACC-M tumor cells killed by HSV-tk/ACV system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tao; Li, Yongjin; Li, Zhiyang; Xie, Xiangmo; Lu, Lisha

    2013-01-01

    HSV-tk/ACV induced and killed human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell (ACC-M) in vivo and in vitro, which were observed through optical imaging and green fluorescence protein (GFP) tagging technique. ACC-M was transfected with TK-GFP, and the single clone cell ACC-M-TK-GFP was selected by G418. With fluorescent stereomicroscope, whole-body fluorescent imaging system and fluorescent microscope, we could observe ACV treated ACC-M-TK-GFP cells in cell level and nude mice. The therapies of tumor were visualized clearly with optical imaging. This study proves that optical imaging is a very good approach for studying the effect of HSV-tk/ACV on the ACC-M tumor cells and decreasing the amount of vessel about tumors cell. Optical imaging will become a visual groundwork for monitoring tumor growth and evaluating in vivo curative effect of antitumor drugs.

  18. POW: A Tcl/Tk Plotting and Image Display Interface Tool for GUIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. E.; Angelini, L.

    We present a new Tcl/Tk based GUI interface tool which features plotting of curve and image data and allows for user input via return of regions or specific cursor positions. The package is accessible from C, Tcl, or \\fortran. POW operates on data arrays, passed to it as pointers. Each data array sent to POW is treated as either an Image object or a Vector object. Vectors are combined to form Curves. Curves and Images may then be combined to form a displayed Graph. Several Graphs can be displayed in a single Tk top-level window. The Graphs can be rearranged, magnified, and zoomed to regions of interest by the user. Individual graph axes can be ``linked'' to implement a ``multiple y-axis'' (or x-axis) plot. The POW display can be written out in PostScript, for printing.

  19. Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) activity of oxyresveratrol derived from Thai medicinal plant: mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy on cutaneous HSV-1 infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Chuanasa, Taksina; Phromjai, Jurairatana; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak; Suzuki, Mikiko; Pramyothin, Pornpen; Hattori, Masao; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2008-10-01

    Oxyresveratrol, a major compound purified from Artocarpus lakoocha, a Thai traditional medicinal plant, was evaluated for its mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy on cutaneous herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in mice. The inhibitory concentrations for 50% HSV-1 plaque formation of oxyresveratrol, three clinical isolates, thymidine kinase (TK)-deficient and phosphonoacetic acid (PAA)-resistant HSV-1 were 19.8, 23.3, 23.5, 24.8, 25.5 and 21.7microg/ml, respectively. Oxyresveratrol exhibited the inhibitory activity at the early and late phase of viral replication and inhibited the viral replication with pretreatment in one-step growth assay of HSV-1 and HSV-2. Oxyresveratrol inhibited late protein synthesis at 30microg/ml. The combination of oxyresveratrol and acyclovir (ACV) produced synergistic anti-HSV-1 effect, as characterized by the isobologram of plaque inhibition. Mice orally treated with oxyresveratrol (500mg/kg/dose) dose at 8 h before and three times daily had significant delay in herpetic skin lesion development (P<0.05). Topical application of 30% oxyresveratrol ointment five times daily significantly delayed the development of skin lesions and protected mice from death (P<0.0001).

  20. Combination of pet imaging with viral vectors for identification of cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Brader, Peter; Wong, Richard J; Horowitz, Gilad; Gil, Ziv

    2012-06-01

    There are three main ways for dissemination of solid tumors: direct invasion, lymphatic spread and hematogenic spread. The presence of metastases is the most significant factor in predicting prognosis and therefore evidence of metastases will influence decision-making regarding treatment. Conventional imaging techniques are limited in the evaluation and localization of metastases due to their restricted ability to identify subcentimeter neoplastic disease. Hence, there is a need for an effective noninvasive modality that can accurately identify occult metastases in cancer patients. One such method is the combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with vectors designed for delivery of reporter genes into target cells. Vectors expressing the herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter system have recently been shown to allow localization of micrometastases in animal models of cancer using non invasive imaging. Combination of HSV1-tk and PET imaging is based on the virtues of vectors which can carry and selectively express the HSV1-tk reporter gene in a variety of cancer cells but not in normal tissue. A radioactive tracer which is applied systemically is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme, and as a consequence, the tracer accumulates in proportion to the level of HSV1-tk expression which can be imaged by PET. In this paper we review the recent developments in molecular imaging of micrometastases using replication-competent viral or nonviral vectors carrying the HSV1-tk gene using PET imaging. These diagnostic paradigms introduce an advantageous new concept in noninvasive molecular imaging with the potential benefits for improving patient care by providing guidance for therapy to patients with risk for metastases.

  1. Role of Proteolipid Protein in HSV-1 Entry in Oligodendrocytic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bello-Morales, Raquel; Crespillo, Antonio Jesús; Praena, Beatriz; Tabarés, Enrique; Revilla, Yolanda; García, Elena; Fraile-Ramos, Alberto; Baron, Wia; Krummenacher, Claude; López-Guerrero, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has the ability to enter many different hosts and cell types by several strategies. This highly prevalent alphaherpesvirus can enter target cells using different receptors and different pathways: fusion at a neutral pH, low-pH-dependent and low-pH-independent endocytosis. Several cell receptors for viral entry have been described, but several observations suggest that more receptors for HSV-1 might exist. In this work, we propose a novel role for the proteolipid protein (PLP) in HSV-1 entry into the human oligodendrocytic cell line HOG. Cells transfected with PLP-EGFP showed an increase in susceptibility to HSV-1. Furthermore, the infection of HOG and HOG-PLP transfected cells with the R120vGF virus--unable to replicate in ICP4-defficient cells--showed an increase in viral signal in HOG-PLP, suggesting a PLP involvement in viral entry. In addition, a mouse monoclonal antibody against PLP drastically inhibited HSV-1 entry into HOG cells. PLP and virions colocalized in confocal immunofluorescence images, and in electron microscopy images, which suggest that PLP acts at the site of entry into HOG cells. Taken together these results suggest that PLP may be involved in HSV-1 entry in human oligodendrocytic cells.

  2. Role of Proteolipid Protein in HSV-1 Entry in Oligodendrocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bello-Morales, Raquel; Crespillo, Antonio Jesús; Praena, Beatriz; Tabarés, Enrique; Revilla, Yolanda; García, Elena; Fraile-Ramos, Alberto; Baron, Wia; Krummenacher, Claude; López-Guerrero, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has the ability to enter many different hosts and cell types by several strategies. This highly prevalent alphaherpesvirus can enter target cells using different receptors and different pathways: fusion at a neutral pH, low-pH-dependent and low-pH-independent endocytosis. Several cell receptors for viral entry have been described, but several observations suggest that more receptors for HSV-1 might exist. In this work, we propose a novel role for the proteolipid protein (PLP) in HSV-1 entry into the human oligodendrocytic cell line HOG. Cells transfected with PLP-EGFP showed an increase in susceptibility to HSV-1. Furthermore, the infection of HOG and HOG-PLP transfected cells with the R120vGF virus–unable to replicate in ICP4-defficient cells- showed an increase in viral signal in HOG-PLP, suggesting a PLP involvement in viral entry. In addition, a mouse monoclonal antibody against PLP drastically inhibited HSV-1 entry into HOG cells. PLP and virions colocalized in confocal immunofluorescence images, and in electron microscopy images, which suggest that PLP acts at the site of entry into HOG cells. Taken together these results suggest that PLP may be involved in HSV-1 entry in human oligodendrocytic cells. PMID:26807581

  3. HSV-1 amplicon peptide display vector.

    PubMed

    Spear, Matthew A; Schuback, Deborah; Miyata, Kenichi; Grandi, Paola; Sun, Fang; Yoo, Linda; Nguyen, Anh; Brandt, Curtis R; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2003-01-01

    There are significant uses for expressing foreign peptide epitopes in viral surface attachment proteins in terms of investigating viral targeting, biology, and immunology. HSV-1 attachment, followed by fusion and entry, is mediated in large part by the binding of viral surface glycoproteins to cell surface receptors, primarily through heparan sulfate (HS) glycosaminoglycan residues. We constructed a HSV-1 amplicon plasmid (pCONGA) carrying the gC primary attachment protein gene with unique restriction sites flanking the HS binding domain (HSBD) (residues 33-176) to allow rapid, high efficiency substitution with foreign peptide domains. To test this system, a His tag with an additional unique restriction site (for selection and assay digests) was recombined into the pCONGA HSBD site to create pCONGAH. Infection of pCONGAH transfected Vero cells with HSV-1 helper virus (gCdelta2-3 or hrR3) produced His-modified gC as demonstrated by western blot analysis with co-localization of anti-gC and anti-His tag antibodies to a protein of appropriate molecular weight (50 kd). As CONGA and CONGAH amplicons carry a GFP transgene and the gCdelta2-3 and hrR3 viruses carry a lacZ transgene, vector stocks produced from 1 x 10(5) Vero cells could be titered for competent vector on cell monolayers and were demonstrated to contain 2 x 10(5) amplicon vector transducing units (t.u.)/ml and 1 x 10(7) virus t.u./ml. As the amplicon plasmids also contain the neomycin resistance gene (neo(r)), long term vector producer cell lines were created using G418 selection. This amplicon system provides means to rapidly and efficiently generate HSV-1 amplicon and viral vector expressing surface attachment proteins modified with different peptide epitopes for investigational and therapeutic uses, with the advantages of an amplicon plasmid that can be used with interchangeable helper virus vectors, is designed specifically for easy manipulation, and carries GFP and neo(r) transgenes for marker and

  4. Genetic incorporation of HSV-1 thymidine kinase into the adenovirus protein IX for functional display on the virion

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Le, Long; Sibley, Don A.; Mathis, J. Michael; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: david.curiel@ccc.uab.edu

    2005-08-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been exploited for a wide range of gene therapy applications. Direct genetic modification of the adenovirus capsid proteins has been employed to achieve alteration of vector tropism. We have defined the carboxy-terminus of the minor capsid protein pIX as a locus capable of presenting incorporated ligands on the virus capsid surface. Thus, we sought to exploit the possibility of incorporating functional proteins at pIX. In our current study, we incorporated the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (TK) within pIX to determine if a larger protein of this type could retain functionality in this context. Our study herein clearly demonstrates our ability to rescue viable adenoviral particles that display functional HSV-1 TK as a component of their capsid surface. DNA packaging and cytopathic effect were not affected by this genetic modification to the virus, while CAR-dependent binding was only marginally affected. Using an in vitro [{sup 3}H]-thymidine phosphorylation assay, we demonstrated that the kinase activity of the protein IX-TK fusion protein incorporated into adenoviral virions is functional. Analysis of cell killing after adenovirus infection showed that the protein IX-TK fusion protein could also serve as a therapeutic gene by rendering transduced cells sensitive to gancyclovir. Using 9-[4-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl]guanine ([{sup 18}F]-FHBG; a positron-emitting TK substrate), we demonstrated that we could detect specific cell binding and uptake of adenoviral virions containing the protein IX-TK fusion protein at 1 h post-infection. Our study herein clearly demonstrates our ability to rescue viable adenoviral particles that display functional HSV-1 TK as a component of their capsid surface. The alternative display of HSV-1 TK on the capsid may offer advantages with respect to direct functional applications of this gene product. In addition, the determination of an expanded upper limit of incorporable

  5. SPECT imaging of herpes simplex virus type1 thymidine kinase gene expression by [(123)I]FIAU(1).

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok Rye; Zhuang, Zhi-Ping; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Acton, Paul D; Tjuvajev-Gelovani, Juri; Doubrovin, Mikhai; Chu, David C K; Kung, Hank F

    2005-07-01

    Introduction of suicide genes, such as herpes simplex virus type1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk), in tumor cells has provided a useful method for tumor gene therapy. Several L-nucleosides, such as Lamivudine (3TC) and Clevudine (L-FMAU), have been successfully tested as high-potency antiviral agents. To investigate the potential differences between D- and L-isomers of nucleosides, [(125/123)I]-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1beta-D/L-arabino-furanosy-5-iodo-uracil (D/L-FIAU) have been synthesized and evaluated as potential SPECT agents for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression. [(125/123)I]D- and L-FIAU were prepared by iododestannylation of the respective tin precursors with (125/123)I-sodium iodide. In vitro cell uptake studies were performed by incubation of [(125)I]D- and L-FIAU in RG2 cells expressing HSV1-tk (RG2TK+). In vivo studies including biodistribution and SPECT were performed in RG2TK+ and RG2TK- tumor-bearing nude mice using [(123)I]D- and L-FIAU. Cell uptake and biodistribution studies indicated that [(125/123)I]L-FIAU did not show any high accumulation (sensitivity) or uptake ratios (selectivity) in HSV1-TK-positive (RG2TK+) tumors as compared to control tumors. In contrast, [(125/123)I]D-FIAU displayed both sensitivity and selectivity to RG2TK+ tumors. The selective in vivo accumulation of [(123)I]D-FIAU increased with time and the tumor uptake ratios (RG2TK+/RG2TK-) for 2, 4, and 24 hours averaged 6.2, 22.7, and 58.8, respectively. High-resolution SPECT of four nude tumor-bearing mice demonstrated a very high uptake of [(123)I]D-FIAU in the RG2TK+ tumor, while no significant tracer accumulation was observed in the RG2TK- tumor and other organs. The data suggest that only the D-isomer of [(123)I]FIAU is useful for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression in mice by high-resolution SPECT imaging.

  6. Aurintricarboxylic acid increases yield of HSV-1 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Pechan, Peter; Ardinger, Jeffery; Ketavarapu, Jyothi; Rubin, Hillard; Wadsworth, Samuel C; Scaria, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Production of large quantities of viral vectors is crucial for the success of gene therapy in the clinic. There is a need for higher titers of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) vectors both for therapeutic use as well as in the manufacturing of clinical grade adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. HSV-1 yield increased when primary human fibroblasts were treated with anti-inflammatory drugs like dexamethasone or valproic acid. In our search for compounds that would increase HSV-1 yield, we investigated another anti-inflammatory compound, aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA). Although ATA has been previously shown to have antiviral effects, we find that low (micromolar) concentrations of ATA increased HSV-1 vector production yields. Our results showing the use of ATA to increase HSV-1 titers have important implications for the production of certain HSV-1 vectors as well as recombinant AAV vectors. PMID:26015945

  7. Inhibition of HSV-1 Replication by Gene Editing Strategy.

    PubMed

    Roehm, Pamela C; Shekarabi, Masoud; Wollebo, Hassen S; Bellizzi, Anna; He, Lifan; Salkind, Julian; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-04-11

    HSV-1 induced illness affects greater than 85% of adults worldwide with no permanent curative therapy. We used RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to specifically target for deletion of DNA sequences of the HSV-1 genome that span the region directing expression of ICP0, a key viral protein that stimulates HSV-1 gene expression and replication. We found that CRISPR/Cas9 introduced InDel mutations into exon 2 of the ICP0 gene profoundly reduced HSV-1 infectivity in permissive human cell culture models and protected permissive cells against HSV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 mediated targeting ICP0 prevented HSV-1-induced disintegration of promonocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, an intracellular event critical to productive HSV-1 infection that is initiated by interaction of the ICP0 N-terminus with PML. Combined treatment of cells with CRISPR targeting ICP0 plus the immediate early viral proteins, ICP4 or ICP27, completely abrogated HSV-1 infection. We conclude that RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 can be used to develop a novel, specific and efficacious therapeutic and prophylactic platform for targeted viral genomic ablation to treat HSV-1 diseases.

  8. Inhibition of HSV-1 Replication by Gene Editing Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Shekarabi, Masoud; Wollebo, Hassen S.; Bellizzi, Anna; He, Lifan; Salkind, Julian; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    HSV-1 induced illness affects greater than 85% of adults worldwide with no permanent curative therapy. We used RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to specifically target for deletion of DNA sequences of the HSV-1 genome that span the region directing expression of ICP0, a key viral protein that stimulates HSV-1 gene expression and replication. We found that CRISPR/Cas9 introduced InDel mutations into exon 2 of the ICP0 gene profoundly reduced HSV-1 infectivity in permissive human cell culture models and protected permissive cells against HSV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 mediated targeting ICP0 prevented HSV-1-induced disintegration of promonocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, an intracellular event critical to productive HSV-1 infection that is initiated by interaction of the ICP0 N-terminus with PML. Combined treatment of cells with CRISPR targeting ICP0 plus the immediate early viral proteins, ICP4 or ICP27, completely abrogated HSV-1 infection. We conclude that RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 can be used to develop a novel, specific and efficacious therapeutic and prophylactic platform for targeted viral genomic ablation to treat HSV-1 diseases. PMID:27064617

  9. [Myocardial single photon emission tomography imaging of reporter gene expression in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lan, Xiao-li; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Tao; Jiang, Ri-feng; Zhang, Yong-xue

    2009-06-01

    To explore the feasibility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detection of heart reporter gene expression and observed the optimal transfecting titer and imaging time by using herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) as reporter gene and 131I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (131I-FIAU) as reporter probe in rabbit myocardium. The recombinant Ad-tk carrying HSV1-tk gene and adenovirus (Ad) as vector was constructed and intramyocardially injected to rabbits at various concentrations (1 x 10(9) pfu, 5 x 10(8) pfu, 1 x 10(8) pfu, 5 x 10(7) pfu, 1 x 10(7) pfu). Two days later, rabbits were injected with 600 microCi 131I-FIAU in ear-margin vein and then underwent SPECT myocardium imaging for detection of HSV1-tk expression at 6 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h after injection, rabbits with 1 x 10(9) pfu Ad-tk injection were imaged at 96 h and 120 h. Rabbits were sacrificed after imaging and the total myocardial 131I-FIAU accumulation was quantified in percent of injected dose per gram myocardium (% ID/g). The myocardial Ad-tk expression was determined with RT-PCR. Reporter gene was detected by SPECT imaging in the injection site while not detected in the control myocardium and site remote from injection. RT-PCR results also evidenced HSV1-tk express in the injection site. The SPECT target/nontarget ratio was correlated with ex vivo gamma-counting (r2 = 0.933, P<0.01) and expression of HSV1-tk (r2 = 0.877, P<0.01). Myocardial accumulation could be identified at viral titers as low as 1 x 10(7) pfu by SPECT imaging. The cardiac SPECT reporter gene imaging with HSV1-tk as reporter gene and 131I-FIAU as reporter probe is feasible.

  10. Nested PCR for detection of HSV-1 in oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Jalouli, Miranda-Masoumeh; Jalouli, Jamshid; Hasséus, Bengt; Öhman, Jenny; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that 15%-20% of human tumours are driven by infection and inflammation, and viral infections play an important role in malignant transformation. The evidence that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) could be involved in the aetiology of oral cancer varies from weak to persuasive. This study aimed to investigate by nested PCR (NPCR) the prevalence of HSV-1 in samples from normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Material and Methods We investigated the prevalence of HSV-1 in biopsies obtained from 26 fresh, normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers as well as 53 oral leukoplakia and 27 OSCC paraffin-embedded samples. DNA was extracted from the specimens and investigated for the presence of HSV-1 by nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) and DNA sequencing. Results HSV-1 was detected in 14 (54%) of the healthy samples, in 19 (36%) of the oral leukoplakia samples, and in 14 (52%) of the OSCC samples. The differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions We observed a high incidence of HSV-1 in healthy oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and OSCC tissues. Thus, no connection between OSCC development and presence of HSV-1 was detected. Key words:HSV-1, nested PCR, PCR. PMID:26449432

  11. Reactivation of HSV-1 following explant of tree shrew brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Lihong; Li, Zhuoran; Li, Xin; Wang, Erlin; Lang, Fengchao; Xia, Yujie; Fraser, Nigel W; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Jumin

    2016-06-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus type I (HSV-1) latently infects peripheral nervous system (PNS) sensory neurons, and its reactivation leads to recurring cold sores. The reactivated HSV-1 can travel retrograde from the PNS into the central nervous system (CNS) and is known to be causative of Herpes Simplex viral encephalitis. HSV-1 infection in the PNS is well documented, but little is known on the fate of HSV-1 once it enters the CNS. In the murine model, HSV-1 genome persists in the CNS once infected through an ocular route. To gain more details of HSV-1 infection in the CNS, we characterized HSV-1 infection of the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) brain following ocular inoculation. Here, we report that HSV-1 enters the tree shrew brain following ocular inoculation and HSV-1 transcripts, ICP0, ICP4, and LAT can be detected at 5 days post-infection (p.i.), peaking at 10 days p.i. After 2 weeks, ICP4 and ICP0 transcripts are reduced to a basal level, but the LAT intron region continues to be expressed. Live virus could be recovered from the olfactory bulb and brain stem tissue. Viral proteins could be detected using anti-HSV-1 antibodies and anti-ICP4 antibody, during the acute stage but not beyond. In situ hybridization could detect LAT during acute infection in most brain regions and in olfactory bulb and brain stem tissue well beyond the acute stage. Using a homogenate from these tissues' post-acute infection, we did not recover live HSV-1 virus, supporting a latent infection, but using a modified explant cocultivation technique, we were able to recover reactivated virus from these tissues, suggesting that the HSV-1 virus latently infects the tree shrew CNS. Compared to mouse, the CNS acute infection of the tree shrew is delayed and the olfactory bulb contains most latent virus. During the acute stage, a portion of the infected tree shrews exhibit symptoms similar to human viral encephalitis. These findings, together with the fact that tree shrews are closely

  12. Engineering HSV-1 vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, William F; Huang, Shaohua; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Virus vectors have been employed as gene transfer vehicles for various preclinical and clinical gene therapy applications, and with the approval of Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec) as the first gene therapy product as a standard medical treatment (Yla-Herttuala, Mol Ther 20: 1831-1832, 2013), gene therapy has reached the status of being a part of standard patient care. Replication-competent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors that replicate specifically in actively dividing tumor cells have been used in Phase I-III human trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a fatal form of brain cancer, and in malignant melanoma. In fact, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly known as OncoVex GM-CSF) displayed efficacy in a recent Phase III trial when compared to standard GM-CSF treatment alone (Andtbacka et al. J Clin Oncol 31: sLBA9008, 2013) and may soon become the second FDA-approved gene therapy product used in standard patient care. In addition to the replication-competent oncolytic HSV vectors like T-VEC, replication-defective HSV vectors have been employed in Phase I-II human trials and have been explored as delivery vehicles for disorders such as pain, neuropathy, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Research during the last decade on the development of HSV vectors has resulted in the engineering of recombinant vectors that are totally replication defective, nontoxic, and capable of long-term transgene expression in neurons. This chapter describes methods for the construction of recombinant genomic HSV vectors based on the HSV-1 replication-defective vector backbones, steps in their purification, and their small-scale production for use in cell culture experiments as well as preclinical animal studies.

  13. Nested PCR for detection of HSV-1 in oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Jalouli, Miranda-Masoumeh; Jalouli, Jamshid; Hasséus, Bengt; Öhman, Jenny; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél; Sand, Lars

    2015-11-01

    It has been estimated that 15%-20% of human tumours are driven by infection and inflammation, and viral infections play an important role in malignant transformation. The evidence that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) could be involved in the aetiology of oral cancer varies from weak to persuasive. This study aimed to investigate by nested PCR (NPCR) the prevalence of HSV-1 in samples from normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We investigated the prevalence of HSV-1 in biopsies obtained from 26 fresh, normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers as well as 53 oral leukoplakia and 27 OSCC paraffin-embedded samples. DNA was extracted from the specimens and investigated for the presence of HSV-1 by nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) and DNA sequencing. HSV-1 was detected in 14 (54%) of the healthy samples, in 19 (36%) of the oral leukoplakia samples, and in 14 (52%) of the OSCC samples. The differences were not statistically significant. We observed a high incidence of HSV-1 in healthy oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and OSCC tissues. Thus, no connection between OSCC development and presence of HSV-1 was detected.

  14. Positron-emission tomography reporter gene expression imaging in rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Wu, Joseph C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Namavari, Mohammad; Yee, Simon; Barrio, Jorge R; Stout, David; Chatziioannou, Arion F; Wu, Lily; Schelbert, Heinrich R

    2003-01-21

    This study examines the quantitative accuracy, detection sensitivity, and time course of imaging the expression of a mutant herpes simplex type-1 virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-sr39tk) PET reporter gene in rat myocardium by using the PET reporter probe 9-(4-[18F]-Fluoro-3-Hydroxymethylbutyl)-Guanine ([18F]-FHBG) and a small-animal PET (microPET). In 40 rats, adenovirus expressing HSV1-sr39tk driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter (Ad-CMV-HSV1-sr39tk, 1x10(6) to 1x10(9) pfu) was injected through a thoracotomy directly into the left ventricular myocardium. After 3 days, myocardial perfusion was imaged with [13N]-ammonia for delineating the left ventricular myocardium, followed by imaging the expression of the reporter gene with intravenous [18F]-FHBG. The total myocardial [18F]-FHBG accumulation was quantified in percent of injected dose (%ID). Immunohistochemistry and autoradiography demonstrated HSV1-sr39tk enzyme (HSV1-sr39TK) and accumulation of [18F]-FHBG in the inoculated myocardium in 3 rats each. In 24 rats with various viral titers, the %ID was correlated with ex vivo well counting (r2=0.981, P<0.0001) and myocardial HSV1-sr39TK activity by tissue enzyme activity assay (r2=0.790, P<0.0001). Myocardial [18F]-FHBG accumulation was identified at viral titers down to 1x10(7) pfu. In 6 rats serially imaged up to day 17, myocardial [18F]-FHBG accumulation on microPET peaked on days 3 to 5 and was no longer identified on days 10 to 17. HSV1-sr39tk reporter gene expression can be monitored with [18F]-FHBG and microPET in rat myocardium quantitatively and serially with high detection sensitivity. Cardiac PET reporter gene imaging offers the potential of monitoring the expression of therapeutic genes in cardiac gene therapy.

  15. Cultured Vestibular Ganglion Neurons Demonstrate Latent HSV1 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Camarena, Vladimir; Nayak, Shruti; Gardner, James B.; Wilson, Angus; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Vestibular neuritis is a common cause of both acute and chronic vestibular dysfunction. Multiple pathologies have been hypothesized to be the causative agent of vestibular neuritis; however, whether herpes simplex type I (HSV1) reactivation occurs within the vestibular ganglion has not been demonstrated previously by experimental evidence. We developed an in vitro system to study HSV1 infection of vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) using a cell culture model system. Study design basic science study. Results Lytic infection of cultured rat VGNs was observed following low viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Inclusion of acyclovir suppressed lytic replication and allowed latency to be established. Upon removal of acyclovir, latent infection was confirmed with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization for the latency-associated transcript (LAT). 29% cells in latently infected cultures were LAT positive. The lytic IPC27 transcript was not detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Reactivation of HSV1 occurred at a high frequency in latently infected cultures following treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deactylase inhibitor. Conclusions VGNs can be both lytically and latently infected with HSV1. Furthermore, latently infected VGNs can be induced to reactivate using TSA. This demonstrates that reactivation of latent HSV1 infection in the vestibular ganglion can occur in a cell culture model, and suggests that reactivation of HSV1 infection a plausible etiologic mechanism of vestibular neuritis. PMID:21898423

  16. Inflammatory and neurodegeneration markers during asymptomatic HSV-1 reactivation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carolina; Aguila, Blanca; Araya, Paulina; Vio, Karin; Valdivia, Sharin; Zambrano, Angara; Concha, Margarita I; Otth, Carola

    2014-01-01

    Currently, it is unclear whether asymptomatic recurrent reactivations of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) occur in the central nervous systems of infected people, and if these events could lead to a progressive deterioration of neuronal function. In this context, HSV-1 constitutes an important candidate to be included among the risk factors for the development of neuropathies associated with chronic neuroinflammation. The aim of this study was to assess in vivo inflammatory and neurodegenerative markers in the brain during productive and latent HSV-1 infection using a mouse model of herpes simplex encephalitis. Neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration markers were evaluated in mice trigeminal ganglia and cerebral cortex during HSV-1 infection, by immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR. Neuronal ICP4 viral antigen expression indicative of a reactivation episode during asymptomatic latency of HSV-1 infection in mice was accompanied by upregulation of neuroinflammatory (toll-like receptor-4, interferon α/β, and p-IRF3) and early neurodegenerative markers (phospho-tau and TauC3). HSV-1 reactivation from latency induced neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative markers in the brain of asymptomatic mice suggesting that recurrent reactivations could be associated with cumulative neuronal dysfunctions.

  17. Widespread disruption of host transcription termination in HSV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Andrzej J.; Erhard, Florian; L'Hernault, Anne; Bonfert, Thomas; Schilhabel, Markus; Crump, Colin; Rosenstiel, Philip; Efstathiou, Stacey; Zimmer, Ralf; Friedel, Caroline C.; Dölken, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is an important human pathogen and a paradigm for virus-induced host shut-off. Here we show that global changes in transcription and RNA processing and their impact on translation can be analysed in a single experimental setting by applying 4sU-tagging of newly transcribed RNA and ribosome profiling to lytic HSV-1 infection. Unexpectedly, we find that HSV-1 triggers the disruption of transcription termination of cellular, but not viral, genes. This results in extensive transcription for tens of thousands of nucleotides beyond poly(A) sites and into downstream genes, leading to novel intergenic splicing between exons of neighbouring cellular genes. As a consequence, hundreds of cellular genes seem to be transcriptionally induced but are not translated. In contrast to previous reports, we show that HSV-1 does not inhibit co-transcriptional splicing. Our approach thus substantially advances our understanding of HSV-1 biology and establishes HSV-1 as a model system for studying transcription termination. PMID:25989971

  18. Active immunotherapy: oncolytic virus therapy using HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tomoki

    2012-01-01

    Conditionally replicating herpes simplex viruses Type 1 (HSV-1) are promising therapeutic agents for glioma. They can replicate in situ, spread and exhibit oncolytic activity via a direct cytocidal effect. In addition, specific antitumor immunity is effectively induced in the course of oncolytic activities. G47Δ is a genetically engineered HSV-1 with triple mutations that realized augmented viral replication in tumor cells, strong induction of antitumor immunity and enhanced safety in normal tissues. A clinical trial of G47Δ in patients with recurrent glioblastoma has started in 2009. One of the advantages of HSV-1 is its capacity to incorporate large and/or multiple transgenes within the viral genome. In preclinical studies, "arming" of an oncolytic HSV-1 with transgenes encoding immunomodulatory molecules, such as interleukin 12, has been shown to greatly augment the efficacy of oncolytic HSV-1 therapy. Oncolytic virus therapy using HSV-1 may be a useful treatment for glioma that can also function as an efficient in situ tumor vaccination.

  19. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  20. The NifTK software platform for image-guided interventions: platform overview and NiftyLink messaging.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Matthew J; Zombori, Gergely; Thompson, Steve; Totz, Johannes; Song, Yi; Espak, Miklos; Johnsen, Stian; Hawkes, David; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    To perform research in image-guided interventions, researchers need a wide variety of software components, and assembling these components into a flexible and reliable system can be a challenging task. In this paper, the NifTK software platform is presented. A key focus has been high-performance streaming of stereo laparoscopic video data, ultrasound data and tracking data simultaneously. A new messaging library called NiftyLink is introduced that uses the OpenIGTLink protocol and provides the user with easy-to-use asynchronous two-way messaging, high reliability and comprehensive error reporting. A small suite of applications called NiftyGuide has been developed, containing lightweight applications for grabbing data, currently from position trackers and ultrasound scanners. These applications use NiftyLink to stream data into NiftyIGI, which is a workstation-based application, built on top of MITK, for visualisation and user interaction. Design decisions, performance characteristics and initial applications are described in detail. NiftyLink was tested for latency when transmitting images, tracking data, and interleaved imaging and tracking data. NiftyLink can transmit tracking data at 1,024 frames per second (fps) with latency of 0.31 milliseconds, and 512 KB images with latency of 6.06 milliseconds at 32 fps. NiftyIGI was tested, receiving stereo high-definition laparoscopic video at 30 fps, tracking data from 4 rigid bodies at 20-30 fps and ultrasound data at 20 fps with rendering refresh rates between 2 and 20 Hz with no loss of user interaction. These packages form part of the NifTK platform and have proven to be successful in a variety of image-guided surgery projects. Code and documentation for the NifTK platform are available from http://www.niftk.org . NiftyLink is provided open-source under a BSD license and available from http://github.com/NifTK/NiftyLink . The code for this paper is tagged IJCARS-2014.

  1. Selective recruitment of host factors by HSV-1 replication centers.

    PubMed

    Lang, Feng-Chao; Li, Xin; Vladmirova, Olga; Li, Zhuo-Ran; Chen, Gui-Jun; Xiao, Yu; Li, Li-Hong; Lu, Dan-Feng; Han, Hong-Bo; Zhou, Ju-Min

    2015-05-18

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) enters productive infection after infecting epithelial cells, where it controls the host nucleus to make viral proteins, starts viral DNA synthesis and assembles infectious virions. In this process, replicating viral genomes are organized into replication centers to facilitate viral growth. HSV-1 is known to use host factors, including host chromatin and host transcription regulators, to transcribe its genes; however, the invading virus also encounters host defense and stress responses to inhibit viral growth. Recently, we found that HSV-1 replication centers recruit host factor CTCF but exclude γH2A.X. Thus, HSV-1 replication centers may selectively recruit cellular factors needed for viral growth, while excluding host factors that are deleterious for viral transcription or replication. Here we report that the viral replication centers selectively excluded modified histone H3, including heterochromatin mark H3K9me3, H3S10P and active chromatin mark H3K4me3, but not unmodified H3. We found a dynamic association between the viral replication centers and host RNA polymerase II. The centers also recruited components of the DNA damage response pathway, including 53BP1, BRCA1 and host antiviral protein SP100. Importantly, we found that ATM kinase was needed for the recruitment of CTCF to the viral centers. These results suggest that the HSV-1 replication centers took advantage of host signaling pathways to actively recruit or exclude host factors to benefit viral growth.

  2. Selective recruitment of host factors by HSV-1 replication centers

    PubMed Central

    LANG, Feng-Chao; LI, Xin; VLADMIROVA, Olga; LI, Zhuo-Ran; CHEN, Gui-Jun; XIAO, Yu; LI, Li-Hong; LU, Dan-Feng; HAN, Hong-Bo; ZHOU, Ju-Min

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) enters productive infection after infecting epithelial cells, where it controls the host nucleus to make viral proteins, starts viral DNA synthesis and assembles infectious virions. In this process, replicating viral genomes are organized into replication centers to facilitate viral growth. HSV-1 is known to use host factors, including host chromatin and host transcription regulators, to transcribe its genes; however, the invading virus also encounters host defense and stress responses to inhibit viral growth. Recently, we found that HSV-1 replication centers recruit host factor CTCF but exclude βH2A.X. Thus, HSV-1 replication centers may selectively recruit cellular factors needed for viral growth, while excluding host factors that are deleterious for viral transcription or replication. Here we report that the viral replication centers selectively excluded modified histone H3, including heterochromatin mark H3K9me3, H3S10P and active chromatin mark H3K4me3, but not unmodified H3. We found a dynamic association between the viral replication centers and host RNA polymerase II. The centers also recruited components of the DNA damage response pathway, including 53BP1, BRCA1 and host antiviral protein SP100. Importantly, we found that ATM kinase was needed for the recruitment of CTCF to the viral centers. These results suggest that the HSV-1 replication centers took advantage of host signaling pathways to actively recruit or exclude host factors to benefit viral growth. PMID:26018857

  3. Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of 5-[18F]Fluoroalkyl Pyrimidine Nucleosides for Molecular Imaging of Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Thymidine Kinase Reporter Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Qu, Wenchao; Kung, Hank F.

    2014-01-01

    Two novel series of 5-fluoroalkyl-2′-deoxyuridines (FPrDU, FBuDU, FPeDU) and 2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-5-fluoroalkylarabinouridines (FFPrAU, FFBuAU, FFPeAU), having three, four or five methylene units (propyl, butyl, or pentyl) at C-5, were prepared and tested as reporter probes for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression. The Negishi coupling methodology was employed to efficiently synthesize the radiolabeling precursors. All six 5-[18F]fluoroalkyl pyrimidines were prepared readily from 3-N-benzoyl-3′,5′-di-O-benzoyl-protected 5-O-mesylate precursors in 17–35% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected). In vitro studies highlighted that all six [18F]labeled nucleosides selectively accumulated in cells expressing the HSV1-TK protein, with negligible uptake in control cells. [18F]FPrDU, [18F]FBuDU, [18F]FPeDU, and [18F]FFBuAU had the best uptake profiles. Despite selective accumulation in HSV1-tk expressing cells, all 5-fluoroalkyl pyrimidine nucleosides had low to negligible cytotoxic activity (CC50>1000–209 μM). Ultimately, results demonstrated that 5-[18F]fluoropropyl, [18F]fluorobutyl, and [18F]fluoropentyl pyrimidine nucleosides have potential as in vivo HSV1-TK PET reporter probes over a dynamic range of reporter gene expression levels. PMID:18800764

  4. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of 5-[(18)f]fluoroalkyl pyrimidine nucleosides for molecular imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Qu, Wenchao; Kung, Hank F

    2008-09-25

    Two novel series of 5-fluoroalkyl-2'-deoxyuridines (FPrDU, FBuDU, FPeDU) and 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-fluoroalkylarabinouridines (FFPrAU, FFBuAU, FFPeAU) that have three, four, or five methylene units (propyl, butyl, or pentyl) at C-5 were prepared and tested as reporter probes for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1- tk) gene expression. The Negishi coupling methodology was employed in efficiently synthesizing the radiolabeling precursors. All six 5-[(18)F]fluoroalkyl pyrimidines were readily prepared from 3-N-benzoyl-3',5'-di-O-benzoyl-protected 5-O-mesylate precursors in 17-35% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected). In vitro studies highlighted that all six [(18)F]-labeled nucleosides selectively accumulated in cells expressing the HSV1-TK protein and there was negligible uptake in control cells. [(18)F]FPrDU, [(18)F]FBuDU, [(18)F]FPeDU, and [(18)F]FFBuAU had the best uptake profiles. Despite their selective accumulation in HSV1- tk-expressing cells, all 5-fluoroalkyl pyrimidine nucleosides had low-to-negligible cytotoxic activity (CC50 > 1000-1209 microM). Ultimately, the results demonstrated that 5-[(18)F]fluoropropyl, [(18)F]fluorobutyl, and [(18)F]fluoropentyl pyrimidine nucleosides have the potential to be in vivo HSV1-TK PET reporter probes over a dynamic range of reporter gene expression levels.

  5. Distribution of cellular HSV-1 receptor expression in human brain.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Haas, Juergen G

    2016-12-15

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus linked to a range of acute and chronic neurological disorders affecting distinct regions of the brain. Unusually, HSV-1 entry into cells requires the interaction of viral proteins glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) with distinct cellular receptor proteins. Several different gD and gB receptors have been identified, including TNFRSF14/HVEM and PVRL1/nectin 1 as gD receptors and PILRA, MAG, and MYH9 as gB receptors. We investigated the expression of these receptor molecules in different areas of the adult and developing human brain using online transcriptome databases. Whereas all HSV-1 receptors showed distinct expression patterns in different brain areas, the Allan Brain Atlas (ABA) reported increased expression of both gD and gB receptors in the hippocampus. Specifically, for PVRL1, TNFRFS14, and MYH9, the differential z scores for hippocampal expression, a measure of relative levels of increased expression, rose to 2.9, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, comparable to the z score for the archetypical hippocampus-enriched mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2, z = 3.1). These data were confirmed at the Human Brain Transcriptome (HBT) database, but HBT data indicate that MAG expression is also enriched in hippocampus. The HBT database allowed the developmental pattern of expression to be investigated; we report that all HSV1 receptors markedly increase in expression levels between gestation and the postnatal/adult periods. These results suggest that differential receptor expression levels of several HSV-1 gD and gB receptors in the adult hippocampus are likely to underlie the susceptibility of this brain region to HSV-1 infection.

  6. First HSV-1 non primary genital herpes in two patients.

    PubMed

    Fouéré, Sébastien; Chaine, Bénédicte; Maylin, Sarah; Minier, Marine; Vallée, Pascale; Scieux, Catherine; Lassau, François; Legoff, Jérôme; Janier, Michel

    2016-05-01

    First HSV-1 genital episodes in HSV-2 infected patients however, had never been demonstrated until the 2 cases we observed. This scarcity could reflect the lower impact of HSV-2 on western populations but questions the existence of cross-protection between viral types.

  7. Reporter gene imaging of targeted T cell immunotherapy in recurrent glioma.

    PubMed

    Keu, Khun Visith; Witney, Timothy H; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Kurien, Anita; Magnusson, Rachel; Williams, John; Habte, Frezghi; Wagner, Jamie R; Forman, Stephen; Brown, Christine; Allen-Auerbach, Martin; Czernin, Johannes; Tang, Winson; Jensen, Michael C; Badie, Behnam; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2017-01-18

    High-grade gliomas are aggressive cancers that often become rapidly fatal. Immunotherapy using CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), engineered to express both herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) zetakine chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), is a treatment strategy with considerable potential. To optimize this and related immunotherapies, it would be helpful to monitor CTL viability and trafficking to glioma cells. We show that noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 9-[4-[(18)F]fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl]guanine ([(18)F]FHBG) can track HSV1-tk reporter gene expression present in CAR-engineered CTLs. [(18)F]FHBG imaging was safe and enabled the longitudinal imaging of T cells stably transfected with a PET reporter gene in patients. Further optimization of this imaging approach for monitoring in vivo cell trafficking should greatly benefit various cell-based therapies for cancer.

  8. High avidity HSV-1 antibodies correlate with absence of amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment conversion to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Simone; Mancuso, Roberta; Baglio, Francesca; Cabinio, Monia; Hernis, Ambra; Costa, Andrea Saul; Calabrese, Elena; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) is an alteration in cognitive abilities that can progress to Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition in which herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) infection might play a pathogenetic role. Prognostic indexes capable of predicting aMCI conversion to AD are only partially understood. The objective of the present work is to verify whether HSV-1 immune responses is involved in conversion of aMCI to AD and correlate with grey matter brain morphometry. Two homogeneous groups of individuals who did or did not convert to AD over a 24-months period were selected after retrospective analysis of a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of aMCI. The selection of subjects was based on: a) clinical follow-up; b) neurocognitive evaluation at baseline and after 24months; c) availability of serum and DNA samples at baseline. 36 aMCI individuals, 21 of whom did (aMCI-converters) and 15 of whom did not (aMCI-non-converters) convert to AD, were included in the study. HSV-1 antibody (Ab) titers, avidity index and APOE genotyping were performed in all the enrolled individuals at baseline. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by 1.5T scanner results at baseline were available as well in most (29/36) of these individuals. HSV-1-specific Ab titers were increased at baseline in aMCI-non-converters, and the avidity of these Ab was significantly higher in aMCI-non-converter compared to aMCI-converter (p=0.0018). Receiver operating characteristics analysis showed that HSV-1 avidity had a predictive value in distinguishing between aMCI-non-converters and aMCI-converters (p<0.0001). Notably, a positive correlation was detected as well between HSV-1 antibody titers and MRI-evaluated cortical volumes in the left hippocampus and amigdala (pcorr<0.05). In conclusion, stronger HSV-1-specific humoral responses associate with protection against AD conversion and better-preserved cortical volumes. These results reinforce the hypothesis for a role for HSV-1 in the

  9. Epigenetic regulation of latent HSV-1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David C.; Giordani, Nicole V.; Kwiatkowski, Dacia L.

    2010-01-01

    Like other alpha-herpesviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) possesses the ability to establish latency in sensory ganglia as a non-integrated, nucleosome-associated episome in the host cell nucleus. Transcription of the genome is limited to the Latency-Associated Transcript (LAT), while the lytic genes are maintained in a transcriptionally-repressed state. This partitioning of the genome into areas of active and inactive transcription suggests epigenetic control of HSV-1 latent gene expression. During latency viral transcription is not regulated by DNA methylation but likely by post-translational histone modifications. The LAT region is the only region of the genome enriched in marks indicative of transcriptional permissiveness, specifically dimethyl H3 K4 and acetyl H3 K9, K14, while the lytic genes appear under-enriched in those same marks. In addition, facultative heterochromatin marks, specifically trimethyl H3 K27 and the histone variant macroH2A, are enriched on lytic genes during latency. The distinct epigenetic domains of the LAT and the lytic genes appear to be separated by chromatin insulators. Binding of CTCF, a protein that binds to all known vertebrate insulators, to sites within the HSV-1 genome likely prevents heterochromatic spreading and blocks enhancer activity. When the latent viral genome undergoes stress-induced reactivation, it is possible that CTCF binding and insulator function are abrogated, enabling lytic gene transcription to ensue. In this review we summarize our current understanding of latent HSV-1 epigenetic regulation as it pertains to infections in both the rabbit and mouse models. CTCF insulator function and regulation of histone tail modifications will be discussed. We will also present a current model of how the latent genome is carefully controlled at the epigenetic level and how stress-induced changes to it may trigger reactivation. PMID:20045093

  10. HSV-1 exploits the innate immune scavenger receptor MARCO to enhance epithelial adsorption and infection

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Daniel T.; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Kobzik, Lester; Gallo, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    HSV-1 is an important epithelial pathogen and has the potential for significant morbidity in humans. Here we demonstrate that a cell surface scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), previously thought to enhance antiviral defense by enabling nucleic acid recognition, is usurped by HSV-1 and functions together with heparan sulfate proteoglycans to mediate adsorption to epithelial cells. Ligands of MARCO dramatically inhibit HSV-1 adsorption and infection of human keratinocytes and protect mice against infection. HSV-1 glycoprotein C (gC) closely co-localizes with MARCO at the cell surface, and gC binds directly to purified MARCO with high affinity. Increasing MARCO expression enhances HSV-1 infection while MARCO-/- mice have reduced susceptibility to infection by HSV-1. These findings demonstrate that HSV-1 binds to MARCO to enhance its capacity for disease, and suggests a new therapeutic target to alter pathogenicity of HSV-1 in skin infection. PMID:23739639

  11. Gamma camera imaging of HSV-tk gene expression with [131I]-FIAU: Clinical applications in gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tjuvajev, J.; Joshi, R.; Kennedy, J.

    1996-05-01

    Develop a method to image gene expression that can be used to monitor successful gene transduction in patients. Currently there are no noninvasive ways to define the extent and spatial location of gene transduction or the level of gene expression in targeted organs or tumors. Wild-type RF2 s.c. tumors were produced by implantation of 10{sup 6} cells into both flanks of Sprague Dawley R-Nu rats. Following a 46 day growth period, the left and right flank tumors reached a 5x4x3 and 3x2x1 cm size. The left tumor was inoculated with 10{sup 6} gp-STK-A2 retroviral vector-producer cells (10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} cfu/ml) in 100 {mu}l of media to induce in vivo transduction with HSV-tk gene. No carrier added 2`-fluoro-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-[131I]-iodo-uracil [131I]-FIAU was synthesized and 2.8 mCi was injected i.v. 14 days after gp-STK-A2 cell inoculation. Gamma camera imaging was performed in vivo at 4,24 and 36 hours post [131I]-FIAU injection with a dual-headed gamma camera. The 24 and 36 hour images showed specific localization of retained radioactivity only in the transduced tumors. These results were confirmed using quantitative autoradiography (QAR) of the same tumors. QAR also showed significantly higher levels of retained radioactivity (>1% dose/g) in the transduced tumor than in other nontransduced areas (<0.03 %dose/g). The transduced tumor tissue had microscopic features typical of subcutaneously growing RG2 glioma and non vector-producer cells could be identified. Gene therapy trials in patients would benefit greatly from a noninvasive measure and image that could define the location, magnitude and persistence of gene expression overtime. HSV-tk and FIAU can be used as a {open_quotes}marker gene{close_quotes} - {open_quotes}marker substrate{close_quotes} combination for PET ([124-I]) or possibly SPECT ([123-I]) imaging.

  12. A General Approach to the Non-Invasive Imaging of Transgenes Using Cis-Linked Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase1

    PubMed Central

    Tjuvajev, Juri G; Joshi, Arjun; Callegari, James; Lindsley, Laura; Joshi, Revathi; Balatoni, Julius; Finn, Ronald; Larson, Steven M; Sadelain, Michel; Blasberg, Ronald G

    1999-01-01

    Abstract Non-invasive imaging of gene expression opens new prospects for the study of transgenic animals and the implementation of genetically based therapies in patients. We have sought to establish a general paradigm to enable whole body non-invasive imaging of any transgene. We show that the expression and imaging of HSV1-tk (a marker gene) can be used to monitor the expression of the LacZ gene (a second gene) under the transcriptional control of a single promoter within a bicistronic unit that includes a type II internal ribosomal entry site. In cells bearing a single copy of the vector, the expression of the two genes is proportional and constant, both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that non-invasive imaging of HSV1-tk gene accurately reflects the topology and activity of the other cis-linked transgene. PMID:10935486

  13. HSV-1 targets lymphatic vessels in the eye and draining lymph node of mice leading to edema in the absence of a functional type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Hudson, Katie M; Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Conrady, Christopher D; Cohen, Alex; Zheng, Min; Carr, Daniel J J

    2013-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) induces new lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis) in the cornea via expression of vascular endothelial growth factor by virally infected epithelial cells. Here, we extend this observation to demonstrate the selective targeting of corneal lymphatics by HSV-1 in the absence of functional type I interferon (IFN) pathway. Specifically, we examined the impact of HSV-1 replication on angiogenesis using type I IFN receptor deficient (CD118(-/-)) mice. HSV-1-induced lymphatic and blood vessel growth into the cornea proper was time-dependent in immunocompetent animals. In contrast, there was an initial robust growth of lymphatic vessels into the cornea of HSV-1-infected CD118(-/-)mice, but such vessels disappeared by day 5 postinfection. The loss was selective as blood vessel integrity remained intact. Magnetic resonance imaging and confocal microscopy analysis of the draining lymph nodes of CD118(-/-) mice revealed extensive edema and loss of lymphatics compared with wild-type mice. In addition to a loss of lymphatic vessels in CD118(-/-) mice, HSV-1 infection resulted in epithelial thinning associated with geographic lesions and edema within the cornea, which is consistent with a loss of lymphatic vasculature. These results underscore the key role functional type I IFN pathway plays in the maintenance of structural integrity within the cornea in addition to the anti-viral characteristics often ascribed to the type I IFN cytokine family. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of the SUMO2 Proteome during HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Groslambert, Marine; Glass, Mandy; Orr, Anne; Hay, Ronald T.; Everett, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Covalent linkage to members of the small ubiquitin-like (SUMO) family of proteins is an important mechanism by which the functions of many cellular proteins are regulated. Sumoylation has roles in the control of protein stability, activity and localization, and is involved in the regulation of transcription, gene expression, chromatin structure, nuclear transport and RNA metabolism. Sumoylation is also linked, both positively and negatively, with the replication of many different viruses both in terms of modification of viral proteins and modulation of sumoylated cellular proteins that influence the efficiency of infection. One prominent example of the latter is the widespread reduction in the levels of cellular sumoylated species induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ubiquitin ligase ICP0. This activity correlates with relief from intrinsic immunity antiviral defence mechanisms. Previous work has shown that ICP0 is selective in substrate choice, with some sumoylated proteins such the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML being extremely sensitive, while RanGAP is completely resistant. Here we present a comprehensive proteomic analysis of changes in the cellular SUMO2 proteome during HSV-1 infection. Amongst the 877 potentially sumoylated species detected, we identified 124 whose abundance was decreased by a factor of 3 or more by the virus, several of which were validated by western blot and expression analysis. We found many previously undescribed substrates of ICP0 whose degradation occurs by a range of mechanisms, influenced or not by sumoylation and/or the SUMO2 interaction motif within ICP0. Many of these proteins are known or are predicted to be involved in the regulation of transcription, chromatin assembly or modification. These results present novel insights into mechanisms and host cell proteins that might influence the efficiency of HSV-1 infection. PMID:26200910

  15. [Silencing HSV1 gD expression in cultured cells by RNA interference].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qin-Chang; Ren, Zhe; Zhang, Chun-Long; Zhang, Mei-Ying; Liao, Hong-Juan; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Zhuo; Li, Jiu-Xiang; Hu, Chao-Feng; Wang, Hua-Dong; Wang, Yi-Fei

    2007-01-01

    To explore the anti-HSV-1 effect of silencing gD gene expression by RNA interference, five 21-nucleotide duplex small interfering RNAs(siRNAs) targeting the HSV1 gD sequence were designed and the gD-EGFP fusion gene expression vector was constructed, then co-transfected into Vero cell, and screened the effective siRNA through analyzing the intensity of the EGFP fluorescence. Finally, the anti-HSV1 effect was confirmed by plaque reduction assay, real-time PCR and daughter virus titration of HSV1 infected Vero cells transfected with siRNAs. The study demonstrated that siRNAs could effectively and specifically inhibit gD gene expression in HSV1-infected cells, but only had a little effect on HSV1 infection, so taking gD as the target of siRNA against HSV1 needs further study.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of AmpliVue HSV 1+2 Assay with ELVIS Culture for Detecting Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in Clinical Specimens.

    PubMed

    Granato, Paul A; Alkins, Brenda R; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Greene, Wallace H; Connolly, Jessica; Buchan, Blake W; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2015-12-01

    The AmpliVue HSV 1+2 assay was compared to the ELVIS HSV ID and D(3) Typing Culture System for the qualitative detection and differentiation of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 DNA in 1,351 cutaneous and mucocutaneous specimens. Compared to ELVIS, AmpliVue had sensitivities of 95.7 and 97.6% for detecting HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. Following arbitration of discordant results by an independent molecular method, the AmpliVue assay had a resolved sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 and 99.7%, respectively, for both HSV-1 and HSV-2, whereas ELVIS had a resolved sensitivity of 87.1% for HSV-1 and 84.5% for HSV-2.

  17. A case of relapsing-remitting facial palsy and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy caused by HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Alstadhaug, Karl B; Kvarenes, Hanne W; Prytz, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2016-05-01

    The etiologies of Bell's palsy and brachial neuritis remain uncertain, and the conditions rarely co-occur or reoccur. Here we present a woman in her twenties who had several relapsing-remitting episodes with left-sided facial palsy and brachial neuropathy. The episodes always started with painful left-sided oral blisters. Repeat PCRs HSV-1 DNA from oral vesicular lesions were positive. Extensive screening did not reveal any other underlying cause. Findings on MRI T2-weighted brachial plexus STIR images, using a 3.0-Tesla scanner during an episode, were compatible with brachial plexus neuritis. Except a mannose-binding lectin deficiency, a congenital complement deficiency that is frequently found in the general Caucasian population, no other immunodeficiency was demonstrated in our patient. In vitro resistance to acyclovir was tested negative, but despite prophylactic treatment with the drug in high doses, relapses recurred. To our knowledge, this is the first ever reported documentation of relapsing-remitting facial and brachial plexus neuritis caused by HSV-1.

  18. An Attenuated Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV1) Encoding the HIV-1 Tat Protein Protects Mice from a Deadly Mucosal HSV1 Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sicurella, Mariaconcetta; Nicoli, Francesco; Gallerani, Eleonora; Volpi, Ilaria; Berto, Elena; Finessi, Valentina; Destro, Federica; Manservigi, Roberto; Cafaro, Aurelio; Ensoli, Barbara; Caputo, Antonella; Gavioli, Riccardo; Marconi, Peggy C.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2) are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat). In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ), induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1 infection and

  19. An attenuated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) encoding the HIV-1 Tat protein protects mice from a deadly mucosal HSV1 challenge.

    PubMed

    Sicurella, Mariaconcetta; Nicoli, Francesco; Gallerani, Eleonora; Volpi, Ilaria; Berto, Elena; Finessi, Valentina; Destro, Federica; Manservigi, Roberto; Cafaro, Aurelio; Ensoli, Barbara; Caputo, Antonella; Gavioli, Riccardo; Marconi, Peggy C

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2) are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat). In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ), induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1 infection and

  20. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1.

  1. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1. PMID:28378566

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new acyclic pyrimidine derivative as a probe for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Meščić, Andrijana; Betzel, Thomas; Müller, Adrienne; Slavik, Roger; Cermak, Stjepko; Raić-Malić, Silvana; Ametamey, Simon M

    2013-07-19

    With the idea of finding a more selective radiotracer for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene expression by means of positron emission tomography (PET), a novel [¹⁸F]fluorine radiolabeled pyrimidine with 4-hydroxy-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl side chain at N-1 (HHB-5-[¹⁸F]FEP) was prepared and evaluated as a potential PET probe. Unlabeled reference compound, HHB-5-FEP, was synthesized via a five-step reaction sequence starting from 5-(2-acetoxyethyl)-4-methoxypyrimidin-2-one. The radiosynthesis of HHB-[¹⁸F]-FEP was accomplished by nucleophilic radiofluorination of a tosylate precursor using [¹⁸F]fluoride-cryptate complex in 45% ± 4 (n = 4) radiochemical yields and high purity (>99%). The biological evaluation indicated the feasibility of using HHB-5-[¹⁸F]FEP as a PET radiotracer for monitoring HSV1-tk expression in vivo.

  3. Ocular HSV-1: Is the Cornea a Reservoir for Viral Latency or a Fast Pit Stop?

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, David P.; Clement, Christian; Arceneaux, Richard L.; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Huq, Tashfin S.; Hill, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To present a review supporting and refuting evidence from mouse, rabbit, non-human primate, and human studies of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) concerning corneal latency. Methods More than 50 research papers on HSV-1 published in peer-reviewed journals were examined. Results Infectious HSV-1 has been found in mouse denervated tissues and in tissues with negative cultures from the corresponding ganglion. However, the different mouse strains have shown varied responses to different strains of HSV, making it difficult to relate such findings to humans. Rabbit studies provide excellent evidence for HSV-1 corneal latency including data on HSV-1 migration from the cornea into the corneoscleral rim and on the distribution of HSV-1 DNA in the cornea. However, the available methods for the detection of infectious HSV-1 may not be sensitive enough to detect low-level infection. Infectious HSV-1 has been successfully isolated from the tears of non-human primates in the absence of detectable corneal lesions. The recurrence of corneal ulcers in non-human primates before the appearance of infectious HSV-1 in tears suggests that the origin of the HSV-1 is the cornea, rather than the TG. Human studies presented evidence of both ganglion and corneal latency. Conclusion Understanding HSV-1 disease progression and the possibility of corneal latency could lead to more effective treatments for herpetic keratitis. However, it is unlikely that operational latency in the cornea will be definitively proven unless a new method with higher sensitivity for the detection of infectious virus is developed. PMID:21304287

  4. [18F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75+-selected donor T cells (1.0–13 × 105)/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-(18F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [18F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [18F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  5. 5-[18F]Fluoroalkyl pyrimidine nucleosides: probes for positron emission tomography imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Blankemeyer, Eric; Lieberman, Brian P; Qu, Wenchao; Kung, Hank F

    2009-01-01

    The preliminary in vivo evaluation of novel 5-[(18)F]fluoroalkyl-2'-deoxyuridines ([(18)F]FPrDU, [(18)F]FBuDU, [(18)F]FPeDU; [(18)F]1a-c, respectively) and 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-[(18)F]fluoroalkyl-1-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl uracils ([(18)F]FFPrAU, [(18)F]FFBuAU, [(18)F]FFPeAU; [(18)F]1d-f, respectively) as probes for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene expression is described. [(18)F]1a-f were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step one-pot nucleophilic fluorination reaction using 5-O-mesylate precursors and [(18)F]F(-). For in vivo studies, tumor xenografts were grown in nude mice by implanting RG2 cells stably expressing HSV1-tk (RG2TK+) and wild-type cells (RG2). Biodistribution studies at 2 h pi revealed that the uptake of [(18)F]1a-b and [(18)F]1d-e in RG2TK+ tumors was not significantly different from control tumors. However, [(18)F]1c and [(18)F]1f had an average 1.6- and 1.7-fold higher uptake in RG2TK+ tumors than control RG2 tumors. Blood activity curves for [(18)F]1c and [(18)F]1f highlight rapid clearance of radioactivity in the blood. Dynamic small animal PET (A-PET) imaging studies of tumor-bearing mice with [(18)F]1c and [(18)F]1f showed higher initial uptake (3.5- and 1.4-fold, respectively) in RG2TK+ tumors than in control tumors, with continued washout of activity from both tumors over time. Biological evaluations suggest that [(18)F]1c and [(18)F]1f may have limited potential for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression due to fast washout of activity from the blood, thus significantly decreasing sensitivity and specificity of tracer accumulation in HSV1-tk-expressing tumors.

  6. Visualization of mouse neuronal ganglia infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) using multimodal non-linear optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Houle, Marie-Andrée; Blache, Marie-Claire; Légaré, François; Pearson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry), which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives.

  7. Visualization of Mouse Neuronal Ganglia Infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Using Multimodal Non-Linear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Houle, Marie-Andrée; Blache, Marie-Claire; Légaré, François; Pearson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry), which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives. PMID:25133579

  8. ICP4-induced miR-101 attenuates HSV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangling; Diao, Caifeng; Yang, Xi; Yang, Zhen; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

    2016-03-17

    Hepes simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an enveloped DNA virus that can cause lytic and latent infection. miRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, and our previous work has indicated that HSV-1 infection induces miR-101 expression in HeLa cells. The present study demonstrates that HSV-1-induced miR-101 is mainly derived from its precursor hsa-mir-101-2, and the HSV-1 immediate early gene ICP4 (infected-cell polypeptide 4) directly binds to the hsa-mir-101-2 promoter to activate its expression. RNA-binding protein G-rich sequence factor 1 (GRSF1) was identified as a new target of miR-101; GRSF1 binds to HSV-1 p40 mRNA and enhances its expression, facilitating viral proliferation. Together, ICP4 induces miR-101 expression, which downregulates GRSF1 expression and attenuates the replication of HSV-1. This allows host cells to maintain a permissive environment for viral replication by preventing lytic cell death. These findings indicate that HSV-1 early gene expression modulates host miRNAs to regulate molecular defense mechanisms. This study provides novel insight into host-virus interactions in HSV-1 infection and may contribute to the development of antiviral therapeutics.

  9. The Role of Cyclooxygenase in Multiplication and Reactivation of HSV-1 in Vestibular Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuehong; Li, Shufeng; Wang, Zhengmin

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and nerve inflammation have been shown to be involved in vertigo-related vestibular pathogenesis. Treatments of such diseases have been less than perfect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to suppress reactivation of HSV-1 in trigeminal ganglions. However, whether this drug can affect reactivation of HSV-1 in vestibular ganglions is unclear. Due to the difficulties of constructing in vivo animal models, in this study, we developed a vestibular ganglion culture system, in which vestibular neurons were latently or lytically infected with HSV-1. Indomethacin and celecoxib were selected to measure their effects on HSV-1. Trichostatin A was used to reactivate HSV-1 in latently infected neurons. Cycloxygenase-2, which is the target of NSAIDs, was induced by HSV-1 in the lytically infected cultures, with an increase of 14-fold. Although it appeared that indomethacin and celecoxib showed limited but concentration-dependent inhibition effects on viral production under our condition, indomethacin decreased reactivation rate of HSV-1 by about 20%. Though more in vitro or in vivo studies are needed to confirm the effects of the drugs, our study may provide a potential way to investigate the mechanism of HSV-related vestibular pathogenesis as well as new treatments of vertigo-related diseases. PMID:24688447

  10. Combined CMV- and HSV-1 brainstem encephalitis restricted to medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, J; Branding, G; Stocker, H

    2014-04-15

    We report a very rare case of a combined CMV- and HSV-1 isolated brainstem encephalitis restricted to medulla oblongata in a patient with advanced HIV disease. Neither limbic nor general ventricular involvement was detected on neuroimaging. The case highlights the importance of testing for HSV-1 and CMV in HIV-infected patients presenting with an isolated brainstem syndrome.

  11. Biochemical transformation of thymidine kinase (TK)-deficient mouse cells by herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA fragments purified from hybrid plasmids.

    PubMed

    Kit, S; Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Trkula, D; Dubbs, D R; Hazen, M

    1980-11-25

    The thymidine kinase (TK) gene of HSV-1 has been cloned in Escherichia coli K12 plasmids, pMH1, pMH1A, and pMH4. These plasmids contain a 1,92Obp HSV-1 TK DNA sequence, which replaces a 2,067 bp EcoR I to Pvu II sequence of plasmid pBR322 DNA. Superhelical DNAs of plasmids pMH1, pMH1A, and pMH4 as well as plasmid DNAs cleaved by EcoR I, Hinc II, Bg1 II, Sma I, and Pvu II transformed TK-deficient LM(TK-) cells to the TK+ phenotype. A 1,230bp EcoR I-Sma I fragment purified from pMH1 DNA (and from plasmid pAGO, DNA, the parent of pMH1) also transformed LM(TK-) cells. Serological and disc PAGE studies demonstrated that the TK activity expressed in biochemically transformed cells were HSV-1-specific. The experiments suggest that the HSV-1 TK coding region may be contained within a l.1kbp DNA sequence extending from about the Hinc II (or Bgl II) cleavage site to the Sma I site. 35S-methionine labeling experiments carried out on cell lines transformed by Hinc II-cleaved pMH1 DNA and by the EcoR I-Sma I fragment showed that the TKs purified from the transformed cells consisted of about 39-40,000 dalton polypeptides.

  12. Imaging Transgene Expression with Radionuclide Imaging Technologies1

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, SS; Herschman, HR; Cherry, SR; Barrio, JR; Satyamurthy, N; Toyokuni, T; Phelps, ME; Larson, SM; Balaton, J; Finn, R; Sadelain, M; Tjuvajev, J

    2000-01-01

    Abstract A variety of imaging technologies are being investigated as tools for studying gene expression in living subjects. Noninvasive, repetitive and quantitative imaging of gene expression will help both to facilitate human gene therapy trials and to allow for the study of animal models of molecular and cellular therapy. Radionuclide approaches using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are the most mature of the current imaging technologies and offer many advantages for imaging gene expression compared to optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based approaches. These advantages include relatively high sensitivity, full quantitative capability (for PET), and the ability to extend small animal assays directly into clinical human applications. We describe a PET scanner (micro PET) designed specifically for studies of small animals. We review “marker/reporter gene” imaging approaches using the herpes simplex type 1 virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and the dopamine type 2 receptor (D2R) genes. We describe and contrast several radiolabeled probes that can be used with the HSV1-tk reporter gene both for SPECT and for PET imaging. We also describe the advantages/disadvantages of each of the assays developed and discuss future animal and human applications. PMID:10933072

  13. Granulocytes in Ocular HSV-1 Infection: Opposing Roles of Mast Cells and Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Derek J.; Zheng, Min; Conrady, Christopher D.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The contributions of mast cells (MCs) to immunologic defense against pathogens in the eye are unknown. We have characterized pericorneal MCs as tissue-resident innate sentinels and determined their impact on the immune response to herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), a common ocular pathogen. Methods. The impact of mast cells on the immune response to HSV-1 infection was investigated using MC-deficient KitW-sh mice. Virus titers, inflammatory cytokine production, eicosanoid profiles, cellular immune responses, and ocular pathology were evaluated and compared with C57BL/6J mice during an acute corneal HSV-1 infection. Results. Corneas of KitW-sh mice have higher viral titers, increased edema, and greater leukocyte infiltration following HSV-1 infection. Following infection, cytokine profiles were slightly elevated overall in KitW-sh mice. Eicosanoid profiles were remarkably different only when comparing uninfected corneas from both groups. Neutrophils within infected corneas expressed HSV-1 antigen, lytic genes, and served as a disease-causing vector when adoptively transferred into immunocompromised animals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells did not infiltrate into the cornea or suppress the expansion, recruitment, or cytokine production by CD8+ T cells following acute HSV-1 infection. Conclusions. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into host defense in the cornea and the pathogenesis of HSV-1 infection by identifying previously unacknowledged MCs as protective innate sentinels for infection of the ocular surface and reinforcing that neutrophils are detrimental to corneal infection. PMID:26066745

  14. Rabbit and Mouse Models of HSV-1 Latency, Reactivation, and Recurrent Eye Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Webre, Jody M.; Hill, James M.; Nolan, Nicole M.; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E.; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Hsia, Victor; Neumann, Donna M.; Foster, Timothy P.; Lukiw, Walter J.; Thompson, Hilary W.

    2012-01-01

    The exact mechanisms of HSV-1 establishment, maintenance, latency, reactivation, and also the courses of recurrent ocular infections remain a mystery. Comprehensive understanding of the HSV-1 disease process could lead to prevention of HSV-1 acute infection, reactivation, and more effective treatments of recurrent ocular disease. Animal models have been used for over sixty years to investigate our concepts and hypotheses of HSV-1 diseases. In this paper we present descriptions and examples of rabbit and mouse eye models of HSV-1 latency, reactivation, and recurrent diseases. We summarize studies in animal models of spontaneous and induced HSV-1 reactivation and recurrent disease. Numerous stimuli that induce reactivation in mice and rabbits are described, as well as factors that inhibit viral reactivation from latency. The key features, advantages, and disadvantages of the mouse and rabbit models in relation to the study of ocular HSV-1 are discussed. This paper is pertinent but not intended to be all inclusive. We will give examples of key papers that have reported novel discoveries related to the review topics. PMID:23091352

  15. The Effect of Cellular Differentiation on HSV-1 Infection of Oligodendrocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bello-Morales, Raquel; Crespillo, Antonio Jesús; García, Beatriz; Dorado, Luis Ángel; Martín, Beatriz; Tabarés, Enrique; Krummenacher, Claude; de Castro, Fernando; López-Guerrero, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that infects many types of cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that oligodendrocytic cells are highly susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Here we analysed HSV-1 infection of a human oligodendrocytic cell line, HOG, and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) cultured under growth or differentiation conditions. In addition to cell susceptibility, the role of the major cell receptors for viral entry was assessed. Our results revealed that OPCs and HOG cells cultured under differentiation conditions became more susceptible to HSV-1. On the other hand, viral infection induced morphological changes corresponding to differentiated cells, suggesting that HSV-1 might be inducing cell differentiation. We also observed colocalization of HVEM and nectin-1 with viral particles, suggesting that these two major HSV-1 receptors are functional in HOG cells. Finally, electron microscopy assays indicated that HSV-1 may be also entering OLs by macropinocytosis depending on their differentiation stage. In addition, vesicles containing intracellular enveloped virions observed in differentiated cells point to an endocytic mechanism of virus entry. All these data are indicative of diverse entry pathways dependent on the maturation stage of OLs. PMID:24551233

  16. A role for 3-O-sulfotransferase isoform-4 in assisting HSV-1 entry and spread

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; O'Donnell, Christopher D.; Oh, Myung-Jin; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Shukla, Deepak . E-mail: dshukla@uic.edu

    2005-12-16

    Many heparan sulfate (HS) 3-O-sulfotransferase (3-OST) isoforms generate cellular receptors for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD). Interestingly, the ability of 3-OST-4 to mediate HSV-1 entry and cell-to-cell fusion has not been determined, although it is predominantly expressed in the brain, a primary target of HSV-1 infections. We report that expression of 3-OST-4 can render Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells susceptible to entry of wild-type and a mutant (Rid1) strain of HSV-1. Evidence for generation of gD receptors by 3-OST-4 was suggested by gD-mediated interference assay and the ability of 3-OST-4 expressing CHO-K1 cells to preferentially bind HSV-1 gD, which could be reversed by prior treatment of cells with HS lyases (heparinases-II/III). In addition, 3-OST-4 expressing CHO-K1 cells acquired the ability to fuse with cells-expressing HSV-1 glycoproteins. Demonstrating specificity, the cell fusion was inhibited by soluble 3-O-sulfated forms of HS, but not unmodified HS. Taken together our results suggest a role of 3-OST-4 in HSV-1 pathogenesis.

  17. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T C; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F T; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-05-26

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light-inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation-dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell-depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML.

  18. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T. C.; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F. T.; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William

    2016-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light–inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation–dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell–depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. PMID:26941401

  19. Establishment of HSV1 Latency in Immunodeficient Mice Facilitates Efficient In Vivo Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Chandran; Ferraioli, Adrianna; Calle, Aleth; Nguyen, Thanh K.; Openshaw, Harry; Lundberg, Patric S.; Lomonte, Patrick; Cantin, Edouard M.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of latent infections in sensory neurons is a remarkably effective immune evasion strategy that accounts for the widespread dissemination of life long Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV1) infections in humans. Periodic reactivation of latent virus results in asymptomatic shedding and transmission of HSV1 or recurrent disease that is usually mild but can be severe. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms regulating the maintenance of latency and reactivation are essential for developing new approaches to block reactivation. However, the lack of a reliable mouse model that supports efficient in vivo reactivation (IVR) resulting in production of infectious HSV1 and/or disease has hampered progress. Since HSV1 reactivation is enhanced in immunosuppressed hosts, we exploited the antiviral and immunomodulatory activities of IVIG (intravenous immunoglobulins) to promote survival of latently infected immunodeficient Rag mice. Latently infected Rag mice derived by high dose (HD), but not low dose (LD), HSV1 inoculation exhibited spontaneous reactivation. Following hyperthermia stress (HS), the majority of HD inoculated mice developed HSV1 encephalitis (HSE) rapidly and synchronously, whereas for LD inoculated mice reactivated HSV1 persisted only transiently in trigeminal ganglia (Tg). T cells, but not B cells, were required to suppress spontaneous reactivation in HD inoculated latently infected mice. Transfer of HSV1 memory but not OVA specific or naïve T cells prior to HS blocked IVR, revealing the utility of this powerful Rag latency model for studying immune mechanisms involved in control of reactivation. Crossing Rag mice to various knockout strains and infecting them with wild type or mutant HSV1 strains is expected to provide novel insights into the role of specific cellular and viral genes in reactivation, thereby facilitating identification of new targets with the potential to block reactivation. PMID:25760441

  20. Establishment of HSV1 latency in immunodeficient mice facilitates efficient in vivo reactivation.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Chandran; Ferraioli, Adrianna; Calle, Aleth; Nguyen, Thanh K; Openshaw, Harry; Lundberg, Patric S; Lomonte, Patrick; Cantin, Edouard M

    2015-03-01

    The establishment of latent infections in sensory neurons is a remarkably effective immune evasion strategy that accounts for the widespread dissemination of life long Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV1) infections in humans. Periodic reactivation of latent virus results in asymptomatic shedding and transmission of HSV1 or recurrent disease that is usually mild but can be severe. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms regulating the maintenance of latency and reactivation are essential for developing new approaches to block reactivation. However, the lack of a reliable mouse model that supports efficient in vivo reactivation (IVR) resulting in production of infectious HSV1 and/or disease has hampered progress. Since HSV1 reactivation is enhanced in immunosuppressed hosts, we exploited the antiviral and immunomodulatory activities of IVIG (intravenous immunoglobulins) to promote survival of latently infected immunodeficient Rag mice. Latently infected Rag mice derived by high dose (HD), but not low dose (LD), HSV1 inoculation exhibited spontaneous reactivation. Following hyperthermia stress (HS), the majority of HD inoculated mice developed HSV1 encephalitis (HSE) rapidly and synchronously, whereas for LD inoculated mice reactivated HSV1 persisted only transiently in trigeminal ganglia (Tg). T cells, but not B cells, were required to suppress spontaneous reactivation in HD inoculated latently infected mice. Transfer of HSV1 memory but not OVA specific or naïve T cells prior to HS blocked IVR, revealing the utility of this powerful Rag latency model for studying immune mechanisms involved in control of reactivation. Crossing Rag mice to various knockout strains and infecting them with wild type or mutant HSV1 strains is expected to provide novel insights into the role of specific cellular and viral genes in reactivation, thereby facilitating identification of new targets with the potential to block reactivation.

  1. Adenovirus-mediated shRNA interference against HSV-1 replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Liu, Xinjing; Wang, Qingzhi; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Ting; Han, Zhiqiang; Xu, Yuming

    2016-12-01

    The UL29 and UL28 proteins encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are critical for its replication and packaging, respectively. Research has demonstrated that synthesized siRNA molecules targeting the UL29 gene are able to suppress HSV-2 replication and the UL28-null HSV-1 gene cannot form infectious viruses in vitro. Silencing the UL28 and UL29 genes by RNAi might lead to the development of novel antiviral agents for the treatment of HSV-1 infections. Two kinds of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the UL29 and UL28 genes were chemically synthesized and then delivered into cells by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Adv5) vector. (-) shRNAs targeting none of the genome of HSV-1 were used as the control. Vero cells were inoculated with Ad-UL28shRNA or Ad-UL29shRNA at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100 and challenged 24 h later with HSV-1 at an MOI of 0.01 to inhibit HSV-1 replication, as measured by the level of the corresponding RNA and proteins. In addition, the amount of progeny virus was assessed at daily intervals. The antiviral effects of Ad-shRNAs at ongoing HSV-1 infection were explored at 12 h after inoculation of the HSV-1. The results showed that the shRNAs delivered by Adv5 significantly suppressed HSV-1 replication in vitro, as determined by the levels of viral RNA transcription, viral protein synthesis, and viral production. The Ad-UL28shRNA and Ad-UL29shRNA suppressed the replication of HSV-1, respectively, compared with the control group (P < 0.001). When Ad-UL28shRNA and Ad-UL29shRNA were combined, a synergistic effect was observed. The antiviral effects could sustain for at least 4 days after the HSV-1 infection (P < 0.001). Furthermore, antiviral effects were achieved 12 h prior to inoculation of Adv5-shRNAs (P < 0.001). Our data demonstrated comparable antiviral activities against herpes simplex virus by shRNAs targeting either UL29 or UL28 sites in vitro and the effectiveness of using the Adv5

  2. Mechanism of inhibition of HSV-1 replication by tumor necrosis factor and interferon gamma.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1991-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) synergizes with interferon (IFN gamma) in the blockade of HSV-1 replication. Antibodies against IFN beta block this synergism, implying a role of IFN beta in the antiviral activity of TNF plus IFN gamma. IFN beta 1 added exogenously to Hep-2 cells shows antiviral activity against HSV-1 only at high concentrations, whereas IFN beta 2 (also known as IL-6) alone has no effect on the replication of VSV or HSV-1 even when 1,000 U/ml are present. Our results are in accordance with the idea that TNF induces IFN beta 1 and that both cytokines must be present in the culture medium to synergize with IFN gamma in order to inhibit HSV-1 replication.

  3. The interaction of the HSV-1 tegument proteins pUL36 and pUL37 is essential for secondary envelopment during viral egress.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Barbara J; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Laimbacher, Andrea S; Fraefel, Cornel; Diefenbach, Russell J

    2014-04-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) tegument proteins pUL36 (VP1/2) and pUL37 are essential for viral egress. We previously defined a minimal domain in HSV-1 pUL36, residues 548-572, as important for binding pUL37. Here, we investigated the role of this region in binding to pUL37 and facilitating viral replication. We deleted residues 548-572 in frame in a virus containing a mRFP tag at the N-terminus of the capsid protein VP26 and an eGFP tag at the C-terminus of pUL37 (HSV-1pUL36∆548-572). This mutant virus was unable to generate plaques in Vero cells, indicating that deletion of this region of pUL36 blocks viral replication. Imaging of HSV-1pUL36∆548-572-infected Vero cells, in comparison to parental and resucant, revealed a block in secondary envelopment of cytoplasmic capsids. In addition, immunoblot analysis suggested that failure to bind pUL37 affected the stability of pUL36. This study provides further insight into the role of this essential interaction.

  4. The Current State of Vaccine Development for Ocular HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Royer, DJ; Cohen, A; Carr, DJJ

    2015-01-01

    Summary HSV-1 continues to be the leading cause of infectious corneal blindness. Clinical trials for vaccines against genital HSV infection have been ongoing for more than three decades. Despite this, no approved vaccine exists, and no formal clinical trials have evaluated the impact of HSV vaccines on eye health. We review here the current state of development for an efficacious HSV-1 vaccine and call for involvement of ophthalmologists and vision researchers. PMID:25983856

  5. MicroRNA-649 promotes HSV-1 replication by directly targeting MALT1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Dai, Jun; Tang, Jinfeng; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mengzhou

    2016-11-03

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a member of the Herpes viridae, is associated with a wide variety of nervous system diseases including meningitis and encephalitis. The data presented here demonstrate that miR-649 promotes the replication of HSV-1 without affecting cell viability. Further mechanistic studies revealed that MALT1 (mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1) is directly targeted by miR-649. We then found that MALT1 and the downstream NF-κB signaling pathway, are involved in miR-649-induced HSV-1 replication. Interestingly, miR-649 levels were downregulated after HSV-1 infection, and miR-649 expression was negatively associated with MALT1 expression in HSV-1-infected HeLa cells. Taken together, this present study indicates that miR-649 promotes HSV-1 replication through regulation of the MALT1-mediated antiviral signaling pathway and suggests a promising target for antiviral therapies. J. Med. Virol. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Pentagalloylglucose Blocks the Nuclear Transport and the Process of Nucleocapsid Egress to Inhibit HSV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fujun; Ma, Kaiqi; Chen, Maoyun; Zou, Muping; Wu, Yanting; Li, Feng; Wang, Yifei

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a widespread virus, causes a variety of human viral diseases worldwide. The serious threat of drug-resistance highlights the extreme urgency to develop novel antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with significant anti-HSV activity; however, the mechanisms underlying its antiviral activity need to be defined by further studies. In this study, we found that PGG treatment delays the nuclear transport process of HSV-1 particles by inhibiting the upregulation of dynein (a cellular major motor protein) induced by HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, PGG treatment affects the nucleocapsid egress of HSV-1 by inhibiting the expression and disrupting the cellular localization of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34, which are indispensable for HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress from the nucleus. However, the over-expression of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34 could decrease the antiviral effect of PGG. In this study, for the first time, the antiviral activity of PGG against acyclovir-resistant virus was demonstrated in vitro, and the possible mechanisms of its anti-HSV activities were identified based on the inhibition of nuclear transport and nucleocapsid egress in HSV-1. It was further confirmed that PGG could be a promising candidate for HSV therapy, especially for drug-resistant strains.

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus-Type1 (HSV-1) Impairs DNA Repair in Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    De Chiara, Giovanna; Racaniello, Mauro; Mollinari, Cristiana; Marcocci, Maria Elena; Aversa, Giorgia; Cardinale, Alessio; Giovanetti, Anna; Garaci, Enrico; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Merlo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Several findings suggest that Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection plays a role in the neurodegenerative processes that characterize Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the underlying mechanisms have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we show that HSV-1 productive infection in cortical neurons causes the accumulation of DNA lesions that include both single (SSBs) and double strand breaks (DSBs), which are reported to be implicated in the neuronal loss observed in neurodegenerative diseases. We demonstrate that HSV-1 downregulates the expression level of Ku80, one of the main components of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway for the repair of DSBs. We also provide data suggesting that HSV-1 drives Ku80 for proteasomal degradation and impairs NHEJ activity, leading to DSB accumulation. Since HSV-1 usually causes life-long recurrent infections, it is possible to speculate that cumulating damages, including those occurring on DNA, may contribute to virus induced neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration, further suggesting HSV-1 as a risk factor for neurodegenerative conditions.

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus-Type1 (HSV-1) Impairs DNA Repair in Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    De Chiara, Giovanna; Racaniello, Mauro; Mollinari, Cristiana; Marcocci, Maria Elena; Aversa, Giorgia; Cardinale, Alessio; Giovanetti, Anna; Garaci, Enrico; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Merlo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Several findings suggest that Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection plays a role in the neurodegenerative processes that characterize Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the underlying mechanisms have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we show that HSV-1 productive infection in cortical neurons causes the accumulation of DNA lesions that include both single (SSBs) and double strand breaks (DSBs), which are reported to be implicated in the neuronal loss observed in neurodegenerative diseases. We demonstrate that HSV-1 downregulates the expression level of Ku80, one of the main components of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway for the repair of DSBs. We also provide data suggesting that HSV-1 drives Ku80 for proteasomal degradation and impairs NHEJ activity, leading to DSB accumulation. Since HSV-1 usually causes life-long recurrent infections, it is possible to speculate that cumulating damages, including those occurring on DNA, may contribute to virus induced neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration, further suggesting HSV-1 as a risk factor for neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:27803664

  9. Comparative studies of HSV-1 antigens solubilised from infected cells by using non-ionic or zwitterionic detergents.

    PubMed

    Jennings, R; Erturk, M

    1990-06-01

    HSV-1 antigen preparations solubilised from Vero cells by using either the non-ionic detergent Nonidet P40 or the zwitterionic detergent Empigen BB, and purified on sucrose density gradients or over a sucrose cushion, were tested by ELISA with anti-HSV-1 glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies and by radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) with polyclonal HSV-1 antiserum. Amongst several proteins detected in these preparations, the four major HSV-1 glycoproteins, gB, gC, gD, and gE, were found to be present. Differences between NP40 or Empigen-solubilised HSV-1 antigen preparations with respect to two of these glycoproteins, gB and gE, were detected by using a small panel of monoclonal antibodies. Comparative studies in mice showed the Empigen-solubilised HSV-1 antigen preparations elicited greater antibody responses and greater protection against lethal HSV-1 challenge infection than the NP40-solubilised preparation.

  10. CK2 Inhibitors Increase the Sensitivity of HSV-1 to Interferon-β

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Miles C.; Bayless, Adam M.; Goddard, Erica T.; Davido, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) requires the activities of cellular kinases for efficient replication. The host kinase, CK2, has been shown or is predicted to modify several HSV-1 proteins and has been proposed to affect one or more steps in the viral lifecycle. Furthermore, potential cellular and viral substrates of CK2 are involved in antiviral pathways and viral counter-defenses, respectively, suggesting that CK2 regulates these processes. Consequently, we tested whether pharmacological inhibitors of CK2 impaired HSV-1 replication, either alone or in combination with the cellular antiviral factor, interferon-β (IFN-β). Our results indicate that the use of CK2 inhibitors results in a minor reduction in HSV-1 replication but enhanced the inhibitory effect of IFN-β on replication. This effect was dependent on the HSV-1 E3 ubiquitin ligase, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), which impairs several host antiviral responses, including that produced by IFN-β. Inhibitors of CK2 did not, however, impede the ability of ICP0 to induce the degradation of two cellular targets: the promyelocyticleukemia protein (PML) and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Notably, this effect was only apparent for HSV-1, as the CK2 inhibitors did not enhance the antiviral effect of IFN-β on either vesicular stomatitis virus or adenovirus type 5. Thus, our data suggest that the activity of CK2 is required for an early function during viral infection that assists the growth of HSV-1 in IFN-β-treated cells. PMID:21722672

  11. Assessment of Anti HSV-1 Activity of Aloe Vera Gel Extract: an In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Alyaseri, Montazer

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is one of the most common and debilitating oral diseases; yet, there is no standard topical treatment to control it. The extract of Aloe vera leaves has been previously reported to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and also antiviral effects. There is no data on anti-Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) activity of Aloe vera gel. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in Vero cell line. Materials and Method In this study, gel extraction and cytotoxicity of various increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5%) was evaluated in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Having been washed with phosphate buffered saline, 50 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1 was added to each well. After 1 hour of incubation at 37°C, cell monolayers in 24 well plates were exposed to different increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel. The anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in different concentrations was assessed by plaque reduction assays. Data were analyzed by using One-way ANOVA. Results The cytotoxicity assay showed that Aloe vera in prearranged concentrations was cell-compatible. The inhibitory effect of various concentrations of Aloe vera was observed one hour after the Vero cell was infected with HSV-1. However, there was no significant difference between two serial concentrations (p> 0.05). One-way ANOVA also revealed no significant difference between the groups. The findings indicated a dose-dependent antiviral effect of Aloe vera. Conclusion The findings showed significant inhibitory effect of 0.2-5% Aloe vera gel on HSV-1 growth in Vero cell line. Therefore, this gel could be a useful topical treatment for oral HSV-1 infections without any significant toxicity. PMID:26966709

  12. Serum HSV-1 and -2 IgM in pregnant women in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okonko, I O; Cookey, T I; Okerentugba, P O; Frank-Peterside, N

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken for the purpose of finding IgM antibodies against HSV-1 and 2 infections among pregnant women and also to evaluate correlation of Serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in these pregnant women. A total of 180 pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at Braithwaite Memorial Specialist Hospital (BMSH) in Port Harcourt, Nigeria were consecutively recruited, after they had given consents to participate in the study. Serum of each sample was assayed for HSV-1&2 IgM antibody using a commercial ELISA. Five (2.8%) of the pregnant women were positive for IgM antibody against HSV-1&2. Marital status mainly correlated (χ(2) = 221.5, P < 0.05) with HSV-2 infection and HSV-1/HSV-2 co-infection. Age, educational level, occupation, and gestation were not consistently associated (P>0.05) with HSV-1/HSV-2 infection and co-infection. We also observed a high overall anti-HSV-1&2 IgM seronegativity of 97.2% among these pregnant women. Group-specific seronegativity was also high ranging from 93.3-100%. Although the age-groups significantly differed, none of their variables showed statistical association with the seronegativity. This represents the first analysis of HSV IgM antibody reported in Port Harcourt, Nigeria and has important public health implications, particularly for pregnant women. Consideration of this information would benefit physicians providing primary gynecological and obstetric care to this population of women.

  13. Deciphering Human Cell-Autonomous Anti-HSV-1 Immunity in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Studer, Lorenz; Smith, Gregory; Notarangelo, Luigi; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common virus that can rarely invade the human central nervous system (CNS), causing devastating encephalitis. The permissiveness to HSV-1 of the various relevant cell types of the CNS, neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia cells, as well as their response to viral infection, has been extensively studied in humans and other animals. Nevertheless, human CNS cell-based models of anti-HSV-1 immunity are of particular importance, as responses to any given neurotropic virus may differ between humans and other animals. Human CNS neuron cell lines as well as primary human CNS neurons, astrocytes, and microglia cells cultured/isolated from embryos or cadavers, have enabled the study of cell-autonomous anti-HSV-1 immunity in vitro. However, the paucity of biological samples and their lack of purity have hindered progress in the field, which furthermore suffers from the absence of testable primary human oligodendrocytes. Recently, the authors have established a human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-based model of anti-HSV-1 immunity in neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, astrocytes, and neural stem cells, which has widened the scope of possible in vitro studies while permitting in-depth explorations. This mini-review summarizes the available data on human primary and iPSC-derived CNS cells for anti-HSV-1 immunity. The hiPSC-mediated study of anti-viral immunity in both healthy individuals and patients with viral encephalitis will be a powerful tool in dissecting the disease pathogenesis of CNS infections with HSV-1 and other neurotropic viruses.

  14. Assessment of Anti HSV-1 Activity of Aloe Vera Gel Extract: an In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Alyaseri, Montazer

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is one of the most common and debilitating oral diseases; yet, there is no standard topical treatment to control it. The extract of Aloe vera leaves has been previously reported to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and also antiviral effects. There is no data on anti-Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) activity of Aloe vera gel. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in Vero cell line. In this study, gel extraction and cytotoxicity of various increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5%) was evaluated in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Having been washed with phosphate buffered saline, 50 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1 was added to each well. After 1 hour of incubation at 37°C, cell monolayers in 24 well plates were exposed to different increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel. The anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in different concentrations was assessed by plaque reduction assays. Data were analyzed by using One-way ANOVA. The cytotoxicity assay showed that Aloe vera in prearranged concentrations was cell-compatible. The inhibitory effect of various concentrations of Aloe vera was observed one hour after the Vero cell was infected with HSV-1. However, there was no significant difference between two serial concentrations (p> 0.05). One-way ANOVA also revealed no significant difference between the groups. The findings indicated a dose-dependent antiviral effect of Aloe vera. The findings showed significant inhibitory effect of 0.2-5% Aloe vera gel on HSV-1 growth in Vero cell line. Therefore, this gel could be a useful topical treatment for oral HSV-1 infections without any significant toxicity.

  15. Circulating herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1)-specific CD8+ T cells do not access HSV-1 latently infected trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapeutic vaccines can be designed to enhance existing T cell memory populations for increased protection against re-infection. In the case of herpes simplex virus type 1, recurrent disease results from reactivation of latent virus in sensory ganglia, which is controlled in part by a ganglia-resident HSV-specific memory CD8+ T cell population. Thus, an important goal of a therapeutic HSV-1 vaccine would be to enhance this population. Methods HSV-1-infected mice were treated with TAK-779 to block CCR5- and CXCR3-mediated CD8+ T cell migration during both acute and latent infections. Additionally, HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells were transferred into HSV-1 latently infected mice to mimic the effect of a therapeutic vaccine, and their migration into trigeminal ganglia (TG) was traced during steady-state latency, or during recovery of the TG-resident memory CD8+ T cell population following stress-, and corticosterone-induced depletion and HSV-1 reactivation from latency. Bromodeoxy uridine (BrdU) incorporation measured cell proliferation in vivo. Results TAK-779 treatment during acute HSV-1 infection reduced the number of infiltrating CD8+ T cells but did not alter the number of viral genome copies. TAK-779 treatment during HSV latency did not affect the size of the TG-resident memory CD8+ T cell population. Transferred HSV-specific CD8+ T cells failed to access latently infected TG during steady-state latency, or during recovery of the TG resident HSV-specific CD8+ T cell population following exposure of latently infected mice to stress and corticosterone. Recovery of the HSV-specific CD8+ T cell population after stress and corticosterone treatment occurred with homeostatic levels of cell division and did not require CD4+ T cell help. Conclusions Our findings are consistent with the notion that the CD8+ T cells in latently infected TG are a tissue-resident memory (Trm) population that is maintained without replenishment from the periphery, and that when this

  16. Activities of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ICP4 genes specifying nonsense peptides.

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, N A; Schaffer, P A

    1987-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotide linkers containing translational termination codons in all possible reading frames were inserted at various positions in the cloned gene encoding the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) immediate-early regulatory protein, ICP4. It was determined that the amino-terminal 60 percent of the ICP4 gene was sufficient for trans-induction of a thymidine kinase promoter-CAT chimera (pTKCAT) and negative regulation of an ICP4 promoter-CAT chimera (pIE3CAT); however, it was relatively inefficient in complementing an ICP4 deletion mutant. The amino-terminal ninety amino acids do not appear to be required for infectivity as reflected by the replication competence of a mutant virus containing a linker insertion at amino acid 12. The size of the ICP4 molecule expressed from the mutant virus was consistent with translational restart at the next methionine codon corresponding to amino acid 90 of the deduced ICP4 amino acid sequence. Images PMID:3035496

  17. Analysis of Ori-S sequence of HSV-1: identification of one functional DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Deb, S; Deb, S P

    1989-01-01

    Using gel retardation assays, we have detected an Ori-S binding activity in the nuclear extract of HSV-1 infected Vero cells. The sequence-specific DNA binding activity seems to be identical to that described by Elias et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83: 6322-6326, 1986). This activity fails to retard a mutant origin DNA that has a 5 bp deletion in the reported protein binding site along with an A to T substitution at a position 16 base-pairs away from the site. This mutant also failed to replicate in a transient replication assay, thus correlating binding of the factor on the origin to replication efficiency. Using crude nuclear extracts as the source of the factor and with the help of footprint and gel retardation analyses, we confirmed that protection is only observed on the preferred site of binding on and near the left arm of the Ori-S palindrome. In order to analyze the sequence specificity of the binding we have generated a set of binding site mutants. Competition experiments with these mutant origins indicate that the sequence 5'-TTCGCACTT-3' is crucial for binding. Images PMID:2541411

  18. Radiofrequency hyperthermia promotes the therapeutic effects on chemotherapeutic-resistant breast cancer when combined with heat shock protein promoter-controlled HSV-TK gene therapy: Toward imaging-guided interventional gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jingfeng; Wu, Xiaotian; Zhou, Fei; Zhou, Yurong; Huang, Tongchun; Liu, Fei; Han, Guocan; Chen, Luming; Bai, Weixian; Wu, Xia; Sun, Jihong; Yang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gene therapy is a frontier in modern medicine. In the present study, we explored a new technique for the effective treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) breast cancer by combining fully the advantages of multidisciplinary fields, including image-guided minimally invasive interventional oncology, radiofrequency technology, and direct intratumoral gene therapy. Results Combination treatment with PHSP-TK plus RFH resulted in significantly higher TK gene transfection/expression, as well as a lower cell proliferation rate and a higher cell apoptosis index, than those of control groups. In vivo validation experiments with MRI confirmed that combination therapy resulted in a significant reduction of relative tumor volume compared with those of control animals, which was supported by the results of histologic and apoptosis analyses. Materials and methods The heat shock protein promoter (PHSP) was used to precisely control the overexpression of thymidine kinase (TK) (PHSP-TK). Serial in vitro experiments were performed to confirm whether radiofrequency hyperthermia (RFH) could enhance PHSP-TK transfection and expression in a MDR breast cancer cell line (MCF7/Adr). Serial in vivo experiments were then carried out to validate the feasibility of the new technique, termed interventional RFH-enhanced direct intratumoral PHSP-TK gene therapy. The therapeutic effect of combination therapy was evaluated by MRI and confirmed by subsequent laboratory correlation. Conclusions This study has established “proof-of-principle” of a new technique, interventional RFH-enhanced local gene therapy for MDR breast cancer, which may open new avenues for the effective management of MDR breast cancers via the simultaneous integration of interventional oncology, RF technology, and direct intratumoral gene therapy. PMID:27542255

  19. Worldwide circulation of HSV-2 × HSV-1 recombinant strains

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, David M.; Norberg, Peter; Fitzgibbon, Matthew P.; Russell, Ronnie M.; Greninger, Alex L.; Huang, Meei-Li; Stensland, Larry; Jing, Lichen; Magaret, Amalia S.; Diem, Kurt; Selke, Stacy; Xie, Hong; Celum, Connie; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Jerome, Keith R.; Wald, Anna; Johnston, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Homo sapiens harbor two distinct, medically significant species of simplexviruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and HSV-2, with estimated divergence 6–8 million years ago (MYA). Unexpectedly, we found that circulating HSV-2 strains can contain HSV-1 DNA segments in three distinct genes. Using over 150 genital swabs from North and South America and Africa, we detected recombinants worldwide. Common, widely distributed gene UL39 genotypes are parsimoniously explained by an initial >457 basepair (bp) HSV-1 × HSV-2 crossover followed by back-recombination to HSV-2. Blocks of >244 and >539 bp of HSV-1 DNA within genes UL29 and UL30, respectively, have reached near fixation, with a minority of strains retaining sequences we posit as ancestral HSV-2. Our data add to previous in vitro and animal work, implying that in vivo cellular co-infection with HSV-1 and HSV-2 yields viable interspecies recombinants in the natural human host. PMID:28287142

  20. KSHV-TK is a tyrosine kinase that disrupts focal adhesions and induces Rho-mediated cell contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michael B; Turner, Rachel; Stevenson, Philip G; Way, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paradoxically, the thymidine kinase (TK) encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an extremely inefficient nucleoside kinase, when compared to TKs from related herpesviruses. We now show that KSHV-TK, in contrast to HSV1-TK, associates with the actin cytoskeleton and induces extensive cell contraction followed by membrane blebbing. These dramatic changes in cell morphology depend on the auto-phosphorylation of tyrosines 65, 85 and 120 in the N-terminus of KSHV-TK. Phosphorylation of tyrosines 65/85 and 120 results in an interaction with Crk family proteins and the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3-Kinase, respectively. The interaction of Crk with KSHV-TK leads to tyrosine phoshorylation of this cellular adaptor. Auto-phosphorylation of KSHV-TK also induces a loss of FAK and paxillin from focal adhesions, resulting in activation of RhoA-ROCK signalling to myosin II and cell contraction. In the absence of FAK or paxillin, KSHV-TK has no effect on focal adhesion integrity or cell morphology. Our observations demonstrate that by acting as a tyrosine kinase, KSHV-TK modulates signalling and cell morphology. PMID:25471072

  1. Ocular infection of mice with an avirulent recombinant HSV-1 expressing IL-4 and an attenuated HSV-1 strain generates virulent recombinants in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mott, Kevin R; Wechsler, Steven L; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2010-10-26

    To assess the relative impact of overexpression of interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin 4 (IL-4), and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) expressing recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) on altering immune responses in ocularly infected mice. BALB/c mice were co-infected ocularly with avirulent HSV-1 strain KOS and avirulent recombinant HSV-1 expressing murine IL-4 (HSV-IL-4). Controls mice were co-infected with KOS+HSV-IL-2 or KOS+HSV-IFNγ. Following ocular infection, virus replication in the eye, corneal scarring (CS), and survival were determined. We also isolated recombinant viruses from eye and trigeminal ganglia of KOS+HSV-IL-4 infected mice. In this study we found that ocular infection of BALB/c mice with a mixture of HSV-IL-4 and KOS resulted in increased death and increased eye disease. In contrast, when mice were infected in one eye with KOS and the other eye with HSV-IL-4 no death or eye disease was seen. Intraperitoneal co-infection of mice with KOS and HSV-IL-4 also did not result in HSV-1 induced death. Interestingly, ocular infection of mice with a mixture of HSV-IL-2 and KOS did not have any effect on severity of the disease in infected mice. We isolated recombinant viruses from KOS+HSV-IL-4 infected mice eye and trigeminal ganglia. Some of the isolated viruses were more neurovirulent then either parental virus. Infection of macrophages with IL-4 expressing virus down-regulated IL-12 production by macrophages. These results suggest a role for IL-4 in suppression of immune response and generation of virulent viruses in vivo.

  2. Neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of HSV-1 latency.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Pamela C; Katzenell, Sarah; Pesola, Jean M; North, Brian; Coen, Donald M; Leib, David A

    2016-10-01

    IFN responses control acute HSV infection, but their role in regulating HSV latency is poorly understood. To address this we used mice lacking IFN signaling specifically in neural tissues. These mice supported a higher acute viral load in nervous tissue and delayed establishment of latency. While latent HSV-1 genome copies were equivalent, ganglia from neuronal IFN signaling-deficient mice unexpectedly supported reduced reactivation. IFNβ promoted survival of primary sensory neurons after infection with HSV-1, indicating a role for IFN signaling in sustaining neurons. We observed higher levels of latency associated transcripts (LATs) per HSV genome in mice lacking neuronal IFN signaling, consistent with a role for IFN in regulating LAT expression. These data show that neuronal IFN signaling modulates the expression of LAT and may conserve the pool of neurons available to harbor latent HSV-1 genome. The data also show that neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of latency.

  3. Membrane deformation and scission by the HSV-1 nuclear egress complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigalke, Janna M.; Heuser, Thomas; Nicastro, Daniela; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2014-06-01

    The nuclear egress complex (NEC) of herpesviruses such as HSV-1 is essential for the exit of nascent capsids from the cell nucleus. The NEC drives nuclear envelope vesiculation in cells, but the precise budding mechanism and the potential involvement of cellular proteins are unclear. Here we report that HSV-1 NEC alone is sufficient for membrane budding in vitro and thus represents a complete membrane deformation and scission machinery. It forms ordered coats on the inner surface of the budded vesicles, suggesting that it mediates scission by scaffolding the membrane bud and constricting the neck to the point of scission. The inward topology of NEC-mediated budding in vitro resembles capsid budding into the inner nuclear membrane during HSV-1 infection and nuclear envelope vesiculation in NEC-transfected cells. We propose that the NEC functions as minimal virus-encoded membrane-budding machinery during nuclear egress and does not require additional cellular factors.

  4. Membrane deformation and scission by the HSV-1 nuclear egress complex

    PubMed Central

    Bigalke, Janna M.; Heuser, Thomas; Nicastro, Daniela; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear egress complex (NEC) of herpesviruses such as HSV-1 is essential for the exit of nascent capsids from the cell nucleus. The NEC drives nuclear envelope vesiculation in cells, but the precise budding mechanism and the potential involvement of cellular proteins are unclear. Here we report that HSV-1 NEC alone is sufficient for membrane budding in vitro and thus represents a complete membrane deformation and scission machinery. It forms ordered coats on the inner surface of budded vesicles, suggesting that it mediates scission by scaffolding the membrane bud and constricting the neck to the point of scission. The inward topology of NEC-mediated budding in vitro resembles capsid budding into the inner nuclear membrane during HSV-1 infection and nuclear envelope vesiculation in NEC-transfected cells. We propose that the NEC functions as minimal virus-encoded membrane-budding machinery during nuclear egress and does not require additional cellular factors. PMID:24916797

  5. [Glycoprotein D (5-23) specific Th2-T-cell line induces HSV-1 keratitis].

    PubMed

    Heiligenhaus, A; Jayaraman, S; Soukiasian, S; Dorf, M; Foster, C S

    1995-08-01

    BALB/c inbred Igh-1-disparate mice exhibit different susceptibility to the development of HSV-1 stromal keratitis (HSK), which may be due to the differential immune regulation. CD4+ T lymphocytes may be critical for the disease induction. A T-cell line (CD4+, T-cell receptor V beta 8+, interleukin-4+) specific for the N-terminal amino acids 5-23 of glycoprotein D from HSV-1 [gD(5-23)] was established from HSK susceptible C.AL-20 mice. HSK-resistant C.B-17 mice, and HSK-susceptible BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with cells (5 x 10(5)/mouse) alone or combined with HSV-1 corneal inoculation (10(5) PFU, KOS strain). Control groups were injected with HSV-antigen-unrelated cells (PPD specific), or were only HSV-1 infected. Migration of the adoptively transferred gD(5-23) Th2 cells was analyzed by histology, by immunohistochemistry and by cell membrane labelling (PKH26). The transfer of gD(5-23) cells accelerated the disease onset (day 2, compared to day 7 without cells). The transfer of gD(5-23) cells increased the incidence of HSK (BALB/c 100%, C.B-17 20%) compared to mice that were only infected with HSV-1 (BALB/c 75%, C.B-17 0%). Keratitis was more severe in mice injected with gD(5-23) cells. In contrast, the transfer of PPD-specific cells did not influence the disease patterns. Mice injected with gD(5-23) cells and not inoculated with HSV-1 did not develop keratitis. The results suggest that CD4+ MHC class II, V beta 8+, IL-4 expressing T-cells (T helper 2) may be important for the induction of HSK.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Molecular Engineering of Vector-Based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    hydroxymethylbutyl) guanine ([18F]FHBG), will lead to the trapping and accumulation of the radiolabeled tracer in cells expressing HSV1 -tk, which in turn can be...AdTSTA-sr39tk at MOI 1 and 5. The level of sr39tk protein expression was assessed by Western blot using a polyclonal HSV1 -tk antibody [15] as well as...transcriptional regulatory system (TSTA) has been utilized to restrict the expression of our adenoviral vector specifically to prostate or prostate cancer cells

  7. Effect of human apolipoprotein E genotype on the pathogenesis of experimental ocular HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Neumann, Donna M.; Foster, Timothy P.; Bouhanik, Sadallah; Clement, Christian; Vinay, Dass; Thompson, Hilary W.; Hill, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The isoform-specific role of human apolipoprotein E (apoE) has been assessed in a mouse model of ocular herpes. Female, age-matched transgenic mice knocked-in for the human allele apoE3 or apoE4 and their parent C57Bl/6 mice were inoculated corneally with HSV-1 strain KOS. Ocular HSV-1 pathogenesis was monitored through viral replication and clinical progression of stromal opacity and neovascularization by slit-lamp examination. Establishment of latency was determined by analysis of HSV-1 DNA (copy number) by specific real-time PCR in the cornea, trigeminal ganglia (TG), and brain. Representative groups of transgenic mice were sacrificed for the analysis of gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by reverse-transcription PCR, and apoE expression by Western blot analysis. At 6 days post-infection (P.I.), the ocular infectious HSV-1 titer was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in apoE4 mice compared with apoE3 and C57Bl/6 mice. Corneal neovascularization in apoE4 mice was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than apoE3 and C57Bl/6 mice. The onset of corneal opacity in apoE4 mice was accelerated during days 9--11 P.I.; however, no significant difference in severity was seen on P.I. days 15 and beyond. At 28 days P.I., infected mice of all genotypes had no significant differences in copy numbers (range 0--15) of HSV-1 DNA in their corneas, indicating that HSV-1 DNA copy numbers in cornea are independent of apoE isoform regulation. At 28 days P.I., both apoE4 and C57Bl/6 mice had a significantly higher (p = 0.001) number of copies of HSV-1 DNA in TG compared with apoE3. ApoE4 mice also had significantly higher (p = 0.001) copies of HSV-1 DNA in their TGs compared with C57Bl/6 mice. In brain, both apoE4 and C57Bl/6 mice had significantly higher numbers (p ≤ 0.03) of copies of HSV-1 DNA compared with apoE3 mice. However, the number of HSV-1 DNA copies in the brain of C57Bl/6 mice was not significantly different than that of apoE4 (p = 0.1). Comparative

  8. Herpes simplex (HSV-1) infection of bovine aorta smooth muscle cells (SMC) inhibits matrix protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lashgari, M.S.; Friedman, H.M.; Kefalides, N.A.

    1986-03-01

    Studies from this laboratory have shown that HSV-1 infection suppresses matrix protein synthesis by endothelial cells in vitro. In this study the authors have investigated the effects of HSV-1 infection on SMC. Monolayers of SMC were infected with HSV-1 at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) ranging from 0.1 to 20. Viral replication and release to the medium was measured by plaque assay in Vero cells. At an MOI of 0.1, 10 or 20, viral replication occurred and maximum virus titers were achieved by 24 hrs. post-infection. Virus release in the medium began during the first 12 hrs. post-infection and reached maximum at 24 hrs. Infected and uninfected cultures of SMC were pulse labeled with either (/sup 14/C)proline or (/sup 35/S)-methionine at different hrs. post-infection. Incorporation of radioactivity into non-dialyzable protein was determined in fluorograms following SDS-PAGE of the cell-matrix or medium fractions. The synthesis of fibronectin and collagen Types I and III was suppressed and the degree of suppression was dependent on the duration of infection and on the virus dose. These data suggest that SMC can support HSV-1 replication in vitro and that such infection can lead to altered extracellular matrix synthesis.

  9. PD-L1-expressing dendritic cells contribute to viral resistance during acute HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Hudson, Katie M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2012-01-01

    The inhibitory receptor, Programmed Death 1 (PD-1), and its ligands (PD-L1/PD-L2) are thought to play a role in immune surveillance during chronic viral infection. The contribution of the receptor/ligand pair during an acute infection is less understood. To determine the role of PD-L1 and PD-L2 during acute ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, HSV-1-infected mice administered neutralizing antibody to PD-L1 or PD-L2 were assessed for viral burden and host cellular immune responses. Virus titers were elevated in cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) of anti-PD-L1-treated mice which corresponded with a reduced number of CD80-expressing dendritic cells, PD-L1⁺ dendritic cells, and HSV-1-specific CD8⁺ T cells within the draining (mandibular) lymph node (MLN). In contrast, anti-PD-L2 treatment had no effect on viral replication or changes in the MLN population. Notably, analysis of CD11c-enriched MLN cells from anti-PD-L1-treated mice revealed impaired functional capabilities. These studies indicate PD-L1-expressing dendritic cells are important for antiviral defense during acute HSV-1 infection.

  10. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibiting drug reduces HSV-1 reactivation in the mouse eye model.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Shiro; Watanabe, Keizo; Itahashi, Motoki; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2009-03-01

    To examine the effects of COX inhibitors on suppressing HSV-1 reactivation in a mouse model. BALB/c mice were latently infected with HSV-1 and treated by 0.1% bromfenac Na eye drops, 0.1% pranoprofen eye drops, 0.1 mg oral etodolac 4 times/day, and saline for 4 days. After reactivating the latent HSV-1, we swabbed the mouse ocular surface for the culture of the infectious virus and assessed the viral loads in the eyes and trigeminal ganglia (TGs) using real-time PCR to determine the treatment efficacies. With stimulated reactivation, 10 of 24 (41.7%), 5 of 10 (50.0%), 17 of 25 (68%), and 16 of 22 eyes (72.7%) showed positive swab results in the bromfenac Na, etodolac, pranoprofen, and saline groups, respectively; and a significant difference was seen only between the bromfenac Na and saline groups (p = 0.033). None of the three drug-treated groups showed any significant difference from the saline group in the viral DNA in the eyes and TGs (p > 0.05). Bromfenac Na eye drops can suppress HSV-1 reactivation.

  11. Meganuclease-mediated Inhibition of HSV1 Infection in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Stéphanie; Huot, Nicolas; Mahiet, Charlotte; Arnould, Sylvain; Barradeau, Sébastien; Clerre, Diane Le; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Jacqmarcq, Cécile; Chapellier, Benoît; Ergani, Ayla; Desseaux, Carole; Cédrone, Frédéric; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Pâques, Frédéric; Labetoulle, Marc; Smith, Julianne

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is a major health problem. As for most viral diseases, current antiviral treatments are based on the inhibition of viral replication once it has already started. As a consequence, they impair neither the viral cycle at its early stages nor the latent form of the virus, and thus cannot be considered as real preventive treatments. Latent HSV1 virus could be addressed by rare cutting endonucleases, such as meganucleases. With the aim of a proof of concept study, we generated several meganucleases recognizing HSV1 sequences, and assessed their antiviral activity in cultured cells. We demonstrate that expression of these proteins in African green monkey kidney fibroblast (COS-7) and BSR cells inhibits infection by HSV1, at low and moderate multiplicities of infection (MOIs), inducing a significant reduction of the viral load. Furthermore, the remaining viral genomes display a high rate of mutation (up to 16%) at the meganuclease cleavage site, consistent with a mechanism of action based on the cleavage of the viral genome. This specific mechanism of action qualifies meganucleases as an alternative class of antiviral agent, with the potential to address replicative as well as latent DNA viral forms. PMID:21224832

  12. CTCF interacts with the lytic HSV-1 genome to promote viral transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Fengchao; Li, Xin; Vladimirova, Olga; Hu, Benxia; Chen, Guijun; Xiao, Yu; Singh, Vikrant; Lu, Danfeng; Li, Lihong; Han, Hongbo; Wickramasinghe, J. M. A. S. P.; Smith, Sheryl T.; Zheng, Chunfu; Li, Qihan; Lieberman, Paul M.; Fraser, Nigel W.; Zhou, Jumin

    2017-01-01

    CTCF is an essential chromatin regulator implicated in important nuclear processes including in nuclear organization and transcription. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen, which enters productive infection in human epithelial and many other cell types. CTCF is known to bind several sites in the HSV-1 genome during latency and reactivation, but its function has not been defined. Here, we report that CTCF interacts extensively with the HSV-1 DNA during lytic infection by ChIP-seq, and its knockdown results in the reduction of viral transcription, viral genome copy number and virus yield. CTCF knockdown led to increased H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, and a reduction of RNA pol II occupancy on viral genes. Importantly, ChIP-seq analysis revealed that there is a higher level of CTD Ser2P modified RNA Pol II near CTCF peaks relative to the Ser5P form in the viral genome. Consistent with this, CTCF knockdown reduced the Ser2P but increased Ser5P modified forms of RNA Pol II on viral genes. These results suggest that CTCF promotes HSV-1 lytic transcription by facilitating the elongation of RNA Pol II and preventing silenced chromatin on the viral genome. PMID:28045091

  13. Modulating vascular intimal hyperplasia using HSV-1 mutant requires activated MEK.

    PubMed

    Skelly, C L; He, Q; Spiguel, L; McCormick, S; Weichselbaum, R

    2013-02-01

    Outcomes of cardiovascular procedures, such as angioplasty and stent or bypass grafting are limited by failure, predominantly caused by pathological smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, known as intimal hyperplasia. Local delivery of a genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV) is known to block vascular SMC proliferation while allowing for re-endothelialization. However, the mechanism this mutant virus uses to prevent SMC hyperplasia is unknown. The Ras signaling cascade is activated in SMCs undergoing hyperplasia leading to phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In this study we tested the hypothesis that MAPK kinase (MEK) activity is the molecular basis by which SMCs are susceptible to mutant HSV. We show that genetically engineered herpes simplex-1 viruses (HSV-1) can target proliferating SMCs. We demonstrate that the molecular basis of this HSV-1 anti-proliferative effect is MEK activation in SMCs. We demonstrate efficacy and practicality of the MEK-dependent HSV-1 for the treatment of intimal hyperplasia in a clinically relevant in vivo model. Important to this strategy is the ability to modulate the effects by controlling viral dose. These results propel genetically engineered HSV-1 therapy towards clinical evaluation in treatment of intimal hyperplasia.

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  15. A designed equine herpes thymidine kinase (EHV4 TK) variant improves ganciclovir-induced cell-killing.

    PubMed

    McSorley, Theresa; Ort, Stephan; Monnerjahn, Christian; Konrad, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The limitations of the ganciclovir (GCV)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV1 TK: EC 2.7.1.21) system as a suicide gene therapy approach have been extensively studied over the years. In our study, we focused on improving the cytotoxic profile of the GCV/equine herpes virus-4 thymidine kinase (EHV4 TK: EC 2.7.1.21) system. Our approach involved the structure-guided mutagenesis of EHV4 TK in order to switch its ability to preferentially phosphorylate the natural substrate deoxythymidine (dT) to that of GCV. We performed steady-state kinetic analysis, genetic complementation in a thymidine kinase-deficient Escherichia coli strain, isothermal titration calorimetry, and analysis of GCV-induced cell killing through generation of HEK 293 stable cell-lines expressing EHV4 TK mutants and wild-type EHV4 TK. We found that the EHV4 TK S144H-GFP mutant preferentially phosphorylates GCV and confers increased GCV-induced cytotoxicity compared to wild-type EHV4 TK.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in European HIV infected women

    PubMed Central

    van Benthem, B H B; Spaargaren, J; van den Hoek, J A R; Merks, J; Coutinho, R; Prins, M

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in HIV infected women and the association between recurrent genital ulcerations and HIV disease progression in HSV-2 positive women. Methods: The presence of HSV antibodies was tested in 276 of the 487 women participating in a European cohort study of HIV infected women. Prevalence rate ratios described the association between HSV infection and its risk factors, using log binomial regression. Generalised estimating equations (GEE) analysis was performed to determine the impact of markers of HIV disease progression on recurrent genital ulcerations. Results: The prevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies was 76% (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 71–81) and 42% (95% CI: 36–50); 30% (95% CI: 24–35) of the women had antibodies against both HSV-1 and HSV-2. The prevalence of HSV-1 was 86% (95% CI: 80–92) in southern Europe compared with 69% (95% CI: 57–79) and 67% (95% CI: 55–77) in central and northern Europe (p=0.002). This geographical variation remained after adjustment for other risk factors. An increasing number of years of sexual activity (p=0.0002) and a history of prostitution (p=0.0001) were independently associated with HSV-2 prevalence. In HSV-2 positive women, symptomatic cases of HSV infection were minimal, but increased with decreasing CD4 count. Conclusion: In HIV infected women, the prevalence of HSV antibodies is high and symptomatic cases of HSV infection are minimal, but increase with decreasing CD4 count. HSV-2 but not HSV-1 was related to sexual behaviour (that is, a history of prostitution and the number of sexually active years) in this group of HIV infected women. Key Words: herpes simplex viruses; genital ulcerations; HIV infection; women; Europe PMID:11287691

  17. Elevated PrPC expression predisposes to increased HSV-1 pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Thackray, Alana M; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    PrPC is a ubiquitously expressed glycophos-phatidylinositol-linked cell-surface glycoprotein found primarily in neural tissue. Although its normal function has not been established, there is evidence suggesting that PrPC is involved in cell signalling and cellular homeostasis. This suggests that variation in neuronal expression levels of this protein contributes towards pathogenicity induced by neurotropic agents. We have investigated the pathological response to infection with herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) in strains of mice that express different levels of PrPC. Prnp-/- mice fail to express PrPC due to an interruption in the open reading frame of the Prnp gene, whilst tg19 and tga20 mice express approximately 5 and 10 times more PrPC protein, respectively, than wild-type animals. Mice that express normal or increased levels of PrPC protein were more susceptible to acute HSV-1 infection than Prnp-/- mice. Following ear pinna inoculation with HSV-1 SC16, the order of susceptibility was tga20>tg19>wild-type>Prnp-/-. This trend was reversed when latent virus was assessed. Prnp-/- mice expressed significantly higher levels of latency-associated transcript-positive neurons in various tissues when compared with wild-type, tg19 and tga20 mice. Collectively, our data show that acute HSV-1 replication proceeds more efficiently in neuronal tissue that expresses PrPC protein and lends support to the view that this protein is involved in regulation of neurotropic viral pathogenesis. This suggests that interference of PrPC expression, or possible biochemical pathways associated with its function, may serve as an effective means of limiting the pathogenesis of acute HSV-1 infection.

  18. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Ying; Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Qihan

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  19. Detection of serum IgA to HSV1 and its diagnostic role in sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Guido; Palermo, Concetta Ilenia; Maiolino, Luigi; Costanzo, Carmela Maria; Zappal, Domenica; Grillo, Caterina; Martines, Anna Maria; Cocuzza, Salvatore; Russo, Raffaela; Serra, Agostino

    2013-01-01

    A viral etiology of sudden hearing loss has been hypothesized by many authors. HSV1 neurotropism and its involvement in sudden hearing loss has implicated HSV1 as one of the most accredited etiological agents. A non-invasive method such as the titration of HSV1-specific IgA was evaluated to determine the role of HSV1 as a possible cause sudden hearing loss. A prospective study was carried out by titration of serum IgA to HSV1 in 93 patients and in a control group of 50 healthy subjects and 35 subjects suffering from recent herpes labialis reactivation. Statistical analysis of the results disclosed that IgA titers to HSV1 higher than 1:80 are suggestive for the association of HSV1 infection and sudden hearing loss. Moreover, acyclovir therapy was effective in 81% of patients who showed high specific IgA titers. Overall, the titration of specific serum IgA to HSV1 can be a useful tool to determine the viral etiology of certain cases of sudden hearing loss. This method is simple to perform and minimally invasive. It can lead to a rapid presumptive diagnosis and to prompt specific therapy, reducing the need for corticosteroids.

  20. Using homogeneous primary neuron cultures to study fundamental aspects of HSV-1 latency and reactivation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Youn; Shiflett, Lora A; Linderman, Jessica A; Mohr, Ian; Wilson, Angus C

    2014-01-01

    We describe a primary neuronal culture system suitable for molecular characterization of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, latency, and reactivation. While several alternative models are available, including infections of live animal and explanted ganglia, these are complicated by the presence of multiple cell types, including immune cells, and difficulties in manipulating the neuronal environment. The highly pure neuron culture system described here can be readily manipulated and is ideal for molecular studies that focus exclusively on the relationship between the virus and host neuron, the fundamental unit of latency. As such it allows for detailed investigations of both viral and neuronal factors involved in the establishment and maintenance of HSV-1 latency and in viral reactivation induced by defined stimuli.

  1. Homologous HSV1 and alpha-synuclein peptides stimulate a T cell response in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Caggiu, E; Paulus, K; Galleri, G; Arru, G; Manetti, R; Sechi, G P; Sechi, L A

    2017-09-15

    Environmental factors are implicated in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study is to investigate the role of cell-mediated immunity upon a specific immune-stimulation with HSV-1 and human alpha-synuclein homologues peptides by using the intracellular cytokine method on Parkinson's patients and healthy controls. The study showed, for the first time, a specific response to TNF-α CD8, CD4 and NK cells after stimulation in PD patients. Our data show a possible role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, and that HSV-1 infections may lead to a progression of the disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Acyclovir-resistant corneal HSV-1 isolates from patients with herpetic keratitis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Rui; de Vries, Rory D; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Remeijer, Lies; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2008-09-01

    The prevalence and molecular characteristics of isolates from 173 immunocompetent patients with herpetic keratitis (HK) who were infected with acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(R)) corneal herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 was determined. Isolates from 11 (6.4%) of the patients were ACV(R), and 9 of these 11 patients were refractory to therapy with ACV; the ACV(R) isolates from 5 and 1 of these 9 patients were cross-resistant to gancyclovir and to both gancyclovir and foscarnet, respectively. Of the 11 ACV(R) isolates, 10 had, in the thymidine kinase gene, mutations that presumably conferred the ACV(R) phenotype. These data demonstrate a relatively high prevalence of corneal HSV-1 ACV(R) isolates in patients with HK, which emphasizes the need to monitor for ACV susceptibility in patients with HK who are refractory to therapy with ACV.

  3. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) Receptor Deletion or Antagonism Attenuates Severe HSV-1 Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Rodrigues, David Henrique; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Pedroso, Vinicius Sousa Pietra; de Miranda, Aline Silva; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Campos, Marco Antônio; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen that may cause severe encephalitis. The exacerbated immune response against the virus contributes to the disease severity and death. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a mediator capable of inducing increase in vascular permeability, production of cytokines on endothelial cells and leukocytes. We aimed to investigate the activation of PAF receptor (PAFR) and its contribution to the severity of the inflammatory response in the brain following HSV-1 infection. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and PAFR deficient (PAFR(-/-)) mice were inoculated intracranially with 10(4) plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1. Visualization of leukocyte recruitment was performed using intravital microscopy. Cells infiltration in the brain tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. Brain was removed for chemokine assessment by ELISA and for histopathological analysis. The pharmacological inhibition by the PAFR antagonist UK-74,505 was also analyzed. In PAFR(-/-) mice, there was delayed lethality but no difference in viral load. Histopathological analysis of infected PAFR(-/-) mice showed that brain lesions were less severe when compared to their WT counterparts. Moreover, PAFR(-/-) mice showed less TCD4(+), TCD8(+) and macrophages in brain tissue. This reduction of the presence of leukocytes in parenchyma may be mechanistically explained by a decrease in leukocytes rolling and adhesion. PAFR(-/-) mice also presented a reduction of the chemokine CXCL9 in the brain. In addition, by antagonizing PAFR, survival of C57BL/6 infected mice increased. Altogether, our data suggest that PAFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of experimental HSV-1 meningoencephalitis, and its blockade prevents severe disease manifestation.

  4. In vitro effect of phototherapy with low-intensity laser on HSV-1 and epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eduardo, Fernanda P.; Mehnert, Dolores U.; Monezi, Telma A.; Zezell, Denise M.; Schubert, Mark M.; Eduardo, Carlos P.; Marques, Márcia M.

    2007-02-01

    The effects of phototherapy on herpes lesions have been clinically demonstrated by either preventing the lesion formation or speeding their repair. The aim of this in vitro study was analyze the effect of phototherapy on epithelial cells and HSV-1 in culture. Cultures of HSV-1 and epithelial cells (Vero cell line) were used. The irradiations were done using a GaAlAs laser (660 e 780 nm, 4.0 mm2). One, two and three irradiations with 6 h-intervals were done. The experimental groups were: Control: non-irradiated; 660 nm and 3 J/cm2 (2.8 sec); 660 nm and 5 J/cm2 (3.8 sec); 780 nm and 3 J/cm2 (1.9 sec), and 780 nm and 5 J/cm2 (2.5 sec). The HSV-1 cytopatic effect and the cell viability of irradiated cultures and controls were analyzed in four different conditions: irradiation of non-infected epithelial cells; epithelial cells irradiated prior infection; virus irradiated prior infection; irradiation of HSV infected cells. The mitochondrial activity and cytopathic effects were assessed. The number of irradiations influenced the cell growth positively and proportionally, except for the 660 nm/ 3 J/cm2 group. Any variation in cytopathic effects was observed amongst the experimental groups. The viability of infected cells prior irradiation was significantly higher than that of non-irradiated cultures when 2 irradiations were done. Under the experimental conditions of this study we concluded that phototherapy is capable of enhancing epithelial cell growth and prolonging cell viability of HSV-1 infected cells. Positive benefits of phototherapy could be resultant from prolongation of infected cells viability, corroborating with host defenses.

  5. Chorioretinal disease patterns in congenic mice following intraocular inoculation with HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Opremcak, E M; Foster, C S; Hemady, R; Rice, B A; Daigle, J A; Raizman, M B; Chung, H; Zaltas, M

    1989-06-01

    Disease patterns and immunologic parameters were studied employing inbred and Igh-1 disparate congenic mice to determine the role of host genetics and Igh-1-linked gene products in the von Szily model of viral chorioretinitis. Following intracameral inoculation of 1.5 x 10(4) PFU HSV-1 (KOS), 100% of BALB/c (Igh-1a), 62% of A/J (Igh-1e) and none of the C57BL/6J (Igh-1b) inbred mice developed contralateral necrotizing chorioretinitis. Multigenic differences between inbred mice prohibit conclusions about the specific role of Igh-1-linked immune regulation in this model. In order to more exactly define Igh-1-specific restriction of HSV-1-mediated chorioretinitis, Igh-1-disparate, congenic BALB/c mice were studied following both anterior chamber and intravitreal inoculation protocols. Anterior chamber inoculation resulted in contralateral retinal necrosis in 75% of BALB/c (Igh-1a) mice, 30% of C.AL-20 (Igh-1d) and 5% of the C.B-17 (Igh-1b) congenic mice; all strains showed ipsilateral retinal sparing. Following intravitreal inoculation of HSV-1 a similar restricted disease pattern was found in contralateral eyes. Contralateral chorioretinitis developed in 30% of BALB/c, 15% of C.AL-20 and 6% of C.B-17 mice. Ipsilateral disease, however, was found in all murine strains. These disease patterns developed despite equivalent suppression of systemic DTH and equivalent RPE permissivity to viral replication. These data demonstrate that host genetics strongly regulates contralateral HSV-1-mediated chorioretinal disease patterns by a mechanism unrelated to the development of systemic suppression of DTH and specifically support a dominant role for gene products linked to the Igh-1 locus in the immunomodulation of ocular disease.

  6. Novel Mutant AAV2 Rep Proteins Support AAV2 Replication without Blocking HSV-1 Helpervirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Seyffert, Michael; Glauser, Daniel L.; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; de Oliveira, Anna-Paula; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Vogt, Bernd; Büning, Hildegard; Linden, R. Michael; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2017-01-01

    As their names imply, parvoviruses of the genus Dependovirus rely for their efficient replication on the concurrent presence of a helpervirus, such as herpesvirus, adenovirus, or papilloma virus. Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is such an example, which in turn can efficiently inhibit the replication of each helpervirus by distinct mechanisms. In a previous study we have shown that expression of the AAV2 rep gene is not compatible with efficient replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). In particular, the combined DNA-binding and ATPase/helicase activities of the Rep68/78 proteins have been shown to exert opposite effects on the replication of AAV2 and HSV-1. While essential for AAV2 DNA replication these protein activities account for the Rep-mediated inhibition of HSV-1 replication. Here, we describe a novel Rep mutant (Rep-D371Y), which displayed an unexpected phenotype. Rep-D371Y did not block HSV-1 replication, but still supported efficient AAV2 replication, at least when a double-stranded AAV2 genome template was used. We also found that the capacity of Rep-D371Y to induce apoptosis and a Rep-specific DNA damage response was significantly reduced compared to wild-type Rep. These findings suggest that AAV2 Rep-helicase subdomains exert diverging activities, which contribute to distinct steps of the AAV2 life cycle. More important, the novel AAV2 mutant Rep-D371Y may allow deciphering yet unsolved activities of the AAV2 Rep proteins such as DNA second-strand synthesis, genomic integration or packaging, which all involve the Rep-helicase activity. PMID:28125695

  7. Time-resolved global and chromatin proteomics during herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) infection.

    PubMed

    Kulej, Katarzyna; Avgousti, Daphne C; Sidoli, Simone; Herrmann, Christin; Della Fera, Ashley N; Kim, Eui Tae; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-02-08

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) lytic infection results in global changes to the host cell proteome and the proteins associated with host chromatin. We present a system level characterization of proteome dynamics during infection by performing a multi-dimensional analysis during HSV-1 lytic infection of human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Our study includes identification and quantification of the host and viral proteomes, phosphoproteomes, chromatin bound proteomes and post-translational modifications (PTMs) on cellular histones during infection. We analyzed proteomes across six time points of virus infection (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 hours post-infection) and clustered trends in abundance using fuzzy c-means. Globally, we accurately quantified more than 4,000 proteins, 200 differently modified histone peptides and 9,000 phosphorylation sites on cellular proteins. In addition, we identified 67 viral proteins and quantified 571 phosphorylation events (465 with high confidence site localization) on viral proteins, which is currently the most comprehensive map of HSV-1 phosphoproteome. We investigated chromatin bound proteins by proteomic analysis of the high-salt chromatin fraction and identified 510 proteins that were significantly different in abundance during infection. We found 53 histone marks significantly regulated during virus infection, including a steady increase of histone H3 acetylation (H3K9ac and H3K14ac). Our data provide a resource of unprecedented depth for human and viral proteome dynamics during infection. Collectively, our results indicate that the proteome composition of the chromatin of HFF cells is highly affected during HSV-1 infection, and that phosphorylation events are abundant on viral proteins. We propose that our epi-proteomics approach will prove to be important in the characterization of other model infectious systems that involve changes to chromatin composition.

  8. HSV-1 Glycoproteins Are Delivered to Virus Assembly Sites Through Dynamin-Dependent Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Albecka, Anna; Laine, Romain F; Janssen, Anne F J; Kaminski, Clemens F; Crump, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a large enveloped DNA virus that belongs to the family of Herpesviridae. It has been recently shown that the cytoplasmic membranes that wrap the newly assembled capsids are endocytic compartments derived from the plasma membrane. Here, we show that dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a major role in this process. Dominant-negative dynamin and clathrin adaptor AP180 significantly decrease virus production. Moreover, inhibitors targeting dynamin and clathrin lead to a decreased transport of glycoproteins to cytoplasmic capsids, confirming that glycoproteins are delivered to assembly sites via endocytosis. We also show that certain combinations of glycoproteins colocalize with each other and with the components of clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytosis pathways. Importantly, we demonstrate that the uptake of neutralizing antibodies that bind to glycoproteins when they become exposed on the cell surface during virus particle assembly leads to the production of non-infectious HSV-1. Our results demonstrate that transport of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane prior to endocytosis is the major route by which these proteins are localized to the cytoplasmic virus assembly compartments. This highlights the importance of endocytosis as a major protein-sorting event during HSV-1 envelopment.

  9. PEDF plus DHA modulate inflammation and stimulate nerve regeneration after HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jiucheng; Neumann, Donna; Kakazu, Azucena; Pham, Thang Luong; Musarrat, Farhana; Cortina, M Soledad; Bazan, Haydee E P

    2017-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection leads to impaired corneal sensation and, in severe cases, to corneal ulceration, melting and perforation. Here, we explore the potential therapeutic action of pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on corneal inflammation and nerve regeneration following HSV-1 infection. Rabbits inoculated with 100,000 PFU/eye of HSV-1 strain 17Syn+ were treated with PEDF + DHA or vehicle. PEDF + DHA treatment resulted in a biphasic immune response with stronger infiltration of CD4+T cells, neutrophils and macrophages at 7-days post-treatment (p.t.) that was significantly decreased by 14 days, compared to the vehicle-treated group. Screening of 14 immune-related genes by q-PCR showed that treatment induced higher expression of IFN-γ and CCL20 and inhibition of IL-18 by 7 days in the cornea. PEDF + DHA-treated animals developed less dendritic corneal lesions, opacity and neovascularization. Corneal nerve density increased at 12-weeks p.t. with functional recovery of corneal sensation. Treatment with PEDF + DHA that was postponed by 3 weeks also showed increased nerve density when compared to vehicle. Our data demonstrate that PEDF + DHA promotes resolution of the inflammatory response to the virus and, most importantly, induces regeneration of damaged corneal nerves vital for maintaining ocular surface homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. HSV1 MicroRNA Modulation of GPI Anchoring and Downstream Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Enk, Jonatan; Levi, Assi; Weisblum, Yiska; Yamin, Rachel; Charpak-Amikam, Yoav; Wolf, Dana G; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-10-18

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that utilizes variable mechanisms to evade immune surveillance. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring pathway is a multistep process in which a myriad of different proteins are covalently attached to a GPI moiety to be presented on the cell surface. Among the different GPI-anchored proteins there are many with immunological importance. We present evidence that the HSV1-encoded miR H8 directly targets PIGT, a member of the protein complex that covalently attaches proteins to GPI in the final step of GPI anchoring. This results in a membrane down-modulation of several different immune-related, GPI-anchored proteins, including ligands for natural killer-activating receptors and the prominent viral restriction factor tetherin. Thus, we suggest that by utilizing just one of dozens of miRNAs encoded by HSV1, the virus can counteract the host immune response at several key points. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A associates with viral proteins and impacts HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Rowles, Daniell L; Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Greco, Todd M; Lin, Aaron E; Li, Minghao; Yeh, Justin; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-06-01

    Viral infections can alter the cellular epigenetic landscape, through modulation of either DNA methylation profiles or chromatin remodeling enzymes and histone modifications. These changes can act to promote viral replication or host defense. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a prominent human pathogen, which relies on interactions with host factors for efficient replication and spread. Nevertheless, the knowledge regarding its modulation of epigenetic factors remains limited. Here, we used fluorescently-labeled viruses in conjunction with immunoaffinity purification and MS to study virus-virus and virus-host protein interactions during HSV-1 infection in primary human fibroblasts. We identified interactions among viral capsid and tegument proteins, detecting phosphorylation of the capsid protein VP26 at sites within its UL37-binding domain, and an acetylation within the major capsid protein VP5. Interestingly, we found a nuclear association between viral capsid proteins and the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), which we confirmed by reciprocal isolations and microscopy. We show that drug-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase activity, as well as siRNA- and shRNA-mediated DNMT3A knockdowns trigger reductions in virus titers. Altogether, our results highlight a functional association of viral proteins with the mammalian DNA methyltransferase machinery, pointing to DNMT3A as a host factor required for effective HSV-1 infection.

  12. The HSV-1 tegument protein pUL46 associates with cellular membranes and viral capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael A.; Bucks, Michelle A.; O'Regan, Kevin J.; Courtney, Richard J.

    2008-07-05

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the addition of tegument proteins into nascent herpesvirus particles are poorly understood. To better understand the tegumentation process of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, we initiated studies that showed the tegument protein pUL46 (VP11/12) has a similar cellular localization to the membrane-associated tegument protein VP22. Using membrane flotation analysis we found that pUL46 associates with membranes in both the presence and absence of other HSV-1 proteins. However, when purified virions were stripped of their envelope, the majority of pUL46 was found to associate with the capsid fraction. This strong affinity of pUL46 for capsids was confirmed by an in vitro capsid pull-down assay in which purified pUL46-GST was able to interact specifically with capsids purified from the nuclear fraction of HSV-1 infected cells. These results suggest that pUL46 displays a dynamic interaction between cellular membranes and capsids.

  13. Induction of humoral responses to BHV-1 glycoprotein D expressed by HSV-1 amplicon vectors

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Andrea Maria; Berois, Mabel Beatriz; Tomé, Lorena Magalí; Epstein, Alberto L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are versatile and useful tools for transferring genes into cells that are capable of stimulating a specific immune response to their expressed antigens. In this work, two HSV-1-derived amplicon vectors were generated. One of these expressed the full-length glycoprotein D (gD) of bovine herpesvirus 1 while the second expressed the truncated form of gD (gDtr) which lacked the trans-membrane region. After evaluating gD expression in the infected cells, the ability of both vectors to induce a specific gD immune response was tested in BALB/c mice that were intramuscularly immunized. Specific serum antibody responses were detected in mice inoculated with both vectors, and the response against truncated gD was higher than the response against full-length gD. These results reinforce previous findings that HSV-1 amplicon vectors can potentially deliver antigens to animals and highlight the prospective use of these vectors for treating infectious bovine rhinotracheitis disease. PMID:22437537

  14. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    PubMed

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  15. Current trends in negative immuno-synergy between two sexually transmitted infectious viruses: HIV-1 and HSV-1/2.

    PubMed

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Dervillez, Xavier; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Kuo, Tiffany; Zhang, Xiuli; Nagot, Nicolas; Tuaillon, Edouard; Van De Perre, Philippe; Nesburn, Anthony B; Benmohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of effective anti-retroviral therapy, immuno-compromised patients with HIV-1 infection do live long enough to suffer diseases caused by many opportunistic infections, such as herpes simplex virus type 1 and/or type 2 (HSV-1/2). An estimated two-third of the 40 million individuals that have contracted HIV-1 worldwide are co-infected with HSV-1/2 viruses, the causative agents of ocular oro-facial and genital herpes. The highest prevalence of HIV and HSV-1/2 infections are confined to the same regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. HSV-1/2 infections affect HIV-1 immunity, and vice versa. While important research gains have been made in understanding herpes and HIV immunity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between HSV-1/2 and HIV co-infection remain to be fully elucidated. Understanding the mechanisms behind the apparent HSV/HIV negative immuno-synergy maybe the key to successful HSV and HIV vaccines; both are currently unavailable. An effective herpes immunotherapeutic vaccine would in turn - indirectly - contribute in reducing HIV epidemic. The purpose of this review is: (i) to summarize the current trends in understanding the negative immuno-crosstalk between HIV and HSV-1/2 infections; and (ii) to discuss the possibility of developing a novel mucosal herpes immunotherapeutic strategy or even a combined or chimeric immunotherapeutic vaccine that simultaneously targets HIV and HSV-1/2 infections. These new trends in immunology of HSV-1/2 and HIV co-infections should become part of current efforts in preventing sexually transmitted infections. The alternative is needed to balance the ethical and financial concerns associated with the rising number of unsuccessful mono-valent clinical vaccine trials.

  16. Current trends in negative immuno-synergy between two sexually transmitted infectious viruses: HIV-1 and HSV-1/2

    PubMed Central

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Dervillez, Xavier; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Kuo, Tiffany; Zhang, Xiuli; Nagot, Nicolas; Tuaillon, Edouard; Van De Perre, Philippe; Nesburn, Anthony B.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of effective anti-retroviral therapy, immuno-compromised patients with HIV-1 infection do live long enough to suffer diseases caused by many opportunistic infections, such as herpes simplex virus type 1 and/or type 2 (HSV-1/2). An estimated two-third of the 40 million individuals that have contracted HIV-1 worldwide are co-infected with HSV-1/2 viruses, the causative agents of ocular oro-facial and genital herpes. The highest prevalence of HIV and HSV-1/2 infections are confined to the same regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. HSV-1/2 infections affect HIV-1 immunity, and vice versa. While important research gains have been made in understanding herpes and HIV immunity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between HSV-1/2 and HIV co-infection remain to be fully elucidated. Understanding the mechanisms behind the apparent HSV/HIV negative immuno-synergy maybe the key to successful HSV and HIV vaccines; both are currently unavailable. An effective herpes immunotherapeutic vaccine would in turn - indirectly - contribute in reducing HIV epidemic. The purpose of this review is: (i) to summarize the current trends in understanding the negative immuno-crosstalk between HIV and HSV-1/2 infections; and (ii) to discuss the possibility of developing a novel mucosal herpes immunotherapeutic strategy or even a combined or chimeric immunotherapeutic vaccine that simultaneously targets HIV and HSV-1/2 infections. These new trends in immunology of HSV-1/2 and HIV co-infections should become part of current efforts in preventing sexually transmitted infections. The alternative is needed to balance the ethical and financial concerns associated with the rising number of unsuccessful mono-valent clinical vaccine trials. PMID:23355766

  17. HIV-Associated Disruption of Tight and Adherens Junctions of Oral Epithelial Cells Facilitates HSV-1 Infection and Spread

    PubMed Central

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:24586397

  18. Early responding dendritic cells direct the local natural killer response to control HSV-1 infection within the cornea

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Gregory M.; Buela, Kristine-Ann; Maker, Dawn M.; Harvey, Steven A.; Hendricks, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) regulate both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here we exploit the unique avascularity of the cornea to examine a role for local or very early infiltrating DCs in regulating the migration of blood-derived innate immune cells towards herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) lesions. A single systemic diphtheria toxin (DT) treatment 2 days before HSV-1 corneal infection transiently depleted CD11c+DCs from both the cornea and lymphoid organs of CD11c-DTR bone marrow chimeric mice for up to 24 hours after infection. Transient DC depletion significantly delayedHSV-1 clearance from the corneathrough 6 days post infection(dpi). No further compromise of viral clearance was observed when DCs were continuously depleted throughout the first week of infection. DC depletion did not influenceextravasation of NK cells, inflammatory monocytes, orneutrophils into the peripheral cornea,but did significantly reduce migration of NK cells and inflammatory monocytes, but not neutrophils towards the HSV-1 lesion in the central cornea. Depletion of NK cells resulted in similar loss of viral control to transient DC ablation. Our findings demonstrate resident corneal DC and/or those that infiltrate the cornea during the first 24 hours after HSV-1 infection contribute to the migration of NK cells and inflammatory monocytes into the central cornea, and are consistent with a role for NK cells and possibly inflammatory monocytes, but not PMN in the clearing HSV-1 from the infected cornea. PMID:22210909

  19. Intravesical treatment of advanced urothelial bladder cancers with oncolytic HSV-1 co-regulated by differentially expressed microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K-X; Matsui, Y; Lee, C; Osamu, O; Skinner, L; Wang, J; So, A; Rennie, P S; Jia, W W

    2016-05-01

    Urothelial bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Although most cases are initially diagnosed as non-muscle-invasive, more than 80% of patients will develop recurrent or metastatic tumors. No effective therapy exists currently for late-stage metastatic tumors. By intravesical application, local administration of oncolytic Herpes Simplex virus (oHSV-1) can provide a promising new therapy for this disease. However, its inherent neurotoxicity has been a perceived limitation for such application. In this study, we present a novel microRNA-regulatory approach to reduce HSV-1-induced neurotoxicity by suppressing viral replication in neurons while maintaining oncolytic selectivity toward urothelial tumors. Specifically, we designed a recombinant virus that utilizes differentially expressed endogenous microR143 (non-cancerous, ubiquitous) and microR124 (neural-specific) to regulate expression of ICP-4, a gene essential for HSV-1 replication. We found that expression of ICP-4 must be controlled by a combination of both miR143 and miR124 to achieve the most effective attenuation in HSV-1-induced toxicity while retaining maximal oncolytic capacity. These results suggest that interaction between miR143 and miR124 may be required to successfully regulate HSV-1 replication. Our resent study is the first proof-in-principle that miRNA combination can be exploited to fine-tune the replication of HSV-1 to treat human cancers.

  20. Fetal gene transfer using lentiviral vectors: in vivo detection of gene expression by microPET and optical imaging in fetal and infant monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I; Jimenez, Daniel F; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-12-01

    Fetal intraperitoneal administration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-l-derived lentiviral vectors (10(7) infectious particles/fetus) has consistently shown high levels of transduction and gene expression in the omentum, peritoneum, and diaphragm when assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and whole tissue fluorescence. In vivo imaging techniques were explored with early-gestation long-tailed macaques that were administered the vesicular stomatitis virus-glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped HIV-1-derived lentiviral vector expressing a mutant herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-sr39tk) and firefly luciferase under the control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. Fetuses were monitored sonographically and twice during gestation 9-[4-[18F]Fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl]guanine (18F-FHBG) was injected into the fetal circulation under ultrasound guidance in preparation for microPET imaging. All newborns were delivered at term by cesarean section and raised in the nursery for postnatal studies. At 2 months postnatal age, animals were imaged and biodistribution was assessed. Optical imaging for firefly luciferase expression was also performed every 2 months postnatal age. Under all imaging conditions gene expression was observed in the abdominal region, and closely paralleled findings from prior studies based on whole tissue fluorescence. These investigations have shown that HSV-1-sr39tk and firefly luciferase can be used to safely detect transgene expression at multiple time points in fetal and infant monkeys in vivo and without evidence of adverse effects.

  1. Dual-therapeutic reporter genes fusion for enhanced cancer gene therapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sekar, T V; Foygel, K; Willmann, J K; Paulmurugan, R

    2013-05-01

    Two of the successful gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies include herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) enzyme-ganciclovir prodrug and the Escherichia coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme-CB1954 prodrug strategies; these enzyme-prodrug combinations produce activated cytotoxic metabolites of the prodrugs capable of tumor cell death by inhibiting DNA synthesis and killing quiescent cells, respectively. Both these strategies also affect significant bystander cell killing of neighboring tumor cells that do not express these enzymes. We have developed a dual-combination gene strategy, where we identified HSV1-TK and NTR fused in a particular orientation can effectively kill tumor cells when the tumor cells are treated with a fusion HSV1-TK-NTR gene- along with a prodrug combination of GCV and CB1954. In order to determine whether the dual-system demonstrate superior therapeutic efficacy than either HSV1-TK or NTR systems alone, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft studies using triple negative SUM159 breast cancer cells, by evaluating the efficacy of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis upon treatment with the dual HSV1-TK genes-GCV-CB1954 prodrugs system, and compared the efficiency to HSV1-TK-GCV and NTR-CB1954. Our cell-based studies, tumor regression studies in xenograft mice, histological analyses of treated tumors and bystander studies indicate that the dual HSV1-TK-NTR-prodrug system is two times more efficient even with half the doses of both prodrugs than the respective single gene-prodrug system, as evidenced by enhanced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in vitro in culture and xenograft of tumor tissues in animals.

  2. Microarray analysis in the HSV-1 latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Shiro; Deai, Tatsunori; Fukuda, Masahiko; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2004-11-01

    To review our previous studies regarding alterations in gene expression in HSV-1 latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia (TGs) following treatment with immunosuppressants and hyperthermia. Uninfected and HSV-1 latently infected mice were treated with immunosuppressants or heat stressed (43 degrees C for 10 minutes). In the immunosuppressant study, 4 groups of animals were examined: (1) uninfected, not treated; (2) uninfected, drug-treated; (3) latently infected, not treated; and (4) latently infected, drug-treated. In the hyperthermia study, TG from 6 groups of mice were studied: (1) uninfected, not stressed; (2) uninfected, heat-stressed; killed at 6 hours after hyperthermia; (3) uninfected, heat-stressed, killed at 24 hours after hyperthermia; (4) latently infected, not stressed; (5) latently infected, heat-stressed, killed at 6 hours after hyperthermia; and (6) latently infected, heat-stressed, killed at 24 hours after hyperthermia. PolyA mRNA from the TGs of each group was reverse-transcribed, labeled with P, incubated on a gene array membrane, and analyzed by phosphorimaging. As a comparison and to confirm microarray results, semiquantitative RT-PCR for selected genes was also performed. The immunosuppressive drugs significantly increased expression of two genes--calpactin 1 light chain and guanine nucleotide-binding protein alpha stimulating activity polypeptide (GNAS)--in the ganglia of uninfected mice compared with untreated, uninfected mice. Ten genes were shown to be significantly increased in the latent TGs from mice treated with the immunosuppressants compared with latently infected untreated mice. These genes were prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 subtype (PTGER4), insulin promoter factor 1 (IPF1), glutathione S-transferase mu2, cyclin D2, peripherin, plasma glutathione peroxidase, methyl CpG-binding protein 2, retinal S-antigen, ErbB2 protooncogene, and GNAS. Eight genes were shown to be significantly decreased in the HSV-1 latent TGs treated with the

  3. Degeneration and Regeneration of Corneal Nerves in Response to HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chucair-Elliott, Ana J.; Zheng, Min; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is one cause of neurotrophic keratitis, characterized by decreases in corneal sensation, blink reflex, and tear secretion as consequence of damage to the sensory fibers innervating the cornea. Our aim was to characterize changes in the corneal nerve network and its function in response to HSV-1 infection. Methods. C57BL/6J mice were infected with HSV-1 or left uninfected. Corneas were harvested at predetermined times post infection (pi) and assessed for β III tubulin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and neurofilament H staining by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Corneal sensitivity was evaluated using a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer. Expression of genes associated with nerve repair was determined in corneas by real time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and IHC. Semaphorin 7A (SEMA 7A) neutralizing antibody or isotype control was subconjunctivally administered to infected mice. Results. The area of cornea occupied by β III tubulin immunoreactivity and sensitivity significantly decreased by day 8 pi. Modified reinnervation was observed by day 30 pi without recovery of corneal sensation. Sensory fibers were lost by day 8 pi and were still absent or abnormal at day 30 pi. Expression of SEMA 7A increased at day 8 pi, localizing to corneal epithelial cells. Neutralization of SEMA 7A resulted in defective reinnervation and lower corneal sensitivity. Conclusions. Corneal sensory nerves were lost, consistent with loss of corneal sensation at day 8 pi. At day 30 pi, the cornea reinnervated but without recovering the normal arrangement of its fibers or function. SEMA 7A expression was increased at day 8pi, likely as part of a nerve regeneration mechanism. PMID:25587055

  4. Inhibition of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) Kinase Suppresses Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Oleg; Donovan, Kelly; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Herpes keratitis (HK) remains the leading cause of cornea-derived blindness in the developed world, despite the availability of effective antiviral drugs. Treatment toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance highlight the need for additional therapeutic approaches. This study examined ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an apical kinase in the host DNA damage response, as a potential new target for the treatment of HK. Methods. Small molecule inhibitor of ATM (KU-55933) was used to treat herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in three experimental models: (1) in vitro—cultured human corneal epithelial cells, hTCEpi, (2) ex vivo—organotypically explanted human and rabbit corneas, and (3) in vivo—corneal infection in young C57BL/6J mice. Infection productivity was assayed by plaque assay, real-time PCR, Western blot, and disease scoring. Results. Robust ATM activation was detected in HSV-1-infected human corneal epithelial cells. Inhibition of ATM greatly suppressed viral replication in cultured cells and in explanted human and rabbit corneas, and reduced the severity of stromal keratitis in mice. The antiviral effect of KU-55933 in combination with acyclovir was additive, and KU-55933 suppressed replication of a drug-resistant HSV-1 strain. KU-55933 caused minimal toxicity, as monitored by clonogenic survival assay and fluorescein staining. Conclusions. This study identifies ATM as a potential target for the treatment of HK. ATM inhibition by KU-55933 reduces epithelial infection and stromal disease severity without producing appreciable toxicity. These findings warrant further investigations into the DNA damage response as an area for therapeutic intervention in herpetic ocular diseases. PMID:24370835

  5. Modeling HSV-1 Latency in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pourchet, Aldo; Modrek, Aram S.; Placantonakis, Dimitris G.; Mohr, Ian; Wilson, Angus C.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) uses latency in peripheral ganglia to persist in its human host, however, recurrent reactivation from this reservoir can cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening disease. Most studies of latency use live-animal infection models, but these are complex, multilayered systems and can be difficult to manipulate. Infection of cultured primary neurons provides a powerful alternative, yielding important insights into host signaling pathways controlling latency. However, small animal models do not recapitulate all aspects of HSV-1 infection in humans and are limited in terms of the available molecular tools. To address this, we have developed a latency model based on human neurons differentiated in culture from an NIH-approved embryonic stem cell line. The resulting neurons are highly permissive for replication of wild-type HSV-1, but establish a non-productive infection state resembling latency when infected at low viral doses in the presence of the antivirals acyclovir and interferon-α. In this state, viral replication and expression of a late viral gene marker are not detected but there is an accumulation of the viral latency-associated transcript (LAT) RNA. After a six-day establishment period, antivirals can be removed and the infected cultures maintained for several weeks. Subsequent treatment with sodium butyrate induces reactivation and production of new infectious virus. Human neurons derived from stem cells provide the appropriate species context to study this exclusively human virus with the potential for more extensive manipulation of the progenitors and access to a wide range of preexisting molecular tools. PMID:28594343

  6. HSV-1 as a novel therapy for breast cancer meningeal metastases.

    PubMed

    Kuruppu, D; Tanabe, K K

    2015-10-01

    Meningeal metastasis is a fatal complication of breast cancer that affects 5-8% of patients. When cancer cells seed in the meninges, their subsequent growth results in severe neurological complications involving the cranial nerves, cerebrum and spinal cord, limiting life expectancy to less than 4 months. The incidences of meningeal metastases increase with prolonged lifespan resulting from treatment advances for primary breast cancer and their metastases. Currently, there is no cure. Aggressive multimodal therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy (intra-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and systemic) are ineffective. Therapeutic agents are often quickly cleared from the CSF, while higher doses that can achieve a therapeutic response are highly toxic. The secure guarding of the subarachnoid space by the blood-brain barrier on one side and the blood-CSF barrier on the other prevents chemotherapy from reaching cancer cells in the meninges. These challenges with treating meningeal metastases highlight the urgent need for a new therapeutic modality. An ideal treatment would be an agent that avoids rapid clearance, remains within the CSF, reaches the meninges and selectively destroys tumor cells. Replication conditional oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may be effective in this regard. Viral oncolysis, the destruction of cancer cells by replicating virus, is under clinical investigation for cancers that are unresponsive to current therapies. It is based on the model of multiple cycles of lytic virus replication in cancer cells that amplify the injected dose. The therapeutic potential of oncolytic HSV-1 for breast cancer meningeal metastases is discussed here. HSV-1 could be a potential novel treatment for meningeal metastases that can be translated to the clinic.

  7. Inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase suppresses herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) keratitis.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Oleg; Donovan, Kelly; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-02-03

    Herpes keratitis (HK) remains the leading cause of cornea-derived blindness in the developed world, despite the availability of effective antiviral drugs. Treatment toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance highlight the need for additional therapeutic approaches. This study examined ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an apical kinase in the host DNA damage response, as a potential new target for the treatment of HK. Small molecule inhibitor of ATM (KU-55933) was used to treat herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in three experimental models: (1) in vitro--cultured human corneal epithelial cells, hTCEpi, (2) ex vivo--organotypically explanted human and rabbit corneas, and (3) in vivo--corneal infection in young C57BL/6J mice. Infection productivity was assayed by plaque assay, real-time PCR, Western blot, and disease scoring. Robust ATM activation was detected in HSV-1-infected human corneal epithelial cells. Inhibition of ATM greatly suppressed viral replication in cultured cells and in explanted human and rabbit corneas, and reduced the severity of stromal keratitis in mice. The antiviral effect of KU-55933 in combination with acyclovir was additive, and KU-55933 suppressed replication of a drug-resistant HSV-1 strain. KU-55933 caused minimal toxicity, as monitored by clonogenic survival assay and fluorescein staining. This study identifies ATM as a potential target for the treatment of HK. ATM inhibition by KU-55933 reduces epithelial infection and stromal disease severity without producing appreciable toxicity. These findings warrant further investigations into the DNA damage response as an area for therapeutic intervention in herpetic ocular diseases.

  8. Nicotine applied by transdermal patch induced HSV-1 reactivation and ocular shedding in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Myles, M E; Alack, C; Manino, P M; Reish, E R; Higaki, S; Maruyama, K; Mallakin, A; Azcuy, A; Barker, S; Ragan, F A; Thompson, H; Hill, James M

    2003-04-01

    The identification of factors involved in herpes virus latency and reactivation is critical to a better understanding of the mechanisms essential to viral neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence. Recurrent episodes of ocular herpes infections cause irreversible corneal scarring and are the primary cause of loss of vision due to an infectious agent in industrialized countries. In this study, we examined the ability of nicotine, a compound known to be involved in stress-associated immunomodulation and recognized as one of the most frequently used addictive agents, to induce ocular shedding in rabbits latently infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain McKrae. New Zealand white rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 at 3-4 weeks post-inoculation were randomly divided into two groups. The corneas of all rabbits were free of lesions as verified by slit lamp biomicroscopy. One group received nicotine by transdermal patch (21 mg/day) for 20 days and the other group served as the control. Reactivation data were obtained by detection of virus in tear film collected by ocular swabbing performed concurrently with the administration of nicotine. Compilation of data from three separate experiments demonstrated that 16.5% (258/1560) of the swabs taken from rabbits treated with nicotine were positive for virus, compared with 8.3% (53/639) of swabs taken from controls. Rabbits receiving nicotine exhibited a significantly (P < 0.0001) higher rate of ocular shedding than controls. The concentration of nicotine in the serum was determined at various times (0-24 hrs) after new patch replacement. Peak (average) serum level of nicotine was obtained 8 hours after patch replacement and exhibited a broad range of values (0.233 microg/mL-6.21 microg/mL). These results suggest that an initial systemic exposure to nicotine significantly increases HSV-1 reactivation. Further studies are needed to reveal any effects of nicotine dependency and nicotine withdrawal on herpesvirus

  9. Tromantadine inhibits HSV-1 induced syncytia formation and viral glycoprotein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ickes, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Tromantadine inhibits a late event in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) replication, visualized by the inhibition of both the size and number of syncytia. Tromantadine can be added at any time between 1 and 9 h post infection with complete inhibition of syncytia formation. Glycan synthesis of the viral glycoproteins, important for syncytia formation, is incomplete due to tromantadine treatment. Tromantadine does not inhibit the initiation of glycosylation, since viral glycoproteins, gX{sub t}, synthesized in the presence of tromantadine still incorporate {sup 3}H-glucosamine. Tromantadine does not inhibit the transport of t e viral glycoproteins to the cell surface, since glycoproteins B, C, and D are expressed, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence. Tromantadine inhibition of HSV-1 glycoprotein processing is demonstrated by an increase in mobility of the radioimmunoprecipitated gX{sub t}, on SDS-PAGE. The gX{sub t} of KOS, a non-syncytial strain of HSV-1, had a similar increase in mobility, suggesting that the block in glycoprotein processing is a general effect of tromantadine treatment. Fucose, which is incorporated into oligosaccharides in the medial Golgi, is incorporated into gX{sub t}, indicating that the tromantadine block in glycoprotein processing occurs after this step. Lectin binding studies and SDS-PAGE analysis of gC processed in the presence of tromantadine, gC{sub t}, indicates that it has terminal galactose residues in both N- and O-linked glycans (binds Peanut and Ricin Agglutinins, respectively). The inhibition of sialylation of N-linked glycans by tromantadine was indicated by the extent of the increase in SDS-PAGE mobility of the G protein from Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. O-glycanase digestion and SDS-PAGE analysis of gC{sub t} indicate that the O-linked disaccharide NAcGal-Galactose is present.

  10. Gene transfer of integration defective anti-HSV-1 meganuclease to human corneas ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Elbadawy, H M; Gailledrat, M; Desseaux, C; Salvalaio, G; Di Iorio, E; Ferrari, B; Bertolin, M; Barbaro, V; Parekh, M; Gayon, R; Munegato, D; Franchin, E; Calistri, A; Palù, G; Parolin, C; Ponzin, D; Ferrari, S

    2014-03-01

    Corneal graft rejection is a major problem in chronic herpetic keratitis (HK) patients with latent infection. A new class of antiviral agents targeting latent and active forms of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is importantly required. Meganucleases are sequence-specific homing endonucleases capable of inducing DNA double-strand breaks. A proof-of-concept experiment has shown that tailor-made meganucleases are efficient against HSV-1 in vitro. To take this work a step forward, we hypothesized that the pre-treatment of human corneas in eye banks using meganuclease-encoding vectors will allow HK patients to receive a medicated cornea to resist the recurrence of the infection and the common graft rejection problem. However, this strategy requires efficient gene delivery to human corneal endothelium. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus, serotype 2/1 (rAAV2/1), efficient gene delivery of a reporter gene was demonstrated in human corneas ex vivo. The optimum viral dose was 3.7 × 10(11) VG with an exposure time of 1 day, followed by 6 days incubation in de-swelling medium. In addition, 12 days incubation can result in transgene expression in excess of 70%. Using similar transduction conditions, meganuclease transgene expression was detected in 39.4% of the endothelial cells after 2 weeks in culture. Reduction of the total viral load in the media and the endothelial cells of corneas infected with HSV-1 was shown. Collectively, this work provides information about the optimum conditions to deliver genetic material to the cornea, and demonstrates for the first time the expression of meganuclease in human corneas ex vivo and its antiviral activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the treatment of human corneas in eye banks before transplantation is a new approach to address the unmet clinical needs in corneal diseases.

  11. Comparative analysis of HSV-1 temperature mutants proteins and their reactivity.

    PubMed

    Litwińska, B; Biesiadecka, A; Gut, W; Kańtoch, M

    1996-01-01

    Protein's characteristic of temperature sensitive (ts 28 degrees C) and temperature resistant (tr 39 degrees C) mutants and native HSV-1 strain was performed. Electrophoretic and Western-blott analysis of virus proteins and their reactivity tested by immunoenzymatic staining was the main subject of the presented paper. There were found no significant differences in the protein structure between native strain and its temperature clones in electrophoresis. It is important that slight differences observed in protein's antigenic reactivity of ts 28 degrees C (54 kDa) and tr 39 degrees C (99-100; 160 kDa), do not influence on the possible application of the mutants for immunization and challenging.

  12. A single intramuscular vaccination of mice with the HSV-1 VC2 virus with mutations in the glycoprotein K and the membrane protein UL20 confers full protection against lethal intravaginal challenge with virulent HSV-1 and HSV-2 strains.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, Brent A; Stahl, Jacque; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Subramanian, Ramesh; Charles, Anu-Susan; Saied, Ahmad A; Walker, Jason D; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2014-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 (HSV-1) and type-2 (HSV-2) establish life-long infections and cause significant orofacial and genital infections in humans. HSV-1 is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the western world. Currently, there are no available vaccines to protect against herpes simplex infections. Recently, we showed that a single intramuscular immunization with an HSV-1(F) mutant virus lacking expression of the viral glycoprotein K (gK), which prevents the virus from entering into distal axons of ganglionic neurons, conferred significant protection against either virulent HSV-1(McKrae) or HSV-2(G) intravaginal challenge in mice. Specifically, 90% of the mice were protected against HSV-1(McKrae) challenge, while 70% of the mice were protected against HSV-2(G) challenge. We constructed the recombinant virus VC2 that contains specific mutations in gK and the membrane protein UL20 preventing virus entry into axonal compartments of neurons, while allowing efficient replication in cell culture, unlike the gK-null virus, which has a major defect in virus replication and spread. Intramuscular injection of mice with 107 VC2 plaque forming units did not cause any significant clinical disease in mice. A single intramuscular immunization with the VC2 virus protected 100% of mice against lethal intravaginal challenge with either HSV-1(McKrae) or HSV-2(G) viruses. Importantly, vaccination with VC2 produced robust cross protective humoral and cellular immunity that fully protected vaccinated mice against lethal disease. Quantitative PCR did not detect any viral DNA in ganglionic tissues of vaccinated mice, while unvaccinated mice contained high levels of viral DNA. The VC2 virus may serve as an efficient vaccine against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections, as well as a safe vector for the production of vaccines against other viral and bacterial pathogens.

  13. LAT Region Factors Mediating Differential Neuronal Tropism of HSV-1 and HSV-2 Do Not Act in Trans

    PubMed Central

    Bertke, Andrea S.; Apakupakul, Kathleen; Ma, AyeAye; Imai, Yumi; Gussow, Anne M.; Wang, Kening; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Bloom, David C.; Margolis, Todd P.

    2012-01-01

    After HSV infection, some trigeminal ganglion neurons support productive cycle gene expression, while in other neurons the virus establishes a latent infection. We previously demonstrated that HSV-1 and HSV-2 preferentially establish latent infection in A5+ and KH10+ sensory neurons, respectively, and that exchanging the latency-associated transcript (LAT) between HSV-1 and HSV-2 also exchanges the neuronal preference. Since many viral genes besides the LAT are functionally interchangeable between HSV-1 and HSV-2, we co-infected HSV-1 and HSV-2, both in vivo and in vitro, to determine if trans-acting viral factors regulate whether HSV infection follows a productive or latent pattern of gene expression in sensory neurons. The pattern of HSV-1 and HSV-2 latent infection in trigeminal neurons was no different following co-infection than with either virus alone, consistent with the hypothesis that a trans-acting viral factor is not responsible for the different patterns of latent infection of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in A5+ and KH10+ neurons. Since exchanging the LAT regions between the viruses also exchanges neuronal preferences, we infected transgenic mice that constitutively express 2.8 kb of the LAT region with the heterologous viral serotype. Endogenous expression of LAT did not alter the pattern of latent infection after inoculation with the heterologous serotype virus, demonstrating that the LAT region does not act in trans to direct preferential establishment of latency of HSV-1 and HSV-2. Using HSV1-RFP and HSV2-GFP in adult trigeminal ganglion neurons in vitro, we determined that HSV-1 and HSV-2 do not exert trans-acting effects during acute infection to regulate neuron specificity. Although some neurons were productively infected with both HSV-1 and HSV-2, no A5+ or KH10+ neurons were productively infected with both viruses. Thus, trans-acting viral factors do not regulate preferential permissiveness of A5+ and KH10+ neurons for productive HSV infection and

  14. Focused ultrasound enhanced molecular imaging and gene therapy for multifusion reporter gene in glioma-bearing rat model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Chang, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Ting; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Chien, Yi-Chun; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Tsai, Min-Lan

    2015-11-03

    The ability to monitor the responses of and inhibit the growth of brain tumors during gene therapy has been severely limited due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A previous study has demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive in vivo imaging with 123I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodo-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (123I-FIAU) for monitoring herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) cancer gene expression in an experimental animal model. Here, we tested the enhancement of SPECT with 123I-FIAU and ganciclovir (GCV) treatment in brain tumors after BBB disruption induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles. We established an orthotopic F98 glioma-bearing rat model with trifusion reporter genes. The results of this study showed that the rat model of HSV1-tk-expressing glioma cells could be successfully detected by SPECT imaging after FUS-induced BBB disruption on day 10 after implantation. Compared to the control group, animals receiving the GCV with or without sonication exhibited a significant antitumor activity (P < 0.05) of glioma cells on day 16 after implantation. Moreover, combining sonication with GCV significantly inhibited tumor growth compared with GCV alone. This study demonstrated that FUS may be used to deliver a wide variety of theranostic agents to the brain for molecular imaging and gene therapy in brain diseases.

  15. Neddylation is required for herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1)-induced early phase interferon-beta production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueying; Ye, Zhenjie; Pei, Yujun; Qiu, Guihua; Wang, Qingyang; Xu, Yunlu; Shen, Beifen; Zhang, Jiyan

    2016-09-01

    Type I interferons such as interferon-beta (IFN-β) play essential roles in the host innate immune response to herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) infection. The transcription of type I interferon genes is controlled by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members including IRF3. NF-κB activation depends on the phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB (IκB), which triggers its ubiqitination and degradation. It has been reported that neddylation inhibition by a pharmacological agent MLN4924 potently suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production with the accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα. However, the role of neddylation in type I interferon expression remains unknown. Here, we report that neddylation inhibition with MLN4924 or upon UBA3 deficiency led to accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα, impaired IκBα degradation, and impaired NF-κB nuclear translocation in the early phase of HSV-1 infection even though phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 were not affected. The blockade of NF-κB nuclear translocation by neddylation inhibition becomes less efficient at the later time points of HSV-1 infection. Consequently, HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production significantly decreased upon MLN4924 treatment and UBA3 deficiency. NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 mimicked the effects of neddylation inhibition in the early phase of HSV-1 infection. Moreover, the effects of neddylation inhibition on HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production diminished in the presence of NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23. Thus, neddylation contributes to HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production through, at least partially, promoting NF-κB activation.

  16. Impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in human iPSC-derived TLR3-deficient CNS cells.

    PubMed

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Pessach, Itai M; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Herman, Melina; Abhyankar, Avinash; Ying, Shui-Wang; Keros, Sotirios; Goldstein, Peter A; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Tu, Edmund; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Tardieu, Marc; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Daley, George Q; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Studer, Lorenz; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2012-11-29

    In the course of primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), children with inborn errors of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) immunity are prone to HSV-1 encephalitis (HSE). We tested the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of HSE involves non-haematopoietic CNS-resident cells. We derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of TLR3- and UNC-93B-deficient patients and from controls. These iPSCs were differentiated into highly purified populations of neural stem cells (NSCs), neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and/or IFN-λ1 in response to stimulation by the dsRNA analogue polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) was dependent on TLR3 and UNC-93B in all cells tested. However, the induction of IFN-β and IFN-λ1 in response to HSV-1 infection was impaired selectively in UNC-93B-deficient neurons and oligodendrocytes. These cells were also much more susceptible to HSV-1 infection than control cells, whereas UNC-93B-deficient NSCs and astrocytes were not. TLR3-deficient neurons were also found to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. The rescue of UNC-93B- and TLR3-deficient cells with the corresponding wild-type allele showed that the genetic defect was the cause of the poly(I:C) and HSV-1 phenotypes. The viral infection phenotype was rescued further by treatment with exogenous IFN-α or IFN-β ( IFN-α/β) but not IFN-λ1. Thus, impaired TLR3- and UNC-93B-dependent IFN-α/β intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in the CNS, in neurons and oligodendrocytes in particular, may underlie the pathogenesis of HSE in children with TLR3-pathway deficiencies.

  17. Iontophoresis of lysophosphatidic acid into rabbit cornea induces HSV-1 reactivation: evidence that neuronal signaling changes after infection.

    PubMed

    Martin, R E; Loutsch, J M; Garza, H H; Boedeker, D J; Hill, J M

    1999-12-20

    Lysophosphatidic acid induces neurite retraction; it is also present in tears and aqueous humor. We determined whether lysophosphatidic acid induces HSV-1 reactivation in latently infected rabbits and whether the nerve growth associated protein GAP-43 undergoes posttranslational modification during the course of HSV-1 infection. Rabbits were infected with HSV-1 and acute infection was documented by slit lamp examination. Corneas of latently infected rabbits were treated with lysophosphatidic acid or lysophosphatidylserine (structurally similar but lacking biological potency). For application to the cornea, these compounds were impregnated into collagen shields, applied as topical drops, or iontophoresed. In another experiment, corneas of latently infected rabbits were either untreated or treated iontophoretically with lysophosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidylserine, or saline. Ocular swabs detected shedding of infectious virus. Western blot and immunoprecipitation identified GAP-43 in corneal extracts and densitometry of silver-stained isoelectric focusing gels measured changes in GAP-43 isoform abundance. Iontophoresis of lysophosphatidic acid induced HSV-1 shedding more frequently than lysophosphatidylserine or saline. Viral shedding induced by collagen shield and topical drop administration was low and not significantly different for lysophosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidylserine. Five discrete GAP-43 isoforms predominated in the IEF gels. Most abundant were the pI 4.7 band in uninfected cornea and the pI 5.05 band in latently-infected cornea. Compared to latently-infected cornea, there was no significant change in isoform abundance 1 h after lysophosphatidic acid iontophoresis, but 24 and 72 h later, the pI 5. 05 band was diminished. Lysophosphatidic acid can induce HSV-1 reactivation and changes in GAP-43 pI suggest that posttranslational modifications, possibly related to phosphorylation and ADP-ribosylation, are occurring during HSV-1 latency and after LPA

  18. Cell Cycle-Dependent Expression of Adeno-Associated Virus 2 (AAV2) Rep in Coinfections with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Gives Rise to a Mosaic of Cells Replicating either AAV2 or HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Franzoso, Francesca D; Seyffert, Michael; Vogel, Rebecca; Yakimovich, Artur; de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; Meier, Anita F; Sutter, Sereina O; Tobler, Kurt; Vogt, Bernd; Greber, Urs F; Büning, Hildegard; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2017-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) depends on the simultaneous presence of a helper virus such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for productive replication. At the same time, AAV2 efficiently blocks the replication of HSV-1, which would eventually limit its own replication by diminishing the helper virus reservoir. This discrepancy begs the question of how AAV2 and HSV-1 can coexist in a cell population. Here we show that in coinfected cultures, AAV2 DNA replication takes place almost exclusively in S/G2-phase cells, while HSV-1 DNA replication is restricted to G1 phase. Live microscopy revealed that not only wild-type AAV2 (wtAAV2) replication but also reporter gene expression from both single-stranded and double-stranded (self-complementary) recombinant AAV2 vectors preferentially occurs in S/G2-phase cells, suggesting that the preference for S/G2 phase is independent of the nature of the viral genome. Interestingly, however, a substantial proportion of S/G2-phase cells transduced by the double-stranded but not the single-stranded recombinant AAV2 vectors progressed through mitosis in the absence of the helper virus. We conclude that cell cycle-dependent AAV2 rep expression facilitates cell cycle-dependent AAV2 DNA replication and inhibits HSV-1 DNA replication. This may limit competition for cellular and viral helper factors and, hence, creates a biological niche for either virus to replicate.IMPORTANCE Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) differs from most other viruses, as it requires not only a host cell for replication but also a helper virus such as an adenovirus or a herpesvirus. This situation inevitably leads to competition for cellular resources. AAV2 has been shown to efficiently inhibit the replication of helper viruses. Here we present a new facet of the interaction between AAV2 and one of its helper viruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). We observed that AAV2 rep gene expression is cell cycle dependent and gives rise to distinct time-controlled windows

  19. Quantitative comparison of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 transcriptomes using DNA microarray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, J.S. . E-mail: jsaguila@uci.edu; Devi-Rao, G.V.; Rice, M.K.; Sunabe, J.; Ghazal, P.; Wagner, E.K.

    2006-04-25

    The genomes of human herpes virus type-1 and type-2 share a high degree of sequence identity; yet, they exhibit important differences in pathology in their natural human host as well as in animal host and cell cultures. Here, we report the comparative analysis of the time and relative abundance profiles of the transcription of each virus type (their transcriptomes) using parallel infections and microarray analysis using HSV-1 probes which hybridize with high efficiency to orthologous HSV-2 transcripts. We have confirmed that orthologous transcripts belong to the same kinetic class; however, the temporal pattern of accumulation of 4 transcripts (U{sub L}4, U{sub L}29, U{sub L}30, and U{sub L}31) differs in infections between the two virus types. Interestingly, the protein products of these transcripts are all involved in nuclear organization and viral DNA localization. We discuss the relevance of these findings and whether they may have potential roles in the pathological differences of HSV-1 and HSV-2.

  20. HSV1 latent transcription and non-coding RNA: A critical retrospective.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Dane; Barrozo, Enrico R; Bloom, David C

    2017-07-15

    Virologists have invested great effort into understanding how the herpes simplex viruses and their relatives are maintained dormant over the lifespan of their host while maintaining the poise to remobilize on sporadic occasions. Piece by piece, our field has defined the tissues in play (the sensory ganglia), the transcriptional units (the latency-associated transcripts), and the responsive genomic region (the long repeats of the viral genomes). With time, the observed complexity of these features has compounded, and the totality of viral factors regulating latency are less obvious. In this review, we compose a comprehensive picture of the viral genetic elements suspected to be relevant to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) latent transcription by conducting a critical analysis of about three decades of research. We describe these studies, which largely involved mutational analysis of the notable latency-associated transcripts (LATs), and more recently a series of viral miRNAs. We also intend to draw attention to the many other less characterized non-coding RNAs, and perhaps coding RNAs, that may be important for consideration when trying to disentangle the multitude of phenotypes of the many genetic modifications introduced into recombinant HSV1 strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of 123I-FIAU imaging of herpes simplex viral gene expression in the treatment of glioma.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Mary F; Wyper, David; Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally; Papanastassiou, Vakis; Patterson, James; Hadley, Donald M; Nicol, Alice; Rampling, Roy; Brown, S M

    2006-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1716 (HSV1716), a selectively replication competent mutant of HSV1, is under investigation as an oncolytic viral therapy in human malignant glioma. As with similar therapies, a technique for measurement of viral replication and distribution over time following virus administration is required. Imaging expression of the HSV-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene offers an opportunity for non-invasive assessment of viral distribution in living subjects. This is the first study to explore the use of HSV-tk as a reporter gene and radiolabelled thymidine analogue 5-[(123)I]iodo-1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl) uracil ((123)I-FIAU) as a marker substrate to non-invasively monitor HSV1716 replication in humans during treatment of high-grade glioma. I-FIAU brain SPECT imaging was undertaken in eight patients receiving intra-tumoural injection of HSV1716, before and after administration of the virus. Baseline images were acquired 3 days prior to virus administration and between 1 and 5 days following virus administration. Region of interest analysis was used to investigate whether there was an increase in (123)I-FIAU concentration following virus administration due to HSV-tk expression. Increased (123)I-FIAU accumulation due to HSV-tk expression was not detected in this study. The possible explanations for this finding are explored and design options for future studies are discussed.

  2. HSV-1 Genome Subnuclear Positioning and Associations with Host-Cell PML-NBs and Centromeres Regulate LAT Locus Transcription during Latency in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Catez, Frédéric; Picard, Christel; Held, Kathrin; Gross, Sylvain; Rousseau, Antoine; Theil, Diethilde; Sawtell, Nancy; Labetoulle, Marc; Lomonte, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Major human pathologies are caused by nuclear replicative viruses establishing life-long latent infection in their host. During latency the genomes of these viruses are intimately interacting with the cell nucleus environment. A hallmark of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency establishment is the shutdown of lytic genes expression and the concomitant induction of the latency associated (LAT) transcripts. Although the setting up and the maintenance of the latent genetic program is most likely dependent on a subtle interplay between viral and nuclear factors, this remains uninvestigated. Combining the use of in situ fluorescent-based approaches and high-resolution microscopic analysis, we show that HSV-1 genomes adopt specific nuclear patterns in sensory neurons of latently infected mice (28 days post-inoculation, d.p.i.). Latent HSV-1 genomes display two major patterns, called “Single” and “Multiple”, which associate with centromeres, and with promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) as viral DNA-containing PML-NBs (DCP-NBs). 3D-image reconstruction of DCP-NBs shows that PML forms a shell around viral genomes and associated Daxx and ATRX, two PML partners within PML-NBs. During latency establishment (6 d.p.i.), infected mouse TGs display, at the level of the whole TG and in individual cells, a substantial increase of PML amount consistent with the interferon-mediated antiviral role of PML. “Single” and “Multiple” patterns are reminiscent of low and high-viral genome copy-containing neurons. We show that LAT expression is significantly favored within the “Multiple” pattern, which underlines a heterogeneity of LAT expression dependent on the viral genome copy number, pattern acquisition, and association with nuclear domains. Infection of PML-knockout mice demonstrates that PML/PML-NBs are involved in virus nuclear pattern acquisition, and negatively regulate the expression of the LAT. This study demonstrates that nuclear domains

  3. [Construction of a recombinant BAC-HSV-1 strain HF with a GFP reporter gene and characterization of its infectious progeny virus].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Jing; Song, Bo; Lu, Jia-Meng; Wang, Qing-Zhi; Han, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Yu-Ming

    2011-05-01

    To construct the plasmid of BAC-HSV-1 with GFP reporter gene and research the biological property of its infectious progeny virus. We constructed the plasmid C223-UL43-left-arms-UL47-right-arms which carried the homologous sequences of HSV-1. Liposome embedding method was used to transfect HSV-1 genome and the plasmid C223-UL43-left-arms-UL47-right-arms linearized by Mlu I digestion into Vero cells. After the successful homologous recombination in the eukaryotic cells, the recombinant BAC-HSV-1 with GFP reporter gene was generated. Then, the positive CPE were taken by plaque purification and by hirt extraction during the moment of the circularization of HSV-1 DNA, and the plasmid of BAC -HSV-1 was acquired. Electroporation was used to transfect the BAC -HSV-1 into DH10B, and then the single colonies of interest were confirmed both by MluI digestion and PCR. Experimental group and the control group cells were given BAC-HSV-1 plasmid and HSV-1 genomic DNA respectively to produce the BAC-HSV-1 and HSV-1 progeny virions. Vero cells were inoculated with the progeny virions at MOI = 0.1 and then a TCID50 assay was performed to determine the titers of virons in the two groups at 48 hours post inoculation. The plasmid BAC-HSV-1 was successfully constructed by the restriction enzyme analysis and the PCR. The titers of progeny virions were calculated by the TCID50 assay. No significant difference in the titers of virions between two groups was observed (P > 0.05). The infectious BAC-HSV-1 shuttle virus/plasmid between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells was successfully constructed.

  4. Anti HSV-1 Activity of Halistanol Sulfate and Halistanol Sulfate C Isolated from Brazilian Marine Sponge Petromica citrina (Demospongiae)

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa Guimarães, Tatiana; Quiroz, Carlos Guillermo; Rigotto, Caroline; de Oliveira, Simone Quintana; Rojo de Almeida, Maria Tereza; Bianco, Éverson Miguel; Moritz, Maria Izabel Goulart; Carraro, João Luís; Palermo, Jorge Alejandro; Cabrera, Gabriela; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Oliveira Simões, Cláudia Maria

    2013-01-01

    The n-butanol fraction (BF) obtained from the crude extract of the marine sponge Petromica citrina, the halistanol-enriched fraction (TSH fraction), and the isolated compounds halistanol sulfate (1) and halistanol sulfate C (2), were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on the replication of the Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1, KOS strain) by the viral plaque number reduction assay. The TSH fraction was the most effective against HSV-1 replication (SI = 15.33), whereas compounds 1 (SI = 2.46) and 2 (SI = 1.95) were less active. The most active fraction and these compounds were also assayed to determine the viral multiplication step(s) upon which they act as well as their potential synergistic effects. The anti-HSV-1 activity detected was mediated by the inhibition of virus attachment and by the penetration into Vero cells, the virucidal effect on virus particles, and by the impairment in levels of ICP27 and gD proteins of HSV-1. In summary, these results suggest that the anti-HSV-1 activity of TSH fraction detected is possibly related to the synergic effects of compounds 1 and 2. PMID:24172213

  5. Nature and duration of growth factor signaling through receptor tyrosine kinases regulates HSV-1 latency in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Camarena, Vladimir; Kobayashi, Mariko; Kim, Ju Youn; Roehm, Pamela; Perez, Rosalia; Gardner, James; Wilson, Angus C.; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong latency in peripheral neurons where productive replication is suppressed. While periodic reactivation results in virus production, the molecular basis of neuronal latency remains incompletely understood. Using a primary neuronal culture system of HSV-1 latency and reactivation, we show that continuous signaling through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) pathway triggered by nerve growth factor (NGF)-binding to the TrkA receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is instrumental in maintaining latent HSV-1. The PI3-K p110α catalytic subunit, but not the β or δ isoforms, is specifically required to activate 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) and sustain latency. Disrupting this pathway leads to virus reactivation. EGF and GDNF, two other growth factors capable of activating PI3-K and PDK1 but that differ from NGF in their ability to persistently activate Akt, do not fully support HSV-1 latency. Thus the nature of RTK-signaling is a critical host parameter that regulates the HSV-1 latent-lytic switch. PMID:20951966

  6. Increasing the Efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Precise Genome Editing of HSV-1 Virus in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chaolong; Li, Huanhuan; Hao, Mengru; Xiong, Dan; Luo, Yong; Huang, Chenghao; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified HSV-1 viruses serve as promising vectors for tumour therapy and vaccine development. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is one of the most powerful tools for precise gene editing of the genomes of organisms. However, whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system can precisely and efficiently make gene replacements in the genome of HSV-1 remains essentially unknown. Here, we reported CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the HSV-1 genome in human cells, including the knockout and replacement of large genes. In established cells stably expressing CRISPR/Cas9, gRNA in coordination with Cas9 could direct a precise cleavage within a pre-defined target region, and foreign genes were successfully used to replace the target gene seamlessly by HDR-mediated gene replacement. Introducing the NHEJ inhibitor SCR7 to the CRISPR/Cas9 system greatly facilitated HDR-mediated gene replacement in the HSV-1 genome. We provided the first genetic evidence that two copies of the ICP0 gene in different locations on the same HSV-1 genome could be simultaneously modified with high efficiency and with no off-target modifications. We also developed a revolutionized isolation platform for desired recombinant viruses using single-cell sorting. Together, our work provides a significantly improved method for targeted editing of DNA viruses, which will facilitate the development of anti-cancer oncolytic viruses and vaccines. PMID:27713537

  7. Increasing the Efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Precise Genome Editing of HSV-1 Virus in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chaolong; Li, Huanhuan; Hao, Mengru; Xiong, Dan; Luo, Yong; Huang, Chenghao; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-10-07

    Genetically modified HSV-1 viruses serve as promising vectors for tumour therapy and vaccine development. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is one of the most powerful tools for precise gene editing of the genomes of organisms. However, whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system can precisely and efficiently make gene replacements in the genome of HSV-1 remains essentially unknown. Here, we reported CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the HSV-1 genome in human cells, including the knockout and replacement of large genes. In established cells stably expressing CRISPR/Cas9, gRNA in coordination with Cas9 could direct a precise cleavage within a pre-defined target region, and foreign genes were successfully used to replace the target gene seamlessly by HDR-mediated gene replacement. Introducing the NHEJ inhibitor SCR7 to the CRISPR/Cas9 system greatly facilitated HDR-mediated gene replacement in the HSV-1 genome. We provided the first genetic evidence that two copies of the ICP0 gene in different locations on the same HSV-1 genome could be simultaneously modified with high efficiency and with no off-target modifications. We also developed a revolutionized isolation platform for desired recombinant viruses using single-cell sorting. Together, our work provides a significantly improved method for targeted editing of DNA viruses, which will facilitate the development of anti-cancer oncolytic viruses and vaccines.

  8. Differentiated SH-SY5Y human cells provide a reductionist model of HSV-1 neurotropism.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Mackenzie M; Mangold, Colleen A; Kuny, Chad V; Szpara, Moriah L

    2017-09-27

    Neuron-virus interactions that occur during herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection are not fully understood. Neurons are the site of lifelong latency and are a crucial target for long-term suppressive therapy or viral clearance. A reproducible neuronal model of human origin would facilitate studies of HSV and other neurotropic viruses. Current neuronal models in the herpesvirus field vary widely and have caveats including incomplete differentiation, non-human origins, or the use of dividing cells that have neuropotential, but lack neuronal morphology. Here we use a robust approach to differentiate human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells over 2.5 weeks, producing a uniform population of mature human neuronal cells. We demonstrate that terminally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells have neuronal morphology and express proteins with subcellular localization indicative of mature neurons. These neuronal cells are able to support a productive HSV-1 infection, with kinetics and overall titer similar to those seen in undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cells and the related SK-N-SH cell line. However terminally differentiated, neuronal SH-SY5Y cells release significantly less extracellular HSV-1 by 24 hpi, suggesting a unique neuronal response to viral infection. With this model, we are able to distinguish differences in neuronal spread between two strains of HSV-1. We also show expression of the antiviral protein cGAS in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells, which is the first demonstration of the presence of this protein in non-epithelial cells. These data provide a model for studying neuron-virus interactions at the single-cell level as well as via bulk biochemistry, and will be advantageous for the study of neurotropic viruses in vitroImportance Herpes simplex virus (HSV) affects millions of people worldwide, causing painful oral and genital lesions, in addition to a multitude of more severe symptoms such as eye disease, neonatal infection, and in rare cases, encephalitis. Presently, there is no cure

  9. Herpes simplex type I (HSV-1) infection of the nervous system: is an immune response a good thing?

    PubMed

    Conrady, Christopher D; Drevets, Douglas A; Carr, Daniel J J

    2010-03-30

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can induce a robust immune response initially thru the activation of pattern recognition receptors and subsequent type I interferon production that then shapes, along with other innate immune components, the adaptive immune response to the insult. While this response is necessary to quell virus replication, drive the pathogen into a "latent" state, and likely hinder viral reactivation, collateral damage can ensue with demonstrable cell death and foci of tissue pathology in the central nervous system (CNS) as a result of the release of inflammatory mediators including reactive oxygen species. Although rare, HSV-1 is the leading cause of frank sporadic encephalitis that, if left untreated, can result in death. A greater understanding of the contribution of resident glial cells and infiltrating leukocytes within the CNS in response to HSV-1 invasion is necessary to identify candidate molecules as targets for therapeutic intervention to reduce unwarranted inflammation coinciding with the maintenance of the anti-viral state.

  10. Anti-Viral Evaluation of Sesquiterpene Coumarins from Ferula assa-foetida against HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Ghannadi, Alireza; Fattahian, Khadijeh; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Behbahani, Mandana; Shahnoush, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Several complications attributed with Herpes virus related infections and the emergence of drug resistant viruses prompt scientists to search for new drugs. Several terpenoids and coumarins have shown anti HSV effects while no sesquiterpene coumarins have been previously tested for HSV treatment. Three sesquiterpene coumarins badrakemin acetate (1), kellerin (2) and samarcandin diastereomer (3) were isolated from the gum resin of Ferula assa-foetida, a herbal medicine with antimicrobial, antiprotozoal and antiviral effects. Compounds were identified by 1D and 2D- NMR spectroscopies and comparison with literature data. A comparative evaluation of cytotoxicity and antiviral activity showed that kellerin (2) could significantly inhibit the cytopathic effects and reduce the viral titre of the herpes virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA viral strain KOS at concentrations of 10, 5 and 2.5 µg/mL.

  11. Anti-Viral Evaluation of Sesquiterpene Coumarins from Ferula assa-foetida against HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ghannadi, Alireza; Fattahian, Khadijeh; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Behbahani, Mandana; Shahnoush, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Several complications attributed with Herpes virus related infections and the emergence of drug resistant viruses prompt scientists to search for new drugs. Several terpenoids and coumarins have shown anti HSV effects while no sesquiterpene coumarins have been previously tested for HSV treatment. Three sesquiterpene coumarins badrakemin acetate (1), kellerin (2) and samarcandin diastereomer (3) were isolated from the gum resin of Ferula assa-foetida, a herbal medicine with antimicrobial, antiprotozoal and antiviral effects. Compounds were identified by 1D and 2D- NMR spectroscopies and comparison with literature data. A comparative evaluation of cytotoxicity and antiviral activity showed that kellerin (2) could significantly inhibit the cytopathic effects and reduce the viral titre of the herpes virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA viral strain KOS at concentrations of 10, 5 and 2.5 µg/mL. PMID:25237347

  12. The Use of Human Cornea Organotypic Cultures to Study Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Drevets, Peter; Chucair-Elliott, Ana; Shrestha, Priyadarsini; Jinkins, Jeremy; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Carr, Daniel J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the utility of human organotypic cornea cultures as a model to study HSV-1-induced inflammation and neovascularization. Methods Human organotypic cornea cultures were established after retrieving the cornea with intact limbus from donated whole globes. One cornea culture was infected with HSV-1 (104 plaque forming units) while the other cornea from the same donor was mock-infected. Supernatants were collected at times post culture with and without infection to determine viral titer (by plaque assay) and pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory cytokine concentration by suspension array analysis. In some experiments, the cultured corneas were collected and evaluated for HSV-1 antigen by immunohistochemical means. Another set of experiments measured susceptibility of human 3-dimensional cornea fibroblast constructs in the presence and absence of TGF-β1 to HSV-1 infection in terms of viral replication and the inflammatory response to infection as a comparison to the organotypic cornea cultures. Results Organotypic cornea cultures and 3-dimensional fibroblast constructs were susceptible to HSV-1 with varying degrees. Fibroblast constructs were more susceptible to infection in terms of infectious virus recovered in a shorter period of time. There were changes in the levels of select pro-angiogenic or pro-inflammatory cytokines that were dictated as much by the cultures producing them as whether they were infected with HSV-1 or treated with TGF-β1. Conclusion The organotypic cornea and 3-dimensional fibroblast cultures are likely useful in the identification and short-term study of novel anti-viral compounds and virus replication but are limited in the study of the local immune response to infection. PMID:26047535

  13. Resident T Cells are Unable to Control HSV-1 Activity in the Brain Ependymal Region During Latency1

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Chandra M.; Jinkins, Jeremy K.; Carr, Daniel J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is one of the leading etiologies of sporadic viral encephalitis. Early anti-viral intervention is crucial to the survival of herpes simplex encephalitis patients; however, many survivors suffer from long-term neurological deficits. It is currently understood that HSV-1 establishes a latent infection within sensory peripheral neurons throughout the life of the host. However, the tissue residence of latent virus, other than in sensory neurons, and the potential pathogenic consequences of latency remain enigmatic. In the present study, we characterized the lytic and latent infection of HSV-1 in the central nervous system in comparison to the peripheral nervous system following ocular infection in mice. We utilized RT-PCR to detect latency associated transcripts and HSV-1 lytic cycle genes within the brain stem, the ependyma (EP), containing the limbic and cortical areas which also harbor neural progenitor cells, in comparison to the trigeminal ganglia. Unexpectedly, HSV-1 lytic genes, usually identified during acute infection, are uniquely expressed in the EP 60 days post infection when animals are no longer suffering from encephalitis. An inflammatory response was also mounted in the EP by the maintenance of resident memory T cells. However, EP T cells were incapable of controlling HSV-1 infection ex-vivo and secreted less IFN-γ which correlated with expression of a variety of exhaustion-related inhibitory markers. Collectively our data suggest that the persistent viral lytic gene expression during latency is the cause of the chronic inflammatory response leading to the exhaustion of the resident T cells in the EP. PMID:27357149

  14. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  15. Comparison of [14C]FMAU, [3H]FEAU, [14C]FIAU, and [3H]PCV for monitoring reporter gene expression of wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Keon Wook; Min, Jung-Joon; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2005-01-01

    To assess the optimal reporter probe/reporter gene combination for monitoring herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene expression, we compared the cellular uptake of 1-(2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-methyluracil (FMAU), 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyarabinofuranosyl-5-ethyluracil (FEAU), 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (FIAU) and penciclovir (PCV) in both HSV1-tk and HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells. For stably transfected cell studies, C6 rat glioma cells, C6 HSV1-tk transfectant, C6 mutant HSV1-sr39tk transfectant, rat Morris hepatoma cells (MH3924A), and MH3924A HSV1-tk transfectant cells were used. For adenoviral infection studies, C6 rat glioma cells were exposed to serial titers of AdCMV-HSV1-tk, AdCMV-HSV1-sr39tk, or AdCMV-fluc for 24 hours. These cells were incubated with [(14)C]FMAU, [(3)H]FEAU, [(14)C]FIAU, and [(3)H]PCV, and cellular uptake of radioactivity was measured. [(3)H]FEAU exhibited the highest or second highest accumulation and the most selectivity regardless of the mode of gene transfer for both HSV1-tk and mutant HSV1-sr39tk reporter genes. This combination of high accumulation and high selectivity for both HSV1-tk and HSV1-sr39tk makes suitably radiolabeled FEAU a promising candidate as a radiotracer for imaging HSV1-tk/HSV1-sr39tk gene expression in living subjects.

  16. Histological and immunopathological analysis of T-cells mediating murine HSV-1 keratitis.

    PubMed

    Heiligenhaus, A; Foster, C S

    1994-10-01

    Thymus-derived lymphocytes play a critical role in the development of herpes simplex keratitis (HSK). T-cell subsets defined by their expression of various T-cell receptor (TCR) V beta segments were studied following corneal HSV-1 infection (p.i.). Conjunctiva, corneal limbus and corneal stroma of two inbred BALB/c congenic mouse strains which differ only in the gene products closely linked to the Igh-1 locus on chromosome 12 were analyzed. While C.B-17 mice (Igh-1b) were resistant to HSK, C.AL-20 mice (Igh-1d) clinically developed severe necrotizing keratitis by day 11 p.i. The corneal stroma of C.B-17 mice remained clear, while it was increasingly infiltrated by mononuclear cells and neutrophils in C.AL-20 mice by day 11 p.i. In C.B-17 mice, Thy1.2+ cells were found in the conjunctiva between days 2 to 4 p.i., and subsequently decreased. Only a few Thy1.2+ cells were found in the limbus, and no such cells were found in the stroma. In contrast, in C.AL-20 mice the numbers of Thy1.2+ cells (activated CD4+, V beta 8+ T cells) profoundly increased in the conjunctiva by day 4 p.i. These cells infiltrated the limbus between days 7 and 11 p.i. and eventually entered the stromal tissue by day 11 p.i. Our data suggest that the HSV-1-induced corneal tissue destruction is mediated by mononuclear cells and neutrophils and that these cells are probably attracted into the cornea by cytokines elaborated by activated CD4+, V beta 8+ T cells.

  17. Developing de novo human artificial chromosomes in embryonic stem cells using HSV-1 amplicon technology.

    PubMed

    Moralli, Daniela; Monaco, Zoia L

    2015-02-01

    De novo artificial chromosomes expressing genes have been generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) and are maintained following differentiation into other cell types. Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are small, functional, extrachromosomal elements, which behave as normal chromosomes in human cells. De novo HAC are generated following delivery of alpha satellite DNA into target cells. HAC are characterized by high levels of mitotic stability and are used as models to study centromere formation and chromosome organisation. They are successful and effective as gene expression vectors since they remain autonomous and can accommodate larger genes and regulatory regions for long-term expression studies in cells unlike other viral gene delivery vectors currently used. Transferring the essential DNA sequences for HAC formation intact across the cell membrane has been challenging for a number of years. A highly efficient delivery system based on HSV-1 amplicons has been used to target DNA directly to the ES cell nucleus and HAC stably generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) at high frequency. HAC were detected using an improved protocol for hESc chromosome harvesting, which consistently produced high-quality metaphase spreads that could routinely detect HAC in hESc. In tumour cells, the input DNA often integrated in the host chromosomes, but in the host ES genome, it remained intact. The hESc containing the HAC formed embryoid bodies, generated teratoma in mice, and differentiated into neuronal cells where the HAC were maintained. The HAC structure and chromatin composition was similar to the endogenous hESc chromosomes. This review will discuss the technological advances in HAC vector delivery using HSV-1 amplicons and the improvements in the identification of de novo HAC in hESc.

  18. Different Mechanisms Regulate Productive Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 Infections in Adult Trigeminal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, AyeAye; Margolis, Mathew S.

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 establish latency in different neuronal subtypes (A5+ and KH10+) in murine trigeminal ganglia, results which correlate with restricted productive infection in these neurons in vitro. HSV-2 latency-associated transcript (LAT) contains a cis-acting regulatory element near the transcription start site that promotes productive infection in A5+ neurons and a second element in exon 1 that inhibits productive infection in KH10+ neurons. HSV-1 contains no such regulatory sequences, demonstrating different mechanisms for regulating productive HSV infection in neurons. PMID:23514893

  19. The anti-HSV-1 effect of quercetin is dependent on the suppression of TLR-3 in Raw 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seulki; Lee, Hwan Hee; Shin, Yu Su; Kang, Hyojeung; Cho, Hyosun

    2017-03-03

    Quercetin is a major component of the plant Glycyrrhiza uralensis, which is largely used as a traditional medicine in Asia. Quercetin has been reported to have several biological activities, which include anti-viral and anti-inflammatory effects. We explored the molecular mechanism linking anti-viral and anti-inflammatory activities using an in vitro herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection model. Raw 264.7 cells were infected with HSV-1 in the presence or absence of different concentrations of quercetin and infected cell lysates were harvested 24 h later. HSV plaque reduction assays, western blotting (HSV-1gD, HSV-1 ICP0, TLR-2, 3, 9, NF-κB, IRF3), and real time PCR (HSV-1ICP0, HSV-1UL13, HSV-1UL52) were performed to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the anti-HSV-1 effect of quercetin. In addition, TNF-α level was measured. Quercetin significantly lowered HSV infectivity in Raw 264.7 cells and inhibited the expressions of HSV proteins (gD, ICP0) and genes (ICP0, UL13, UL52). Interestingly, quercetin specifically suppressed the expression of TLR-3, and this led to the inhibitions of inflammatory transcriptional factors (NF-κB and IRF3). These findings suggest that the anti-HSV-1 effects of quercetin are related to the suppression of TLR-3 dependent inflammatory responses in Raw 264.7 cells.

  20. Synergistic effects of deleting multiple nonessential elements in nonreplicative HSV-1 BAC genomic vectors play a critical role in their viability.

    PubMed

    Ventosa, M; Ortiz-Temprano, A; Khalique, H; Lim, F

    2017-07-01

    Nonreplicative Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) genomic vectors have already entered into clinical trials for neurological gene therapy thanks to their scalable growth in permissive cells. However, the small transgene capacity of this type of HSV-1 vectors currently used in the clinic represents an important limiting factor as a gene delivery system. To develop high-capacity nonreplicative genomic HSV-1 vectors, in this study we have characterized a series of multiply deleted mutants which we have constructed in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), removing up to 24 kb of unstable or dispensable genomic sequences to allow insertion of transgenes up to this size. We show that synergistic effects of deletions of: the HSV-1 replication origins oriS and oriL, the HSV-1 internal repeat region, the remaining ICP4 gene copy and the genes encoding for ICP27, UL56, UL55, can severely reduce the growth of these HSV-1 vectors. Given that several of these elements have been characterized as 'non-essential' for viral growth in cell culture by single-deletion experiments of wild-type HSV-1, our study highlights the need to re-evaluate their functional contribution in the context of multiply deleted nonreplicative HSV-1 genomic vectors. Our BAC mutants described here can serve as useful starting platforms to accelerate HSV-1 vector development.

  1. An overview of the infection of CMV, HSV 1/2 and EBV in Mexican patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Vega, Sergio; Castro-Escarpulli, Graciela; Hernández-Santos, Hector; Salinas-Lara, Citlatepetl; Palma, Icela; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Gelista-Herrera, Noemí; Rembao-Bojorquez, Daniel; Ochoa, Sara A; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Uribe-Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Arellano-Galindo, José

    2017-03-01

    Several risk factors are involved in glioblastoma, including cytomegalovirus (CMV). This research was carried out to determine the rate of CMV infection, as well as HSV 1/2 and EBV in brain tissue, in patients with glioblastomamultiforme (GBM). The tissues were tested using immunohistochemistry, PCR, in situ hybridization and real-time PCR. At least, one HHV was detected in 21/29 (72%) patients as follows: single infections with HSV-1/2 in 4/21 (19%), EBV in 6/21 (28.6%) and CMV in 1/21 (4.8%). Mixed viral infection, HSV-1/2 and EBV were detected in 4/21 patients (19%), CMV and EBV in 5/21 (23.8%), and HSV-1/2, EBV, and CMV in 1/21. The CMV viral load ranged from 3×10(2) to 4.33×10(5) genome/100ng of tissue. Genotype based on CMV gB was 3/7 where 2/3 was gB1 and 1/3 gB4. HSV, EBV and CMV were frequently found in brain tissues, more in mix in a population reported as highly seropositive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. HSV-1-induced activation of NF-κB protects U937 monocytic cells against both virus replication and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Marino-Merlo, Francesca; Papaianni, Emanuela; Medici, Maria Antonietta; Macchi, Beatrice; Grelli, Sandro; Mosca, Claudia; Borner, Christoph; Mastino, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is a crucial player of the antiviral innate response. Intriguingly, however, NF-κB activation is assumed to favour herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection rather than restrict it. Apoptosis, a form of innate response to viruses, is completely inhibited by HSV in fully permissive cells, but not in cells incapable to fully sustain HSV replication, such as immunocompetent cells. To resolve the intricate interplay among NF-κB signalling, apoptosis and permissiveness to HSV-1 in monocytic cells, we utilized U937 monocytic cells in which NF-κB activation was inhibited by expressing a dominant-negative IκBα. Surprisingly, viral production was increased in monocytic cells in which NF-κB was inhibited. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB led to increased apoptosis following HSV-1 infection, associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization. High expression of late viral proteins and induction of apoptosis occurred in distinct cells. Transcriptional analysis of known innate response genes by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR excluded a contribution of the assayed genes to the observed phenomena. Thus, in monocytic cells NF-κB activation simultaneously serves as an innate process to restrict viral replication as well as a mechanism to limit the damage of an excessive apoptotic response to HSV-1 infection. This finding may clarify mechanisms controlling HSV-1 infection in monocytic cells. PMID:27584793

  3. HSV-1-induced activation of NF-κB protects U937 monocytic cells against both virus replication and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Marino-Merlo, Francesca; Papaianni, Emanuela; Medici, Maria Antonietta; Macchi, Beatrice; Grelli, Sandro; Mosca, Claudia; Borner, Christoph; Mastino, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is a crucial player of the antiviral innate response. Intriguingly, however, NF-κB activation is assumed to favour herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection rather than restrict it. Apoptosis, a form of innate response to viruses, is completely inhibited by HSV in fully permissive cells, but not in cells incapable to fully sustain HSV replication, such as immunocompetent cells. To resolve the intricate interplay among NF-κB signalling, apoptosis and permissiveness to HSV-1 in monocytic cells, we utilized U937 monocytic cells in which NF-κB activation was inhibited by expressing a dominant-negative IκBα. Surprisingly, viral production was increased in monocytic cells in which NF-κB was inhibited. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB led to increased apoptosis following HSV-1 infection, associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization. High expression of late viral proteins and induction of apoptosis occurred in distinct cells. Transcriptional analysis of known innate response genes by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR excluded a contribution of the assayed genes to the observed phenomena. Thus, in monocytic cells NF-κB activation simultaneously serves as an innate process to restrict viral replication as well as a mechanism to limit the damage of an excessive apoptotic response to HSV-1 infection. This finding may clarify mechanisms controlling HSV-1 infection in monocytic cells.

  4. HSV-1-Based Vectors for Gene Therapy of Neurological Diseases and Brain Tumors: Part II. Vector Systems and Applications1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Andreas; Breakefield, Xandra O; Fraefel, Cornel

    1999-01-01

    Abstract Many properties of HSV-1 are especially suitable for using this virus as a vector to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS), such as Parkinson's disease or malignant gliomas. These advantageous properties include natural neurotropism, high transduction efficiency, large transgene capacity, and the ability of entering a latent state in neurons. Selective oncolysis in combination with modulation of the immune response mediated by replication-conditional HSV-1 vectors appears to be a highly promising approach in the battle against malignant glioma. Helper virus-free HSV/AAV hybrid amplicon vectors have great promise in mediating long-term gene expression in the PNS and CNS for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders or chronic pain. Current research focuses on the design of HSV-1-derived vectors which are targeted to certain cell types and support transcriptionally regulatable transgene expression. Here, we review the recent developments on HSV-1-based vector systems and their applications in experimental and clinical gene therapy protocols. PMID:10933055

  5. Rab6 Dependent Post-Golgi Trafficking of HSV1 Envelope Proteins to Sites of Virus Envelopment

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Helen L; Gonzalez-Lopez, Claudia; Sayers, Charlotte L; Hollinshead, Michael; Elliott, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) is an enveloped virus that uses undefined transport carriers for trafficking of its glycoproteins to envelopment sites. Screening of an siRNA library against 60 Rab GTPases revealed Rab6 as the principal Rab involved in HSV1 infection, with its depletion preventing Golgi-to-plasma membrane transport of HSV1 glycoproteins in a pathway used by several integral membrane proteins but not the luminal secreted protein Gaussia luciferase. Knockdown of Rab6 reduced virus yield to 1% and inhibited capsid envelopment, revealing glycoprotein exocytosis as a prerequisite for morphogenesis. Rab6-dependent virus production did not require the effectors myosin-II, bicaudal-D, dynactin-1 or rabkinesin-6, but was facilitated by ERC1, a factor involved in linking microtubules to the cell cortex. Tubulation and exocytosis of Rab6-positive, glycoprotein-containing membranes from the Golgi was substantially augmented by infection, resulting in enhanced and targeted delivery to cell tips. This reveals HSV1 morphogenesis as one of the first biological processes shown to be dependent on the exocytic activity of Rab6. PMID:24152084

  6. Subchronic toxicity and anti-HSV-1 activity in experimental animal of dolabelladienetriol from the seaweed, Dictyota pfaffii.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Valéria; Barros, Caroline; Melchiades, Vanessa A; Fonseca, Rainomar Raimundo; Pinheiro, Sergio; Ocampo, Patrícia; Teixeira, Valéria L; Cavalcanti, Diana N; Giongo, Viveca; Ratcliffe, Norman A; Teixeira, Gerlinde; Paixão, Izabel Christina N P

    2017-03-08

    This study examined in rats the subchronic toxicity and anti- HSV-1activity after oral administration of dolabelladienetriol (D1), a diterpene isolated from the seaweed Dictyota pfaffii. In subchronic toxicity (SCT) tests, female rats received D1 by gavage 15 mg/kg/day (n = 5) for 50 days, and general behavior, death, hematological, biochemical and histological changes in the liver, kidney, stomach, and duodenum were determined. For the anti-HSV-1 activity, female mice were infected and treated orally with a dose of 20 mg/kg (n = 5) twice a day with D1 and any lesions in the skin were then recorded for 18 days. Dolabelladienetriol in SCT did not significantly change behavior, body weight, hematological or biochemical profiles. The liver and kidneys, however, showed some alterations in rats treated with D1, similar to those in rats treated with ACV, while the other tissues had no significant changes. The anti-HSV-1 activity of D1 had a similar efficacy to the ACV drug control in mice. Our results showed that D1 has potential commercial development as a new HSV-1drug.

  7. Optical imaging of reporter gene expression using a positron-emission-tomography probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Xiaofen; Chen, Luxi; Han, Peizhen; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-11-01

    Reporter gene/reporter probe technology is one of the most important techniques in molecular imaging. Lately, many reporter gene/reporter probe systems have been coupled to different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and optical imaging (OI). It has been recently found that OI techniques could be used to monitor radioactive tracers in vitro and in living subjects. In this study, we further demonstrate that a reporter gene/nuclear reporter probe system [herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and 9-(4-18F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl] butyl) guanine ([18F]FHBG)] could be successfully imaged by OI in vitro and in vivo. OI with radioactive reporter probes will facilitate and broaden the applications of reporter gene/reporter probe techniques in medical research.

  8. Engineering cell lines for production of replication defective HSV-1 gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kyle G; Krisky, David M; Ataai, Mohammed M; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2009-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) represents an attractive vehicle for a variety of gene therapy applications. To render this virus safe for clinical use, its cytotoxic genes must be removed without losing its ability to express transgenes efficiently. Our vectors are deleted for the essential immediate early genes ICP4 and ICP27. These genes are controlled by unique promoters having enhancer elements responsive to a viral structural protein VP16. The expression of these genes occurs prior to the activation of all other lytic functions and is thus required to initiate and complete the virus replication cycle. For large scale manufacture of clinical grade vectors, efficient cell lines must be generated that express the essential viral gene products in trans during vector propagation. Here we describe methods for engineering HSV-1 production cell lines that improve vector growth by altering the kinetics of complementing gene expression. We examined the ability of Vero cells independently transduced with ICP4 and ICP27 under transcriptional control of their respective promoters to support the growth of a replication defective vector (JDTOZHE), deleted for ICP4, ICP27 and approximately 20 kb of internal elements that are not required for virus growth in Vero cells. Vector yield on this cell line was 3 logs lower than wild-type virus grown on Vero cells. To understand the mechanism underlying poor vector yield, we examined the expression of ICP4 and ICP27 during virus complementation. While ICP27 was expressed immediately on vector infection, the expression of ICP4 was considerably delayed by 8-10 h, suggesting that the ICP4 promoter was not adequately activated by VP16 delivered by the infectious vector particle. Use of the ICP0 promoter to express ICP4 from the cellular genome resulted in higher induction levels and faster kinetics of ICP4 expression and a 10-fold improvement in vector yield. This study suggests that vector complementation is highly dependent on the

  9. Involvement of STAT4 in IgG subtype switching and ocular HSV-1 replication in mice

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sariah J.; Mott, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the relative impact of elevated T-helper 2 (TH2)- and reduced T-Helper 1 (TH1)-dependent immune responses on ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Methods Signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 4 knockout mice (BALB/c-STAT4−/−) and wild-type BALB/c control mice were immunized with avirulent HSV-1 strain KOS or were mock-immunized. Three weeks after the third immunization, neutralizing antibody titers were determined by plaque reduction assays. Following ocular infection with virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae, viral replication in the eye, blepharitis, corneal scarring (CS), survival, and immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes in sera were determined. Results Vaccinated STAT4−/− and BALB/c mice contained significant and similar neutralizing antibody titers and were completely protected against HSV-1-induced death and CS. In contrast to vaccinated STAT4−/− mice, mock-vaccinated STAT4−/− mice had higher ocular HSV-1 titers than mock-vaccinated BALB/c mice on days 2–3 post-ocular infection. There were also significant differences in the levels of IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 in the sera of STAT4−/− mice when compared to the control BALB/c mice. Conclusions These results suggest that the absence of TH1 cytokine responses did alter protection against viral replication and IgG isotypes but not eye disease or survival. PMID:20104254

  10. Comparison of the dynamics and correlates of transmission of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) and Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) in a sample of the Israeli population.

    PubMed

    Davidovici, Batya B; Balicer, Ran D; Klement, Eyal; Green, Manfred S; Mendelson, Ella; Smetana, Zehava; Cohen, Dani I

    2007-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types-1 (HSV-1) and Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are herpes viruses that share many characteristics. However, HSV-1 spreads by close contact while VZV spreads mainly by the airborne route. In this study we compared the dynamics and correlates of transmission of these viruses in the same population. In 2000-2001, 1555 sera from an age-stratified general population sample were tested using commercial ELISA kits to measure type-specific HSV-1 and varicella IgG antibodies. The VZV seroprevalence increased rapidly with age reaching 50% seropositivity by the age of 3 years, while HSV-1 reached 50% seropositivity at the age of 14 years. The highest VZV force of infection was in the 3.5-5.5-year age group followed by the 5.5-10.5 years age group, while for HSV-1 the age specific force of infection was substantially lower and stable over the various age groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that HSV-1 seroprevalence was significantly, independently associated with age, country of birth, country of origin, ethnicity, socio-economic status and VZV sero-status. Only age, country of origin and HSV-1 sero-status were found to be associated with VZV seropositivity. In developed countries such as Israel the transmission of VZV is much quicker and less dependent on socioeconomic status as compared with HSV-1.

  11. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Michael P.; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E. R.; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M.; Proença, João T.; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir. PMID:27055281

  12. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Michael P; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E R; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir.

  13. Role of cell surface carbohydrate on herpes virus type I (HSV-1) entry

    SciTech Connect

    Massare, M.J.; Blough, H.A.

    1987-05-01

    The role of cell surface glycopeptides (GP) or oligosaccharides (OS) on HSV-1 (strain HF) attachment was studied by isolating those macromolecules by proteolytic digestion of uninfected cells and/or hydrazinolysis of whole cells or plasma membrane fractions. Variable amounts of GP or OS were mixed with 100-200 pfu of (/sup 3/H)-HSV incubated for 45 min at 20/sup 0/C, and infectivity determined. GP were fractionated by lectin affinity-, ion exchange- and molecular sieve column chromatography. A GP fraction containing 13 ..mu..g reducing sugar/ml inhibited plaque formation by 80%. sigma-elimination or the removal of NeuNAc had no affect. OS obtained by hydrazinolysis, inhibited plaque formation by 86-100% at concentrations of 14-20 ..mu..g reducing sugars/ml. Only complex OS, obtained by treating delipidated, whose cells with endoglycosidase D, blocked attachment; whereas high mannose fractions had no effect. These OS failed to inhibit fusion suggesting that N-linked complex OS are part of the receptor site(s).

  14. Neutrophils are dispensable in the modulation of T cell immunity against cutaneous HSV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Hor, Jyh Liang; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils rapidly infiltrate sites of inflammation during peripheral infection or tissue injury. In addition to their well described roles as pro-inflammatory phagocytes responsible for pathogen clearance, recent studies have demonstrated a broader functional repertoire including mediating crosstalk between innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Specifically, neutrophils have been proposed to mediate antigen transport to lymph nodes (LN) to modulate T cell priming and to influence T cell migration to infected tissues. Using a mouse model of cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection we explored potential contributions of neutrophils toward anti-viral immunity. While a transient, early influx of neutrophils was triggered by dermal scarification, we did not detect migration of neutrophils from the skin to LN. Furthermore, despite recruitment of neutrophils into LN from the blood, priming and expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was unaffected following neutrophil depletion. Finally, we found that neutrophils were dispensable for the migration of effector T cells into infected skin. Our study suggests that the immunomodulatory roles of neutrophils toward adaptive immunity may be context-dependent, and are likely determined by the type of pathogen and anatomical site of infection. PMID:28112242

  15. Expression of HSV-1 receptors in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease determines susceptibility to oncolytic HSV.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-Y; Currier, M A; Hansford, L; Kaplan, D; Chiocca, E A; Uchida, H; Goins, W F; Cohen, J B; Glorioso, J C; van Kuppevelt, T H; Mo, X; Cripe, T P

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. As PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus (HSV), and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising antitumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was the most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas downregulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a NB cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases, due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact antiviral PKR signaling.

  16. Resistance to HSV-1 infection in the epithelium resides with the novel innate sensor, IFI-16.

    PubMed

    Conrady, C D; Zheng, M; Fitzgerald, K A; Liu, C; Carr, D J J

    2012-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate sentinels required for clearance of bacterial and fungal infections of the cornea, but their role in viral immunity is currently unknown. We report that TLR signaling is expendable in herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 containment as depicted by plaque assays of knockout mice (MyD88(-/-), Trif(-/-) and MyD88(-/-) Trif(-/-) double knockout) resembling wild-type controls. To identify the key sentinel in viral recognition of the cornea, in vivo knockdown of the DNA sensor IFI-16/p204 in the corneal epithelium was performed and resulted in a loss of IFN-regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3) nuclear translocation, interferon-α production, and viral containment. The sensor seems to have a similar function in other HSV clinically relevant sites such as the vaginal mucosa in which a loss of p204/IFI-16 results in significantly more HSV-2 shedding. Thus, we have identified an IRF-3-dependent, IRF-7- and TLR-independent innate sensor responsible for HSV containment at the site of acute infection.

  17. Resistance to HSV-1 Infection in the Epithelium Resides with the Novel Innate Sensor, IFI-16

    PubMed Central

    Conrady, Christopher D.; Zheng, Min; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Liu, Chuanju; Carr, Daniel J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate sentinels required for clearance of bacterial and fungal infections of the cornea, but their role in viral immunity is currently unknown. We report TLR signaling is expendable in HSV-1 containment as depicted by plaque assays of knockout mice (MyD88−/−, Trif−/− and MyD88−/− Trif−/− DKO) resembling wild type controls. To identify the key sentinel in viral recognition of the cornea, in vivo knockdown of the DNA sensor IFI-16/p204 in corneal epithelium was performed and resulted in a loss of IRF-3 nuclear translocation, interferon-α production, and viral containment. The sensor appears to have a similar function in other HSV clinically-relevant sites such as the vaginal mucosa in which a loss of p204/IFI-16 results in significantly more HSV-2 shedding. Thus, we have identified an IRF-3 dependent, IRF-7 and TLR - independent innate sensor responsible for HSV containment at the site of acute infection. PMID:22236996

  18. Ethosomes for the delivery of anti-HSV-1 molecules: preparation, characterization and in vitro activity.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, R; Ravani, L; Zaid, A N; Menegatti, E; Romagnoli, R; Drechsler, M; Esposito, E

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the production, characterization and in vitro activity of ethosomes containing two molecules with antiviral activity, such as acyclovir (ACY) and N1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-pyrazole [3,4d]pyridazin-7(6p-chlorine-phenyl)-one nucleoside (N1CP). Ethosomes were prepared and morphologically characterized by Cryo-TEM. The encapsulation efficiency was 92.3 +/- 2.5% for ACY and 94.2 +/- 2.8% for N1CP. The release of the drug from vesicles, determined by a Franz cell method, indicated that both drugs were released in a controlled manner. In order to possibly guarantee the stability during long-term storage ethosome suspensions was freeze-dried. It was found that the freeze-dried ethosomes' cakes were compact, glassy characterized by low density and quick re-hydration. However, the storage time slightly influences the percentage of drug encapsulation within ethosomes showing a drug leakage after re-hydration around 10%. The antiviral activity against HSV-1 of both drugs was tested by plaque reduction assay in monolayer cultures of Vero cells. Data showed that ethosomes allowed a reduction of the ED50 of N1CP evidencing an increase of its antiviral activity. However, ACY remains more active than N1CP. No differences are appreciable between drug-containing ethosomes before and after freeze-drying. Taken together these results, ethosomal formulation could be possibly proposed as mean for topical administration of anti-herpetic molecules.

  19. Solid-to-fluid DNA transition inside HSV-1 capsid close to the temperature of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Sae-Ueng, Udom; Li, Dong; Zuo, Xiaobing; Huffman, Jamie B.; Homa, Fred L.; Rau, Donald; Evilevitch, Alex

    2014-10-01

    DNA in the human Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid is packaged to a tight density. This leads to tens of atmospheres of internal pressure responsible for the delivery of the herpes genome into the cell nucleus. In this study we show that, despite its liquid crystalline state inside the capsid, the DNA is fluid-like, which facilitates its ejection into the cell nucleus during infection. We found that the sliding friction between closely packaged DNA strands, caused by interstrand repulsive interactions, is reduced by the ionic environment of epithelial cells and neurons susceptible to herpes infection. However, variations in the ionic conditions corresponding to neuronal activity can restrict DNA mobility in the capsid, making it more solid-like. This can inhibit intranuclear DNA release and interfere with viral replication. In addition, the temperature of the human host (37 °C) induces a disordering transition of the encapsidated herpes genome, which reduces interstrand interactions and provides genome mobility required for infection.

  20. Expression of HSV-1 Receptors in EBV-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease Determines Susceptibility to Oncolytic HSV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin-Yi; Currier, Mark A; Hansford, Loen; Kaplan, David; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Mo, Xiaokui; Cripe, Timothy P

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. Because PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate, and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas down-regulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a neuroblastoma cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact anti-viral PKR signaling. PMID:23254370

  1. Conformational analysis of a quinolonic ribonucleoside with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane D.; Velloso, Marcia Helena R.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. de V.; Sugiura, Makiko; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Santos, Fernanda da C.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V. de; Cunha, Anna Claudia; Seidl, Peter R.; Alencastro, Ricardo B. de; Ferreira, Vitor F.

    2011-01-01

    The infections caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus are one of the most common sources of diseases in adults and several natural nucleoside analogues are currently used in the treatment of these infections. In vitro tests of a series of quinolonic ribonucleosides derivatives synthesized by part of our group indicated that some of them have antiviral activity against HSV-1. The conformational analysis of bioactive compounds is extremely important in order to better understand their chemical structures and biological activity. In this work, we have carried out a nuclear relaxation NMR study of 6-Me ribonucleoside derivative in order to determine if the syn or anti conformation is preferential. The NMR analysis permits the determination of inter-atomic distances by using techniques which are based on nuclear relaxation and related phenomena. Those techniques are non-selective longitudinal or spin-lattice relaxation rates and NULL pulse sequence, which allow the determination of distances between pairs of hydrogen atoms. The results of NMR studies were compared with those obtained by molecular modeling.

  2. Genome-Wide Mouse Mutagenesis Reveals CD45-Mediated T Cell Function as Critical in Protective Immunity to HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Caignard, Grégory; Leiva-Torres, Gabriel A.; Leney-Greene, Michael; Charbonneau, Benoit; Dumaine, Anne; Fodil-Cornu, Nassima; Pyzik, Michal; Cingolani, Pablo; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Dupaul-Chicoine, Jeremy; Guo, Huaijian; Saleh, Maya; Veillette, André; Lathrop, Marc; Blanchette, Mathieu; Majewski, Jacek; Pearson, Angela; Vidal, Silvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a lethal neurological disease resulting from infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1). Loss-of-function mutations in the UNC93B1, TLR3, TRIF, TRAF3, and TBK1 genes have been associated with a human genetic predisposition to HSE, demonstrating the UNC93B-TLR3-type I IFN pathway as critical in protective immunity to HSV-1. However, the TLR3, UNC93B1, and TRIF mutations exhibit incomplete penetrance and represent only a minority of HSE cases, perhaps reflecting the effects of additional host genetic factors. In order to identify new host genes, proteins and signaling pathways involved in HSV-1 and HSE susceptibility, we have implemented the first genome-wide mutagenesis screen in an in vivo HSV-1 infectious model. One pedigree (named P43) segregated a susceptible trait with a fully penetrant phenotype. Genetic mapping and whole exome sequencing led to the identification of the causative nonsense mutation L3X in the Receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase C gene (PtprcL3X), which encodes for the tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Expression of MCP1, IL-6, MMP3, MMP8, and the ICP4 viral gene were significantly increased in the brain stems of infected PtprcL3X mice accounting for hyper-inflammation and pathological damages caused by viral replication. PtprcL3X mutation drastically affects the early stages of thymocytes development but also the final stage of B cell maturation. Transfer of total splenocytes from heterozygous littermates into PtprcL3X mice resulted in a complete HSV-1 protective effect. Furthermore, T cells were the only cell population to fully restore resistance to HSV-1 in the mutants, an effect that required both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and could be attributed to function of CD4+ T helper 1 (Th1) cells in CD8+ T cell recruitment to the site of infection. Altogether, these results revealed the CD45-mediated T cell function as potentially critical for infection and viral spread to the brain, and also for subsequent

  3. Transforming thymidine into a magnetic resonance imaging probe for monitoring gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Liu, Guanshu; Liang, Yajie; Yadav, Nirbhay N; McMahon, Michael T; Walczak, Piotr; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pomper, Martin G; Tallman, Keri A; Greenberg, Marc M; van Zijl, Peter C M; Bulte, Jeff W M; Gilad, Assaf A

    2013-01-30

    Synthetic chemistry has revolutionized the understanding of many biological systems. Small compounds that act as agonists and antagonists of proteins, and occasionally as imaging probes, have contributed tremendously to the elucidation of many biological pathways. Nevertheless, the function of thousands of proteins is still elusive, and designing new imaging probes remains a challenge. Through screening and characterization, we identified a thymidine analogue as a probe for imaging the expression of herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK). To detect the probe, we used chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging (CEST-MRI), in which a dynamic exchange process between an exchangeable proton and the surrounding water protons is used to amplify the desired contrast. Initially, five pyrimidine-based molecules were recognized as putative imaging agents, since their exchangeable imino protons resonate at 5-6 ppm from the water proton frequency and their detection is therefore less affected by endogenous CEST contrast or confounded by direct water saturation. Increasing the pK(a) value of the imino proton by reduction of its 5,6-double bond results in a significant reduction of the exchange rate (k(ex)) between this proton and the water protons. This reduced k(ex) of the dihydropyrimidine nucleosides fulfills the "slow to intermediate regime" condition for generating high CEST-MRI contrast. Consequently, we identified 5-methyl-5,6-dihydrothymidine as the optimal probe and demonstrated its feasibility for in vivo imaging of HSV1-TK. In light of these findings, this new approach can be generalized for designing specific probes for the in vivo imaging of a variety of proteins and enzymes.

  4. Characterization of a Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Chimera in Which the Us3 Protein Kinase Gene Is Replaced with the HSV-2 Us3 Gene.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Keiko; Kato, Akihisa; Koyanagi, Naoto; Sagara, Hiroshi; Arii, Jun; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2015-10-21

    Us3 protein kinases encoded by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) play important roles in viral replication and pathogenicity. To investigate type-specific differences between HSV-1 Us3 and HSV-2 Us3 in cells infected by viruses with all the same viral gene products except for their Us3 kinases, we constructed and characterized a recombinant HSV-1 in which its Us3 gene was replaced with the HSV-2 Us3 gene. Replacement of HSV-1 Us3 with HSV-2 Us3 had no apparent effect on viral growth in cell cultures or on the range of proteins phosphorylated by Us3. HSV-2 Us3 efficiently compensated for HSV-1 Us3 functions, including blocking apoptosis, controlling infected cell morphology, and downregulating cell surface expression of viral envelope glycoprotein B. In contrast, replacement of HSV-1 Us3 by HSV-2 Us3 changed the phosphorylation status of UL31 and UL34, which are critical viral regulators of nuclear egress. It also caused aberrant localization of these viral proteins and aberrant accumulation of primary enveloped virions in membranous vesicle structures adjacent to the nuclear membrane, and it reduced viral cell-cell spread in cell cultures and pathogenesis in mice. These results clearly demonstrated biological differences between HSV-1 Us3 and HSV-2 Us3, especially in regulation of viral nuclear egress and phosphorylation of viral regulators critical for this process. Our study also suggested that the regulatory role(s) of HSV-1 Us3, which was not carried out by HSV-2 Us3, was important for HSV-1 cell-cell spread and pathogenesis in vivo. A previous study comparing the phenotypes of HSV-1 and HSV-2 suggested that the HSV-2 Us3 kinase lacked some of the functions of HSV-1 Us3 kinase. The difference between HSV-1 and HSV-2 Us3 kinases appeared to be due to the fact that some Us3 phosphorylation sites in HSV-1 proteins are not conserved in the corresponding HSV-2 proteins. Therefore, we generated recombinant HSV-1 strains YK781 (Us3-chimera) with HSV-2 Us3

  5. Subcellular Trafficking and Functional Relationship of the HSV-1 Glycoproteins N and M

    PubMed Central

    Striebinger, Hannah; Funk, Christina; Raschbichler, Verena; Bailer, Susanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein N (gN/UL49.5) is a type I transmembrane protein conserved throughout the herpesvirus family. gN is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum that in the presence of gM is translocated to the trans Golgi network. gM and gN are covalently linked by a single disulphide bond formed between cysteine 46 of gN and cysteine 59 of gM. Exit of gN from the endoplasmic reticulum requires the N-terminal core of gM composed of eight transmembrane domains but is independent of the C-terminal extension of gM. Co-transport of gN and gM to the trans Golgi network also occurs upon replacement of conserved cysteines in gM and gN, suggesting that their physical interaction is mediated by covalent and non-covalent forces. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mutagenesis generated mutant viruses with wild-type growth behaviour, while full deletion of gM/UL10 resulted in an attenuated phenotype. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 in conjunction with various gM/UL10 mutants reduced average plaque sizes to the same extent as either single gM/UL10 mutant, indicating that gN is nonessential for the function performed by gM. We propose that gN functions in gM-dependent as well as gM-independent processes during which it is complemented by other viral factors. PMID:26999189

  6. ET: EPICS TCL/TK interface

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, B.

    1995-02-01

    This document describes the tc1 command and command types which are used to communicate with EPICS database servers. The application libraries upon which et is built include tc1, tk, tc1-dp, and blt. The reader of this document is assumed to be familiar with tc1/tk.

  7. Expression of herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia of normal and HSV-1 infected mice.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, S Krisztian; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Prandovszky, Emese; Dosa, Sandor; Bacsa, Sarolta; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Shukla, Deepak; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor

    2009-10-01

    Herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) plays a critical role in the regulation of inflammation through interaction with its natural ligands LIGHT and lymphotoxin alpha and also serves as one of the entry receptors of herpes simplex virus (HSV). The purpose of this study was to better understand the expression of HVEM in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG), which are important targets of HSV infection. Immunohistochemistry was used to define HVEM expression in the cornea and TG of normal and HSV-1 infected mice euthanized 2 to 5 days or 7 months following corneal inoculation of virus. We found that HVEM is widely expressed in the normal corneal epithelium and endothelium, is weakly and focally expressed in the corneal stroma, and is expressed in a portion of neurons and non-neuronal cells in the TG. Acute HSV-1 keratitis and ganglionitis were associated with increased HVEM expression in the corneal epithelium and stroma and in neurons and non-neuronal cells of TG, and many inflammatory cells in these tissues also expressed HVEM. TG derived from mice 7 months after virus inoculation demonstrated latent HSV-1 infection that was associated with increased HVEM expression in neurons and non-neuronal cells relative to uninfected control tissues. Latent TG also contained focal infiltrates of mononuclear inflammatory cells, many of which expressed HVEM. Corneas derived from latently infected mice demonstrated chronic keratitis, with no evidence of virus replication or increased HVEM expression in the corneal epithelium, and inflammatory cells present showed only weak HVEM expression. HVEM is expressed in the cornea and TG and therefore may serve as an HSV entry receptor in these tissues. Furthermore, these findings raise the possibility that changes in HVEM expression following ocular HSV-1 infection can modulate HSV spread and infection-induced inflammation in the cornea and TG.

  8. Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor Expressing Cells Infiltrating the Cornea Control Corneal Nerve Degeneration in Response to HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chucair-Elliott, Ana J.; Gurung, Hem R.; Carr, Meghan M.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is a leading cause of neurotrophic keratitis, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensation due to damage to the sensory corneal innervation. We previously reported the elicited immune response to infection contributes to the mechanism of corneal nerve regression/damage during acute HSV-1 infection. Our aim is to further establish the involvement of infiltrated macrophages in the mechanism of nerve loss upon infection. Methods Macrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic C57BL/6 mice were systemically treated with AP20187 dimerizer or vehicle (VEH), and their corneas, lymph nodes, and blood were assessed for CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cell depletion by flow cytometry (FC). Mice were ocularly infected with HSV-1 or left uninfected. At 2, 4, and/or 6 days post infection (PI), corneas were assessed for sensitivity and harvested for FC, nerve structure by immunohistochemistry, viral content by plaque assay, soluble factor content by suspension array, and activation of signaling pathways by Western blot analysis. C57BL6 mice were used to compare to the MAFIA mouse model. Results MAFIA mice treated with AP20187 had efficient depletion of CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cells in the tissues analyzed. The reduction of CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cells recruited to the infected corneas of AP20187-treated mice correlated with preservation of corneal nerve structure and function, decreased protein concentration of inflammatory cytokines, and decreased STAT3 activation despite no changes in viral content in the cornea compared to VEH-treated animals. Conclusions Our results suggest infiltrated macrophages are early effectors in the nerve regression following HSV-1 infection. We propose the neurodegeneration mechanism involves macrophages, local up-regulation of IL-6, and activation of STAT3. PMID:28903153

  9. Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor Expressing Cells Infiltrating the Cornea Control Corneal Nerve Degeneration in Response to HSV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Gurung, Hem R; Carr, Meghan M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is a leading cause of neurotrophic keratitis, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensation due to damage to the sensory corneal innervation. We previously reported the elicited immune response to infection contributes to the mechanism of corneal nerve regression/damage during acute HSV-1 infection. Our aim is to further establish the involvement of infiltrated macrophages in the mechanism of nerve loss upon infection. Macrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic C57BL/6 mice were systemically treated with AP20187 dimerizer or vehicle (VEH), and their corneas, lymph nodes, and blood were assessed for CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cell depletion by flow cytometry (FC). Mice were ocularly infected with HSV-1 or left uninfected. At 2, 4, and/or 6 days post infection (PI), corneas were assessed for sensitivity and harvested for FC, nerve structure by immunohistochemistry, viral content by plaque assay, soluble factor content by suspension array, and activation of signaling pathways by Western blot analysis. C57BL6 mice were used to compare to the MAFIA mouse model. MAFIA mice treated with AP20187 had efficient depletion of CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cells in the tissues analyzed. The reduction of CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cells recruited to the infected corneas of AP20187-treated mice correlated with preservation of corneal nerve structure and function, decreased protein concentration of inflammatory cytokines, and decreased STAT3 activation despite no changes in viral content in the cornea compared to VEH-treated animals. Our results suggest infiltrated macrophages are early effectors in the nerve regression following HSV-1 infection. We propose the neurodegeneration mechanism involves macrophages, local up-regulation of IL-6, and activation of STAT3.

  10. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE) domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Christine M; Ifrim, Marius F; Cowan, Ann E; Weller, Sandra K

    2009-10-01

    Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE) domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC) during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70), the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  11. Neurotrophic Factors NGF, GDNF and NTN Selectively Modulate HSV1 and HSV2 Lytic Infection and Reactivation in Primary Adult Sensory and Autonomic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yanez, Andy A; Harrell, Telvin; Sriranganathan, Heather J; Ives, Angela M; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-02-07

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) establish latency in peripheral ganglia after ocular or genital infection, and can reactivate to produce different patterns and frequencies of recurrent disease. Previous studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF) maintains HSV1 latency in embryonic sympathetic and sensory neurons. However, adult sensory neurons are no longer dependent on NGF for survival, some populations cease expression of NGF receptors postnatally, and the viruses preferentially establish latency in different populations of sensory neurons responsive to other neurotrophic factors (NTFs). Thus, NGF may not maintain latency in adult sensory neurons. To identify NTFs important for maintaining HSV1 and HSV2 latency in adult neurons, we investigated acute and latently-infected primary adult sensory trigeminal (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG) after NTF removal. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) deprivation induced HSV1 reactivation in adult sympathetic neurons. In adult sensory neurons, however, neurturin (NTN) and GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 and HSV2 reactivation, respectively, while NGF deprivation had no effects. Furthermore, HSV1 and HSV2 preferentially reactivated from neurons expressing GFRα2 and GFRα1, the high affinity receptors for NTN and GDNF, respectively. Thus, NTN and GDNF play a critical role in selective maintenance of HSV1 and HSV2 latency in primary adult sensory neurons.

  12. The effects of Xalatan on the recovery of ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in the induced reactivation and spontaneous shedding rabbit models.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Y Jerold; Yates, Kathleen A; Mah, Francis S; Romanowski, Eric G

    2003-06-01

    Xalatan treatment has been reported both clinically and experimentally to promote recurrences of herpetic keratitis. Our goal was to determine the effects of topical Xalatan and its components on the recovery of ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in the Induced Reactivation (IR) and Spontaneous Shedding (SS) HSV-1/NZW rabbit latency models using virological outcome measures. HSV-1 latently-infected rabbits in both the IR and SS studies were divided into different topical treatment groups to evaluate commercial Xalatan, its preservatives, and vehicle against appropriate negative and positive controls. In the IR Studies, 91 rabbits received intra-stromal injections of water in both eyes to promote ocular shedding of latent HSV-1. All eyes were then treated and cultured for 10 days. In the SS Studies, 65 rabbits were treated and cultured in both eyes for 30 days. Dexamethasone, a positive control, promoted extensive ocular shedding of HSV-1 in both the IR and SS Models. In general, neither Xalatan nor its components demonstrated any adverse effects, but some experimental variation was noted. All groups demonstrated comparable recovery of latent HSV-1 from respective trigeminal ganglia. Our experimental studies support the world wide clinical epidemiological experience that commercial Xalatan does not appear to promote HSV-1 ocular shedding.

  13. Neurotrophic Factors NGF, GDNF and NTN Selectively Modulate HSV1 and HSV2 Lytic Infection and Reactivation in Primary Adult Sensory and Autonomic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yanez, Andy A.; Harrell, Telvin; Sriranganathan, Heather J.; Ives, Angela M.; Bertke, Andrea S.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) establish latency in peripheral ganglia after ocular or genital infection, and can reactivate to produce different patterns and frequencies of recurrent disease. Previous studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF) maintains HSV1 latency in embryonic sympathetic and sensory neurons. However, adult sensory neurons are no longer dependent on NGF for survival, some populations cease expression of NGF receptors postnatally, and the viruses preferentially establish latency in different populations of sensory neurons responsive to other neurotrophic factors (NTFs). Thus, NGF may not maintain latency in adult sensory neurons. To identify NTFs important for maintaining HSV1 and HSV2 latency in adult neurons, we investigated acute and latently-infected primary adult sensory trigeminal (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG) after NTF removal. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) deprivation induced HSV1 reactivation in adult sympathetic neurons. In adult sensory neurons, however, neurturin (NTN) and GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 and HSV2 reactivation, respectively, while NGF deprivation had no effects. Furthermore, HSV1 and HSV2 preferentially reactivated from neurons expressing GFRα2 and GFRα1, the high affinity receptors for NTN and GDNF, respectively. Thus, NTN and GDNF play a critical role in selective maintenance of HSV1 and HSV2 latency in primary adult sensory neurons. PMID:28178213

  14. Anti-HSV Activity of Kuwanon X from Mulberry Leaves with Genes Expression Inhibitory and HSV-1 Induced NF-κB Deactivated Properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Shen, Wenwei; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Li, Manmei; Wang, Yifei; Zou, Yuxiao; Li, Yaolan; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Six stilbene derivatives isolated from Mulberry leaves including Kuwanon X, Mulberrofuran C, Mulberrofuran G, Moracin C, Moracin M 3'-O-b-glucopyranoside and Moracin M were found to have antiviral effects against herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) at different potencies except for Mulberrofuran G. Kuwanon X exhibited the greatest activity against HSV-1 15577 and clinical strains and HSV-2 strain 333 with IC50 values of 2.2, 1.5 and 2.5 µg/mL, respectively. Further study revealed that Kuwanon X did not inactivate cell-free HSV-1 particles, but inhibited cellular adsorption and penetration of HSV-1 viral particles. Following viral penetration, Kuwanon X reduced the expression of HSV-1 IE and L genes, and decreased the synthesis of HSV-1 DNA. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that Kuwanon X inhibited the HSV-1-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation through blocking the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB. These results suggest that Kuwanon X exerts anti-HSV activity through multiple modes and could be a potential candidate for the therapy of HSV infection.

  15. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation

    PubMed Central

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Simpson, Jennifer L.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the explant TG induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT(+) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT(−) virus) were irradiated with UV-B and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT(−) virus, LAT(+) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B induced reactivation model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs are discussed. PMID:26002839

  16. Retrovirus transduction: segregation of the viral transforming function and the herpes simplex virus tk gene in infectious Friend spleen focus-forming virus thymidine kinase vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, A L; Bernstein, A

    1983-01-01

    A series of deletions and insertions utilizing the herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene (tk) were constructed in the murine retrovirus Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV). In all cases, the coding region for the SFFV-specific glycoprotein (gp55), which is implicated in erythroleukemic transformation, was left intact. These SFFV-TK and SFFV deletion vectors were analyzed for expression of tk and gp55 after DNA-mediated gene transfer. In addition, virus rescued by cotransfection of these vectors with Moloney murine leukemia virus was analyzed for infectious TK-transducing virus, gp55 expression, and erythroleukemia-inducing ability. The experiments demonstrated that deletions or insertions within the intron for the gp55 env gene can interfere with expression of gp55 after both DNA-mediated gene transfer and virus infection. In contrast, the gene transfer efficiency of the tk gene was unaffected in the SFFV-TK vectors, and high-titer infectious TK virus could be recovered. Revertant viruses capable of inducing erythroleukemia and expressing gp55 were generated after cotransfection of the SFFV-TK vectors with murine leukemia virus. The revertant viruses lost both tk sequences and the ability to transduce TK- fibroblasts to a TK+ phenotype. These experiments demonstrate that segregation of the TK and erythroleukemia functions can occur in retrovirus vectors which initially carry both markers. Images PMID:6318088

  17. Efficacy of the ND:YAG laser therapy on EBV and HSV1 contamination in periodontal pockets.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Francesco Saverio; Bacci, Giovanni; Martelli, Maria Laura; Nobili, Piero; Boddi, Anna; Rosati, Claudio; Fanti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to verify the efficacy of Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of periodontal pockets infected by Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1). Subgingival plaque samples of 291 Italian periodontal patients were analyzed by Real Time PCR to evaluate the frequency of both viruses before and after Nd:YAG laser-assisted periodontal treatment. Before treatment, EBV and HSV1 were observed in 29.9% and in 3.8% of periodontal patients respectively, while co-infection with both viruses was detected in 1.7% of cases. Periodontal Nd:YAG laser treatment ("Periodontal Biological Laser-Assisted Therapy", PERIOBLAST) produced statistical significant benefits, especially in EBV periodontal infection: 78.2% of EBV positive patients became EBV-negative following treatment. Results of this preliminary study highlight that EBV is found in periodontal pockets more frequently than HSV1, supporting the theory of the potential role of EBV in the onset and progression of periodontal disease. Moreover, our data showed that Nd:YAG laser-assisted periodontal treatment (Perioblast) is also effective in case of viral infection, validating evidences that it represents a successful alternative approach to traditional periodontal protocols.

  18. Early activation of MyD88-mediated autophagy sustains HSV-1 replication in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Siracusano, Gabriel; Venuti, Assunta; Lombardo, Daniele; Mastino, Antonio; Esclatine, Audrey; Sciortino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that exerts numerous functions in vital biological processes. Among these, it contributes to both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, pathogens have evolved strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own advantage. By monitoring autophagic markers, we showed that HSV-1 transiently induced autophagosome formation during early times of the infection of monocytic THP-1 cells and human monocytes. Autophagy is induced in THP-1 cells by a mechanism independent of viral gene expression or viral DNA accumulation. We found that the MyD88 signaling pathway is required for HSV-1-mediated autophagy, and it is linked to the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological modulators or siRNA knockdown impaired viral replication in both THP-1 cells and human monocytes, suggest that the virus exploits the autophagic machinery to its own benefit in these cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that the early autophagic response induced by HSV-1 exerts a proviral role, improving viral production in a semi-permissive model such as THP-1 cells and human monocytes. PMID:27509841

  19. Ellagitannins as synergists of ACV on the replication of ACV-resistant strains of HSV 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Vilhelmova-Ilieva, N; Jacquet, R; Quideau, S; Galabov, A S

    2014-10-01

    The plant-derived polyphenolic compounds castalagin, vescalagin and grandinin (C-glucosidic ellagitannins containing nonahydroxyterphenoyl) manifested a strong inhibitory effect on the replication of acyclovir-resistant strains of herpes simplex viruses (HSV) type 1 and 2 in MDBK cells in focus forming units (i.e., microscopically registered microplaques) reduction assay and in two variants of cytopathic effect inhibition test. The effect on the acyclovir (ACV)-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain was markedly higher compared to that on the ACV-resistant herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). The three compounds showed comparable levels of antiviral activity against ACV-resistant HSV strains, in contrast with previous results where castalagin exerted the highest degree of activity against wild type HSV strains (Vilhelmova et al., 2011). Combinations of ellagitannins and ACV were tested on the ACV-resistant strains of both HSV-1 and 2 and produced synergistic effects that were revealed by applying the three-dimensional approach of Prichard and Shipman (1990). The ellagitannin(s)-ACV combination applied against ACV-resistant HSV-1 produced a much stronger synergistic effect compared to the effect observed against ACV-resistant HSV-2. The study of the effects of the combination ellagitannin(s)-ACF on intact cell monolayers did not show any toxicity resulting from interaction between the two substances. Altogether, the results obtained in this study demonstrate the highly promising potential of these plant polyphenols as antiherpetic agents.

  20. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) regulates host defense and protects mice against herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Hung-Ching; Stopford, Charles M; Zhang, Zhigang; Damania, Blossom; Baldwin, Albert S

    2016-12-13

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mediates cellular responses to multiple cytokines, governs gene expression, and regulates the development and activation of immune cells. STAT3 also modulates reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) in ganglia. However, it is unclear how STAT3 regulates the innate immune response during the early phase of HSV-1 lytic infection. Many cell types critical for the innate immunity are derived from the myeloid lineage. Therefore, in this study, we used myeloid-specific Stat3 knockout mice to investigate the role of STAT3 in the innate immune response against HSV-1. Our results demonstrate that Stat3 knockout bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) expressed decreased levels of interferon-α (IFN-α) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) upon HSV-1 infection. In vivo, knockout mice were more susceptible to HSV-1, as marked by higher viral loads and more significant weight loss. Splenic expression of IFN-α and ISGs was reduced in the absence of STAT3, indicating that STAT3 is required for optimal type I interferon response to HSV-1. Expression of TNF-α and IL-12, cytokines that have been shown to limit HSV-1 replication and pathogenesis, was also significantly lower in knockout mice. Interestingly, Stat3 knockout mice failed to expand the CD8(+) conventional DC (cDC) population upon HSV-1 infection, and this was accompanied by impaired NK and CD8 T cell activation. Collectively, our data demonstrate that myeloid-specific Stat3 deletion causes defects in multiple aspects of the immune system and that STAT3 has a protective role at the early stage of systemic HSV-1 infection.

  1. Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) into the Distal Axons of Trigeminal Neurons Favors the Onset of Nonproductive, Silent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eing, Bodo R.; Müller, Marcus; King, Nicholas J. C.; Klupp, Barbara; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Kühn, Joachim E.

    2012-01-01

    Following productive, lytic infection in epithelia, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) establishes a lifelong latent infection in sensory neurons that is interrupted by episodes of reactivation. In order to better understand what triggers this lytic/latent decision in neurons, we set up an organotypic model based on chicken embryonic trigeminal ganglia explants (TGEs) in a double chamber system. Adding HSV-1 to the ganglion compartment (GC) resulted in a productive infection in the explants. By contrast, selective application of the virus to distal axons led to a largely nonproductive infection that was characterized by the poor expression of lytic genes and the presence of high levels of the 2.0-kb major latency-associated transcript (LAT) RNA. Treatment of the explants with the immediate-early (IE) gene transcriptional inducer hexamethylene bisacetamide, and simultaneous co-infection of the GC with HSV-1, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) or pseudorabies virus (PrV) helper virus significantly enhanced the ability of HSV-1 to productively infect sensory neurons upon axonal entry. Helper-virus-induced transactivation of HSV-1 IE gene expression in axonally-infected TGEs in the absence of de novo protein synthesis was dependent on the presence of functional tegument protein VP16 in HSV-1 helper virus particles. After the establishment of a LAT-positive silent infection in TGEs, HSV-1 was refractory to transactivation by superinfection of the GC with HSV-1 but not with HSV-2 and PrV helper virus. In conclusion, the site of entry appears to be a critical determinant in the lytic/latent decision in sensory neurons. HSV-1 entry into distal axons results in an insufficient transactivation of IE gene expression and favors the establishment of a nonproductive, silent infection in trigeminal neurons. PMID:22589716

  2. Prostate-Specific and Tumor-Specific Targeting of an Oncolytic HSV-1 Amplicon/Helper Virus for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Targeting of an Oncolytic HSV - 1 Amplicon/Helper Virus for Prostate Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cleo Lee CONTRACTING...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate-Specific and Tumor-Specific Targeting of an Oncolytic HSV - 1 Amplicon/Helper Virus for Prostate Cancer Treatment...untranslated region (3’UTR) of a herpes simplex virus- 1 ( HSV - 1 ) essential viral gene, ICP4, to create CMV-ICP4-143T and CMV-ICP4-145T amplicon viruses. Our

  3. Enhanced resistance of CXCR3 deficient mice to ocular HSV-1 infection is due to control of replication in the brain ependyma.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Chandra M; Zheng, Min; Carr, Daniel J J

    2014-11-15

    CXCR3 deficient (CXCR3(-/-)) mice are resistant to ocular HSV-1 infection in that less mice develop encephalitis and succumb to infection in comparison to wild type (WT) animals. A region of the brain previously identified to be crucial for development of encephalitis was evaluated in HSV-1-infected CXCR3(-/-) and WT mice. In this region, known as the ependyma, viral titer, infiltrating leukocyte populations, and key anti-viral cytokine message levels were evaluated. We found that CXCR3(-/-) mice possessed significantly less HSV-1 and expressed significantly more IFN-β mRNA in the brain ependyma compared to WT animals during the development of encephalitis.

  4. [HSV-1 and HSV-2 seropositivity rates in pregnant women admitted to Izmir Ataturk Research and Training Hospital, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Rahim; Er, Hakan; Baran, Nurten; Vural, Ahmet; Demirci, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    In this study, the seropositivity rates of herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and their distribution according to the age groups in the sera of asymptomatic pregnant women who were admitted to Gynecology and Obstetrics clinics of Izmir Ataturk Research and Training Hospital for routine control, were investigated. IgG and IgM antibodies specific for HSV-1 and HSV-2 were screened by commercial ELISA kits (RADIM SpA-Pomezia, Italia). Total IgG seropositivity rates for HSV-1 and HSV-2 were found as 94.7% (108/114) and 8.2% (13/158), while IgM seropositivities were 0 (0/114) and 1.4% (2/148), respectively. The distribution of HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgG seropositivity rates according to the age groups were as follows; 100% (8/8) and 10% (1/10) in 18-20; 92.9% (26/28) and 13.9% (5/36) in 21-25; 93.3% (42/45) and 3% (2/66) in 26-30; 96.6% (28/29) and 8.3% (3/36) in 31-35 and 100% (4/4) and 20% (2/10) in 36-40 years age groups, respectively. HSV-2 IgM antibodies were positive only in 21-25 years age group (2/35; 5.7%). The difference between seropositivity rates of HSV-1 IgG and HSV-2 IgG were found statistically significant (p = 0.000, p < 0.05); whereas the differences between both HSV-1 IgG and IgM and HSV-2 IgG and IgM seropositivity rates in the age groups didn't display statistical significance (p = 0.872, p> 0.05; p = 0.217, p> 0.05). The aim of this letter was to contribute to the seroepidemiological data of HSV prevalance in pregnant women in our region.

  5. Seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in Canadian women screened for enrolment in a herpes simplex virus vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Gorfinkel, I S; Aoki, F; McNeil, S; Dionne, M; Shafran, S D; Zickler, P; Halperin, S; Langley, J; Bellamy, A; Schulte, J; Heineman, T; Belshe, R

    2013-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections continue to be among the most common and unrecognized sexually transmitted infections in the world. Although treatable, HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections remain incurable. Hence, there is interest in the development of a vaccine to prevent genital herpes. As part of a multicentre, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to test such a vaccine, healthy women 18-30 years were enrolled as volunteers in several Canadian centres between 2005 and 2007. This study reports the seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in this group. A total of 2694 adult female volunteers in Canada with no known history of herpes simplex were screened for HSV antibodies using Western blot assay (the gold standard for diagnosis of HSV) for potential participation in a randomized, double-blind efficacy field trial of a herpes simplex vaccine. This trial provides a unique opportunity to examine the prevalence of antibodies to HSV-1 and of antibodies to HSV-2 in women with no known history of herpes simplex infection. The prevalence of antibodies to HSV-1 and to HSV-2 is compared with that found in previous Canadian studies that focused on a more general population. The overall seroprevalence of antibody to HSV-1 was 43%; that of HSV-2 was 2.5% and seropositivity to both was 2%. The prevalence of antibody to both HSV-1 and to HSV-2 increased with age. Seronegativity to both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was 56% in participating centres with populations under 250,000 and 46% in participating centres with populations over 250,000. Significant racial differences in seropositivity to HSV-1 and to HSV-2 were noted. The likelihood of participants being seropositive to HSV-1 and to HSV-2 was found to increase with age and to positively correlate with the population of the city in which they resided. Hypotheses are proposed to account for differences in racial seropositivity to HSV-1 and to HSV-2.

  6. A haploid HSV-1 genome platform for vector development: testing of the tetracycline-responsive switch shows interference by infected cell protein 0.

    PubMed

    Khalique, Hena; López Marco, Jorge; Lim, Filip

    2016-10-01

    Although herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has outstanding properties for gene delivery vectors and its genome is available in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) for mutagenesis studies, one impediment is the presence of approximately 15.4 kb of DNA sequences that are duplicated in the HSV-1 genome, complicating vector construction and stability. As a useful platform for building HSV-1 vectors, we have constructed a fully haploid HSV-1 genome BAC by deletion of one of these repeats, confirming that viral propagation in culture is not impaired. We used this ΔIR mutant to subsequently investigate whether the insertion of tetracycline-responsive tetO elements into the ICP34.5-ICP0 gene region can be used to control HSV-1 lytic replication. The results of the present study show that ΔIR mutants deleted for ICP34.5 are viable for replication but not when the ICP0 promoter is also disrupted, thus indicating that regulation of infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) levels in the absence of ICP34.5 could be a viable means for controlling growth of HSV-1 vectors. Surprisingly, however, the tetO elements inserted into the ICP0 promoter did not confer ligand responsiveness to growth or ICP0 expression. Further analysis by transfection experiments revealed that ICP0 itself interferes with the tetracycline switch and reduces the the inducibility of this system. Our new haploid HSV-1 BAC is a useful platform for building multiply deleted HSV-1 vectors. Deletion of the gene for ICP34.5 in this backbone renders viral growth dependent on ICP0, although ICP0 expression could not be regulated by tet-responsive transcriptional regulators. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A STING-dependent innate sensing pathway mediates resistance to corneal HSV-1 infection via upregulation of the antiviral effector tetherin

    PubMed Central

    Royer, D.J.; Carr, D.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 interferons (IFNα/β) mediate immunologic host resistance to numerous viral infections including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The pathways responsible for IFNα/β signaling during the innate immune response to acute HSV-1 infection in the cornea are incompletely understood. Using a murine ocular infection model, we hypothesized that the stimulator of IFN genes (STING) mediates resistance to HSV-1 infection at the ocular surface and preserves the structural integrity of this mucosal site. Viral pathogenesis, tissue pathology, and host immune responses during ocular HSV-1 infection were characterized by plaque assay, esthesiometry, pachymetry, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and siRNA transfection in wildtype C57BL/6 (WT), STING-deficient (STING−/−), and IFNα/β receptor-deficient (CD118−/−) mice at days 3–5 post infection. The presence of STING was critical for sustained control of HSV-1 replication in the corneal epithelium and neuroinvasion, but loss of STING had a negligible impact with respect to gross tissue pathology. Auxiliary STING-independent IFNα/β signaling pathways were responsible for maintenance of the corneal integrity. Lymphatic vessels, mast cells, and sensory innervation were compromised in CD118−/− mice concurrent with increased tissue edema. STING-dependent signaling led to the upregulation of tetherin, a viral restriction factor we identify is important in containing the spread of HSV-1 in vivo. PMID:26627457

  8. Protection from Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) 2 Infection with Replication-Defective HSV-2 or Glycoprotein D2 Vaccines in HSV-1 Seropositive and Seronegative Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Yo; Pesnicak, Lesley; Dowdell, Kennichi C.; Burbelo, Peter D.; Knipe, David M.; Straus, Stephen E.; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Background A herpes simplex virus (HSV) 2 candidate vaccine consisting of glycoprotein D (gD2) in alum and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) reduced genital herpes disease in HSV-1 seronegative women, but not in men or HSV-1 seropositive women. Methods To determine the effect of HSV-1 serostatus on effectiveness of different vaccines, we tested gD2 in alum/MPL, gD2 in Freund's adjuvant, and dl5-29 (a replication-defective HSV-2 mutant) in seropositive or seronegative guinea pigs. Results In HSV-1 seronegative animals, dl5-29 induced the highest titers of neutralizing antibody, and after vaginal challenge with wild-type virus, dl5-29 resulted in lower rates of vaginal shedding, lower levels of HSV DNA in ganglia, and a trend for less acute and recurrent genital herpes than the gD2 vaccines. In HSV-1 seropositive animals, all three vaccines induced similar titers of neutralizing antibodies and showed similar levels of protection against acute and recurrent genital herpes after vaginal challenge with wild-type virus, but dl5-29 reduced vaginal shedding after challenge more than the gD2 vaccines. Conclusions dl5-29 is an effective vaccine in both HSV-1 seropositive and seronegative guinea pigs, and was superior to gD2 vaccines in reducing virus shedding after challenge in both groups of animals which might reduce transmission of HSV-2. PMID:19702506

  9. Nonthermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Suppresses Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Replication in Corneal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Oleg; Donovan, Kelly; Limonnik, Vladimir; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Herpes keratitis (HK) is the leading cause of cornea-derived and infection-associated blindness in the developed world. Despite the availability of effective antivirals, some patients develop refractory disease, drug-resistant infection, and topical toxicity. A nonpharmaceutical treatment modality may offer a unique advantage in the management of such cases. This study investigated the antiviral effect of nonthermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma, a partially ionized gas that can be applied to organic substances to produce various biological effects. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells and explanted corneas were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and exposed to culture medium treated with nonthermal DBD plasma. The extent of infection was measured by plaque assay, quantitative PCR, and Western blot. Corneal toxicity assessment was performed with fluorescein staining, histologic examination, and 8-OHdG detection. Results Application of DBD plasma–treated medium to human corneal epithelial cells and explanted corneas produced a dose-dependent reduction of the cytopathic effect, viral genome replication, and the overall production of infectious viral progeny. Toxicity studies showed lack of detrimental effects in explanted human corneas. Conclusions Nonthermal DBD plasma substantially suppresses corneal HSV-1 infection in vitro and ex vivo without causing pronounced toxicity. Translational Relevance Nonthermal plasma is a versatile tool that holds great biomedical potential for ophthalmology, where it is being investigated for wound healing and sterilization and is already in use for ocular microsurgery. The anti-HSV-1 activity of DBD plasma demonstrated here could be directly translated to the clinic for use against drug-resistant herpes keratitis. PMID:24757592

  10. Treatment of Inflamed Pancreas with Enkephalin Encoding HSV-1 Recombinant Vector Reduces Inflammatory Damage and Behavioral Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying; McNearney, Terry A; Lin, Weidong; Wilson, Steven P; Yeomans, David C

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of pancreatic surface delivered enkephalin (ENK)-encoding herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) on spontaneous behaviors and spinal cord and pancreatic enkephalin expression in an experimental pancreatitis model. Replication-defective HSV-1 with proenkephalin complementary DNA (cDNA) (HSV-ENK) or control β-galactosidase cDNA (HSV-β-gal), or media vehicle (Veh) was applied to the pancreatic surface of rats with dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC)-induced pancreatitis. Spontaneous exploratory behavioral activity was monitored on days 0 and 6 post DBTC and vector treatments. The pancreas, thoracic dorsal root ganglia (DRG, T9-10), and spinal cord (T9-10) were immunostained for metenkephalin (met-ENK), β-gal, and HSV-1 proteins. Spinal cord was also immunostained for c-Fos, and pancreas was stained for the inflammatory marker regulated on activation, normal T-cells expressed and secreted (RANTES), mu-opioid receptor, and hemotoxylin/eosin. On day 6, compared to pancreatitis and vector controls, the DBTC/HSV-ENK treated rats had significantly improved spontaneous exploratory activities, increased met-ENK staining in the pancreas and spinal cord, and normalized c-Fos staining in the dorsal horn. Histopathology of pancreas in DBTC/HSV-ENK treated rats showed preservation of acinar cells and cytoarchitecture with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrates, compared to severe inflammation and acinar cell loss seen in DBTC/HSV-β-gal and DBTC/Veh treated rats. Targeted transgene delivery and met-ENK expression successfully produced decreased inflammation in experimental pancreatitis. PMID:17565349

  11. Anti-HSV-1 and HSV-2 Flavonoids and a New Kaempferol Triglycoside from the Medicinal Plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Ürményi, Fernanda Gouvêa Gomes; Saraiva, Georgia do Nascimento; Casanova, Livia Marques; Matos, Amanda Dos Santos; de Magalhães Camargo, Luiza Maria; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Costa, Sônia Soares

    2016-12-01

    Kalanchoe daigremontiana (Crassulaceae) is a medicinal plant native to Madagascar. The aim of this study was to investigate the flavonoid content of an aqueous leaf extract from K. daigremontiana (Kd), and assess its antiherpetic potential. The major flavonoid, kaempferol 3-O-β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (1), was isolated from the AcOEt fraction (Kd-AC). The BuOH-soluble fraction afforded quercetin 3-O-β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (2) and the new kaempferol 3-O-β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (3), named daigremontrioside. The crude extract, Kd-AC fraction, flavonoids 1 and 2 were evaluated using acyclovir-sensitive strains of HSV-1 and HSV-2. Kd-AC was highly active against HSV-1 (EC50  = 0.97 μg/ml, SI > 206.1) and HSV-2 (EC50  = 0.72 μg/ml, SI > 277.7). Flavonoids 1 and 2 showed anti-HSV-1 (EC50  = 7.4 μg/ml; SI > 27 and EC50  = 5.8 μg/ml; SI > 8.6, respectively) and anti-HSV-2 (EC50  = 9.0 μg/ml; SI > 22.2 and EC50  = 36.2 μg/ml; SI > 5.5, respectively) activities, suggesting the contribution of additional substances to the antiviral activity.

  12. Quantitative characterization of cell transduction by HSV-1 amplicons using flow cytometry and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbini, Yasser M; Stevenson, Mark M; Seymour, Leonard W; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2009-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon preparations are usually quantified as transducing units/ml (TU/ml), with little information on genomic copy/TU ratios. In the present study, two HSV-1 amplicons expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were analysed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and transducing activity to obtain genomic copy/TU ratios. One vector (pHSV-GL) contains the HSV-1 packaging signal (pac) and origin of replication (oriS) and the other (pHSV/EBV-GL) includes Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) episomal maintenance elements. The pHSV-GL and pHSV/EBV-GL amplicons were prepared at titres of 7.55x10(7) and 7.24x10(7)TU/ml, containing 2.56x10(9) and 1.33x10(9) genomic copies/ml respectively. This produced preliminary estimates of genomic copy/TU ratios of 34:1 and 18:1. However standard transduction conditions did not deplete fully the supernatant of transducing particles since the same supernatant was subsequently able to achieve 25% the initial transduction efficiency, although centrifugation of amplicon particles onto cells improved infectivity by 1.8-fold. Finally, qPCR analysis of FACS-purified EGFP-expressing cells showed the presence of approximately 3 amplicon genomes/transduced cell, independent of the infection dose. Accordingly, the initial estimated genomic copy/TU ratio for pHSV-GL was revised to 6.3:1. Measuring the genomic copy/TU ratios is an important parameter for comparing the quality of amplicon preparations and standardizing experimental conditions.

  13. Early collection of saliva specimens from Bell's palsy patients: quantitative analysis of HHV-6, HSV-1, and VZV.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Falasca, Francesca; Maida, Paola; Gaeta, Aurelia; De Vito, Corrado; Mancini, Patrizia; De Seta, Daniele; Covelli, Edoardo; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. Although it has been associated with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pregnancy, and preeclampsia, the etiology of Bell's palsy remains unknown. The reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) with subsequent inflammation and entrapment of the facial nerve in the narrow labyrinthine segment has been implicated as a cause of facial paralysis, but the active role of these viruses in Bell's palsy is still discussed. This study quantified HSV-1 DNA, VZV DNA, and HHV-6 DNA in 95 saliva samples collected from patients within 48 hr from the onset of paralysis. HSV-1, VZV, and HHV-6 were detected in 13%, 3%, and 61% of patients, respectively. The detection rate did not differ significantly between patients and a control group of healthy donors. Interestingly, however, the value of HHV-6 DNA copies was significantly higher than that detected in healthy donors. In addition, the mean value of HHV-6 DNA recorded in patients who had at least a one grade improvement of palsy at the first visit was significantly lower than that detected in patients who showed no change in facial palsy grade or an increase of at least one grade. These findings call into question the role of HSV-1 and VZV in the etiology of Bell's palsy, and suggest that HHV-6 may be involved in the development of the disease or that the underlying disease mechanism might predispose patients to HHV-6 reactivation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Molecular modeling studies of 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline ribonucleosides with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Seidl, Peter Rudolf; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca

    2011-12-01

    Eight human herpes viruses ( e.g., herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, Kaposi's sarcoma) are responsible for several diseases from sub-clinic manifestations to fatal infections, mostly in immunocompromised patients. The major limitations of the currently available antiviral drug therapy are drug resistance, host toxicity, and narrow spectrum of activity. However, some non-nucleoside 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline derivatives ( e.g., PNU-183792) [4] shows broad spectrum antiviral activity. We have developed molecular modeling studies, including molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, based on a model proposed by Liu and co-workers [14] in order to understand the mechanism of action of a 6-chloro substituted 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline ribonucleoside, synthesized by the synthetic group, which showed anti-HSV-1 activity [9]. The molecular docking simulations confirmed the Liu's model showing that the ligand needs to dislocate template residues from the active site in order to interact with the viral DNA polymerase enzyme, reinforcing that the interaction with the Val823 residue is pivotal for the inhibitory activity of non-nucleoside 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline derivatives, such as PNU-183792, with the HSV-1. The molecular dynamics simulations showed that the 6-chloro-benzyl group of PNU-183792 maintains its interaction with residues of the HSV-1 DNA polymerase hydrophobic pocket, considered important according to the Liu's model, and also showed that the methyl group bounded to the nitrogen atom from PNU-183792 is probably contributing to a push-pull effect with the carbonyl group.

  15. Phosphoramidate derivatives of acyclovir: synthesis and antiviral activity in HIV-1 and HSV-1 models in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zakirova, Natalia F; Shipitsyn, Alexander V; Jasko, Maxim V; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Andronova, Valeria L; Galegov, Georgiy A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Kochetkov, Sergey N

    2012-10-01

    The antiviral activity against HIV and HSV and the chemical stability of ACV phosphoramidate derivatives were studied. The phosphoramidates of ACV demonstrated moderate activity. The best compound appeared to be 9-(2-hydroxymethyl)guanine phosphoromonomorpholidate (7), which inhibited virus replication in pseudo-HIV-1 particles by 50% at 50 μM. It also inhibited replication of wild-type HSV-1 (9.7 μM) as well as an acyclovir-resistant strain (25 μM). None of the synthesised compounds showed any cytotoxicity.

  16. Macrophage IL-12p70 Signaling Prevents HSV-1–Induced CNS Autoimmunity Triggered by Autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Kevin R.; Gate, David; Zandian, Mandana; Allen, Sariah J.; Rajasagi, Naveen Kumar; van Rooijen, Nico; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Rouse, Barry T.; Flavell, Richard A.; Town, Terrence; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain self-tolerance and function to suppress overly exuberant immune responses. However, it is unclear whether innate immune cells modulate Treg function. Here the authors examined the role of innate immunity in lymphomyeloid homeostasis. Methods. The involvement of B cells, dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, and T cells in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination in different strains of mice infected ocularly with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was investigated. Results. The authors found that depletion of macrophages, but not DCs, B cells, NK cells, CD4+ T cells, or CD8+ T cells, induced CNS demyelination irrespective of virus or mouse strain. As with macrophage depletion, mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-12p35 or IL-12p40 showed CNS demyelination after HSV-1 infection, whereas demyelination was undetectable in HSV-1–infected, IL-23p19–deficient, or Epstein-Barr virus–induced gene 3-deficient mice. Demyelination could be rescued in macrophage-depleted mice after the injection of IL-12p70 DNA and in IL-12p35−/− or IL-12p40−/− mice after injection with IL-12p35 or IL-12p40 DNA or with recombinant viruses expressing IL-12p35 or IL-12p40. Using FoxP3-, CD4-, CD8-, or CD25-depletion and gene-deficient mouse approaches, the authors demonstrated that HSV-1–induced demyelination was blocked in the absence of CD4, CD25, or FoxP3 in macrophage-depleted mice. Flow cytometry showed an elevation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells in the spleens of infected macrophage-depleted mice, and adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells to infected macrophage-depleted severe combined immunodeficient mice induced CNS demyelination. Conclusions. The authors demonstrated that macrophage IL-12p70 signaling plays an important role in maintaining immune homeostasis in the CNS by preventing the development of autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs. PMID:21220560

  17. Barrier to auto integration factor becomes dephosphorylated during HSV-1 Infection and Can Act as a host defense by impairing viral DNA replication and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Augusta; Thunuguntla, Prasanth; Wicklund, April; Jones, Clinton; Wiebe, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    BAF (Barrier to Autointegration Factor) is a highly conserved DNA binding protein that senses poxviral DNA in the cytoplasm and tightly binds to the viral genome to interfere with DNA replication and transcription. To counteract BAF, a poxviral-encoded protein kinase phosphorylates BAF, which renders BAF unable to bind DNA and allows efficient viral replication to occur. Herein, we examined how BAF phosphorylation is affected by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and tested the ability of BAF to interfere with HSV-1 productive infection. Interestingly, we found that BAF phosphorylation decreases markedly following HSV-1 infection. To determine whether dephosphorylated BAF impacts HSV-1 productive infection, we employed cell lines stably expressing a constitutively unphosphorylated form of BAF (BAF-MAAAQ) and cells overexpressing wild type (wt) BAF for comparison. Although HSV-1 production in cells overexpressing wtBAF was similar to that in cells expressing no additional BAF, viral growth was reduced approximately 80% in the presence of BAF-MAAAQ. Experiments were also performed to determine the mechanism of the antiviral activity of BAF with the following results. BAF-MAAAQ was localized to the nucleus, whereas wtBAF was dispersed throughout cells prior to infection. Following infection, wtBAF becomes dephosphorylated and relocalized to the nucleus. Additionally, BAF was associated with the HSV-1 genome during infection, with BAF-MAAAQ associated to a greater extent than wtBAF. Importantly, unphosphorylated BAF inhibited both viral DNA replication and gene expression. For example, expression of two regulatory proteins, ICP0 and VP16, were substantially reduced in cells expressing BAF-MAAAQ. However, other viral genes were not dramatically affected suggesting that expression of certain viral genes can be differentially regulated by unphosphorylated BAF. Collectively, these results suggest that BAF can act in a phosphorylation-regulated manner to impair

  18. Grey matter changes associated with host genetic variation and exposure to Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1) in First Episode Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bamne, Mikhil; Shirts, Brian; Goradia, Dhruman; Mannali, Vimal; Pancholi, Krishna; Xue, Bai; McClain, Lora; Yolken, Robert; Keshavan, Matcheri; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit

    2010-01-01

    Background We previously reported reduced prefrontal cortex (PFC) grey matter volume among first-episode, antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia subjects (SZ) exposed to HSV1 but not among healthy subjects (HS) (Prasad et al. 2007). Independently, rs1051788, an exonic polymorphism of the MHC Class I polypeptide-related sequence B (MICB) gene was associated with HSV1 seropositivity, as well as SZ risk. In this study, we examined whether PFC grey matter changes associated with HSV1 exposure varied against the background of MICB genotypes. Methods We examined Caucasian individuals from the sample we studied in our previous report (Prasad et al. 2007) (SZ, n=21 and HS, n=19). Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis of structural MRI scans was conducted using Statistical Parametric Mapping, ver 5 (SPM5). The impact of rs1051788 variation and HSV1 seropositivity on grey matter volumes was examined using regression models on the combined sample of cases and controls, and then within each diagnostic group. Results In the combined sample of cases and controls, we observed the main effects of HSV1 seropositivity and genotypes, and a significant joint effect of HSV1 seropositivity and genotype mainly in the PFC. The joint effect was more prominent among cases than among controls. Discussion Our observations suggest that rs1051788 and HSV1 seropositivity are associated individually and jointly with reduced PFC grey matter volume. The patterns of these associations differ by diagnostic status, and these factors explain only a “small” portion of the variance in the grey matter volume reductions. PMID:20138739

  19. Comparison of the Simplexa HSV1 & 2 Direct kit and laboratory-developed real-time PCR assays for herpes simplex virus detection.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Jane; Boughton, Gregory; Chung, Jina; Hussey, Lindsay; Huang, Meei-Li; Cook, Linda; Jerome, Keith R

    2015-01-01

    Rapid detection and differentiation of herpes simplex viruses (HSV) is important for patient management and treatment, especially in HSV meningoencephalitis. Results of Simplexa HSV1 & 2 Direct kit (Focus Diagnostics), an FDA-cleared sample-to-result method providing results in ∼ 75 min, were compared to those of laboratory-developed real-time PCR assays (LDT) for detection of HSV1 and HSV2. Samples tested included 168 cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collected prospectively and 150 tested retrospectively: 81 from clinical testing and 69 from subjects in a neonatal herpes study; and 53 plasma and sera. Each sample was tested by both methods on the same day. Three of 318 CSF had invalid Simplexa Direct results and negative LDT results. Three neonatal samples with low HSV viral loads by LDT could not be typed; two were HSV2 positive and one was negative by Simplexa Direct. Of 312 CSF with valid, type-specific results, HSV1 was detected in 16 by LDT and in 17 by Simplexa Direct; HSV2 was detected in 48 by LDT and in 49 by Simplexa Direct. Concordance rates were 98.4% (κ 0.84) and 97.1% (κ 0.89) for HSV1 and HSV2, respectively. Positive percent agreements were 87.5% for HSV1 and 91.7% for HSV2. Two and four CSF were positive only by LDT and three and five were positive only by Simplexa Direct for HSV1 and HSV2, respectively. Simplexa HSV1 & 2 assay performed well compared to an established LDT. The faster turn-around-time compared to LDT will allow for more rapid antiviral treatment and better patient management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Joint capsule treatment with enkephalin-encoding HSV-1 recombinant vector reduces inflammatory damage and behavioural sequelae in rat CFA monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; McNearney, Terry A; Wilson, Steven P; Yeomans, David C; Westlund, Karin N

    2008-03-01

    This study assessed enkephalin expression induced by intra-articular application of recombinant, enkephalin-encoding herpes virus (HSV-1) and the impact of expression on nociceptive behaviours and synovial lining inflammation in arthritic rats. Replication-conditional HSV-1 recombinant vectors with cDNA encoding preproenkephalin (HSV-ENK), or control transgene beta-galactosidase cDNA (HSV-beta-gal; control) were injected into knee joints with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Joint temperatures, circumferences and nociceptive behaviours were monitored on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 post CFA and vector treatments. Lumbar (L4-6) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cords were immunostained for met-enkephalin (met-ENK), beta-gal, HSV-1 proteins and Fos. Joint tissues were immunostained for met-ENK, HSV-1 proteins, and inflammatory mediators Regulated on Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) and cyclo-oxygenase-2, or stained with haematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Compared to exuberant synovial hypertrophy and inflammatory cell infiltration seen in arthritic rats treated with CFA only or CFA and HSV-beta-gal, the CFA- and HSV-ENK-treated arthritic rats had: (i) striking preservation of synovial membrane cytoarchitecture with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrates; (ii) significantly improved nociceptive behavioural responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli; (iii) normalized Fos staining in lumbar dorsal horn; and (iv) significantly increased met-ENK staining in ipsilateral synovial tissue, lumbar DRG and spinal cord. The HSV-1 and transgene product expression were confined to ipsilateral lumbar DRG (HSV-1, met-ENK, beta-gal). Only transgene product (met-ENK and beta-gal) was seen in lumbar spinal cord sections. Targeted delivery of enkephalin-encoding HSV-1 vector generated safe, sustained opioid-induced analgesia with protective anti-inflammatory blunting in rat inflammatory arthritis.

  1. Sensing of HSV-1 by the cGAS–STING pathway in microglia orchestrates antiviral defence in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Line S.; Lopušná, Katarína; Winther, Henriette; Sun, Chenglong; Thomsen, Martin K.; Nandakumar, Ramya; Mogensen, Trine H.; Meyer, Morten; Vægter, Christian; Nyengaard, Jens R.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Paludan, Søren R.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV-induced type I IFN expression in CNS cells and these cytokines are induced in a cGAS–STING-dependent manner. Consistently, mice defective in cGAS or STING are highly susceptible to acute HSE. Although STING is redundant for cell-autonomous antiviral resistance in astrocytes and neurons, viral replication is strongly increased in neurons in STING-deficient mice. Interestingly, HSV-infected microglia confer STING-dependent antiviral activities in neurons and prime type I IFN production in astrocytes through the TLR3 pathway. Thus, sensing of HSV-1 infection in the CNS by microglia through the cGAS–STING pathway orchestrates an antiviral program that includes type I IFNs and immune-priming of other cell types. PMID:27830700

  2. Mice with mutations in Fas and Fas ligand demonstrate increased herpetic stromal keratitis following corneal infection with HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jessica E.; Zobell, Stephanie; Yin, Xiao-Tang; Zakaria, Hamideh; Summers, Bretton C.; Leib, David A.; Stuart, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV) infection of the cornea leads to a potentially blinding immuno-inflammatory lesion of the cornea that is termed herpetic stromal keratitis (HSK). It has also been demonstrated that one of the factors that limits inflammation of the cornea is the presence of Fas ligand (FasL) on corneal epithelium and endothelium. In this study the role that FasL expression in the cornea plays following acute infection with HSV-1 was determined. HSV-1 infection of both BALB/c and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were compared to their lpr and gld counterparts. Results indicated that mice bearing mutations in the Fas antigen (lpr) displayed most severe disease while the FasL defective gld mouse displayed an intermediate phenotype. It was further demonstrated that increased disease was due to lack of Fas expression on bone-marrow derived cells. Interestingly, while virus persisted slightly longer in the corneas of mice bearing lpr and gld mutations, the persistence of infectious virus in the trigeminal ganglia was the same for all strains infected. Furthermore, B6 mice bearing lpr and gld mutations were also more resistant to virus-induced mortality than wild-type B6 mice. Thus neither disease nor mortality correlated with viral replication in these mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that the presence of FasL on the cornea restricts the entry of Fas+ bone marrow-derived inflammatory cells and thus reduces the severity of HSK. PMID:22156346

  3. Effect of promoter strength on protein expression and immunogenicity of an HSV-1 amplicon vector encoding HIV-1 Gag

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Kathlyn; Duke, Cindy M.P.; Rodriguez-Colon, Sol M.; Dakwar, Anthony; Fan, Shongshan; Keefer, Michael C.; Federoff, Howard J.; Frelinger, John G.; Bowers, William J.; Dewhurst., Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Helper-free herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors elicit robust immune responses to encoded proteins, including human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) antigens. To improve this vaccine delivery system, seven amplicon vectors were constructed, each encoding HIV-1 Gag under the control of a different promoter. Gag expression levels were analyzed in murine and human cell lines, as well as in biopsied tissue samples from injected mice; these data were then compared with Gag-specific T cell responses in BALB/c mice. The magnitude of the amplicon-induced immune response was found to correlate strongly with the level of Gag production both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, the best correlation of the strength of the amplicon-induced immune response was with antigen expression in cultured DC rather than expression at the tissue site of injection or in cultured cell lines. These findings may have implications for the generation of improved HSV-1 amplicon vectors for HIV-1 vaccine delivery. PMID:17145123

  4. Transient Reversal of Episome Silencing Precedes VP16-Dependent Transcription during Reactivation of Latent HSV-1 in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Youn; Mandarino, Angelo; Chao, Moses V.; Mohr, Ian; Wilson, Angus C.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) establishes latency in peripheral neurons, creating a permanent source of recurrent infections. The latent genome is assembled into chromatin and lytic cycle genes are silenced. Processes that orchestrate reentry into productive replication (reactivation) remain poorly understood. We have used latently infected cultures of primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) sympathetic neurons to profile viral gene expression following a defined reactivation stimulus. Lytic genes are transcribed in two distinct phases, differing in their reliance on protein synthesis, viral DNA replication and the essential initiator protein VP16. The first phase does not require viral proteins and has the appearance of a transient, widespread de-repression of the previously silent lytic genes. This allows synthesis of viral regulatory proteins including VP16, which accumulate in the cytoplasm of the host neuron. During the second phase, VP16 and its cellular cofactor HCF-1, which is also predominantly cytoplasmic, concentrate in the nucleus where they assemble an activator complex on viral promoters. The transactivation function supplied by VP16 promotes increased viral lytic gene transcription leading to the onset of genome amplification and the production of infectious viral particles. Thus regulated localization of de novo synthesized VP16 is likely to be a critical determinant of HSV-1 reactivation in sympathetic neurons. PMID:22383875

  5. Combining oncolytic HSV-1 with immunogenic cell death-inducing drug mitoxantrone breaks cancer immune tolerance and improves therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Workenhe, Samuel T; Pol, Jonathan G; Lichty, Brian D; Cummings, Derek T; Mossman, Karen L

    2013-11-01

    Although antitumor activity of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0 null oncolytic vectors has been validated in murine breast cancer models, oncolytic virus treatment alone is insufficient to break immune tolerance. Thus, we investigated enhancing efficacy through combination therapy with the immunogenic cell death-inducing chemotherapeutic drug, mitoxantrone. Despite a lack of enhanced cytotoxicity in vitro, HSV-1 ICP0 null oncolytic virus KM100 with 5 μmol/L mitoxantrone provided significant survival benefit to BALB/c mice bearing Her2/neu TUBO-derived tumors. This protection was mediated by increased intratumoral infiltration of neutrophils and tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Depletion studies verified that CD8-, CD4-, and Ly6G-expressing cells are essential for enhanced efficacy of the combination therapy. Moreover, the addition of mitoxantrone to KM100 oncolytic virus treatment broke immune tolerance in BALB-neuT mice bearing TUBO-derived tumors. This study suggests that oncolytic viruses in combination with immunogenic cell death-inducing chemotherapeutics enhance the immunogenicity of the tumor-associated antigens, breaking immunologic tolerance established toward these antigens.

  6. Changes to euchromatin on LAT and ICP4 following reactivation are more prevalent in an efficiently reactivating strain of HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Creech, Clinton C; Neumann, Donna M

    2010-11-04

    Epigenetic mechanisms, via post-translational histone modifications, have roles in the establishment and maintenance of latency of the HSV-1 genome in the sensory neurons. Considering that many post-translational histone marks are reversible in nature, epigenetic mechanisms may also play a critical role in the process of induced HSV-1 reactivation. This study utilized the rabbit ocular model of HSV-1 infection and reactivation, induced by the transcorneal iontophoresis of epinephrine (TCIE), to characterize changes to chromatin that occur between 0.5 and 4 h following the application of the reactivation stimulus. Our goal was to explore the hypothesis that chromatin remodeling is an early and essential step in the process of HSV-1 reactivation. Analysis of the HSV-1 latently infected rabbit trigeminal ganglia (TG) showed that enrichment of the euchromatic marker H3K4me2 significantly decreased in the LAT 5'exon region (∼2.5-fold) and significantly increased in the lytic ICP4 promoter region (∼3-fold) by 1 h post-TCIE in the highly efficient reactivating McKrae strain of HSV-1. In contrast, we observed no significant change in the euchromatic marks of H3K4me2 associated with LAT 5'exon or ICP4 promoter regions of the poorly reactivating KOS strain of HSV-1 following TCIE through 4 h. The implication that these observed epigenetic changes were linked to transcriptional activity was confirmed by qRT-PCR examining both LAT and lytic transcript abundance following TCIE. We found a significant decrease in the abundance of LAT RNA by 2 h post-iontophoresis of epinephrine coupled to an increase in the transcript abundance of ICP4 in the McKrae strain of HSV-1. By comparison, we observed no change in the LAT or ICP4 transcript abundance of the poor reactivator KOS following iontophoresis of epinephrine through 4 h. Our results implicate that chromatin remodeling is an early and essential step involved in the process of in vivo HSV-1 reactivation.

  7. Changes to Euchromatin on LAT and ICP4 Following Reactivation Are More Prevalent in an Efficiently Reactivating Strain of HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Creech, Clinton C.; Neumann, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epigenetic mechanisms, via post-translational histone modifications, have roles in the establishment and maintenance of latency of the HSV-1 genome in the sensory neurons. Considering that many post-translational histone marks are reversible in nature, epigenetic mechanisms may also play a critical role in the process of induced HSV-1 reactivation. Methodology/Principal Findings This study utilized the rabbit ocular model of HSV-1 infection and reactivation, induced by the transcorneal iontophoresis of epinephrine (TCIE), to characterize changes to chromatin that occur between 0.5 and 4 h following the application of the reactivation stimulus. Our goal was to explore the hypothesis that chromatin remodeling is an early and essential step in the process of HSV-1 reactivation. Analysis of the HSV-1 latently infected rabbit trigeminal ganglia (TG) showed that enrichment of the euchromatic marker H3K4me2 significantly decreased in the LAT 5′exon region (∼2.5-fold) and significantly increased in the lytic ICP4 promoter region (∼3-fold) by 1 h post-TCIE in the highly efficient reactivating McKrae strain of HSV-1. In contrast, we observed no significant change in the euchromatic marks of H3K4me2 associated with LAT 5′exon or ICP4 promoter regions of the poorly reactivating KOS strain of HSV-1 following TCIE through 4 h. The implication that these observed epigenetic changes were linked to transcriptional activity was confirmed by qRT-PCR examining both LAT and lytic transcript abundance following TCIE. We found a significant decrease in the abundance of LAT RNA by 2 h post-iontophoresis of epinephrine coupled to an increase in the transcript abundance of ICP4 in the McKrae strain of HSV-1. By comparison, we observed no change in the LAT or ICP4 transcript abundance of the poor reactivator KOS following iontophoresis of epinephrine through 4 h. Conclusions/Significance Our results implicate that chromatin remodeling is an early and essential step

  8. Application of shRNA-containing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based gene therapy for HSV-2-induced genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihong; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Zhun; Yu, Bo; Shao, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Hong; Li, Manmei; Guan, Ming; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    HSV-1-based vectors have been widely used to achieve targeted delivery of genes into the nervous system. In the current study, we aim to use shRNA-containing HSV-1-based gene delivery system for the therapy of HSV-2 infection. Guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with HSV-2 and scored daily for 100 days for the severity of vaginal disease. HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 was applied intravaginally daily between 8 and 14 days after HSV-2 challenge. Delivery of HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 had no effect on the onset of disease and acute virus shedding in animals, but resulted in a significant reduction in both the cumulative recurrent lesion days and the number of days with recurrent disease. Around half of the animals in the HSV-2 shRNA group did not develop recurrent disease 100 days post HSV-2 infection. In conclusion, HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 particles are effective in reducing the recurrence of genital herpes caused by HSV-2.

  9. Assessment of IgG Antibodies Against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and EBV in Patients with Pemphigus Vulgaris Versus Healthy People

    PubMed Central

    Ghalayani, Parichehr; Rashidi, Fateme; Saberi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Regarding the implication of viruses particularly herpes in pemphigus vulgaris, we sought to assess and compare the level of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in patients with pemphigus vulgaris and healthy people. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 25 patients with pemphigus vulgaris and 27 healthy individuals comprised the experimental and control groups, respectively. Serum samples were taken from both groups; the levels of IgG antibodies against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and EBV were measured using ELISA. Results: Immunoglobulin G titer was higher for all four viruses in the patient group in comparison to the control group. This difference was significant for anti-EBV (P= 0.005), anti-CMV (P=0.0001) and anti-HSV2 (P=0.001) but not significant for anti-HSV1 (P= 0.36). Conclusion: Viruses including EBV, CMV, and HSV2 probably play a role in the pathogenesis of pemphigus in addition to the effects of genetics, toxins and other predisposing factors. In this study, no statistically significant relationship was observed between HSV1 and pemphigus vulgaris, which was probably due to the high titer of anti-HSV1 IgG in healthy individuals in the community. More studies must be done in this regard. PMID:27507994

  10. Infectivity of Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors in dendritic cells is determined by the helper virus strain used for packaging

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Kathlyn; Sanfilippo, Christine M.; Narrow, Wade C.; Casey, Ann E.; Rodriguez-Colon, Sol M.; McDermott, Michael P.; Federoff, Howard J.; Bowers, William J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are being explored for a wide range of potential applications, including vaccine delivery and immunotherapy of cancer. While extensive effort has been directed towards the improvement of the amplicon “payload” in these vectors, relatively little attention has been paid to the effect of the packaging HSV-1 strains on the biological properties of co-packaged amplicon vectors. We therefore compared the biological properties of amplicon stocks prepared using a panel of primary HSV-1 isolates, a molecularly cloned strain used to package helper-free amplicons (designated here as F5), and two laboratory isolates (KOS and strain 17, which is the parent of the F5 clone). This analysis revealed considerable inter-strain variability in the ability of amplicon stocks packaged by different primary HSV-1 isolates to efficiently transduce established cell lines and primary human dendritic cells (DC). Amplicons packaged by both the F5 molecularly cloned virus and its lab-adapted parent (strain 17) were very inefficient at transducing DC, when compared to amplicons packaged by KOS or by several of the primary virus isolates. These finding have important implications for the future development of improved amplicon-based vaccine delivery systems and suggest that DC tropism may be an instrinsic property of some HSV-1 strains, independent of passage history or molecular cloning. PMID:17606303

  11. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer to NMDA NR1-containing neurons in rat neocortex by helper virus-free HSV-1 vector particles containing a chimeric HSV-1 glycoprotein C-staphylococcus A protein.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Geller, Alfred I

    2010-09-10

    Because of the heterogeneous cellular composition of the brain, and especially the forebrain, cell type-specific expression will benefit many potential applications of direct gene transfer. The two prevalent approaches for achieving cell type-specific expression are using a cell type-specific promoter or targeting gene transfer to a specific cell type. Targeted gene transfer with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors modifies glycoprotein C (gC) to replace the heparin binding domain, which binds to many cell types, with a binding activity for a specific cell surface protein. We previously reported targeted gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons using chimeric gC-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor or gC-brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein. Unfortunately, this approach is limited to cells that express the cognate receptor for either neurotrophic factor. Thus, a general strategy for targeting gene transfer to many different types of neurons is desirable. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer has been developed for targeting specific virus vectors to specific peripheral cell types; a specific vector particle protein is modified to contain the Staphylococcus A protein ZZ domain, which binds immunoglobulin (Ig) G. Here, we report antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer of HSV-1 vectors to a specific type of forebrain neuron. We constructed a chimeric gC-ZZ protein, and showed this protein is incorporated into vector particles and binds Ig G. Complexes of these vector particles and an antibody to the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit supported targeted gene transfer to NR1-containing neocortical neurons in the rat brain, with long-term (2 months) expression.

  12. Selective removal of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells from differentiation cultures through HSV1 thymidine kinase and ganciclovir treatment.

    PubMed

    Naujok, Ortwin; Kaldrack, Joanna; Taivankhuu, Terbish; Jörns, Anne; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2010-09-01

    Pluripotent cell lines such as embryonic stem cells are an attractive source for a potential cell replacement therapy. However, transplantation of differentiated cells harbors the risk of teratoma formation, presenting a serious health risk. To overcome this obstacle, a negative selection system was established that permits selective removal of undifferentiated cells during in vitro differentiation. Use of the HSV1 thymidine kinase and eGFP under the control of the Oct4 promoter allowed the destruction of undifferentiated ES cells by ganciclovir treatment; differentiated cells were unharmed. Clonal ES cells remained pluripotent and showed positive staining for a wide range of embryonic markers. Thus, treatment with ganciclovir during in vitro differentiation effectively removed the population of undifferentiated cells and provided a pure population of completely differentiated cells. This approach may pave the way for a safe application of ES cells in regenerative medicine in the future.

  13. Cellular responses to HSV-1 infection are linked to specific types of alterations in the host transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Benxia; Li, Xin; Huo, Yongxia; Yu, Yafen; Zhang, Qiuping; Chen, Guijun; Zhang, Yaping; Fraser, Nigel W.; Wu, Dongdong; Zhou, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen invasion triggers a number of cellular responses and alters the host transcriptome. Here we report that the type of changes to cellular transcriptome is related to the type of cellular functions affected by lytic infection of Herpes Simplex Virus type I in Human primary fibroblasts. Specifically, genes involved in stress responses and nuclear transport exhibited mostly changes in alternative polyadenylation (APA), cell cycle genes showed mostly alternative splicing (AS) changes, while genes in neurogenesis, rarely underwent these changes. Transcriptome wide, the infection resulted in 1,032 cases of AS, 161 incidences of APA, 1,827 events of isoform changes, and up regulation of 596 genes and down regulations of 61 genes compared to uninfected cells. Thus, these findings provided important and specific links between cellular responses to HSV-1 infection and the type of alterations to the host transcriptome, highlighting important roles of RNA processing in virus-host interactions. PMID:27354008

  14. OAS/PKR Pathways and α/β TCR+ T Cells are Required for Ad: IFN-γ Inhibition of HSV-1 in Cornea1

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Bobbie Ann; Halford, William P.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2007-01-01

    An adenoviral vector containing the muIFN-γ transgene (Ad:IFN-γ) was evaluated for its capacity to inhibit HSV-1. To measure effectiveness, viral titers were analyzed in cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during acute ocular HSV-1 infection. Ad: IFN-γ potently suppressed HSV-1 replication in a dose-dependent fashion, requiring IFN-γ R. Moreover, Ad:IFN-γ was effective when delivered -72 and -24 h prior to infection as well as 24 h post infection. Associated with anti-viral opposition, TG from Ad: IFN-γ transduced mice harbored fewer T cells. Also related to T cell involvement, Ad:IFN-γ was effective but attenuated in TG from α/β TCR deficient mice. In corneas, α/β TCR+ T cells were obligatory for protection against viral multiplication. Type I IFN involvement amid anti-viral efficacy of Ad: IFN-γ was further investigated because type I and II IFN pathways have synergistic anti-HSV-1 activity. Ad:IFN-γ inhibited viral reproduction in corneas and TG from IFN-α/β R deficient (CD118 −/−) mice, although viral titers were 2–3 fold higher in cornea and TG, compared to wild type. The absence of IFN-stimulated anti-viral proteins, 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L and ds RNA dependent protein kinase R, completely eliminated the anti-viral effectiveness of Ad:IFN-γ. Collectively, the results demonstrate: (1) nonexistence of type I IFN R does not abolish defense of Ad:IFN-γ against HSV-1; (2) anti-viral pathways, OAS/RNase L and PKR are mandatory; and (3) α/β TCR+ T cells are compulsory for Ad: IFN-γ effectiveness against HSV-1 in cornea but not in TG. PMID:17404299

  15. High-Risk Corneal Graft Rejection in the Setting of Previous Corneal Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Kuffova, Lucia; Knickelbein, Jared E; Yu, Tian; Medina, Carlos; Amescua, Guillermo; Rowe, Alexander M; Hendricks, Robert L; Forrester, John V

    2016-04-01

    The "high-risk phenotype" of corneal graft recipients is considered to be related to preexisting vascularization such as that associated with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) keratitis (HSK). The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunologic mechanisms underlying accelerated corneal graft rejection using a mouse model of HSK. Herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis was induced in BALB/c mice. Syngeneic and allogeneic (C57BL/6 mice) corneal grafts were performed in mice with HSK at different times after infection. Some grafts were performed on HSV-infected CD4 T cell-deficient BALB/c mice. Clinical, histologic, immunologic, and virus detection studies were performed on samples of cornea, draining lymph node (LN), and trigeminal ganglion (TG) cells. Corneal grafts in mice with HSK rejected with higher frequency and more rapid tempo compared with grafts in uninfected mice. In corneas with HSK and vascularization at the time of grafting, both syngeneic and allogeneic corneal grafts failed with similar frequency and tempo. However, in the absence of preexisting inflammation and vascularization, syngeneic grafts were accepted when the grafts were performed at a late time point after HSV infection (42 days), whereas allografts were rejected at this time. In contrast, syngeneic grafts in nonvascularized HSV-infected recipients failed if they were performed within 10 days of HSV infection, an effect that was dependent on CD4 T cells, as demonstrated using CD4 deficient mice. Importantly, a variably sustained but strongly positive anti-HSV T-cell response was detected in allografted HSK recipients with a similar but lesser response in syngeneic hosts. A previous HSV-1 corneal infection predisposes donor grafts to a high risk of failure by both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms in which an anti-HSV CD4 T-cell response plays a prominent role.

  16. A tale of two HSV-1 helicases: roles of phage and animal virus helicases in DNA replication and recombination.

    PubMed

    Marintcheva, B; Weller, S K

    2001-01-01

    Helicases play essential roles in many important biological processes such as DNA replication, repair, recombination, transcription, splicing, and translation. Many bacteriophages and plant and animal viruses encode one or more helicases, and these enzymes have been shown to play many roles in their respective viral life cycles. In this review we concentrate primarily on the roles of helicases in DNA replication and recombination with special emphasis on the bacteriophages T4, T7, and A as model systems. We explore comparisons between these model systems and the herpesviruses--primarily herpes simplex virus. Bacteriophage utilize various pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication during the replication of their genomes. In fact the study of recombination in the phage systems has greatly enhanced our understanding of the importance of recombination in the replication strategies of bacteria, yeast, and higher eukaryotes. The ability to "restart" the replication process after a replication fork has stalled or has become disrupted for other reasons is a critical feature in the replication of all organisms studied. Phage helicases and other recombination proteins play critical roles in the "restart" process. Parallels between DNA replication and recombination in phage and in the herpesviruses is explored. We and others have proposed that recombination plays an important role in the life cycle of the herpesviruses, and in this review, we discuss models for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA replication. HSV-1 encodes two helicases. UL9 binds specifically to the origins of replication and is believed to initiate HSV DNA replication by unwinding at the origin; the heterotrimeric helicase-primase complex, encoded by UL5, UL8, and UL52 genes, is believed to unwind duplex viral DNA at replication forks. Structure-function analyses of UL9 and the helicase-primase are discussed with attention to the roles these proteins might play during HSV replication.

  17. High-Risk Corneal Graft Rejection in the Setting of Previous Corneal Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuffova, Lucia; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Yu, Tian; Medina, Carlos; Amescua, Guillermo; Rowe, Alexander M.; Hendricks, Robert L.; Forrester, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The “high-risk phenotype” of corneal graft recipients is considered to be related to preexisting vascularization such as that associated with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) keratitis (HSK). The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunologic mechanisms underlying accelerated corneal graft rejection using a mouse model of HSK. Methods Herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis was induced in BALB/c mice. Syngeneic and allogeneic (C57BL/6 mice) corneal grafts were performed in mice with HSK at different times after infection. Some grafts were performed on HSV-infected CD4 T cell–deficient BALB/c mice. Clinical, histologic, immunologic, and virus detection studies were performed on samples of cornea, draining lymph node (LN), and trigeminal ganglion (TG) cells. Results Corneal grafts in mice with HSK rejected with higher frequency and more rapid tempo compared with grafts in uninfected mice. In corneas with HSK and vascularization at the time of grafting, both syngeneic and allogeneic corneal grafts failed with similar frequency and tempo. However, in the absence of preexisting inflammation and vascularization, syngeneic grafts were accepted when the grafts were performed at a late time point after HSV infection (42 days), whereas allografts were rejected at this time. In contrast, syngeneic grafts in nonvascularized HSV-infected recipients failed if they were performed within 10 days of HSV infection, an effect that was dependent on CD4 T cells, as demonstrated using CD4 deficient mice. Importantly, a variably sustained but strongly positive anti-HSV T-cell response was detected in allografted HSK recipients with a similar but lesser response in syngeneic hosts. Conclusions A previous HSV-1 corneal infection predisposes donor grafts to a high risk of failure by both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms in which an anti-HSV CD4 T-cell response plays a prominent role. PMID:27050878

  18. False-negative type-specific glycoprotein G antibody responses in STI clinic patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital herpes, The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Rooijen, Martijn S; Roest, Wim; Hansen, Gino; Kwa, David; de Vries, Henry J C

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-discriminating antibody tests (glycoprotein G (gG) directed) are used to identify naïve persons and differentiate acute infections from recurrences. We studied test characteristics of three commercially available antibody tests in patients with recurrent (established by viral PCR tests) herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital herpes episodes. Serum samples (at minimum 3 months after t=0) were examined for the presence of gG-1-specific or gG-2-specific antibodies using the HerpeSelect 1 and 2 Immunoblot IgG, the HerpeSelect 1 and 2 enzyme linked immunoassays IgG and the LIAISON HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgG indirect chemiluminescence immunoassays. The immunoblot was HSV-1 positive in 70.6% (95% CI 44.0% to 89.7%), the LIAISON in 88.2% (95% CI 63.5% to 98.5%) and the ELISA in 82.4% (95% CI 56.6% to 96.2%) of the 17 patients with a recurrent HSV-1 episode. From 33 patients with a recurrent HSV-2 episode, the immunoblot was HSV-2 positive in 84.8% (95% CI 68.1% to 94.9%), the LIAISON in 69.7% (95% CI 51.3% to 84.4%) and the ELISA in 84.8% (95% CI 68.1% to 94.9%). Among 15/17 (88.2%; 95% CI 63.5% to 98.5%) patients with HSV-1 and 30/33 (90.1%; 95% CI 75.7% to 98.1%) patients with HSV-2, HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibodies, respectively, were detected in at least one of the three antibody tests. Commercial type-specific gG HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibody assays were false negative in 12-30% of patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital lesions. The clinical and epidemiological use of type-specific HSV serology can be hampered by false-negative results, especially if based on a single test. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Stress Hormones Epinephrine and Corticosterone Selectively Modulate Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 Productive Infections in Adult Sympathetic, but Not Sensory, Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ives, Angela M; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-07-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infect and establish latency in peripheral neurons, from which they can reactivate to cause recurrent disease throughout the life of the host. Stress is associated with the exacerbation of clinical symptoms and the induction of recurrences in humans and animal models. The viruses preferentially replicate and establish latency in different subtypes of sensory neurons, as well as in neurons of the autonomic nervous system that are highly responsive to stress hormones. To determine if stress-related hormones modulate productive HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections within sensory and autonomic neurons, we analyzed viral DNA and the production of viral progeny after treatment of primary adult murine neuronal cultures with the stress hormones epinephrine and corticosterone. Both sensory trigeminal ganglion (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons expressed adrenergic receptors (activated by epinephrine) and the glucocorticoid receptor (activated by corticosterone). Productive HSV infection colocalized with these receptors in SCG but not in TG neurons. In productively infected neuronal cultures, epinephrine treatment significantly increased the levels of HSV-1 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons, but no significant differences were found in TG neurons. In contrast, corticosterone significantly decreased the levels of HSV-2 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons but not in TG neurons. Thus, the stress-related hormones epinephrine and corticosterone selectively modulate acute HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in autonomic, but not sensory, neurons.IMPORTANCE Stress exacerbates acute disease symptoms resulting from HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections and is associated with the appearance of recurrent skin lesions in millions of people. Although stress hormones are thought to impact HSV-1 and HSV-2 through immune system suppression, sensory and autonomic neurons that become infected

  20. PET imaging of thymidine kinase gene expression in the liver of non-human primates following systemic delivery of an adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Fontanellas, A; Hervas-Stubbs, S; Sampedro, A; Collantes, M; Azpilicueta, A; Mauleón, I; Pañeda, A; Quincoces, G; Prieto, J; Melero, I; Peñuelas, I

    2009-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging of transgene expression is currently providing very important means to optimize gene therapy regimes. Results in non-human primates are considered the most predictive models for the outcome in patients. In this study, we have documented that tumour and primary cell lines from human and non-human primates are comparably gene-transduced in vitro by serotype 5 adenovirus expressing HSV1-thymidine kinase. Transgene expression can be quantified in human and monkey cultured cells by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging when transduced cells are incubated with a fluoride-18 labelled penciclovir analogue. In our hands, PET images of cell cultures estimate the number of transduced cells rather than intensity of transgene expression once a threshold of TK per cell is reached. Interestingly, in vivo systemic administration of a clinical grade recombinant adenovirus expressing TK into macaques gives rise to an intense retention of the radiotracer in the liver parenchyma, providing an experimental system to visualize transgene expression that ought to be similar in human and macaques. Such imaging methodology might contribute to improve strategies based on adenoviral vectors.

  1. Reciprocal transmission of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) between corneal epithelium and trigeminal neurites in an embryonic chick organ culture.

    PubMed

    Hafezi, Wali; Eing, Bodo R; Lorentzen, Eva U; Thanos, Solon; Kühn, Joachim E

    2002-06-01

    Reciprocal transmission between epithelia and sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system is a crucial step in the life cycle of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and related alphaherpesviruses. In searching for an easy-to-perform and generally applicable experimental approach that enables the direct analysis of virus transfer between primary epithelial cells and sensory neurites, we investigated the spread of HSV-1 in a dual-chamber organ model comprising chick embryonic corneal epithelia and trigeminal sensory neurons. Embryonic chick corneal and trigeminal tissues were found to be permissive for productive infection with HSV-1. Our data show that HSV-1 efficiently enters neurites re-innervating the cornea and reaches the ganglion explant by retrograde axonal transport, with the first antigen-positive cells being detectable approximately 12 h postinfection. After direct infection of trigeminal tissues, the virus is transported by anterograde axonal transport to the corneal epithelium, causing a visible cytopathic effect approximately 48 h postinfection. These results suggest that the organ model presented in this study holds particular promise for the direct observation and molecular analysis of herpes simplex virus spread between primary epithelia and sensory neurons and that it may be an attractive alternative to current experimental approaches based on laboratory animals or human fetal tissues.

  2. Cryo-EM Techniques to Resolve the Structure of HSV-1 Capsid-Associated Components

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Ryan H.; Hecksel, Corey W.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy has become a routine technique to determine structure of biochemically purified herpes simplex virus capsid particles. This chapter describes the procedures of specimen preparation by cryopreservation; low dose and low temperature imaging in an electron cryo-microscope; and data processing for reconstruction. This methodology has yielded subnanometer resolution structures of the icosahedral capsid shell where alpha helices and beta sheets of individual subunits can be recognized. A relaxation of the symmetry in the reconstruction steps allows us to resolve the DNA packaging protein located at one of the 12 vertices in the capsid. PMID:24671690

  3. Experiences in effective use of Tcl/Tk

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    Tcl/Tk (Toot Command Language and Tool Kit, pronounced ``tickle tee-kay``) is a scripting language supporting Motifm style X Window interfaces. It is extendible, allowing developers to embed additional functionality as commands in the language. However, the power and flexibility of the system leads to many variations or possibilities in its usage. We describe effective methods for taking advantage of Tcl/Tk to increase productivity and enhance the flexibility and adaptability of applications: writing simple Tcl/Tk scripts, extending the Tcl/Tk widget set, wrapping Tcl commands around existing classes and functions, and building Tcl/Tk and 3GL coprocesses. Examples are presented from working applications.

  4. Intravenous Administration Is an Effective and Safe Route for Cancer Gene Therapy Using the Bifidobacterium-Mediated Recombinant HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Ganciclovir

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huicong; He, Zhiliang; Wang, Changdong; Xie, Tingting; Liu, Lin; Liu, Chuanyang; Song, Fangzhou; Ma, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV TK/GCV) system is one of the best studied cancer suicide gene therapy systems. Our previous study showed that caspase 3 expression was upregulated and bladder tumor growth was significantly reduced in rats treated with a combination of Bifidobacterium (BF) and HSV TK/GCV (BF-rTK/GCV). However, it was raised whether the BF-mediated recombinant thymidine kinase combined with ganciclovir (BF-rTK/GCV) was safe to administer via venous for cancer gene therapy. To answer this question, the antitumor effects of BF-rTK/GCV were mainly evaluated in a xenograft nude mouse model bearing MKN-45 gastric tumor cells. The immune response, including analysis of cytokine profiles, was analyzed to evaluate the safety of intramuscular and intravenous injection of BF-rTK in BALB/c mice. The results suggested that gastric tumor growth was significantly inhibited in vivo by BF-rTK/GCV. However, the BF-rTK/GCV had no effect on mouse body weight, indicating that the treatment was safe for the host. The results of cytokine profile analysis indicated that intravenous injection of a low dose of BF-rTK resulted in a weaker cytokine response than that obtained with intramuscular injection. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed that intravenous administration did not affect the expression of immune-associated TLR2 and TLR4. Finally, the BF-rTK/GCV inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in mouse model, which is helpful for inhibiting of tumor angiogenesis. That meant intravenous administration of BF-rTK/GCV was an effective and safe way for cancer gene therapy. PMID:27275821

  5. Intravenous Administration Is an Effective and Safe Route for Cancer Gene Therapy Using the Bifidobacterium-Mediated Recombinant HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Ganciclovir.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huicong; He, Zhiliang; Wang, Changdong; Xie, Tingting; Liu, Lin; Liu, Chuanyang; Song, Fangzhou; Ma, Yongping

    2016-06-06

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV TK/GCV) system is one of the best studied cancer suicide gene therapy systems. Our previous study showed that caspase 3 expression was upregulated and bladder tumor growth was significantly reduced in rats treated with a combination of Bifidobacterium (BF) and HSV TK/GCV (BF-rTK/GCV). However, it was raised whether the BF-mediated recombinant thymidine kinase combined with ganciclovir (BF-rTK/GCV) was safe to administer via venous for cancer gene therapy. To answer this question, the antitumor effects of BF-rTK/GCV were mainly evaluated in a xenograft nude mouse model bearing MKN-45 gastric tumor cells. The immune response, including analysis of cytokine profiles, was analyzed to evaluate the safety of intramuscular and intravenous injection of BF-rTK in BALB/c mice. The results suggested that gastric tumor growth was significantly inhibited in vivo by BF-rTK/GCV. However, the BF-rTK/GCV had no effect on mouse body weight, indicating that the treatment was safe for the host. The results of cytokine profile analysis indicated that intravenous injection of a low dose of BF-rTK resulted in a weaker cytokine response than that obtained with intramuscular injection. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed that intravenous administration did not affect the expression of immune-associated TLR2 and TLR4. Finally, the BF-rTK/GCV inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in mouse model, which is helpful for inhibiting of tumor angiogenesis. That meant intravenous administration of BF-rTK/GCV was an effective and safe way for cancer gene therapy.

  6. Onset and organ specificity of Tk2 deficiency depends on Tk1 down-regulation and transcriptional compensation.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Beatriz; Area, Estela; Akman, Hasan O; Hirano, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency of thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a frequent cause of isolated myopathy or encephalomyopathy in children with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. To determine the bases of disease onset, organ specificity and severity of TK2 deficiency, we have carefully characterized Tk2 H126N knockin mice (Tk2-/-). Although normal until postnatal day 8, Tk2-/- mice rapidly develop fatal encephalomyopathy between postnatal days 10 and 13. We have observed that wild-type Tk2 activity is constant in the second week of life, while Tk1 activity decreases significantly between postnatal days 8 and 13. The down-regulation of Tk1 activity unmasks Tk2 deficiency in Tk2-/- mice and correlates with the onset of mtDNA depletion in the brain and the heart. Resistance to pathology in Tk2 mutant organs depends on compensatory mechanisms to the reduced mtDNA level. Our analyses at postnatal day 13 have revealed that Tk2-/- heart significantly increases mitochondrial transcript levels relative to the mtDNA content. This transcriptional compensation allows the heart to maintain normal levels of mtDNA-encoded proteins. The up-regulation in mitochondrial transcripts is not due to increased expression of the master mitochondrial biogenesis regulators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha and nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2, or to enhanced expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors A, B1 or B2. Instead, Tk2-/- heart compensates for mtDNA depletion by down-regulating the expression of the mitochondrial transcriptional terminator transcription factor 3 (MTERF3). Understanding the molecular mechanisms that allow Tk2 mutant organs to be spared may help design therapies for Tk2 deficiency.

  7. Repeated social stress enhances the innate immune response to a primary HSV-1 infection in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia of Balb/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong-Newsom, P.; Powell, N.D.; Bailey, M.T.; Padgett, D.A.; Sheridan, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Three to 5 days after a primary HSV-1 infection, macrophages infiltrate into the trigeminal ganglia (TG) and produce anti-viral cytokines to reduce viral replication. Previous research demonstrated that social disruption stress (SDR) enhances the trafficking of monocytes/macrophages from the bone marrow to the spleen and increases pro-inflammatory cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. The impact of SDR on the trafficking of these cells to loci of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and subsequent function has not been examined. The following studies were designed to determine whether SDR would enhance the innate immune response during a primary HSV-1 infection by increasing the number of macrophages in the cornea and TG, thus increasing anti-viral cytokine production and reducing viral replication. BALB/c mice were exposed to six cycles of SDR prior to ocular infection with HSV-1 McKrae virus. Flow cytometric analysis of cells from the TG revealed an increase in the percentage of CD11b+ macrophages in SDR mice compared to controls. Immune cell infiltration into the cornea, however, could not be determined due to low cell numbers. Although gene expression of IFN-β was decreased, SDR increased gene expression of IFN-α, and TNF-α, in the cornea and TG. Examination of viral proteins showed decreased expression of infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), glycoprotein B (gB), glycoprotein H (gH) and latency-associated transcript (LAT) in the TG, however, expression of ICP0 and gB were elevated in the cornea of SDR mice. These results indicate that the innate immune response to HSV-1 was altered and enhanced by the experience of repeated social defeat. PMID:19822203

  8. Repeated social stress enhances the innate immune response to a primary HSV-1 infection in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia of Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Dong-Newsom, P; Powell, N D; Bailey, M T; Padgett, D A; Sheridan, J F

    2010-02-01

    Three to 5 days after a primary HSV-1 infection, macrophages infiltrate into the trigeminal ganglia (TG) and produce anti-viral cytokines to reduce viral replication. Previous research demonstrated that social disruption stress (SDR) enhances the trafficking of monocytes/macrophages from the bone marrow to the spleen and increases pro-inflammatory cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. The impact of SDR on the trafficking of these cells to loci of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and subsequent function has not been examined. The following studies were designed to determine whether SDR would enhance the innate immune response during a primary HSV-1 infection by increasing the number of macrophages in the cornea and TG, thus increasing anti-viral cytokine production and reducing viral replication. BALB/c mice were exposed to six cycles of SDR prior to ocular infection with HSV-1 McKrae virus. Flow cytometric analysis of cells from the TG revealed an increase in the percentage of CD11b+ macrophages in SDR mice compared to controls. Immune cell infiltration into the cornea, however, could not be determined due to low cell numbers. Although gene expression of IFN-beta was decreased, SDR increased gene expression of IFN-alpha, and TNF-alpha, in the cornea and TG. Examination of viral proteins showed decreased expression of infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), glycoprotein B (gB), glycoprotein H (gH) and latency-associated transcript (LAT) in the TG, however, expression of ICP0 and gB were elevated in the cornea of SDR mice. These results indicate that the innate immune response to HSV-1 was altered and enhanced by the experience of repeated social defeat. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. OAS and PKR are not required for the antiviral effect of Ad:IFN-gamma against acute HSV-1 in primary trigeminal ganglia cultures.

    PubMed

    Austin, Bobbie Ann; Halford, William; Silverman, Robert H; Williams, Bryan R G; Carr, Daniel J J

    2006-04-01

    Three interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-induced antiviral pathways have been reported. Involved antiviral proteins include: Mx, RNase L/2',5'-OAS, and protein kinase R (PKR). Involvement of OAS and PKR in IFN-gamma-induced anti-herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) pathways has not been reported previously, but IFN-gamma induces OAS and PKR when other viruses invade the nervous system. The aim of the current study was to determine if the absence of intact OAS and PKR antiviral pathways affects the antiviral activity of IFN-gamma during acute HSV-1 infection within the trigeminal ganglia (TG). To investigate this, primary TG cultures were established using TGs removed from C57BL/6 (wild-type), RNase L knockout, and RNase L/PKR double knockout mice. Each dissociated TG was transduced with an adenoviral vector containing an IFN-gamma transgene or vector alone. Viral titers after HSV-1 infection of primary TG cell cultures were determined. Significant differences in viral titer for Ad:Null-transduced vs. Ad:IFN-gamma-tranduced TG were found in each genotype. However, the effectiveness of Ad:IFN-gamma was not reduced in the absence of both OAS and PKR pathways or OAS alone. Recombinant IFN-gamma also exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity. The effectiveness of the IFN-gamma transgene was lost in primary TG cells from IFN-gamma receptor knockout mice. The data suggest that novel anti-HSV-1 mechanisms are induced by IFN-gamma.

  10. Protection provided by a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein C and D subunit antigen vaccine against genital HSV-2 infection in HSV-1-seropositive guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Balliet, John W; Flynn, Jessica A; Lubinski, John M; Shaw, Carolyn E; DiStefano, Daniel J; Cai, Michael; Brown, Martha; Smith, Judith F; Kowalski, Rose; Swoyer, Ryan; Galli, Jennifer; Copeland, Victoria; Rios, Sandra; Davidson, Robert C; Salnikova, Maya; Kingsley, Susan; Bryan, Janine; Casimiro, Danilo R; Friedman, Harvey M

    2014-02-01

    A prophylactic vaccine for genital herpes disease remains an elusive goal. We report the results of two studies performed collaboratively in different laboratories that assessed immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)-seropositive guinea pigs immunized and subsequently challenged intravaginally with HSV-2. In study 1, HSV-2 glycoproteins C (gC2) and D (gD2) were produced in baculovirus and administered intramuscularly as monovalent or bivalent vaccines with CpG and alum. In study 2, gD2 was produced in CHO cells and given intramuscularly with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and alum, or gC2 and gD2 were produced in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris and administered intramuscularly as a bivalent vaccine with Iscomatrix and alum to HSV-1-naive or -seropositive guinea pigs. In both studies, immunization boosted neutralizing antibody responses to HSV-1 and HSV-2. In study 1, immunization with gC2, gD2, or both immunogens significantly reduced the frequency of genital lesions, with the bivalent vaccine showing the greatest protection. In study 2, both vaccines were highly protective against genital disease in naive and HSV-1-seropositive animals. Comparisons between gD2 and gC2/gD2 in study 2 must be interpreted cautiously, because different adjuvants, gD2 doses, and antigen production methods were used; however, significant differences invariably favored the bivalent vaccine. Immunization of naive animals with gC2/gD2 significantly reduced the number of days of vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA compared with that for mock-immunized animals. Surprisingly, in both studies, immunization of HSV-1-seropositive animals had little effect on recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA, despite significantly reducing genital disease.

  11. HSV-1 Cgal+ Infection Promotes Quaking RNA Binding Protein Production and Induces Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Shuttling of Quaking I-5 Isoform in Human Hepatoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quiles, Virginia; Mora, María I.; Segura, Victor; Greco, Anna; Epstein, Alberto L.; Foschini, Maria Giovanna; Dayon, Loïc; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Prieto, Jesús; Corrales, Fernando J.; Santamaría, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Herpesvirus type 1 (HSV-1) based oncolytic vectors arise as a promising therapeutic alternative for neoplastic diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the mechanisms mediating the host cell response to such treatments are not completely known. It is well established that HSV-1 infection induces functional and structural alterations in the nucleus of the host cell. In the present work, we have used gel-based and shotgun proteomic strategies to elucidate the signaling pathways impaired in the nucleus of human hepatoma cells (Huh7) upon HSV-1 Cgal+ infection. Both approaches allowed the identification of differential proteins suggesting impairment of cell functions involved in many aspects of host-virus interaction such as transcription regulation, mRNA processing, and mRNA splicing. Based on our proteomic data and additional functional studies, cellular protein quaking content (QKI) increases 4 hours postinfection (hpi), when viral immediate-early genes such as ICP4 and ICP27 could be also detected. Depletion of QKI expression by small interfering RNA results in reduction of viral immediate-early protein levels, subsequent decrease in early and late viral protein content, and a reduction in the viral yield indicating that QKI directly interferes with viral replication. In particular, HSV-1 Cgal+ induces a transient increase in quaking I-5 isoform (QKI-5) levels, in parallel with an enhancement of p27Kip1 protein content. Moreover, immunofluorescence microscopy showed an early nuclear redistribution of QKI-5, shuttling from the nucleus to the cytosol and colocalizing with nectin-1 in cell to cell contact regions at 16–24 hpi. This evidence sheds new light on mechanisms mediating hepatoma cell response to HSV-1 vectors highlighting QKI as a central molecular mediator. PMID:21467216

  12. Human Antiviral Protein IFIX Suppresses Viral Gene Expression during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Infection and Is Counteracted by Virus-induced Proteasomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Crow, Marni S; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-04-01

    The interferon-inducible protein X (IFIX), a member of the PYHIN family, was recently recognized as an antiviral factor against infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). IFIX binds viral DNA upon infection and promotes expression of antiviral cytokines. How IFIX exerts its host defense functions and whether it is inhibited by the virus remain unknown. Here, we integrated live cell microscopy, proteomics, IFIX domain characterization, and molecular virology to investigate IFIX regulation and antiviral functions during HSV-1 infection. We find that IFIX has a dynamic localization during infection that changes from diffuse nuclear and nucleoli distribution in uninfected cells to discrete nuclear puncta early in infection. This is rapidly followed by a reduction in IFIX protein levels. Indeed, using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry, we define IFIX interactions during HSV-1 infection, finding an association with a proteasome subunit and proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome processes. Using synchronized HSV-1 infection, microscopy, and proteasome-inhibition experiments, we demonstrate that IFIX co-localizes with nuclear proteasome puncta shortly after 3 h of infection and that its pyrin domain is rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to several other host defense factors, IFIX degradation is not dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the viral protein ICP0. However, we show IFIX degradation requires immediate-early viral gene expression, suggesting a viral host suppression mechanism. The IFIX interactome also demonstrated its association with transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the 5FMC complex. We validate this interaction using microscopy and reciprocal isolations and determine it is mediated by the IFIX HIN domain. Finally, we show IFIX suppresses immediate-early and early viral gene expression during infection. Altogether, our study demonstrates that IFIX antiviral

  13. Interferon Regulator Factor 8 (IRF8) Limits Ocular Pathology during HSV-1 Infection by Restraining the Activation and Expansion of CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Rong; He, Chang; Mahdi, Rashid M.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C.; Egwuagu, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 (IRF8) is constitutively expressed in monocytes and B cell lineages and plays important roles in immunity to pathogens and cancer. Although IRF8 expression is induced in activated T cells, the functional relevance of IRF8 in T cell-mediated immunity is not well understood. In this study, we used mice with targeted deletion of Irf8 in T-cells (IRF8KO) to investigate the role of IRF8 in T cell-mediated responses during herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection of the eye. In contrast to wild type mice, HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice mounted a more robust anti-HSV-1 immune response, which included marked expansion of HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) and enhanced elimination of virus within the trigeminal ganglion. However, the consequence of the enhanced immunological response was the development of ocular inflammation, limbitis, and neutrophilic infiltration into the cornea of HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice. Surprisingly, we observed a marked increase in virus-specific memory precursor effector cells (MPEC) in IRF8KO mice, suggesting that IRF8 might play a role in regulating the differentiation of effector CD8+ T cells to the memory phenotype. Together, our data suggest that IRF8 might play a role in restraining excess lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, modulating IRF8 levels in T cells can be exploited therapeutically to prevent immune-mediated ocular pathology during autoimmune and infectious diseases of the eye. PMID:27171004

  14. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  15. Measuring herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase reporter gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2006-01-01

    The herpes simplex 1 virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene (PRG) or its mutant HSV1-sr39tk are used to investigate intracellular molecular events in cultured cells and for imaging intracellular molecular events and cell trafficking in living subjects. Two in vitro methods are available to assay gene expression of HSV1-tk or HSV1-sr39tk in cells or tissues. One method determines the level of HSV1-TK or HSV1-sr39TK enzyme activity in cell or tissue lysates by measuring the amount of the radiolabeled substrates that have been phosphorylated by these enzymes in a fixed amount of cell lysate protein after a fixed incubation time. The other method, called the 'cell-uptake assay', takes into account the natural uptake and efflux characteristics of the radiolabeled substrate by specific cells, in addition to the level of HSV1-TK or HSV1-sr39TK activity. Both of these assays can be used to validate molecular models in cultured cells, prior to studying them in living research subjects. Each of these assays can be completed in one day.

  16. Prior Corneal Scarification and Injection of Immune Serum are Not Required Before Ocular HSV-1 Infection for UV-B-Induced Virus Reactivation and Recurrent Herpetic Corneal Disease in Latently Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Khan, Arif A; Srivastava, Ruchi; Huang, Lei; Krochmal, John J; Garcia, Jairo M; Simpson, Jennifer L; Wechsler, Steven L

    2016-06-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to spontaneous reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. Mice latently infected with HSV-1 undergo little or no in vivo spontaneous reactivation with accompanying virus shedding in tears. HSV-1 reactivation can be induced in latently infected mice by several in vivo procedures, with UV-B-induced reactivation being one commonly used method. In the UV-B model, corneas are scarified (lightly scratched) just prior to ocular infection to increase efficiency of the primary infection and immune serum containing HSV-1 neutralizing antibodies is injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) to increase survival and decrease acute corneal damage. Since scarification can significantly alter host gene transcription in the cornea and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG; the site of HSV-1 latency) and since injection of immune serum likely modulates innate and adaptive herpes immunity, we investigated eliminating both treatments. Mice were infected with HSV-1 with or without corneal scarification and immune serum. HSV-1 reactivation and recurrent disease were induced by UV-B irradiation. When corneal scarification and immune serum were both eliminated, UV-B irradiation still induced both HSV-1 reactivation, as measured by shedding of reactivated virus in tears and herpetic eye disease, albeit at reduced levels compared to the original procedure. Despite the reduced reactivation and disease, avoidance of both corneal scarification and immune serum should improve the clinical relevance of the UV-B mouse model.

  17. Use of isotopically chiral [4'-13C]penciclovir and 13C NMR to determine the specificity and absolute configuration of penciclovir phosphate esters formed in HSV-1 and HSV-2 infected cells and by HSV-1-encoded thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Vere Hodge, R A; Darlison, S J; Earnshaw, D L; Readshaw, S A

    1993-01-01

    Penciclovir is a potent antiherpesvirus agent which is highly selective due to its phosphorylation only in virus infected cells. Phosphorylation of one of the hydroxymethyl groups of penciclovir (PCV) creates a chiral centre leading to the possible formation of (R)- and (S)-enantiomers. The absolute configuration and stereospecificity of the PCV-phosphates produced in cells infected with herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), as well as by HSV-1-encoded thymidine kinase, were determined using isotopically chiral [4'-13C]PCV precursors and 13C NMR spectroscopy of the isolated metabolites. The absolute configuration of penciclovir-triphosphate (PCV-TP) produced in HSV-1 infected cells was shown to be S with an enantiomeric purity of greater than 95%. However, in contrast fo HSV-1-infected cells in which none of the (R) enantiomer was detected, about 10% of (R)-PCV-TP was produced in HSV-2-infected cells. Phosphorylation of PCV by HSV-1-encoded thymidine kinase was found to give 75% (S)- and 25% (R)-PCV-monophosphate. The proportion of the (S)-isomer appears to be amplified in the subsequent phosphorylations leading to the triphosphate.

  18. Antiviral Action of Hydromethanolic Extract of Geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica against Antiherpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1).

    PubMed

    Coelho, Guilherme Rabelo; Mendonça, Ronaldo Zucatelli; Vilar, Karina de Senna; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Badari, Juliana Cuoco; Taniwaki, Noemi; Namiyama, Gisleine; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Curti, Suely Pires; Evelyn Silva, Patricia; Negri, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    The studies on chemical composition and biological activity of propolis had focused mainly on species Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). There are few studies about the uncommon propolis collected by stingless bees of the Meliponini tribe known as geopropolis. The geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica was collected in the region of Barra do Corda, Maranhão state, Brazil. The chemical analysis of hydromethanolic extract of this geopropolis (HMG) was carried out through HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and the main constituents found were pyrrolizidine alkaloids and C-glycosyl flavones. The presence of alkaloids in extracts of propolis is detected for the first time in this sample. The antiviral activity of HMG was evaluated through viral DNA quantification experiments and electron microscopy experiments. Quantification of viral DNA from herpes virus showed reduction of about 98% in all conditions and concentration tested of the HMG extract. The results obtained were corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, in which the images did not show particle or viral replication complex. The antiviral activity of C-glycosyl flavones was reported for a variety of viruses, being observed at different points in the viral replication. This work is the first report about the antiviral activity of geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica, in vitro, against antiherpes simplex virus (HSV).

  19. Antiviral Action of Hydromethanolic Extract of Geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica against Antiherpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Guilherme Rabelo; Mendonça, Ronaldo Zucatelli; Vilar, Karina de Senna; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Badari, Juliana Cuoco; Taniwaki, Noemi; Namiyama, Gisleine; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Curti, Suely Pires; Evelyn Silva, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The studies on chemical composition and biological activity of propolis had focused mainly on species Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). There are few studies about the uncommon propolis collected by stingless bees of the Meliponini tribe known as geopropolis. The geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica was collected in the region of Barra do Corda, Maranhão state, Brazil. The chemical analysis of hydromethanolic extract of this geopropolis (HMG) was carried out through HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and the main constituents found were pyrrolizidine alkaloids and C-glycosyl flavones. The presence of alkaloids in extracts of propolis is detected for the first time in this sample. The antiviral activity of HMG was evaluated through viral DNA quantification experiments and electron microscopy experiments. Quantification of viral DNA from herpes virus showed reduction of about 98% in all conditions and concentration tested of the HMG extract. The results obtained were corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, in which the images did not show particle or viral replication complex. The antiviral activity of C-glycosyl flavones was reported for a variety of viruses, being observed at different points in the viral replication. This work is the first report about the antiviral activity of geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica, in vitro, against antiherpes simplex virus (HSV). PMID:25861357

  20. Better neutralization of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) than HSV-2 by antibody from recipients of GlaxoSmithKline HSV-2 glycoprotein D2 subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Belshe, Robert B; Friedman, Harvey M

    2014-08-15

    The Herpevac Trial evaluated a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2) subunit vaccine to prevent genital herpes. Unexpectedly, the vaccine protected against genital HSV-1 infection but not genital HSV-2 infection. We evaluated sera from 30 women seronegative for HSV-1 and HSV-2 who were immunized with gD2 in the Herpevac Trial. Neutralizing antibody titers to HSV-1 were 3.5-fold higher than those to HSV-2 (P < .001). HSV-2 gC2 and gE2 on the virus blocked neutralization by gD2 antibody, while HSV-1 gC1 and gE1 did not block neutralization by gD2 antibody. The higher neutralizing antibody titers to HSV-1 offer an explanation for the Herpevac results, and shielding neutralizing domains provides a potential mechanism.

  1. In vitro research of anti-HSV-1 activity in different extracts from Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Olicard, Cécile; Didier, Yohann; Marty, Christel; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Renault, Tristan

    2005-11-09

    Mortalities related to the detection of Ostreid Herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) have been previously reported in France among larvae and spat of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Adult oysters appear less sensitive to herpesvirus infections, although OsHV-1 has been detected in adults without signs of disease or mortality. This suggests that the virus is able to persist in its host and that adult oysters may be able to control OsHV-1 infection. Little is known about antiviral substances in invertebrates. The present work concerns the research of antiviral substances in adult oyster C. gigas, where putative antiviral activities were monitored using 3 strategies: (1) in metabolites with variable polarity, (2) in peptidic extracts and (3) in crude haemolymph. In vitro antiviral assays were based on inhibition of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) replication in Vero cell monolayers. All extracts presented no cytotoxicity. Antiviral activity was detected in the fresh filtered haemolymph (EC50:425 microg ml(-1)) and seasonal variation of the haemolymph antiviral activity was monitored.

  2. Anti-HSV-1, antioxidant and antifouling phenolic compounds from the deep-sea-derived fungus Aspergillus versicolor SCSIO 41502.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhonghui; Nong, Xuhua; Ren, Zhe; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Qi, Shuhua

    2017-02-15

    Chemical investigation of the deep-sea-derived fungus Aspergillus versicolor SCSIO 41502 resulted in the isolation of three new anthraquinones, aspergilols G-I (1-3), one new diphenyl ether, 4-carbglyceryl-3,3'-dihydroxy-5,5'-dimethyldiphenyl ether (4), and one new benzaldehyde derivative, 2,4-dihydroxy-6-(4-methoxy-2-oxopentyl)-3-methylbenzaldehyde (5), along with 23 known phenolic compounds (6-28). The structures of new compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of 3 was established by CD spectrum and the modified Mosher method. Compounds 2, 3 and 9 had evident antiviral activity towards HSV-1 with EC50 values of 4.68, 6.25, and 3.12μM, respectively. Compounds 15, 18, 20 and 22-24 showed more potent antioxidant activity than l-ascorbic acid with IC50 values of 18.92-52.27μM towards DPPH radicals. Comparison of the structures and antioxidant activities of 1-28 suggests that the number of phenolic hydroxyl group that can freely rotate can significantly affect the antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds. In addition, 4, 22-24 and 27 had significant antifouling activity against Bugula neritina larval settlement with EC50 values of 1.28, 2.61, 5.48, 1.59, and 3.40μg/ml, respectively.

  3. The nectin-1{alpha} transmembrane domain, but not the cytoplasmic tail, influences cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Ravi P.; Dunn, Jennifer E.; Geraghty, Robert J. . E-mail: rgeragh@uky.edu

    2005-09-01

    Nectin-1 is a receptor for herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, and a cellular adhesion molecule. To study domains of nectin-1{alpha} involved in cell fusion, we measured the ability of nectin-1{alpha}/nectin-2{alpha} chimeras, nectin-1{alpha}/CD4 chimeras, and transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail mutants of nectin-1{alpha} to promote cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins. Our results demonstrate that only chimeras and mutants containing the entire V-like domain and a link to the plasma membrane conferred cell-fusion activity. The transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of nectin-1 were not required for any viral receptor or cell adhesion function tested. Cellular cytoplasmic factors that bind to the nectin-1{alpha} cytoplasmic tail, therefore, did not influence virus entry or cell fusion. Interestingly, the efficiency of cell fusion was reduced when membrane-spanning domains of nectin-1{alpha} and gD were replaced by glycosylphosphatidylinositol tethers, indicating that transmembrane domains may play a modulatory role in the gD/nectin-1{alpha} interaction in fusion.

  4. The effects of radiation damage on the structure of frozen hydrated HSV-1 capsids.

    PubMed

    Conway, J F; Trus, B L; Booy, F P; Newcomb, W W; Brown, J C; Steven, A C

    1993-01-01

    Radiation damage imposes stringent limits on the information content of electron micrographs of biological specimens. In this study, we have investigated its effects on frozen, hydrated specimens and three-dimensional reconstructions calculated from cryomicrographs using capsids of herpes simplex virus as a model system. Multiple-exposure series of micrographs of both B-capsids (which contain no DNA) and C-capsids (which are fully packaged) were recorded and reconstructions were calculated from the first exposures, corresponding to a cumulative electron dose of 6-7 e-/A2, and from later exposures (25-40 e-/A2). Experimental procedures were standardized to ensure that perceived changes in the micrographs and reconstructions would be attributable to radiation damage alone. The effects of the higher doses in both the micrographs and the reconstructions were expressed as a progressive blurring of the finer details, corresponding to a delocalization of structure in the ice-embedded specimens. The resolutions of the reconstructions were quantified according to a form of the Fourier ring correlation coefficient criterion, according to which the first-exposure reconstructions had resolutions of 30-36 A. The fifth-exposure B-capsid reconstruction had comparable nominal resolution, although it exhibited progressively lower correlations at higher spatial frequencies. Qualitatively similar changes in the series of C-capsid reconstructions were observed although they were more pronounced, presumably because these micrographs had lower contrast and signal-to-noise ratios. We infer that the observed changes in the images and reconstructions and the concomitant loss in contrast in the immediate vicinity of the capsid surface may reflect radiation-induced perturbation of molecular structure and/or the release of peptide fragments. Nevertheless, the observed changes are relatively subtle, at least at the operational resolution of this study; overall, our results support earlier

  5. Multicenter Evaluation of Meridian Bioscience HSV 1&2 Molecular Assay for Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 from Clinical Cutaneous and Mucocutaneous Specimens.

    PubMed

    Faron, Matthew L; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Patel, Anami; Beqa, Safedin H; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Kohn, Debra; Leber, Amy L; Mayne, Donna; Northern, William I; Buchan, Blake W

    2016-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes acute and relapsing symptoms characterized by ulcerative lesions. Laboratory diagnosis of HSV in cutaneous or mucocutaneous lesions has historically been performed with the use of viral cell culture systems; however, these tests are laborious and suffer decreased sensitivity for advanced-stage lesions. The recent availability of FDA-cleared moderately complex assays has resulted in the increased use of molecular diagnostics for the routine detection of HSV in superficial swab specimens. We performed a clinical evaluation of the recently FDA-cleared illumigene HSV 1&2 loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati OH) for the detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in cutaneous and mucocutaneous swab specimens. A total of 1,153 clinical swab specimens were collected and tested at 7 different clinical centers. Each specimen was tested for the presence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 using the illumigene assay, and results were compared to those of the enzyme-linked virus-inducible system (ELVIS) as the reference method. Overall, the illumigene assay demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 94.8% and 95.5%, respectively, for the detection of HSV-1. Detection of HSV-2 was similar, with a sensitivity of 98.9% and a specificity of 95.5%. Discrepant analysis was performed using an alternative molecular test (AmpliVue HSV1+2 assay; Quidel Molecular, San Diego, CA) on 91/99 specimens that were recorded as false positive (FP) or false negative (FN) compared to the reference method. In total, 57/78 (73%) FP and 9/13 (69%) FN illumigene results were supported by the AmpliVue result. The illumigene HSV 1&2 assay demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to detect and differentiate HSV in clinical specimens and identified 57 additional specimens that were positive for HSV compared to culture. The use of LAMP eliminates the need for the cycling of temperatures and provides results in less than 60 min

  6. Multicenter Evaluation of Meridian Bioscience HSV 1&2 Molecular Assay for Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 from Clinical Cutaneous and Mucocutaneous Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Faron, Matthew L.; Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Patel, Anami; Beqa, Safedin H.; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Kohn, Debra; Leber, Amy L.; Mayne, Donna; Northern, William I.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes acute and relapsing symptoms characterized by ulcerative lesions. Laboratory diagnosis of HSV in cutaneous or mucocutaneous lesions has historically been performed with the use of viral cell culture systems; however, these tests are laborious and suffer decreased sensitivity for advanced-stage lesions. The recent availability of FDA-cleared moderately complex assays has resulted in the increased use of molecular diagnostics for the routine detection of HSV in superficial swab specimens. We performed a clinical evaluation of the recently FDA-cleared illumigene HSV 1&2 loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati OH) for the detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in cutaneous and mucocutaneous swab specimens. A total of 1,153 clinical swab specimens were collected and tested at 7 different clinical centers. Each specimen was tested for the presence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 using the illumigene assay, and results were compared to those of the enzyme-linked virus-inducible system (ELVIS) as the reference method. Overall, the illumigene assay demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 94.8% and 95.5%, respectively, for the detection of HSV-1. Detection of HSV-2 was similar, with a sensitivity of 98.9% and a specificity of 95.5%. Discrepant analysis was performed using an alternative molecular test (AmpliVue HSV1+2 assay; Quidel Molecular, San Diego, CA) on 91/99 specimens that were recorded as false positive (FP) or false negative (FN) compared to the reference method. In total, 57/78 (73%) FP and 9/13 (69%) FN illumigene results were supported by the AmpliVue result. The illumigene HSV 1&2 assay demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to detect and differentiate HSV in clinical specimens and identified 57 additional specimens that were positive for HSV compared to culture. The use of LAMP eliminates the need for the cycling of temperatures and provides results in less than 60 min

  7. Activation of NF-κB signaling pathway in HSV-1-induced mouse facial palsy: Possible relation to therapeutic effect of glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Fan, Z; Han, Y; Xu, L; Wang, M; Zhang, D; Mao, Y; Li, J; Wang, H

    2015-03-19

    It has been documented that infection of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) contributes to the initiation of Bell's palsy. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for this disorder have not been fully elucidated to date. A mouse model of facial palsy induced by HSV-1 provides an opportunity to investigate the alteration in activities of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and its consequent effect on two key inflammatory factors, i.e., tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), as well as the effect of glucocorticoids (GCs) in this work. I-kappa B (IκB)-α phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation were measured by western blotting, and NF-κB/DNA binding activity was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Results showed the IκB-α phosphorylation and degradation as well as NF-κB activation in a time-dependent manner. The expression of TNF-α and COX-2 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), western blotting and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) respectively. Concomitant with the activation, the expression and secretion of TNF-α and COX-2 were rapidly induced in HSV-1-infected paralyzed mice. Conversely, the activation of NF-κB and up-regulation of TNF-α and COX-2 were blocked by pretreatment with NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) before being inoculated with HSV-1 to mice. In addition, GCs inhibited the nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB via inhibiting IκB-α degradation. Meanwhile, TNF-α production and COX-2 expression were significantly reduced by GCs. In conclusion, HSV-1 inoculation induced the activation of NF-κB, expression and secretion of TNF-α and COX-2 in the facial paralyzed mice, while, glucocorticoid effectively down-regulated TNF-α and COX-2 expression in HSV-1-induced paralyzed mice.

  8. Immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces a CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and confers a level of protection comparable to that of wild-type HSV-1.

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, M A; Bonneau, R H; Knipe, D M; Tevethia, S S

    1997-01-01

    Replication-deficient viruses provide an attractive alternative to conventional approaches used in the induction of antiviral immunity. We have quantitatively evaluated both the primary and memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses elicited by immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). In addition, we have examined the potential role of these CTL in protection against HSV infection. Using bulk culture analysis and limiting-dilution analysis, we have shown that a replication-deficient virus, d301, generates a strong primary CTL response that is comparable to the response induced by the wild type-strain, KOS1.1. Furthermore, the CTL induced by d301 immunization recognized the immunodominant, H-2Kb-restricted, CTL recognition epitope gB498-505 to a level similar to that for CTL from KOS1.1-immunized mice. The memory CTL response evoked by d301 was strong and persistent, even though the frequencies of CTL were slightly lower than the frequencies of CTL induced by KOS1.1. Adoptive transfer studies indicated that both the CD8+ and the CD4+ T-cell responses generated by immunization with d301 and KOS1.1 were able to limit the extent of a cutaneous HSV infection to comparable levels. Overall, these results indicate that viral replication is not necessary to elicit a potent and durable HSV-specific immune response and suggest that replication-deficient viruses may be effective in eliciting protection against viral pathogens. PMID:9094625

  9. Bortezomib-induced unfolded protein response increases oncolytic HSV-1 replication resulting in synergistic, anti-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Hurwitz, Brian S; Bolyard, Chelsea; Yu, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Jianying; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Rath, Kellie S; He, Shun; Bailey, Zachary; Eaves, David; Cripe, Timothy P; Parris, Deborah S.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Yu, Jianhua; Old, Matthew; Kaur, Balveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Bortezomib is an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) is a promising therapeutic approach for cancer. We tested the impact of combining bortezomib with oHSV for anti-tumor efficacy. Methods The synergistic interaction between oHSV and bortezomib was calculated using Chou-Talalay analysis. Viral replication was evaluated using plaque assay and immune fluorescence. Western-blot assays were used to evaluate induction of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Inhibitors targeting Hsp90 were utilized to investigate the mechanism of cell killing. Anti-tumor efficacy in vivo was evaluated using subcutaneous and intracranial tumor xenografts of glioma and head and neck cancer. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and two-sided log rank test. Results Combination treatment with bortezomib and oHSV, 34.5ENVE, displayed strong synergistic interaction in ovarian cancer, head & neck cancer, glioma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells. Bortezomib treatment induced ER stress, evident by strong induction of Grp78, CHOP, PERK and IRE1α (western blot analysis) and the UPR (induction of hsp40, 70 and 90). Bortezomib treatment of cells at both sublethal and lethal doses increased viral replication (p value <0.001), but inhibition of Hsp90 ablated this response, reducing viral replication and synergistic cell killing. The combination of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE significantly enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in multiple different tumor models in vivo. Conclusions The dramatic synergy of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE is mediated by bortezomib- induced UPR and warrants future clinical testing in patients. PMID:24815720

  10. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes.

  11. Murine Corneal Inflammation and Nerve Damage After Infection With HSV-1 Are Promoted by HVEM and Ameliorated by Immune-Modifying Nanoparticle Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Rebecca G.; Kopp, Sarah J.; Ifergan, Igal; Shui, Jr-Wen; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Miller, Stephen D.; Longnecker, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine cellular and temporal expression patterns of herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM, Tnfrsf14) in the murine cornea during the course of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection, the impact of this expression on pathogenesis, and whether alterations in HVEM or downstream HVEM-mediated effects ameliorate corneal disease. Methods Corneal HVEM levels were assessed in C57BL/6 mice after infection with HSV-1(17). Leukocytic infiltrates and corneal sensitivity loss were measured in the presence, global absence (HVEM knockout [KO] mice; Tnfrsf14−/−), or partial absence of HVEM (HVEM conditional KO). Effects of immune-modifying nanoparticles (IMPs) on viral replication, corneal sensitivity, and corneal infiltrates were measured. Results Corneal HVEM+ populations, particularly monocytes/macrophages during acute infection (3 days post infection [dpi]) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) during the chronic inflammatory phase (14 dpi), increased after HSV-1 infection. Herpes virus entry mediator increased leukocytes in the cornea and corneal sensitivity loss. Ablation of HVEM from CD45+ cells, or intravenous IMP therapy, reduced infiltrates in the chronic phase and maintained corneal sensitivity. Conclusions Herpes virus entry mediator was expressed on two key populations: corneal monocytes/macrophages and PMNs. Herpes virus entry mediator promoted the recruitment of myeloid cells to the cornea in the chronic phase. Herpes virus entry mediator–associated corneal sensitivity loss preceded leukocytic infiltration, suggesting it may play an active role in recruitment. We propose that HVEM on resident corneal macrophages increases nerve damage and immune cell invasion, and we showed that prevention of late-phase infiltration of PMN and CD4+ T cells by IMP therapy improved clinical symptoms and mortality and reduced corneal sensitivity loss caused by HSV-1. PMID:28114589

  12. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  13. UV-C irradiation of HSV-1 infected fibroblasts (HSV-FS) enhances human natural killer (NK) cell activity against these targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pettera, L.; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, P. )

    1991-03-11

    Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene products has been bound to be sufficient for NK cell mediated lysis of HSV-1 infected FS. To block the targets at various stages in the infectious cycle, HSV-FS were irradiated with UV light for 1 min at 2, 6, and 20 hr post-infection. NK mediated lysis of 2 hr and 5 hr UV treated HSV-FS was 2-fold higher than non-UV treated HSV-FS despite a {gt}99% inhibition in virus yield. In contrast, 20 hr infected targets were lysed less well than 2 and 6 hr targets despite strong glycoprotein expression and induction of high levels of interferon-alpha (IFN-{alpha}) production by effector PBMC's; this lysis was not enhanced by UV treatment. Since NK lysis of HSV-FS has been found to be dependent on an HLA-DR{sup +} accessory cell (AC), lysis of irradiated HSV-FS by PBMC's depleted of AC was measured. Such depletion eradicated NK lysis of the UV treated HSV-FS indicating that irradiation does not overcome the AC requirement for NK lysis. UV irradiation of another HLA-DR{sup +} dependent target, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) infected FS led to a dramatic reduction in both NK lysis and IFN-{alpha} induction. HSV-1 is a DNA virus whose genes are expressed in a cascade fashion whereas VSV is an RNA virus. The authors hypothesize that the enhancement in AC dependent NK activity observed for UV irradiated HSV-FS, but not VSV-FS, targets is due to overproduction of either a cellular or viral gene product which specifically occurs early in the HSV-1 infectious cycle and is downregulated by 20 hr post-infection.

  14. Identification of Replication-competent HSV-1 Cgal+ Strain Signaling Targets in Human Hepatoma Cells by Functional Organelle Proteomics*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría, Enrique; Mora, María I.; Potel, Corinne; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Carro-Roldán, Elvira; Hernández-Alcoceba, Rubén; Prieto, Jesús; Epstein, Alberto L.; Corrales, Fernando J.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, we have attempted a comprehensive analysis of cytosolic and microsomal proteomes to elucidate the signaling pathways impaired in human hepatoma (Huh7) cells upon herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; Cgal+) infection. Using a combination of differential in-gel electrophoresis and nano liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, 18 spots corresponding to 16 unique deregulated cellular proteins were unambiguously identified, which were involved in the regulation of essential processes such as apoptosis, mRNA processing, cellular structure and integrity, signal transduction, and endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation pathway. Based on our proteomic data and additional functional studies target proteins were identified indicating a late activation of apoptotic pathways in Huh7 cells upon HSV-1 Cgal+ infection. Additionally to changes on RuvB-like 2 and Bif-1, down-regulation of Erlin-2 suggests stimulation of Ca2+-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway results from a time-dependent multi-factorial impairment as inferred from the stepwise characterization of constitutive pro- and anti-apoptotic factors. Activation of serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) was also found in Huh7 cells upon HSV-1 Cgal+ infection. In addition, PP2A activation paralleled dephosphorylation and inactivation of downstream mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway (MEK½, ERK½) critical to cell survival and activation of proapoptotic Bad by dephosphorylation of Ser-112. Taken together, our results provide novel molecular information that contributes to define in detail the apoptotic mechanisms triggered by HSV-1 Cgal+ in the host cell and lead to the implication of PP2A in the transduction of cell death signals and cell survival pathway arrest. PMID:19098277

  15. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts.

  16. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation.

    PubMed

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Simpson, Jennifer L; Wechsler, Steven L

    2015-10-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular immune mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) explant-induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild-type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT((+)) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT((-)) virus) were irradiated with UV-B, and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT((-)) virus, LAT((+)) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B-induced reactivation mouse model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs is discussed.

  17. Simultaneous Detection and Genotype Determination of HSV 1 and 2 by Real-time PCR Using Melting Curve Analysis and a Unique Pair of Primers.

    PubMed

    Paryan, Mahdi; Mohammadi-Yeganeh, Samira; Rezvan, Houri; Kia, Vahid; Mansouri, Ardalan; Mirab Samiee, Siamak

    2017-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a human pathogen that causes different pathologic manifestations. Rapid and feasible detection and discrimination methods for HSV genotyping is a challenge in clinical laboratories, especially in children suffering from herpetic encephalitis. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping assay using SYBR Green I was established. We designed only 1 pair of primer for HSV 1 and 2, targeting thymidine kinase gene conserved region. HSV genotypes were determined by PCR using melting curve analysis with LightCycler. Different HSV genotypes were successfully detected in all clinical samples. The melting temperature for HSV 1 and 2 was 85.5±0.78°C and 89±0.53°C, respectively. These 2 genotypes were completely distinguished by means of the accurate melting assay. Importantly, detection was reliably performed within only 1 hour. The assay had no cross-reactivity across species, an excellent dynamic range from 10 to 10 copies per reaction, a good intra-assay and interassay reproducibility, and a detection limit of a single copy per reaction. Our homebrew designed and validated quantitative real-time PCR followed by a melting curve analysis provided a rapid and convenient screening test for differential identification of HSV genotypes 1 and 2. We recommend the large-scale application of this method for HSV 1 and 2 detection.

  18. Regulation of viral gene expression by the herpes simplex virus 1UL24 protein (HSV-1UL24 inhibits accumulation of viral transcripts).

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Solano, Carolina; Gonzalez, Carmen Elena; Richerioux, Nicolas; Bertrand, Luc; Dridi, Slimane; Griffiths, Anthony; Langelier, Yves; Pearson, Angela

    2016-08-01

    UL24 is conserved among all Herpesviridae. In herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), UL24 mutations lead to reduced viral titers both in cell culture and in vivo, and reduced pathogenicity. The human cytomegalovirus ortholog of UL24 has a gene regulatory function; however, it is not known whether other UL24 orthologs also affect gene expression. We discovered that in co-transfection experiments, expression of UL24 correlated with a reduction in the expression of several viral proteins and transcripts. Substitution mutations targeting conserved residues in UL24 impaired this function. Reduced transcript levels did not appear attributable to changes in mRNA stability. The UL24 ortholog of Herpes B virus exhibited a similar activity. An HSV-1 mutant that does not express UL24 produced more viral R1 and R2 transcripts than the wild type or rescue virus relative to the amount of viral DNA. These results reveal a new role for HSV-1UL24 in regulating viral mRNA accumulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Prostate-Restricted Replication Competent Adenovirus-AD-IU-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    imaging HSV1 - tk reporter gene expression in vivo using PET. J. Nucl. Med. 2001, 42, 96–105. 30. Martin, J.C.; McGee, D.P.C.; Jeffrey, G.A.; Hobbs...8-[18F]Fluoropenciclovir: an improved reporter probe for imaging HSV1 -tk reporter gene expression in vivo using PET. J. Nucl. Med. 2001, 42, 96–105...nucleoside probes (FIAU, Wang et al.930 ORDER REPRINTS FHBG, and FHPG) for PET imaging of HSV1 tk gene expression . J. Nucl. Med. 2002

  20. APP Processing Induced by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Yields Several APP Fragments in Human and Rat Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Civitelli, Livia; Argnani, Rafaela; Piacentini, Roberto; Ripoli, Cristian; Manservigi, Roberto; Grassi, Claudio; Garaci, Enrico; Palamara, Anna Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Lifelong latent infections of the trigeminal ganglion by the neurotropic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are characterized by periodic reactivation. During these episodes, newly produced virions may also reach the central nervous system (CNS), causing productive but generally asymptomatic infections. Epidemiological and experimental findings suggest that HSV-1 might contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder is related to an overproduction of amyloid beta (Aβ) and other neurotoxic peptides, which occurs during amyloidogenic endoproteolytic processing of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). The aim of our study was to identify the effects of productive HSV-1 infection on APP processing in neuronal cells. We found that infection of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and rat cortical neurons is followed by multiple cleavages of APP, which result in the intra- and/or extra-cellular accumulation of various neurotoxic species. These include: i) APP fragments (APP-Fs) of 35 and 45 kDa (APP-F35 and APP-F45) that comprise portions of Aβ; ii) N-terminal APP-Fs that are secreted; iii) intracellular C-terminal APP-Fs; and iv) Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. Western blot analysis of infected-cell lysates treated with formic acid suggests that APP-F35 may be an Aβ oligomer. The multiple cleavages of APP that occur in infected cells are produced in part by known components of the amyloidogenic APP processing pathway, i.e., host-cell β-secretase, γ-secretase, and caspase-3-like enzymes. These findings demonstrate that HSV-1 infection of neuronal cells can generate multiple APP fragments with well-documented neurotoxic potentials. It is tempting to speculate that intra- and extracellular accumulation of these species in the CNS resulting from repeated HSV-1 reactivation could, in the presence of other risk factors, play a co-factorial role in the development of AD. PMID:21085580

  1. Noninvasive molecular imaging of hypoxia in human xenografts: comparing hypoxia-induced gene expression with endogenous and exogenous hypoxia markers.

    PubMed

    He, Fuqiu; Deng, Xuelong; Wen, Bixiu; Liu, Yueping; Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Minami, Akiko; Huang, Yunhong; Chen, Qing; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2008-10-15

    Tumor hypoxia is important in the development and treatment of human cancers. We have developed a novel xenograft model for studying and imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression. A hypoxia-inducible dual reporter herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (HSV1-TKeGFP), under the control of hypoxia response element (9HRE), was stably transfected into human colorectal HT29 cancer cells. Selected clones were further enriched by repeated live cell sorting gated for hypoxia-induced eGFP expression. Fluorescent microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and radioactive substrate trapping assays showed strong hypoxia-induced expression of eGFP and HSV1-tk enzyme in the HT29-9HRE cells in vitro. Sequential micropositron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor-bearing animals, using the hypoxic cell tracer (18)F-FMISO and the reporter substrate (124)I-FIAU, yielded similar tumor hypoxia images for the HT29-9HRE xenograft but not in the parental HT29 tumor. Using autoradiography and IHC, detailed spatial distributions in tumor sections were obtained and compared for the following hypoxia-associated biomarkers in the HT29-9HRE xenograft: (124)I-FIAU, (18)F-FMISO, Hoechst (perfusion), lectin-TRITC (functional blood vessels), eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9. Intratumoral distributions of (124)I-FIAU and (18)F-FMISO were similar, and eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9 colocalized in the same areas but not in well-perfused regions that were positive for Hoechst and lectin-TRITC. In enabling the detection of hypoxia-induced molecular events and mapping their distribution in vivo with serial noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging, and multiple variable analysis with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy, this human xenograft model provides a valuable tool for studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia.

  2. Implementing Portfolios Using Tk20: An Educational Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jie; Fallon, Moira A.; Wright, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share results of collaborative effort introducing special education portfolios into an inclusive teacher education program using the Tk20 assessment system. Tk20 is an assessment system for both providing evidence of educational skills and achieving that evidence in such a way as to demonstrate growth of teacher…

  3. Prior Corneal Scarification and Injection of Immune Serum are Not Required Before Ocular HSV-1 Infection for UV-B-Induced Virus Reactivation and Recurrent Herpetic Corneal Disease in Latently Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Huang, Lei; Krochmal, John J.; Garcia, Jairo M.; Simpson, Jennifer L.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to spontaneous reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. Mice latently infected with HSV-1 undergo little or no in vivo spontaneous reactivation with accompanying virus shedding in tears. HSV-1 reactivation can be induced in latently infected mice by several in vivo procedures, with UV-B-induced reactivation being one commonly used method. In the UV-B model, corneas are scarified (lightly scratched) just prior to ocular infection to increase efficiency of the primary infection and immune serum containing HSV-1 neutralizing antibodies is injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) to increase survival and decrease acute corneal damage. Since scarification can significantly alter host gene transcription in the cornea and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG; the site of HSV-1 latency) and since injection of immune serum likely modulates innate and adaptive herpes immunity, we investigated eliminating both treatments. Material and Methods Mice were infected with HSV-1 with or without corneal scarification and immune serum. HSV-1 reactivation and recurrent disease were induced by UV-B irradiation. Results When corneal scarification and immune serum were both eliminated, UV-B irradiation still induced both HSV-1 reactivation, as measured by shedding of reactivated virus in tears and herpetic eye disease, albeit at reduced levels compared to the original procedure. Conclusion Despite the reduced reactivation and disease, avoidance of both corneal scarification and immune serum should improve the clinical relevance of the UV-B mouse model. PMID:26398722

  4. Kinetics of cytokine production in the cornea and trigeminal ganglion of C57BL/6 mice after corneal HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    He, J; Ichimura, H; Iida, T; Minami, M; Kobayashi, K; Kita, M; Sotozono, C; Tagawa, Y I; Iwakura, Y; Imanishi, J

    1999-06-01

    To investigate the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of acute herpetic keratitis (HK), we examined the kinetics of cytokine expression in the corneas and the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of C57BL/6Cr (B6) mice after herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and observed the influence of the targeted disruption of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) gene on the clinical course of HK and/or viral clearance. Following corneal infection with HSV-1 Amakata strain, all corneas developed a typical dendritic keratitis. Quantitative analysis using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that the expression of interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-5, IL-6, and IFN-gamma in corneas and TGs significantly elevated immediately after infection, peaked between days 2 and 7 postinfection (p.i.), and then diminished. One exception was IFN-gamma, whose expression significantly persisted in the TGs until day 30 p.i. An additional experiment using IFN-gamma-/- (gko) mice revealed that there was no significant difference in the peak level of viral replication in corneas and TGs between gko and B6 mice, although gko mice showed a significant delay of virus clearance in both corneas and TGs (p < 0.005) and higher mortality rate than B6 mice after HSV-1 infection (p < 0.01). These data suggest that the production of proinflammatory cytokines closely correlates with the pathogenesis of HK, and that IFN-gamma plays an important role in enhancing viral clearance from the cornea and TG.

  5. The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein K(gK) is essential for viral corneal spread and neuroinvasiveness.

    PubMed

    David, Andrew T; Baghian, A; Foster, T P; Chouljenko, V N; Kousoulas, K G

    2008-05-01

    To determine the role of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein K(gK) in corneal infection, neuroinvasion, and virus latency in trigeminal ganglia of mice. The recombinant virus HSV-1 (McKrae) Delta gK (MKDelta gK) carrying a deletion of the gK gene was constructed by insertional/deletion mutagenesis and replaced by a gene cassette constitutively expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein. The gK deletion of the MKDelta gK virus was rescued to produce the wild-type-like virus MKgK. Balb/c mice were infected ocularly with either virus, and the infection pattern in the eye, clinical disease progression, and establishment of viral latency was monitored. Mice infected with the MKDelta gK strain produced in a gK complementing cell line did not exhibit clinical signs when compared with mice infected with the MKgK virus. Direct visualization of infected eyes revealed that the MKDelta gK virus was unable to spread in mouse corneas, while the MKgK rescued virus spread efficiently. Nineteen of 20 scarified and 5/12 unscarified mice infected with the MKgK virus produced infectious virus after coculture with permissive cells, while 0/20 scarified and 0/12 unscarified mice infected with the MKDelta gK virus produced infectious virus. HSV DNA was detected in trigeminal ganglia by PCR in 19/20 scarified and 9/12 unscarified mice inoculated with MKgK, while HSV DNA was detected in the trigeminal ganglia of 3/20 scarified and 0/12 unscarified mice inoculated with MKDelta gK. The results show that HSV-1 gK is essential for efficient replication and spread in the corneal epithelium and trigeminal ganglia neuroinvasion in MKDelta gK inoculated mice.

  6. Diet-induced obesity prolongs neuroinflammation and recruits CCR2(+) monocytes to the brain following herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 latency in mice.

    PubMed

    White, Katherine A; Hutton, Scott R; Weimer, Jill M; Sheridan, Patricia A

    2016-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 is a ubiquitous human infection, with increased prevalence in obese populations. Obesity has been linked to increased inflammation, susceptibility to infection, and higher rates of anxiety disorder and cognitive impairment. To determine how obesity alters neuroinflammation and behavior following infection, we infected weanling C57BL/6 or CCR2(RFP/+)/CX3CR1(GFP/+) mice with a very low dose of HSV-1. Following viral latency (14days post infection (d p.i.)), mice were randomly assigned to remain on the low fat (LF) diet or switched to a 45% high fat (HF) diet. Eight weeks post diet shift, latently infected mice on the HF diet (HSV-HF) had greater microglial activation and infiltration of inflammatory CCR2(+) monocytes in the hypothalamus and dentate gyrus, in comparison to both HSV-LF mice and uninfected mice on LF and HF diets. VCAM staining was present in hypothalamus and hippocampus of the HSV-HF mice in the areas of monocyte infiltration. Infiltrating monocytes also produced proinflammatory cytokines demonstrating that, along with activated microglia, monocytes contribute to sustained neuroinflammation in latently infected obese mice. Utilizing a light-dark preference test, we found that HSV-HF mice had increased anxiety-like behavior. In the marble-burying test, HF diet and HSV infection resulted in increased numbers of buried marbles. Together, these mice provide a useful, testable model to study the biobehavioral effects of obesity and latent HSV-1 infection in regards to anxiety and may provide a tool for studying diet intervention programs in the future.

  7. Upregulation of Mouse Genes in HSV-1 Latent TG after Butyrate Treatment Implicates the Multiple Roles of the LAT-ICP0 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Christian; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Kumar, Manish; Foster, Timothy P.; Thompson, Hilary W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine host response by gene expression in HSV-1 latent trigeminal ganglia (TG) after sodium butyrate (NaBu) treatment. Methods. Corneas of 6-week-old female BALB/c mice were scarified and inoculated with HSV-1 17Syn+ (high phenotypic reactivator) or its mutant 17ΔPst(LAT−) (low phenotypic reactivator) at 104 plaque-forming units/eye. NaBu-induced viral reactivation was by intraperitoneal (IP) administration at postinfection (PI) day 28, followed by euthanasia after 1 hour. NaBu-treated, uninfected mice served as the control. The resultant labeled cRNA from TG isolated total RNA was hybridized to gene microarray chips containing 14,000 mouse genes. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to confirm gene expression. Results. Differential induction of gene expression between 17Syn+ and its mutant 17ΔPst(LAT−) was designated as NaBu-induced gene expression and yielded significant upregulation of 2- to 16-fold of 0.4% (56/14,000) host genes probed, comprising mainly nucleosome assembly and binding, central nervous system structural activity, hormonal activity, and signaling activity. Approximately 0.2% (24/14,000) of the host genes, mainly of the same functional categories were downregulated 3- to 11-fold. Immune activity was minor in comparison to our reports on gene expression during latency and heat stress induction. Euchromatin analysis revealed that the LAT-ICP0 locus is amenable to the effects of NaBu. Histone activity was detected by early transcription of histone cluster 2 H2be (Hist2h2be). Conclusions. NaBu-induced reactivation of HSV-1 is twofold: drug action involving significant moderation of specific host epigenetic changes and failure to elicit or suppress immune activity at the early time point of 1 hour. PMID:20881297

  8. Comparison of Simplexa HSV 1 & 2 PCR with culture, immunofluorescence, and laboratory-developed TaqMan PCR for detection of herpes simplex virus in swab specimens.

    PubMed

    Gitman, Melissa R; Ferguson, David; Landry, Marie L

    2013-11-01

    The Simplexa HSV 1 & 2 direct PCR assay was compared with conventional cell culture, cytospin-enhanced direct fluorescent antibody (DFA), and a laboratory-developed real-time TaqMan PCR (LDT HSV PCR) using extracted nucleic acid for the detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in dermal, genital, mouth, ocular, and other swab samples. One hundred seventy-one swabs were tested prospectively, and 58 were positive for HSV (34 HSV-1 and 24 HSV-2). Cytospin-DFA detected 50 (86.2%), conventional cell culture 51 (87.9%), Simplexa direct 55 (94.8%), and LDT HSV PCR 57 (98.3%) of 58 true positives. Simplexa direct detected more positives than DFA and culture, but the differences were not significant (P = 0.0736 and P = 0.3711, respectively, by the McNemar test). Samples that were positive by all methods (n = 48) were strong positives (LDT cycle threshold [CT] value, 14.4 to 26.1). One strongly positive sample was falsely negative by LDT HSV PCR due to a failure of TaqMan probe binding. Three samples falsely negative by Simplexa direct had high CT values by LDT HSV PCR (LDT CT, 35.8 to 38.2). Omission of the DNA extraction step by Simplexa direct led to a drop in sensitivity compared to the sensitivity of LDT HSV PCR using extracted samples (94.8% versus 98.3%, respectively), but the difference was not significant (P = 0.6171). Simplexa HSV 1 & 2 direct PCR was the most expensive but required the least training of the assays used, had the lowest hands-on time and fastest assay time (75 min, versus 3 h by LDT HSV PCR), and provided the HSV type.

  9. A TCL/TK widget for display of MEDM screens.

    SciTech Connect

    Soliday, R.; APS Operations Division

    2005-01-01

    A new Tcl/Tk widget has been created to display MEDM screens inside a Tcl/Tk application. Tcl/Tk parses the MEDM input files and the appropriate widgets are created and linked to the associated process variables. One advantage of this approach is that an X-Windows emulator is not required to view and manipulate the MEDM screen under a Windows operating system. Another benefit is that the MEDM screen can now be tightly integrated into a scripting language to attach higher-level logic to various process variable manipulations. Further details and examples of the new widget will be discussed.

  10. Efficacy of the Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Glycoprotein D/AS04 Vaccine against Genital HSV-2 and HSV-1 Infection and Disease in the Cotton Rat Sigmodon hispidus Model

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Jamall; Mbaye, Aissatou; Sanford-Crane, Hannah; Blanco, Jorge C. G.; Huber, Ashley; Herold, Betsy C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Subunit vaccines based on the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD-2) have been the major focus of HSV-2 vaccine development for the past 2 decades. Based on the promising data generated in the guinea pig model, a formulation containing truncated gD-2, aluminum salt, and MPL (gD/AS04) advanced to clinical trials. The results of these trials, however, were unexpected, as the vaccine protected against HSV-1 infection but not against HSV-2. To address this discrepancy, we developed a Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA)-treated cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus model of HSV-2 and HSV-1 genital infection. The severity of HSV-1 genital herpes was less than that of HSV-2 genital herpes in cotton rats, and yet the model allowed for comparative evaluation of gD/AS04 immunogenicity and efficacy. Cotton rats were intramuscularly vaccinated using a prime boost strategy with gD/AS04 (Simplirix vaccine) or control vaccine formulation (hepatitis B vaccine FENDrix) and subsequently challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 or HSV-1. The gD/AS04 vaccine was immunogenic in cotton rats and induced serum IgG directed against gD-2 and serum HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies but failed to efficiently protect against HSV-2 disease or to decrease the HSV-2 viral load. However, gD/AS04 significantly reduced vaginal titers of HSV-1 and better protected animals against HSV-1 compared to HSV-2 genital disease. The latter finding is generally consistent with the clinical outcome of the Herpevac trial of Simplirix. Passive transfer of serum from gD/AS04-immunized cotton rats conferred stronger protection against HSV-1 genital disease. These findings suggest the need for alternative vaccine strategies and the identification of new correlates of protection. IMPORTANCE In spite of the high health burden of genital herpes, there is still no effective intervention against the disease. The significant gap in knowledge on genital herpes pathogenesis has been further highlighted by the

  11. Using CamiTK for rapid prototyping of interactive computer assisted medical intervention applications.

    PubMed

    Promayon, Emmanuel; Fouard, Céline; Bailet, Mathieu; Deram, Aurélien; Fiard, Gaëlle; Hungr, Nikolai; Luboz, Vincent; Payan, Yohan; Sarrazin, Johan; Saubat, Nicolas; Selmi, Sonia Yuki; Voros, Sandrine; Cinquin, Philippe; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    Computer Assisted Medical Intervention (CAMI hereafter) is a complex multi-disciplinary field. CAMI research requires the collaboration of experts in several fields as diverse as medicine, computer science, mathematics, instrumentation, signal processing, mechanics, modeling, automatics, optics, etc. CamiTK is a modular framework that helps researchers and clinicians to collaborate together in order to prototype CAMI applications by regrouping the knowledge and expertise from each discipline. It is an open-source, cross-platform generic and modular tool written in C++ which can handle medical images, surgical navigation, biomedicals simulations and robot control. This paper presents the Computer Assisted Medical Intervention ToolKit (CamiTK) and how it is used in various applications in our research team.

  12. A philosophical assessment of TK's autopsy report: Implications for the debate over the brain death criteria.

    PubMed

    Austriaco, Nicanor Pier Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing evidence that the totally brain-dead patient is able to continue to live and to maintain some integrated functions, albeit with the necessary assistance of mechanical ventilation. Several years ago, the autopsy report of a totally brain-dead patient named TK who was kept on life support for nearly twenty years was published in the Journal of Child Neurology. He remains the individual kept on life support the longest after suffering total brain failure. In this essay, I argue that the clinical data described in the autopsy report demonstrate that TK's long-term survival after total brain failure supports the claim acknowledged by the President's Council on Bioethics that the brain-dead patient retains his bodily integrity. As such, he is not dead. He is still a living, though severely disabled, human organism, a human person made in the image and likeness of God.

  13. RIG-I is required for VSV-induced cytokine production by murine glia and acts in combination with DAI to initiate responses to HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Crill, Emma K.; Furr-Rogers, Samantha R.; Marriott, Ian

    2015-01-01

    A defining feature of viral central nervous system (CNS) infection is the rapid onset of severe neuroinflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying glial responses to replicative neurotropic viruses are only now becoming apparent with the discovery of a number of cytosolic sensors for viral nucleic acids. We have described the expression by murine and human glial cells of two disparate pattern recognition receptors, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factors (DAI), receptors for viral RNA and DNA moieties, respectively. In the present study, we demonstrate the functional significance of RIG-I expression in primary murine microglia and astrocytes. Our data indicate that murine glial immune responses to a model neurotropic RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, are RIG-I dependent and independent of levels of DAI expression or RNA polymerase III activity. In contrast, maximal glial inflammatory and antiviral responses to the DNA virus herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) are dependent on the expression of both RIG-I and DAI, and require RNA polymerase III activity. These findings indicate that the RNA sensor, RIG-I, acts in parallel with DAI in an RNA polymerase III-dependent manner to initiate glial responses to HSV-1. We therefore suggest that RIG-I plays a significant role in the detection of both RNA and DNA pathogens by microglia and astrocytes. PMID:26146945

  14. RIG-I is required for VSV-induced cytokine production by murine glia and acts in combination with DAI to initiate responses to HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Crill, Emma K; Furr-Rogers, Samantha R; Marriott, Ian

    2015-12-01

    A defining feature of viral central nervous system (CNS) infection is the rapid onset of severe neuroinflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying glial responses to replicative neurotropic viruses are only now becoming apparent with the discovery of a number of cytosolic sensors for viral nucleic acids. We have described the expression by murine and human glial cells of two disparate pattern recognition receptors, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factors (DAI), receptors for viral RNA and DNA moieties, respectively. In the present study, we demonstrate the functional significance of RIG-I expression in primary murine microglia and astrocytes. Our data indicate that murine glial immune responses to a model neurotropic RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, are RIG-I dependent and independent of levels of DAI expression or RNA polymerase III activity. In contrast, maximal glial inflammatory and antiviral responses to the DNA virus herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) are dependent on the expression of both RIG-I and DAI, and require RNA polymerase III activity. These findings indicate that the RNA sensor, RIG-I, acts in parallel with DAI in an RNA polymerase III-dependent manner to initiate glial responses to HSV-1. We therefore suggest that RIG-I plays a significant role in the detection of both RNA and DNA pathogens by microglia and astrocytes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. HSV-1 Amplicon Vectors Launch the Production of Heterologous Rotavirus-like Particles and Induce Rotavirus-specific Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laimbacher, Andrea S; Esteban, Laura E; Castello, Alejandro A; Abdusetir Cerfoglio, Juan C; Argüelles, Marcelo H; Glikmann, Graciela; D'Antuono, Alejandra; Mattion, Nora; Berois, Mabel; Arbiza, Juan; Hilbe, Monika; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seyffert, Michael; Dresch, Christiane; Epstein, Alberto L; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2012-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates because they represent viral antigens in the authentic conformation of the virion and are therefore readily recognized by the immune system. As VLPs do not contain genetic material they are safer than attenuated virus vaccines. In this study, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors were constructed to coexpress the rotavirus (RV) structural genes VP2, VP6, and VP7 and were used as platforms to launch the production of RV-like particles (RVLPs) in vector-infected mammalian cells. Despite the observed splicing of VP6 RNA, full-length VP6 protein and RVLPs were efficiently produced. Intramuscular injection of mice with the amplicon vectors as a two-dose regimen without adjuvants resulted in RV-specific humoral immune responses and, most importantly, immunized mice were partially protected at the mucosal level from challenge with live wild-type (wt) RV. This work provides proof of principle for the application of HSV-1 amplicon vectors that mediate the efficient production of heterologous VLPs as genetic vaccines. PMID:22713696

  16. A conformational epitope mapped in the bovine herpesvirus type 1 envelope glycoprotein B by phage display and the HSV-1 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Greyciele R; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Bataus, Luiz A M; Japolla, Greice; Brito, Wilia M E D; Campos, Ivan T N; Ribeiro, Cristina; Souza, Guilherme R L

    2015-08-01

    The selected dodecapeptide (1)DRALYGPTVIDH(12) from a phage-displayed peptide library and the crystal structure of the envelope glycoprotein B (Env gB) from Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) led us to the identification of a new discontinuous epitope on the Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) Env gB. In silico analysis revealed a short BoHV-1 gB motif ((338)YKRD(341)) within a epitope region, with a high similarity to the motifs shared by the dodecapeptide N-terminal region ((5)YxARD(1)) and HSV-1 Env gB ((326)YARD(329)), in which the (328)Arg residue is described to be a neutralizing antibody target. Besides the characterization of an antibody-binding site of the BoHV-1 Env gB, we have demonstrated that the phage-fused peptide has the potential to be used as a reagent for virus diagnosis by phage-ELISA assay, which discriminated BoHV-1 infected serum samples from negative ones.

  17. An Epigenetic Compound Library Screen Identifies BET Inhibitors That Promote HSV-1 and -2 Replication by Bridging P-TEFb to Viral Gene Promoters through BRD4.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ke; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaoqing; Ma, Yingyu; Dai, Yue; Fan, Yimei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang; Li, Erguang

    2016-10-01

    The human HSV-1 and -2 are common pathogens of human diseases. Both host and viral factors are involved in HSV lytic infection, although detailed mechanisms remain elusive. By screening a chemical library of epigenetic regulation, we identified bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) as a critical player in HSV infection. We show that treatment with pan BD domain inhibitor enhanced both HSV infection. Using JQ1 as a probe, we found that JQ1, a defined BD1 inhibitor, acts through BRD4 protein since knockdown of BRD4 expression ablated JQ1 effect on HSV infection. BRD4 regulates HSV replication through complex formation involving CDK9 and RNAP II; whereas, JQ1 promotes HSV-1 infection by allocating the complex to HSV gene promoters. Therefore, suppression of BRD4 expression or inhibition of CDK9 activity impeded HSV infection. Our data support a model that JQ1 enhances HSV infection by switching BRD4 to transcription regulation of viral gene expression from chromatin targeting since transient expression of BRD4 BD1 or BD1/2 domain had similar effect to that by JQ1 treatment. In addition to the identification that BRD4 is a modulator for JQ1 action on HSV infection, this study demonstrates BRD4 has an essential role in HSV infection.

  18. HSV-1-mediated IL-1 receptor antagonist gene therapy ameliorates MOG(35-55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Furlan, R; Bergami, A; Brambilla, E; Butti, E; De Simoni, M G; Campagnoli, M; Marconi, P; Comi, G; Martino, G

    2007-01-01

    Primary proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1beta, play a crucial pathogenic role in multiple sclerosis and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and may represent, therefore, a suitable therapeutic target. We have previously established the delivery of anti-inflammatory cytokine genes within the central nervous system (CNS), based on intracisternal (i.c.) injection of non-replicative HSV-1-derived vectors. Here we show the therapeutic efficacy of i.c. administration of an HSV-1-derived vector carrying the interleukin-1receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) gene, the physiological antagonist of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1, in C57BL/6 mice affected by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced EAE. IL-1ra gene therapy is effective preventively, delaying EAE onset by almost 1 week (22.4+/-1.4 days post-immunization vs 15.9+/-2.1 days in control mice; P=0.0229 log-rank test), and decreasing disease severity. Amelioration of EAE course was associated with a reduced number of macrophages infiltrating the CNS and in a decreased level of proinflammatory cytokine mRNA in the CNS, suggesting an inhibitory activity of IL-1ra on effector cell recruitment, as antigen-specific peripheral T-cell activation and T-cell recruitment to the CNS is unaffected. Thus, local IL-1ra gene therapy may represent a therapeutic alternative for the inhibition of immune-mediated demyelination of the CNS.

  19. An Epigenetic Compound Library Screen Identifies BET Inhibitors That Promote HSV-1 and -2 Replication by Bridging P-TEFb to Viral Gene Promoters through BRD4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Ma, Yingyu; Dai, Yue; Fan, Yimei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The human HSV-1 and -2 are common pathogens of human diseases. Both host and viral factors are involved in HSV lytic infection, although detailed mechanisms remain elusive. By screening a chemical library of epigenetic regulation, we identified bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) as a critical player in HSV infection. We show that treatment with pan BD domain inhibitor enhanced both HSV infection. Using JQ1 as a probe, we found that JQ1, a defined BD1 inhibitor, acts through BRD4 protein since knockdown of BRD4 expression ablated JQ1 effect on HSV infection. BRD4 regulates HSV replication through complex formation involving CDK9 and RNAP II; whereas, JQ1 promotes HSV-1 infection by allocating the complex to HSV gene promoters. Therefore, suppression of BRD4 expression or inhibition of CDK9 activity impeded HSV infection. Our data support a model that JQ1 enhances HSV infection by switching BRD4 to transcription regulation of viral gene expression from chromatin targeting since transient expression of BRD4 BD1 or BD1/2 domain had similar effect to that by JQ1 treatment. In addition to the identification that BRD4 is a modulator for JQ1 action on HSV infection, this study demonstrates BRD4 has an essential role in HSV infection. PMID:27764245

  20. Structural Characterization and Anti-HSV-1 and HSV-2 Activity of Glycolipids from the Marine Algae Osmundaria obtusiloba Isolated from Southeastern Brazilian Coast

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Lauro M.; Sassaki, Guilherme L.; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipids were extracted from the red alga Osmundaria obtusiloba from Southeastern Brazilian coast. The acetone insoluble material was extracted with chloroform/methanol and the lipids, enriched in glycolipids, were fractionated on a silica gel column eluted with chloroform, acetone and then methanol. Three major orcinol-positive bands were found in the acetone and methanol fractions, being detected by thin layer chromatography. The structures of the corresponding glycolipids were elucidated by ESI-MS and 1H/13C NMR analysis, on the basis of their tandem-MS behavior and HSQC, TOCSY fingerprints. For the first time, the structure of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol from the red alga Osmundaria obtusiloba was characterized. This molecule exhibited potent antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2 with EC50 values of 42 µg/mL to HSV-1 and 12 µg/mL to HSV-2, respectively. Two other glycolipids, mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol, were also found in the alga, being characterized by ESI-MS/MS. The structural elucidation of algae glycolipids is a first step for a better understanding of the relation between these structures and their biological activities. PMID:22690151

  1. Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) replicates in mature dendritic cells but can only be transferred in a cell-cell contact-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Goldwich, Andreas; Prechtel, Alexander T; Mühl-Zürbes, Petra; Pangratz, Nadine M; Stössel, Hella; Romani, Nikolaus; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Kummer, Mirko

    2011-06-01

    HSV-1 is a very successful representative of the α-herpesvirus family, and ∼ 90% of the population is seropositive for this particular virus. Although the pathogen usually causes the well-known mild lesions on the lips, also, severe infections of the eye or the brain can be observed in rare cases. It is well known, that this virus can efficiently infect the most potent APCs, i.e., the DCs, in their immature and mature state. Although the infection of the iDC has been shown to be productive, infection of mMDDCs is believed to be abortive in the early phase of the viral replication cycle. In line with these findings, no virus particles can be detected in the supernatant of HSV-1-infected mMDDC. In this study, however, we show for the first time that this pathogen completes its replication cycle in mMDDCs. We detected the presence of viral gene transcripts of all three phases of the replication cycle, as well as of late viral proteins, and even the generation of small amounts of progeny virus. Although we could confirm the findings that these particles are not released into the supernatant, surprisingly, the newly generated viral particles can be passed on to Vero cells, as well as to primary keratinocytes in a cell-cell contact-dependent manner. Finally, we provide evidence that the viral gE is involved in the transfer of infectious virus from mMDDCs to other permissive cells.

  2. STAT3/NF-κB-Regulated Lentiviral TK/GCV Suicide Gene Therapy for Cisplatin-Resistant Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Wei-Ying; Hwu, Luen; Wu, Chun-Yi; Lee, Jhih-Shian; Chang, Chi-Wei; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents approximately 20% of all breast cancers and appears resistance to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, demonstrating a particularly poor prognosis and a significantly worse clinical outcome than other types of cancer. Suicide gene therapy has been used for the in vivo treatment of various solid tumors in recent clinical trials. In tumor microenvironment, STAT3/NF-κB pathways are constitutively activated in stromal cells as well as in cancer stem cells (CSCs). In this study, we have cloned a novel STAT3/NF-κB-based reporter system to drive the expression of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) against breast cancer. Lentiviral vector expressing HSV-TK under the regulation of STAT3/NF-κB fused response element was developed. In this setting, we exploited the constitutive STAT3/NF-κB activation in tumors to achieve higher transgene expression than that driven by a constitutively active CMV promotor in vivo. An orthotropic MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer mouse model was used for evaluating the feasibility of STAT3-NF-κB-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system. The basal promoter activity of Lenti-CMV-TK and Lenti-STAT3-NF-κB-TK in MDA-MB-231 cells was compared by 3H-FEAU uptake assay. The Lenti-CMV-TK showed ~5 fold higher 3H-FEAU uptake then Lenti -STAT3-NF-κB-TK. In clonogenic assay, cells expressing Lenti-CMV-TK were 2-fold more sensitive to GCV than Lenti-STAT3-NF-κB-TK transduced cells. In vitro effect of STAT3-NF-κB-induced transgene expression was determined by 10ng/mL TNF-α induction and confirmed by western blot analysis and DsRedm fluorescent microscopy. In vivo evaluation of therapeutic effect by bioluminescence and [18F]FHBG microPET imaging indicated that Lenti-STAT3-NF-κB-TK showed more tumor growth retardation than Lenti-CMV-TK when GCV (20 mg/kg) was administered. The invasiveness and expression of cancer stem cell markers were both decreased after STAT3/NF-κB-regulated HSV-TK

  3. STAT3/NF-κB-Regulated Lentiviral TK/GCV Suicide Gene Therapy for Cisplatin-Resistant Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wei-Ying; Hwu, Luen; Wu, Chun-Yi; Lee, Jhih-Shian; Chang, Chi-Wei; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents approximately 20% of all breast cancers and appears resistance to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, demonstrating a particularly poor prognosis and a significantly worse clinical outcome than other types of cancer. Suicide gene therapy has been used for the in vivo treatment of various solid tumors in recent clinical trials. In tumor microenvironment, STAT3/NF-κB pathways are constitutively activated in stromal cells as well as in cancer stem cells (CSCs). In this study, we have cloned a novel STAT3/NF-κB-based reporter system to drive the expression of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) against breast cancer. Lentiviral vector expressing HSV-TK under the regulation of STAT3/NF-κB fused response element was developed. In this setting, we exploited the constitutive STAT3/NF-κB activation in tumors to achieve higher transgene expression than that driven by a constitutively active CMV promotor in vivo. An orthotropic MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer mouse model was used for evaluating the feasibility of STAT3-NF-κB-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system. The basal promoter activity of Lenti-CMV-TK and Lenti-STAT3-NF-κB-TK in MDA-MB-231 cells was compared by (3)H-FEAU uptake assay. The Lenti-CMV-TK showed ~5 fold higher (3)H-FEAU uptake then Lenti -STAT3-NF-κB-TK. In clonogenic assay, cells expressing Lenti-CMV-TK were 2-fold more sensitive to GCV than Lenti-STAT3-NF-κB-TK transduced cells. In vitro effect of STAT3-NF-κB-induced transgene expression was determined by 10ng/mL TNF-α induction and confirmed by western blot analysis and DsRedm fluorescent microscopy. In vivo evaluation of therapeutic effect by bioluminescence and [(18)F]FHBG microPET imaging indicated that Lenti-STAT3-NF-κB-TK showed more tumor growth retardation than Lenti-CMV-TK when GCV (20 mg/kg) was administered. The invasiveness and expression of cancer stem cell markers were both decreased after STAT3/NF-κB-regulated HSV-TK

  4. The site of integration of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene in human cells transformed by an HSV-1 DNA fragment.

    PubMed

    Kit, S; Hazen, M; Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Trkula, D; Dubbs, D R

    1981-12-01

    To analyze the site of integration of the herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-I) thymidine kinase (TK) gene in biochemically transformed human cells, TK-HeLa-(BU25) cells were transformed to the TK+ phenotype by a cloned, 2 kbp Pvull fragment of HSV-I DNA. The transformed cells [HeLa(BU25)/TF pAGO PP3] were fused with mouse LM(TK-) cells, and human-mouse somatic cell hybrid clones (LH PP3 clones 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6) were isolated in HATG-ouabain selective medium. The HeLa(BU25)/TF pAGO PP3 cells and the LH PP3 hybrid clones expressed HSV-I specific TK activity and a herpesvirus-associated nuclear antigen, and contained herpesvirus nucleotide sequences. Molecular hybridization experiments were carried out to map the HSV-I and flanking cellular nucleotide sequences in the biochemically transformed cells. These experiments demonstrated that the HSV-I nucleotide sequences were integrated at a single site, and that the same cellular nucleotide sequences flanked the viral DNA in transformed HeLa(BU25)/TF pAGO PP3 and LH PP3 clone 5 cells. TK- revertant subclones isolated by growing the LH PP3 clone 5 cells in BrdUrd (and diphtheria toxin) failed to form colonies in HATG medium, but retained HSV-I nucleotide sequences. Isozyme analyses on 21 gene-enzyme systems representing 21 human chromosomes revealed that all of the LH PP3 clonal lines expressed human hexosaminidase B, which has been assigned to chromosome 5, and all were sensitive to diphtheria toxin, which is also a marker for chromosome 5. Chromosome analyses showed that chromosome 5 was the nly human chromosome present in mitoses of LH PP3 clone 5 cells and that human chromosome 5 was present in most of the mitoses of LH PP3 clone 1, 2, 3, and 6 cells. The latter clones also contained 1 or 2 additional human chromosomes in some of the cells. As expected from the molecular hybridization analyses, TK- revertants of LH PP3 clone 5 cells retained portions of chromosome 5 and expressed human hexosaminidase B. The results

  5. Auto-associative heparin nanoassemblies: a biomimetic platform against the heparan sulfate-dependent viruses HSV-1, HSV-2, HPV-16 and RSV.

    PubMed

    Lembo, David; Donalisio, Manuela; Laine, Claire; Cagno, Valeria; Civra, Andrea; Bianchini, Elsa P; Zeghbib, Narimane; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2014-09-01

    A new, simple and green method was developed for the manufacturing of heparin nanoassemblies active against the heparan sulfate-dependent viruses HSV-1, HSV-2, HPV-16 and RSV. These nanoassemblies were obtained by the auto-association of O-palmitoyl-heparin and α-cyclodextrin in water. The synthesized O-palmitoyl-heparin derivatives mixed with α-cyclodextrin resulted in the formation of crystalline hexagonal nanoassemblies as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The nanoassembly mean hydrodynamic diameters were modulated from 340 to 659 nm depending on the type and the initial concentration of O-palmitoyl-heparin or α-cyclodextrin. The antiviral activity of the nanoassemblies was not affected by the concentration of the components. However, the method of the synthesis of O-palmitoyl-heparin affected the antiviral activity of the formulations. We showed that reduced antiviral activity is correlated with lower sulfation degree and anticoagulant activity.

  6. Improved packaging system for generation of high-level noncytotoxic HSV-1 amplicon vectors using Cre-loxP site-specific recombination to delete the packaging signals of defective helper genomes.

    PubMed

    Zaupa, Cécile; Revol-Guyot, Valerie; Epstein, Alberto L

    2003-07-20

    Amplicons are promising helper-dependent HSV-1-derived vectors that allow the transfer and expression of very large foreigner DNA into dividing and quiescent cells. We had already described an approach to prepare large amounts of high-titer amplicon vectors, using Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system to delete the packaging ("a") signals of an HSV-1 recombinant helper virus (HSV-1 LaL). Amplicon vectors prepared using such a system showed a level of contamination with helper particles lower than 1%. The residual helper particles generated by this system are, however, replication-competent, thus precluding their use in gene therapy. To avoid such potential spread of residual particles, we present here the development of a defective Cre-loxP-based helper virus (HSV-1 LaL Delta J), deleted of the genes encoding ICP4 and ICP34.5 proteins from the helper genome, in addition to the native "a" signals. HSV-1 LaL Delta J carries a single floxed "a" signal in gC locus. To produce HSV-1 LaL Delta J and to prepare the amplicon vectors, we have constructed two novel cell lines expressing the essential ICP4 protein, either alone or in combination with Cre recombinase. These cell lines were conceived to complement ICP4 while minimizing the probability of generating replication-competent particles. In this paper we present results demonstrating that the novel helper system allows ready production of large amounts of high-titer amplicon vectors. Residual helper particles generated still do not exceed 0.5% of the viral population and can grow only in cells expressing ICP4. Amplicon vectors produced with this method showed no cytotoxicty for infected cells.

  7. Analysis of the cell cycle regulatory protein (E2F1) after infection of cultured cells with bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) or herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1).

    PubMed

    Workman, Aspen; Jones, Clinton

    2011-09-01

    The E2F family of cellular transcription factors controls cell cycle progression and cell death. During cell cycle progression, activated cyclin-dependent kinases phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, causing the release and activation of E2F family members. Previous studies demonstrated that bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1) productive infection increases E2F1 protein levels, the bICP0 early promoter is activated more than 100 fold by E2F1 or E2F2, and silencing E2F1 reduced the efficiency of productive infection. In this study, the effect of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) productive infection on E2F protein levels and regulation of E2F dependent transcription was compared to BHV-1 infection in the same permissive cell line, rabbit skin (RS) cells. Silencing E2F1 with a specific siRNA reduced HSV-1 productive infection approximately 10 fold in RS cells, and total E2F1 protein levels increased during productive infection. In contrast to RS cells infected with BHV-1, a fraction of total E2F1 protein was localized to the cytoplasm in HSV-1 infected RS cells. Furthermore, E2F1 did not efficiently trans-activate the HSV-1 ICP0 or ICP4 promoter. When RS cells were transfected with an E2F reporter construct or the cyclin D1 promoter and then infected with BHV-1, promoter activity increased after infection. In contrast, HSV-1 infection of RS cells had little effect on E2F dependent transcription and cyclin D1 promoter activity was reduced. In summary, these studies indicated that silencing E2F1 reduced the efficiency of HSV-1 and BHV-1 productive infection. However, only BHV-1 productive infection induced E2F dependent transcription.

  8. The unexpected detection of varicella-zoster virus in genital specimens using the Lyra™ Direct HSV 1+2/VZV Assay.

    PubMed

    Granato, Paul A; DeGilio, Marcia A; Wilson, Elsie M

    2016-11-01

    The Lyra™ Direct HSV 1+2/VZV Assay is a moderately complex, multiplex PCR assay that qualitatively detects the presence of HSV 1, HSV 2, and VZV DNA in cutaneous and mucocutaneous specimens with a time-to-result of less than 60min. To report a one-year laboratory experience using Lyra assay for testing cutaneous and mucocutaneous specimens for HSV and VZV that resulted in the unexpected detection of VZV in 14 male and female genital specimens. Over a one-year period, 2113 cutaneous and mucocutaneous specimens from male and female patients were submitted for testing using the Lyra assay. An unexpected 14 genital specimens were positive for the presence VZV DNA. Eleven of the 14 specimens were available for confirmatory testing using two alternative molecular methods and Sanger sequencing. Fourteen male and female genital specimens were positive for the presence of VZV DNA. All of the 11 specimens (9 female and 2 male) that were available for confirmatory testing by the alternative molecular method and Sanger sequencing were confirmed as containing VZV DNA. Using of the Lyra assay over a one-year time period, VZV DNA was detected in 126 specimens of which 14 (11.1%) were from male and female genital sites. This rare and unexpected finding suggests that the appearance of zoster lesions in the genital area may not be as uncommon as previously thought and that this finding would have considerable impact on patient counseling and public health considerations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced protection against HSV lethal challenges in mice by immunization with a combined HSV-1 glycoprotein B:H:L gene DNAs.

    PubMed

    Cha, Soung Chul; Kim, Young Sik; Cho, Jae Kyung; Cho, Jun; Kim, Su Yung; Kang, Hyun; Cho, Myung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Hoan

    2002-06-01

    The effectiveness of a cocktailed HSV-1 three-glycoprotein B, H, and L gene vaccine in comparison to individual glycoprotein gene vaccines was studied with regard to protecting against the HSV-1 infection. Three glycoprotein gene recombinant DNA vaccines, which produced the corresponding glycoproteins in Vero cells, were constructed using a CMV promoter. The cocktailed DNA vaccines were prepared by combining all three genes. The titers of neurtalizing antibody following the immunization of the five vaccines were KOS(1/1024)>B:H:L=B(1/512)>H:L(1/64)>H(1/16) genes. The mice, which were immunized with L gene alone failed to induce enough neutralizing antibody. The CTL activity was rated as KOS (95%)>B:H:L (80%)>B(60%)>H:L(50%)> H (35%) gene vaccines at an E:T ratio of 50:1. The H gene alone or L gene vaccine alone induced little CTL activity. The protection rates of the DNA-vaccinated mice against the lethal intraperitoneal (i.p.) or i.m challenges were shown as KOS>B:H:L>B>H:L>H gene vaccines, and the protection activity depended on the lethal dosage of the challenging virus, which are inversely proportional to each other. Compared with the mice, which were vaccinated with individual DNA vaccines, the mice, which were vaccinated with the cocktailed three-gene vaccine, were shown to be better protected against the lethal challenging doses. It can be concluded that vaccination with the cocktailed three gene vaccines is more effective in protecting mice from the viral challenge and the protection rate varies inversely with the amount of lethal challenging dose used, although all DNA vaccines failed to block the latent infection in sensory nerves.

  10. IL-2 Suppression of IL-12p70 by a Recombinant HSV-1 Expressing IL-2 Induces T-Cell Auto-Reactivity and CNS Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Zandian, Mandana; Mott, Kevin R.; Allen, Sariah J.; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of cellular infiltrates in CNS demyelination in immunocompetent mice, we have used a model of multiple sclerosis (MS) in which different strains of mice are infected with a recombinant HSV-1 expressing IL-2. Histologic examination of the mice infected with HSV-IL-2 demonstrates that natural killer cells, dendritic cells, B cells, and CD25 (IL-2rα) do not play any role in the HSV-IL-2-induced demyelination. T cell depletion, T cell knockout and T cell adoptive transfer experiments suggest that both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells contribute to HSV-IL-2-induced CNS demyelination with CD8+ T cells being the primary inducers. In the adoptive transfer studies, all of the transferred T cells irrespective of their CD25 status at the time of transfer were positive for expression of FoxP3 and depletion of FoxP3 blocked CNS demyelination by HSV-IL-2. The expression levels of IL-12p35 relative to IL-12p40 differed in BM-derived macrophages infected with HSV-IL-2 from those infected with wild-type HSV-1. HSV-IL-2-induced demyelination was blocked by injecting HSV-IL-2-infected mice with IL-12p70 DNA. This study demonstrates that suppression of the IL-12p70 function of macrophages by IL-2 causes T cells to become auto-aggressive. Interruption of this immunoregulatory axis results in demyelination of the optic nerve, the spinal cord and the brain by autoreactive T cells in the HSV-IL-2 mouse model of MS. PMID:21364747

  11. Nucleotide sequences of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) affecting virus entry, cell fusion, and production of glycoprotein gB (VP7)

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, N.; Bzik, D.J.; Bond, V.C.; Person, S.; Snipes, W.

    1982-10-30

    The tsB5 strain of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) contains at least two mutations; one mutation specifies the syncytial phenotype and the other confers temperature sensitivity for virus growth. These functions are known to be located between the prototypic map coordinates 0.30 and 0.42. In this study it was demonstrated that tsB5 enters human embryonic lung (HEL) cells more rapidly than KOS, another strain of HSV-1. The EcoRI restriction fragment F from the KOS strain (map coordinates 0.315 to 0.421) was mapped with eight restriction endonucleases, and 16 recombinant plasmids were constructed which contained varying portions of the KOS genome. Recombinant viruses were generated by marker-rescue and marker-transfer cotransfection procedures, using intact DNA from one strain and a recombinant plasmid containing DNA from the other strain. The region of the crossover between the two nonisogenic strains was inferred by the identification of restriction sites in the recombinants that were characteristic of the parental strains. The recombinants were subjected to phenotypic analysis. Syncytium formation, rate of virus entry, and the production of gB were all separable by the crossovers that produced the recombinants. The KOS sequences which rescue the syncytial phenotype of tsB5 were localized to 1.5 kb (map coordinates 0.345 to 0.355), and the temperature-sensitive mutation was localized to 1.2 kb (0.360 to 0.368), giving an average separation between the mutations of 2.5 kb on the 150-kb genome. DNA sequences that specify a functional domain for virus entry were localized to the nucleotide sequences between the two mutations. All three functions could be encoded by the virus gene specifying the gB glycoprotein.

  12. MerTK regulates thymic selection of autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Wallet, Mark A; Flores, Rafael R; Wang, Yaming; Yi, Zuoan; Kroger, Charles J; Mathews, Clayton E; Earp, H Shelton; Matsushima, Glenn; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2009-03-24

    T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D) are believed to be the result in part of inefficient negative selection of self-specific thymocytes. However, the events regulating thymic negative selection are not fully understood. In the current study, we demonstrate that nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice lacking expression of the Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK) have reduced inflammation of the pancreatic islets and fail to develop diabetes. Furthermore, NOD mice deficient in MerTK expression (Mer(-/-)) exhibit a reduced frequency of beta cell-specific T cells independent of immunoregulatory effectors. The establishment of bone marrow chimeric mice demonstrated that the block in beta cell autoimmunity required hematopoietic-derived cells lacking MerTK expression. Notably, fetal thymic organ cultures and self-peptide administration showed increased thymic negative selection in Mer(-/-) mice. Finally, thymic dendritic cells (DC) prepared from Mer(-/-) mice exhibited an increased capacity to induce thymocyte apoptosis in a peptide-specific manner in vitro. These findings provide evidence for a unique mechanism involving MerTK-mediated regulation of thymocyte negative selection and thymic DC, and suggest a role for MerTK in contributing to beta cell autoimmunity.

  13. Discovery of Macrocyclic Pyrimidines as MerTK-Specific Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    McIver, Andrew L; Zhang, Weihe; Liu, Qingyang; Jiang, Xinpeng; Stashko, Michael A; Nichols, James; Miley, Michael J; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Machius, Mischa; DeRyckere, Deborah; Wood, Edgar; Graham, Douglas K; Earp, H Shelton; Kireev, Dmitri; Frye, Stephen V; Wang, Xiaodong

    2017-02-03

    Macrocycles have attracted significant attention in drug discovery recently. In fact, a few de novo designed macrocyclic kinase inhibitors are currently in clinical trials with good potency and selectivity for their intended target. In this study, we successfully engaged a structure-based drug design approach to discover macrocyclic pyrimidines as potent Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK)-specific inhibitors. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 384-well format was employed to evaluate the inhibitory activity of macrocycles in a cell-based assay assessing tyrosine phosphorylation of MerTK. Through structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, analogue 11 [UNC2541; (S)-7-amino-N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-8-oxo-2,9,16-triaza-1(2,4)-pyrimidinacyclohexadecaphane-1-carboxamide] was identified as a potent and MerTK-specific inhibitor that exhibits sub-micromolar inhibitory activity in the cell-based ELISA. In addition, an X-ray structure of MerTK protein in complex with 11 was resolved to show that these macrocycles bind in the MerTK ATP pocket.

  14. Herpes simplex virus-1 infects the olfactory bulb shortly following ocular infection and exhibits a long-term inflammatory profile in the form of effector and HSV-1-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Chandra M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-06-23

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection can result in a life-threatening condition known as herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Trafficking patterns by which the virus reaches the central nervous system (CNS) following ocular infection are unresolved. We evaluated early viral dissemination pathways following ocular infection that involve trafficking to the olfactory bulb (OB). Additionally, we have characterized the capacity of HSV-1 to establish latency within OB tissue and profiled the local T lymphocyte response over the course of the acute infection into latency. Scarified corneas of C57BL/6 or reporter-inducible Rosa mice (Rosa(Td/Tm)) were inoculated with HSV-1 and assessed for viral dissemination into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and CNS by RT-PCR and confocal microscopy. T cells and the resident microglia activation signatures were analyzed by flow cytometry. T cell effector function in the form of IFN-γ secretion was measured by T cells isolated from OB in comparison to T cells from other nervous system sites known to harbor HSV-1-specific memory T cells. Following ocular infection, HSV-1 viral titers from nasal secretions were detected as early as 48 h through 8 days post infection (8 DPI). HSV-1 gene expression was expressed as early as 2 days following ocular infection in the OB and was consistent with an enhanced expression in the ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve ganglia (TG). Rosa fluorescence protein expression (RFP(+)) representing HSV-1-infected cells from Rosa(Td/Tm) mice was detected in the OB before other areas of the CNS (2 DPI). Additionally, during acute infection, most infected cells appeared to be anatomically distributed within the OB rather than other regions of the CNS. During latency (i.e., 30 DPI and beyond) despite no detectable infectious virus or lytic gene expression and low levels of latency associated transcripts, total effector (CD44(+) CD62(-)) CD4(+) T, CD8(+) T, HSV-1-specific

  15. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces lividans TK24.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Christian; Albersmeier, Andreas; Busche, Tobias; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Winkler, Anika; Friðjónsson, Ólafur H; Hreggviðsson, Guðmundur Óli; Lambert, Christophe; Badcock, Daniel; Bernaerts, Kristel; Anne, Jozef; Economou, Anastassios; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-04-10

    Streptomyces lividans TK24 is the standard host for the heterologous expression of a number of different proteins and antibiotic-synthesizing enzymes. As such, it is often used as an experimental microbial cell factory for the production of secreted heterologous proteins including human cytokines and industrial enzymes, and of several antibiotics. It accepts methylated DNA and is an ideal Streptomyces cloning system. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of S. lividans TK24 that includes a plasmid-less genome of 8.345Mbp (72.24% G+C content).

  16. HSV-1 gM and the gK/pUL20 Complex Are Important for the Localization of gD and gH/L to Viral Assembly Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Sheung-Yee Kathy; Crump, Colin M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), like all herpesviruses, is a large complex DNA virus containing up to 16 different viral membrane proteins in its envelope. The assembly of HSV-1 particles occurs by budding/wrapping at intracellular membranes producing infectious virions contained within the lumen of cytoplasmic membrane-bound compartments that are then released by secretion. To ensure incorporation of all viral membrane proteins into the envelope, they need to be localized to the appropriate intracellular membranes either via the endocytic pathway or by direct targeting to assembly sites from the biosynthetic secretory pathway. Many HSV-1 envelope proteins encode targeting motifs that direct their endocytosis and targeting, while others do not, including the essential entry proteins gD and the gH/gL complex, and so it has been unclear how these envelope proteins reach the appropriate assembly compartments. We now show that efficient endocytosis of gD and gH/gL and their incorporation into mature virions relies upon the presence of the HSV-1 envelope proteins gM and the gK/pUL20 complex. Our data demonstrate both redundant and synergistic roles for gM and gK/pUL20 in controlling the targeting of gD and gH/L to the appropriate intracellular virus assembly compartments. PMID:25746217

  17. Dendritic cells, macrophages, NK and CD8(+) T lymphocytes play pivotal roles in controlling HSV-1 in the trigeminal ganglia by producing IL1-beta, iNOS and granzyme B.

    PubMed

    Lucinda, Natália; Figueiredo, Maria Marta; Pessoa, Natália Lima; Santos, Beatriz Senra Álvares da Silva; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Freitas, Arthur Molinari; Machado, Alexandre Magalhães Vieira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Valle; Campos, Marco Antônio

    2017-02-21

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) cause not only mild symptoms but also blindness and encephalitis. It was previously shown that the immune response against HSV-1 occurs mainly in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) and that Toll-like receptors 2 and 9 (TLR2/9) are important in mediating this response. It was also demonstrated that iNOS (nitric oxide synthase) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) play an essential role in the defense against HSV-1 infection. Importantly, the present work aimed to identify the primary cells responsible for iNOS and IL-1β production and search for other important molecules and cells that might or might not depend on TLR2/9 receptors to mediate the immune response against HSV-1. C57BL/6 (wild type, WT) and TLR2/9(-/-) mice were infected by the intranasal route with HSV-1 (1 × 10(6) p.f.u.). Cells were obtained from the TG and spleen tissues and the profile of immune cells was determined by flow cytometry in infected and mock infected WT and knockout mice. The percentage of cells producing iNOS, IL-1β, granzyme B and perforin was also determined by flow cytometry. Chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1) was measured by Cytometric Bead Array (CBA) in the TG, spleen and lung. Expression of type I interferons (IFNs), interleukins (IL) 5 and 10, IL-1β and granzyme B were quantified by real time PCR. The results indicate that dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Mϕ) were the main sources of IL-1β and iNOS, respectively, which, together with type I IFNs, were essential for the immune response against HSV-1. Additionally, we showed that granzyme B produced by CD8(+) T and NK lymphocytes and MCP-1 were also important for this immune response. Moreover, our data indicate that the robust production of MCP-1 and granzyme B is either TLR-independent or down regulated by TLRs and occurs in the TG of TLR2/9(-/-) infected mice. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that the responses mediated by DCs, Mo/Mϕ, NK

  18. On the Suitability of Tcl/Tk for SYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    that it sees no advantage in confirming any of its reliance on Tcl. www.motorola.com T ctler NetTest / InterWatch ATAK “The Automated Test...Authoring Kit ( ATAK ) available in both UNIX® and Windows® versions, automates the InterWatch and InterEmulator platforms through industry standard Tcl/Tk

  19. A case of extravascular hemolysis with Tk-activation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Chisa; Davenport, Robertson D

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 50-year-old female with ovarian cancer for 4 years presented with abdominal pain. She started antibiotics for possible infection, and developed extravascular hemolysis. All antigen detection tests were negative, but lectin panel suggested Tk-activation. Additional laboratory testing in conjunction with blood bank is essential to investigate rare cause of hemolysis. PMID:25356271

  20. meRanTK: methylated RNA analysis ToolKit.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Dietmar; Amort, Thomas; Kugler, Elisabeth; Lusser, Alexandra; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2016-03-01

    The significance and function of posttranscriptional cytosine methylation in poly(A)RNA attracts great interest but is still poorly understood. High-throughput sequencing of RNA treated with bisulfite (RNA-BSseq) or subjected to enrichment techniques like Aza-IP or miCLIP enables transcriptome wide studies of this particular modification at single base pair resolution. However, to date, there are no specialized software tools available for the analysis of RNA-BSseq or Aza-IP data. Therefore, we developed meRanTK, the first publicly available tool kit which addresses the special demands of high-throughput RNA cytosine methylation data analysis. It provides fast and easy to use splice-aware bisulfite sequencing read mapping, comprehensive methylation calling and identification of differentially methylated cytosines by statistical analysis of single- and multi-replicate experiments. Application of meRanTK to RNA-BSseq or Aza-IP data produces accurate results in standard compliant formats. meRanTK, source code and test data are released under the GNU GPLv3+ license and are available at http://icbi.at/software/meRanTK/ CONTACT: dietmar.rieder@i-med.ac.at. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Distinct APC subtypes drive spatially segregated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell effector activity during skin infection with HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Bethany L; Bedoui, Sammy; Hor, Jyh Liang; Mueller, Scott N; Russell, Tiffany A; Hollett, Natasha A; Heath, William R; Tscharke, David C; Brooks, Andrew G; Gebhardt, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Efficient infection control requires potent T-cell responses at sites of pathogen replication. However, the regulation of T-cell effector function in situ remains poorly understood. Here, we show key differences in the regulation of effector activity between CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells during skin infection with HSV-1. IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells disseminated widely throughout the skin and draining lymph nodes (LN), clearly exceeding the epithelial distribution of infectious virus. By contrast, IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells were only found within the infected epidermal layer of the skin and associated hair follicles. Mechanistically, while various subsets of lymphoid- and skin-derived dendritic cells (DC) elicited IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells responded exclusively to infected epidermal cells directly presenting viral antigen. Notably, uninfected cross-presenting DCs from both skin and LNs failed to trigger IFN-γ production by CD8+ T-cells. Thus, we describe a previously unappreciated complexity in the regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell effector activity that is subset-specific, microanatomically distinct and involves largely non-overlapping types of antigen-presenting cells (APC).

  2. Lytic gene expression is frequent in HSV-1 latent infection and correlates with the engagement of a cell-intrinsic transcriptional response.

    PubMed

    Ma, Joel Z; Russell, Tiffany A; Spelman, Tim; Carbone, Francis R; Tscharke, David C

    2014-07-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are significant human pathogens that provide one of the best-described examples of viral latency and reactivation. HSV latency occurs in sensory neurons, being characterized by the absence of virus replication and only fragmentary evidence of protein production. In mouse models, HSV latency is especially stable but the detection of some lytic gene transcription and the ongoing presence of activated immune cells in latent ganglia have been used to suggest that this state is not entirely quiescent. Alternatively, these findings can be interpreted as signs of a low, but constant level of abortive reactivation punctuating otherwise silent latency. Using single cell analysis of transcription in mouse dorsal root ganglia, we reveal that HSV-1 latency is highly dynamic in the majority of neurons. Specifically, transcription from areas of the HSV genome associated with at least one viral lytic gene occurs in nearly two thirds of latently-infected neurons and more than half of these have RNA from more than one lytic gene locus. Further, bioinformatics analyses of host transcription showed that progressive appearance of these lytic transcripts correlated with alterations in expression of cellular genes. These data show for the first time that transcription consistent with lytic gene expression is a frequent event, taking place in the majority of HSV latently-infected neurons. Furthermore, this transcription is of biological significance in that it influences host gene expression. We suggest that the maintenance of HSV latency involves an active host response to frequent viral activity.

  3. Enzyme-Assisted Extraction of Bioactive Material from Chondrus crispus and Codium fragile and Its Effect on Herpes simplex Virus (HSV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Burlot, Anne-Sophie; Marty, Christel; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Bedoux, Gilles; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Codium fragile and Chondrus crispus are, respectively, green and red seaweeds which are abundant along the North Atlantic coasts. We investigated the chemical composition and antiviral activity of enzymatic extracts of C. fragile (CF) and C. crispus (CC). On a dry weight basis, CF consisted of 11% protein, 31% neutral sugars, 0.8% sulfate, 0.6% uronic acids, and 49% ash, while CC contained 27% protein, 28% neutral sugars, 17% sulfate, 1.8% uronic acids, and 25% ash. Enzyme-assisted hydrolysis improved the extraction efficiency of bioactive materials. Commercial proteases and carbohydrases significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) biomass yield (40%–70% dry matter) as compared to aqueous extraction (20%–25% dry matter). Moreover, enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced the recovery of protein, neutral sugars, uronic acids, and sulfates. The enzymatic hydrolysates exhibited significant activity against Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) with EC50 of 77.6–126.8 μg/mL for CC and 36.5–41.3 μg/mL for CF, at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.001 ID50/cells without cytotoxity (1–200 μg/mL). The extracts obtained from proteases (P1) and carbohydrases (C3) were also effective at higher virus MOI of 0.01 ID50/cells without cytotoxity. Taken together, these results indicate the potential application of enzymatic hydrolysates of C. fragile and C. crispus in functional food and antiviral drug discovery. PMID:25603348

  4. HSV-1 amplicon vectors elicit polyfunctional T cell responses to HIV-1 Env, and strongly boost responses to an adenovirus prime

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Cindy M.P.; Maguire, Casey A.; Keefer, Michael C.; Federoff, Howard J.; Bowers, William J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    HSV-1 amplicon vectors elicit strong T-cell responses to encoded antigens but the qualitative nature of these responses is poorly understood. Antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to amplicon and adenovirus (rAd5) vectors encoding HIV-1 gp120 were assessed following immunization of mice, by performing intracellular cytokine staining for IFNγ, IL-2 and TNFα, following stimulation of splenocytes with a HIV-1 Env peptide pool. The quality of the primary T-cell response to amplicon and rAd5 vectors was strikingly similar, but there were qualitative differences in responses to amplicon vectors that incorporated different promoters upstream of gp120 - suggesting that promoters can significantly influence immune response quality. When prime-boost combinations were studied, a rAd5 prime and amplicon boost elicited the highest T-cell response. Furthermore, protocols that incorporated a rAd5 prime consistently elicited a greater proportion of polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells - regardless of boost. This suggests that initial priming can shape immune response quality after a boost. Overall, these findings provide insight into effective vector combinations for HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:17868958

  5. ImTK: an open source multi-center information management toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Adil; Ingeholm, Mary Lou; Padh, Shilpa; Dorobantu, Mihai; Desai, Mihir; Cleary, Kevin; Mun, Seong K.

    2008-03-01

    The Information Management Toolkit (ImTK) Consortium is an open source initiative to develop robust, freely available tools related to the information management needs of basic, clinical, and translational research. An open source framework and agile programming methodology can enable distributed software development while an open architecture will encourage interoperability across different environments. The ISIS Center has conceptualized a prototype data sharing network that simulates a multi-center environment based on a federated data access model. This model includes the development of software tools to enable efficient exchange, sharing, management, and analysis of multimedia medical information such as clinical information, images, and bioinformatics data from multiple data sources. The envisioned ImTK data environment will include an open architecture and data model implementation that complies with existing standards such as Digital Imaging and Communications (DICOM), Health Level 7 (HL7), and the technical framework and workflow defined by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Information Technology Infrastructure initiative, mainly the Cross Enterprise Document Sharing (XDS) specifications.

  6. Molecular imaging of brain tumors personal experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Bernhard J; Cornelius, Jan F; Sandu, Nora; Buchfelder, Michael

    2008-12-01

    HSV-1-TK expression if the blood brain barrier is disrupted. The higher uptake of [(18)F]FLT in the wild-type compared to the transduced type may demonstrate the different doubling time of both tumor tissues suggesting different cytosolic thymidine kinase activity. Molecular imaging probes are developed to image the function of targets without disturbing them or as drug in oder to modify the target's function. This is transfer of gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications. Molecular imaging closes the gap between in vitro to in vivo integrative biology of disease.

  7. Psychological stress impairs the local CD8+ T cell response to mucosal HSV-1 infection and allows for increased pathogenicity via a glucocorticoid receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ashcraft, Kathleen A; Hunzeker, John; Bonneau, Robert H

    2008-08-01

    Psychological stress and its associated increases in corticosterone are generally immunosuppressive and contribute to increased herpes simplex virus (HSV)-associated pathogenicity. However, the impact of stress on local control of the initial mucosal-based HSV infection has not been elucidated, nor have the ramifications of such failures of the immune response in terms of viral spread. To address these gaps in knowledge, the studies described herein sought to determine how psychological stress and associated increases in corticosterone may increase susceptibility to HSV encephalitis by allowing for increased viral titers at the site of initial infection. We have shown that in mice intranasally infected with HSV-1, a cell-mediated immune response occurs in the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN), and superficial cervical lymph nodes (CLN). However, psychological stress induced by restraint decreased the number of lymphocytes in these tissues in HSV-infected mice. Surprisingly, the effects of this restraint stress on HSV-specific CTL function varied by immune tissue. Increased viral titers were found in the nasal cavity of stressed mice, an observation which correlated with an increased CD8+ cell response in the CLN. These findings led us to extend our studies to also determine the ramifications of decreased numbers of locally derived lymphocytes on viral titers following infection. Using an approach in which the NALT was surgically removed prior to infection, we confirmed that decreased numbers of NALT-derived lymphocytes at the time of infection allows for increased viral replication. We conclude that the increased viral titers observed in mice experiencing psychological stress are the consequence of a glucocorticoid-mediated reduction in the numbers of lymphocytes responsible for resolving the initial infection.

  8. Characterization of the herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 tegument protein VP1-2 during infection with the HSV temperature-sensitive mutant tsB7.

    PubMed

    Abaitua, F; Souto, R N; Browne, H; Daikoku, T; O'Hare, P

    2009-10-01

    VP1-2, encoded by the UL36 gene of herpes simplex virus (HSV), is a large structural protein, conserved across the family Herpesviridae, that is assembled into the tegument and is essential for virus replication. Current evidence indicates that VP1-2 is a central component in the tegumentation and envelopment processes and that it also possesses important roles in capsid transport and entry. However, any detailed mechanistic understanding of VP1-2 function(s) remains limited. This study characterized the replication of HSV-1 tsB7, a temperature-sensitive mutant restricted at the non-permissive temperature due to a defect in VP1-2 function. A tsB7 virus expressing green fluorescent protein-fused VP16 protein was used to track the accumulation and location of a major tegument protein. After infection at the permissive temperature and shift to the non-permissive temperature, the production of infectious virus ceased. VP1-2 accumulated in altered cytosolic clusters, together with VP16 and other virion proteins. Furthermore, correlating with the results of immunofluorescence, electron microscopy demonstrated abnormal cytosolic capsid clustering and a block in envelopment. As VP1-2 encompasses a ubiquitin-specific protease domain, the occurrence of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins during tsB7 infection was also examined at the non-permissive temperature. A striking overaccumulation was observed of ubiquitin-specific conjugates in cytoplasmic clusters, overlapping and adjacent to the VP1-2 clusters. These results are discussed in relation to the possible functions of VP1-2 in the assembly pathway and the nature of the defect in tsB7.

  9. Shedding of HSV-1, HSV-2, CMV, and EBV in the saliva of hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients at Fundación HOMI - Hospital de la Misericordia, Bogotá, D.C.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, Sonia P; Díaz, Juliana; Rincón, Claudia M; Estupiñán, Marcela; Chaparro, Mauricio; Low-Calle, Ana María; Castellanos, Jaime E

    2016-05-19

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric patients is an alternative treatment for different diseases. The conditioning regimen for transplant predisposes recipients to the development of infections. Viral infections by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), human cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are the most common, and the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among these patients. These viruses lie dormant in various cell types and the reactivation of latent infections may lead to asymptomatic viral shedding in saliva. The detection of these viruses in secretions may contribute to understand the behavioral dynamics of these viral infections in transplanted patients, and to the early diagnosis of reactivation.  To assess HSV-1, HSV-2, CMV and EBV viral shedding in the saliva of patients admitted for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at Fundación HOMI - Hospital de la Misericordia between January and November of 2012.  We evaluated stimulated saliva samples of 17 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients weekly. We performed DNA extraction from saliva, and we evaluated the presence of DNA for HSV-1, HSV-2, CMV, and EBV by PCR.  While we detected HSV-2 and CMV DNA in the saliva of four patients, EBV DNA was detected in nine patients with leukopenia. In contrast, we did not detect HSV-1 DNA in saliva. Additionally, four out of the 17 patients showed a simultaneous shedding of CMV and EBV.  By conventional PCR, we demonstrated asymptomatic HSV-2, CMV, and EBV viral shedding in saliva, associated with leukopenia.

  10. Heat-induced reactivation of HSV-1 in latent mice: upregulation in the TG of CD83 and other immune response genes and their LAT-ICP0 locus.

    PubMed

    Clement, Christian; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2009-06-01

    To determine changes in host gene expression in HSV-1 latent trigeminal ganglia (TG) after hyperthermic stress. Scarified corneas of 6-week-old female BALB/c mice were inoculated with either HSV-1 17Syn(+) (high phenotypic reactivator) or 17DeltaPst(LAT(-)) (low phenotypic reactivator) at 10(4) plaque-forming units/eye. At 28 days after infection, viral reactivation was induced in some of the infected mice with hyperthermic stress, and the mice were killed after 1 hour. Heat-treated uninfected mice served as the control. Labeled cRNA derived from TG-isolated total RNA was hybridized to 430 2.0 chips containing 14,000 mouse genes. Gene expression was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. There was no difference in gene expression in the non-heat-treated mice. Gene expression in the TG of each of the heat-treated mouse groups (17Syn(+), 17DeltaPst(LAT(-)) and uninfected) yielded upregulation of more than twofold of a group of the same genes, designated as heat stress-induced gene expression. Twenty-nine genes (0.2%) were significantly upregulated (2- to 17-fold) when the heat stress-induced gene expression was subtracted from the gene expression of 17Syn(+) latent TG relative to 17DeltaPst(LAT(-)) latent TG 1 hour after mouse hyperthermic stress. Nine host adaptive immunity genes comprising Ig molecules, CD83, CD8A, ADA, and CCL8 were the largest subset upregulated, and all were confirmed by real-time PCR. Others identified included genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary gland functions. Hyperthermic stress-induced reactivation of the HSV-1 high phenotypic reactivator can upregulate gene expression involved in B-cell function and in T-cell function. CD83 is implicated in HSV-1 latency, suggesting it could also be involved in immune-mediated mechanisms of viral reactivation.

  11. Increased Expression of Herpes Virus-Encoded hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9-5p in Cancer-Containing Prostate Tissue Compared to That in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Tissue.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seok Joong; Jeong, Pildu; Kang, Ho Won; Shinn, Helen Ki; Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Choi, Young-Ki; Kim, Dongho; Ryu, Dong Hee; Ha, Yun-Sok; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Kim, Jung Min; Suh, Sang Heon; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Won Tae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Isaac Yi; Kim, Jayoung; Cha, Hee-Jae; Choi, Yung-Hyun; Cha, Eun-Jong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-06-01

    Previously, we reported the presence of virus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) in the urine of prostate cancer (CaP) patients. In this study, we investigated the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs in prostate tissue. A total of 175 tissue samples from noncancerous benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 248 tissue samples from patients with CaP and BPH, and 50 samples from noncancerous surrounding tissues from these same patients were analyzed for the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunocytochemistry using nanoparticles as molecular beacons. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed significantly higher expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miRH9- 5p in surrounding noncancerous and CaP tissues than that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.001). Of note, these miRNA were expressed equivalently in the CaP tissues and surrounding noncancerous tissues. Moreover, immunocytochemistry clearly demonstrated a significant enrichment of both hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9 beacon-labeled cells in CaP and surrounding noncancerous tissue compared to that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.05 for hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2- miR-H9). These results suggest that increased expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H95p might be associated with tumorigenesis in the prostate. Further studies will be required to elucidate the role of these miRNAs with respect to CaP and herpes viral infections.

  12. Heat-Induced Reactivation of HSV-1 in Latent Mice: Upregulation in the TG of CD83 and Other Immune Response Genes and Their LAT-ICP0 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Christian; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Kaufman, Herbert E.; Hill, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine changes in host gene expression in HSV-1 latent trigeminal ganglia (TG) after hyperthermic stress. Methods Scarified corneas of 6-week-old female BALB/c mice were inoculated with either HSV-1 17Syn+ (high phenotypic reactivator) or 17ΔPst(LAT−) (low phenotypic reactivator) at 104 plaque-forming units/eye. At 28 days after infection, viral reactivation was induced in some of the infected mice with hyperthermic stress, and the mice were killed after 1 hour. Heat-treated uninfected mice served as the control. Labeled cRNA derived from TG-isolated total RNA was hybridized to 430 2.0 chips containing 14,000 mouse genes. Gene expression was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Results There was no difference in gene expression in the non–heat-treated mice. Gene expression in the TG of each of the heat-treated mouse groups (17Syn+, 17ΔPst(LAT−) and uninfected) yielded upregulation of more than twofold of a group of the same genes, designated as heat stress–induced gene expression. Twenty-nine genes (0.2%) were significantly upregulated (2- to 17-fold) when the heat stress–induced gene expression was subtracted from the gene expression of 17Syn+ latent TG relative to 17ΔPst(LAT−) latent TG 1 hour after mouse hyperthermic stress. Nine host adaptive immunity genes comprising Ig molecules, CD83, CD8A, ADA, and CCL8 were the largest subset upregulated, and all were confirmed by real-time PCR. Others identified included genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary gland functions. Conclusions Hyperthermic stress–induced reactivation of the HSV-1 high phenotypic reactivator can upregulate gene expression involved in B-cell function and in T-cell function. CD83 is implicated in HSV-1 latency, suggesting it could also be involved in immune-mediated mechanisms of viral reactivation. PMID:19151393

  13. Effect of Azone upon the in vivo antiviral efficacy of cidofovir or acyclovir topical formulations in treatment/prevention of cutaneous HSV-1 infections and its correlation with skin target site free drug concentration in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Afouna, Mohsen I; Fincher, Timothy K; Zaghloul, Abdel-Azim A; Reddy, Indra K

    2003-03-06

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of Azone upon the skin target site free drug concentration (C(*)) and its correlation with the in vivo antiviral efficacies of cidofovir (HPMPC) and acyclovir (ACV) against HSV-1 infections. Formulations of HPMPC and ACV with or without Azone were used. The in vitro skin flux experiments were performed and the C(*) values were calculated. For the in vivo efficacy studies, hairless mice cutaneously infected with HSV-1 were used and three different treatment protocols were carried out. The protocols were chosen based upon when therapy is initiated and terminated in such a way to assess the efficacy of the test drug to cure and/or prevent HSV-1 infections. A finite dose of the formulation was topically applied twice a day for the predetermined time course for each protocol and the lesions were scored on the fifth day. For ACV formulation with Azone, the C(*) values and hence the in vivo efficacy were much higher than those for that without Azone. In protocol #1, however, early treatment did not increase the in vivo efficacy of ACV when compared with the standard treatment protocol #3. In protocol #2 where the treatment was terminated on the day of virus inoculation, the efficacies for both ACV formulations were completely absent. Although the estimated C(*) values for HPMPC formulations with and without Azone were comparable, formulation with Azone was much more effective than that without Azone in all treatment protocols. HPMPC formulations with Azone at similar flux values were much more effective in "treating and preventing" HSV-1 infections than those without Azone. For ACV formulations, in contrast, addition of Azone has failed to show any effect on the preventive in vivo antiviral efficacy and the enhancement of ACV in vivo antiviral efficacy was merely the skin permeation enhancement effect of Azone.

  14. Multicenter evaluation of the Luminex® ARIES® HSV 1&2 Assay for the detection of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 in cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesion specimens.

    PubMed

    Young, Stephen; Body, Barbara; Moore, Franklin; Dunbar, Sherry

    2016-12-01

    The ARIES® HSV 1&2 Assay is a new FDA cleared real-time PCR test for detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA from cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesions. The test is performed on the ARIES® System, an automated sample to answer real-time PCR instrument that provides a closed system and simple workflow for performing molecular testing. Areas covered: This article reports the clinical performance of the ARIES® HSV 1&2 Assay assessed on 1963 prospectively collected specimens. Assay sensitivities were 91.1-95% (cutaneous) and 97-98.5% (mucocutaneous), and specificities were 88.8-94.2% (cutaneous) and 93.2-95.4% (mucocutaneous), as compared to the ELVIS® HSV test system. Expert commentary: Detection of HSV DNA by PCR is rapid and more sensitive than traditional culture and immunoassay methods and is being widely adopted in many laboratory settings. Sample to answer molecular platforms like ARIES® will enable routine and non-molecular labs to perform sensitive and rapid molecular testing with ease.

  15. MicroRNA-H4-5p encoded by HSV-1 latency-associated transcript promotes cell proliferation, invasion and cell cycle progression via p16-mediated PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in SHSY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiliang; Zhang, Chunying; Hou, Guangjun; Song, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) microRNAs (miRNAs) mostly located in transcription-associated transcript (LAT) region have been identified that play critical roles in the intricate host-pathogen interaction networks. Increasing evidences throw new insight into the role of miRNA-mediated miRNA-mRNA cross-talk in HSV-1 latent or acute infection. In the present study, we found that hsv-1 miR-H4-5p (here termed as miR-H4b) can down-regulate the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A, p16) in neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cell lines. Decreased expression of miR-H4b was directly related to attenuated cell proliferation and invasion as well as malfunction of cell cycle in recombinant SHSY5Y cells that stably expressing miR-H4b. Bioinformatics analysis and luciferase assays demonstrated miR-H4b can directly target p16 mRNA. MiR-H4b exerts its pro-proliferation function through inhibition of the p16-related PI3K-Akt pathways. Our findings provide, for the first time, significant clues regarding the role of herpesvirus-encoded miRNAs as a viral modulator to host cells. PMID:26221296

  16. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with the live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine VC2 stimulates the proliferation of mucosal T cells and germinal center responses resulting in sustained production of highly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, Brent A; Pahar, Bapi; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Veazey, Ronald; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2017-01-23

    We have shown that the live-attenuated HSV-1 VC2 vaccine strain with mutations in glycoprotein K (gK) and the membrane protein UL20 is unable to establish latency in vaccinated animals and produces a robust immune response capable of completely protecting mice against lethal vaginal HSV-1 or HSV-2 infections. To better understand the immune response generated by vaccination with VC2, we tested its ability to elicit immune responses in rhesus macaques. Vaccinated animals showed no signs of disease and developed increasing HSV-1 and HSV-2 reactive IgG1 after two booster vaccinations, while IgG subtypes IgG2 and IgG3 remained at low to undetectable levels. All vaccinated animals produced high levels of cross protective neutralizing antibodies. Flow cytometry analysis of cells isolated from draining lymph nodes showed that VC2 vaccination stimulated significant increases in plasmablast (CD27(high)CD38(high)) and mature memory (CD21(-)IgM(-)) B cells. T cell analysis on cells isolated from draining lymph node biopsies demonstrated a statistically significant increase in proliferating (Ki67(+)) follicular T helper cells and regulatory CXCR5(+) CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells. Analysis of plasma isolated two weeks post vaccination showed significant increases in circulating CXCL13 indicating increased germinal center activity. Cells isolated from vaginal biopsy samples collected over the course of the study exhibited vaccination-dependent increases in proliferating (Ki67(+)) CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell populations. These results suggest that intramuscular vaccination with the live-attenuated HSV-1 VC2 vaccine strain can stimulate robust IgG1 antibody responses that persist for >250days post vaccination. In addition, vaccination lead to the maturation of B cells into plasmablast and mature memory B cells, the expansion of follicular T helper cells, and affects in the mucosal immune responses. These data suggest that the HSV VC2 vaccine induces potent immune responses that could help

  17. Interleukin-2 production in SC and TK chickens infected with Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangxing; Lillehoj, Erik P; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2002-01-01

    SC and TK inbred chicken strains display differential protective immunity to coccidiosis, SC being more resistant and TK susceptible to disease. In this study, the association between interleukin (IL)-2 and disease phenotype was assessed by cytokine quantification in serum, duodenum, cecum, and spleen cell cultures of SC and TK chickens experimentally infected with Eimeria tenella. In general, after primary infection, SC and TK strains produced equivalent amounts of IL-2 in all sources examined. However, after secondary infection, SC animals displayed significantly greater IL-2 levels in serum and the duodenum compared with strain TK. IL-2 production after reinfection with Eimeria may be an important factor contributing to the genetic differences in coccidiosis between SC and TK chickens and provides a rational foundation for cytokine-based immunotherapeutic approaches to disease control strategies.

  18. BX-795 inhibits HSV-1 and HSV-2 replication in a JNK/p38-dependent manner without interfering with PDK1 activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Ai-Rong; Qiu, Min; Li, Yan-Lei; Xu, Wen-Tao; Song, Si-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Song, Hong-Yong; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Zhi-Wei

    2017-01-23

    BX-795, an aminopyrimidine compound, was developed as an inhibitor of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) and was later shown to be a potent inhibitor of the IKK-related kinase, TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and IKKɛ. The currect study aimed to investigate the inhibition mechanism(s) of BX-795 on Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replication. HEC-1-A or Vero cells were treated in the absence or presence of serial concentrations of BX-795 and infected with HSV-1 or HSV-2 for different periods. BX-795 did not suppress HSV IE gene transcription at 6 h postinfection. In contrast, at 12 h postinfection, BX-795 exhibited an inhibitory effect on the expression of not only the two IE genes (ICP0 and ICP27) but also on the late gene (gD) in a dose-dependent manner with low cytotoxicity. HSV-2 infection resulted in the activation of PI3K and Akt. BX-795 inhibited HSV-2-induced Akt phosphorylation and activation. The blockage of PI3K/Akt/mTOR by LY294002 and rapamycin did not affect HSV-2 replication. HSV-2 infection increased the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 but reduced ERK phosphorylation at 8 h postinfection in HEC-1A cells. SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) and SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), but not PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), inhibited viral replication in both HEC-1-A and Vero cells in a dose-dependent manner. BX-795 inhibited HSV-2-induced activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, BX-795 inhibited activation of c-Jun and ATF-2 caused by HSV-2 infection. BX-795 blocked PMA-stimulated c-Jun activation as well as HSV-2-mediated c-Jun nuclear translocation. BX-795 also inhibited AP-1 activation induced by HSV-2, PMA, TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of BX-795 on HSV replication was attenuated by overexpression of p38/JNK. BX-795 completely blocked HSV-2-induced MKK4 phosphorylation suggesting that BX-795 acted upstream of JNK and p38 MAP kinase. BX-795 had no effects on HSV-induced NF-κB activation. The results indicated that BX-795 inhibited HSV

  19. BX-795 inhibits HSV-1 and HSV-2 replication by blocking the JNK/p38 pathways without interfering with PDK1 activity in host cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ai-rong; Qiu, Min; Li, Yan-lei; Xu, Wen-tao; Song, Si-wei; Wang, Xiao-hui; Song, Hong-yong; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Zhi-wei

    2017-01-01

    BX-795 is an inhibitor of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), but also a potent inhibitor of the IKK-related kinase, TANKbinding kinase 1 (TBK1) and IKKɛ. In this study we attempted to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the inhibition of BX-795 on Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replication. HEC-1-A or Vero cells were treated with BX-795 and infected with HSV-1 or HSV-2 for different periods. BX-795 (3.125-25 μmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed HSV-2 replication, and displayed a low cytotoxicity to the host cells. BX-795 treatment dose-dependently suppressed the expression of two HSV immediate-early (IE) genes (ICP0 and ICP27) and the late gene (gD) at 12 h postinfection. HSV-2 infection resulted in the activation of PI3K and Akt in the host cells, and BX-795 treatment inhibited HSV-2-induced Akt phosphorylation and activation. However, the blockage of PI3K/Akt/mTOR with LY294002 and rapamycin did not affect HSV-2 replication. HSV-2 infection increased the phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and reduced ERK phosphorylation at 8 h postinfection in the host cells; BX-795 treatment inhibited HSV-2-induced activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase as well as the phosphorylation of c-Jun and ATF-2, the downstream targets of JNK and p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) dose-dependently inhibited the viral replication in the host cells, whereas PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor) was not effective. Moreover, BX-795 blocked PMA-stimulated c-Jun activation as well as HSV-2-mediated c-Jun nuclear translocation. BX-795 dose-dependently inhibited HSV-2, PMA, TNF-α-stimulated AP-1 activation, but not HSV-induced NF-κB activation. Overexpression of p38/JNK attenuated the inhibitory effect of BX-795 on HSV replication. BX-795 completely blocked HSV-2-induced MKK4 phosphorylation, suggesting that BX-795 acting upstream of JNK and p38 MAP kinase. In conclusion, this study identifies the anti-HSV activity of BX-795 and its

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies, Derived from Humans Vaccinated with the RV144 HIV Vaccine Containing the HVEM Binding Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Glycoprotein D, Neutralize HSV Infection, Mediate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity, and Protect Mice from Ocular Challenge with HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kening; Tomaras, Georgia D; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Goodman, Kyle N; Berman, Phillip W; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-10-01

    The RV144 HIV vaccine trial included a recombinant HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120) construct fused to a small portion of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) so that the first 40 amino acids of gp120 were replaced by the signal sequence and the first 27 amino acids of the mature form of gD. This region of gD contains most of the binding site for HVEM, an HSV receptor important for virus infection of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. RV144 induced antibodies to HIV that were partially protective against infection, as well as antibodies to HSV. We derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from peripheral blood B cells of recipients of the RV144 HIV vaccine and showed that these antibodies neutralized HSV-1 infection in cells expressing HVEM, but not the other major virus receptor, nectin-1. The MAbs mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and mice that received the MAbs and were then challenged by corneal inoculation with HSV-1 had reduced eye disease, shedding, and latent infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of MAbs derived from human recipients of a vaccine that specifically target the HVEM binding site of gD. In summary, we found that monoclonal antibodies derived from humans vaccinated with the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD (i) neutralized HSV-1 infection in a cell receptor-specific manner, (ii) mediated ADCC, and (iii) reduced ocular disease in virus-infected mice.IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes cold sores and neonatal herpes and is a leading cause of blindness. Despite many trials, no HSV vaccine has been approved. Nectin-1 and HVEM are the two major cellular receptors for HSV. These receptors are expressed at different levels in various tissues, and the role of each receptor in HSV pathogenesis is not well understood. We derived human monoclonal antibodies from persons who received the HIV RV144 vaccine that contained the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD fused to HIV gp120. These antibodies were

  1. Efficiency of the TK Culture System in the diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kocagöz, Tanıl; Altın, Sedat; Türkyılmaz, Özgül; Taş, İlhan; Karaduman, Perihan; Bolaban, Dilek; Yeşilyurt, Elif; Öktem, Sinem; Aytekin, Nihan; Şınık, Gülçe; Mozioğlu, Erkan; Silier, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    We have evaluated the efficiency of the TK Rapid Mycobacterial Culture System in isolating mycobacteria from clinical samples and in susceptibility testing. The TK Medium indicates mycobacterial growth by changing its color from red to yellow. During a 1-year period, 16,303 clinical samples were inoculated to TK selective (TK SLC) and Löwenstein-Jensen media (LJ). Mycobacteria were isolated in 2150 (13.04%) samples in at least 1 type of medium. While LJ isolated mycobacteria from 1920 (11.69%) of all samples, TK SLC isolated 2070 (12.63%). Among all positives, the isolation rates for LJ and TK SLC were 89.30% and 96.27%, respectively. Contamination of cultures by other organisms was observed in 878 (5.33%) LJ tubes and in 90 (0.55%) TK SLC tubes. On average, time-to-growth detection was 15.57 days in TK SLC and 25.14 days in LJ. The modes of time-to-growth detection were 12 and 25 days for TK SLC and LJ, respectively. The reliability of antimycobacterial susceptibility testing was checked by 36 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with known susceptibility patterns which were obtained from the World Health Organization collection and by participating in an external quality control program. All susceptibility results, except for a few borderline-resistant strains, were consistent with the expected susceptibility patterns. The TK Rapid Mycobacterial Culture System is a practical and reliable automated system that shortens the time required for both culture and susceptibility results. All types of TK Media are ready to use, saving time and effort as well as drastically reducing contamination during testing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Katherine A.; Yasseen, Akeel A.; McKerr, George; Downes, C. S.; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J.

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1+ and TK1- clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumor suppressor (TP53) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene regions, over 1 h after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1+ compared to TK1- cells, a trend also reflected to a lesser degree in genomic DNA repair between the cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK+ cells occurred rapid