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Sample records for imaging nr2b subtype

  1. Negative Allosteric Modulators Selective for The NR2B Subtype of The NMDA Receptor Impair Cognition in Multiple Domains.

    PubMed

    Weed, Michael R; Bookbinder, Mark; Polino, Joseph; Keavy, Deborah; Cardinal, Rudolf N; Simmermacher-Mayer, Jean; Cometa, Fu-ni L; King, Dalton; Thangathirupathy, Srinivasan; Macor, John E; Bristow, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressant activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) has led to increased investigation of their behavioral pharmacology. NMDA antagonists, such as ketamine, impair cognition in multiple species and in multiple cognitive domains. However, studies with NR2B subtype-selective NAMs have reported mixed results in rodents including increased impulsivity, no effect on cognition, impairment or even improvement of some cognitive tasks. To date, the effects of NR2B-selective NAMs on cognitive tests have not been reported in nonhuman primates. The current study evaluated two selective NR2B NAMs, CP101,606 and BMT-108908, along with the nonselective NMDA antagonists, ketamine and AZD6765, in the nonhuman primate Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) list-based delayed match to sample (list-DMS) task. Ketamine and the two NMDA NR2B NAMs produced selective impairments in memory in the list-DMS task. AZD6765 impaired performance in a non-specific manner. In a separate cohort, CP101,606 impaired performance of the nonhuman primate CANTAB visuo-spatial Paired Associates Learning (vsPAL) task with a selective impairment at more difficult conditions. The results of these studies clearly show that systemic administration of a selective NR2B NAM can cause transient cognitive impairment in multiple cognitive domains.

  2. Negative Allosteric Modulators Selective for The NR2B Subtype of The NMDA Receptor Impair Cognition in Multiple Domains

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Michael R; Bookbinder, Mark; Polino, Joseph; Keavy, Deborah; Cardinal, Rudolf N; Simmermacher-Mayer, Jean; Cometa, Fu-ni L; King, Dalton; Thangathirupathy, Srinivasan; Macor, John E; Bristow, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressant activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) has led to increased investigation of their behavioral pharmacology. NMDA antagonists, such as ketamine, impair cognition in multiple species and in multiple cognitive domains. However, studies with NR2B subtype-selective NAMs have reported mixed results in rodents including increased impulsivity, no effect on cognition, impairment or even improvement of some cognitive tasks. To date, the effects of NR2B-selective NAMs on cognitive tests have not been reported in nonhuman primates. The current study evaluated two selective NR2B NAMs, CP101,606 and BMT-108908, along with the nonselective NMDA antagonists, ketamine and AZD6765, in the nonhuman primate Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) list-based delayed match to sample (list-DMS) task. Ketamine and the two NMDA NR2B NAMs produced selective impairments in memory in the list-DMS task. AZD6765 impaired performance in a non-specific manner. In a separate cohort, CP101,606 impaired performance of the nonhuman primate CANTAB visuo-spatial Paired Associates Learning (vsPAL) task with a selective impairment at more difficult conditions. The results of these studies clearly show that systemic administration of a selective NR2B NAM can cause transient cognitive impairment in multiple cognitive domains. PMID:26105137

  3. Discovery of 3-Substituted Aminocyclopentanes as Potent and Orally Bioavailable NR2B Subtype-Selective NMDA Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A series of 3-substituted aminocyclopentanes has been identified as highly potent and selective NR2B receptor antagonists. Incorporation of a 1,2,4-oxadiazole linker and substitution of the pendant phenyl ring led to the discovery of orally bioavailable analogues that showed efficient NR2B receptor occupancy in rats. Unlike nonselective NMDA antagonists, the NR2B-selective antagonist 22 showed no adverse affects on motor coordination in the rotarod assay at high dose. Compound 22 was efficacious following oral administration in a spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain and in an acute model of Parkinson’s disease in a dose dependent manner. PMID:22816022

  4. Synthesis and in vitro characterization of trans- and cis-[(18)F]-4-methylbenzyl 4-[(pyrimidin-2-ylamino)methyl]-3-fluoropiperidine-1-carboxylates as new potential PET radiotracer candidates for the NR2B subtype N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Koudih, Radouane; Gilbert, Gwénaëlle; Dhilly, Martine; Abbas, Ahmed; Barré, Louisa; Debruyne, Danièle; Sobrio, Franck

    2012-07-01

    Diastereoisomeric compounds [(18)F]cis- and [(18)F]trans-4-methylbenzyl 4-[(pyrimidin-2-ylamino)methyl]-3-fluoro-piperidine-1-carboxylates were successfully synthesized as new subtype-selective PET radiotracers for imaging the NR2B subunit containing NMDA receptors. Rat brain section autoradiographies demonstrated a high specific binding in NR2B/NMDA receptor rich regions for both radioligands. The measured logD(7.4) values as well as B(max)/K(d) ratios indicated that both radiotracers possess the adequate properties required for PET radiotracers.

  5. Effect of NMDA NR2B antagonist on neuropathic pain in two spinal cord injury models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngkyung; Cho, Hwi-young; Ahn, Young Ju; Kim, Junesun; Yoon, Young Wook

    2012-05-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are thought to play an important role in the processes of central sensitization and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, particularly after spinal cord injury (SCI). NMDA antagonists effectively reduce neuropathic pain, but serious side effects prevent their use as therapeutic drugs. NMDA NR2B antagonists have been reported to effectively reduce inflammatory and neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated the effects of NR2B antagonists on neuropathic pain and the expression of NR2B in the spinal cord in 2 SCI models. SCI was induced at T12 by a New York University impactor (contusion) or by sectioning of the lateral half of the spinal cord (hemisection). Ifenprodil (100, 200, 500, 1000nmol) and Ro25-6981 (20, 50, 100, 200nmol) were intrathecally injected and behavioral tests were conducted. Ifenprodil increased the paw withdrawal threshold in both models but also produced mild motor depression at higher doses. Ro25-6981 increased the mechanical nociceptive threshold in a dose-dependent manner without motor depression. NR2B expression was significantly increased on both sides at the spinal segments of L1-2 and L4-5 in the hemisection model but did not change in the contusion model. Increased expression of NR2B in the hemisection model was reduced by intrathecal ifenprodil. These results suggest that intrathecal NMDA NR2B antagonist increased the mechanical nociceptive threshold after SCI without motor depression. A selective subtype of NMDA receptor, such as NR2B, may be a more selective target for pain control because NMDA receptors play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain.

  6. Inhibition of NR2B-Containing N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors (NMDARs) in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, a Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Farjam, Mojtaba; Beigi Zarandi, Faegheh Baha'addini; Farjadian, Shirin; Geramizadeh, Bita; Nikseresht, Ali Reza; Panjehshahin, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is the pathophysiological basis for permanent neurological disabilities in multiple sclerosis (MS); thus neuroprotection is emerging as a therapeutic approach in MS research. Modulation of excitotoxicity by inhibition of NMDARs has been suggested for neuroprotection, but selective antagonisation of the NR2B subtype of these receptors, a subtype believed to play a more pivotal role in neurodegeneration, has not been tested in MS. In this study inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDAR was evaluated on the animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE induction was done using MOG in C57BL/6 mice. Therapeutic administration of different doses of highly selective NR2B-containing NMDAR inhibitor (RO25-6981) was compared with memantine (non-selective NMDAR antagonist) and vehicle. Neurological deficits in EAE animals were more efficiently decreased by selective inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs. Histological studies of the spinal cords also showed decreased inflammation, myelin degradation and neuro-axonal degeneration when RO25-6981was administered with higher doses. The effects were dose dependent. Regarding the role of NR2B-containing NMDARs in excitotoxicity, selective inhibition of these receptor subtypes seems to modulate the neurological disabilities and pathological changes in EAE. Further elucidation of the exact mechanism of action as well as more experimental studies can suggest NR2B-containing NMDAR inhibition as a potentially effective treatment strategy for slowing down the clinical deterioration of disability in MS. PMID:25237366

  7. Inhibition of NR2B-Containing N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors (NMDARs) in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, a Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Farjam, Mojtaba; Beigi Zarandi, Faegheh Baha'addini; Farjadian, Shirin; Geramizadeh, Bita; Nikseresht, Ali Reza; Panjehshahin, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is the pathophysiological basis for permanent neurological disabilities in multiple sclerosis (MS); thus neuroprotection is emerging as a therapeutic approach in MS research. Modulation of excitotoxicity by inhibition of NMDARs has been suggested for neuroprotection, but selective antagonisation of the NR2B subtype of these receptors, a subtype believed to play a more pivotal role in neurodegeneration, has not been tested in MS. In this study inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDAR was evaluated on the animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE induction was done using MOG in C57BL/6 mice. Therapeutic administration of different doses of highly selective NR2B-containing NMDAR inhibitor (RO25-6981) was compared with memantine (non-selective NMDAR antagonist) and vehicle. Neurological deficits in EAE animals were more efficiently decreased by selective inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs. Histological studies of the spinal cords also showed decreased inflammation, myelin degradation and neuro-axonal degeneration when RO25-6981was administered with higher doses. The effects were dose dependent. Regarding the role of NR2B-containing NMDARs in excitotoxicity, selective inhibition of these receptor subtypes seems to modulate the neurological disabilities and pathological changes in EAE. Further elucidation of the exact mechanism of action as well as more experimental studies can suggest NR2B-containing NMDAR inhibition as a potentially effective treatment strategy for slowing down the clinical deterioration of disability in MS.

  8. Positive feedback of NR2B-containing NMDA receptor activity is the initial step toward visual imprinting: a model for juvenile learning.

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Tomoharu; Sato, Katsushige; Kinoshita, Masae; Kanamatsu, Tomoyuki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting in chicks is a good model for elucidating the processes underlying neural plasticity changes during juvenile learning. We recently reported that neural activation of a telencephalic region, the core region of the hyperpallium densocellulare (HDCo), was critical for success of visual imprinting, and that N-Methyl-D-aspartic (NMDA) receptors containing the NR2B subunit (NR2B/NR1) in this region were essential for imprinting. Using electrophysiological and multiple-site optical imaging techniques with acute brain slices, we found that long-term potentiation (LTP) and enhancement of NR2B/NR1 currents in HDCo neurons were induced in imprinted chicks. Enhancement of NR2B/NR1 currents as well as an increase in surface NR2B expression occurred even following a brief training that was too weak to induce LTP or imprinting behavior. This means that NR2B/NR1 activation is the initial step of learning, well before the activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptors which induces LTP. We also showed that knockdown of NR2B/NR1 inhibited imprinting, and inversely, increasing the surface NR2B expression by treatment with a casein kinase 2 inhibitor successfully reduced training time required for imprinting. These results suggest that imprinting stimuli activate post-synaptic NR2B/NR1 in HDCo cells, increase NR2B/NR1 signaling through up-regulation of its expression, and induce LTP and memory acquisition. The study investigated the neural mechanism underlying juvenile learning. In the initial stage of chick imprinting, NMDA receptors containing the NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) are activated, surface expression of NR2B/NR1 (NMDA receptor subunit 1) is up-regulated, and consequently long-term potentiation is induced in the telencephalic neurons. We suggest that the positive feedback in the NR2B/NR1 activation is a unique process of juvenile learning, exhibiting rapid memory acquisition.

  9. The qEEG Signature of Selective NMDA NR2B Negative Allosteric Modulators; A Potential Translational Biomarker for Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Keavy, Deborah; Bristow, Linda J; Sivarao, Digavalli V; Batchelder, Margaret; King, Dalton; Thangathirupathy, Srinivasan; Macor, John E; Weed, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The antidepressant activity of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel blocker, ketamine, has led to the investigation of negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) selective for the NR2B receptor subtype. The clinical development of NR2B NAMs would benefit from a translational pharmacodynamic biomarker that demonstrates brain penetration and functional inhibition of NR2B receptors in preclinical species and humans. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) is a translational measure that can be used to demonstrate pharmacodynamic effects across species. NMDA receptor channel blockers, such as ketamine and phencyclidine, increase the EEG gamma power band, which has been used as a pharmacodynamic biomarker in the development of NMDA receptor antagonists. However, detailed qEEG studies with ketamine or NR2B NAMs are lacking in nonhuman primates. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects on the qEEG power spectra of the NR2B NAMs traxoprodil (CP-101,606) and BMT-108908 in nonhuman primates, and to compare them to the NMDA receptor channel blockers, ketamine and lanicemine. Cynomolgus monkeys were surgically implanted with EEG radio-telemetry transmitters, and qEEG was measured after vehicle or drug administration. The relative power for a number of frequency bands was determined. Ketamine and lanicemine increased relative gamma power, whereas the NR2B NAMs traxoprodil and BMT-108908 had no effect. Robust decreases in beta power were elicited by ketamine, traxoprodil and BMT-108908; and these agents also produced decreases in alpha power and increases in delta power at the doses tested. These results suggest that measurement of power spectra in the beta and delta bands may represent a translational pharmacodynamic biomarker to demonstrate functional effects of NR2B NAMs. The results of these studies may help guide the selection of qEEG measures that can be incorporated into early clinical evaluation of NR2B NAMs in healthy humans.

  10. The qEEG Signature of Selective NMDA NR2B Negative Allosteric Modulators; A Potential Translational Biomarker for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Keavy, Deborah; Bristow, Linda J.; Sivarao, Digavalli V.; Batchelder, Margaret; King, Dalton; Thangathirupathy, Srinivasan; Macor, John E.; Weed, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The antidepressant activity of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel blocker, ketamine, has led to the investigation of negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) selective for the NR2B receptor subtype. The clinical development of NR2B NAMs would benefit from a translational pharmacodynamic biomarker that demonstrates brain penetration and functional inhibition of NR2B receptors in preclinical species and humans. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) is a translational measure that can be used to demonstrate pharmacodynamic effects across species. NMDA receptor channel blockers, such as ketamine and phencyclidine, increase the EEG gamma power band, which has been used as a pharmacodynamic biomarker in the development of NMDA receptor antagonists. However, detailed qEEG studies with ketamine or NR2B NAMs are lacking in nonhuman primates. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects on the qEEG power spectra of the NR2B NAMs traxoprodil (CP-101,606) and BMT-108908 in nonhuman primates, and to compare them to the NMDA receptor channel blockers, ketamine and lanicemine. Cynomolgus monkeys were surgically implanted with EEG radio-telemetry transmitters, and qEEG was measured after vehicle or drug administration. The relative power for a number of frequency bands was determined. Ketamine and lanicemine increased relative gamma power, whereas the NR2B NAMs traxoprodil and BMT-108908 had no effect. Robust decreases in beta power were elicited by ketamine, traxoprodil and BMT-108908; and these agents also produced decreases in alpha power and increases in delta power at the doses tested. These results suggest that measurement of power spectra in the beta and delta bands may represent a translational pharmacodynamic biomarker to demonstrate functional effects of NR2B NAMs. The results of these studies may help guide the selection of qEEG measures that can be incorporated into early clinical evaluation of NR2B NAMs in healthy humans. PMID:27035340

  11. [Roles and expressions of the NMDA receptor subunits (NR2A and NR2B) in visual cortex area of kittens with the normal visual development and anisometropic amblyopia].

    PubMed

    Li, Haiwei; Liu, Longqian; Liu, Xuyang

    2011-04-01

    In order to understand the roles of the other subunits, we investigated expression of the NMDA receptor subunits (NR2A and NR2B) in visual cortex of normal and anisometropic amblyopia kittens with different ages in the present study. We examined the expressions of NR2A and NR2B in the visual cortex of the kittens by immunohistochemistry with polyclonal anti-NR2A antibody and anti-NR2B antibody, respectively. Using immunohisto-chemical Streptavidin Perosidase (SP) method, we observed the dynamic changes of NR2A and NR2B with microscope and computer-assisted image analyses. We found that NR2A and NR2B remained low expression after the peak of the critical period of kitten visual development; compared with normal group of the same age, NR2A expresses low. However, the difference is not significant for NR2B before maturation period of visual development. NR2B rises after the maturation period of visual development. According to this, the component of NR2A and NR2B can be affected by anisometropia. This research suggests that the difference of NR2A and NR2B expressions may affect the formation of amblyopia.

  12. NR2B Antagonist CP-101,606 Abolishes Pitch-Mediated Deviance Detection in Awake Rats.

    PubMed

    Sivarao, Digavalli V; Chen, Ping; Yang, Yili; Li, Yu-Wen; Pieschl, Rick; Ahlijanian, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients exhibit a decreased ability to detect change in their auditory environment as measured by auditory event-related potentials (ERP) such as mismatch negativity. This deficit has been linked to abnormal NMDA neurotransmission since, among other observations, non-selective channel blockers of NMDA reliably diminish automatic deviance detection in human subjects as well as in animal models. Recent molecular and functional evidence links NR2B receptor subtype to aberrant NMDA transmission in schizophrenia. However, it is unknown if NR2B receptors participate in pre-attentive deviance detection. We recorded ERP from the vertex of freely behaving rats in response to frequency mismatch protocols. We saw a robust increase in N1 response to deviants compared to standard as well as control stimuli indicating true deviance detection. Moreover, the increased negativity was highly sensitive to deviant probability. Next, we tested the effect of a non-selective NMDA channel blocker (ketamine, 30 mg/kg) and a highly selective NR2B antagonist, CP-101,606 (10 or 30 mg/kg) on deviance detection. Ketamine attenuated deviance mainly by increasing the amplitude of the standard ERP. Amplitude and/or latency of several ERP components were also markedly affected. In contrast, CP-101,606 robustly and dose-dependently inhibited the deviant's N1 amplitude, and as a consequence, completely abolished deviance detection. No other ERPs or components were affected. Thus, we report first evidence that NR2B receptors robustly participate in processes of automatic deviance detection in a rodent model. Lastly, our model demonstrates a path forward to test specific pharmacological hypotheses using translational endpoints relevant to aberrant sensory processing in schizophrenia.

  13. NR2B antagonist CP-101,606 inhibits NR2B phosphorylation at tyrosine-1472 and its interactions with Fyn in levodopa-induced dyskinesia rat model.

    PubMed

    Kong, Min; Ba, Maowen; Liu, Chuanyu; Zhang, Yanxiang; Zhang, Hongli; Qiu, Haiyan

    2015-04-01

    The augmented tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) dependent on Fyn kinase has been associated with levodopa (l-dopa)-induced dyskinesia (LID). CP-101,606, one selective NR2B subunit antagonist, can improve dyskinesia. Yet, the accurate action mechanism is less well understood. In the present study, the evidences were investigated. Valid 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned parkinsonian rats were treated with l-dopa intraperitoneally for 22 days to induce LID rat model. On day 23, rats received either CP-101,606 (0.5mg/kg) or vehicle with each l-dopa dose. On the day of 1, 8, 15, 22, and 23 during l-dopa treatment, we determined abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) in rats. The levels of NR2B phosphorylation at tyrosine-1472 (pNR2B-Tyr1472) and interactions of NR2B with Fyn in LID rat model were detected by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Results showed that CP-101,606 attenuated l-dopa-induced AIMs. In agreement with behavioral analysis, CP-101,606 reduced the augmented pNR2B-Tyr1472 and its interactions with Fyn triggered during the l-dopa administration in the lesioned striatum of parkinsonian rats. Moreover, CP-101,606 also decreased the level of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II at threonine-286 hyperphosphorylation (pCaMKII-Thr286), which was the downstream signaling amplification molecule of NMDAR overactivation and closely associated with LID. However, the protein level of NR2B and Fyn had no difference under the above conditions. These data indicate that the inhibition of the interactions of NR2B with Fyn and NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation may contribute to the CP-101,606-induced downregulation of NMDAR function and provide benefit for the therapy of LID. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. (3R,4S)-3-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl]chroman-4,7-diol: a conformationally restricted analogue of the NR2B subtype-selective NMDA antagonist (1S,2S)-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-hydroxy-4-phenylpiperidino)- 1-propanol.

    PubMed

    Butler, T W; Blake, J F; Bordner, J; Butler, P; Chenard, B L; Collins, M A; DeCosta, D; Ducat, M J; Eisenhard, M E; Menniti, F S; Pagnozzi, M J; Sands, S B; Segelstein, B E; Volberg, W; White, W F; Zhao, D

    1998-03-26

    (1S,2S)-1-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-hydroxy-4-phenylpiperidino)-1-propanol (CP-101,606, 1) is a recently described antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors containing the NR2B subunit. In the present study, the optimal orientation of compounds of this structural type for their receptor was explored. Tethering of the pendent methyl group of 1 to the phenolic aromatic ring via an oxygen atom prevents rotation about the central portion of the molecule. Several of the new chromanol compounds have high affinity for the racemic [3H]CP-101,606 binding site on the NMDA receptor and protect against glutamate toxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons. The new ring caused a change in the stereochemical preference of the receptor-cis (erythro) compounds had better affinity for the receptor than the trans isomers. Computational studies suggest that steric interactions between the pendent methyl group and the phenol ring in the acyclic series determine which structures can best fit the receptor. The chromanol analogue, (3R,4S)-3-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-1- yl]chroman-4,7-diol (12a, CP-283,097), was found to possess potency and selectivity comparable to CP-101,606. Thus 12a is a new tool to explore the function of the NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  15. Expression of NR2B in different brain regions and effect of NR2B antagonism on learning deficits after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Li, Q; Feng, D; Hu, T; Fang, Q; Wang, Z

    2013-02-12

    Approximately 50% of patients who survived after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have cognitive or neurobehavioral dysfunction. The mechanisms are not known. NR2B, one of the subunits of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, has been proved to be an important factor for synapse function and behavior cognition. Experiment 1 aimed to investigate the timecourse of the NR2B expression in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum after SAH in rats. In experiment 2, we assessed the effect of Ro 25-6981 (a specific NR2B antagonist) on regulation of learning deficits and behavioral activity following SAH. All SAH animals were subjected to injection of autologous blood into the prechiasmatic cistern once on day 0. NR2B was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Cognitive and memory changes were investigated in the Morris water maze. As a result, the expression of NR2B was decreased remarkably in SAH groups compared with the control group and the low ebb was on days 1-3. The immunohistochemical staining demonstrated expression of NR2B was present mainly in the neurons in all of the three different regions, such as the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. After Ro 25-6981 intraperitoneal administration, learning deficits induced by SAH was markedly aggravated and clinical behavior scale was also significantly decreased. Our results suggest that NR2B expression is down-regulated in the brain after experimental SAH and NR2B antagonism resulted in augmentation of the development of cognitive dysfunction after SAH.

  16. Memory Enhancement by Targeting Cdk5 Regulation of NR2B

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Florian; Hernandéz, Adan; Kistler, Tara M.; Pozo, Karine; Zhong, Ping; Yuen, Eunice Y.; Tan, Chunfeng; Hawasli, Ammar H.; Cooke, Sam F.; Nishi, Akinori; Guo, Ailan; Wiederhold, Thorsten; Yan, Zhen; Bibb, James A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Many psychiatric and neurological disorders are characterized by learning and memory deficits, for which cognitive enhancement is considered a valid treatment strategy. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a prime target for the development of cognitive enhancers due to its fundamental role in learning and memory. In particular, the NMDAR subunit NR2B improves synaptic plasticity and memory when over-expressed in neurons. However, NR2B regulation is not well understood and no therapies potentiating NMDAR function have been developed. Here, we show that serine 1116 of NR2B is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). Cdk5-dependent NR2B phosphorylation is regulated by neuronal activity and controls the receptor’s cell surface expression. Disrupting NR2B-Cdk5 interaction using a small interfering peptide (siP) increases NR2B surface levels, facilitates synaptic transmission, and improves memory formation in vivo. Our results reveal a novel regulatory mechanism critical to NR2B function that can be targeted for the development of cognitive enhancers. PMID:24607229

  17. NR2B phosphorylation at tyrosine 1472 in spinal dorsal horn contributed to N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced pain hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Cao, Jing; Yang, Xian; Suo, Zhan-Wei; Shi, Lei; Liu, Yan-Ni; Yang, Hong-Bin; Hu, Xiao-Dong

    2011-11-01

    Calcium influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-subtype glutamate receptors (NMDARs) regulates the intracellular trafficking of NMDARs, leading to long-lasting modification of NMDAR-mediated synaptic transmission that is involved in development, learning, and synaptic plasticity. The present study investigated the contribution of such NMDAR-dependent synaptic trafficking in spinal dorsal horn to the induction of pain hypersensitivity. Our data showed that direct activation of NMDARs by intrathecal NMDA application elicited pronounced mechanical allodynia in intact mice, which was concurrent with a specific increase in the abundance of NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B at the postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched fraction. Selective inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs (NR2BR) by ifenprodil dose dependently attenuated the mechanical allodynia in NMDA-injected mice, suggesting the importance of NR2BR synaptic accumulation in NMDA-induced pain sensitization. The NR2BR redistribution at synapses after NMDA challenge was associated with a significant increase in NR2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a catalytic site by Src family protein tyrosine kinases (SFKs) that has been shown to prevent NR2B endocytosis. Intrathecal injection of a specific SFKs inhibitor, PP2, to block NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation eliminated NMDA-induced NR2BR synaptic expression and also attenuated the mechanical allodynia. These data suggested that activation of spinal NMDARs was able to accumulate NR2BR at synapses via SFK signaling, which might exaggerate NMDAR-dependent nociceptive transmission and contribute to NMDA-induced nociceptive behavioral hyperresponsiveness.

  18. Blockade of NR2B-Containing NMDA Receptors Prevents BDNF Enhancement of Glutamatergic Transmission in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, Robert A.; Black, Ira B.; Plummer, Mark R.

    1999-01-01

    Application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to hippocampal neurons has profound effects on glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Both pre- and postsynaptic actions have been identified that depend on the age and type of preparation. To understand the nature of this diversity, we have begun to examine the mechanisms of BDNF action in cultured dissociated embryonic hippocampal neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording during iontophoretic application of glutamate revealed that BDNF doubled the amplitude of induced inward current. Coexposure to BDNF and the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-5 markedly reduced, but did not entirely prevent, the increase in current. Coexposure to BDNF and ifenprodil, an NR2B subunit antagonist, reproduced the response observed with AP-5, suggesting BDNF primarily enhanced activity of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors with a lesser effect on non-NMDA receptors. Protein kinase involvement was confirmed with the broad spectrum inhibitor staurosporine, which prevented the response to BDNF. PKCI19-31 and H-89, selective antagonists of PKC and PKA, had no effect on the response to BDNF, whereas autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide, an antagonist of CaM kinase II, reduced response magnitude by 60%. These results demonstrate the predominant role of a specific NMDA receptor subtype in BDNF modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission. PMID:10492007

  19. Amygdala Infusions of an NR2B-Selective or an NR2A-Preferring NMDA Receptor Antagonist Differentially Influence Fear Conditioning and Expression in the Fear-Potentiated Startle Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David L.; Davis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Within the amygdala, most N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors consist of NR1 subunits in combination with either NR2A or NR2B subunits. Because the particular subunit composition greatly influences the receptors' properties, we investigated the contribution of both subtypes to fear conditioning and expression. To do so, we infused the…

  20. Amygdala Infusions of an NR2B-Selective or an NR2A-Preferring NMDA Receptor Antagonist Differentially Influence Fear Conditioning and Expression in the Fear-Potentiated Startle Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David L.; Davis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Within the amygdala, most N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors consist of NR1 subunits in combination with either NR2A or NR2B subunits. Because the particular subunit composition greatly influences the receptors' properties, we investigated the contribution of both subtypes to fear conditioning and expression. To do so, we infused the…

  1. The NMDAR subunit NR2B expression is modified in hippocampus after repetitive seizures.

    PubMed

    Auzmendi, J; González, N; Girardi, Elena

    2009-05-01

    NMDA receptor is involved in synaptic plasticity, learning, memory and neurological diseases like epilepsia and it is the major mediator of excitotoxicity. NR2B-containing NMDA receptors may be playing a crucial role in epileptic disorders. In the present study the effect of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP) repetitive administration (4-7 days) on the hippocampal NR2B subunit was studied. A significant decrease in NR2B in the whole hippocampus was observed after MP4 with a tendency to recover to normal values in MP7 by western blot assay. Immunohistochemical studies showed a decrease in several CA1 and CA2/3 strata (21-73%). MP7 showed a reversion of the drop observed at 4 days in stratum oriens, pyramidal cell layer in CA1, CA2/3 and CA1 stratum radiatum. A significant fall in the lacunosum molecular layer of both areas and stratum radiatum of CA2/3 was observed. The immunostaining in MP4 showed a decrease in the granulare layer from dentate gyrus (20%), in hillus (71%) and subicullum (63%) as compared with control and these decreases were similar at MP7 values. Results showed decreases in NR2B subunit expression in different areas following repeated MP-induce seizures, suggesting that NR2B expression is altered depending on the diverse hippocampal input and output signals of each region that could be differently involved in modulating MP-induced hyperactivity.

  2. NR2B subunit of the NMDA glutamate receptor regulates appetite in the parabrachial nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Zheng, Ruimao; Srisai, Dollada; McKnight, G Stanley; Palmiter, Richard D

    2013-09-03

    Diphtheria toxin-mediated, acute ablation of hypothalamic neurons expressing agouti-related protein (AgRP) in adult mice leads to anorexia and starvation within 7 d that is caused by hyperactivity of neurons within the parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Because NMDA glutamate receptors are involved in various synaptic plasticity-based behavioral modifications, we hypothesized that modulation of the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the NMDA receptor in PBN neurons could contribute to the anorexia phenotype. We observed by Western blot analyses that ablation of AgRP neurons results in enhanced expression of NR2B along with a modest suppression of NR2A. Interestingly, systemic administration of LiCl in a critical time window before AgRP neuron ablation abolished the anorectic response. LiCl treatment suppressed NR2B levels in the PBN and ameliorated the local Fos induction that is associated with anorexia. This protective role of LiCl on feeding was blunted in vagotomized mice. Chronic infusion of RO25-6981, a selective NR2B inhibitor, into the PBN recapitulated the role of LiCl in maintaining feeding after AgRP neuron ablation. We suggest that the accumulation of NR2B subunits in the PBN contributes to aphagia in response to AgRP neuron ablation and may be involved in other forms of anorexia.

  3. NR4A1 Knockdown Suppresses Seizure Activity by Regulating Surface Expression of NR2B.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanke; Chen, Guojun; Gao, Baobing; Li, Yunlin; Liang, Shuli; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhu, Binglin

    2016-11-23

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (NR4A1), a downstream target of CREB that is a key regulator of epileptogenesis, has been implicated in a variety of biological processes and was previously identified as a seizure-associated molecule. However, the relationship between NR4A1 and epileptogenesis remains unclear. Here, we showed that NR4A1 protein was predominantly expressed in neurons and up-regulated in patients with epilepsy as well as pilocarpine-induced mouse epileptic models. NR4A1 knockdown by lentivirus transfection (lenti-shNR4A1) alleviated seizure severity and prolonged onset latency in mouse models. Moreover, reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation of NR4A1 and NR2B demonstrated their interaction. Furthermore, the expression of p-NR2B (Tyr1472) in epileptic mice and the expression of NR2B in the postsynaptic density (PSD) were significantly reduced in the lenti-shNR4A1 group, indicating that NR4A1 knockdown partly decreased surface NR2B by promoting NR2B internalization. These results are the first to indicate that the expression of NR4A1 in epileptic brain tissues may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying epilepsy.

  4. Molecular level activation insights from a NR2A/NR2B agonist.

    PubMed

    Ieong Tou, Weng; Chang, Su-Sen; Wu, Dongchuan; Lai, Ted Weita; Wang, Yu Tian; Hsu, Chung Y; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-01-01

    N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), a subclass of glutamate receptors have broad actions in neural transmission for major brain functions. Overactivation of NMDARs leading to "excitotoxicity" is the underlying mechanism of neuronal death in a number of neurological diseases, especially stroke. Much research effort has been directed toward developing pharmacological agents to modulate NMDAR actions for treating neurological diseases, in particular stroke. Here, we report that Alliin, a sulfoxide in fresh garlic, exhibits affinity toward NR2A as well as NR2B receptors based on virtual screening. Biological activities of Alliin on these two receptors were confirmed in electrophysiological studies. Ligand-binding site closure, a structural change precluding ion channel opening, was observed with Alliin during 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation. Alliin interactions with NR2A and NR2B suggest that residues E/A413, H485, T690, and Y730 may play important roles in the conformation shift. Activation of NR2A and NR2B by Alliin can be differentiated from that caused by glutamate, the endogenous neurotransmitter. These characteristic molecular features in NR2A and NR2B activation provide insight into structural requirements for future development of novel drugs with selective interaction with NR2A and NR2B for treating neurological diseases, particularly stroke.

  5. NR4A1 Knockdown Suppresses Seizure Activity by Regulating Surface Expression of NR2B

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanke; Chen, Guojun; Gao, Baobing; Li, Yunlin; Liang, Shuli; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhu, Binglin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (NR4A1), a downstream target of CREB that is a key regulator of epileptogenesis, has been implicated in a variety of biological processes and was previously identified as a seizure-associated molecule. However, the relationship between NR4A1 and epileptogenesis remains unclear. Here, we showed that NR4A1 protein was predominantly expressed in neurons and up-regulated in patients with epilepsy as well as pilocarpine-induced mouse epileptic models. NR4A1 knockdown by lentivirus transfection (lenti-shNR4A1) alleviated seizure severity and prolonged onset latency in mouse models. Moreover, reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation of NR4A1 and NR2B demonstrated their interaction. Furthermore, the expression of p-NR2B (Tyr1472) in epileptic mice and the expression of NR2B in the postsynaptic density (PSD) were significantly reduced in the lenti-shNR4A1 group, indicating that NR4A1 knockdown partly decreased surface NR2B by promoting NR2B internalization. These results are the first to indicate that the expression of NR4A1 in epileptic brain tissues may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying epilepsy. PMID:27876882

  6. Prenatal stress disturbs hippocampal KIF17 and NR2B in spatial cognition in male offspring.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Depeng; Liu, Dan; Chen, Xueyu; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Ai; Kang, Jiuhong; Zhou, Qian; Duan, Tao

    2013-04-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that prenatal stress disturbs the hippocampal-mediated learning and memory processes in offspring. The underlying mechanisms for this effect, however, remain vague. It is well documented that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a pivotal role in learning and memory, which are related to dynamically trafficking and regulating NMDA receptors by their response motor proteins. Over the past few years, increasing numbers of studies have elucidated that hippocampal-mediated learning and memory are regulated by KIF17 (kinesin superfamily motor protein 17), which specifically transports and regulates the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in hippocampal neurons. The present study shows the influence of prenatal stress on KIF17 and NR2B expression and hippocampal NR2A/NR2B ratio partially reflecting function of KIF17, using mice as models. It was found that prenatal stress significantly decreased the hippocampal KIF17 and NR2B level in offspring at postnatal stages of 3 weeks and 9 weeks. Moreover, hippocampal KIF17 in the prenatally stressed pups continued to be weakened even after serial Morris water maze trainings, but not NR2B. Finally, the synaptic NR2A/NR2B level was upregulated in offspring exposed to prenatal stress, which revealed the dysfunction of KIF17. Thus, we conclude that prenatal stress leads to long-lasting deterioration of the expression and function of hippocampal KIF17 in offspring, which may be related to deficits of spatial cognition caused by prenatal stress. These data underpin the hypotheses that a physiopathology of neurodevelopmental origin in early life leads to defects in learning and memory in later life.

  7. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of NR2B Contributes to Chronic Migraines via Increased Expression of CGRP in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiping; Wang, Sha; Qin, Guangcheng; Xie, Jingmei; Tan, Ge; Zhou, Jiying; McBride, Devin W.

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B (NR2B-pTyr), a subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, has been reported to develop central sensitization and persistent pain in the spine, but its effect in chronic migraines has not been examined. We hypothesized that tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B contributes to chronic migraines (CM) through calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in rats. Ninety-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to seven inflammatory soup (IS) injections. In a subset of animals, the time course and location of NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation were detected by western blot and immunofluorescence double staining. Another set of animals were given either genistein, vehicle, or genistein and recombinant CGRP. The mechanical threshold was measured, the expressions of NR2B-pTyr, NR2B, and CGRP were quantified using western blot, and nitric oxide (NO) was measured with the nitric acid reductase method. NR2B-pTyr expression, in neurons, peaked at 24 hours after CM. Genistein improved the mechanical threshold and reduced migraine attacks 24 and 72 hours after CM. Tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B decreased the mechanical threshold and increased migraine attacks via upregulated CGRP expression in the rat model of CM. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B may be a potential therapeutic target for treatment of CM. PMID:28393079

  8. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of NR2B Contributes to Chronic Migraines via Increased Expression of CGRP in Rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiping; Wang, Sha; Qin, Guangcheng; Xie, Jingmei; Tan, Ge; Zhou, Jiying; McBride, Devin W; Chen, Lixue

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B (NR2B-pTyr), a subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, has been reported to develop central sensitization and persistent pain in the spine, but its effect in chronic migraines has not been examined. We hypothesized that tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B contributes to chronic migraines (CM) through calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in rats. Ninety-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to seven inflammatory soup (IS) injections. In a subset of animals, the time course and location of NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation were detected by western blot and immunofluorescence double staining. Another set of animals were given either genistein, vehicle, or genistein and recombinant CGRP. The mechanical threshold was measured, the expressions of NR2B-pTyr, NR2B, and CGRP were quantified using western blot, and nitric oxide (NO) was measured with the nitric acid reductase method. NR2B-pTyr expression, in neurons, peaked at 24 hours after CM. Genistein improved the mechanical threshold and reduced migraine attacks 24 and 72 hours after CM. Tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B decreased the mechanical threshold and increased migraine attacks via upregulated CGRP expression in the rat model of CM. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B may be a potential therapeutic target for treatment of CM.

  9. Perturbing NR2B-PSD-95 interaction relieves neuropathic pain by inactivating CaMKII-CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangxia; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Lin; Song, Jia; Zhu, Yingjun; Chu, Shuaishuai; Shao, Xueming; Li, Xiuxiu; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2017-09-06

    Neuropathic pain is characterized by central sensitization. The interaction between N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) plays a major role in central sensitization. Here, we aimed to investigate the analgesic effect of disruption of the interaction between NMDAR and PSD-95. Chronic dorsal root ganglia compression model rats were used to mimic sciatica. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were evaluated. The expression of spinal phospho-NR2B, PSD-95, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) was measured using western blotting. A mimetic peptide Myr-NR2B9c was injected intrathecally to disrupt the interaction between PSD-95 and NR2B and detected by coimmunoprecipitation. Chronic dorsal root ganglia compression surgery induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, and upregulated pain-related proteins such as phospho-NR2B, PSD-95, CaMKII, and CREB expressions in the spinal cord. Myr-NR2B9c disrupted the interaction between NR2B-containing NMDARs and PSD-95 in the spinal cord. Intrathecal administration of Myr-NR2B9c attenuated neuropathic pain behaviors and downregulated the expressions of phospho-NR2B, PSD-95, CaMKII, and CREB in the spinal cord. The present study indicates that dissociation of NR2B-containing NMDARs from PSD-95 inactivates CaMKII and CREB signaling and relieves pain.

  10. Neuroprotective effect of estrogen: role of nonsynaptic NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shui-bing; Zhao, Ming-gao

    2013-04-01

    Excessive activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. Some studies reported that NR2A and NR2B play different roles in the central nervous system (CNS). The NR2A subunit is primarily found in the synapses and is required for glutamate-mediated neuronal survival. On the other hand, the NR2B subunit is primarily found in the extrasynaptic sites and is required for glutamate-mediated neuronal death in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Estrogen is a steroid hormone well known for its widespread effects such as neuroprotection in the brain. Classically, estrogen can bind to two kinds of nuclear receptors, namely, estrogen receptor α (ERα) and estrogen receptor β (ERβ), and produce physiological and neuroprotective effects. Aside from nuclear receptors, estrogen has one membrane receptor, which can either be G-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), Gq-mER, or ER-X. NMDA exposure clearly promotes NR2B subunit phosphorylation at Ser-1303 and causes neuronal cell death. GPR30 mediates rapid non-genomic effects to protect neurons against injury by inhibiting p-DAPK1 dephosphorylation, which inhibits NR2B subunit phosphorylation at Ser-1303. In addition, NMDA exposure and global ischemia activate the autophagy pathway and induce cell death, which are markedly blocked by the NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981. Thus, NR2B signaling, autophagy induction and cell death may be closely related. Ro 25-6981 inhibits the dissociation of the NR2B-Beclin-1 signaling complex and delays autophagy in vivo, thus confirming the link between NR2B signaling and autophagy. In short, ERα, ERβ, and GPR30 are involved in the neuroprotection of estrogen in the CNS. Additional research must be conducted to reveal the mechanism of estrogen action fully and to identify better targets for the development of more effective drugs. This

  11. SRC Inhibition Reduces NR2B Surface Expression and Synaptic Plasticity in the Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinai, Laleh; Duffy, Steven; Roder, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The Src protein tyrosine kinase plays a central role in the regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity by regulating NMDAR subunit 2B (NR2B) surface expression. In the amygdala, NMDA-dependent synaptic plasticity resulting from convergent somatosensory and auditory inputs contributes to emotional memory; however, the role of Src…

  12. NR2B overexpression leads to the enhancement of specific protein phosphorylation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunxia; Zhang, Ning; Hu, Yinghe; Wang, Huimin

    2014-11-07

    n-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) including the cerebral cortex, and it has been found that they contribute significantly to the processes of learning and memory. Dysfunctions of NMDARs are implicated in many neurological disorders. To further investigate the specific role of the NR2B subunit of NMDARs in brain functions, we have examined differences in gene expression in the cerebral cortex between NR2B transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates using the DNA microarray. Total of 179 differentially expressed genes were identified, including genes involved in ion channel activity and/or neurotransmission, signal transduction, structure/cytoskeleton, transcription, and hormone/growth factor activity. Signal pathway analysis has indicated that multiple pathways were involved in this process, especially the Mitogen-activated protein kinases/Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (MAPK/ERK) pathway. The phosphorylation levels of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and the mRNA levels of CREB target genes (C-Fos and Nr4a1) were significantly upregulated in the cerebral cortices of NR2B transgenic mice compared to their wild-type littermates. Our study suggested that a chronic increase of NMDARs activation by NR2B overexpression in the forebrain may enhance the protein serine/threonine phosphorylation levels of MAPK/ERK-CREB and thereby regulated their signaling pathway.

  13. Chronic Kappa opioid receptor activation modulates NR2B: Implication in treatment resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Shalini; Kumar, Ajeet; Umrao, Deepmala; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A.; Yadav, Prem N.

    2016-01-01

    Psychotomimetic and prodepressive effect by kappa opioid receptor (KOR) activation in rodents and human is widely known. Significantly, recent clinical investigations demonstrated the salutary effects of KOR antagonists in patients with treatment resistant depression, indicating essential role of KOR signaling in refractory depression. This study was undertaken to reveal the molecular determinant of KOR mediated depression and antidepressant response of KOR antagonist. We observed that chronic KOR activation by U50488, a selective KOR agonist, significantly increased depression like symptoms (behavioral despair, anhedonia and sociability) in C57BL/6J mice, which were blocked by KOR antagonist norBNI and antidepressant imipramine, but not by fluoxetine or citalopram. Further, chronic KOR activation increased phosphorylation of NR2B subunit of NMDA at tyrosine 1472 (pNR2B NMDA) in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex. Similar to behavioral effects norBNI and imipramine, but not SSRIs, blocked NR2B phosphorylation. Moreover, KOR induced depression like behaviors were reversed by NR2B selective inhibitor Ro 25-6981. Mechanistic studies in primary cultured neurons and brain tissues using genetic and pharmacological approaches revealed that stimulation of KOR modulates several molecular correlates of depression. Thus, these findings elucidate molecular mechanism of KOR signaling in treatment resistant depression like behaviors in mice. PMID:27634008

  14. Sensory Activity Differentially Modulates NR2A and NR2B subunits in Cortical Layers

    PubMed Central

    CORSON, James; NAHMANI, Marc; LUBARSKY, Katherine; BADR, Nadia; WRIGHT, Carinne; ERISIR, Alev

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent modulation of NMDA receptors containing selective NR2 subunits has been implicated in plastic processes in developing and adult sensory cortex. Aiming to reveal differential sensitivity of NR2 subunits to sustained changes in sensory activity, we utilized four paradigms that blocked, reinstated, or initiated sensory visual activity. Laminar prevalence of NR2A- and NR2B-containing synapses in visual cortex of postnatal and adult ferrets was assessed using quantitative electron microscopy. Light-deprivation at all ages resulted in a downregulation of NR2A, while recovery from deprivation resulted in an upregulation. Furthermore, premature eyelid opening caused a precocious increase of NR2A. Thus, transitions between periods of dark and light rapidly and bidirectionally regulate NR2A, regardless of cortical layer or age. In contrast, NR2B regulation is layer- and age-dependent. Only in layer IV, NR2B prevalence displays a one-time decline about three weeks after the initiation of sensory activity upon normal or premature eyelid opening, or upon termination of dark-rearing. Incongruity in patterns of NR2A and NR2B modulation by activity is consistent with involvement of these subunits in two distinct, yet partially co-occurring processes: developmental plasticity with a critical period, and life-long plasticity that is established in early developmental ages. PMID:19596055

  15. SRC Inhibition Reduces NR2B Surface Expression and Synaptic Plasticity in the Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinai, Laleh; Duffy, Steven; Roder, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The Src protein tyrosine kinase plays a central role in the regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity by regulating NMDAR subunit 2B (NR2B) surface expression. In the amygdala, NMDA-dependent synaptic plasticity resulting from convergent somatosensory and auditory inputs contributes to emotional memory; however, the role of Src…

  16. Forebrain NR2B overexpression facilitating the prefrontal cortex long-term potentiation and enhancing working memory function in mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yihui; Jin, Jing; Zhang, Xuliang; Xu, Hao; Yang, Liguo; Du, Dan; Zeng, Qingwen; Tsien, Joe Z; Yu, Huiting; Cao, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    Prefrontal cortex plays an important role in working memory, attention regulation and behavioral inhibition. Its functions are associated with NMDA receptors. However, there is little information regarding the roles of NMDA receptor NR2B subunit in prefrontal cortical synaptic plasticity and prefrontal cortex-related working memory. Whether the up-regulation of NR2B subunit influences prefrontal cortical synaptic plasticity and working memory is not yet clear. In the present study, we measured prefrontal cortical synaptic plasticity and working memory function in NR2B overexpressing transgenic mice. In vitro electrophysiological data showed that overexpression of NR2B specifically in the forebrain region resulted in enhancement of prefrontal cortical long-term potentiation (LTP) but did not alter long-term depression (LTD). The enhanced LTP was completely abolished by a NR2B subunit selective antagonist, Ro25-6981, indicating that overexpression of NR2B subunit is responsible for enhanced LTP. In addition, NR2B transgenic mice exhibited better performance in a set of working memory paradigms including delay no-match-to-place T-maze, working memory version of water maze and odor span task. Our study provides evidence that NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor in prefrontal cortex is critical for prefrontal cortex LTP and prefrontal cortex-related working memory.

  17. The effect of NR2B subunit palmitoylation at the spinal level after chronic dorsal root ganglia compression in rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tianjiao; Cui, Yin; Shi, Han; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-11-01

    The NR2B subunit (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit) regulates the source of pain, and it participates in the formation of central sensitization. Palmitoylation was shown to be involved in the regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor internalization. In the present study, we investigated the effects of NR2B subunit palmitoylation in a chronic dorsal root ganglia compression (CCD) rat model. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency were used to assess mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after a CCD operation and an intrathecal injection of the inhibitor of palmitoylation (2-bromopalmitate [2-BP]). The acyl-biotinyl exchange method, Western blotting, and coimmunoprecipitation were used to investigate the effects of pain processing and the expression of levels of NR2B palmitoylation and phosphorylation at the spinal level. CCD rats had long-lasting thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, leading to upregulation of the level of NR2B palmitoylation and phosphorylation at the spinal level. An intrathecal treatment with 2-BP on day 14 after CCD surgery markedly improved pain behaviors and downregulated the expression of NR2B palmitoylation and phosphorylation. These data suggest that upregulated NR2B palmitoylation in CCD-induced neuropathic pain and intrathecal injection of 2-BP could reduce pain behaviors and NR2B phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that spinal NR2B palmitoylation is an important component of CCD-induced neuropathic pain, and it might be a potential target for chronic pain therapy.

  18. Targeting the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B for treating or preventing age-related memory decline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deheng; Jacobs, Stephanie A; Tsien, Joe Z

    2014-10-01

    Age-related memory loss is believed to be a result of reduced synaptic plasticity, including changes in the NR2 subunit composition of the NMDA receptor. It is known that endogenous NR2B subunits decrease as the brain ages, whereas transgenic upregulation of NR2B enhances synaptic plasticity and learning and memory in several animal species. Accumulating evidence suggests that elevated brain magnesium levels, via dietary supplementation, can boost NR2B in the brain, consequently reversing memory deficits and enhancing cognitive abilities. This review highlights the convergent molecular mechanisms via the NR2B pathway as a useful strategy for treating age-related memory loss. A dietary approach, via oral intake of a novel compound, magnesium L-threonate (MgT), to boost NR2B expression in the brain is highlighted. Direct upregulation of the NR2B subunit expression can enhance synaptic plasticity and memory functions in a broad range of behavioral tasks in rodents. Other upregulation approaches, such as targeting the NR2B transporter or surface recycling pathway via cyclin-dependent kinase 5, are highly effective in improving memory functions. A dietary supplemental approach by optimally elevating the [Mg²⁺] in the brain is surprisingly effective in upregulating NR2B expression and improving memories in preclinical studies. MgT is currently under clinical trials.

  19. Ethanol-withdrawal seizures are controlled by tissue plasminogen activator via modulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Robert; Melchor, Jerry P; Matys, Tomasz; Skrzypiec, Anna E; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-11

    Chronic ethanol abuse causes up-regulation of NMDA receptors, which underlies seizures and brain damage upon ethanol withdrawal (EW). Here we show that tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA), a protease implicated in neuronal plasticity and seizures, is induced in the limbic system by chronic ethanol consumption, temporally coinciding with up-regulation of NMDA receptors. tPA interacts with NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and is required for up-regulation of the NR2B subunit in response to ethanol. As a consequence, tPA-deficient mice have reduced NR2B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, and seizures after EW. tPA-mediated facilitation of EW seizures is abolished by NR2B-specific NMDA antagonist ifenprodil. These results indicate that tPA mediates the development of physical dependence on ethanol by regulating NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  20. Vagal afferent-dependent cholecystokinin modulation of visceral pain requires central amygdala NMDA-NR2B receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, E M; Li, W T; Yan, X J; Chen, X; Liu, Q; Feng, C C; Cao, Z J; Fang, J Y; Chen, S L

    2015-09-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a gut hormone that is released during feeding, exerts gastrointestinal effects in part through vagal pathway. It is reported to be a potential trigger for increased postprandial visceral sensitivity in healthy subjects and, especially in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. NR2B-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the central amygdala (CeA) participate in pain modulation. Systemically administered CCK activates the CeA-innervating neurons. Here, we investigated whether CCK modulation of visceral sensitivity is mediated through CeA NMDA-NR2B receptors and whether this modulation involves vagal pathway. We first examined the visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distention (CRD) following i.p. injection of CCK octapeptide (CCK-8) in a rat model. Next, the NR2B antagonist ifenprodil and the NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 were microinjected into the CeA before systemic CCK injection. NR2B phosphorylation was detected by Western blot. To down-regulate NR2B gene expression, NR2B-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) was delivered into CeA neurons by electroporation. In addition, the effects of functional deafferentation by perivagal application of capsaicin and pretreatment with the CCK1 receptor antagonist devazepide were investigated. CCK-8 increased VMR to CRD in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was blunted by intra-CeA administration of ifenprodil (but not NVP-AAM077) and was accompanied by phosphorylation of NR2B subunits in the CeA. CCK failed to increase VMR to CRD in NR2B siRNA-treated rats. Perivagal capsaicin application and pretreatment with devazepide prevented CCK-induced pronociception and CeA NR2B phosphorylation. The pronociception induced by systemic CCK, which is vagal afferent-dependent, requires activation of CeA NMDA-NR2B receptors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. NR2B-deficient mice are more sensitive to the locomotor stimulant and depressant effects of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Badanich, K A; Doremus-Fitzwater, T L; Mulholland, P J; Randall, P K; Delpire, E; Becker, H C

    2011-10-01

    The NR2B subunit of N-methyl d-aspartate glutamate receptors influences pharmacological properties and confers greater sensitivity to the modulatory effects of ethanol. This study examined behavioral responses to acute ethanol in a conditional knockout mouse model that allowed for a delayed genetic deletion of the NR2B subunit to avoid mouse lethality. Mice lacking the NR2B gene (knockout) were produced by mating NR2B[f/f] mice with CAMKIIa-driven tTA transgenic mice and the tetO-CRE transgenic mice. Adult male and female offspring representing each of the resultant genotypes (knockout, CAM, CRE and wildtype mice) were tested for open-field locomotor activity following acute low- and high-dose ethanol challenge as well as loss of righting reflex. Findings indicate that male and female mice lacking the NR2B subunit exhibited greater overall activity in comparison to other genotypes during the baseline locomotor activity test. NR2B knockout mice exhibited an exaggerated stimulant response to 1.5 g/kg (i.p.) and an exaggerated depressant response to 3.0 g/kg (i.p.) ethanol challenge. In addition, NR2B knockout mice slept longer following a high dose of ethanol (4.0 g/kg, i.p.). To evaluate pharmacokinetics, clearance rates of ethanol (1.5, 4.0 g/kg, i.p.) were measured and showed that female NR2B knockouts had a faster rate of metabolism only at the higher ethanol dose. Western blot analyses confirmed significant reduction in NR2B expression in the forebrain of knockout mice. Collectively, these data indicate that the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl d-aspartate glutamate receptor is involved in regulating low-dose stimulant effects of ethanol and the depressant/hypnotic effects of ethanol.

  2. NR2B-Deficient Mice are More Sensitive to the Locomotor Stimulant and Depressant Effects of Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, Patrick J.; Randall, Patrick K.; Delpire, Eric; Becker, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    The NR2B subunit of N-methyl D-aspartate glutamate receptors influences pharmacological properties and confers greater sensitivity to the modulatory effects of ethanol. This study examined behavioral responses to acute ethanol in a conditional knockout mouse model that allowed for a delayed genetic deletion of the NR2B subunit to avoid mouse lethality. Mice lacking the NR2B gene (knockout) were produced by mating NR2B[f/f] mice with CAMKIIa-drive tTA transgenic mice and the tetO-CRE transgenic mice. Adult male and female offspring representing each of the resultant genotypes (knockout, CAM, CRE, and wild-type mice) were tested for open field locomotor activity following acute low and high dose ethanol challenge as well as loss of righting reflex. Findings indicate that male and female mice lacking the NR2B subunit exhibited greater overall activity in comparison to other genotypes during the baseline locomotor activity test. NR2B knockout mice exhibited an exaggerated stimulant response to 1.5 g/kg (ip) and an exaggerated depressant response to 3.0 g/kg (ip) ethanol challenge. Additionally, NR2B knockout mice slept longer following a high dose of ethanol (4.0 g/kg, ip). To evaluate pharmacokinetics, clearance rates of ethanol (1.5, 4.0 g/kg, ip) were measured and showed female NR2B knockouts had a faster rate of metabolism only at the higher ethanol dose. Western blot analyses confirmed significant reduction in NR2B expression in the forebrain of knockout mice. Collectively, these data indicate the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl D-aspartate glutamate receptor is involved in regulating low-dose stimulant effects of ethanol and the depressant/hypnotic effects of ethanol. PMID:21762461

  3. Influences of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors knockdown on neural activity in hippocampal newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-jun; Zhang, Hui-wen; Tang, Na

    2013-08-01

    Adult-born neurons undergo a transient period of plasticity during their integration into the neural circuit. This transient plasticity may involve NMDA receptors containing NR2B, the major subunit expressed at early developmental stages. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of NR2B gene knockdown on the functional integration of the adult-born granule cells generated from the subgranule zone (SGZ) in the hippocampus. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down the NR2B gene in the adult-born hippocampal neurons. In the functional integration test, the mice were exposed to a novel environment (open field arena), and the expression of c-fos was immunohistochemically detected in the hippocampus. After exposure to the novel environment, siRNA-NR2B mice were significantly different from control mice in either the number of squares or the number of rears they crossed, showing decreased horizontal and vertical activity (P<0.05). Moreover, the c-fos expression was increased in both control and siRNA-NR2B mice after open field test. But, it was significantly lower in siRNA-NR2B neurons than in control neurons. It was concluded that the neural activity of newborn neurons is regulated by their own NR2B-containing NMDA glutamate receptors during a short, critical period after neuronal birth.

  4. NR2B-containing NMDA receptors promote neural progenitor cell proliferation through CaMKIV/CREB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mei; Zhang, Dong-Qing; Wang, Xiang-Zhen; Xu, Tie-Jun

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The NR2B component of the NMDARs is important for the NSPC proliferation. {yields} pCaMKIV and pCREB exist in NSPCs. {yields} The CaMKIV/CREB pathway mediates NSPC proliferation. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence indicates the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in regulating neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation. Functional properties of NMDARs can be markedly influenced by incorporating the regulatory subunit NR2B. Here, we aim to analyze the effect of NR2B-containing NMDARs on the proliferation of hippocampal NSPCs and to explore the mechanism responsible for this effect. NSPCs were shown to express NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B. The NR2B selective antagonist, Ro 25-6981, prevented the NMDA-induced increase in cell proliferation. Moreover, we demonstrated that the phosphorylation levels of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) were increased by NMDA treatment, whereas Ro 25-6981 decreased them. The role that NR2B-containing NMDARs plays in NSPC proliferation was abolished when CREB phosphorylation was attenuated by CaMKIV silencing. These results suggest that NR2B-containing NMDARs have a positive role in regulating NSPC proliferation, which may be mediated through CaMKIV phosphorylation and subsequent induction of CREB activation.

  5. IGF-1-Involved Negative Feedback of NR2B NMDA Subunits Protects Cultured Hippocampal Neurons Against NMDA-Induced Excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Sun, Wei; Han, Song; Li, Jianing; Ding, Shu; Wang, Wei; Yin, Yanling

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a multifunctional protein involved in neuronal polarity and axonal guidance. In our previous study, it was discovered that IGF-1 alleviated 50-μM NMDA-induced excitotoxicity against neuronal autophagy via depression of NR2B p-Ser1303 activation. However, it was found that NMDA at a higher dose did not cause neuronal autophagy. And, the performance of IGF-1 under severe excitotoxicity still needs to be clarified. In this study, we observed that IGF-1 can salvage the hippocampal neurons in an autophagy-independent manner after 150-μM NMDA exposure using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Western blot assay, and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, over-activation of post-synaptic NMDARs was found with the whole-cell patch clamp recording method. In order to explore whether there is a positive feedback way for post-synaptic NMDARs and the different pathway caused by 150 μM NMDA, the phosphorylation level of Fyn and the phosphorylation site of NR2B were investigated. It was observed that NR2B p-Tyr1472 was increased by the activation of Fyn after 150-μM NMDA exposure. When the neutralizing antibody against NR2B p-Ser1303 was added into the medium, both the activations of Fyn and NR2B p-Tyr1472 were blocked, suggesting NR2B p-Ser1303 may be the initial step of NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. In addition, since IGF-1 can block the initial step of NR2B activation, its effect is concluded to continue with the development of excitotoxicity. Overall, this study strongly indicates that the relationship between different phosphorylation sites of NR2B should be laid more emphasis on, which may be a vital target for the NR2B-involved excitotoxicity.

  6. Effects of chronic NMDA-NR2b inhibition in the median eminence of the reproductive senescent female rat.

    PubMed

    Kermath, B A; Riha, P D; Sajjad, A; Gore, A C

    2013-10-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis drive reproductive function and undergo age-related decreases in activation during the transition to reproductive senescence. Decreased GnRH secretion from the median eminence (ME) partially arises from attenuated glutamatergic signalling via the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and may be a result of changing NMDAR stoichiometry to favour NR2b over NR2a subunit expression with ageing. We have previously shown that the systemic inhibition of NR2b-containing receptors with ifenprodil, an NR2b-specific antagonist, stimulates parameters of luteinising hormone (used as a proxy for GnRH) release in both young and middle-aged females. In the present study, we chronically administered ifenprodil, an NR2b-specific antagonist, at the site of GnRH terminals in the ME or at GnRH perikarya in the preoptic area, in reproductively senescent middle-aged female rats, aiming to determine whether NR2b antagonism could restore aspects of reproductive functionality. Effects on oestrous cyclicity, serum hormones, and protein expression of GnRH, NR2b and phosphorylated NR2b (Tyr-1472) in the ME were measured. Chronic ifenprodil treatment in the ME (but not the preoptic area) altered oestrous cyclicity by increasing the percentage of days spent in pro-oestrus. This was accompanied by increased GnRH fluorescence intensity in the external ME zone and a greater proportion of GnRH terminals that co-labelled with pNR2b with treatment. We also observed changes in the relationships between protein immunofluorescence, serum hormone levels and other aspects of reproductive physiology in acyclic females, as revealed by bionetwork analysis. Together, these data support the hypothesis that NMDAR-NR2b expression and phosphorylation state play a role in reproductive senescence and highlight the ME as a major player in reproductive ageing.

  7. Homology modeling of NR2B modulatory domain of NMDA receptor and analysis of ifenprodil binding.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Luciana; Cosconati, Sandro; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Limongelli, Vittorio; Bertamino, Alessia; Novellino, Ettore; Case, David A

    2007-10-01

    NMDA receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels (iGluRs) that are involved in several important physiological functions such as neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Among iGluRs, NMDA receptors have been perhaps the most actively investigated for their role in chronic neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Recent studies have shown that the NTD of subunit NR2B modulates ion channel gating through the binding of allosteric modulators such as the prototypical compound ifenprodil. In the present paper, the construction of a three-dimensional model for the NR2B modulatory domain is described and docking calculations allow, for the first time, definition of the ifenprodil binding pose at an atomic level and fully explain all the available structure-activity relationships. Moreover, in an attempt to add further insight into the ifenprodil mechanism of action, as it is not completely clear if it binds and stabilizes an open or a closed conformation of the NR2B modulatory domain, a matter, which is fundamental for the rational design of NMDA antagonists, MD simulations followed by an MM-PBSA analysis were performed. These calculations reveal that the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain, rather than the open, constitutes the high affinity binding site for ifenprodil and that a profound stabilization of the closed conformation upon ifenprodil binding occurs. Thus, for a rational design and/or for virtual screening experiments, the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain should be taken into account and our 3D model can provide valuable hints for the design of NR2B-selective antagonists.

  8. NR2B receptor blockade inhibits pain-related sensitization of amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guangchen; Horváth, Csilla; Neugebauer, Volker

    2009-04-28

    Pain-related sensitization and synaptic plasticity in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) depend on the endogenous activation of NMDA receptors and phosphorylation of the NR1 subunit through a PKA-dependent mechanism. Functional NMDA receptors are heteromeric assemblies of NR1 with NR2A-D or NR3A, B subunits. NMDA receptors composed of NR1 and NR2B subunits have been implicated in neuroplasticity and are present in the CeA. Here we used a selective NR2B antagonist (Ro-256981) to determine the contribution of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors to pain-related sensitization of CeA neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were made from CeA neurons in anesthetized adult male rats before and during the development of an acute arthritis. Arthritis was induced in one knee joint by intraarticular injections of kaolin and carrageenan. Brief (15 s) mechanical stimuli of innocuous (100-500 g/30 mm2) and noxious (1000-2000 g/30 mm2) intensity were applied to the knee and other parts of the body. In agreement with our previous studies, all CeA neurons developed increased background and evoked activity after arthritis induction. Ro-256981 (1, 10 and 100 muM; 15 min each) was administered into the CeA by microdialysis 5-6 h postinduction of arthritis. Ro-256981 concentration-dependently decreased evoked responses, but not background activity. This pattern of effect is different from that of an NMDA receptor antagonist (AP5) in our previous studies. AP5 (100 microM - 5 mM) inhibited background activity and evoked responses. The differential effects of AP5 and Ro-256981 may suggest that NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit are important but not sole contributors to pain-related changes of CeA neurons.

  9. Cortical NR2B NMDA subunit antagonism reduces inflammatory pain in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Gabriel C; Herrera, Jairo; Bethancourt, José

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a critical role in pain processing at different levels of the central nervous system. Methods In this study, we used adult Wistar rats to examine gender differences in the effects of NR2B NMDA antagonism at the level of the anterior cingulate cortex in phasic pain, and in the first and second phases of a formalin test. Rats underwent stereotactic surgery for cannula implantation in the anterior cingulate cortex. After recovery, paw withdrawal latency to a noxious thermal stimulus was assessed. Rats were also subjected to a formalin pain test whereby 60 μL of 5% formalin was injected into the right hind paw. Results Female and male rats that received Ro 25-6981, an NR2B antagonist, before formalin injection showed significantly reduced pain responses to the formalin test compared with saline-injected control rats (P < 0.05). No gender differences in phasic pain responses were found in rats treated with Ro 25-6981. Conclusion These results suggest that cortical antagonism of the NR2B subunit reduces inflammatory pain levels in both genders of rat. PMID:22003303

  10. Reduction of inflammatory pain in female rats after NR2B NMDA cortical antagonism.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Carol; Sánchez, Melany; Herrera, Jairo; Quintero, Gabriel

    2012-05-01

    Studies have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a critical role in pain processing at different levels of the central nervous system. In this study, we used female adult Wistar rats to examine the effects of antagonizing the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor in phasic and tonic pain processes. All the rats underwent stereotaxic surgery for cortical cannula implantation and after at least one week of recovery, rats performed behavioral tests. For evaluating the effects of drugs on motor coordination rats were tested in the rotarod apparatus. Moreover, rats were evaluated in the paw withdrawal latency (PWL) to a noxious thermal stimulus. Furthermore, rats were tested in the formalin-pain test. Rats that received the NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981 before and after formalin injection showed significantly reduced pain responses in the formalin test, as compared with female control rats (p<0.05). In contrast, no differences among groups were found in the phasic pain test (Hargreaves) and the rotarod test. Taken together, these results suggest that cortical antagonism of the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors is able to reduce inflammatory pain levels not only before, but after the formalin injection in females at different phases of the estrous cycle.

  11. Immunolocalization of CaMKII and NR2B in hippocampal subregions of rat during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiya; Chang, Lirong; Song, Yizhi; Gao, Xianghong; Ling, Wei; Lu, Tao; Zhang, Yali; Wu, Yan

    2013-04-01

    Although the expression of CaMKII and synaptic-associated proteins has been widely studied, the temporospatial distribution of CaMKII and NMDAR subunits in different hippocampal subregions during postnatal development still lacks detailed information. In this study, we used immunofluorescent staining to assess CaMKII and NR2B expressions and the relationship between them in CA1, CA3, and DG of rat hippocampus on postnatal (P) days: P0, P4, P7, P10, P14, P21, P28, and P56. The results showed that from P0 to P56, CaMKII expression increased gradually, while NR2B expression decreased gradually, and the time points of their expression peak differed in CA1, CA3, and DG during postnatal development. Although the expression of CaMKII was negatively correlated with NR2B in CA1 and DG, the coexpression of CaMKII with NR2B existed in CA1, CA3, and DG during postnatal development. Interestingly, after P21, CaMKII expression and the coexpression of CaMKII with NR2B became obvious in the Stratum lucidum of CA3. The specific temporospatial distribution pattern of CaMKII with NR2B might be related to the different physiological functions during postnatal development. Discovery of the alteration of the relationship between expression of CaMKII and NMDAR subunits may be helpful for understanding mechanisms and therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. The role of NR2B containing NMDA receptor in place preference conditioned with morphine and natural reinforcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao-Ying; Guo, Chang-Yong; Yu, Peng; Lee, David Yue-Wei; Han, Ji-Sheng; Cui, Cai-Lian

    2006-08-01

    It has been reported that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is implicated in drug addiction and antagonists of the NMDA receptor complex can inhibit the development and expression of conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by several addictive drugs, implying that this class of compounds might be considered as candidate for the treatment of substance abuse. To explore this possibility, it is important to evaluate whether the inhibitory effect of NMDA receptor antagonists would be confined to behaviors produced by drugs of abuse only, but not by natural reinforcers. According to the quantitative changes of NMDA receptor subunits, including NR1, NR2A, and NR2B, induced by diverse types of reinforcers, we chose NR2B subunit as the target of research. Experimental results showed that (1) an augmented expression of NR2B subunit was revealed by Western blotting in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus in rats with CPP induced by morphine, but not by natural rewards such as food, novel environment and social interaction. (2) Ifenprodil, an antagonist highly selective for NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, produced a dose-dependent reduction in CPP induced by morphine and novel environment, but not that by food consumption and social interaction. Taking together, these findings suggested that NR2B containing NMDA receptor may be more involved with morphine reward rather than natural rewards, and that antagonism of NR2B may have a potential for the treatment of morphine abuse.

  13. Role for the NR2B Subunit of the NMDA Receptor in Mediating Light Input to the Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, LM; Schroeder, A; Loh, D; Smith, D; Lin, K; Han, JH; Michel, S; Hummer, DL; Ehlen, JC; Albers, HE; Colwell, CS

    2008-01-01

    Light information reaches the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells that utilize glutamate as a neurotransmitter. A variety of evidence suggests that the release of glutamate then activates N-methyl-Daspartate (NMDA) receptors within the SCN and triggers a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to phase shifts in the circadian system. In this study, we first sought to explore the role of the NR2B subunit in mediating the effects of light on the circadian system. We found that localized microinjection of the NR2B subunit antagonist ifenprodil into the SCN region inhibits the magnitude of light-induced phase shifts of the circadian rhythm in wheel-running activity. Next, we found that the NR2B message and levels of phospho-NR2B levels vary with time of day in SCN tissue using semi-quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Functionally, we found that blocking the NR2B subunit with ifenprodil significantly reduced the magnitude of NMDA currents recorded in SCN neurons. Ifenprodil also significantly reduced the magnitude of NMDA-induced calcium changes in SCN cells. Together, these results demonstrate that the NR2B subunit is an important component of NMDA receptor mediated responses within SCN neurons and that this subunit contributes to light-induced phase shifts of the mammalian circadian system. PMID:18380671

  14. Identification and characterization of 4-methylbenzyl 4-[(pyrimidin-2-ylamino)methyl]piperidine-1-carboxylate, an orally bioavailable, brain penetrant NR2B selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Liverton, Nigel J; Bednar, Rodney A; Bednar, Bohumil; Butcher, John W; Claiborne, Christopher F; Claremon, David A; Cunningham, Michael; DiLella, Anthony G; Gaul, Stanley L; Libby, Brian E; Lyle, Elizabeth A; Lynch, Joseph J; McCauley, John A; Mosser, Scott D; Nguyen, Kevin T; Stump, Gary L; Sun, Hong; Wang, Hao; Yergey, James; Koblan, Kenneth S

    2007-02-22

    The discovery of a novel series of NR2B subtype selective N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists is reported. Initial optimization of a high-throughput screening lead afforded an aminopyridine derivative 13 with significant NR2B antagonist potency but limited selectivity over hERG-channel and other off-target activities. Further structure-activity studies on the aminoheterocycle moiety and optimization of the carbamate led to the highly potent 2-aminopyrimidine derivative 20j with a significantly improved off-target activity profile and oral bioavailability in multiple species coupled with good brain penetration. Compound 20j demonstrated efficacy in in vivo rodent models of antinociception, allodynia, and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Kalirin binds the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, altering its synaptic localization and function.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Drew D; Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad; Levine, Eric S; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2011-08-31

    The ability of dendritic spines to change size and shape rapidly is critical in modulating synaptic strength; these morphological changes are dependent upon rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Kalirin-7 (Kal7), a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor localized to the postsynaptic density (PSD), modulates dendritic spine morphology in vitro and in vivo. Kal7 activates Rac and interacts with several PSD proteins, including PSD-95, DISC-1, AF-6, and Arf6. Mice genetically lacking Kal7 (Kal7(KO)) exhibit deficient hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as behavioral abnormalities in models of addiction and learning. Purified PSDs from Kal7(KO) mice contain diminished levels of NR2B, an NMDA receptor subunit that plays a critical role in LTP induction. Here we demonstrate that Kal7(KO) animals have decreased levels of NR2B-dependent NMDA receptor currents in cortical pyramidal neurons as well as a specific deficit in cell surface expression of NR2B. Additionally, we demonstrate that the genotypic differences in conditioned place preference and passive avoidance learning seen in Kal7(KO) mice are abrogated when animals are treated with an NR2B-specific antagonist during conditioning. Finally, we identify a stable interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of Kal7 and the juxtamembrane region of NR2B preceding its cytosolic C-terminal domain. Binding of NR2B to a protein that modulates the actin cytoskeleton is important, as NMDA receptors require actin integrity for synaptic localization and function. These studies demonstrate a novel and functionally important interaction between the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor and Kalirin, proteins known to be essential for normal synaptic plasticity.

  16. Arcuate Src activation-induced phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunit contributes to inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Zhu, Qi; Gong, Shan; Tao, Jin; Xu, Guang-Yin; Jiang, Xinghong

    2012-12-01

    The tyrosine kinases of Src family play an important role in the central sensitization following peripheral inflammation. However, whether the Src family in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of mediobasal hypothalamus is involved in central sensitization remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanisms of tyrosine kinases of Src family in N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity in the ARC following peripheral inflammation. Peripheral inflammation was induced by unilateral injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into rat hindpaw. The neuronal activities of the ARC were recorded using electrophysiological field recording from the in vitro mediobasal hypothalamic slices from control and CFA rats. Expression of total and phosphorylated Src and NR2B subunit protein was analyzed by Western blot and immuoprecipitation. Our results showed that CFA injection resulted in an increase in mechanical and thermal sensitivity, which was partially blocked by neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment. CFA injection also enhanced spontaneous firings of ARC neurons, which were reversed by the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit specific antagonist Ro25-6981 and by PP2, an Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor. In addition, peripheral inflammation enhanced Src phosphorylation and NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation without alteration of total NR2B subunit expression in the ARC. Peripheral inflammation also increased the association of NR2B protein with p-Src protein in the ARC. Administration of PP2 blocked the upregulation of NR2B phosphorylation induced by CFA injection. Taken together, our present results suggest that the arcuate Src activation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunit may contribute to inflammatory pain.

  17. Kalirin binds the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, altering its synaptic localization and function

    PubMed Central

    Kiraly, Drew D.; Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad; Levine, Eric S.; Mains, Richard E.; Eipper, Betty A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of dendritic spines to change size and shape rapidly is critical in modulating synaptic strength; these morphological changes are dependent upon rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Kalirin-7 (Kal7), a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) localized to the postsynaptic density (PSD), modulates dendritic spine morphology in vitro and in vivo. Kal7 activates Rac and interacts with several PSD proteins including PSD-95, DISC-1, AF-6 and Arf6. Mice genetically lacking Kal7 (Kal7KO) exhibit deficient hippocampal LTP as well as behavioral abnormalities in models of addiction and learning. Purified PSDs from Kal7KO mice contain diminished levels of NR2B, an NMDA receptor subunit that plays a critical role in LTP induction. Here we demonstrate that Kal7KO animals have decreased levels of NR2B-dependent NMDA receptor currents in cortical pyramidal neurons as well as a specific deficit in cell-surface expression of NR2B. Additionally, we demonstrate that the genotypic differences in conditioned place preference and passive avoidance learning seen in Kal7KO mice are abrogated when animals are treated with an NR2B-specific antagonist during conditioning. Finally, we identify a stable interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of Kal7 and the juxtamembrane region of NR2B preceding its cytosolic C-terminal domain. Binding of NR2B to a protein that modulates the actin cytoskeleton is important, as NMDA receptors require actin integrity for synaptic localization and function. These studies demonstrate a novel and functionally important interaction between the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor and Kalirin, proteins known to be essential for normal synaptic plasticity. PMID:21880917

  18. SETDB1 HISTONE METHYLTRANSFERASE REGULATES MOOD-RELATED BEHAVIORS AND EXPRESSION OF THE NMDA RECEPTOR SUBUNIT NR2B

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Jakovcevski, Mira; Bharadwaj, Rahul; Connor, Caroline; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Lin, Cong L.; Straubhaar, Juerg; Martin, Gilles; Akbarian, Schahram

    2010-01-01

    Histone methyltransferases specific for the histone H3-lysine 9 (H3K9) residue, including Setdb1 (Set domain, bifurcated 1)/Eset/Kmt1e are associated with repressive chromatin remodeling and expressed in adult brain, but potential effects on neuronal function and behavior remain unexplored. Here, we report that transgenic mice with increased Setdb1 expression in adult forebrain neurons show antidepressant-like phenotypes in behavioral paradigms for anhedonia, despair and learned helplessness. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in conjunction with DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-chip) revealed that genomic occupancies of neuronal Setdb1 are limited to less than 1% of annotated genes, which include the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B/Grin2B and other ionotropic glutamate receptor genes. Chromatin conformation capture (“3C”) and Setdb1-ChIP revealed a loop formation tethering the NR2B/Grin2b promoter to the Setdb1 target site positioned 30Kb downstream of the transcription start site. In hippocampus and ventral striatum, two key structures in the neuronal circuitry regulating mood-related behaviors, Setdb1-mediated repressive histone methylation at NR2B/Grin2b was associated with decreased NR2B expression and EPSP insensitivity to pharmacological blockade of NR2B, and accelerated NMDA receptor desensitization consistent with a shift in NR2A/B subunit ratios. In wildtype mice, systemic treatment with the NR2B antagonist, Ro-256981, and hippocampal siRNA-mediated NR2B/Grin2b knockdown, resulted in behavioral changes similar to those elicited by the Setdb1 transgene. Together, these findings point to a role for neuronal Setdb1 in the regulation of affective and motivational behaviors through repressive chromatin remodeling at a select set of target genes, resulting in altered NMDA receptor subunit composition and other molecular adaptations. PMID:20505083

  19. The A-Current Modulates Learning via NMDA Receptors Containing the NR2B Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Fontán-Lozano, Ángela; Suárez-Pereira, Irene; González-Forero, David; Carrión, Ángel Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity involves short- and long-term events, although the molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes are not fully understood. The transient A-type K+ current (IA) controls the excitability of the dendrites from CA1 pyramidal neurons by regulating the back-propagation of action potentials and shaping synaptic input. Here, we have studied how decreases in IA affect cognitive processes and synaptic plasticity. Using wild-type mice treated with 4-AP, an IA inhibitor, and mice lacking the DREAM protein, a transcriptional repressor and modulator of the IA, we demonstrate that impairment of IA decreases the stimulation threshold for learning and the induction of early-LTP. Hippocampal electrical recordings in both models revealed alterations in basal electrical oscillatory properties toward low-theta frequencies. In addition, we demonstrated that the facilitated learning induced by decreased IA requires the activation of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit. Together, these findings point to a balance between the IA and the activity of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in the regulation of learning. PMID:21966384

  20. 2,6-Disubstituted pyrazines and related analogs as NR2B site antagonists of the NMDA receptor with anti-depressant activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean G; Maier, Donna L; Sylvester, Mark A; Hoerter, Tiffany N; Menhaji-Klotz, Elnaz; Lasota, Celina C; Hirata, Lee T; Wilkins, Deidre E; Scott, Clay W; Trivedi, Shephali; Chen, Tongming; McCarthy, Dennis J; Maciag, Carla M; Sutton, Evelynjeane J; Cumberledge, Jerry; Mathisen, Don; Roberts, John; Gupta, Anshul; Liu, Frank; Elmore, Charles S; Alhambra, Cristobal; Krumrine, Jennifer R; Wang, Xia; Ciaccio, Paul J; Wood, Michael W; Campbell, James B; Johansson, Magnus J; Xia, Jian; Wen, Xiaotian; Jiang, Ji; Wang, Xiaoping; Peng, Zuozhong; Hu, Tao; Wang, Jian

    2011-06-01

    Herein we describe the discovery of compounds that are competitive antagonists of the CP101-606 binding site within the NR2B subtype of the NMDA receptor. The compounds identified do not possess phenolic functional groups such as those in ifenprodil and related analogs. Initial identification of hits in this series focused on a basic, secondary amine side chain which led to good potency, but also presented a hERG liability. Further modifications led to examples of non-basic replacements which demonstrated much less liability in this regard. Finally, one compound in the series, 6a, was tested in the mouse forced swim depression assay and found to show activity (s.c. 60 mg/kg). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Forebrain NR2B overexpression enhancing fear acquisition and long-term potentiation in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yanhong; Zhou, Siqi; Ma, Jing; Yin, Pengcheng; Cao, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at the thalamus-lateral amygdala (T-LA) synapses is the basis for acquisition of auditory fear memory. However, the role of the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit in synaptic plasticity at T-LA synapses remains speculative. In the present study, using transgenic mice with forebrain-specific overexpression of the NR2B subunit, we have observed that forebrain NR2B overexpression results in enhanced LTP but does not alter long-term depression (LTD) at the T-LA synapses in transgenic mice. To elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying enhanced LTP at T-LA synapses in these transgenic mice, AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated postsynaptic currents have been measured. The data show a marked increasing in the amplitude and decay time of NMDA receptor-mediated currents in these transgenic mice. Consistent with enhanced LTP at T-LA synapses, NR2B-transgenic mice exhibit better performance in the acquisition of auditory fear memory than wild-type littermates. Our results demonstrate that up-regulation of NR2B expression facilitates acquisition of auditory cued fear memory and enhances LTP at T-LA synapses. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. NMDA receptor NR2B subunits contribute to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal astrocytosis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Zhang, Yuan; Lv, Xuan; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2015-05-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases, including epilepsy. The present study investigated the effect of NMDA receptor NR2B subunits on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced pathological and biochemical events in mice. Our results showed that PTZ-kindling up-regulates the expression of NMDA receptor NR2B subunits in the hippocampus and that kindled mice were characterized by significant astrocytosis and neuron loss in the hippocampus. Oxidative stress, including excessive malondialdehyde (MDA) production and decreased enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), were detected in the hippocampus after the mice were fully kindled. Additionally, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus was found to be up-regulated in PTZ-kindled mice. However, selectively blocking NMDA receptor NR2B subunits by ifenprodil significantly suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal astrocytosis, oxidative stress and neuron loss. Furthermore, blocking NMDA receptor NR2B subunits also abolished PTZ-kindling-induced BDNF expression. These results indicate that NMDA receptor NR2B subunits contribute to epilepsy-associated pathological and biochemical events, including hippocampal astrocytosis, oxidative stress and neuron loss, and these events might be correlated with up-regulation of BDNF expression.

  3. Co-activation of NR2A and NR2B subunits induces resistance to fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Leaderbrand, Katherine; Corcoran, Kevin A; Radulovic, Jelena

    2014-09-01

    Unpredictable stress is known to profoundly enhance susceptibility to fear and anxiety while reducing the ability to extinguish fear when threat is no longer present. Accordingly, partial aversive reinforcement, via random exposure to footshocks, induces fear that is resistant to extinction. Here we sought to determine the hippocampal mechanisms underlying susceptibility versus resistance to context fear extinction as a result of continuous (CR) and partial (PR) reinforcement, respectively. We focused on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits 2A and B (NR2A and NR2B) as well as their downstream signaling effector, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), based on their critical role in the acquisition and extinction of fear. Pharmacological inactivation of NR2A, but not NR2B, blocked extinction after CR, whereas inactivation of NR2A, NR2B, or both subunits facilitated extinction after PR. The latter finding suggests that co-activation of NR2A and NR2B contributes to persistent fear following PR. In contrast to CR, PR increased membrane levels of ERK and NR2 subunits after the conditioning and extinction sessions, respectively. In parallel, nuclear activation of ERK was significantly reduced after the extinction session. Thus, co-activation and increased surface expression of NR2A and NR2B, possibly mediated by ERK, may cause persistent fear. These findings suggest that patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may benefit from antagonism of specific NR2 subunits.

  4. Diminution of the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit in cortical and subcortical areas of WAG/Rij rats.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Fariba; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Jafarian, Maryam; Mohamadpour, Maliheh; Kazemi, Hadi; Joghataei, Mohammad-Taghi; Gorji, Ali

    2013-12-01

    Modulation of glutamatergic NMDA receptors affects the synchronization of spike discharges in in WAG/Rij rats, a valid genetic animal model of absence epilepsy. In this study, we describe the alteration of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors expression in WAG/Rij rats in different somatosensory cortical layers and in hippocampal CA1 area. Experimental groups were divided into four groups of six rats of both WAG/Rij and Wistar strains with 2 and 6 months of age. The distribution of NR2B receptors was assessed by immunohistochemical staining in WAG/Rij and compared with age-matched Wistar rats. The expression of NR2B subunit was significantly decreased in different somatosensory cortical layers in 2- and 6-month-old WAG/Rij rats. In addition, the distribution of NR2B in hippocampal CA1 area was lower in 6-month-old WAG/Rij compared with age-matched Wistar rats. The reduction of NR2B receptors in different brain areas points to disturbance of glutamate receptors expression in cortical and subcortical areas in WAG/Rij rats. An altered subunit assembly of NMDA receptors may underlie cortical hyperexcitability in absence epilepsy.

  5. Effects of diazoxide on Aβ1-42-induced expression of the NR2B subunit in cultured cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Fu, Qingxi; Xia, Chunfeng; Ma, Guozhao

    2015-12-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is significant in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Several previous studies indicate that the NR2B‑containing N‑methyl‑D‑aspartate receptors are critically involved in the Aβ mediated disruption of neuronal function. Diazoxide (DZ), a highly selective drug capable of opening mitochondrial ATP‑sensitive potassium channels, has neuroprotective effects against neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism by which DZ protects cholinergic neurons against Aβ‑induced cytotoxicity remains to be elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of DZ pretreatment against Aβ1‑42‑induced expression of NR2B in order to gain novel insights into the neuroprotective mechanisms. Following exposure to Aβ1‑42 for 24 h, the expression of the NR2B subunit remained unchanged compared with the control group. However, a significant increase in the expression of the NR2B subunit was observed following treatment with Aβ1‑42 for 72 h (P<0.05); and the upregulation of the expression of the NR2B subunit was reversed by pretreatment with DZ (P<0.05). These results suggested that DZ may counteract Aβ1‑42‑mediated cytotoxicity by alleviating the expression of NR2B.

  6. Early chronic blockade of NR2B subunits and transient activation of NMDA receptors modulate LTP in mouse auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuting; Zang, Shaoyun; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2006-02-16

    In the auditory cortex, the properties of NMDA receptors depend primarily on the ratio of NR2A and NR2B subunits. NR2B subunit expression is high at the beginning of critical period and lower in adulthood. Because NMDA receptors are crucial in triggering long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression, developmental or experience-dependent modification of NMDAR subunit composition is likely to influence synaptic plasticity. To examine how NMDA subunit change during postnatal development affect the adult synaptic plasticity, we employed chronic ifenprodil blockade of NR2B subunits and analyzed evoked field potentials in adult C57BL/6 mice auditory cortex (AC). We found that chronic loss of NR2B activity led to a decline in LTP magnitude in the AC of adult mice. Adding NMDA to the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in blocked mice had the opposite effect, producing LTP magnitudes at or exceeding those found in treated or untreated animals. These results suggest that, even in adulthood when NR2B expression is downregulated, these receptor subunits play an important role in experience-dependent plasticity of mouse auditory cortex. Blockade from P60 did not result in any decrease of LTP amplitude, suggesting that chronic block in postnatal period may permanently affect cortical circuits so that they cannot produce significant LTP in adulthood.

  7. Silencing the NR2B gene in rat ACC neurons by lentivirus-delivered shRNA alleviates pain-related aversion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shou-Gang; Lv, Xiu-Hua; Guan, Shan-Hui; Li, Hui-Lu; Qiao, Yong; Feng, Hao; Cong, Lin; Wang, Gong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR2B subunit on neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is implicated in the affective response to noxious stimuli. Selectively silencing this NR2B subunit in ACC neurons could therefore alleviate pain-related aversion. However, to date, there is no optimal approach to selectively silence the NR2B gene in ACC neurons. In the present study, we constructed lentiviral vectors and delivered shRNA (NR2B-RNAi-LV) to effectively silence the NR2B gene in ACC neurons. The use of lentivirus resulted in 95% transfection efficiency and 83% silencing of the NR2B gene in ACC neurons. Electrophysiological experiments showed that the total INMDA was similarly reduced by 48% in lentivirus-transfected ACC neurons. The biochemical and functional data demonstrated that lentiviral shRNA delivery produced a high transfection and silencing efficiency in the ACC neurons. SNI rats weighting 220-250 g were randomly divided into three groups: normal saline group (NS), lenti-siRNA/NC (LV-NC) group, and lenti-siRNA/NR2B (LV-NR2B) group, and conditioned place avoidance was conducted. The results indicated that NR2B-RNAi-LV decreased greatly the conditioning scores of F-CPA while NC-GFP-LV has no effects. NR2B mRNA expression in the NR2B-RNAi-LV group was significantly lower than that in the control group and NC-GFP-LV group. This novel approach of silencing the NR2B gene in ACC neuron could potentially be used to alleviate pain-related aversion.

  8. NR2B-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors Contribute to Network Asynchrony and Loss of Long-Term Potentiation Following Mild Mechanical Injury In Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    REPORT NR2B -N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS CONTRIBUTE TO NETWORK ASYNCHRONY AND LOSS OF LONG-TERM POTENTIATION FOLLOWING MILD MECHANICAL INJURY IN...integrate-and-fire model of network activity, 2) simulated an injured network, 3) predicted an important role for the NR2B -NMDA receptor in mediating...ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS synchrony, NR2B -NMDA receptor, network

  9. Alpha-synuclein modulates NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and decreases their levels after rotenone exposure.

    PubMed

    Navarria, Laura; Zaltieri, Michela; Longhena, Francesca; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Missale, Cristina; Spano, PierFranco; Bellucci, Arianna

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-syn) is the main protein component of Lewy bodies (LBs), that together with nigrostriatal dopamine neuron loss constitute typical pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). Glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) abnormalities, peculiarly involving NR2B-containing NMDAR, have been observed in the brain of PD patients and in several experimental models of the disease. Recent findings, indicating that α-syn can modulate NMDAR trafficking and function, suggest that this protein may be a pivotal regulator of NMDAR activity. Prompted by these evidences, we used fluorescence immunocytochemistry, western blotting and ratiometric Ca(2+) measurements to investigate whether wild type (wt) or C-terminally truncated α-syn can specifically modulate NR2B-containing NMDAR levels, subcellular trafficking and function. In addition, we evaluated whether the exposure of primary cortical neurons to increasing concentrations of rotenone could differentially regulate NR2B levels and cell viability in the presence or in the absence of α-syn. Our results indicate that both wt and C-terminally truncated α-syn negatively modulate NR2B-containing NMDAR levels, membrane translocation and function. Moreover, we found that absence of α-syn abolishes the rotenone-dependent decrease of NR2B levels and reduces neuronal vulnerability in primary cortical neurons. These findings suggest that α-syn can modulate neuronal resilience by regulating NR2B-containing NMDAR, whose specific alterations could connect α-syn pathology to neuronal degeneration in PD.

  10. NR2B subunit in the prefrontal cortex: A double-edged sword for working memory function and psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Sarah A.; Gulchina, Yelena; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a brain region featured with working memory function. The exact mechanism of how working memory operates within the PFC circuitry is unknown, but persistent neuronal firing recorded from prefrontal neurons during a working memory task is proposed to be the neural correlate of this mnemonic encoding. The PFC appears to be specialized for sustaining persistent firing, with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, especially slow-decay NR2B subunits, playing an essential role in the maintenance of sustained activity and normal working memory function. However, the NR2B subunit serves as a double-edged sword for PFC function. Because of its slow kinetics, NR2B endows the PFC with not only “neural psychic” properties, but also susceptibilities for neuroexcitotoxicity and psychiatric disorders. This review aims to clarify the interplay among working memory, the PFC, and NMDA receptors; demonstrate the importance of the NR2B subunit in the maintenance of persistent activity; understand the risks and vulnerabilities of how NR2B is related to the development of neuropsychiatric disorders; identify gaps that currently exist in our understanding of these processes; and provide insights regarding future directions that may clarify these issues. We conclude that the PFC is a specialized brain region with distinct delayed maturation, unique neuronal circuitry, and characteristic NMDA receptor function. The unique properties and development of NMDA receptors, especially enrichment of NR2B subunits, endows the PFC with not only the capability to generate sustained activity for working memory, but also serves as a major vulnerability to environmental insults and risk factors for psychiatric disorders. PMID:26143512

  11. NR2B subunit in the prefrontal cortex: A double-edged sword for working memory function and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Sarah A; Gulchina, Yelena; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2015-09-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a brain region featured with working memory function. The exact mechanism of how working memory operates within the PFC circuitry is unknown, but persistent neuronal firing recorded from prefrontal neurons during a working memory task is proposed to be the neural correlate of this mnemonic encoding. The PFC appears to be specialized for sustaining persistent firing, with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, especially slow-decay NR2B subunits, playing an essential role in the maintenance of sustained activity and normal working memory function. However, the NR2B subunit serves as a double-edged sword for PFC function. Because of its slow kinetics, NR2B endows the PFC with not only "neural psychic" properties, but also susceptibilities for neuroexcitotoxicity and psychiatric disorders. This review aims to clarify the interplay among working memory, the PFC, and NMDA receptors; demonstrate the importance of NR2B in the maintenance of persistent activity; understand the risks and vulnerabilities of how NR2B is related to the development of neuropsychiatric disorders; identify gaps that currently exist in our understanding of these processes; and provide insights regarding future directions that may clarify these issues. We conclude that the PFC is a specialized brain region with distinct delayed maturation, unique neuronal circuitry, and characteristic NMDA receptor function. The unique properties and development of NMDA receptors, especially enrichment of NR2B subunits, endow the PFC with not only the capability to generate sustained activity for working memory, but also serves as a major vulnerability to environmental insults and risk factors for psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hippocampal NR2B-containing NMDA receptors enhance long-term potentiation in rats with chronic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Ai-qin; Luo, Xiao-qing; Guo, Li-xia; Tang, Ying; Bao, Cheng-jia; Lin, Ling; Lin, Chun

    2014-06-27

    Pain and learning memory have striking similarities in synaptic plasticity. Activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors 2B subunits (NR2B-NMDAs) is responsible for the hippocampal LTP in memory formation. In our previous studies, we found the significant enhancement of CA1 hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in rats with chronic visceral pain. However, it is unclear whether the NR2B-NMDAs are required for the LTP in chronic visceral pain. In this study, a rat model with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was established by colorectal distention (CRD). The sensitivity of visceral pain and HFS-induced LTP at SC-CA1 synapses were significantly enhanced in IBS-like rats (p<0.05). In addition, hippocampal NR2B protein levels significantly increased in IBS-like rats (p<0.05). To test whether NR2B-NMDAs are responsible for the LTP, effects of Ro 25-6981, a selective antagonist of NR2B-NMDAs, on field potential in CA1 region were investigated in vitro. Our results demonstrated that Ro 25-6981 dose-dependently inhibited the facilitation of CA1 LTP in IBS-like rats. The plausible activation mechanism of hippocampal NR2B-NMDAs in the LTP enhancement was further explored. Western blot data indicated that expression of tyrosine phosphorylated NR2B protein in hippocampus significantly enhanced in IBS-like rats. Accordingly, genistein, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, dose-dependently blocked the facilitation of hippocampal LTP in IBS-like rats. Furthermore, EMG data revealed that intra-hippocampal injection of Ro 25-6981 dose-dependently attenuated the visceral hypersensitivity. In conclusion, hippocampal NR2B-NMDAs are responsible for the facilitation of CA1 LTP via tyrosine phosphorylation, which leads to visceral hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuropathic Allodynia Involves Spinal Neurexin-1β-dependent Neuroligin-1/Postsynaptic Density-95/NR2B Cascade in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzer-Bin; Lai, Cheng-Yuan; Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Jiang, Jian-Lin; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chau, Yat-Pang; Ruan, Ting; Chen, Gin-Den; Peng, Hsien-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Neuroligin-1 (NL1) forms a complex with the presynaptic neurexin-1β (Nrx1b), regulating clustering of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors with postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) to underlie learning-/memory-associated plasticity. Pain-related spinal neuroplasticity shares several common features with learning-/memory-associated plasticity. The authors thereby investigated the potential involvement of NL1-related mechanism in spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-associated allodynia. In 626 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, the withdrawal threshold and NL1, PSD-95, phosphorylated NR2B (pNR2B) expressions, interactions, and locations in dorsal horn (L4 to L5) were compared between the sham operation and SNL groups. A recombinant Nrx1b Fc chimera (Nrx1b Fc, 10 μg, 10 μl, i.t., bolus), antisense small-interfering RNA targeting to NL1 (10 μg, 10 μl, i.t., daily for 4 days), or NR2B antagonist (Ro 25-6981; 1 μM, 10 μl, i.t., bolus) were administered to SNL animals to elucidate possible cascades involved. SNL-induced allodynia failed to affect NL1 or PSD-95 expression. However, pNR2B expression (mean ± SD from 13.1 ± 2.87 to 23.1 ± 2.52, n = 6) and coexpression of NL1-PSD-95, pNR2B-PSD-95, and NL1-total NR2B were enhanced by SNL (from 10.7 ± 2.27 to 22.2 ± 3.94, 11.5 ± 2.15 to 23.8 ± 3.32, and 8.9 ± 1.83 to 14.9 ± 2.27 at day 7, n = 6). Furthermore, neuron-localized pNR2B PSD-95-pNR2B double-labeled and NL1/PSD-95/pNR2B triple-labeled immunofluorescence in the ipsilateral dorsal horn was all prevented by Nrx1b Fc and NL1-targeted small-interfering RNA designed to block and prevent NL1 expression. Without affecting NL1-PSD-95 coupling, Ro 25-6981 decreased the SNL-induced PSD-95-pNR2B coprecipitation (from 18.7 ± 1.80 to 14.7 ± 2.36 at day 7, n = 6). SNL-induced allodynia, which is mediated by the spinal NL1/PSD-95/pNR2B cascade, can be prevented by blockade of transsynaptic Nrx1b-NL1 interactions.

  14. Delay-dependent impairment of spatial working memory with inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in hippocampal CA1 region of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Han; Liu, Shu-Su; Yi, Feng; Zhuo, Min; Li, Bao-Ming

    2013-03-13

    Hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is required for spatial working memory. Although evidence from genetic manipulation mice suggests an important role of hippocampal NMDAR NR2B subunits (NR2B-NMDARs) in spatial working memory, it remains unclear whether or not the requirement of hippocampal NR2B-NMDARs for spatial working memory depends on the time of spatial information maintained. Here, we investigate the contribution of hippocampal NR2B-NMDARs to spatial working memory on delayed alternation task in T-maze (DAT task) and delayed matched-to-place task in water maze (DMP task). Our data show that infusions of the NR2B-NMDAR selective antagonists, Ro25-6981 or ifenprodil, directly into the CA1 region, impair spatial working memory in DAT task with 30-s delay (not 5-s delay), but severely impair error-correction capability in both 5-s and 30-s delay task. Furthermore, intra-CA1 inhibition of NR2B-NMDARs impairs spatial working memory in DMP task with 10-min delay (not 30-s delay). Our results suggest that hippocampal NR2B-NMDARs are required for spatial working memory in long-delay task, whereas spare for spatial working memory in short-delay task. We conclude that the requirement of NR2B-NMDARs for spatial working memory is delay-dependent in the CA1 region.

  15. Mas-Related Gene (Mrg) C Activation Attenuates Bone Cancer Pain via Modulating Gi and NR2B.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu'e; Jiang, Ming; Hou, Bailing; Lu, Cui'e; Lei, Yishan; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    This study is to investigate the role of Mas-related gene (Mrg) C in the pathogenesis and treatment of bone cancer pain (BCP). BCP mouse model was established by osteosarcoma cell inoculation. Pain-related behaviors were assessed with the spontaneous lifting behavior test and mechanical allodynia test. Expression levels of MrgC, Gi, and NR2B in the spinal cord were detected with Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Pain-related behavior tests showed significantly increased spontaneous flinches (NSF) and decreased paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) in mouse models of BCP. Western blot analysis showed that, compared with the control group and before modeling, all the expression levels of MrgC, Gi, and NR2B in the spinal cord of BCP mice were dramatically elevated, which were especially increased at day 7 after operation and thereafter, in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, the treatment of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 significantly up-regulated Gi and down-regulated NR2B expression levels, in the spinal cord of BCP mice, in a time-dependent manner. On the other hand, anti-MrgC significantly down-regulated Gi expression, while dramatically up-regulated NR2B expression, in the BCP mice. Similar results were obtained from the immunohistochemical detection. Importantly, BAM8-22 significantly attenuated the nociceptive behaviors in the BCP mice. Our results indicated the MrgC-mediated Gi and NR2B expression alterations in the BCP mice, which might contribute to the pain hypersensitivity. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of BCP in clinic.

  16. Activation of 5-HT and NR2B contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Xian; Chen, Yu; Fu, Rui; Liu, Sai-Yue; Yang, Qin-Qin; Shen, Tang-Biao

    2016-01-01

    The roles of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and spinal N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 2B (NR2B) in visceral hypersensitivity were investigated. A rat model with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was established by intracolonic injections of acetic acid onpost-natal days 8-21. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: normal intact (control) group, IBS model group, Ro25-6981-treated IBS rats (Ro25-6981, a NR2B antagonist) group, amitriptyline-treated IBS rats (amitriptyline, a 5-HT antagonist) and Ro25-6981 plus amitriptyline-treated IBS rats (Ro25-6981+amitriptyline) group. The expressions of 5-HT, NR2B, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT7R, SERT, TNF-α and IL-1β in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and hypothalamus, respectively, were measured by Immunohistochemical staining, Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Our results showed increased DRG and hypothalamus expression of 5-HT, NR2B, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT7R in IBS model group and decreased expression of those in Ro25-6981 and amitriptyline alone or both treatment groups. Moreover, SERT expression was decreased in colorectal, DRG and hypothalamus of ISB model rats, but increased by Ro25-6981 and amitriptyline alone or both treatments. Ro25-6981 and amitriptyline treatment also decreased colorectal expression of TNF-α and IL-1β induced by IBS model. In conclusion, activation of 5-HT and NR2B may play a crucial role in visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome in rats.

  17. Mas-Related Gene (Mrg) C Activation Attenuates Bone Cancer Pain via Modulating Gi and NR2B

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui’e; Lei, Yishan; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study is to investigate the role of Mas-related gene (Mrg) C in the pathogenesis and treatment of bone cancer pain (BCP). Methods BCP mouse model was established by osteosarcoma cell inoculation. Pain-related behaviors were assessed with the spontaneous lifting behavior test and mechanical allodynia test. Expression levels of MrgC, Gi, and NR2B in the spinal cord were detected with Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Results Pain-related behavior tests showed significantly increased spontaneous flinches (NSF) and decreased paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) in mouse models of BCP. Western blot analysis showed that, compared with the control group and before modeling, all the expression levels of MrgC, Gi, and NR2B in the spinal cord of BCP mice were dramatically elevated, which were especially increased at day 7 after operation and thereafter, in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, the treatment of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 significantly up-regulated Gi and down-regulated NR2B expression levels, in the spinal cord of BCP mice, in a time-dependent manner. On the other hand, anti-MrgC significantly down-regulated Gi expression, while dramatically up-regulated NR2B expression, in the BCP mice. Similar results were obtained from the immunohistochemical detection. Importantly, BAM8-22 significantly attenuated the nociceptive behaviors in the BCP mice. Conclusion Our results indicated the MrgC-mediated Gi and NR2B expression alterations in the BCP mice, which might contribute to the pain hypersensitivity. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of BCP in clinic. PMID:27152740

  18. Activation of 5-HT and NR2B contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Xian; Chen, Yu; Fu, Rui; Liu, Sai-Yue; Yang, Qin-Qin; Shen, Tang-Biao

    2016-01-01

    The roles of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and spinal N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 2B (NR2B) in visceral hypersensitivity were investigated. A rat model with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was established by intracolonic injections of acetic acid onpost-natal days 8-21. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: normal intact (control) group, IBS model group, Ro25-6981-treated IBS rats (Ro25-6981, a NR2B antagonist) group, amitriptyline-treated IBS rats (amitriptyline, a 5-HT antagonist) and Ro25-6981 plus amitriptyline-treated IBS rats (Ro25-6981+amitriptyline) group. The expressions of 5-HT, NR2B, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT7R, SERT, TNF-α and IL-1β in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and hypothalamus, respectively, were measured by Immunohistochemical staining, Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Our results showed increased DRG and hypothalamus expression of 5-HT, NR2B, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT7R in IBS model group and decreased expression of those in Ro25-6981 and amitriptyline alone or both treatment groups. Moreover, SERT expression was decreased in colorectal, DRG and hypothalamus of ISB model rats, but increased by Ro25-6981 and amitriptyline alone or both treatments. Ro25-6981 and amitriptyline treatment also decreased colorectal expression of TNF-α and IL-1β induced by IBS model. In conclusion, activation of 5-HT and NR2B may play a crucial role in visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome in rats. PMID:28078028

  19. NR2B Expression in Rat DRG Is Differentially Regulated Following Peripheral Nerve Injuries That Lead to Transient or Sustained Stimuli-Evoked Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Norcini, Monica; Sideris, Alexandra; Adler, Samantha M; Hernandez, Lourdes A M; Zhang, Jin; Blanck, Thomas J J; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Following injury, primary sensory neurons undergo changes that drive central sensitization and contribute to the maintenance of persistent hypersensitivity. NR2B expression in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has not been previously examined in neuropathic pain models. Here, we investigated if changes in NR2B expression within the DRG are associated with hypersensitivities that result from peripheral nerve injuries. This was done by comparing the NR2B expression in the DRG derived from two modalities of the spared nerve injury (SNI) model, since each variant produces different neuropathic pain phenotypes. Using the electronic von Frey to stimulate the spared and non-spared regions of the hindpaws, we demonstrated that sural-SNI animals develop sustained neuropathic pain in both regions while the tibial-SNI animals recover. NR2B expression was measured at Day 23 and Day 86 post-injury. At Day 23 and 86 post-injury, sural-SNI animals display strong hypersensitivity, whereas tibial-SNI animals display 50 and 100% recovery from post-injury-induced hypersensitivity, respectively. In tibial-SNI at Day 86, but not at Day 23 the perinuclear region of the neuronal somata displayed an increase in NR2B protein. This retention of NR2B protein within the perinuclear region, which will render them non-functional, correlates with the recovery observed in tibial-SNI. In sural-SNI at Day 86, DRG displayed an increase in NR2B mRNA which correlates with the development of sustained hypersensitivity in this model. The increase in NR2B mRNA was not associated with an increase in NR2B protein within the neuronal somata. The latter may result from a decrease in kinesin Kif17, since Kif17 mediates NR2B transport to the soma's plasma membrane. In both SNIs, microglia/macrophages showed a transient increase in NR2B protein detected at Day 23 but not at Day 86, which correlates with the initial post-injury induced hypersensitivity in both SNIs. In tibial-SNI at Day 86, but not at Day 23

  20. NR2B Expression in Rat DRG Is Differentially Regulated Following Peripheral Nerve Injuries That Lead to Transient or Sustained Stimuli-Evoked Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Norcini, Monica; Sideris, Alexandra; Adler, Samantha M.; Hernandez, Lourdes A. M.; Zhang, Jin; Blanck, Thomas J. J.; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Following injury, primary sensory neurons undergo changes that drive central sensitization and contribute to the maintenance of persistent hypersensitivity. NR2B expression in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has not been previously examined in neuropathic pain models. Here, we investigated if changes in NR2B expression within the DRG are associated with hypersensitivities that result from peripheral nerve injuries. This was done by comparing the NR2B expression in the DRG derived from two modalities of the spared nerve injury (SNI) model, since each variant produces different neuropathic pain phenotypes. Using the electronic von Frey to stimulate the spared and non-spared regions of the hindpaws, we demonstrated that sural-SNI animals develop sustained neuropathic pain in both regions while the tibial-SNI animals recover. NR2B expression was measured at Day 23 and Day 86 post-injury. At Day 23 and 86 post-injury, sural-SNI animals display strong hypersensitivity, whereas tibial-SNI animals display 50 and 100% recovery from post-injury-induced hypersensitivity, respectively. In tibial-SNI at Day 86, but not at Day 23 the perinuclear region of the neuronal somata displayed an increase in NR2B protein. This retention of NR2B protein within the perinuclear region, which will render them non-functional, correlates with the recovery observed in tibial-SNI. In sural-SNI at Day 86, DRG displayed an increase in NR2B mRNA which correlates with the development of sustained hypersensitivity in this model. The increase in NR2B mRNA was not associated with an increase in NR2B protein within the neuronal somata. The latter may result from a decrease in kinesin Kif17, since Kif17 mediates NR2B transport to the soma’s plasma membrane. In both SNIs, microglia/macrophages showed a transient increase in NR2B protein detected at Day 23 but not at Day 86, which correlates with the initial post-injury induced hypersensitivity in both SNIs. In tibial-SNI at Day 86, but not at Day 23

  1. PSD95 suppresses dendritic arbor development in mature hippocampal neurons by occluding the clustering of NR2B-NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Fernando J; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Campos, Matias; Henriquez, Berta; Phillips, Marnie; Opazo, Carlos; Aguayo, Luis G; Montecino, Martin; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits NR2A and NR2B are critical mediators of synaptic plasticity and dendritogenesis; however, how they differentially regulate these processes is unclear. Here we investigate the roles of the NR2A and NR2B subunits, and of their scaffolding proteins PSD-95 and SAP102, in remodeling the dendritic architecture of developing hippocampal neurons (2-25 DIV). Analysis of the dendritic architecture and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the NMDARs and anchoring proteins in immature cultures revealed a strong positive correlation between synaptic expression of the NR2B subunit and dendritogenesis. With maturation, the pruning of dendritic branches was paralleled by a strong reduction in overall and synaptic expression of NR2B, and a significant elevation in synaptic expression of NR2A and PSD95. Using constructs that alter the synaptic composition, we found that either over-expression of NR2B or knock-down of PSD95 by shRNA-PSD95 augmented dendritogenesis in immature neurons. Reactivation of dendritogenesis could also be achieved in mature cultured neurons, but required both manipulations simultaneously, and was accompanied by increased dendritic clustering of NR2B. Our results indicate that the developmental increase in synaptic expression of PSD95 obstructs the synaptic clustering of NR2B-NMDARs, and thereby restricts reactivation of dendritic branching. Experiments with shRNA-PSD95 and chimeric NR2A/NR2B constructs further revealed that C-terminus of the NR2B subunit (tail) was sufficient to induce robust dendritic branching in mature hippocampal neurons, and suggest that the NR2B tail is important in recruiting calcium-dependent signaling proteins and scaffolding proteins necessary for dendritogenesis.

  2. Regulation of PINK1 by NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in ischemic neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yuexin; Liu, Baosong; Li, Lijun; Chang, Ning; Li, Lei; Wang, Hanbin; Wang, Dianshi; Feng, Hua; Cheung, Carol; Liao, Mingxia; Cui, Tianyuan; Sugita, Shuzo; Wan, Qi

    2009-12-01

    Dysfunction of PTEN-induced kinase-1 (PINK1) is implicated in neurodegeneration. We report here that oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro insult mimicking ischemic neuron injury, resulted in a significant reduction of PINK1 protein expression in cultured cortical neurons. The decrease of PINK1 expression was blocked by the antagonists of NMDA receptors. We revealed that the overactivation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NR2BRs) was responsible for the OGD-induced PINK1 reduction. The overactivated NR2BRs also inhibited the phosphorylation, but not the protein expression, of the cell survival-promoting kinase Akt after OGD insult, indicating that OGD-induced reduction of PINK1 protein is specific in the injury paradigm. We further showed that enhancing the protein expression of PINK1 antagonized OGD-induced reduction of Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that Akt may be a downstream target of PINK1 in ischemic neuron injury. Importantly, we provided evidence that both NR2BR antagonist and PINK1 over-expression protected against OGD-induced neuronal death. These results suggest that the overactivation of NR2BRs may contribute to ischemic neuron death through suppressing PINK1-dependent survival signaling. Thus, selectively antagonizing NR2BR signal pathway-induced neurotoxicity may be a potential neuroprotection strategy.

  3. Spinal serum-inducible and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 mediates neuropathic pain via kalirin and downstream PSD-95-dependent NR2B phosphorylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsien-Yu; Chen, Gin-Den; Lai, Cheng-Yuan; Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Lin, Tzer-Bin

    2013-03-20

    The coupling of the spinal postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) with the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit and the subsequent NR2B phosphorylation contribute to pain-related plasticity. Increasing evidence reveals that kalirin, a Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor, modulates PSD-95-NR2B-dependent neuroplasticity. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that serum-inducible and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) participates in inflammation-associated pain hypersensitivity by modulating spinal glutamatergic neurotransmission. Because kalirin is one of the proteins in PSD that is highly phosphorylated by various kinases, we tested whether kalirin could be a downstream target of spinal SGK1 that participates in neuropathic pain development via regulation of the PSD-95-NR2B coupling-dependent phosphorylation of NR2B. We observed that spinal nerve ligation (SNL, L5) in male Sprague Dawley rats resulted in behavioral allodynia, which was associated with phosphorylated SGK1 (pSGK1), kalirin, and phosphorylated NR2B (pNR2B) expression and an increase in pSGK1-kalirin-PSD-95-pNR2B coprecipitation in the ipsilateral dorsal horn (L4-L5). SNL-enhanced kalirin immunofluorescence was coincident with pSGK1, PSD-95, and pNR2B immunoreactivity. Small-interfering RNA (siRNA) that targeted spinal kalirin mRNA expression (10 μg, 10 μl; i.t.) reduced SNL-induced allodynia, kalirin and pNR2B expression, as well as kalirin-PSD-95 and PSD-95-pNR2B coupling and costaining without affecting SGK1 phosphorylation. Daily administration of GSK-650394 (an SGK1 antagonist; 100 nm, 10 μl, i.t.) not only exhibited effects similar to the kalirin mRNA-targeting siRNA but also attenuated pSGK1-kalirin costaining and SGK1-kalirin coupling. We suggest that nerve injury could induce spinal SGK1 phosphorylation that subsequently interacts with and upregulates kalirin to participate in neuropathic pain development via PSD-95-NR2B coupling-dependent NR2B phosphorylation.

  4. Effects of L-DOPA and STN-HFS dyskinesiogenic treatments on NR2B regulation in basal ganglia in the rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Adrien; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique; Savasta, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Dyskinesia is a major side effect of chronic levodopa (L-DOPA) administration, the reference treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) alleviates parkinsonian motor symptoms and indirectly improves dyskinesia by decreasing L-DOPA requirement. However, inadequate stimulation can also trigger dyskinetic movements in PD patients and animal models. Here, we investigated the possible association between L-DOPA- and STN-HFS-induced dyskinesia and regulation of the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors in the rodent model of PD. We subjected 6-OHDA-lesioned rats to HFS for 1h, at an intensity triggering forelimb dyskinesia. Other 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were treated with chronic high doses of L-DOPA for ten days, to induce abnormal involuntary movements. The 6-OHDA lesion regulated NR2B only in the SNr, where the activation of NR2B was observed (as assessed by phosphorylation of the Tyr1472 residue). Both STN-HFS and L-DOPA dyskinesiogenic treatments induced NR2B activation in the STN and EP, but only L-DOPA triggered NR2B hyperphosphorylation in the striatum. Finally, the use of CP-101,606 exacerbated L-DOPA-induced motor behavior and associated NR2B hyperphosphorylation in the striatum, STN and EP. Thus, NR2B activation in basal ganglia structures is correlated with dyskinesia.

  5. NR2B-dependent Cyclophilin D translocation suppresses the recovery of synaptic transmission after oxygen-glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shijun; Du, Fang; Yan, Shirley Shidu

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) subunit 2B (NR2B)-containing NMDA receptors and mitochondrial protein cyclophilin D (CypD) are well characterized in mediating neuronal death after ischemia, respectively. However, whether and how NR2B and CypD work together in mediating synaptic injury after ischemia remains elusive. Using a de novo ischemia model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in hippocampal slices, we identified a NR2B-dependent mechanism for CypD translocation onto the mitochondrial inner membrane. CypD depletion (CypD null mice) prevented OGD-induced impairment in synaptic transmission recovery. Overexpression of neuronal CypD mice (CypD+) exacerbated OGD-induced loss of synaptic transmission. Inhibition of CypD-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening by cyclosporine A (CSA) attenuated ischemia-induced synaptic perturbation in CypD+ and non-transgenic (nonTg) mice. The treatment of antioxidant EUK134 to suppress mitochondrial oxidative stress rescued CypD-mediated synaptic dysfunction following OGD in CypD+ slices. Furthermore, OGD provoked the interaction of CypD with P53, which was enhanced in slices overexpressing CypD but was diminished in CypD-null slices Inhibition of p53 using a specific inhibitor of p53 (pifithrin-μ) attenuated the CypD/p53 interaction following OGD, along with a restored synaptic transmission in both nonTg and CypD+ hippocampal slices. Our results indicate that OGD-induced CypD translocation potentiates CypD/P53 interaction in a NR2B dependent manner, promoting oxidative stress and loss of synaptic transmission. We also evaluate a new ex-vivo chronic OGD-induced ischemia model for studying the effect of oxidative stress on synaptic damage. PMID:26232180

  6. NR2B-dependent cyclophilin D translocation suppresses the recovery of synaptic transmission after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihua; Wang, Yongfu; Yan, Shijun; Du, Fang; Yan, Shirley Shidu

    2015-10-01

    N-methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) subunit 2B (NR2B)-containing NMDA receptors and mitochondrial protein cyclophilin D (CypD) are well characterized in mediating neuronal death after ischemia, respectively. However, whether and how NR2B and CypD work together in mediating synaptic injury after ischemia remains elusive. Using an ex vivo ischemia model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in hippocampal slices, we identified a NR2B-dependent mechanism for CypD translocation onto the mitochondrial inner membrane. CypD depletion (CypD null mice) prevented OGD-induced impairment in synaptic transmission recovery. Overexpression of neuronal CypD mice (CypD+) exacerbated OGD-induced loss of synaptic transmission. Inhibition of CypD-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening by cyclosporine A (CSA) attenuated ischemia-induced synaptic perturbation in CypD+ and non-transgenic (non-Tg) mice. The treatment of antioxidant EUK134 to suppress mitochondrial oxidative stress rescued CypD-mediated synaptic dysfunction following OGD in CypD+ slices. Furthermore, OGD provoked the interaction of CypD with P53, which was enhanced in slices overexpressing CypD but was diminished in CypD-null slices. Inhibition of p53 using a specific inhibitor of p53 (pifithrin-μ) attenuated the CypD/p53 interaction following OGD, along with a restored synaptic transmission in both non-Tg and CypD+ hippocampal slices. Our results indicate that OGD-induced CypD translocation potentiates CypD/P53 interaction in a NR2B dependent manner, promoting oxidative stress and loss of synaptic transmission. We also evaluate a new ex vivo chronic OGD-induced ischemia model for studying the effect of oxidative stress on synaptic damage.

  7. Protons trap NR1/NR2B NMDA receptors in a nonconducting state.

    PubMed

    Banke, Tue G; Dravid, Shashank M; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2005-01-05

    NMDA receptors are highly expressed in the CNS and are involved in excitatory synaptic transmission, as well as synaptic plasticity. Given that overstimulation of NMDA receptors can cause cell death, it is not surprising that these channels are under tight control by a series of inhibitory extracellular ions, including zinc, magnesium, and H+. We studied the inhibition by extracellular protons of recombinant NMDA receptor NR1/NR2B single-channel and macroscopic responses in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney HEK 293 cells using patch-clamp techniques. We report that proton inhibition proceeds identically in the absence or presence of agonist, which rules out the possibility that protonation inhibits receptors by altering coagonist binding. The response of macroscopic currents in excised patches to rapid jumps in pH was used to estimate the microscopic association and dissociation rates for protons, which were 1.4 x 10(9) m(-1) sec(-1) and 110-196 sec(-1), respectively (K(d) corresponds to pH 7.2). Protons reduce the open probability without altering the time course of desensitization or deactivation. Protons appear to slow at least one time constant describing the intra-activation shut-time histogram and modestly reduce channel open time, which we interpret to reflect a reduction in the overall channel activation rate and possible proton-induced termination of openings. This is consistent with a modest proton-dependent slowing of the macroscopic response rise time. From these data, we propose a physical model of proton inhibition that can describe macroscopic and single-channel properties of NMDA receptor function over a range of pH values.

  8. NR2B-NMDA receptor mediated modulation of the tyrosine phosphatase STEP regulates glutamate induced neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Deb, Ishani; Mukherjee, Saibal; Paul, Surojit

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the role of a neuron-specific tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in excitotoxic cell death. Our findings demonstrate that p38 MAPK, a stress-activated kinase that is known to play a role in the etiology of excitotoxic cell death is a substrate of STEP. Glutamate-mediated NMDA receptor stimulation leads to rapid but transient activation of p38 MAPK, which is primarily dependent on NR2A-NMDA receptor activation. Conversely, activation of NR2B-NMDA receptors leads to dephosphorylation and subsequent activation of STEP, which in turn leads to inactivation of p38 MAPK. Thus during transient NMDA receptor stimulation, increases in STEP activity appears to limit the duration of activation of p38 MAPK and improves neuronal survival. However, if NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation is sustained, protective effects of STEP activation are lost, as these stimuli cause significant degradation of active STEP, leading to secondary activation of p38 MAP kinase. Consistent with this observation, a cell transducible TAT-STEP peptide that constitutively binds to p38 MAPK attenuated neuronal cell death caused by sustained NMDA receptor stimulation. The findings imply that the activation and levels of STEP are dependent on the duration and magnitude of NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation and STEP serves as a modulator of NMDA receptor dependent neuronal injury, through its regulation of p38 MAPK. PMID:21029094

  9. Early auditory enrichment with music enhances auditory discrimination learning and alters NR2B protein expression in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Cai, Rui; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2009-01-03

    Previous studies have shown that the functional development of auditory system is substantially influenced by the structure of environmental acoustic inputs in early life. In our present study, we investigated the effects of early auditory enrichment with music on rat auditory discrimination learning. We found that early auditory enrichment with music from postnatal day (PND) 14 enhanced learning ability in auditory signal-detection task and in sound duration-discrimination task. In parallel, a significant increase was noted in NMDA receptor subunit NR2B protein expression in the auditory cortex. Furthermore, we found that auditory enrichment with music starting from PND 28 or 56 did not influence NR2B expression in the auditory cortex. No difference was found in the NR2B expression in the inferior colliculus (IC) between music-exposed and normal rats, regardless of when the auditory enrichment with music was initiated. Our findings suggest that early auditory enrichment with music influences NMDA-mediated neural plasticity, which results in enhanced auditory discrimination learning.

  10. PSD-93 deletion inhibits Fyn-mediated phosphorylation of NR2B and protects against focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meijuan; Li, Qingjie; Chen, Ling; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Qingxiu; Shao, Yuan; Xu, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Modification of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitotoxicity appears to be a potential target in the treatment of ischemic stroke. Postsynaptic density protein-93 (PSD-93) specifically binds the C-terminal tails of the NMDAR, which is critical to couple NMDAR activity to specific intracellular signaling. This study is to investigate whether PSD-93 disruption displays neuroprotection in a focal ischemic stroke model of adult mice and, if it does, to explore possible mechanisms. It was found that, following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), PSD-93 knockout (KO) mice manifested significant reductions in infarcted volume, neurological deficits and number of degenerated neurons. PSD-93 deletion also reduced cultured cortical neuronal death caused by glucose and oxygen deprivation (OGD). Ischemic long term potentiation (i-LTP) could not be induced in the PSD-93 KO group and wild type (WT) groups pretreated with either AP-5 (NMDAR inhibitor) or PP2 (Src family inhibitor). PSD-93 KO decreased the phosphorylation of the NR2B at Tyr1472 and the interaction between NR2B and Fyn after MCAO. Together, our study demonstrated that PSD-93 KO confers profound neuroprotection against ischemic brain injury, which probably links to the inhibitory effect on Fyn-mediated phosphorylation of NR2B caused by PSD-93 deletion. These findings may provide a novel avenue for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cleavage of the NR2B Subunit Amino Terminus of N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor by Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kay-Siong; Leung, How-Wing; Wong, Peter T.-H.; Low, Chian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Thrombolysis using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been the key treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke for the past decade. Recent studies, however, suggest that this clot-busting protease also plays various roles in brain physiological and pathophysiological glutamatergic-dependent processes, such as synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. In addition, increasing evidence implicates tPA as an important neuromodulator of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant human tPA cleaves the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor. Analysis of NR2B in rat brain lysates and cortical neurons treated with tPA revealed concentration- and time-dependent degradation of NR2B proteins. Peptide sequencing studies performed on the cleaved-off products obtained from the tPA treatment on a recombinant fusion protein of the amino-terminal domain of NR2B revealed that tPA-mediated cleavage occurred at arginine 67 (Arg67). This cleavage is tPA-specific, plasmin-independent, and removes a predicted ∼4-kDa fragment (Arg27-Arg67) from the amino-terminal domain of the NR2B protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative cleavage site Arg67 to Ala67 impeded tPA-mediated degradation of recombinant protein. This analysis revealed that NR2B is a novel substrate of tPA and suggested that an Arg27–Arg67-truncated NR2B-containing NMDA receptor could be formed. Heterologous expression of NR2B with Gln29–Arg67 deleted is functional but exhibits reduced ifenprodil inhibition and increased glycine EC50 with no change in glutamate EC50. Our results confirmed NR2B as a novel proteolytic substrate of tPA, where tPA may directly interact with NR2B subunits leading to a change in pharmacological properties of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors. PMID:22610100

  12. Differential role of NR2A and NR2B subunits in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist-induced aberrant cortical gamma oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Bernat

    2012-06-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) hypofunction plays an important role in cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. NMDA-R antagonists elicit psychotic symptoms in humans and schizophrenia-relevant signs in rodents, including a strong increase in cortical gamma activity. NMDA-Rs are composed of different subunits, and accumulating evidence indicates that neuronal damage due to NMDA-R antagonists depends on their action on a specific type of the receptor containing the NR2A subunit. In human schizophrenics, NR2A is selectively reduced in fast-firing interneurons. These neurons are critical for gamma oscillations, indicating that pathological changes in gamma activity may depend on subunit-specific NMDA-R deficit. The present study tested this hypothesis. Cortical electroencephalograms were recorded in freely moving rats and the changes in gamma power were measured after administration of NMDA-R antagonists with different subunit selectivity, including NR2A-preferring (PEAQX, n = 5; NVP-AAM077, n = 18), NR2B-selective (ifenprodil, n = 6; threo-ifenprodil, n = 4; Ro25-6985, n = 13), and NR2C/D-selective (n = 8) antagonists, along with vehicle and nonselective NMDA-R antagonists (ketamine, n = 10; MK801, n = 12). Changes in prepulse inhibition of startle was tested after MK-801 (n = 6), NVP-AAM077, and Ro-6891 (n = 5) injection. Strong increase in gamma power was induced by nonselective NMDA-R antagonists and by blockade of NMDA-Rs containing the NR2A subunit, with co-occurring gating deficits and diminished low-frequency modulation of gamma oscillations. In contrast, selective blockade of NR2B, C, or D subunit-containing receptors had minor effects. Major subtype-specific differences in the role of NMDA-Rs in cortical gamma oscillation may have implications for the pathomechanism and treatment of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation of GRs-Akt-nNOs-NR2B signaling pathway by second dose GR agonist contributes to exacerbated hyperalgesia in a rat model of radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Yu'e; Liu, Yue; Song, Lihua; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-06-01

    Central Akt, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) play key roles in the development of neuropathic pain. Here we investigate the effects of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) on the expression and activation of spinal Akt, nNOS and NR2B after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglia (CCD). Thermal hyperalgesia test and mechanical allodynia test were used to measure rats after intrathecal injection of GR antagonist mifepristone or GR agonist dexamethasone for 21 days postoperatively. Expression of spinal Akt, nNOS, NR2B and their phosphorylation state after CCD was examined by western blot. The effects of intrathecal treatment with dexamethasone or mifepristone on nociceptive behaviors and the corresponding expression of Akt, nNOS and NR2B in spinal cord were also investigated. Intrathecal injection of mifepristone or dexamethasone inhibited PWMT and PWTL in CCD rats. However, hyperalgesia was induced by intrathecal injection of dexamethasone on days 12 to 14 after surgery. Treatment of dexamethasone increased the expression and phosphorylation levels of spinal Akt, nNOS, GR and NR2B time dependently, whereas administration of mifepristone downregulated the expression of these proteins significantly. GRs activated spinal Akt-nNOS/NR2B pathway play important roles in the development of neuropathic pain in a time-dependent manner.

  14. The preventive effect of NR2B and NR2D-containing NMDAR antagonists on Aβ-induced LTP disruption in the dentate gyrus of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfang; Wang, Chuang; Deng, Tianxiang; Xue, Zhancheng; Chen, Xiaowei; Chang, Lan; Wang, Qinwen

    2013-12-01

    Amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) potently inhibits the synaptic plasticity subsequently causing the cognitive deficits. Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission is thought to be an important cellular mechanism underlying memory formation. Different NR2 subunits are involved in NMDA receptor-dependent LTP. In the present study, we investigated the roles of NR2B and NR2D-containing NMDAR on Aβ(1-42)-induced LTP deficits in the hippocampal slices of rats by using selective NMDAR antagonists. First, we found that Aβ(1-42) significantly inhibited the LTP in the dentate gyrus of slices as reported before. Following that the Aβ(1-42)-induced LTP inhibition was prevented by the pre-perfusion of the specific NR2B-containing NMDAR antagonists ifenprodil (approximately >200-fold selectivity for NR2B) and Ro25-6981 (>3,000-fold selectivity for NR2B), as well as PPDA, a specific NR2D receptor antagonist. Meanwhile, the antagonists on their own had no or only partial effects on the normal LTP in the same dose condition. These findings not only support the effects of NR2B and NR2D subunits on Aβ(1-42)-induced LTP deficits, but also imply that preferentially targeting NR2B- and NR2D-containing NMDARs may provide an effective means to prevent cognitive deficits in the early AD.

  15. Kinesin superfamily protein 17 contributes to the development of bone cancer pain by participating in NR2B transport in the spinal cord of mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Hou, Bailing; Bu, Dan; Shi, Linyu; Gu, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhengliang

    2015-03-01

    Τreatment of bone cancer pain remains a challenge, while the mechanisms causing the pain remain elusive. We demonstrated that the expression of the N‑methyl‑D‑aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR2B subunit was upregulated in mice with bone cancer pain. Kinesin superfamily protein 17 (KIF17), a recently characterized member of the kinesin superfamily proteins, has been demonstrated to transport and deliver the NR2B subunit to dendrites in mammalian neurons. In the present study, we induced bone cancer pain via femur bone cavity osteosarcoma NCTC 2472 tumor cell implantation (TCI) in mice. The results showed that TCI in mice increased the number of spontaneous flinches, mechanical allodynia events, expression of spinal KIF17 and NR2B subunits. Intrathecal administration of KIF17 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) attenuated the behavioral signs of bone cancer pain and suppressed the increased expression of NR2B induced by TCI. In addition, KIF17 binds to a protein complex that contains mLin‑10 to transport NR2B, and we determined that the increase of mLin‑10 was suppressed following admini-stration. Thus, these findings suggested that KIF17 contributed to the development of bone cancer pain in the spinal cord through NR2B transport and that mLin‑10 may also play a role in pain development.

  16. Negative regulation of REST on NR2B in spinal cord contributes to the development of bone cancer pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Yu, Jianbo

    2016-12-20

    In this study, C3H/HeNCrlVr mice are implanted with sarcoma NCTC 2472 cells into the intramedullary space of the femur to induce ongoing bone cancer-related pain behaviors. During the progress of the bone cancer pain, the down-regulation in spinal REST (Neuron-restrictive silencer factor, NRSF/REST) with concomitant up-regulation in spinal NR2B (2B subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, NR2B) protein expression are observed at days 5, 7, 10 and 14 post-inoculation. Immunofluorescence assay shows that almost all of REST and NR2B-positive signals encompass NeuN (neuron-specific nuclear protein, a neuronal marker)-positive signals in spinal cord of sham and tumor-bearing mice. Different from previous researches involved in the main distribution of REST in neural progenitors, the expression of REST in mature neurons in spinal cord of adult mice is observed. Intrathecal administration of AS-ODN of REST at days 0, 2, 4 and 6 post-inoculation further enhances expression of spinal NR2B at day 7 post-inoculation, which suggests the reduced suppression of spinal REST on NR2B during the development of bone cancer pain. In summary, our study provides the evidence that the negative regulation of REST on NR2B in spinal cord takes part in the exacerbation of bone cancer pain.

  17. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Wen-Zhu; Miao, Yu-Liang; Guo, Wen-Zhi; Wu, Wei; Li, Bao-Wei; An, Li-Na; Fang, Wei-Wu; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Leptin promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells isolated from embryonic mouse hippocampus. • Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. • The effects of leptin are partially mediated by upregulating NR2B subunits. - Abstract: Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  18. Ethanol induces long-term facilitation of NR2B-NMDA receptor activity in the dorsal striatum: implications for alcohol drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Carnicella, Sebastien; Phamluong, Khanhky; Jeanblanc, Jerome; Ronesi, Jennifer A; Chaudhri, Nadia; Janak, Patricia H; Lovinger, David M; Ron, Dorit

    2007-03-28

    Addiction is characterized by compulsive alcohol or drug taking and seeking, and the dorsal striatum has been implicated in such maladaptive persistent habits. The NMDA receptor (NMDAR), which is a major target of alcohol, is implicated in striatal-based habit learning. We found that, in the dorsal striatum, alcohol (ethanol) exposure produced an increase in the phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDAR, and a corresponding increase in the activity of Fyn kinase, which phosphorylates NR2B. We further observed an ethanol-mediated long-term facilitation (LTF) of the activity of NR2B-containing NMDARs (NR2B-NMDARs) in the dorsal striatum. This LTF is Fyn kinase dependent, because it was observed in Fyn wild-type but not in Fyn knock-out mice. Importantly, none of these biochemical and physiological changes was observed in the ventral striatum. Finally, dorsal but not ventral striatum infusion of a Fyn or NR2B-NMDAR inhibitor reduced rat operant self-administration of ethanol. Our results suggest that the Fyn-mediated phosphorylation and LTF of NR2B-NMDAR activity in the dorsal striatum after exposure to ethanol may underlie aberrant plasticity that contributes to mechanisms underlying alcohol drinking behavior.

  19. Amyloid imaging in mild cognitive impairment subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wolk, David A; Price, Julie C; Saxton, Judy A; Snitz, Beth E; James, Jeffrey A; Lopez, Oscar L; Aizenstein, Howard J; Cohen, Ann D; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Mathis, Chester A; Klunk, William E; De-Kosky, Steven T; DeKoskym, Steven T

    2009-05-01

    We utilized the amyloid imaging ligand Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) to determine the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in different mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subtypes and to relate increased PiB binding to other markers of early AD and longitudinal outcome. Twenty-six patients with MCI (13 single-domain amnestic-MCI [a-MCI], 6 multidomain a-MCI, and 7 nonamnestic MCI) underwent PiB imaging. Twenty-three had clinical follow-up (21.2 +/- 16.0 [standard deviation] months) subsequent to their PiB scan. Using cutoffs established from a control cohort, we found that 14 (54%) patients had increased levels of PiB retention and were considered "amyloid-positive." All subtypes were associated with a significant proportion of amyloid-positive patients (6/13 single-domain a-MCI, 5/6 multidomain a-MCI, 3/7 nonamnestic MCI). There were no obvious differences in the distribution of PiB retention in the nonamnestic MCI group. Predictors of conversion to clinical AD in a-MCI, including poorer episodic memory, and medial temporal atrophy, were found in the amyloid-positive relative to amyloid-negative a-MCI patients. Longitudinal follow-up demonstrated 5 of 13 amyloid-positive patients, but 0 of 10 amyloid-negative patients, converted to clinical AD. Further, 3 of 10 amyloid-negative patients "reverted to normal." These data support the notion that amyloid-positive patients are likely to have early AD, and that the use of amyloid imaging may have an important role in determining which patients are likely to benefit from disease-specific therapies. In addition, our data are consistent with longitudinal studies that suggest a significant percentage of all MCI subtypes will develop AD.

  20. Spinal SIRPα1-SHP2 interaction regulates spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain via PSD-95-dependent NR2B activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsien-Yu; Chen, Gin-Den; Lai, Cheng-Yuang; Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Lin, Tzer-Bin

    2012-05-01

    The fact that neuropathic pain mechanisms are not well understood is a major impediment in the development of effective clinical treatments. We examined whether the interaction between signal regulatory protein alpha 1 (SIRPα1) and Src homology-2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2), and the downstream spinal SHP2/postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95)/N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit signaling cascade play a role in neuropathic pain. Following spinal nerve ligation (L5), we assessed tactile allodynia using the von Frey filament test and analyzed dorsal horn samples (L4-5) by Western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, coimmunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence. Nerve ligation induced allodynia, SIRPα1, SHP2, phosphorylated SHP2 (pSHP2), and phosphorylated NR2B (pNR2B) expression, and SHP2-PSD-95, pSHP2-PSD-95, PSD-95-NR2B, and PSD-95-pNR2B coimmunoprecipitation in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. In allodynic rats, injury-induced SHP2 immunoreactivity was localized in the ipsilateral dorsal horn neurons and coincident with PSD-95 and NR2B immunoreactivity. SIRPα1 silencing using small interfering RNA (siRNA; 1, 3, or 5μg/rat for 7days) prevented injury-induced allodynia and the associated changes in protein expression, phosphorylation, and coimmunoprecipitation. Intrathecal administration of NSC-87877 (an SHP2 antagonist; 1, 10, or 100μM/rat) and SIRPα1-neutralizing antibodies (1, 10, or 30μg/rat) suppressed spinal nerve ligation-induced allodynia, spinal SHP2 and NR2B phosphorylation, and SHP2/phosphorylated SHP2-PSD-95 and PSD-95-NR2B/phosphorylated NR2B coprecipitation. SHP2 siRNA led to similar effects as the NSC-87877 and SIRPα1 antibody treatments, except it prevented the allodynia-associated spinal SHP2 expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that a spinal SIRPα1-SHP2 interaction exists that subsequently triggers SHP2/PSD-95/NR2B signaling, thereby playing a role in neuropathic pain development.

  1. Downregulation of the spinal NMDA receptor NR2B subunit during electro-acupuncture relief of chronic visceral hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongping; Zhang, Yuhua; Qi, Debo; Li, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of spinal NR2B, a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit, in the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on chronic visceral hyperalgesia was investigated. Chronic visceral hyperalgesia was induced using an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) model in rats. Graded colorectal distention (CRD) stimuli at strengths of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mmHg were applied, and behavioral tests were performed to measure the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in response to the CRD stimuli and assess the severity of the visceral hyperalgesia. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal intact (control) group, IBS model (model) group, EA-treated IBS rats (EA) group and sham EA-treated IBS rats (sham EA) group. For the EA treatment, electric stimuli were applied through needles inserted into two acupoints [Zu-san-li (ST-36) and Shang-ju-xu (ST-37)] in both hind limbs, while the sham EA treatment consisted of only the insertion of needles into these same acupoints without an application of electric stimuli. Our results showed that AWR scores of the model group responding to CRD stimuli of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mmHg were significantly increased. These increased scores subsequently decreased following EA treatment (P < 0.05) compared with those for the other groups. The expression of NR2B in the superficial laminae (SDH, laminae I and II), nucleus proprius (NP, laminae III and IV), neck of the dorsal horn (NECK, laminae V and VI) and central canal region (lamina X) at thoracolumbar (T13-L2) and lumbosacral (L6-S2) segmental level significantly increased in the model group versus the control group (P < 0.05) and significantly decreased after EA treatment (P < 0.05). There were no significant changes in neither AWR scores nor expression of the NR2B subunit in these spinal regions after the sham EA treatment. These results confirm that EA can relieve chronic visceral hyperalgesia in IBS model rats and suggest that such an effect is possibly mediated through the

  2. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit involved in depression-like behaviours in lithium chloride-pilocarpine chronic rat epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Feng; Ding, Jing; Li, Xin; Fan, Fan; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common comorbidity in patients with epilepsy with unclear mechanisms. This study is to explore the role of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits in epilepsy-associated depression. Lithium chloride (Licl)-pilocarpine chronic rat epilepsy model was established and rats were divided into epilepsy with depression (EWD) and epilepsy without depression (EWND) subgroups based on forced swim test. Expression of NMDA receptor NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits was measured by western blot and immunofluorescence methods. The immobility time (IMT) was significantly greater in Licl-pilocarpine model group than in Control group, which was also greater in EWD group than in EWND group. No differences of spontaneous recurrent seizure (SRS) counts over two weeks and latency were found between EWD and EWND groups. The number of NeuN positive cells was significantly less in Licl-pilocarpine model group than in Control group, but had no difference between EWD and EWND groups. The ratios of phosphorylated NR1 (p-NR1)/NR1 and p-NR2B/NR2B were significantly greater in the hippocampus in EWD group than in EWND group. Moreover, the expression of p-NR1 and p-NR2B in the CA1 subfield of hippocampus were both greater in Licl-pilocarpine model group than Control group. Selective blockage of NR2B subunit with ifenprodil could alleviate depression-like behaviours of Licl-pilocarpine rat epilepsy model. In conclusion, glutamate NMDA receptor NR2B subunit was involved in promoting depression-like behaviours in the Licl-pilocarpine chronic rat epilepsy model and might be a target for treating epilepsy-associated depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor in the spinal cord contributes to chronic visceral pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Qing; Cai, Qin-Yan; Chen, Yu; Guo, Li-Xia; Chen, Ai-Qin; Wu, Zhen-Quan; Lin, Chun

    2014-01-13

    The roles of spinal N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor 2B (NR2B) subunit in central sensitization of chronic visceral pain were investigated. A rat model with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was established by colorectal distention (CRD) on post-natal days 8-14. Responses of the external oblique muscle of the abdomen to CRD were measured to evaluate the sensitivity of visceral pain in rats. The sensitivity of visceral pain significantly increased in IBS-like rats. Expressions of spinal NR2B subunit and phosphorylated NR2B subunit significantly increased by 50-55% in IBS-like rats when compared with those in control rats. Ro 25-6981, a selective antagonist of NR2B subunit, has a dose-dependent anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effect without causing motor dysfunction in IBS-like rats. Furthermore, the activation mechanism of the spinal NR2B subunit in chronic visceral pain was also investigated. Spinal administration of genistein, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, also decreased the visceral pain hypersensitivity of IBS-like rats in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of phosphorylated NR2B subunit was decreased after spinal administration of Ro 25-6981 or genistein in IBS-like rats. In conclusion, tyrosine kinase activation-induced phosphorylation of NR2B subunit may play a crucial role in central sensitization of chronic visceral pain. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphorylated CaMKII post-synaptic binding to NR2B subunits in the anterior cingulate cortex mediates visceral pain in visceral hypersensitive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Zhijun; Chen, Shengliang; Cao, Bing; Liu, Jin

    2012-05-01

    The NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is up-regulated in viscerally hypersensitive (VH) rats induced by colonic anaphylaxis. It plays a critical role in modulation of ACC sensitization and visceral pain responses. Given the key role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in synaptic plasticity and behavior learning and memory, we hypothesize that phosphorylation of CaMKII binding to NR2B mediates visceral pain in VH states. We performed in vivo electroporation of CaMKII siRNA produced inhibition of colorectal distension-induced visceromotor response in the VH rats. The NR2B, CaMKII and P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ protein levels were increased in 180%, 220% and 304% fold in the post-synaptic density (PSD) fraction in VH rats separately. Western blotting following co-immunoprecipitation showed that P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ bound to NR2B in the PSD, which was increased to 267% of control in VH rats. Administration of CaMKII antagonist Antennapedia-CaMKIINtide suppressed visceromotor response in VH rats in parallel with decrease of NR2B levels and reduction of the NR2B-P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ protein complex in PSD. In conclusion, CaMKII is a critical signaling molecule in the ACC glutamatergic synaptic transmission and phosphorylation of CaMKII at Thr286, which binds to NR2B subunit at post-synaptic site, modulates visceral pain in viscerally hypersensitive state.

  5. Histone H3K9 modifications are a local chromatin event involved in ethanol-induced neuroadaptation of the NR2B gene.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley; Lieu, Mai; Carreon, Stephanie; Li, Ji

    2011-09-01

    Expression of the NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) gene is upregulated following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment and withdrawal, which underlies behavioral alterations in addiction. The goal of this study was to characterize the changes of histone modifications induced by CIE treatment and its subsequent removal associated to the upregulation of NR2B gene transcription. To investigate the involvement of histone acetylation in the effect of ethanol on the NR2B gene, we examined the influence of CIE on histone acetylation in the 5' regulatory region of NR2B using a qChIP assay. CIE treatment and its subsequent removal produced a remarkable and selected increase in histone H3K9 acetylation. Interestingly, the majority of the increased H3K9 acetylation occurred after ethanol removal, which was coincident with a decrease in H3K9 methylation in the same time duration. Further examination of the mechanisms of ethanol-induced alterations on the histone modifications revealed that CIE-induced acetylation of H3K9 was not due to the changes in global enzyme activities or the expression of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylase (HDACs). Instead, we found a significant downregulation in some histone methyltransferases (HMTs) at both the global level and the local chromatin of the NR2B gene following CIE treatment. Moreover, our experiments also indicated a decrease of G9a, Suv39 h1 and HDAC1-3 in the chromatin of the NR2B gene promoter, which may be responsible for the altered H3K9 modifications. Taken together, the findings suggest a mechanism where the changes in H3K9 modifications in the local chromatin of the NR2B gene underlie alcohol-induced neuroadaptation.

  6. The inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II KN93 attenuates bone cancer pain via inhibition of KIF17/NR2B trafficking in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Liang, Ying; Hou, Bailing; Liu, Ming; Yang, Xuli; Liu, Chenglong; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-09-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) containing subunit 2B (NR2B) is critical for the regulation of nociception in bone cancer pain, although the precise molecular mechanisms remain unclear. KIF17, a kinesin motor, plays a key role in the dendritic transport of NR2B. The up-regulation of NR2B and KIF17 transcription results from an increase in phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), which is activated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In this study, we hypothesized that CaMKII-mediated KIF17/NR2B trafficking may contribute to bone cancer pain. Osteosarcoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right femurs of C3H/HeJ mice to induce progressive bone cancer-related pain behaviors. The expression of spinal t-CaMKII, p-CaMKII, NR2B and KIF17 after inoculation was also evaluated. These results showed that inoculation of osteosarcoma cells induced progressive bone cancer pain and resulted in a significant up-regulation of p-CaMKII, NR2B and KIF17 expression after inoculation. Intrathecal administration of KN93, a CaMKII inhibitor, down-regulated these three proteins and attenuated bone cancer pain in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These findings indicated that CaMKII-mediated KIF17/NR2B trafficking may contribute to bone cancer pain, and inhibition of CaMKII may be a useful alternative or adjunct therapy for relieving cancer pain.

  7. Extinction of Remotely Acquired Fear Depends on an Inhibitory NR2B/PKA Pathway in the Retrosplenial Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Leaderbrand, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    As memories age, their processing increasingly relies upon cortical rather than hippocampal circuits, but the adaptive significance and mechanisms of this shift are not fully understood. Here we investigated the behavioral features and cortical mechanisms underlying extinction of remotely versus recently acquired context fear in mice. Behaviorally, extinction and reinstatement were similar, but re-extinction of remote fear was significantly faster, suggesting time-dependent engagement of mechanisms specific for processing remote memory. Using pharmacological manipulations of NMDA receptors and associated signaling pathways in the in the retrosplenial cortex, we demonstrated that extinction of remote fear uniquely required NR2B-mediated downregulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)/cAMP response element-binding protein pathway. Interestingly, NR2B/PKA interactions weakened independently of the age of the memory, but the functional significance of this molecular change was evident only as memory retrieval became PKA-dependent over time. Thus, cortical PKA signaling may provide a molecular signature of when a memory has become “remote,” and inhibition of this pathway may open the door for modulation of remote memories. PMID:24336715

  8. The effects of walnut supplementation on hippocampal NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B of rats.

    PubMed

    Hicyilmaz, Hicran; Vural, Huseyin; Delibas, Namik; Sutcu, Recep; Gultekin, Fatih; Yilmaz, Nigar

    2017-04-01

    Walnuts contain numerous selected dietary factors that have an impact on brain functions, especially learning and memory formation in the hippocampus. Hippocampal N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are involved in the formation of cognitive functions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the molecular effects of walnut supplementation on the hippocampal expressions of NMDARs involved in cognitive functions and lipid peroxidation levels in rats. The male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 months old, n = 24) were fed with a walnut-supplemented diet (6% walnut diet, n = 12) and a control diet (rat food, n = 12) as ad libitum for 8 weeks. At the end of this period, NMDAR subunits NR2A and NR2B in the hippocampi were assayed by western blotting. Lipid peroxidation levels were measured using the thiobarbituric acid. The expression of NR2A and NR2B was elevated in the walnut-supplemented rats compared with the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the levels of lipid peroxidation in the walnut-supplemented group were significantly decreased compared with the control group. We suggested that walnut supplementation may have protective effects against the decline of cognitive functions by regulating NMDAR and lipid peroxidation levels in the hippocampus. The study provides evidence that selected dietary factors (polyunsaturated fatty acids, melatonin, vitamin E, and flavonoids) within walnut may help to trigger hippocampal neuronal signal transduction for the formation of learning and memory.

  9. The effects of walnut supplementation on hippocampal NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B of rats.

    PubMed

    Hicyilmaz, Hicran; Vural, Huseyin; Delibas, Namik; Sutcu, Recep; Gultekin, Fatih; Yilmaz, Nigar

    2015-12-28

    Walnuts contain numerous selected dietary factors that have an impact on brain functions, especially learning and memory formation in the hippocampus. Hippocampal N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are involved in the formation of cognitive functions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the molecular effects of walnut supplementation on the hippocampal expressions of NMDARs involved in cognitive functions and lipid peroxidation levels in rats. The male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 months old, n = 24) were fed with a walnut-supplemented diet (6% walnut diet, n = 12) and a control diet (rat food, n = 12) as ad libitum for 8 weeks. At the end of this period, NMDAR subunits NR2A and NR2B in the hippocampi were assayed by western blotting. Lipid peroxidation levels were measured using the thiobarbituric acid. The expression of NR2A and NR2B was elevated in the walnut-supplemented rats compared with the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the levels of lipid peroxidation in the walnut-supplemented group were significantly decreased compared with the control group. We suggested that walnut supplementation may have protective effects against the decline of cognitive functions by regulating NMDAR and lipid peroxidation levels in the hippocampus. The study provides evidence that selected dietary factors (polyunsaturated fatty acids, melatonin, vitamin E, and flavonoids) within walnut may help to trigger hippocampal neuronal signal transduction for the formation of learning and memory.

  10. Multivalent interactions of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II with the postsynaptic density proteins NR2B, densin-180, and alpha-actinin-2.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Bass, Martha A; Jiao, Yuxia; MacMillan, Leigh B; Carmody, Leigh C; Bartlett, Ryan K; Colbran, Roger J

    2005-10-21

    Dendritic calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is dynamically targeted to the synapse. We show that CaMKIIalpha is associated with the CaMKII-binding proteins densin-180, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit, and alpha-actinin in postsynaptic density-enriched rat brain fractions. Residues 819-894 within the C-terminal domain of alpha-actinin-2 constitute the minimal CaMKII-binding domain. Similar amounts of Thr286-autophosphorylated CaMKIIalpha holoenzyme [P-T286]CaMKII bind to alpha-actinin-2 as bind to NR2B (residues 1260-1339) or to densin-180 (residues 1247-1495) in glutathione-agarose cosedimentation assays, even though the CaMKII-binding domains share no amino acid sequence similarity. Like NR2B, alpha-actinin-2 binds to representative splice variants of each CaMKII gene (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta), whereas densin-180 binds selectively to CaMKIIalpha. In addition, C-terminal truncated CaMKIIalpha monomers can interact with NR2B and alpha-actinin-2, but not with densin-180. Soluble alpha-actinin-2 does not compete for [P-T286]CaMKII binding to immobilized densin-180 or NR2B. However, soluble densin-180, but not soluble NR2B, increases CaMKII binding to immobilized alpha-actinin-2 by approximately 10-fold in a PDZ domain-dependent manner. A His6-tagged NR2B fragment associates with GST-densin or GST-actinin but only in the presence of [P-T286]CaMKII. Similarly, His6-tagged densin-180 or alpha-actinin fragments associate with GST-NR2B in a [P-T286]CaMKII-dependent manner. In addition, GST-NR2B and His6-tagged alpha-actinin can bind simultaneously to monomeric CaMKII subunits. In combination, these data support a model in which [P-T286]CaMKIIalpha can simultaneously interact with multiple dendritic spine proteins, possibly stabilizing the synaptic localization of CaMKII and/or nucleating a multiprotein synaptic signaling complex.

  11. Intrathecal injection of selected peptide Myr-RC-13 attenuates bone cancer pain by inhibiting KIF17 and NR2B expression.

    PubMed

    Ni, Kun; Zhou, Yu; Sun, Yu-e; Liu, Yue; Gu, Xiao-ping; Ma, Zheng-liang

    2014-07-01

    Although bone cancer pain is a common intractable clinical symptom, its underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Accumulating evidence reveals that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor containing a 2B subunit (NR2B) in the spinal cord contributes to bone cancer pain. Our preliminary study demonstrated that intrathecal injection of fusion peptide Myr-RC-13 could disrupt spinal KIF17/mLin10 interaction, which is an essential component of KIF17-mediated NR2B transport. Here we report a means by infusion of the selected peptide Myr-RC-13 intrathecally to attenuate bone cancer pain. The results showed that inoculation of fibrosarcoma NCTC 2472 cells into the femur cavity of C3H/HeJ mice induced progressive bone cancer pain and resulted in up-regulation of KIF17 and NR2B in the spinal cord. In addition, repetitive spinal delivery of Myr-RC-13 relieved bone cancer-related mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain behaviors, and down-regulated expression of spinal KIF17 and NR2B. Finally, our results demonstrated that selected peptide Myr-RC-13 was able to attenuate bone cancer pain via decreasing spinal KIF17 and NR2B expressions. Therefore, selected peptide Myr-RC-13 might be a potential analgesic strategy for bone cancer pain.

  12. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-Zhu; Miao, Yu-Liang; Guo, Wen-Zhi; Wu, Wei; Li, Bao-Wei; An, Li-Na; Fang, Wei-Wu; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2014-04-25

    Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  13. Gene silencing of NR2B-containing NMDA receptor by intrathecal injection of short hairpin RNA reduces formalin-induced nociception in C57BL/6 mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rao-Xiang; Yan, Xue-Bin; Gu, Yong-Hong; Huang, Dong; Gan, Li; Han, Rui; Huang, Li-Hua

    2013-09-01

    Spinal NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NR2B) play a critical role in the formation of central sensitization and persistent pain. Previous studies show that gene silencing of the spinal NR2B subunit by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could alleviate nociception in animals. The siRNA is a 19- to 23-nt RNA duplex, which can be synthesized in vitro or derived from short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). In the present study, we investigated whether intrathecal injection of shRNAs targeting NR2B (GRIN2B shRNA) could affect nociception on formalin-induced pain in mice. Our results showed that intrathecal injection of GRIN2B shRNA could decrease NR2B mRNA and protein expression levels and hence effectively relieve formalin-induced nociception in mice, suggesting that intrathecal delivery of GRIN2B shRNA can be an efficient way to silence the target gene and provide new insights into the treatment of chronic pain.

  14. Intrathecal baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, inhibits the expression of p-CREB and NR2B in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with diabetic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Guo, Wen-Ya; Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Bai, Hui-Ping; Wang, Qian; Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of baclofen, a γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) receptor agonist, on the expression of p-CREB and NR2B in the spinal dorsal horn of rats with diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP). The DNP rats, which were successfully induced with streptozocin, were distributed among 3 groups that were treated with saline (D1 group), baclofen (D2 group), or CGP55845 + baclofen (D3 group) continuously for 4 days. The rats induced with saline and subsequently treated with saline were used as controls (C group). The times for the paw withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency of the D1 group were lower than those for the C group, and were significantly increased after baclofen treatment, but not when GABA receptor was pre-blocked with CGP55845 (D3 group). Increased protein expression levels of NR2B and p-CREB and mRNA levels of NR2B were found in the D1 group when compared with the controls. Baclofen treatment significantly suppressed their expression, bringing it close to the levels of controls. However, in the D3 group, the expression of p-CREB and NR2B were still significantly higher than that of the controls. Activation of GABAB receptor by baclofen attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain, which may partly be accomplished via down-regulating the expression of p-CREB and NR2B.

  15. Differential functions of NR2A and NR2B in short-term and long-term memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ye-Ha; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2010-08-23

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are glutamate receptors implicated in synaptic plasticity and memory function. The specific functions of NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B have not yet been fully determined in the different types of memory. Nine Wistar rats (8-weeks-old) were subjected to the Morris water maze task to evaluate the memory behaviorally. Quantitative analysis of NR1, NR2A, and NR2B levels in the right and left forebrain of rats was performed and subunit associations with different types of memory were investigated using the Morris water maze task. Right forebrain NR2A expression was significantly increased and correlated with faster escape time onto a hidden platform, indicating involvement of short-term memory, because of the training time interval. Right forebrain NR2B expression was positively associated with long-term memory lasting 24-h (h). In the left forebrain, NR2B expression was positively related to 72-h long-term memory. In conclusion, the functions of NR2A and NR2B receptors were differentially specialized in short-term and long-term memory, depending on the right or left forebrain.

  16. Amyloid Imaging in Mild Cognitive Impairment Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, David A.; Price, Julie C.; Saxton, Judy A.; Snitz, Beth E.; James, Jeffrey A.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Cohen, Ann D.; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Mathis, Chester A.; Klunk, William E.; DeKosky, Steven T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We utilized the amyloid imaging ligand Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) to determine the presence of AD pathology in different MCI subtypes and to relate elevated PiB binding to other markers of early AD and longitudinal outcome. Methods Twenty-six patients with MCI – 13 single domain amnestic-MCI (sd a-MCI), 6 multiple domain amnestic-MCI (md a-MCI), and 7 non-amnestic MCI (na-MCI) – underwent PiB imaging. Twenty-three had clinical follow-up [21.2 ± 16.0 (SD) months] subsequent to their PiB scan. Results Using cutoffs established from a control cohort, 14 (54%) had elevated levels of PiB retention and were considered “amyloid-positive.” All subtypes were associated with a significant proportion of amyloid-positive patients (6/13 sd a-MCI, 5/6 md a-MCI, 3/7 na-MCI). There were no obvious differences in the distribution of PiB retention in the na-MCI group despite their atypical early AD phenotype. Predictors of conversion to clinical AD in a-MCI, including poorer episodic memory, increased age, and medial temporal atrophy, were found in the amyloid-positive relative to amyloid-negative a-MCI patients. Longitudinal follow-up revealed 5/13 amyloid-positive patients, but 0/10 amyloid-negative patients, converted to clinical AD. Further, 3/10 amyloid-negative patients “reverted to normal” on follow-up. Interpretation These data support the notion that amyloid-positive patients are likely to have early AD and that the use of amyloid imaging may have an important role in determining which patients are likely to benefit from disease-specific therapies. In addition, our data is consistent with longitudinal studies suggesting that a significant percentage of all MCI subtypes will develop clinical AD. PMID:19475670

  17. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics. PMID:27599892

  18. Dopamine receptor D5 deficiency results in a selective reduction of hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit NR2B expression and impaired memory.

    PubMed

    Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; González, Hugo; Ugalde, Valentina; Donoso-Ramos, Juan Pablo; Quintana-Donoso, Daisy; Lara, Marcelo; Morales, Bernardo; Rojas, Patricio; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacological evidence associates type I dopamine receptors, including subtypes D1 and D5, with learning and memory. Analyses using genetic approaches have determined the relative contribution of dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) in cognitive tasks. However, the lack of drugs that can discriminate between D1R and D5R has made the pharmacological distinction between the two receptors difficult. Here, we aimed to determine the role of D5R in learning and memory. In this study we tested D5R knockout mice and wild-type littermates in a battery of behavioral tests, including memory, attention, locomotion, anxiety and motivational evaluations. Our results show that genetic deficiency of D5R significantly impairs performance in the Morris water maze paradigm, object location and object recognition memory, indicating a relevant role for D5R in spatial memory and recognition memory. Moreover, the lack of D5R resulted in decreased exploration and locomotion. In contrast, D5R deficiency had no impact on working memory, anxiety and depressive-like behavior, measured using the spontaneous alternation, open-field, tail suspension test, and forced swimming test. Electrophysiological analyses performed on hippocampal slices showed impairment in long-term-potentiation in mice lacking D5R. Further analyses at the molecular level showed that genetic deficiency of D5R results in a strong and selective reduction in the expression of the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate the relevant contribution of D5R in memory and suggest a functional interaction of D5R with hippocampal glutamatergic pathways.

  19. Chronic Administration of Benzo(a)pyrene Induces Memory Impairment and Anxiety-Like Behavior and Increases of NR2B DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenping; Tian, Fengjie; Zheng, Jinping; Li, Senlin; Qiang, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, an increasing number of human and animal studies have reported that exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) induces neurological abnormalities and is also associated with adverse effects, such as tumor formation, immunosuppression, teratogenicity, and hormonal disorders. However, the exact mechanisms underlying BaP-induced impairment of neurological function remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the regulating mechanisms underlying the impact of chronic BaP exposure on neurobehavioral performance. Methods C57BL mice received either BaP in different doses (1.0, 2.5, 6.25 mg/kg) or olive oil twice a week for 90 days. Memory and emotional behaviors were evaluated using Y-maze and open-field tests, respectively. Furthermore, levels of mRNA expression were measured by using qPCR, and DNA methylation of NMDA receptor 2B subunit (NR2B) was examined using bisulfate pyrosequencing in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Results Compared to controls, mice that received BaP (2.5, 6.25 mg/kg) showed deficits in short-term memory and an anxiety-like behavior. These behavioral alterations were associated with a down-regulation of the NR2B gene and a concomitant increase in the level of DNA methylation in the NR2B promoter in the two brain regions. Conclusions Chronic BaP exposure induces an increase in DNA methylation in the NR2B gene promoter and down-regulates NR2B expression, which may contribute to its neurotoxic effects on behavioral performance. The results suggest that NR2B vulnerability represents a target for environmental toxicants in the brain. PMID:26901155

  20. Dopamine-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B (Tyr1472) is essential for ERK1/2 activation and processing of novel taste information.

    PubMed

    David, Orit; Barrera, Iliana; Chinnakkaruppan, Adaikkan; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the heterosynaptic interaction between glutamatergic and neuromodulatory synapses is highly important for revealing brain function in health and disease. For instance, the interaction between dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission is vital for memory and synaptic plasticity consolidation, and it is known to converge on extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-MAPK signaling in neurons. Previous studies suggest that dopamine induces N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor phosphorylation at the NR2B Y1472 subunit, influencing receptor internalization at the synaptic plasma membrane. However, it is unclear whether this phosphorylation is upstream to and/or necessary for ERK1/2 activation, which is known to be crucial for synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B at Y1472 is correlated with ERK1/2 activation by dopamine and necessary for it as well. We find that dopamine receptor D1, but not D2, activates ERK1/2 and leads to NR2BY1472 phosphorylation in the mature hippocampus and cortex. Moreover, our results indicate that NR2B Y1472 phosphorylation is necessary for ERK1/2 activation. Importantly, application of dopamine or the D1 receptor agonist SKF38393 to hippocampal slices from NR2B F1472 mutant mice did not result in ERK1/2 activation, suggesting this site is not only correlated with ERK1/2 activation by dopamine stimulation, but also necessary for it. In addition, NR2B F1472 mice show impairment in learning of attenuation of taste neophobia but not associative taste learning. Our study shows that the dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission converge on the NMDA receptor itself, at the Y1472 site of the NR2B subunit, and that this convergence is essential for ERK1/2 activation in the mature brain and for processing new sensory information in the cortex.

  1. Thiol oxidation and altered NR2B/NMDA receptor functions in in vitro and in vivo pilocarpine models: implications for epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Roberto; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Hu, Xiaoping; Montero, Laura M; Greenamyre, J Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis, the main pathological sign of chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), is associated with oxidative injury, altered N-methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) stoichiometry, and loss of hippocampal neurons. However, the mechanisms that drive the chronic progression of TLE remain elusive. Our previous studies have shown that NADPH oxidase activation and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation are required for the up-regulation of the predominantly pre-synaptic NR2B subunit auto-receptor in both in vitro and in vivo pilocarpine (PILO) models of TLE. To provide further understanding of the cellular responses during the early-stages of hyper excitability, we investigated the role of oxidative damage and altered NR2B functions. In rat primary hippocampal cultures, we found that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented PILO-mediated thiol oxidation, apoptosis, cell death and NR2B subunit over-expression. Interestingly, NAC did not block thiol oxidation when added to the neurons 6h after the PILO exposure, suggesting that disulfide formation could rapidly become an irreversible phenomenon. Moreover, NAC pre-treatment did not prevent PILO-induced NR2A subunit over-expression, a critical event in hippocampal sclerosis. Pre-treatment with the highly specific NR2B subunit inhibitor, ifenprodil, partially decreased PILO-mediated thiol oxidation and was not effective in preventing apoptosis and cell death. However, if acutely administered 48h after PILO exposure, ifenprodil blocked glutamate-induced aberrant calcium influx, suggesting the crucial role of NR2B over-expression in triggering neuronal hyper-excitability. Furthermore, ifenprodil treatment was able to prevent NR2A subunit over-expression by means of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Our findings indicate oxidative stress and NR2B/NMDA signaling as promising therapeutic targets for co-treatments aimed to prevent chronic epilepsy following the seizure onset.

  2. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jianwei; Nakajima, Akira; Janssen, William G M; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Xiong, Xiaoli; Morrison, John H; Brorson, James R; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2008-02-27

    It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI) plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s) that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  3. Cleavage of the NR2B subunit amino terminus of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by tissue plasminogen activator: identification of the cleavage site and characterization of ifenprodil and glycine affinities on truncated NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kay-Siong; Leung, How-Wing; Wong, Peter T-H; Low, Chian-Ming

    2012-07-20

    Thrombolysis using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been the key treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke for the past decade. Recent studies, however, suggest that this clot-busting protease also plays various roles in brain physiological and pathophysiological glutamatergic-dependent processes, such as synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. In addition, increasing evidence implicates tPA as an important neuromodulator of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant human tPA cleaves the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor. Analysis of NR2B in rat brain lysates and cortical neurons treated with tPA revealed concentration- and time-dependent degradation of NR2B proteins. Peptide sequencing studies performed on the cleaved-off products obtained from the tPA treatment on a recombinant fusion protein of the amino-terminal domain of NR2B revealed that tPA-mediated cleavage occurred at arginine 67 (Arg(67)). This cleavage is tPA-specific, plasmin-independent, and removes a predicted ~4-kDa fragment (Arg(27)-Arg(67)) from the amino-terminal domain of the NR2B protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative cleavage site Arg(67) to Ala(67) impeded tPA-mediated degradation of recombinant protein. This analysis revealed that NR2B is a novel substrate of tPA and suggested that an Arg(27)-Arg(67)-truncated NR2B-containing NMDA receptor could be formed. Heterologous expression of NR2B with Gln(29)-Arg(67) deleted is functional but exhibits reduced ifenprodil inhibition and increased glycine EC(50) with no change in glutamate EC(50). Our results confirmed NR2B as a novel proteolytic substrate of tPA, where tPA may directly interact with NR2B subunits leading to a change in pharmacological properties of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  4. NR2A- and NR2B-Containing NMDA Receptors in the Prelimbic Medial Prefrontal Cortex Differentially Mediate Trace, Delay, and Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmartin, Marieke R.; Kwapis, Janine L.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of "N"-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex (PL mPFC) is necessary for the acquisition of both trace and contextual fear memories, but it is not known how specific NR2 subunits support each association. The NR2B subunit confers unique properties to the NMDAR and may differentially…

  5. NR2A- and NR2B-Containing NMDA Receptors in the Prelimbic Medial Prefrontal Cortex Differentially Mediate Trace, Delay, and Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmartin, Marieke R.; Kwapis, Janine L.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of "N"-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex (PL mPFC) is necessary for the acquisition of both trace and contextual fear memories, but it is not known how specific NR2 subunits support each association. The NR2B subunit confers unique properties to the NMDAR and may differentially…

  6. Conformationally constrained NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists derived from ifenprodil: Synthesis and biological evaluation of tetrahydro-3-benzazepine-1,7-diols.

    PubMed

    Tewes, Bastian; Frehland, Bastian; Schepmann, Dirk; Schmidtke, Kai-Uwe; Winckler, Thomas; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2010-11-15

    NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists with tetrahydro-3-benzazepine-1,7-diol scaffold have been designed by formal cleavage and reconstitution of the piperidine ring of the lead compound ifenprodil (1). The secondary amine 10 represents the central building block for the synthesis of more than 25 tetrahydro-3-benzazepin-1-ols. Generally 7-hydroxy derivatives display higher NR2B receptor affinities than the corresponding 7-benzyloxy compounds. A distance of four atoms (five bond lengths) between the basic amino group and the terminal aryl moiety led to highest NR2B affinity. 3-(4-Phenylbutyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine-1,7-diol (WMS-1410, 25) represents the most promising NR2B antagonist of this series showing a K(i)-value of 14nM. Compound 25 reveals excellent selectivity over more than 100 further relevant target proteins, antagonizes glutamate induced excitotoxicity (IC(50)=18.4nM) and is metabolically more stable than ifenprodil. Up to a dose of 100mg/kg 25 is well tolerated by mice and it shows dose dependent analgesic activity in the late neuropathic pain phase of the formalin assay.

  7. Bisphenol-A rapidly promotes dynamic changes in hippocampal dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaohong Ye Yinping; Li Tao; Chen Lei; Tian Dong; Luo Qingqing; Lu Mei

    2010-12-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is known to be a potent endocrine disrupter. Evidence is emerging that estrogen exerts a rapid influence on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and the dendritic spine density, which requires activation of NMDA receptors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BPA (ranging from 1 to 1000 nM), focusing on the rapid dynamic changes in dendritic filopodia and the expressions of estrogen receptor (ER) {beta} and NMDA receptor, as well as the phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the cultured hippocampal neurons. A specific ER antagonist ICI 182,780 was used to examine the potential involvement of ERs. The results demonstrated that exposure to BPA (ranging from 10 to 1000 nM) for 30 min rapidly enhanced the motility and the density of dendritic filopodia in the cultured hippocampal neurons, as well as the phosphorylation of NR2B (pNR2B), though the expressions of NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2B, and ER{beta} were not changed. The antagonist of ERs completely inhibited the BPA-induced increases in the filopodial motility and the number of filopodia extending from dendrites. The increased pNR2B induced by BPA (100 nM) was also completely eliminated. Furthermore, BPA attenuated the effects of 17{beta}-estradiol (17{beta}-E{sub 2}) on the dendritic filopodia outgrowth and the expression of pNR2B when BPA was co-treated with 17{beta}-E{sub 2}. The present results suggest that BPA, like 17{beta}-E{sub 2}, rapidly results in the enhanced motility and density of dendritic filopodia in the cultured hippocampal neurons with the concomitant activation of NMDA receptor subunit NR2B via an ER-mediated signaling pathway. Meanwhile, BPA suppressed the enhancement effects of 17{beta}-E{sub 2} when it coexists with 17{beta}-E{sub 2}. These results provided important evidence suggesting the neurotoxicity of the low levels of BPA during the early postnatal development of the brain.

  8. Overactivation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors through entorhinal-hippocampal connection initiates accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in rat hippocampus after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng-Shi; Liu, An-Chun; Chen, Juan; Pan, Zhi-Yong; Wan, Qi; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Ze-Fen

    2015-08-01

    Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) induces secondary damages in the hippocampus that is remote from primary ischemic regions. Tau hyperphosphorylation is an important risk for neurodegenerative diseases. Increased tau phosphorylation has been identified in ischemic cortex, but little is known regarding the changes in the hippocampus. We showed that unilateral transient MCAO induced accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and concurrent dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β at Ser 9 in the ipsilateral hippocampus. These MCAO-induced changes were not reproduced when glutamatergic inputs from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampus were transected; however, the changes were mimicked by intrahippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) administration. Inhibition of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunit NR2B, but not NR2A activity in the hippocampus attenuated the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and spatial cognitive impairment in MCAO rats. Together, our data suggest that overactivation of NR2B-containing NMDARs through entorhinal-hippocampal connection plays an important role in the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampus following MCAO. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β is an important protein kinase involved in NMDARs-mediated tau hyperphosphorylation. This study indicates that early inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs may represent a potential strategy to prevent or delay the occurrence of post-stroke dementia. Middle cerebral artery occlusion induces secondary damage in the hippocampus that is remote from primary ischemic regions. We propose that excessive activation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors through entorhinal-hippocampal connection initiated the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampus, which subsequently induced cognitive deficit. This study provides new insights into the prospects of NR2B inhibition in stoke therapy.

  9. [Effect of electroacupuncture on phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr 1742 site in the spinal dorsal horn of CFA rats].

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi; Fang, Jian-Qiao; Fang, Jun-Fan; Du, Jun-Ying; Qiu, Yu-Jie; Liu, Jin

    2013-10-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on phosphorylation of spinal NR2B at Tyr 1742 site in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced inflammatory pain rats. METHods Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal group (N group, n = 10), the model group (CFA group, n = 15), and the EA group (n = 15). The inflammatory pain model was established by subcutaneous injecting CFA (0.1 mL per rat) into the right hind paw. Paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) were measured before CFA injection (as the base), as well as at 24 h, 25 h, 3rd day, and 7th day after CFA injection. Phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr 1742 site in the ispilateral spinal dorsal horn at the 3rd day post-injection were detected using immunohistochemical assay. PWTs in the CFA group were significantly lower than those of the N group at every detective time point post-injection (P < 0.01). PWTs were obviously lower in the EA group than in the N group at 24 h post-injection (P < 0.01). It showed increasing tendency, markedly higher than those of the CFA group at 25 h and 3rd day post-injection (P < 0.01). Compared with the N group, the ratio of p-NR2B positive cells in the ispilateral spinal dorsal horn of rats in the CFA group was up-regulated. Compared with the CFA group, the ratio of p-NR2B positive cells in the ispilateral spinal dorsal horn of rats showed a decreasing tendency in the EA group. EA might effectively inhibit CFA-induced inflammatory pain possibly associated with down-regulating phosphorylation of NR2B at Tyr 1742 site in the ispilateral spinal dorsal horn.

  10. Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, facilitates fear extinction and enhances expression of the hippocampal NR2B-containing NMDA receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yosuke; Morinobu, Shigeru; Takei, Shiro; Fuchikami, Manabu; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Shigeto; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2012-05-01

    Histone acetylation, which alters the compact chromatin structure and changes the accessibility of DNA to regulatory proteins, is emerging as a fundamental mechanism for regulating gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase histone acetylation and enhance fear extinction. In this study, we examined whether vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor, facilitates fear extinction, using a contextual fear conditioning (FC) paradigm, in Sprague-Dawley rats. We found that vorinostat facilitated fear extinction. Next, the levels of global acetylated histone H3 and H4 were measured by Western blotting. We also assessed the effect of vorinostat on the hippocampal levels of NMDA receptor mRNA by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) and protein by Western blotting. 2 h after vorinostat administration, the levels acetylated histones and NR2B mRNA, but not NR1 or NR2A mRNA, were elevated in the hippocampus. The NR2B protein level was elevated 4 h after vorinostat administration. Last, we investigated the levels of acetylated histones and phospho-CREB (p-CREB) binding at the promoter of the NR2B gene using the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay followed by RT-PCR. The ChIP assay revealed increases in the levels of acetylated histones and they were accompanied by enhanced binding of p-CREB to its binding site at the promoter of the NR2B gene 2 h after vorinostat administration. These findings suggest that vorinostat increases the expression of NR2B in the hippocampus by enhancing histone acetylation, and this process may be implicated in fear extinction.

  11. Selective Regulation of NR2B by Protein Phosphatase-1 for the Control of the NMDA Receptor in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Grewe, Benjamin F.; Tyagarajan, Shiva K.; Helmchen, Fritjof; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2012-01-01

    An imbalance between pro-survival and pro-death pathways in brain cells can lead to neuronal cell death and neurodegeneration. While such imbalance is known to be associated with alterations in glutamatergic and Ca2+ signaling, the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We identified the protein Ser/Thr phosphatase protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), an enzyme associated with glutamate receptors, as a key trigger of survival pathways that can prevent neuronal death and neurodegeneration in the adult hippocampus. We show that PP1α overexpression in hippocampal neurons limits NMDA receptor overactivation and Ca2+ overload during an excitotoxic event, while PP1 inhibition favors Ca2+ overload and cell death. The protective effect of PP1 is associated with a selective dephosphorylation on a residue phosphorylated by CaMKIIα on the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B, which promotes pro-survival pathways and associated transcriptional programs. These results reveal a novel contributor to the mechanisms of neuroprotection and underscore the importance of PP1-dependent dephosphorylation in these mechanisms. They provide a new target for the development of potential therapeutic treatment of neurodegeneration. PMID:22479519

  12. Intrathecal injection of the peptide myr-NR2B9c attenuates bone cancer pain via perturbing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-PSD-95 protein interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Cui, Xinlong; Sun, Yu-E; Yang, Xuli; Ni, Kun; Zhou, Yu; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-06-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDARs)-dependent central sensitization plays an important role in cancer pain. Binding of NMDAR subunit 2B (NR2B) by postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) can couple NMDAR activity to intracellular enzymes, such as neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), facilitate downstream signaling pathways, and modulate NMDAR stability, contributing to synaptic plasticity. In this study, we investigated whether perturbing the specific interaction between spinal NR2B-containing NMDAR and PSD-95, using a peptide-mimetic strategy, could attenuate bone cancer-related pain behaviors. Osteosarcoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right femurs of C3H/HeJ mice to induce progressive bone cancer-related pain behaviors. Western blotting was applied to examine the expression of spinal phospho-Tyr1472 NR2B, nNOS, and PSD-95. We further investigated the effects of intrathecal injection of the mimetic peptide Myr-NR2B9c, which competitively disrupts the interaction between PSD-95 and NR2B, on nociceptive behaviors and on the upregulation of phospho-Tyr1472 NR2B, nNOS, and PSD-95 associated with bone cancer pain in the spinal cord. Inoculation of osteosarcoma cells induced progressive bone cancer pain and resulted in a significant upregulation of phospho-Tyr1472 NR2B, nNOS, and PSD-95. Intrathecal administration of Myr-NR2B9c attenuated bone cancer-evoked mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, and reduced spinal phospho-Tyr1472 NR2B, nNOS, and PSD-95 expression. Intrathecal administration of Myr-NR2B9c reduced bone cancer pain. Internalization of spinal NR2B and dissociation NR2B-containing NMDARs activation from downstream nNOS signaling may contribute to the analgesic effects of Myr-NR2B9c. This approach may circumvent the negative consequences associated with blocking NMDARs, and may be a novel strategy for the treatment of bone cancer pain.

  13. Effects of L-3-n-butylphthalide on cognitive dysfunction and NR2B expression in hippocampus of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Songyun; Zhang, Lihui; Wang, Ruiying; Wang, Mian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with rapid cognitive decline. Currently, there is no effective treatment for cognitive dysfunction induced by diabetes. L-3-n-Butylphthalide (L-NBP) is a nerve protective drug extracted from seeds of celery, which has been proved to improve learning and memory in vascular dementia animal models by improving microcirculation, protecting mitochondria and increasing long-term potentiation (LTP). NR2B, one of the subunits of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, has been proved to be an important factor for the formation of LTP. The study aimed to investigate the role of NR2B in cognitive dysfunction in the rats with type 1 diabetes and define the protective effects of L-NBP on cognition. A rat model of type 1 diabetes was established by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin at 60 mg/kg. Animals were randomly allocated to four groups: normal control (NC); diabetic control (DC); diabetic + low L-NBP (DL, administered L-NBP 60 mg/kg per day for 12 weeks); and diabetic + high L-NBP (DH, administered L-NBP 120 mg/kg per day, for 12 weeks). After 12 weeks, cognitive and memory changes were investigated in the Morris water maze. The expression of NR2B was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Our results indicated that the escape latency was significantly increased and the number of crossing platform was significantly decreased in DC group compared to NC group. Also, the expression of NR2B was significantly declined in DC group. However, compared to DC group, the expression of NR2B of the L-NBP-treated groups was significantly increased and the escape latency was shortened with the DH group being the most obvious. Therefore, L-NBP can improve the cognitive function by up-regulating the expression of NR2B in STZ-diabetic rats, which may provide the direction for future diabetic encephalopathy therapy.

  14. Efficacy of lovastatin on learning and memory deficits caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia: through regulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptor-ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xin-long; Min, Jing-jing; Pan, Cai-yu; Zhao, Cui-cui; Pan, Lu-lu; Gui, Fei-fei; Jin, Lu; Wang, Xiao-tong

    2014-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) exposure leads to learnning and memory deficits in rats. Overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors(NMDARs) can lead to the death of neurons through a process termed excitotoxicity, which is involved in CIHH-induced cognitive deficits. Excessively activated NR2B (GluN2B)-containing NMDARs was reported as the main cause of excitotoxicity. The ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2) signaling cascade acts as a key component in NMDARs-dependent neuronal plasticity and survival. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), synapse-associated protein 102 (SAP102) and Ras GTPase-activating protein (SynGAP) have been shown to be involved in the regulation of NMDAR-ERK signalling cascade. Recent studies revealed statins (the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor) have effect on the expression of NMDARs. The present study intends to explore the potential effect of lovastatin on CIHH-induced cognitive deficits and the NR2B-ERK signaling pathway. Eighty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. Except for those in the control group, the rats were exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) (9 ∼ 11%O2, 5.5 ∼ 6.5%CO2) for 4 weeks. After lovastatin administration, the rats performed better in the Morris water maze test. Electron microscopy showed alleviated hippocampal neuronal synaptic damage. Further observation suggested that either lovastatin or ifenprodil (a selective NR2B antagonist) administration similarly downregulated NR2B subunit expression leading to a suppression of CaMKII/SAP102/SynGAP signaling cascade, which in turn enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. The phosphorylated ERK1/2 induced signaling cascade involving cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activation, which is responsible for neuroprotection. These findings suggest that the ameliorative cognitive deficits caused by lovastatin

  15. Efficacy of Lovastatin on Learning and Memory Deficits Caused by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia-Hypercapnia: Through Regulation of NR2B-Containing NMDA Receptor-ERK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cai-yu; Zhao, Cui-cui; Pan, Lu-lu; Gui, Fei-fei; Jin, Lu; Wang, Xiao-tong

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) exposure leads to learnning and memory deficits in rats. Overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors(NMDARs) can lead to the death of neurons through a process termed excitotoxicity, which is involved in CIHH-induced cognitive deficits. Excessively activated NR2B (GluN2B)-containing NMDARs was reported as the main cause of excitotoxicity. The ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2) signaling cascade acts as a key component in NMDARs-dependent neuronal plasticity and survival. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), synapse-associated protein 102 (SAP102) and Ras GTPase-activating protein (SynGAP) have been shown to be involved in the regulation of NMDAR-ERK signalling cascade. Recent studies revealed statins (the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor) have effect on the expression of NMDARs. The present study intends to explore the potential effect of lovastatin on CIHH-induced cognitive deficits and the NR2B-ERK signaling pathway. Methods and Findings Eighty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. Except for those in the control group, the rats were exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia-hypercapnia (CIHH) (9∼11%O2, 5.5∼6.5%CO2) for 4 weeks. After lovastatin administration, the rats performed better in the Morris water maze test. Electron microscopy showed alleviated hippocampal neuronal synaptic damage. Further observation suggested that either lovastatin or ifenprodil (a selective NR2B antagonist) administration similarly downregulated NR2B subunit expression leading to a suppression of CaMKII/SAP102/SynGAP signaling cascade, which in turn enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. The phosphorylated ERK1/2 induced signaling cascade involving cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activation, which is responsible for neuroprotection. Conclusions These findings suggest that the ameliorative

  16. Copper-catalyzed amination of (bromophenyl)ethanolamine for a concise synthesis of aniline-containing analogues of NMDA NR2B antagonist ifenprodil.

    PubMed

    Bouteiller, Cédric; Becerril-Ortega, Javier; Marchand, Patrice; Nicole, Olivier; Barré, Louisa; Buisson, Alain; Perrio, Cécile

    2010-03-07

    An operationally simple and concise synthesis of anilinoethanolamines, as NMDA NR2B receptor antagonist ifenprodil analogues, was developed via a copper-catalyzed amination of the corresponding bromoarene. Coupling was achieved with linear primary alkylamines, alpha,omega-diamines, hexanolamine and benzophenone imine, as well as with aqueous ammonia, in good yields using CuI and N,N-diethylsalicylamide, 2,4-pentadione or 2-acetylcyclohexanone as catalytic systems. Amination with ethylene diamine was efficient even in the absence of an additive ligand, whereas no reaction occurred with ethanolamine whatever the conditions used. The anilinoethanolamines were evaluated as NR2B receptor antagonists in a functional inhibition assay. Aminoethylanilines displayed inhibition effects close to that of ifenprodil.

  17. Regulation of fear extinction versus other affective behaviors by discrete cortical scaffolding complexes associated with NR2B and PKA signaling.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, K A; Leaderbrand, K; Jovasevic, V; Guedea, A L; Kassam, F; Radulovic, J

    2015-10-13

    In patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), fear evoked by trauma-related memories lasts long past the traumatic event and it is often complicated by general anxiety and depressed mood. This poses a treatment challenge, as drugs beneficial for some symptoms might exacerbate others. For example, in preclinical studies, antagonists of the NR2B subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and activators of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) act as potent antidepressants and anxiolytics, but they block fear extinction. Using mice, we attempted to overcome this problem by interfering with individual NR2B and PKA signaling complexes organized by scaffolding proteins. We infused cell-permeable Tat peptides that displaced either NR2B from receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), or PKA from A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) or microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). The infusions were targeted to the retrosplenial cortex, an area involved in both fear extinction of remotely acquired memories and in mood regulation. Tat-RACK1 and Tat-AKAP enhanced fear extinction, all peptides reduced anxiety and none affected baseline depression-like behavior. However, disruption of PKA complexes distinctively interfered with the rapid antidepressant actions of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors antagonist MK-801 in that Tat-MAP2 blocked, whereas Tat-AKAP completely inverted the effect of MK-801 from antidepressant to depressant. These effects were unrelated to the MK-801-induced changes of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA levels. Together, the findings suggest that NR2B-RACK1 complexes specifically contribute to fear extinction, and may provide a target for the treatment of PTSD. AKAP-PKA, on the other hand, appears to modulate fear extinction and antidepressant responses in opposite directions.

  18. NMDA receptor subunit expression in the supraoptic nucleus of adult rats: Dominance of NR2B and NR2D

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Faye C; Sladek, Celia D

    2011-01-01

    The supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus contains magnocellular neurosecretory neurons (MNC) which synthesize and release the peptide hormones vasopressin and oxytocin. Glutamate is a prominent excitatory neurotransmitter in the SON and regulates MNC excitability. NMDA receptors (NMDAR), a type of ionotropic glutamate receptor, mediate synaptic plasticity of MNCs and are necessary for characteristic burst firing patterns which serve to maximize hormone release. NMDARs are di- or tri-heteromeric complexes of NR1 and NR2 subunits. Receptor properties depend on NR2 subunit composition and variable splicing of NR1. We investigated the expression profile of NR1 and NR2 subunits in the SON at the mRNA and protein levels, plus protein expression of NR1 splice variants in control and salt-loaded adult rats. There was robust mRNA expression of all subunits, with NR2D levels being the highest. At the protein level, NR1, NR2B and NR2D were robustly expressed, while NR2A was weakly expressed. NR2C protein was not detected with either of two antibodies. All four NR1 splice variant cassettes (N1, C1, C2, C2’) were detected in the SON, though NR1 N1 expression was too low for accurate analysis. Three days of salt-loading did not alter mRNA, protein or splice variant expression of NMDAR subunits in the SON. Robust NR2D protein expression has not been previously shown in MNCs, and is uncommon in the adult brain. Though the functional significance of this unusual expression profile is unknown, it may contribute to important physiological characteristics of SON neurons, such as burst firing and resistance to excitotoxicity. PMID:21397592

  19. Taste novelty induces intracellular redistribution of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptor in the insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Jaramillo, Luis; Jimenez, Beatriz; Ramirez-Munguía, Nadia; Delint-Ramírez, Ilse; Luna-Illades, Claudio; Tapia, Ricardo; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    2008-06-18

    Taste recognition memory is a process by which animals associate a taste previously experienced with its gastric consequences. Novel taste presentation induces in the insular cortex biochemical modifications that decrease after the taste becomes familiar. Here we show that, in this cortex, consumption of a novel taste produces an increase of the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the NMDA receptor in the detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction. This increase did not occur in the adjacent parietal cortex, was not due to a change in the total amount of protein, and is related with the novelty of the stimulus since it was reduced after the taste became familiar. Furthermore, NR2A and NR2B subunits increase in the DRM was blocked by the injection of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. These results suggest that modulation of NMDA receptors in the insular cortex through the increase of its NR2A and NR2B subunits in the DRM is involved in the taste memory formation via a cholinergic process.

  20. Identification of a Novel Rat NR2B Subunit Gene Promoter Region Variant and Its Association with Microwave-Induced Neuron Impairment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Feng; Tian, Da-Wei; Li, Hai-Juan; Gao, Ya-Bing; Wang, Chang-Zhen; Zhao, Li; Zuo, Hong-Yan; Dong, Ji; Qiao, Si-Mo; Zou, Yong; Xiong, Lu; Zhou, Hong-Mei; Yang, Yue-Feng; Peng, Rui-Yun; Hu, Xiang-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Microwave radiation has been implicated in cognitive dysfunction and neuronal injury in animal models and in human investigations; however, the mechanism of these effects is unclear. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in the rat GRIN2B promoter region were screened. The associations of these SNPs with microwave-induced rat brain dysfunction and with rat pheochromocytoma-12 (PC12) cell function were investigated. Wistar rats (n = 160) were exposed to microwave radiation (30 mW/cm(2) for 5 min/day, 5 days/week, over a period of 2 months). Screening of the GRIN2B promoter region revealed a stable C-to-T variant at nucleotide position -217 that was not induced by microwave exposure. The learning and memory ability, amino acid contents in the hippocampus and cerebrospinal fluid, and NR2B expression were then investigated in the different genotypes. Following microwave exposure, NR2B protein expression decreased, while the Glu contents in the hippocampus and CSF increased, and memory impairment was observed in the TT genotype but not the CC and CT genotypes. In PC12 cells, the effects of the T allele were more pronounced than those of the C allele on transcription factor binding ability, transcriptional activity, NR2B mRNA, and protein expression. These effects may be related to the detrimental role of the T allele and the protective role of the C allele in rat brain function and PC12 cells exposed to microwave radiation.

  1. Soluble factors from IL-1β-stimulated astrocytes activate NR1a/NR2B receptors: implications for HIV-1-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Jing, Tao; Wu, Li; Borgmann, Kathleen; Surendran, Sankar; Ghorpade, Anuja; Liu, Jianuo; Xiong, Huangui

    2010-11-12

    Astrocytes play an important role in astrocyte-neuron homeostasis. In HIV-1-infected brain, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) activation of astrocytes contributes to neurodegeneration. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying IL-1β-activated-astrocytes-induced neurodegeneration in HIV-1-infected brain are largely unknown. We hypothesize that secretory factors from the activated astrocytes affect N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, a major pathway implicated in HIV-1-associated neurodegeneration. To test this hypothesis, we studied effects of IL-1β-stimulated astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM+) for its ability to activate NR1a/NR2B receptors expressed on Xenopus oocytes. Astrocytes treated with IL-1β 20ng/ml for 24h induced CXCL8, CCL2, MMP1 and MMP7. Pressure ejection of the ACM(+) produced an inward current in NR1a/NR2B-expressing oocytes. The inward current produced by ACM(+) was blocked by NMDA receptor antagonist, APV but not by non-NMDA receptor antagonist, CNQX. These results suggest that IL-1β stimulated astrocytes activate NR1a/NR2B receptors which may have implications in HIV-1-associated neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrogen-rich saline prevents remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia and inhibits MnSOD nitration via regulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptor in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Shu, R; Wang, H; Yu, Y; Wang, C; Yang, M; Wang, M; Wang, G

    2014-11-07

    Remifentanil administration may subsequently cause paradoxical hyperalgesia in animals and humans, but mechanisms remain unclear. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) nitration and inactivation caused by generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are involved in the induction and maintenance of central neuropathic pain. Hydrogen which selectively removes superoxide has gained much attention in recent years. In this study, we investigated antinociceptive effects of hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) on remifentanil-induced postsurgical hyperalgesia in a rat model of incisional pain. HRS was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before remifentanil infusion (1 μg kg(-1) min(-1) for 60 min). A selective NR2B antagonist Ro25-6981 was used to investigate whether antihypernociception of HRS is associated with NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Nociception was evaluated by the paw withdrawal mechanical threshold and thermal latency respectively. Then we assessed MnSOD, NR2A and NR2B in spinal cord dorsal horn via Western blot and immunohistochemistry after nociceptive tests. Here, we found that the analgesic effect of remifentanil was followed by long-term hyperalgesia lasting at least postoperative 7 days, which was accompanied with increase in NR2B expression and trafficking from cytoplasm to surface and MnSOD nitration in dorsal horn. Pretreatment with HRS (10 ml/kg) significantly attenuated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, blocked NR2B trafficking and MnSOD nitration in dorsal horn after remifentanil infusion. Ro25-6981 not 5 μg but 10 and 50 μg dosage-dependently attenuated hyperalgesia, and inhibited MnSOD nitration. Hyperalgesia and MnSOD nitration were attenuated after the combination of HRS (2.5 ml/kg) and Ro25-6981 (5 μg). In conclusion, HRS (10 ml/kg) might reverse remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia, through regulating NR2B-containing NMDAR trafficking to control MnSOD nitration and enhance MnSOD activity.

  3. Inhibiting effects of rhynchophylline on zebrafish methamphetamine dependence are associated with amelioration of neurotransmitters content and down-regulation of TH and NR2B expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingjin; Chen, Yifei; Li, Chan; Peng, Qiuxian; Fang, Miao; Liu, Wei; Kang, Qunzhao; Lin, Yingbo; Yung, Ken Kin Lam; Mo, Zhixian

    2016-07-04

    Others and we have reported that rhynchophylline reverses amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) effect which may be partly mediated by amelioration of central neurotransmitters and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B) levels in the rat brains. The current study investigated the inhibiting effects of rhynchophylline on methamphetamine-induced (METH-induced) CPP in adult zebrafish and METH-induced locomotor activity in tyrosine hydroxylase-green fluorescent protein (TH-GFP) transgenic zebrafish larvae and attempted to confirm the hypothesis that these effects were mediated via regulation of neurotransmitters and dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems. After baseline preference test (on days 1-3), zebrafish were injected intraperitoneally METH (on days 4, 6 and 8) or the same volume of fish physiological saline (on days 5 and 7) and were immediately conditioned. Rhynchophylline was administered at 12h after injection of METH. On day 9, zebrafish were tested for METH-induced CPP. Results revealed that rhynchophylline (100mg/kg) significantly inhibited the acquisition of METH-induced CPP, reduced the content of dopamine and glutamate and down-regulated the expression of TH and NR2B in the CPP zebrafish brains. Furthermore, the influence of rhynchophylline on METH-induced locomotor activity was also observed in TH-GFP transgenic zebrafish larvae. Results showed that rhynchophylline (50mg/L) treatment led to a significant reduction on the locomotor activity and TH expression in TH-GFP transgenic zebrafish larvae. Taken together, these data indicate that the inhibition of the formation of METH dependence by rhynchophylline in zebrafish is associated with amelioration of the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate content and down-regulation of TH and NR2B expression.

  4. Pharmacological inhibition of PTEN attenuates cognitive deficits caused by neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane via inhibition of NR2B-mediated tau phosphorylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Xin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianfang; Li, Shiyong; Zhao, Yilin; Wang, Jintao; Luo, Ailin

    2017-03-01

    Evidence has shown that children exposed to repeated anesthesia in early childhood display long-term cognitive disabilities. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Our previous study has indicated the involvement of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in isoflurane-induced decrease of self-renewal capacity in hippocampal neural precursor cells. Additionally, it is demonstrated by others that PTEN inhibition could protect against cognitive impairment via reduction of tau phosphorylation in the alzheimer's disease model. Therefore, in the present in vivo study, we aimed to examine the effects of PTEN inhibition on the cognitive dysfunction and tau hyperphosphorylation caused by neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane. Our results showed that the neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane resulted in the activation of PTEN in the hippocampus. The treatment of PTEN inhibitor BPV (pic) restored PSD-95 synthesis, and attenuated tau phosphorylation as well as the cognitive dysfunction caused by the repeated isoflurane exposures. In addition, BPV (pic) treatment reversed the activation of NR2B-containing NMDARs induced by repeated isoflurane exposures, while in turn, the antagonism of NR2B subunit with ifenprodil alleviated tau phosphorylation, indicating a possible role of NR2B as the downstream of PTEN in mediating tau phosphorylation in the neonatal rats repeatedly exposed to isoflurane. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel role of PTEN in mediating tau phosphorylation and cognitive deficits caused by neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane, implying that targeting on PTEN may be a potential therapeutic approach for the anesthetic-related cognitive decline in the developing brain.

  5. Regulation of fear extinction versus other affective behaviors by discrete cortical scaffolding complexes associated with NR2B and PKA signaling

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, K A; Leaderbrand, K; Jovasevic, V; Guedea, A L; Kassam, F; Radulovic, J

    2015-01-01

    In patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), fear evoked by trauma-related memories lasts long past the traumatic event and it is often complicated by general anxiety and depressed mood. This poses a treatment challenge, as drugs beneficial for some symptoms might exacerbate others. For example, in preclinical studies, antagonists of the NR2B subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and activators of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) act as potent antidepressants and anxiolytics, but they block fear extinction. Using mice, we attempted to overcome this problem by interfering with individual NR2B and PKA signaling complexes organized by scaffolding proteins. We infused cell-permeable Tat peptides that displaced either NR2B from receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), or PKA from A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) or microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). The infusions were targeted to the retrosplenial cortex, an area involved in both fear extinction of remotely acquired memories and in mood regulation. Tat-RACK1 and Tat-AKAP enhanced fear extinction, all peptides reduced anxiety and none affected baseline depression-like behavior. However, disruption of PKA complexes distinctively interfered with the rapid antidepressant actions of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors antagonist MK-801 in that Tat-MAP2 blocked, whereas Tat-AKAP completely inverted the effect of MK-801 from antidepressant to depressant. These effects were unrelated to the MK-801-induced changes of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA levels. Together, the findings suggest that NR2B–RACK1 complexes specifically contribute to fear extinction, and may provide a target for the treatment of PTSD. AKAP-PKA, on the other hand, appears to modulate fear extinction and antidepressant responses in opposite directions. PMID:26460481

  6. State-dependent increase of cortical gamma activity during REM sleep after selective blockade of NR2B subunit containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Bernat

    2012-07-01

    Sub-anesthetic doses of NMDA receptor antagonists suppress sleep and elicit continuous high-power gamma oscillations lasting for hours. This effect is subunit-specific, as it was also seen after preferential blockade of the NR2A but not of the NR2B subunit-containing receptors. The objective of this study was to test whether NR2B receptor antagonists that do not induce lasting aberrant gamma elevation affect gamma activity during specific behaviors and states, including REM sleep, when gamma normally occurs. Gamma oscillations in cortical EEG were assessed in different vigilance states in rats and were compared before and after injection of nonselective (ketamine, 10 mg/kg, and MK801, 0.2 mg/kg), as well as NR2A-preferring (NVP-AAM077, 20 mg/kg), and NR2B-selective NMDA receptor antagonists (Ro25-6985, 10 mg), and vehicle. In contrast to nonselective and NR2A-preferring antagonists, Ro25-6985 did not disrupt sleep and had no effect on gamma activity during waking and slow wave sleep. It significantly increased, however, gamma power in the frontal (but not in occipital) cortex during REM sleep (by 37% ± 10%, average in the first 4 h). The effect had a short onset; enhanced gamma activity appeared as early as in the first REM sleep episode post-injection and lasted over 8 hours. Increased gamma power induced by MK-801 (46% ± 5%) and NVP-AAM077 (100% ± 8%) during REM sleep could also be detected several hours after injection when periodic alternation of sleep-wake states returned. By acting on gamma oscillations in a state-dependent manner, NMDA receptors might have subunit-specific role in REM sleep-associated cognitive processes.

  7. Identification of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-related epitope, NR2B, in the normal human ovary: implication for the pathogenesis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Naoko; Kinoshita, Michiaki; Saito, Yuko; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2013-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are one type of ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) and are heterotetrametric cation channels composed of NMDAR1 (NR1), NMDAR2 (NR2A, 2B, 2C or 2D) and NMDAR3 (NR3A or NR3B) subunits. The main subunits are NR1 and NR2 and their combinations are classified into several diverse forms including NR1/NR1/NR2A/NR2A, NR1/NR1/NR2B/NR2B and NR1/NR1/NR2A/NR2B. NMDARs are physiologically related to synapse development and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis mainly affecting young women, with various manifestations including initial psychiatric symptoms, subsequent unresponsiveness, intractable generalized seizure, dysautonomia and orofacial dyskinesia. This disorder is often accompanied by ovarian teratoma that is originated from oocytes. Anti-neural antibody for the NR1/NR2 heteromer of NMDAR has been identified as a disease-specific hallmark. It has been emphasized that neural components in ovarian teratoma act as a trigger to produce anti-NMDAR antibodies, although about half of the patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis are not associated with ovarian teratoma. To identify NMDAR-related epitopes located outside of the brain, we performed immunohistochemical examinations of normal human ovary and testis using specific antibodies against NR1, NR2A and NR2B, respectively, and found expression of the NR2B epitope in the cytoplasm of oocytes. In contrast, the testis showed no immunohistochemical reactivity. Therefore, oocytes contain NMDAR-related epitopes including NR2B. The NMDAR-related epitopes in normal oocytes may cause an antigen-antibody reaction in certain pathological conditions. The presence of NR2B immunoreactivity in oocytes may account for the fact that anti-NMDAR encephalitis predominantly affects young females.

  8. Activation of spinal MrgC-Gi-NR2B-nNOS signaling pathway by Mas oncogene-related gene C receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 attenuates bone cancer pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu'e; Zhang, Juan; Lei, Yishan; Lu, Cui'e; Hou, Bailing; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effects of Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) C receptors (MrgC) on the expression and activation of spinal Gi protein, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in mouse model of bone cancer pain. The number of spontaneous foot lift (NSF) and paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) were measured after inoculation of tumor cells and intrathecal injection of MrgC agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22) or MrgC antagonist anti-MrgC for 14 days after operation. Expression of spinal MrgC, Gi protein, NR2B and nNOS and their phosphorylated forms after inoculation was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Double labeling was used to identify the co-localization of NR2B or nNOS with MrgC in spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) neurons. The effects of intrathecal injection of BAM8-22 or anti-MrgC on nociceptive behaviors and the corresponding expression of spinal MrgC, Gi protein, NR2B and nNOS were also investigated. The expression of spinal MrgC, Gi protein, NR2B, and nNOS was higher in tumor-bearing mice in comparison to sham mice or normal mice. Intrathecal injection of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 significantly alleviated bone cancer pain, up-regulated MrgC and Gi protein expression, and down-regulated the expression of spinal p-NR2B, t-nNOS and p-nNOS in SCDH on day 14 after operation, whereas administration of anti-MrgC produced the opposite effect. Meanwhile, MrgC-like immunoreactivity (IR) co-localizes with NR2B-IR or nNOS-IR in SCDH neurons. The present study demonstrates that MrgC-activated spinal Gi-NR2B-nNOS signaling pathway plays important roles in the development of bone cancer pain. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of bone cancer pain.

  9. Adenosine A₂A receptors permit mGluR5-evoked tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B (Tyr1472) in rat hippocampus: a possible key mechanism in NMDA receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Sarantis, Konstantinos; Tsiamaki, Eirini; Kouvaros, Stylianos; Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Angelatou, Fevronia

    2015-11-01

    A great body of evidence points toward a functional interaction between metabotropic glutamate 5 receptors (mGluR5) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR) that enhances synaptic plasticity and cognition. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this interaction remains unclear. Here, we show that co-activation of mGluR5 and NMDAR in hippocampal slices synergistically leads to a robust phosphorylation of NR2B (Tyr1472), which is Src kinase dependent and is enabled by endogenous adenosine acting on A2A receptors. As it is well known, NR2B (Tyr1472) phosphorylation anchors NR2B-containing NMDARs to the surface of post-synaptic membranes, preventing their internalization. This is supported by our electrophysiological experiments showing that co-activation of mGluR5 and NMDARs robustly enhances NMDAR-dependent neuronal excitability recorded in CA1 hippocampal region, which temporally coincides with the robust increase in NR2B (Tyr1472) phosphorylation, depends on Src kinases and is also permitted by A2A receptors. Thus, we strongly suggest that NR2B (Tyr1472) phosphorylation constitutes, at least to some extent, the molecular mechanism underlying the mGluR5-mediated enhancement of NMDAR-dependent responses, which is modulated by A2A receptors. A better understanding of the molecular basis of mGluR5/NMDAR interaction would elucidate their role in synaptic plasticity processes as well as in pathological conditions. We propose the following molecular mechanism by which metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGluR5) potentiate ionotropic Glutamate N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDAR) responses in rat hippocampus. Co-activation of mGLUR5/NMDAR activates Src kinases, leading to NR2B(Tyr1472) phosphorylation, which anchors NR2B-containing NMDAR to the plasma membrane, thus inducing a robust increase in the NMDA-dependent excitability. Interestingly, adenosine A2A receptors license the mGluR5-induced NR2B(Tyr1472) phosphorylation.

  10. Activation of spinal MrgC-Gi-NR2B-nNOS signaling pathway by Mas oncogene-related gene C receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 attenuates bone cancer pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu’e; Zhang, Juan; Lei, Yishan; Lu, Cui’e; Hou, Bailing; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In the present study, we investigate the effects of Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) C receptors (MrgC) on the expression and activation of spinal Gi protein, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in mouse model of bone cancer pain. Methods: The number of spontaneous foot lift (NSF) and paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) were measured after inoculation of tumor cells and intrathecal injection of MrgC agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22) or MrgC antagonist anti-MrgC for 14 days after operation. Expression of spinal MrgC, Gi protein, NR2B and nNOS and their phosphorylated forms after inoculation was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Double labeling was used to identify the co-localization of NR2B or nNOS with MrgC in spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) neurons. The effects of intrathecal injection of BAM8-22 or anti-MrgC on nociceptive behaviors and the corresponding expression of spinal MrgC, Gi protein, NR2B and nNOS were also investigated. Results: The expression of spinal MrgC, Gi protein, NR2B, and nNOS was higher in tumor-bearing mice in comparison to sham mice or normal mice. Intrathecal injection of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 significantly alleviated bone cancer pain, up-regulated MrgC and Gi protein expression, and down-regulated the expression of spinal p-NR2B, t-nNOS and p-nNOS in SCDH on day 14 after operation, whereas administration of anti-MrgC produced the opposite effect. Meanwhile, MrgC-like immunoreactivity (IR) co-localizes with NR2B-IR or nNOS-IR in SCDH neurons. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that MrgC-activated spinal Gi-NR2B-nNOS signaling pathway plays important roles in the development of bone cancer pain. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:27158400

  11. Expression of NMDA receptor NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunit mRNAs during development of the human hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Law, Amanda J; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Webster, Maree J; Herman, Mary M; Kleinman, Joel E; Harrison, Paul J

    2003-09-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor plays a critical role in the formation and maintenance of synapses during brain development. In the rodent, changes in subunit expression and assembly of the heteromeric receptor complex accompany these maturational processes. However, little is known about N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit expression during human brain development. We used in situ hybridization to examine the distribution and relative abundance of NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunit messenger ribonucleic acids in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of 34 human subjects at five stages of life (neonate, infant, adolescent, young adult and adult). At all ages, the three messenger ribonucleic acids were expressed in all subfields, predominantly by pyramidal neurons, granule cells and polymorphic hilar cells. However, their abundance varied across ontogeny. Levels of NR1 messenger ribonucleic acid in CA4, CA3 and CA2 subfields were significantly lower in the neonate than all other age groups. In the dentate gyrus, subiculum and parahippocampal gyrus, NR2B messenger ribonucleic acid levels were higher in the neonate than in older age groups. NR2A messenger ribonucleic acid levels remained constant, leading to an age-related increase in NR2A/2B transcript ratio. We conclude that N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit messenger ribonucleic acids are differentially expressed during postnatal development of the human hippocampus, with a pattern similar but not identical to that seen in the rodent. Changes in subunit composition may thus contribute to maturational differences in human hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, and to their role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  12. A study of glutamate levels, NR1, NR2A, NR2B receptors and oxidative stress in rat model of Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Prashant Singh; Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2017-03-15

    There is paucity of studies on the role of glutamate excitotoxicity in cell damage in Japanese encephalitis. In this study the glutamate levels and its NMDA receptors, and oxidative stress markers in different brain regions have been evaluated and correlated with neurobehavioral changes at different time points. Twelve day old Wistar rats were inoculated with 3×10(6)pfu/ml intracerebrally. The neurobehavioral effects were evaluated by spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA), grip strength and rota rod test on 10, 33 and 48days post inoculation (dpi). Glutamate level was evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, mRNA gene expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor 1, 2A and 2B (NR1, NR2A and NR2B) were evaluated by real time PCR. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels were measured by spectrophotometer in different brain regions of JEV infected rats on 10, 33 and 48dpi. There was significant increase in motor deficit, grip strength and decreased locomotor activity on 10 and 33dpi. Glutamate levels were increased in thalamus, midbrain, frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum on 10 and 33dpi and were followed by a recovery on 48dpi. Glutamate NMDR receptors NR1, NR2A and NR2B were reduced in thalamus, midbrain, frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum on 10dpi which was followed by recovery after 33dpi. A significant increase in MDA level in thalamus, midbrain, frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum was noted on 10 and 33dpi. The antioxidant GSH and GPx were significantly reduced in these brain regions on 10 and 33dpi. Glutamate, MDA, GSH and GPx correlated in different brain regions as the disease progress. Increased Glutamate level may be related to oxidative stress and may be responsible for behavioral alterations in rat model of Japanese encephalitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Both NR2A and NR2B Subunits of the NMDA Receptor Are Critical for Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in the Lateral Amygdala of Horizontal Slices of Adult Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Tobias; Albrecht, Doris; Gebhardt, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) is implicated in emotional and social behaviors. We recently showed that in horizontal brain slices, activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a requirement for persistent synaptic alterations in the LA, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In the LA, NR2A- and NR2B-type NMDRs…

  14. Forelimb dyskinesia mediated by high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is linked to rapid activation of the NR2B subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Adrien; Melon, Christophe; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Salin, Pascal; Savasta, Marc; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique

    2010-08-01

    Dyskinesia is a major side-effect of chronic l-DOPA administration, the reference treatment for Parkinson's disease. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) alleviates parkinsonian motor symptoms and indirectly improves dyskinesia by decreasing the L-DOPA requirement. However, inappropriate stimulation can also trigger dyskinetic movements, in both human and rodents. We investigated whether STN-HFS-evoked forelimb dyskinesia involved changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission as previously reported for L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, focusing on the role of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NR2B/NMDARs). We applied STN-HFS in normal rats at intensities above and below the threshold for triggering forelimb dyskinesia. Dyskinesiogenic STN-HFS induced the activation of NR2B (as assessed by immunodetection of the phosphorylated residue Tyr(1472)) in neurons of the subthalamic nucleus, entopeduncular nucleus, motor thalamus and forelimb motor cortex. The severity of STN-HFS-induced forelimb dyskinesia was decreased in a dose-dependent manner by systemic injections of CP-101,606, a selective blocker of NR2B/NMDARs, but was either unaffected or increased by the non-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, MK-801.

  15. Both NR2A and NR2B Subunits of the NMDA Receptor Are Critical for Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in the Lateral Amygdala of Horizontal Slices of Adult Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Tobias; Albrecht, Doris; Gebhardt, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) is implicated in emotional and social behaviors. We recently showed that in horizontal brain slices, activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a requirement for persistent synaptic alterations in the LA, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In the LA, NR2A- and NR2B-type NMDRs…

  16. Characterisation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-specific [(3)H]Ifenprodil binding to recombinant human NR1a/NR2B receptors compared with native receptors in rodent brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, S; Richards, P; Murray, F; Harrison, N; Wingrove, P B; Hutson, P H

    2000-12-01

    We have performed [(3)H]ifenprodil binding experiments under NMDA receptor-specific assay conditions to provide the first detailed characterisation of the pharmacology of the ifenprodil site on NMDA NR1/NR2B receptors, using recombinant human NR1a/NR2B receptors stably expressed in L(tk-) cells, in comparison with rat cortex/hippocampus membranes. [(3)H]Ifenprodil bound to a single, saturable site on both human recombinant NR1a/NR2B receptors and native rat receptors with B:(max) values of 1.83 and 2.45 pmol/mg of protein, respectively, and K:(D) values of 33.5 and 24.8 nM:, respectively. The affinity of various ifenprodil site ligands-eliprodil, (R:(*), R:(*))-4-hydroxy-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-4-pehnyl-1-pi per idineethanol [(+/-)-CP-101,606], cis-3-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-hydroxy-1-piperidinyl]-3, 4-dihydro-2H:-1-benzopyran-4,7-diol [(+/-)-CP-283,097], and (R:(*), S:(*))-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl)-1-piperid inepropanol [(+/-)-Ro 25-6981] was very similar for inhibition of [(3)H]ifenprodil binding to recombinant human NR1a/NR2B and native rat receptors, whereas allosteric inhibition of [(3)H]ifenprodil binding by polyamine site ligands (spermine, spermidine, and arcaine) showed approximately twofold lower affinity for recombinant receptors compared with native receptors. Glutamate site ligands were less effective at modulating [(3)H]ifenprodil binding to recombinant NR1a/NR2B receptors compared with native rat receptors. The NMDA receptor-specific [(3)H]ifenprodil binding conditions described were also applied to ex vivo experiments to determine the receptor occupancy of ifenprodil site ligands [ifenprodil, (+/-)-CP-101,606, (+/-)-CP-283,097, and (+/-)-Ro 25-6981] given systemically.

  17. Different action of a specific NR2B/NMDA antagonist Ro 25-6981 on cortical evoked potentials and epileptic afterdischarges in immature rats.

    PubMed

    Szczurowska, Ewa; Mareš, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    Ro 25-6981 maleate is a highly selective and activity-dependent antagonist of NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptors containing NR2B subunit (NR2B/NMDARs). The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of Ro 25-6981 administration in developing rats on physiological (single and paired pulse cortical interhemispheric evoked potentials) and epileptic brain activity (cortical afterdischarges (ADs)). Electrophysiological experiments were performed in animals with epidurally implanted electrodes at postnatal days (P) P12, P18, and P25. The drug was injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 1 or 3mg/kg. Control animals were injected with saline (1ml/kg). Single interhemispheric responses were evoked with 0.5-ms biphasic pulses with intensities increasing from 0.4 to 5mA, paired-pulse responses were elicited by twofold threshold intensity. The ADs were elicited by series of 15-s of 1-ms pulses at 8-Hz frequency. Firstly, six stimulations with stable suprathreshold intensity repeated at 30-min intervals were used to determine the time course of Ro 25-6981 effects against ADs in P12 animals. Secondly, similar experiment was performed in all age groups of animals but with 20-min intervals as well as a further experiment using stimulations with stepwise intensities increasing at 10-min intervals from 0.2 to 15 mA. Pretreatment with the 3-mg/kg (but not the lower) dose of Ro 25-9681 decreased significantly the amplitude of single responses evoked with higher stimulation intensities in P12 and P18 animals. Both doses affected responses in P25 animals, only the 1-mg/kg dose was more efficacious than the 3-mg/kg one. Paired pulse responses were not affected by either dose of Ro 25-6981 in any age group. Ro 25-9681 clearly influenced the duration of ADs only in P12 animals. The 1-mg/kg dose did not change the duration of ADs whereas the 3-mg/kg dose suppressed progressive prolongation of ADs with repeated stimulations. This effect was seen even 110-min after the drug injection

  18. Intrahippocampal Administration of Ibotenic Acid Induced Cholinergic Dysfunction via NR2A/NR2B Expression: Implications of Resveratrol against Alzheimer Disease Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Karthick, Chennakesavan; Periyasamy, Sabapathy; Jayachandran, Kesavan S.; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy

    2016-01-01

    Although several drugs revealed moderate amelioration of symptoms, none of them have sufficient potency to prevent or reverse the progression toward Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenolic compound has shown an outstanding therapeutic effect on a broad spectrum of diseases like age-associated neurodegeneration, inflammation etc. The present study was thus conducted to assess the therapeutic efficacy of RSV in ameliorating the deleterious effects of Ibotenic acid (IBO) in male Wistar rats. Stereotactic intrahippocampal administration of IBO (5 μg/μl) lesioned rats impairs cholinergic transmission, learning and memory performance that is rather related to AD and thus chosen as a suitable model to understand the drug efficacy in preventing AD pathophysiology. Since IBO is an agonist of glutamate, it is expected to exhibit an excitotoxic effect by altering glutamatergic receptors like NMDA receptor. The current study displayed significant alterations in the mRNA expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors, and further it is surprising to note that cholinergic receptors decreased in expression particularly α7-nAChR with increased m1AChR. RSV administration (20 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) significantly reduced these changes in IBO induced rats. Glutamatergic and cholinergic receptor alterations were associated with significant changes in the behavioral parameters of rats induced by IBO. While RSV improved spatial learning performance, attenuated immobility, and improvised open field activity in IBO induced rats. NR2B activation in the present study might mediate cell death through oxidative stress that form the basis of abnormal behavioral pattern in IBO induced rats. Interestingly, RSV that could efficiently encounter oxidative stress have significantly decreased stress markers viz., nitrite, PCO, and MDA levels by enhancing antioxidant status. Histopathological analysis displayed significant reduction in the hippocampal

  19. EFFECT OF THE SELECTIVE NMDA NR2B ANTAGONIST, IFENPRODIL, ON ACUTE TOLERANCE TO ETHANOL-INDUCED MOTOR IMPAIRMENT IN ADOLESCENT AND ADULT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, R. Liane; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Linda P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescent rats have been observed to be less sensitive than adults to a number of acute ethanol effects, including ethanol-induced motor impairment. These adolescent insensitivities may be related in part to the more rapid emergence of within session (acute) tolerance in adolescents than adults. Adolescent-related alterations in neural systems that serve as ethanol target sites, including changes in NMDA receptor subunit expression, may influence the responsiveness of adolescents to acute ethanol effects. The present study explored the role of NMDA NR2B receptors in the development of acute tolerance to ethanol-induced motor impairment in male adolescent (postnatal day [P]28–30), and adult (P68-70) Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Motor impairing effects of ethanol on the stationary inclined plane and blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) were examined following challenge at each age with a functionally equivalent ethanol dose (adolescents: 2.25 g/kg; adults: 1.5 g/kg). Data were collected at two post-injection intervals (10 or 60 min) to compare rate of recovery from ethanol intoxication with BEC declines using the Radlow approach (Radlow, 1994) and changes in motor impairment/BEC ratios over time for assessing acute tolerance. Results Both vehicle-treated adolescent and adult animals showed similar acute tolerance development to the motor-impairing effects of ethanol at these functionally equivalent doses on the stationary inclined plane, as indexed by an increasing time-dependent dissociation between BECs and ethanol-induced motor impairment, with motor impairment declining faster than BECs, as well as by significant declines in motor impairment/BEC ratios over time. Acute tolerance development was reliably blocked by administration of the NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil, (5.0 mg/kg), in adult rats, whereas adolescents were affected by a higher dose (10.0 mg/kg). Conclusions These data support the suggestion that alterations in NMDA receptor systems

  20. A role for hippocampal PSA-NCAM and NMDA-NR2B receptor function in flavonoid-induced spatial memory improvements in young rats.

    PubMed

    Rendeiro, Catarina; Foley, Andrew; Lau, Vera C; Ring, Rebecca; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Vauzour, David; Williams, Claire M; Regan, Ciaran; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2014-04-01

    The increase in incidence and prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases highlights the need for a more comprehensive understanding of how food components may affect neural systems. In particular, flavonoids have been recognized as promising agents capable of influencing different aspects of synaptic plasticity resulting in improvements in memory and learning in both animals and humans. Our previous studies highlight the efficacy of flavonoids in reversing memory impairments in aged rats, yet little is known about the effects of these compounds in healthy animals, particularly with respect to the molecular mechanisms by which flavonoids might alter the underlying synaptic modifications responsible for behavioral changes. We demonstrate that a 3-week intervention with two dietary doses of flavonoids (Dose I: 8.7 mg/day and Dose II: 17.4 mg/day) facilitates spatial memory acquisition and consolidation (24 recall) (p < 0.05) in young healthy rats. We show for the first time that these behavioral improvements are linked to increased levels in the polysialylated form of the neural adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, which is known to be required for the establishment of durable memories. We observed parallel increases in hippocampal NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit for both 8.7 mg/day (p < 0.05) and 17.4 mg/day (p < 0.001) doses, suggesting an enhancement of glutamate signaling following flavonoid intervention. This is further strengthened by the simultaneous modulation of hippocampal ERK/CREB/BDNF signaling and the activation of the Akt/mTOR/Arc pathway, which are crucial in inducing changes in the strength of hippocampal synaptic connections that underlie learning. Collectively, the present data supports a new role for PSA-NCAM and NMDA-NR2B receptor on flavonoid-induced improvements in learning and memory, contributing further to the growing body of evidence suggesting beneficial effects of flavonoids in

  1. A role for hippocampal PSA-NCAM and NMDA-NR2B receptor function in flavonoid-induced spatial memory improvements in young rats

    PubMed Central

    Rendeiro, Catarina; Foley, Andrew; Lau, Vera C.; Ring, Rebecca; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Vauzour, David; Williams, Claire M.; Regan, Ciaran; Spencer, Jeremy P.E.

    2014-01-01

    The increase in incidence and prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases highlights the need for a more comprehensive understanding of how food components may affect neural systems. In particular, flavonoids have been recognized as promising agents capable of influencing different aspects of synaptic plasticity resulting in improvements in memory and learning in both animals and humans. Our previous studies highlight the efficacy of flavonoids in reversing memory impairments in aged rats, yet little is known about the effects of these compounds in healthy animals, particularly with respect to the molecular mechanisms by which flavonoids might alter the underlying synaptic modifications responsible for behavioral changes. We demonstrate that a 3-week intervention with two dietary doses of flavonoids (Dose I: 8.7 mg/day and Dose II: 17.4 mg/day) facilitates spatial memory acquisition and consolidation (24 recall) (p < 0.05) in young healthy rats. We show for the first time that these behavioral improvements are linked to increased levels in the polysialylated form of the neural adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, which is known to be required for the establishment of durable memories. We observed parallel increases in hippocampal NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit for both 8.7 mg/day (p < 0.05) and 17.4 mg/day (p < 0.001) doses, suggesting an enhancement of glutamate signaling following flavonoid intervention. This is further strengthened by the simultaneous modulation of hippocampal ERK/CREB/BDNF signaling and the activation of the Akt/mTOR/Arc pathway, which are crucial in inducing changes in the strength of hippocampal synaptic connections that underlie learning. Collectively, the present data supports a new role for PSA-NCAM and NMDA-NR2B receptor on flavonoid-induced improvements in learning and memory, contributing further to the growing body of evidence suggesting beneficial effects of flavonoids in

  2. Fragile X mental retardation protein interactions with a G quadruplex structure in the 3'-untranslated region of NR2B mRNA.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Snezana; DeMarco, Brett A; Underwood, Ayana; Williams, Kathryn R; Bassell, Gary J; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2015-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by a trinucleotide CGG expansion in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene, which leads to the loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP, an RNA-binding protein that regulates the translation of specific mRNAs, has been shown to bind a subset of its mRNA targets by recognizing G quadruplex structures. It has been suggested that FMRP controls the local protein synthesis of several protein components of the post synaptic density (PSD) in response to specific cellular needs. We have previously shown that the interactions between FMRP and mRNAs of the PSD scaffold proteins PSD-95 and Shank1 are mediated via stable G-quadruplex structures formed within the 3'-untranslated regions of these mRNAs. In this study we used biophysical methods to show that a comparable G quadruplex structure forms in the 3'-untranslated region of the glutamate receptor subunit NR2B mRNA encoding for a subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that is recognized specifically by FMRP, suggesting a common theme for FMRP recognition of its dendritic mRNA targets.

  3. Improving solubility of NR2B amino-terminal domain of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, F.-M.; Soh Wanqin; Geballe, Matthew T.; Low, C.-M.

    2007-10-12

    The amino-terminal domains (ATDs) of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors contain binding sites for modulators and may serve as potential drug targets in neurological diseases. Here, three fusion tags (6xHis-, GST-, and MBP-) were fused to the ATD of NMDA receptor NR2B subunit (ATD2B) and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each tag's ability to confer enhanced solubility to ATD2B was assessed. Soluble ATD2B was successfully obtained as a MBP fusion protein. Dynamic light scattering revealed the protein (1 mg/ml) exists as monodispersed species at 25 {sup o}C. Functional studies using circular dichroism showed that the soluble MBP-ATD2B bound ifenprodil in a dose-dependent manner. The dissociation constants obtained for ifenprodil were similar in the absence (64 nM) and presence (116 nM) of saturating concentration of maltose. Moreover, the yield of soluble MBP-ATD2B is 18 times higher than the refolded 6xHis-ATD2B. We have reported a systematic comparison of three different affinity tagging strategies and identified a rapid and efficient method to obtain large amount of ATD2B recombinant protein for biochemical and structural studies.

  4. Sigma-1 (σ₁) receptor deficiency reduces β-amyloid(25-35)-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death and cognitive deficits through suppressing phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor NR2B.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Sha, Sha; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Conghui; Hong, Juan; Jie, Pinghui; Zhou, Rong; Li, Lin; Sokabe, Masahiro; Chen, Ling

    2015-02-01

    In early Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, reduction of sigma-1 receptors (σ1R) is detected. In this study, we employed male heterozygous σ1R knockout (σ1R(+/-)) mice showing normal cognitive performance to investigate association of σ1R deficiency with AD risk. Herein we report that a single injection (i.c.v.) of Aβ(25-35) impaired spatial memory with approximately 25% death of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region of WT mice (Aβ(25-35)-WT mice), whereas it did not cause such impairments in σ1R(+/-) mice (Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice). Compared with WT mice, Aβ(25-35)-WT mice showed increased levels of NMDA-activated currents (INMDA) and NR2B phosphorylation (phospho-NR2B) in the hippocampal CA1 region at 48 h after Aβ25-35-injection (post-Aβ(25-35)) followed by approximately 40% decline at 72 h post-Aβ(25-35) of their respective control levels, which was inhibited by the σ1R antagonist NE100. In Aβ(25-35)-WT mice, the administration of NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 or NE100 on day 1-4 post-Aβ(25-35) attenuated the memory deficits and loss of pyramidal cells. By contrast, Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice showed a slight increase in the INMDA density and the phospho-NR2B at 48 h or 72 h post-Aβ25-35 compared to σ1R(+/-) mice. Treatment with σ1R agonist PRE084 in Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice caused the same changes in the INMDA density and the phospho-NR2B as those in Aβ(25-35)-WT mice. Furthermore, Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice treated with the NMDA receptor agonist NMDA or PRE084 on day 1-4 post-Aβ(25-35) showed a loss of neuronal cells and memory impairment. These results indicate that the σ1R deficiency can reduce Aβ(25-35)-induced neuronal cell death and cognitive deficits through suppressing Aβ(25-35)-enhanced NR2B phosphorylation.

  5. Inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate-activated current by bis(7)-tacrine in HEK-293 cells expressing NR1/NR2A or NR1/NR2B receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuwei; Li, Chaoying

    2012-12-01

    In normal rat forebrain, the NR1/NR2A and NR1/NR2B dimmers are the main constitutional forms of NMDA receptors. The present study was carried out to determine the functional properties of the heteromeric NMDA receptor subunits and their inhibition by bis(7)-tacrine (B7T). Rat NR1, NR2A and NR2B cDNAs were transfected into human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK-293). The inhibition of NMDA-activated currents by B7T was detected in HEK-293 cell expressing NR1/NR2A or NR1/NR2B receptors by using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. The results showed that in HEK-293 cells expressing NR1/NR2A receptor, 1 μmol/L B7T inhibited 30 μmol/L NMDA- and 1000 μmol/L NMDA-activated steady-state currents by 46% and 40%, respectively (P>0.05; n=5), suggesting that the inhibition of B7T on NR1/NR2A receptor doesn't depend on NMDA concentration, which is consistent with a non-competitive mechanism of inhibition. But for the NR1/NR2B receptor, 1 μmol/L B7T inhibited 30 μmol/L NMDA- and 1000 μmol/L NMDA-activated steady-state currents by 61% and 13%, respectively (P<0.05; n=6), showing that B7T appears to be competitive with NMDA. In addition, simultaneous application of 1 μmol/L B7T and 1000 μmol/L NMDA produced a moderate inhibition of peak NMDA-activated current, followed by a gradual decline of the current to a steady state. However, the gradual onset of inhibition produced by B7T applied simultaneously with NMDA was eliminated when B7T was given 5 s before NMDA. These results suggested that B7T inhibition of NMDA current mediated by NR1/NR2B receptor was slow onset, and it did not depend on the presence of the agonist. With holding potentials ranging from -50 to +50 mV, the B7T inhibition rate of NMDA currents didn't change significantly, and neither did the reversal potential. We are led to conclude that the NR1/NR2B recombinant receptor can serve as a very useful model for studying the molecular mechanism of NMDA receptor inhibition by B7T.

  6. Analgesic Effect of Intrathecal Administration of Chemokine Receptor CCR2 Antagonist is Related to Change in Spinal NR2B, nNOS, and SIGIRR Expression in Rat with Bone Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fei; Jiao, Hena; Cai, Hongwei

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the analgesic effect of intrathecal injection of chemokine receptor CCR2 antagonist RS102895, and its effect on spinal expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR2B subunit, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and SIGIRR in a rat model of bone cancer pain (BCP). A rat model of BCP was established by intro-tibial inoculation of W256 breast cancer cells. Female SD rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 10 each): Sham group, Sham + RS102895 group, BCP group, BCP + RS102895 group, and BCP + DMSO group. Rats received intrathecal injections of either RS102895 (3 g/l) 10 μl or 10 % DMSO 10 μl on day 9 to day 20 after operation. Pain thresholds of mechanical stimulation and thermal stimulation of each group were measured one day before and at 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th, 15th, and 20th days after surgery. Spinal expression of NR2B, nNOS, and SIGIRR was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. CCR2 antagonist RS102895 can suppress the pain induced by both mechanical and thermal stimulation in rats with BCP. Spinal expression of CCR2, NR2B, and nNOS was significantly up-regulated, while SIGIRR was down-regulated in BCP rats, and intrathecal injection of RS102895 effectively reversed the pattern of NR2B, nNOS, and SIGIRR expression in spinal cord. Analgesic effects of CCR2 antagonist RS102895 in BCP rats may be related to its downregulation of signal transduction pathway of NMDAR/nNOS and upregulation of Toll-interleukin-1 receptor member SIGIRR.

  7. The NMDA Receptor Subunit NR2b: Effects on LH Release and GnRH Gene Expression in Young and Middle-aged Female Rats, with Modulation by Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Maffucci, Jacqueline A.; Walker, Deena M.; Ikegami, Aiko; Woller, Michael J.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2008-01-01

    The loss of reproductive capacity during aging involves changes in the neural regulation of the hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons controlling reproduction. This neuronal circuitry includes glutamate receptors on GnRH neurons. Previously, we reported an increase in the expression of the NR2b subunit protein of the NMDA receptor on GnRH neurons in middle-aged compared to young female rats. Here, we examined the functional implications of the NR2b subunit on the onset of reproductive aging, using an NR2b-specific antagonist ifenprodil. Young (3–5 mos.) and middle-aged (10–13 mos.) female rats were ovariectomized (OVX), 17β-estradiol (E2) or vehicle (cholesterol) treated, and implanted with a jugular catheter. Serial blood sampling was undertaken every 10 minutes for 4 hours, with ifenprodil (10mg/kg) or vehicle injected (i.p.) after one hour of baseline sampling. The pulsatile release of pituitary LH and levels of GnRH mRNA in hypothalamus were quantified as indices of the reproductive axis. Our results showed effects of ifenprodil on both endpoints. In OVX rats given cholesterol, neither age nor ifenprodil had any effects on LH release. In E2-treated rats, aging was associated with significant decreases in pulsatile LH release. Additionally, ifenprodil stimulated parameters of pulsatile LH release in both young and middle-aged animals. Ifenprodil had few effects on GnRH mRNA; the only significant effect of ifenprodil was found in the middle-aged, cholesterol group. Together, these findings support a role for the NR2b subunit of the NMDAR in GnRH/LH regulation. Because most of these effects were exhibited on pituitary LH release in the absence of a concomitant change in GnRH gene expression, it is likely that NMDA receptors containing the NR2b subunit plays a role in GnRH-induced LH release, independent of de novo GnRH gene expression. PMID:18025808

  8. Involvement of NMDA receptor subtypes in cortical spreading depression in rats assessed by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Shatillo, Artem; Salo, Raimo A; Giniatullin, Rashid; Gröhn, Olli H

    2015-06-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a phenomenon implicated in migraine with aura and associated with other neurological disorders (e.g. stroke, brain trauma). Current evidence points to the essential role of NMDA receptors in CSD mechanisms. However, the roles of multiple subunits of NMDA receptors expressed in neurons, glia and blood vessels in vivo, are little explored. Using BOLD fMRI of urethane anesthetized rats as an integrative CSD readout, we tested the involvement of different NMDA receptor subtypes in CSD induction and propagation. Rats were treated with a non-selective NMDA blocker (MK-801), NR2B antagonist (ifenprodil) or a NR2A selective antagonist (TCN-201). CSD was induced during fMRI scanning by application of KCl onto the cerebral cortex and fMRI data were collected by 9.4 T MRI. The non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801 completely blocked CSD, which was not observed in the NR2A group where TCN-201 did not alter the CSD features. Unexpectedly, the NR2B specific antagonist ifenprodil largely promoted the initial negative phase of the BOLD CSD response, likely due to altered neurovascular coupling. Our data suggest key roles and differential involvement of NMDA receptor subtypes in CSD generation and propagation, highlighting an important role for the NR2B subtype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging features of automated breast volume scanner: Correlation with molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feng-Yang; Lu, Qing; Huang, Bei-Jian; Xia, Han-Sheng; Yan, Li-Xia; Wang, Xi; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the imaging features obtained by an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. We examined 303 malignant breast tumours by ABVS for specific imaging features and by immunohistochemical analysis to determine the molecular subtype. ABVS imaging features, including retraction phenomenon, shape, margins, echogenicity, post-acoustic features, echogenic halo, and calcifications were analysed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine the significant predictive factors of the molecular subtypes. By univariate logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of the Luminal-A subtype (n=128) were retraction phenomenon (odds ratio [OR]=10.188), post-acoustic shadowing (OR=5.112), and echogenic halo (OR=3.263, P<0.001). The predictive factors of the Human-epidermal-growth-factor-receptor-2-amplified subtype (n=39) were calcifications (OR=6.210), absence of retraction phenomenon (OR=4.375), non-mass lesions (OR=4.286, P<0.001), absence of echogenic halo (OR=3.851, P=0.035), and post-acoustic enhancement (OR=3.641, P=0.008). The predictors for the Triple-Negative subtype (n=47) were absence of retraction phenomenon (OR=5.884), post-acoustic enhancement (OR=5.255, P<0.001), absence of echogenic halo (OR=4.138, P=0.002), and absence of calcifications (OR=3.363, P=0.001). Predictors for the Luminal-B subtype (n=89) had a relatively lower association (OR≤2.328). By multivariate logistic regression analysis, retraction phenomenon was the strongest independent predictor for the Luminal-A subtype (OR=9.063, P<0.001) when present and for the Triple-Negative subtype (OR=4.875, P<0.001) when absent. ABVS imaging features, especially retraction phenomenon, have a strong correlation with the molecular subtypes, expanding the scope of ultrasound in identifying breast cancer subtypes with confidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic Monoarthritis Pain Accelerates the Processes of Cognitive Impairment and Increases the NMDAR Subunits NR2B in CA3 of Hippocampus from 5-month-old Transgenic APP/PS1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei-Yi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Yuan; Jin, He; Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Yu-Lan; Li, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Xu; Ni, Jia-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Many factors impact cognitive impairment; however, the effects of chronic pain and the mechanisms underlying these effects on cognitive impairment are currently unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that chronic pain accelerates the transition from normal cognition to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in 5-month-old transgenic APP/PS1 mice, an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and that neurotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) subunits may be involved in this process. Chronic monoarthritis pain was induced in transgenic APP/PS1 mice and 5-month-old wild-type (WT) mice by intra- and pre-articular injections of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) into one knee joint. Pain behavior, learning and memory function, and the distribution and quantity of NMDAR subunits (NR1, NR2A and NR2B) in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions were assessed. Our results showed that although persistent and robust monoarthritis pain was induced by the FCA injections, only the transgenic APP/PS1 mice with chronic monoarthritis pain exhibited marked learning and memory impairments. This result suggested that chronic monoarthritis pain accelerated the cognitive impairment process. Furthermore, only transgenic APP/PS1 mice with chronic monoarthritis pain exhibited an overexpression of NR2B and an increased NR2B/NR2A ratio in the hippocampus CA3. These findings suggest that chronic pain is a risk factor for cognitive impairment and that increased neurotoxicity associated with NMDAR subunit activation may underpin the impairment. Thus, NMDARs may be a therapeutic target for the prevention of chronic pain-induced cognitive impairment.

  11. Differential modulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by regulated interactions with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunits and alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Bartlett, Ryan K; Bass, Martha A; Colbran, Roger J

    2005-11-25

    Neuronal Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) interacts with several prominent dendritic spine proteins, which have been termed CaMKII-associated proteins. The NR2B subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor, densin-180, and alpha-actinin bind comparable, approximately stoichiometric amounts of Thr(286)-autophosphorylated CaMKIIalpha, forming a ternary complex (Robison, A. J., Bass, M. A., Jiao, Y., Macmillan, L. B., Carmody, L. C., Bartlett, R. K., and Colbran, R. J. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 35329-35336), but their impacts on CaMKII function are poorly understood. Here we show that these interactions are differentially regulated and exert distinct effects on CaMKII activity. Nonphosphorylated and Thr(286)-autophosphorylated CaMKII bind to alpha-actinin with similar efficacy, but autophosphorylation at Thr(305/306) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin binding significantly reduce this binding. Moreover, alpha-actinin antagonizes CaMKII activation by Ca(2+)/calmodulin, as assessed by autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of a peptide substrate. CaMKII binding to densin (1247-1542) is partially independent of Thr(286) autophosphorylation and is unaffected by Ca(2+)-independent autophosphorylation or Ca(2+)/calmodulin. In addition, the CaMKII binding domain of densin-180 has little effect on CaMKII activity. In contrast, the interaction of CaMKIIalpha with NR2B requires either Thr(286) autophosphorylation or the binding of both Ca(2+)/calmodulin and adenine nucleotides. NR2B inhibits both the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent and autonomous activities of CaMKII by a mechanism that is competitive with autocamtide-2 substrate, non-competitive with syntide-2 substrate, and uncompetitive with respect to ATP. In combination, these data suggest that dynamically regulated interactions with CaMKII-associated proteins could play pleiotropic roles in finetuning CaMKII signaling in defined subcellular compartments.

  12. NR2B subunit-dependent long-term potentiation enhancement in the rat cortical auditory system in vivo following masking of patterned auditory input by white noise exposure during early postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Hogsden, Jennifer L; Dringenberg, Hans C

    2009-08-01

    The composition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits influences the degree of synaptic plasticity expressed during development and into adulthood. Here, we show that theta-burst stimulation of the medial geniculate nucleus reliably induced NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) of field postsynaptic potentials recorded in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of urethane-anesthetized rats. Furthermore, substantially greater levels of LTP were elicited in juvenile animals (30-37 days old; approximately 55% maximal potentiation) than in adult animals (approximately 30% potentiation). Masking patterned sound via continuous white noise exposure during early postnatal life (from postnatal day 5 to postnatal day 50-60) resulted in enhanced, juvenile-like levels of LTP (approximately 70% maximal potentiation) relative to age-matched controls reared in unaltered acoustic environments (approximately 30%). Rats reared in white noise and then placed in unaltered acoustic environments for 40-50 days showed levels of LTP comparable to those of adult controls, indicating that white noise rearing results in a form of developmental arrest that can be overcome by subsequent patterned sound exposure. We explored the mechanisms mediating white noise-induced plasticity enhancements by local NR2B subunit antagonist application in A1. NR2B subunit antagonists (Ro 25-6981 or ifenprodil) completely reversed white noise-induced LTP enhancement at concentrations that did not affect LTP in adult or age-matched controls. We conclude that white noise exposure during early postnatal life results in the maintenance of juvenile-like, higher levels of plasticity in A1, an effect that appears to be critically dependent on NR2B subunit activation.

  13. Subtypes evaluation of motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease using neuromelanin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuanyuan; Gong, Tao; Wu, Junwei; Li, Jifeng; Chen, Yan; Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Shan; Cong, Lin; Lin, Youting; Han, Yuxiang; Yin, Ling; Wang, Guangbin; Du, Yifeng

    2017-01-18

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the loss of neuromelanin (NM)-containing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), and it is divided into two motor subtypes: the postural instability gait difficulty (PIGD) and the tremor dominant (TD) subtypes. With NM-sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NM-MRI), investigators have been able to accurately detect signal attenuation in SNc of PD; however, the difference of NM loss between PIGD and TD subtypes is still unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in NM-MRI between PD motor subtypes. PD patients were classified into PIGD (n=14) and TD groups (n=9); 20 age and sex matched controls were recruited. We compared the signal intensity contrast ratios in medial and lateral regions of the SNc using NM-MRI in PIGD, TD, and controls, respectively. Remarkable signal attenuation was observed in the lateral part of SNc in PD when compared with the controls, and we were able to detect more severe signal attenuation in the medial part of SNc in PIGD patients in comparison with that in the TD group. Also, the medial part of SNc, ipsilateral to the most clinically affected side, showed the highest power to discriminate the PD motor subtypes (AUC, 81%; sensitivity, 71.4%; specificity, 77.8%). Our results indicated a potential diagnostic value of NM-MRI to discriminate the PD motor subtypes, providing new evidence for the neuropathology-based differences between the two subtypes.

  14. Relationships Between MRI Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) Lexicon Descriptors and Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes: Internal Enhancement is Associated with Luminal B Subtype.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Lars J; Zhang, Jing; Baker, Jay A; Soo, Mary S; Johnson, Karen S; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2017-03-13

    The aim of this study was to determine the associations between breast MRI findings using the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon descriptors and breast cancer molecular subtypes. In this retrospective, IRB-approved, single institution study MRIs from 278 women with breast cancer were reviewed by one of six fellowship-trained breast imagers. Readers reported BI-RADS descriptors for breast masses (shape, margin, internal enhancement) and non-mass enhancement (distribution, internal enhancement). Pathology reports were reviewed for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). Surrogates were used to categorize tumors by molecular subtype: ER/PR+, HER2- (luminal A); ER/PR+, HER2+ (luminal B); ER/PR-, HER2+ (HER2); ER/PR/HER2- (basal). A univariate logistic regression model was developed to identify associations between BI-RADS descriptors and molecular subtypes. Internal enhancement for mass and non-mass enhancement was combined for analysis. There was an association between mass shape and basal subtype (p = 0.039), which was more frequently round (17.1%) than other subtypes (range: 0-8.3%). In addition, there was an association between mass margin and HER2 subtype (p = 0.040), as HER2 cancers more frequently had a smooth margin (33.3%) than other subtypes (range: 4.2-17.1%). Finally, there was an association between internal enhancement and luminal B subtype (p = 0.003), with no cases of luminal B cancer demonstrating homogeneous internal enhancement versus a range of 10.9-23.5% for other subtypes. There are associations between breast cancer molecular subtypes and lesion appearance on MRI using the BI-RADS lexicon.

  15. MR Imaging Findings in Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer According to BIRADS System.

    PubMed

    Navarro Vilar, Lidia; Alandete Germán, Salvador Pascual; Medina García, Rosana; Blanc García, Esther; Camarasa Lillo, Natalia; Vilar Samper, José

    2017-01-09

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, according to Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to relate them with molecular subtypes of breast cancer. The MRI findings were reviewed retrospectively in 201 women diagnosed of invasive breast cancer confirmed by surgery and were compared with the molecular subtypes. Following the BI-RADS, MRI findings included disease type, size, enhancement, morphology and contrast kinetics. In mass-like lesion types were studied shape, margin and enhancement, and in nonmass-like lesion types, distribution modifiers and internal enhancement. Chi-squared analysis showed significant association (p < 0.01) between molecular subtypes and lesion type on MRI and histologic grade. Shape, margin and mass enhancement (p < 0.05) also showed significant association among molecular subtypes. Triple negative were more frequently unifocal and mass-like lesion, high histologic grade, round shape, smooth margin, and rim enhancement. Luminal-A were more frequently low grade, mass-like lesion, irregular shape and spiculated or irregular margin. Luminal-B were more frequently moderate-low grade, mass-like lesion, nonirregular shape and spiculated margin. HER-2-enriched were more frequently moderate grade, nonmass-like lesion and multicentric lesions were more present than in other subtypes. There are significantly different MRI features, according to BI-RADS, between the molecular subtypes breast cancer.

  16. Breast cancer subtype discrimination using standardized 4-IHC and digital image analysis.

    PubMed

    Gándara-Cortes, Marina; Vázquez-Boquete, Ángel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Beatriz; Viaño, Patricia; Ínsua, Dora; Seoane-Seoane, Alejandro; Gude, Francisco; Gallego, Rosalía; Fraga, Máximo; Antúnez, José R; Curiel, Teresa; Pérez-López, Eva; García-Caballero, Tomás

    2017-08-20

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Surrogate classification of intrinsic subtypes of invasive carcinomas by combined immunohistochemistry for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), HER2, and Ki67 (4-IHC) has increased steadily since the 2011 St Gallen symposium, due to its rapid subtyping of tumors at a reasonable cost. An important step in improving 4-IHC reproducibility and reliability will be to provide reference values from the routine use of standardized 4-IHC followed by image analysis. The aims of the current study were (1) to analyze invasive breast carcinomas using standardized 4-IHC and quantitative image analysis and (2) to compare the results obtained in the classification of biological subtypes using current Ki67 and PR threshold values proposed by different authors to sub-classifying the luminal A-like and the luminal B-like (HER2-negative) subtypes. Five hundred twenty-one tumors were analyzed by standardized immunohistochemistry, with automatic image analysis, and HER2 FISH technique. Positivity for ER was found in 82.7% and for PR in 70.1% of cases. Using the Allred scoring system, hormone receptor results showed a bimodal distribution, particularly for ER. HER2 positivity was found in 15.7% of cases, and the mean Ki67 score was 32.3%. Using the most recently proposed surrogate definitions for the classification of luminal breast cancer subtypes, the percentages of different subtypes that we found were similar to those published with genomic platforms: 40.7% luminal A-like, 32.4% luminal B-like/HER2-negative, 9.8% luminal B-like/HER2-positive, 6.0% HER2-positive, and 11.1% triple negative. Standardized 4-IHC with automatic image analysis constitutes a low-cost method for surrogate definitions of biological subtypes of breast cancer that delivers accurate results in a day.

  17. Regulation of Fear Extinction in the Basolateral Amygdala by Dopamine D2 Receptors Accompanied by Altered GluR1, GluR1-Ser845 and NR2B Levels.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-Wei; Fan, Bu-Fang; Xue, Li; Wen, Jia-Ling; Zhao, Hu

    2017-01-01

    The amygdala, a critical structure for both Pavlovian fear conditioning and fear extinction, receives sparse but comprehensive dopamine innervation and contains dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Fear extinction, which involves learning to suppress the expression of a previously learned fear, appears to require the dopaminergic system. The specific roles of D2 receptors in mediating associative learning underlying fear extinction require further study. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusions of a D2 receptor agonist, quinpirole, and a D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride, prior to fear extinction and extinction retention were tested 24 h after fear extinction training for long-term memory (LTM). LTM was facilitated by quinpirole and attenuated by sulpiride. In addition, A-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1) subunit, GluR1 phospho-Ser845, and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor NR2B subunit levels in the BLA were generally increased by quinpirole and down-regulated by sulpiride. The present study suggests that activation of D2 receptors facilitates fear extinction and that blockade of D2 receptors impairs fear extinction, accompanied by changes in GluR1, GluR1-Ser845 and NR2B levels in the amygdala.

  18. An NR2B-Dependent Decrease in the Expression of trkB Receptors Precedes the Disappearance of Dopaminergic Cells in Substantia Nigra in a Rat Model of Presymptomatic Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Eduardo; Abarca, Jorge; Campusano, Jorge M.; Bustos, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Compensatory changes occurring during presymptomatic stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) would explain that the clinical symptoms of the disease appear late, when the degenerative process is quite advanced. Several data support the proposition that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could play a role in these plastic changes. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of the specific BDNF receptor, trkB, in a rat model of presymptomatic PD generated by intrastriatal injection of the neurotoxin 6-OHDA. Immunohistochemical studies revealed a decrease in trkB expression in SN pars compacta (SNc) seven days after 6-OHDA injection. At this time point, no change in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactive (TH-IR) cells is detected, although a decrease is evident 14 days after neurotoxin injection. The decrease in TH-positive cells and trkB expression in SNc was significantly prevented by systemic administration of Ifenprodil, a specific antagonist of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors. Therefore, an NR2B-NMDA receptor-dependent decrease in trkB expression precedes the disappearance of TH-IR cells in SNc in response to 6-OHDA injection. These results support the idea that a functional coupling between NMDA receptors and BDNF/trkB signalling may be important for the maintenance of the dopaminergic phenotype in SNc during presymptomatic stages of PD. PMID:22720191

  19. Imaging patterns predict patient survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma via machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Macyszyn, Luke; Akbari, Hamed; Pisapia, Jared M; Da, Xiao; Attiah, Mark; Pigrish, Vadim; Bi, Yingtao; Pal, Sharmistha; Davuluri, Ramana V; Roccograndi, Laura; Dahmane, Nadia; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Biros, George; Wolf, Ronald L; Bilello, Michel; O'Rourke, Donald M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-03-01

    MRI characteristics of brain gliomas have been used to predict clinical outcome and molecular tumor characteristics. However, previously reported imaging biomarkers have not been sufficiently accurate or reproducible to enter routine clinical practice and often rely on relatively simple MRI measures. The current study leverages advanced image analysis and machine learning algorithms to identify complex and reproducible imaging patterns predictive of overall survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma (GB). One hundred five patients with GB were first used to extract approximately 60 diverse features from preoperative multiparametric MRIs. These imaging features were used by a machine learning algorithm to derive imaging predictors of patient survival and molecular subtype. Cross-validation ensured generalizability of these predictors to new patients. Subsequently, the predictors were evaluated in a prospective cohort of 29 new patients. Survival curves yielded a hazard ratio of 10.64 for predicted long versus short survivors. The overall, 3-way (long/medium/short survival) accuracy in the prospective cohort approached 80%. Classification of patients into the 4 molecular subtypes of GB achieved 76% accuracy. By employing machine learning techniques, we were able to demonstrate that imaging patterns are highly predictive of patient survival. Additionally, we found that GB subtypes have distinctive imaging phenotypes. These results reveal that when imaging markers related to infiltration, cell density, microvascularity, and blood-brain barrier compromise are integrated via advanced pattern analysis methods, they form very accurate predictive biomarkers. These predictive markers used solely preoperative images, hence they can significantly augment diagnosis and treatment of GB patients. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Imaging patterns predict patient survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma via machine learning techniques

    PubMed Central

    Macyszyn, Luke; Akbari, Hamed; Pisapia, Jared M.; Da, Xiao; Attiah, Mark; Pigrish, Vadim; Bi, Yingtao; Pal, Sharmistha; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Roccograndi, Laura; Dahmane, Nadia; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Biros, George; Wolf, Ronald L.; Bilello, Michel; O'Rourke, Donald M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background MRI characteristics of brain gliomas have been used to predict clinical outcome and molecular tumor characteristics. However, previously reported imaging biomarkers have not been sufficiently accurate or reproducible to enter routine clinical practice and often rely on relatively simple MRI measures. The current study leverages advanced image analysis and machine learning algorithms to identify complex and reproducible imaging patterns predictive of overall survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma (GB). Methods One hundred five patients with GB were first used to extract approximately 60 diverse features from preoperative multiparametric MRIs. These imaging features were used by a machine learning algorithm to derive imaging predictors of patient survival and molecular subtype. Cross-validation ensured generalizability of these predictors to new patients. Subsequently, the predictors were evaluated in a prospective cohort of 29 new patients. Results Survival curves yielded a hazard ratio of 10.64 for predicted long versus short survivors. The overall, 3-way (long/medium/short survival) accuracy in the prospective cohort approached 80%. Classification of patients into the 4 molecular subtypes of GB achieved 76% accuracy. Conclusions By employing machine learning techniques, we were able to demonstrate that imaging patterns are highly predictive of patient survival. Additionally, we found that GB subtypes have distinctive imaging phenotypes. These results reveal that when imaging markers related to infiltration, cell density, microvascularity, and blood–brain barrier compromise are integrated via advanced pattern analysis methods, they form very accurate predictive biomarkers. These predictive markers used solely preoperative images, hence they can significantly augment diagnosis and treatment of GB patients. PMID:26188015

  1. Effect of Imaging Parameter Thresholds on MRI Prediction of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ella F.; Newitt, David C.; Kornak, John; Wilmes, Lisa J.; Esserman, Laura J.; Hylton, Nola M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predictive performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers in breast cancer patients by subtype. Sixty-four patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. Each patient received a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI) at baseline, after 1 cycle of chemotherapy and before surgery. Functional tumor volume (FTV), the imaging marker measured by DCE-MRI, was computed at various thresholds of percent enhancement (PEt) and signal-enhancement ratio (SERt). Final FTV before surgery and percent changes of FTVs at the early and final treatment time points were used to predict patients’ recurrence-free survival. The full cohort and each subtype defined by the status of hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HR+/HER2-, HER2+, triple negative) were analyzed. Predictions were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazard model when PEt changed from 30% to 200% in steps of 10% and SERt changed from 0 to 2 in steps of 0.2. Predictions with high hazard ratios and low p-values were considered as strong. Different profiles of FTV as predictors for recurrence-free survival were observed in each breast cancer subtype and strong associations with survival were observed at different PEt/SERt combinations that resulted in different FTVs. Findings from this retrospective study suggest that the predictive performance of imaging markers based on FTV may be improved with enhancement thresholds being optimized separately for clinically-relevant subtypes defined by HR and HER2 receptor expression. PMID:26886725

  2. Connectivity Analysis and Feature Classification in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Sub-Types: A Task Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo-Yong; Kim, Mansu; Seo, Jongbum; Lee, Jong-Min; Park, Hyunjin

    2016-05-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a pervasive neuropsychiatric disorder. Patients with different ADHD subtypes show different behaviors under different stimuli and thus might require differential approaches to treatment. This study explores connectivity differences between ADHD subtypes and attempts to classify these subtypes based on neuroimaging features. A total of 34 patients (13 ADHD-IA and 21 ADHD-C subtypes) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with six task paradigms. Connectivity differences between ADHD subtypes were assessed for the whole brain in each task paradigm. Connectivity measures of the identified regions were used as features for the support vector machine classifier to distinguish between ADHD subtypes. The effectiveness of connectivity measures of the regions were tested by predicting ADHD-related Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) scores. Significant connectivity differences between ADHD subtypes were identified mainly in the frontal, cingulate, and parietal cortices and partially in the temporal, occipital cortices and cerebellum. Classifier accuracy for distinguishing between ADHD subtypes was 91.18 % for both gambling punishment and emotion task paradigms. Linear prediction under the two task paradigms showed significant correlation with DSM hyperactive/impulsive score. Our study identified important brain regions from connectivity analysis based on an fMRI paradigm using gambling punishment and emotion task paradigms. The regions and associated connectivity measures could serve as features to distinguish between ADHD subtypes.

  3. PET imaging of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Shan, Hong; Conti, Peter; Li, Zibo

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) belong to a family of G-protein coupled receptors involved in the modulation of fast excitatory transmission. In particular, the subtype-5 receptor (mGluR5) was found to be an attractive target for the treatment and diagnosis of variety of psychiatric and neurological disease including anxiety, depression, epilepsy, drug addiction, and Parkinson's disease. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive imaging technique that holds great potential for the diagnosis of a brain disorder. In the study published in the American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, a 18F labelled PET probe was developed targeting mGluR5. This paper represents the efforts and challenges on the design and development of novel PET tracers for mGluR5 imaging. PMID:23133800

  4. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  5. Magnetic resonance image features identify glioblastoma phenotypic subtypes with distinct molecular pathway activities

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Haruka; Achrol, Achal S.; Mitchell, Lex A.; Loya, Joshua J.; Liu, Tiffany; Westbroek, Erick M.; Feroze, Abdullah H.; Rodriguez, Scott; Echegaray, Sebastian; Azad, Tej D.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Gevaert, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults. There is a dire need for easily accessible, noninvasive biomarkers that can delineate underlying molecular activities and predict response to therapy. To this end, we sought to identify subtypes of GBM, differentiated solely by quantitative MR imaging features, that could be used for better management of GBM patients. Quantitative image features capturing the shape, texture, and edge sharpness of each lesion were extracted from MR images of 121 patients with de novo, solitary, unilateral GBM. Three distinct phenotypic “clusters” emerged in the development cohort using consensus clustering with 10,000 iterations on these image features. These three clusters—pre-multifocal, spherical, and rim-enhancing, names reflecting their image features—were validated in an independent cohort consisting of 144 multi-institution patients with similar tumor characteristics from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Each cluster mapped to a unique set of molecular signaling pathways using pathway activity estimates derived from analysis of TCGA tumor copy number and gene expression data with the PARADIGM algorithm. Distinct pathways, such as c-Kit and FOXA, were enriched in each cluster, indicating differential molecular activities as determined by image features. Each cluster also demonstrated differential probabilities of survival, indicating prognostic importance. Our imaging method offers a noninvasive approach to stratify GBM patients and also provides unique sets of molecular signatures to inform targeted therapy and personalized treatment of GBM. PMID:26333934

  6. Effects of prenatal chronic mild stress exposure on hippocampal cell proliferation, expression of GSK-3α, β and NR2B in adult offspring during fear extinction in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Li, Xiaobai; Zhang, Xinxin; Ren, Jintao; Jiang, Han; Wang, Yan; Ma, Yuchao; Cheng, Wenwen

    2014-06-01

    Stress during pregnancy has been implicated as a risk factor for the development of many mental disorders; however, the influence of prenatal stress on the fear or anxiety-related behaviors, especially the fear extinction in adult offspring has been little investigated. In order to investigate how prenatal stress affects fear extinction, which is regarded as a form of new learning that counteracts the expression of Pavlovian's conditioned fear, a rat model of prenatal chronic mild stress (PNS) was used to evaluate the effects of PNS on fear extinction in adult offspring. The expression of hippocampal glycogen synthase kinase-3s (GSK-3α, β), N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs)-2B and the hippocampal cell proliferation in dentate gyrus in the adult offspring during fear extinction were studied. Our results showed that PNS significantly reduced body weight of pups, indicating PNS might induce growth retardation in offspring. Moreover, PNS significantly enhanced the freezing behavior of offspring at the phase of extinction, suggesting PNS impaired the abilities of fear extinction learning. In addition, PNS significantly increased the levels of GSK-3α, β and NR2B, but reduced hippocampal cell proliferation during fear extinction. Taken together, our findings suggest that maternal stress during pregnancy can impair the fear extinction of adult offspring, probably by affecting the neural plasticity of brain.

  7. T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas: Spectrum of Disease and the Role of Imaging in the Management of Common Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Lacey; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Shinagare, Atul B.; Krajewski, Katherine M.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are biologically diverse, uncommon malignancies characterized by a spectrum of imaging findings according to subtype. The purpose of this review is to describe the common subtypes of T-cell NHL, highlight important differences between cutaneous, various peripheral and precursor subtypes, and summarize imaging features and the role of imaging in the management of this diverse set of diseases. PMID:28096719

  8. Accounting for tissue heterogeneity in infrared spectroscopic imaging for accurate diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Marin, David; Sreedhar, Hari; Varma, Vishal K; Eloy, Catarina; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Walsh, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microscopy was used to image tissue samples from twenty patients diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma. The spectral data were then used to differentiate between follicular thyroid carcinoma and follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma using principle component analysis coupled with linear discriminant analysis and a Naïve Bayesian classifier operating on a set of computed spectral metrics. Classification of patients' disease type was accomplished by using average spectra from a wide region containing follicular cells, colloid, and fibrosis; however, classification of disease state at the pixel level was only possible when the extracted spectra were limited to follicular epithelial cells in the samples, excluding the relatively uninformative areas of fibrosis. The results demonstrate the potential of FT-IR microscopy as a tool to assist in the difficult diagnosis of these subtypes of thyroid cancer, and also highlights the importance of selectively and separately analyzing spectral information from different features of a tissue of interest.

  9. Traxoprodil, a selective antagonist of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, potentiates the antidepressant-like effects of certain antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Stasiuk, Weronika; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Oniszczuk, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Świąder, Katarzyna; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    One of the newest substances, whose antidepressant activity was shown is traxoprodil, which is a selective antagonist of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of traxoprodil on animals' behavior using the forced swim test (FST), as well as the effect of traxoprodil (10 mg/kg) on the activity of antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg) and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Serotonergic lesion and experiment using the selective agonists of serotonin receptors 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 was conducted to evaluate the role of the serotonergic system in the antidepressant action of traxoprodil. Brain concentrations of tested agents were determined using HPLC. The results showed that traxoprodil at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST and it was not related to changes in animals' locomotor activity. Co-administration of traxoprodil with imipramine, fluoxetine or escitalopram, each in subtherapeutic doses, significantly affected the animals' behavior in the FST and, what is important, these changes were not due to the severity of locomotor activity. The observed effect of traxoprodil is only partially associated with serotonergic system and is independent of the effect on the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 serotonin receptors. The results of an attempt to assess the nature of the interaction between traxoprodil and the tested drugs show that in the case of joint administration of traxoprodil and fluoxetine, imipramine or escitalopram, there were interactions in the pharmacokinetic phase.

  10. Radiogenomic correlation in lung adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations: Imaging features and histological subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Choi, Yo Won; Park, Jeong-Soo; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Lee, Kyung Won

    2016-10-01

    To correlate imaging features of resected lung adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification histological subtypes. In 250 consecutive patients with resected lung adenocarcinoma, EGFR mutation status was correlated with demographics, imaging features including ground-glass opacity (GGO) proportion and the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification histological subtypes. EGFR mutations were significantly more frequent in women (54.5 % vs. 38.1 %, p = 0.011) and in never-smokers (54.7 % vs. 35.3 %, p = 0.003). GGO proportion was significantly higher in tumours with EGFR mutation than in those without (30.3 ± 33.8 % vs. 19.0 ± 29.3 %, p = 0.005). EGFR mutation was significantly more frequent in tumours with GGO ≥ 50 % and tumours with any GGO (p = 0.026 and 0.008, respectively). Adenocarcinomas with exon 19 or 21 mutation showed significantly higher GGO proportion than that in EGFR wild-type tumours (p = 0.009 and 0.029, respectively). Absence of GGO was an independent predictor of negative EGFR mutation (odds ratio, 1.81; 95 % confidence interval, 1.16-3.04; p = 0.018). GGO proportion in adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutation was significantly higher than that in EGFR wild-type tumours, and the absence of GGO on CT was an independent predictor of negative EGFR mutation. • Ground-glass opacity (GGO) proportion is significantly higher in EGFR-mutated adenocarcinomas • Exon 19 or 21 mutated adenocarcinomas shows significantly higher GGO proportion • GGO absence is an independent predictor of negative EGFR mutation in lung adenocarcinomas.

  11. Post hoc immunostaining of GABAergic neuronal subtypes following in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Langer, Dominik; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2012-02-01

    GABAergic neurons in the neocortex are diverse with regard to morphology, physiology, and axonal targeting pattern, indicating functional specializations within the cortical microcircuitry. Little information is available, however, about functional properties of distinct subtypes of GABAergic neurons in the intact brain. Here, we combined in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in supragranular layers of the mouse neocortex with post hoc immunohistochemistry against the three calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calretinin, and calbindin in order to assign subtype marker profiles to neuronal activity. Following coronal sectioning of fixed brains, we matched cells in corresponding volumes of image stacks acquired in vivo and in fixed brain slices. In GAD67-GFP mice, more than 95% of the GABAergic cells could be unambiguously matched, even in large volumes comprising more than a thousand interneurons. Triple immunostaining revealed a depth-dependent distribution of interneuron subtypes with increasing abundance of PV-positive neurons with depth. Most importantly, the triple-labeling approach was compatible with previous in vivo calcium imaging following bulk loading of Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1, which allowed us to classify spontaneous calcium transients recorded in vivo according to the neurochemically defined GABAergic subtypes. Moreover, we demonstrate that post hoc immunostaining can also be applied to wild-type mice expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator Yellow Cameleon 3.60 in cortical neurons. Our approach is a general and flexible method to distinguish GABAergic subtypes in cell populations previously imaged in the living animal. It should thus facilitate dissecting the functional roles of these subtypes in neural circuitry.

  12. Predictive value of axillary nodal imaging by magnetic resonance imaging based on breast cancer subtype after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Steiman, Jennifer; Soran, Atilla; McAuliffe, Priscilla; Diego, Emilia; Bonaventura, Marguerite; Johnson, Ronald; Ahrendt, Gretchen; McGuire, Kandace

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used to determine residual breast disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) for cancer. Few studies have assessed its role in predicting nodal response, by cancer subtype. A retrospective review was completed using our institutional cancer registry. Patients who started NCT from 2005 to 2010 with clinically node positive disease were evaluated. Those who underwent post-NCT breast MRI were selected. Radiologic response was determined by an independent review. Nodal involvement was confirmed pathologically after surgery. A total of 135 patients underwent post-NCT breast MRI. The positive and negative predictive values of MRI are 93% and 26%, respectively. A subset analysis by cancer phenotype demonstrates triple negative cancers have the highest sensitivity (68%) and luminal cancers have the highest positive predictive value (100%). This study demonstrates that MRI post-NCT, even by cancer subtype, cannot reliably predict residual nodal disease because of high false-negative rates (low negative-predictive value). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rosacea Subtypes Visually and Optically Distinct When Viewed with Parallel-Polarized Imaging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, In Hyuk; Choi, Jae Eun; Seo, Soo Hong; Kye, Young Chul

    2017-01-01

    Background Parallel-polarized light (PPL) photography evaluates skin characteristics by analyzing light reflections from the skin surface. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the significance of quantitative analysis of PPL images in rosacea patients, and to provide a new objective evaluation method for use in clinical research and practice. Methods A total of 49 rosacea patients were enrolled. PPL images using green and white light emitting diodes (LEDs) were taken of the lesion and an adjacent normal area. The values from the PPL images were converted to CIELAB coordinates: L* corresponding to the brightness, a* to the red and green intensities, and b* to the yellow and blue intensities. Results A standard grading system showed negative correlations with L* (r=−0.67862, p=0.0108) and b* (r=−0.67862, p=0.0108), and a positive correlation with a* (r=0.64194, p=0.0180) with the green LEDs for papulopustular rosacea (PPR) types. The xerosis severity scale showed a positive correlation with L* (r=0.36709, p=0.0276) and a negative correlation with b* (r=−0.33068, p=0.0489) with the white LEDs for erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR) types. In the ETR types, there was brighter lesional and normal skin with white LEDs and a higher score on the xerosis severity scale than the PPR types. Conclusion This technique using PPL images is applicable to the quantitative and objective assessment of rosacea in clinical settings. In addition, the two main subtypes of ETR and PPR are distinct entities visually and optically. PMID:28392643

  14. Assessment of Residual Disease With Molecular Breast Imaging in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Therapy: Association With Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Menes, Tehillah S; Golan, Orit; Vainer, Gilead; Lerman, Hedva; Schneebaum, Schlomo; Klausner, Joseph; Even-Sapir, Einat

    2016-10-01

    Assessment of residual disease after neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer is an ongoing challenge of breast imaging. This study evaluates the accuracy of a novel dedicated system for molecular breast imaging (MBI) composed of the new generation of cadmium zinc telluride detectors in assessing residual disease after neoadjuvant therapy in patients with breast cancer. Clinical data, imaging, surgical, and pathological findings of 51 women with breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant therapy were recorded. MBI findings were correlated with surgical pathology results. Accuracy of MBI in predicting complete pathological response and size of residual disease was assessed according to molecular subtypes. The size of the largest focus of uptake on MBI correlated with the largest dimension measured on pathology (r = 0.55; P < .001). This correlation was stronger for triple negative and HER2/neu positive subtypes (r = 0.92 and 0.62, respectively). Sixteen patients (31%) had complete pathological response. The sensitivity and specificity of MBI for detecting residual disease were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66-93) and 69% (95% CI, 42-88), respectively. For triple negative or HER2/neu positive disease the sensitivity and specificity were 88% (95% CI, 62-98) and 75% (95% CI, 43-93), respectively. The accuracy of MBI in assessing residual disease after neoadjuvant treatment might be related to the molecular subtype. Accuracy is highest in the triple negative and HER2/neu positive subtypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multimodality Imaging Characteristics of the Common Renal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes: An Analysis of 544 Pathologically Proven Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Winnie; Huang, Guan; Moloo, Zaahir; Girgis, Safwat; Patel, Vimal H; Low, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to define the characteristic imaging appearances of the common renal cell carcinoma (RCC) subtypes. Materials and Methods: The Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, and informed consent was waived. 520 patients (336 men, 184 women; age range, 22–88 years) underwent preoperative cross-sectional imaging of 544 RCCs from 2008 to 2013. The imaging appearances of the RCCs and clinical information were reviewed. Data analysis was performed using parametric and nonparametric statistics, descriptive statistics, and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: The RCC subtypes showed significant differences (P < 0.001) in several imaging parameters such as tumor margins, tumor consistency, tumor homogeneity, the presence of a central stellate scar, T2 signal intensity, and the degree of tumor enhancement. Low T2 signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed differentiation of papillary RCC from clear cell and chromophobe RCCs with 90.9% sensitivity and 93.1% specificity. A tumor-to-cortex ratio ≥1 on the corticomedullary phase had 98% specificity for clear cell RCC. Conclusion: The T2 signal intensity of the tumor on MRI and its degree of enhancement are useful imaging parameters for discriminating between the RCC subtypes while gross morphological findings offer additional value in RCC profiling. PMID:28123840

  16. Imaging and neuropsychological correlates of white matter lesions in different subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lam, Charlene L M; Yiend, Jenny; Lee, Tatia M C

    2017-01-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are prevalent in older adults. The association between WML and cognition in different subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is inconsistent in the literature. We aim to provide a systematic review on the impact of WML in different subtypes of MCI, and discuss the recent findings on white matter plasticity. We reviewed peer-reviewed articles from January 2011 to August 2016 and identified 12 studies investigating the association between WML and subtypes of MCI with both neuroimaging and cognitive measures. Our review shows that 1) WM abnormality was identified between different subtypes of MCI and healthy controls on diffusion imaging; 2) neither visual ratings of WML nor its volumetry differentiate different subtypes of MCI or its prognosis to dementia; and 3) cognitive correlates of WML were evident in the Amnestic-type MCI in the domains of memory, language, psychomotor speed, attention and executive functions. Cognitive reserve and the plasticity of white matter may modulate the impact of WML on the manifestation of the neurodegenerative disease. Further research is needed to study the plasticity of white matter in the MCI population to evaluate its potential clinical application.

  17. Microstructural Abnormalities in the Combined and Inattentive Subtypes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: a Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Du; Ma, Jun; Du, Xiaoxia; Shen, Guohua; Jin, Xingming; Gong, Qiyong

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that there are specific white matter abnormalities in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the results of these studies are not consistent, and one of the most important factors that affects the inconsistency of previous studies maybe the ADHD subtype. Different ADHD subtypes may have some overlapping microstructural damage, but they may also have unique microstructural abnormalities. The objective of this study was to investigate the microstructural abnormalities associated with two subtypes of ADHD: combined (ADHD-C) and inattentive (ADHD-I). Twenty-eight children with ADHD-C, 28 children with ADHD-I and 28 healthy children participated in this study. Fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial diffusivity (AD) were used to analyze diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data to provide specific information regarding abnormal brain areas. Our results demonstrated that ADHD-I is related to abnormalities in the temporo-occipital areas, while the combined subtype (ADHD-C) is related to abnormalities in the frontal-subcortical circuit, the fronto-limbic pathway, and the temporo-occipital areas. Moreover, an abnormality in the motor circuit may represent the main difference between the ADHD-I and ADHD-C subtypes. PMID:25363043

  18. The Values of Combined and Sub-Stratified Imaging Scores with Ultrasonography and Mammography in Breast Cancer Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsun-Hou; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chou, Yu-Ching; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Huang, Guo-Shu; Liao, Guo-Shiou

    2015-01-01

    The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) of Mammography (MG) and Ultrasonography (US) were equivalent to the "5-point score" and applied for combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments. This study evaluated the value of combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments with MG and US over breast cancer subtypes (BCS). Medical records of 5,037 cases having imaging-guided core biopsy, performed from 2009 to 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. This study selected 1,995 cases (1,457 benign and 538 invasive cancer) having both MG and US before biopsy. These cases were categorized with the "5-point score" for their MG and US, and applied for combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments. Invasive cancers were classified on the basis of BCS, and correlated with combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments. These selected cases were evaluated by the "5-point score." MG, US, and combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments all revealed statistically significant (P < 0.001) incidence of malignancy. The sensitivity was increased in the combined imaging score (99.8%), and the specificity was increased in the sub-stratified combined score (75.4%). In the sub-stratified combined imaging assessment, all BCS can be classified with higher scores (abnormality hierarchy), and luminal B subtype showed the most salient result (hierarchy: higher, 95%; lower, 5%). Combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments can increase sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer diagnosis, respectively, and Luminal B subtype shows the best identification by sub-stratified combined imaging scoring.

  19. NMDA receptor GluN2B (GluR epsilon 2/NR2B) subunit is crucial for channel function, postsynaptic macromolecular organization, and actin cytoskeleton at hippocampal CA3 synapses.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kaori; Kakizaki, Toshikazu; Kamiya, Haruyuki; Fukaya, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Miwako; Abe, Manabu; Natsume, Rie; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji

    2009-09-02

    GluN2B (GluRepsilon2/NR2B) subunit is involved in synapse development, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive function. However, its roles in synaptic expression and function of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in the brain remain mostly unknown because of the neonatal lethality of global knock-out mice. To address this, we generated conditional knock-out mice, in which GluN2B was ablated exclusively in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells. By immunohistochemistry, GluN2B disappeared and GluN1 (GluRzeta1/NR1) was moderately reduced, whereas GluN2A (GluRepsilon1/NR2A) and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) were unaltered in the mutant CA3. This was consistent with protein contents in the CA3 crude fraction: 9.6% of control level for GluN2B, 47.7% for GluN1, 90.6% for GluN2A, and 98.0% for PSD-95. Despite the remaining NMDARs, NMDAR-mediated currents and long-term potentiation were virtually lost at various CA3 synapses. Then, we compared synaptic NMDARs by postembedding immunogold electron microscopy and immunoblot using the PSD fraction. In the mutant CA3, GluN1 was severely reduced in both immunogold (20.6-23.6%) and immunoblot (24.6%), whereas GluN2A and PSD-95 were unchanged in immunogold but markedly reduced in the PSD fraction (51.4 and 36.5%, respectively), indicating increased detergent solubility of PSD molecules. No such increased solubility was observed for GluN2B in the CA3 of GluN2A-knock-out mice. Furthermore, significant decreases were found in the ratio of filamentous to globular actin (49.5%) and in the density of dendritic spines (76.2%). These findings suggest that GluN2B is critically involved in NMDAR channel function, organization of postsynaptic macromolecular complexes, formation or maintenance of dendritic spines, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

  20. Clinical and Imaging Characteristics of Arteriopathy Subtypes in Children with Arterial Ischemic Stroke: Results of the VIPS Study.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, M; Hills, N K; DeVeber, G A; Barkovich, A J; Bernard, T J; Friedman, N R; Mackay, M T; Kirton, A; Zhu, G; Leiva-Salinas, C; Hou, Q; Fullerton, H J

    2017-10-05

    Childhood arteriopathies are rare but heterogenous, and difficult to diagnose and classify, especially by nonexperts. We quantified clinical and imaging characteristics associated with childhood arteriopathy subtypes to facilitate their diagnosis and classification in research and clinical settings. The Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS) study prospectively enrolled 355 children with arterial ischemic stroke (2010-2014). A central team of experts reviewed all data to diagnose childhood arteriopathy and classify subtypes, including arterial dissection and focal cerebral arteriopathy-inflammatory type, which includes transient cerebral arteriopathy, Moyamoya disease, and diffuse/multifocal vasculitis. Only children whose stroke etiology could be conclusively diagnosed were included in these analyses. We constructed logistic regression models to identify characteristics associated with each arteriopathy subtype. Among 127 children with definite arteriopathy, the arteriopathy subtype could not be classified in 18 (14%). Moyamoya disease (n = 34) occurred mostly in children younger than 8 years of age; focal cerebral arteriopathy-inflammatory type (n = 25), in children 8-15 years of age; and dissection (n = 26), at all ages. Vertigo at stroke presentation was common in dissection. Dissection affected the cervical arteries, while Moyamoya disease involved the supraclinoid internal carotid arteries. A banded appearance of the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery was pathognomonic of focal cerebral arteriopathy-inflammatory type but was present in <25% of patients with focal cerebral arteriopathy-inflammatory type; a small lenticulostriate distribution infarct was a more common predictor of focal cerebral arteriopathy-inflammatory type, present in 76%. It remained difficult to distinguish focal cerebral arteriopathy-inflammatory type from intracranial dissection of the anterior circulation. We observed only secondary forms of diffuse

  1. [Application of diffusion-weighted intravoxel incoherent motion imaging in diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma subtypes].

    PubMed

    Cong, X Y; Chen, Y; Zhang, J; Yu, X D; Ye, F; Yu, W J; Zhang, M M; Ouyang, H; Zhao, X M

    2016-06-23

    To evaluate the value of parameters derived from intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in differentiating histopathological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Between May 2014 and December 2015, a total of 69 patients who were surgically and pathologically diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma were recruited for the study. We examined 61 clear cell RCC (ccRCC), and 8 non-clear cell carcinoma (non-ccRCC, including 7 chromophobe RCC and 1 papillary RCC). All the ccRCC were divided into well differentiated group (n=46), moderately differentiated group (n=8), and poorly differentiated group (n=7). In addition to routine renal magnetic resonance imaging examination performed on a 3.0-Tesla MR system, all patients were imaged with axial intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging. Using biexponential model, we calculated the diffusion coefficient (D), pseudodiffusion coefficient (D(*)), and perfusion fraction (f). The D and f values of the ccRCC were higher (each P<0.05) than that for non-ccRCC [D (1.29±0.30)×10(-3)mm(2)/s, D(*) (42.92±20.21)×10(-3)mm(2)/s, and f (35.71±6.61)% versus D (0.78±0.23)×10(-3)mm(2)/s, D(*) (32.60±11.33)×10(-3)mm(2)/s, and f (21.52±8.44)% ]. In the well differentiated group of ccRCC, we found D of (1.36±0.29)×10(-3)mm(2)/s, D(*) (38.39±18.51)×10(-3)mm(2)/s, and f (36.40±6.96)%. The D, D(*,) f values of moderately differentiated lesions were (1.10±0.24)×10(-3)mm(2)/s, (59.90±20.23)×10(-3) mm(2)/s, and (32.88±4.02)%, respectively, those of the poorly differentiated group were (1.03±0.16)×10(-3)mm(2)/s, (53.28±18.74)×10(-3)mm(2)/s, and (34.42±6.21)%. The well differentiated group of ccRCC showed a higher D value than the moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated groups (each P<0.05). D(*) values were significantly lower for the well differentiated group than for the moderately differentiated group (P<0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of D values were 90

  2. Breast Cancer Subtype Influences the Accuracy of Predicting Pathologic Response by Imaging and Clinical Breast Exam After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Waldrep, Ashley R; Avery, Eric J; Rose, Ferrill F; Midathada, Madhu V; Tilford, Joni A; Kolberg, Hans-Christian; Hutchins, Mark R

    2016-10-01

    Clinical response evaluation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for breast cancer could include various imaging methods, as well as clinical breast exam (CBE). We assessed the accuracy of CBE and imaging to predict pathologic response after NACT administration according to breast cancer subtype. This retrospective cohort study included 84 patients with records of NACT and subsequent primary breast surgery from 2003-2013. Patients were divided into 4 breast cancer subtypes according to hormone receptor (HR) status and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status. Negative predictive value (NPV), false-negative rate (FNR), false-positive rate (FPR) and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated for CBE and imaging post-NACT and prior to breast cancer surgery. NPV, FNR, FPR and PPV varied by breast cancer subtype and clinical response evaluation method. Imaging resulted in a higher NPV and a lower FNR than CBE among the entire cohort. There was a lower FPR with CBE. Clinical response evaluation by CBE was highly accurate for predicting pathologic residual disease in HR+ tumors (CBE PPV: 95.5% in HR+HER2-, 100.0% in HR+HER2+). In triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the imaging NPV was 100% and the imaging FNR was 0%. The use of imaging in HR+ tumors post-NACT may provide little to no additional value that is not already garnered by performance of a CBE. For TNBC, imaging may play a critical role in the prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) post-NACT. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Distinctive Patterns of Three-Dimensional Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subtypes of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Naoto; Okada, Kazunori; Yamagata, Shingo; Takayoshi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic penumbra in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) can be evaluated using arterial spin-labeled (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used three-dimensional ASL-MRI to examine patients with different stroke subtypes and the clinical utility of the method within 24 hours of AIS onset. The 55 male and 48 female patients (mean age, 79.0 years) underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, and pulsed continuous ASL perfusion imaging to determine stroke subtype, hypoperfused ASL area, and neurological deficit severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale). Arterial transit artifacts, indicative of occlusive regions or collateral flow, and other stroke indices were compared. ASL hypoperfusion was detected in 3 of 9 patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA), 2 of 27 patients with lacunar infarction (LI), 19 of 31 patients with atherothrombotic infarction (AT), and 30 of 36 patients with cardiogenic embolic infarction (CE). ASL abnormalities were significantly less frequent in LI than in AT and CE, and more frequent in CE than in TIA. ASL abnormalities were more prevalent in patients with medium-to-large DWI-assessed lesions than in those with small lesions on DWI. Patients with medium-sized lesions following AT and CE had a high frequency of diffusion-perfusion mismatch. In 4 of the 5 patients who underwent intravenous thrombolytic therapy, ASL hypoperfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch were improved and the occluded arteries were recanalized. ASL perfusion studies may provide useful clinical information allowing diffusion-perfusion mismatch detection and treatment selection in AIS patients, depending on stroke subtype. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Computational approach to radiogenomics of breast cancer: Luminal A and luminal B molecular subtypes are associated with imaging features on routine breast MRI extracted using computer vision algorithms.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Lars J; Zhang, Jing; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2015-10-01

    To identify associations between semiautomatically extracted MRI features and breast cancer molecular subtypes. We analyzed routine clinical pre-operative breast MRIs from 275 breast cancer patients at a single institution in this retrospective, Institutional Review Board-approved study. Six fellowship-trained breast imagers reviewed the MRIs and annotated the cancers. Computer vision algorithms were then used to extract 56 imaging features from the cancers including morphologic, texture, and dynamic features. Surrogate markers (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR], human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 [HER2]) were used to categorize tumors by molecular subtype: ER/PR+, HER2- (luminal A); ER/PR+, HER2+ (luminal B); ER/PR-, HER2+ (HER2); ER/PR/HER2- (basal). A multivariate analysis was used to determine associations between the imaging features and molecular subtype. The imaging features were associated with both luminal A (P = 0.0007) and luminal B (P = 0.0063) molecular subtypes. No association was found for either HER2 (P = 0.2465) or basal (P = 0.1014) molecular subtype and the imaging features. A P-value of 0.0125 (0.05/4) was considered significant. Luminal A and luminal B molecular subtype breast cancer are associated with semiautomatically extracted features from routine contrast enhanced breast MRI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: radiologic-pathologic correlation of the response and disease-free survival depending on molecular subtype.

    PubMed

    Cruz Ciria, S; Jiménez Aragón, F; García Mur, C; Esteban Cuesta, H; Gros Bañeres, B

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic and pathologic responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their correlation in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer and to analyze their impact in disease-free survival. We included 205 patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We evaluated the radiologic response by comparing MRI images acquired before and after chemotherapy. The pathologic response was classified on the Miller and Payne scale. For each subtype (HER2+, TN, luminal A, luminal B HER2-, and luminal B HER2+), we used the χ(2) test, Student's t-test, ANOVA, and Kendall's Tau-b to evaluate the radiologic response and the pathologic response, the radiologic-pathologic correlation, and the disease-free survival. The subtypes HER2+ (62.1%) and TN (45.2%) had higher rates of complete radiologic response. The pathologic response was 65.5% in the HER2+ subtype, 38.1% in the TN subtype, 2.6% in the luminal A subtype, 8.2% in the luminal B HER2- subtype, and 31% in the luminal B HER2+ subtype. The rate of radiologic-pathologic correlation was significant in all subtypes, higher in TN and HER2 (Tau-b coefficients 0.805 and 0.717, respectively). Disease-free survival was higher in HER2+ (91.9±3.3 months) and lower in TN (69.5±6.3 months), with significant differences between the cases with poor and good radiologic responses (P=.040). Survival was greater in cases with good radiologic response, except in cases with luminal A subtype. MRI can be a useful tool that provides information about the evolution of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, which varies with the immunohistochemical subtype. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging of breast cancer: association with histopathological features and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunju; Ko, Kyounglan; Kim, Daehong; Min, Changki; Kim, Sungheon G; Joo, Jungnam; Park, Boram

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the associations between intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM)-derived parameters and histopathological features and subtypes of breast cancer. Pre-operative MRI from 275 patients with unilateral breast cancer was analyzed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and IVIM parameters [tissue diffusion coefficient (Dt), perfusion fraction (fp) and pseudodiffusion coefficient] were obtained from cancer and normal tissue using diffusion-weighted imaging with b-values of 0, 30, 70, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 800 s mm(-2). We then compared the IVIM parameters of tumours with different histopathological features and subtypes. The ADC and Dt were lower and fp was higher in cancers than in normal tissues (p < 0.001). The Dt was lower in high Ki-67 cancer than in low Ki-67 cancer (p = 0.019), whereas ADC showed no significant difference (p = 0.309). Luminal B [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative] cancer showed lower ADC (p = 0.003) and Dt (p = 0.001) than other types. We found low tissue diffusivity in high Ki-67 cancer and luminal B (HER2-negative) cancer using IVIM imaging. Low tissue diffusivity is more clearly shown in high Ki-67 tumours and luminal B (HER2-negative) tumours with the IVIM model.

  7. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for predicting pathological complete response of breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: association with breast cancer subtype.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takayo; Horii, Rie; Gomi, Naoya; Miyagi, Yumi; Takahashi, Shunji; Ito, Yoshinori; Akiyama, Futoshi; Ohno, Shinji; Iwase, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    A pathological complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is a signature of favorable prognosis in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in predicting the pCR after NAC. 265 women with stage II or III breast cancer who underwent surgery after NAC were retrospectively investigated for MRI findings before and after the NAC. Correlation of pCR with an "imaging complete response" (iCR), defined as no detectable tumor on all serial images with dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, was evaluated with respect to each tumor subtype. Of 265 cases, 44 (16.6 %) and 24 (9.1 %) were diagnosed as iCR and pCR, respectively. Nineteen of the 44 iCR cases (43.2 %) were assessed as pCR, and 216 (97.7 %) of the 221 non-iCR cases were assessed as non-pCR. The accuracy (ACC), the pCR predictive value (PPV) and the non-pCR predictive value (NPV) were 88.7, 43.2, and 97.7 %, respectively. When assessed according to each tumor subtype, the ACC, PPV and NPV were 93.2, 21.4 and 100 % for luminal subtype, 70.8, 0 and 89.5 % for luminal/HER2 subtype, 75, 57.1 and 88.8 % for HER2-enriched subtype, and 90.9, 72.7 and 97 % for triple-negative subtype, respectively. MRI is a valuable modality for predicting pCR of breast cancer after NAC treatment. However, its accuracy varies greatly in different breast cancer subtypes. Whereas MRI closely predicts pCR in the triple-negative subtype, iCR in the luminal subtype is often an over-estimation. On the other hand, residual lesions identified by MRI are reliable markers of non-pCR for the luminal subtype.

  8. Prediction of Stroke Subtype and Recanalization Using Susceptibility Vessel Sign on Susceptibility-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Wan; Jeong, Han-Gil; Kim, Do Yeon; Yang, Wookjin; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    The susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) is a hypointense signal visualized because of the susceptibility effect of thrombi, sensitively detected on susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The relationship of SVS parameters with the stroke subtype and recanalization status after endovascular treatment remains uncertain. The data from 89 patients with acute stroke caused by anterior circulation infarcts who underwent susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging before endovascular treatment were examined. Independent reviewers, blinded to the stroke subtype and recanalization status, measured the SVS diameter, length, and estimated volume. The intra- and interrater agreements of the SVS parameters were assessed. The SVS was identified in 78% of the patients. SVS was more commonly associated with cardioembolism than with noncardioembolism (P=0.01). The SVS diameter (P<0.01) and length (P=0.01) were larger in the cardioembolism group. The SVS diameter was larger in the recanalization group (thrombolysis in cerebral infarction ≥2b) than in the nonrecanalization group (P=0.04). Multivariable analysis revealed that the SVS diameter was an independent predictor of cardioembolism (adjusted odds ratio, 1.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.90; P<0.01). There was no significant association between the SVS volume and the recanalization status (adjusted odds ratio, 1.003; 95% confidence interval, 0.999-1.006; P=0.12). The optimal cutoff value of the SVS diameter for the cardioembolism was 5.5 mm (sensitivity, 45.6%; specificity, 93.8%). Increased SVS diameter on susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may predict cardioembolism. No clear association was found between SVS volume and endovascular recanalization. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Impact of Gleason Subtype on Prostate Cancer Detection Using Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Correlation with Final Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Truong, Matthew; Hollenberg, Gary; Weinberg, Eric; Messing, Edward M; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Frye, Thomas P

    2017-02-03

    We determined whether Gleason pattern 4 architecture impacts tumor visibility on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and correlates with final histopathology. A total of 83 tumor foci were identified in 22 radical prostatectomy specimens from patients with a prior negative biopsy who underwent magnetic resonance/ultrasound fusion biopsy followed by radical prostatectomy from January 2015 to July 2016. A genitourinary pathologist rereviewed tumor foci for Gleason architectural subtype. Each prostate imaging reporting and data system category 3 to 5 lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was paired with its corresponding pathological tumor focus. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to determine predictors of tumor visibility. Of the 83 tumor foci identified 26 (31%) were visible on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, 33 (40%) were Gleason score 3+3 and 50 (60%) were Gleason score 3+4 or greater. Among tumor foci containing Gleason pattern 4, increasing tumor size and noncribriform predominant architecture were the only independent predictors of tumor detection on multivariable analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.011, respectively). For tumor foci containing Gleason pattern 4, 0.5 cm or greater, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging detected 10 of 13 (77%), 5 of 14 (36%) and 9 of 10 (90%) for poorly formed, cribriform and fused architecture, respectively (p = 0.01). The size threshold for the detection of cribriform tumors was higher than that of other architectural patterns. Furthermore, cribriform pattern was identified more frequently on systematic biopsy than on targeted biopsy. Reduced visibility of cribriform pattern on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has significant ramifications for prostate cancer detection, surveillance and focal therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computer aided detection and classification of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell subtypes based on microscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    MoradiAmin, Morteza; Memari, Ahmad; Samadzadehaghdam, Nasser; Kermani, Saeed; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2016-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer that starts from the early version of white blood cells called lymphocytes in the bone marrow. It can spread to different parts of the body rapidly and if not treated, would probably be deadly within a couple of months. Leukemia cells are categorized into three types of L1, L2, and L3. The cancer is detected through screening of blood and bone marrow smears by pathologists. But manual examination of blood samples is a time-consuming and boring procedure as well as limited by human error risks. So to overcome these limitations a computer-aided detection system, capable of discriminating cancer from noncancer cases and identifying the cancerous cell subtypes, seems to be necessary. In this article an automatic detection method is proposed; first cell nucleus is segmented by fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm. Then a rich set of features including geometric, first- and second-order statistical features are obtained from the nucleus. A principal component analysis is used to reduce feature matrix dimensionality. Finally, an ensemble of SVM classifiers with different kernels and parameters is applied to classify cells into four groups, that is noncancerous, L1, L2, and L3. Results show that the proposed method can be used as an assistive diagnostic tool in laboratories.

  11. Imaging for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 in rat and monkey brains using PET with [18F]FITM.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Maeda, Jun; Kawamura, Kazunori; Yui, Joji; Hatori, Akiko; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nagai, Yuji; Tokunaga, Masaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we evaluate the utility of 4-[(18)F]fluoro-N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-N-methylbenzamide ([(18)F]FITM) as a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for imaging of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1) in rat and monkey brains. In vivo distribution of [(18)F]FITM in brains was evaluated by PET scans with or without the mGluR1-selective antagonist (JNJ16259685). Kinetic parameters of monkey PET data were obtained using the two-tissue compartment model with arterial blood sampling. In PET studies in rat and monkey brains, the highest uptake of radioactivity was in the cerebellum, followed by moderate uptake in the thalamus, hippocampus and striatum. The lowest uptake of radioactivity was detected in the pons. These uptakes in all brain regions were dramatically decreased by pre-administration of JNJ16259685. In kinetic analysis of monkey PET, the highest volume of distribution (V(T)) was detected in the cerebellum (V(T) = 11.5). [(18)F]FITM has an excellent profile as a PET ligand for mGluR1 imaging. PET with [(18)F]FITM may prove useful for determining the regional distribution and density of mGluR1 and the mGluR1 occupancy of drugs in human brains.

  12. Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy in Breast Cancer: Association of Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging Findings, Diffusion-weighted Imaging Findings, and Tumor Subtype with Tumor Response.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Gorane; Bargalló, Xavier; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Farrús, Blanca; Caparrós, Xavier; Velasco, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Purpose To investigate the performance of tumor subtype and various magnetic resonance (MR) imaging parameters in the assessment of tumor response to neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) in patients with breast cancer and to outline a model of pathologic response, considering pathologic complete response (pCR) as the complete absence of any residual invasive cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Materials and Methods This was an institutional review board-approved retrospective study, with waiver of the need to obtain informed consent. From November 2009 to December 2014, 111 patients with histopathologically confirmed invasive breast cancer who were undergoing NST were included (mean age, 54 years; range, 27-84 years). Breast MR imaging was performed before and after treatment. Presence of late enhancement was assessed. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were obtained by using two different methods. ADC ratio (mean posttreatment ADC/mean pretreatment ADC) was calculated. pCR was defined as absence of any residual invasive cancer or DCIS. Multivariate regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed. Results According to their immunohistochemical (IHC) profile, tumors were classified as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive (n = 51), estrogen receptor (ER) positive/HER2 negative (n = 40), and triple negative (n = 20). pCR was achieved in 19% (21 of 111) of cases; 86% of them were triple-negative or HER2-positive subtypes. Absence of late enhancement at posttreatment MR imaging was significantly associated with pCR (area under the curve [AUC], 0.85). Mean ADC ratio significantly increased when pCR was achieved (P < .001). A κ value of 0.479 was found for late enhancement (P < .001), and the intraclass correlation coefficient for ADCs was 0.788 (P < .001). Good correlation of ADCs obtained with the single-value method and those obtained with the mean-value methods was observed. The model combining the IHC

  13. Breast cancer in very young women (<30 years): Correlation of imaging features with clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical subtypes.

    PubMed

    An, Yeong Yi; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Park, Chang Suk; Jung, Na Young; Kim, Ji Youn

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis of breast cancer in very young women (<30 years) is challenging and the characteristic imaging findings are not yet fully understood. We evaluated the imaging findings of breast cancer in very young women (<30 years) and to correlate them with clinicopathological features. A total of 50 surgically confirmed breast cancers were included in our retrospective study. The medical records were reviewed and the radiological features were analyzed according to the new 5th edition of the ACR BI-RADS lexicon. The breast cancers in our study population most commonly presented as a self-detected mass (74%), T2-3 stage (58%), histological grade III (52.3%) and ER-positive (80%) subtype. The most common finding was an irregular (87.5%) hyperdense (66.7%) mass with indistinct margins (50%) on mammography and an irregular (75.6%) indistinct (57.8%) hypoechoic/heterogeneous (77.8%) mass without a posterior acoustic feature (60%) on ultrasonography. MRI revealed an irregular shape (63.3%), irregular margins (43.3%), and heterogeneous enhancement (60%) with washout kinetics (69.4%). Mammographically, microcalcifications were correlated with the HER2-enriched type, and mass-type lesions were correlated with triple-negative cancer (p=0.04). An oval/round mass on ultrasound (p=0.005), rim enhancement (p=0.004) and intralesional T2 high signal intensity (p=0.04) on MRI were associated with the triple-negative type. On all imaging modalities, breast cancer in very young women usually presented as an irregular mass, and certain radiological features could be used for predicting the specific tumor type. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of apical subtype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kebed, Kalie Y; Al Adham, Raed I; Bishu, Kalkidan; Askew, J Wells; Klarich, Kyle W; Araoz, Philip A; Foley, Thomas A; Glockner, James F; Nishimura, Rick A; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2014-09-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is an uncommon variant of HC. We sought to characterize cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among apical HC patients. This was a retrospective review of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of apical HC who underwent cardiac MRI examinations at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) from August 1999 to October 2011. Clinical and demographic data at the time of cardiac MRI study were abstracted. Cardiac MRI study and 2-dimensional echocardiograms performed within 6 months of the cardiac MRI were reviewed; 96 patients with apical HC underwent cardiac MRI examinations. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 130.7 ± 39.1 ml and 44.2 ± 20.9 ml, respectively. Maximum LV thickness was 19 ± 5 mm. Hypertrophy extended beyond the apex into other segments in 57 (59.4%) patients. Obstructive physiology was seen in 12 (12.5%) and was more common in the mixed apical phenotype than the pure apical (19.3 vs 2.6%, p = 0.02). Apical pouches were noted in 39 (40.6%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 70 (74.5%) patients. LGE was associated with severe symptoms and increased maximal LV wall thickness. In conclusion, cardiac MRI is well suited for studying the apical form of HC because of difficulty imaging the cardiac apex with standard echocardiography. Cardiac MRI is uniquely suited to delineate the presence or absence of an apical pouch and abnormal myocardial LGE that may have implications in the natural history of apical HM. In particular, the presence of abnormal LGE is associated with clinical symptoms and increased wall thickness.

  15. Lung Cancer-Targeting Peptides with Multi-subtype Indication for Combinational Drug Delivery and Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yi-Hsuan; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Lin, Ming-Huang; Chang, Chen; Lan, Chun-Hsin; Wu, Han-Chung

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Most targeted drugs approved for lung cancer treatment are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) directed against EGFR or ALK, and are used mainly for adenocarcinoma. At present, there is no effective or tailored targeting agent for large cell carcinoma (LCC) or small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Therefore, we aimed to identify targeting peptides with diagnostic and therapeutic utility that possess broad subtype specificity for SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed phage display biopanning of H460 LCC cells to select broad-spectrum lung cancer-binding peptides, since LCC has recently been categorized as an undifferentiated tumor type within other histological subcategories of lung cancer. Three targeting phages (HPC1, HPC2, and HPC4) and their respective displayed peptides (HSP1, HSP2, and HSP4) were able to bind to both SCLC and NSCLC cell lines, as well as clinical specimens, but not to normal pneumonic tissues. In vivo optical imaging of phage homing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of peptide-SPIONs revealed that HSP1 was the most favorable probe for multimodal molecular imaging. Using HSP1-SPION, the T2-weighted MR signal of H460 xenografts was decreased up to 42%. In contrast to the tight binding of HSP1 to cancer cell surfaces, HSP4 was preferentially endocytosed and intracellular drug delivery was thereby effected, significantly improving the therapeutic index of liposomal drug in vivo. Liposomal doxorubicin (LD) conjugated to HSP1, HSP2, or HSP4 had significantly greater therapeutic efficacy than non-targeting liposomal drugs in NSCLC (H460 and H1993) animal models. Combined therapy with an HSP4-conjugated stable formulation of liposomal vinorelbine (sLV) further improved median overall survival (131 vs. 84 days; P = 0.0248), even in aggressive A549 orthotopic models. Overall, these peptides have the potential to guide a wide variety of tailored theranostic agents for

  16. Spatial Habitat Features Derived from Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Are Associated with Molecular Subtype and 12-Month Survival Status in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joonsang; Narang, Shivali; Martinez, Juan; Rao, Ganesh; Rao, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumors is Glioblastoma multiforme. Despite the multimodality treatment such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide: TMZ), the median survival rate of glioblastoma patient is less than 15 months. In this study, we investigated the association between measures of spatial diversity derived from spatial point pattern analysis of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data with molecular status as well as 12-month survival in glioblastoma. We obtained 27 measures of spatial proximity (diversity) via spatial point pattern analysis of multiparametric T1 post-contrast and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI data. These measures were used to predict 12-month survival status (≤12 or >12 months) in 74 glioblastoma patients. Kaplan-Meier with receiver operating characteristic analyses was used to assess the relationship between derived spatial features and 12-month survival status as well as molecular subtype status in patients with glioblastoma. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that 14 spatial features were capable of stratifying overall survival in a statistically significant manner. For prediction of 12-month survival status based on these diversity indices, sensitivity and specificity were 0.86 and 0.64, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and the accuracy were 0.76 and 0.75, respectively. For prediction of molecular subtype status, proneural subtype shows highest accuracy of 0.93 among all molecular subtypes based on receiver operating characteristic analysis. We find that measures of spatial diversity from point pattern analysis of intensity habitats from T1 post-contrast and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images are associated with both tumor subtype status and 12-month survival status and may therefore be useful indicators of patient prognosis, in addition to providing potential guidance for molecularly-targeted therapies in

  17. Effect of MR Imaging Contrast Thresholds on Prediction of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Breast Cancer Subtypes: A Subgroup Analysis of the ACRIN 6657/I-SPY 1 TRIAL.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Arasu, Vignesh; Newitt, David C; Jones, Ella F; Wilmes, Lisa; Gibbs, Jessica; Kornak, John; Joe, Bonnie N; Esserman, Laura J; Hylton, Nola M

    2016-12-01

    Functional tumor volume (FTV) measurements by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can predict treatment outcomes for women receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Here, we explore whether the contrast thresholds used to define FTV could be adjusted by breast cancer subtype to improve predictive performance. Absolute FTV and percent change in FTV (ΔFTV) at sequential time-points during treatment were calculated and investigated as predictors of pathologic complete response at surgery. Early percent enhancement threshold (PEt) and signal enhancement ratio threshold (SERt) were varied. The predictive performance of resulting FTV predictors was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. A total number of 116 patients were studied both as a full cohort and in the following groups defined by hormone receptor (HR) and HER2 receptor subtype: 45 HR+/HER2-, 39 HER2+, and 30 triple negatives. High AUCs were found at different ranges of PEt and SERt levels in different subtypes. Findings from this study suggest that the predictive performance to treatment response by MRI varies by contrast thresholds, and that pathologic complete response prediction may be improved through subtype-specific contrast enhancement thresholds. A validation study is underway with a larger patient population.

  18. Effect of MR Imaging Contrast Thresholds on Prediction of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Breast Cancer Subtypes: A Subgroup Analysis of the ACRIN 6657/I-SPY 1 TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Arasu, Vignesh; Newitt, David C.; Jones, Ella F.; Wilmes, Lisa; Gibbs, Jessica; Kornak, John; Joe, Bonnie N.; Esserman, Laura J.; Hylton, Nola M.

    2016-01-01

    Functional tumor volume (FTV) measurements by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can predict treatment outcomes for women receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Here, we explore whether the contrast thresholds used to define FTV could be adjusted by breast cancer subtype to improve predictive performance. Absolute FTV and percent change in FTV (ΔFTV) at sequential time-points during treatment were calculated and investigated as predictors of pathologic complete response at surgery. Early percent enhancement threshold (PEt) and signal enhancement ratio threshold (SERt) were varied. The predictive performance of resulting FTV predictors was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. A total number of 116 patients were studied both as a full cohort and in the following groups defined by hormone receptor (HR) and HER2 receptor subtype: 45 HR+/HER2−, 39 HER2+, and 30 triple negatives. High AUCs were found at different ranges of PEt and SERt levels in different subtypes. Findings from this study suggest that the predictive performance to treatment response by MRI varies by contrast thresholds, and that pathologic complete response prediction may be improved through subtype-specific contrast enhancement thresholds. A validation study is underway with a larger patient population. PMID:28066808

  19. Structural brain imaging correlates of ASD and ADHD across the lifespan: a hypothesis-generating review on developmental ASD-ADHD subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rommelse, Nanda; Buitelaar, Jan K; Hartman, Catharina A

    2017-02-01

    We hypothesize that it is plausible that biologically distinct developmental ASD-ADHD subtypes are present, each characterized by a distinct time of onset of symptoms, progression and combination of symptoms. The aim of the present narrative review was to explore if structural brain imaging studies may shed light on key brain areas that are linked to both ASD and ADHD symptoms and undergo significant changes during development. These findings may possibly pinpoint to brain mechanisms underlying differential developmental ASD-ADHD subtypes. To this end we brought together the literature on ASD and ADHD structural brain imaging symptoms and particularly highlight the adolescent years and beyond. Findings indicate that the vast majority of existing MRI studies has been cross-sectional and conducted in children, and sometimes did include adolescents as well, but without explicitly documenting on this age group. MRI studies documenting on age effects in adults with ASD and/or ADHD are rare, and if age is taken into account, only linear effects are examined. Data from various studies suggest that a crucial distinctive feature underlying different developmental ASD-ADHD subtypes may be the differential developmental thinning patterns of the anterior cingulate cortex and related connections towards other prefrontal regions. These regions are crucial for the development of cognitive/effortful control and socio-emotional functioning, with impairments in these features as key to both ASD and ADHD.

  20. Hyperspectral imaging to monitor simultaneously multiple protein subtypes and live track their spatial dynamics: a new platform to screen drugs for CNS diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, S.; Sylvestre, J.-P.; Marcet, S.; Mangiarini, F.; Verhaegen, M.; De Koninck, P.; Blais-Ouellette, S.

    2015-03-01

    In the past decade, the efficacy of existing therapies and the discovery of innovative treatments for Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases have been limited by the lack of appropriate methods to investigate complex molecular processes at the synaptic level. In order to better understand the fundamental mechanisms that regulate diseases of the CNS, a fast fluorescence hyperspectral imaging platform was designed to track simultaneously various neurotransmitter receptors trafficking in and out of synapses. With this hyperspectral imaging platform, it was possible to image simultaneously five different synaptic proteins, including subtypes of glutamate receptors (mGluR, NMDAR, AMPAR), postsynaptic density proteins, and signaling proteins. This new imaging platform allows fast simultaneous acquisitions of at least five fluorescent markers in living neurons with a high spatial resolution. This technique provides an effective method to observe several synaptic proteins at the same time, thus study how drugs for CNS impact the spatial dynamics of these proteins.

  1. Design and Investigation of a [(18)F]-Labeled Benzamide Derivative as a High Affinity Dual Sigma Receptor Subtype Radioligand for Prostate Tumor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Comeau, Anthony; Bowen, Wayne D; Mach, Robert H; Ross, Brian D; Hong, Hao; Van Dort, Marcian E

    2017-03-06

    High overexpression of sigma (σ) receptors (σ1 and σ2 subtypes) in a variety of human solid tumors has prompted the development of σ receptor-targeting radioligands, as imaging agents for tumor detection. A majority of these radioligands to date target the σ2 receptor, a potential marker of tumor proliferative status. The identification of approximately equal proportions of both σ receptor subtypes in prostate tumors suggests that a high affinity, dual σ receptor-targeting radioligand could potentially provide enhanced tumor targeting efficacy in prostate cancer. To accomplish this goal, we designed a series of ligands which bind to both σ receptor subtypes with high affinity. Ligand 3a in this series, displaying optimal dual σ receptor subtype affinity (σ1, 6.3 nM; σ2, 10.2 nM) was radiolabeled with fluorine-18 ((18)F) to give [(18)F]3a and evaluated as a σ receptor-targeting radioligand in the mouse PC-3 prostate tumor model. Cellular assays with PC-3 cells demonstrated that a major proportion of [(18)F]3a was localized to cell surface σ receptors, while ∼10% of [(18)F]3a was internalized within cells after incubation for 3.5 h. Serial PET imaging in mice bearing PC-3 tumors revealed that uptake of [(18)F]3a was 1.6 ± 0.8, 4.4 ± 0.3, and 3.6 ± 0.6% ID/g (% injection dose per gram) in σ receptor-positive prostate tumors at 15 min, 1.5 h, and 3.5 h postinjection, respectively (n = 3) resulting in clear tumor visualization. Blocking studies conducted with haloperidol (a nonselective inhibitor for both σ receptor subtypes) confirmed that the uptake of [(18)F]3a was σ receptor-mediated. Histology analysis confirmed similar expression of σ1 and σ2 in PC-3 tumors which was significantly greater than its expression in normal organs/tissues such as liver, kidney, and muscle. Metabolite studies revealed that >50% of radioactivity in PC-3 tumors at 30 min postinjection represented intact [(18)F]3a. Prominent σ receptor-specific uptake of [(18)F]3a in

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging tumor regression shrinkage patterns after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer: Correlation with tumor biological subtypes and pathological response after therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballesio, Laura; Gigli, Silvia; Di Pastena, Francesca; Giraldi, Guglielmo; Manganaro, Lucia; Anastasi, Emanuela; Catalano, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze magnetic resonance imaging shrinkage pattern of tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and to evaluate its relationship with biological subtypes and pathological response. We reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging studies of 51 patients with single mass-enhancing lesions (performed at time 0 and at the II and last cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy). Tumors were classified as Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2+, and Triple Negative based on biological and immunohistochemical analysis after core needle biopsy. We classified shrinkage pattern, based on tumor regression morphology on magnetic resonance imaging at the II cycle, as concentric, nodular, and mixed. We assigned a numeric score (0: none; 1: low; 2: medium; 3: high) to the enhancement intensity decrease. Pathological response on the surgical specimen was classified as complete (grade 5), partial (grades 4-3), and non-response (grades 1-2) according to Miller and Payne system. Fisher test was used to relate shrinkage pattern with biological subtypes and final pathological response. Seventeen patients achieved complete response, 25 partial response, and 9 non-response. A total of 13 lesions showed nodular pattern, 20 concentric, and 18 mixed. We found an association between concentric pattern and HER2+ (p < 0.001) and mixed pattern and Luminal A lesions (p < 0.001). We observed a statistical significant correlation between concentric pattern and complete response (p < 0.001) and between mixed pattern and non-response (p = 0.005). Enhancement intensity decrease 3 was associated with complete response (p < 0.001). Shrinkage pattern and enhancement intensity decrease may serve as early response indicators after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Shrinkage pattern correlates with tumor biological subtypes.

  3. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M W; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A; Gulaldi, Nedim C M; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-11-01

    The radioligand 11C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of 11C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. The experimental animals were injected with [11C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent phase of the ID-IF. The combined use of FBP

  4. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The radioligand {sup 11}C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. Methods: The experimental animals were injected with [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. Results: In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent

  5. Eye Tracking Reveals Abnormal Visual Preference for Geometric Images as an Early Biomarker of an Autism Spectrum Disorder Subtype Associated With Increased Symptom Severity.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Karen; Marinero, Steven; Hazin, Roxana; McKenna, Benjamin; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Malige, Ajith

    2016-04-15

    Clinically and biologically, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is heterogeneous. Unusual patterns of visual preference as indexed by eye tracking are hallmarks; however, whether they can be used to define an early biomarker of ASD as a whole or leveraged to define a subtype is unclear. To begin to examine this issue, large cohorts are required. A sample of 334 toddlers from six distinct groups (115 toddlers with ASD, 20 toddlers with ASD features, 57 toddlers with developmental delay, 53 toddlers with other conditions [e.g., premature birth, prenatal drug exposure], 64 toddlers with typical development, and 25 unaffected toddlers with siblings with ASD) was studied. Toddlers watched a movie containing geometric and social images. Fixation duration and number of saccades within each area of interest and validation statistics for this independent sample were computed. Next, to maximize power, data from our previous study (n = 110) were added for a total of 444 subjects. A subset of toddlers repeated the eye-tracking procedure. As in the original study, a subset of toddlers with ASD fixated on geometric images >69% of the time. Using this cutoff, sensitivity for ASD was 21%, specificity was 98%, and positive predictive value was 86%. Toddlers with ASD who strongly preferred geometric images had 1) worse cognitive, language, and social skills relative to toddlers with ASD who strongly preferred social images and 2) fewer saccades when viewing geometric images. Unaffected siblings of ASD probands did not show evidence of heightened preference for geometric images. Test-retest reliability was good. Examination of age effects suggested that this test may not be appropriate with children >4 years old. Enhanced visual preference for geometric repetition may be an early developmental biomarker of an ASD subtype with more severe symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Eye-tracking Reveals Abnormal Visual Preference for Geometric Images as an Early Biomarker of an ASD Subtype Associated with Increased Symptom Severity

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Karen; Marinero, Steven; Hazin, Roxana; McKenna, Benjamin; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Malige, Ajith

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinically and biologically, ASD is heterogeneous. Unusual patterns of visual preference as indexed by eye-tracking are hallmarks, yet whether they can be used to define an early biomarker of ASD as a whole, or leveraged to define a subtype is unclear. To begin to examine this issue, large cohorts are required. Methods A sample of 334 toddlers from 6 distinct groups (115 ASD, 20 ASD-Features, 57 DD, 53 Other, 64 TD, and 25 Typ SIB) participated. Toddlers watched a movie containing both geometric and social images. Fixation duration and number of saccades within each AOI and validation statistics for this independent sample computed. Next, to maximize power, data from our previous study (N=110) was added totaling 444 subjects. A subset of toddlers repeated the eye-tracking procedure. Results As in the original study, a subset of toddlers with ASD fixated on geometric images greater than 69%. Using this cutoff, sensitivity for ASD was 21%, specificity 98%, and PPV 86%. Toddlers with ASD who strongly preferred geometric images had (a) worse cognitive, language, and social skills relative to toddlers with ASD who strongly preferred social images and (b) fewer saccades when viewing geometric images. Unaffected siblings of ASD probands did not show evidence of heightened preference for geometric images. Test-retest reliability was good. Examination of age effects suggest that this test may not be appropriate with children > 4 years. Conclusions Enhanced visual preference for geometric repetition may be an early developmental biomarker of an ASD subtype with more severe symptoms. PMID:25981170

  7. Identification of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subtype-specific binding sites that mediate direct interactions with scaffold protein PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Sarah L; Stephenson, F Anne

    2012-04-13

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) neurotransmitter receptors and the postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of scaffolding proteins are integral components of post-synaptic macromolecular signaling complexes that serve to propagate glutamate responses intracellularly. Classically, NMDA receptor NR2 subunits associate with PSD-95 MAGUKs via a conserved ES(E/D)V amino acid sequence located at their C termini. We previously challenged this dogma to demonstrate a second non-ES(E/D)V PSD-95-binding site in both NMDA receptor NR2A and NR2B subunits. Here, using a combination of co-immunoprecipitations from transfected mammalian cells, yeast two-hybrid interaction assays, and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays, we show that NR2A subunits interact directly with PSD-95 via the C-terminal ESDV motif and additionally via an Src homology 3 domain-binding motif that associates with the Src homology 3 domain of PSD-95. Peptide inhibition of co-immunoprecipitations of NR2A and PSD-95 demonstrates that both the ESDV and non-ESDV sites are required for association in native brain tissue. Furthermore, we refine the non-ESDV site within NR2B to residues 1149-1157. These findings provide a molecular basis for the differential association of NMDA receptor subtypes with PSD-95 MAGUK scaffold proteins. These selective interactions may contribute to the organization, lateral mobility, and ultimately the function of NMDA receptor subtypes at synapses. Furthermore, they provide a more general molecular mechanism by which the scaffold, PSD-95, may discriminate between potential interacting partner proteins.

  8. Identification of N-Methyl-d-aspartic Acid (NMDA) Receptor Subtype-specific Binding Sites That Mediate Direct Interactions with Scaffold Protein PSD-95*

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Sarah L.; Stephenson, F. Anne

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) neurotransmitter receptors and the postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of scaffolding proteins are integral components of post-synaptic macromolecular signaling complexes that serve to propagate glutamate responses intracellularly. Classically, NMDA receptor NR2 subunits associate with PSD-95 MAGUKs via a conserved ES(E/D)V amino acid sequence located at their C termini. We previously challenged this dogma to demonstrate a second non-ES(E/D)V PSD-95-binding site in both NMDA receptor NR2A and NR2B subunits. Here, using a combination of co-immunoprecipitations from transfected mammalian cells, yeast two-hybrid interaction assays, and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays, we show that NR2A subunits interact directly with PSD-95 via the C-terminal ESDV motif and additionally via an Src homology 3 domain-binding motif that associates with the Src homology 3 domain of PSD-95. Peptide inhibition of co-immunoprecipitations of NR2A and PSD-95 demonstrates that both the ESDV and non-ESDV sites are required for association in native brain tissue. Furthermore, we refine the non-ESDV site within NR2B to residues 1149–1157. These findings provide a molecular basis for the differential association of NMDA receptor subtypes with PSD-95 MAGUK scaffold proteins. These selective interactions may contribute to the organization, lateral mobility, and ultimately the function of NMDA receptor subtypes at synapses. Furthermore, they provide a more general molecular mechanism by which the scaffold, PSD-95, may discriminate between potential interacting partner proteins. PMID:22375001

  9. Qualitative and Quantitative Imaging Evaluation of Renal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes with Grating-based X-ray Phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunagel, Margarita; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Marschner, Mathias; De Marco, Fabio; Viermetz, Manuel; Notohamiprodjo, Susan; Hellbach, Katharina; Auweter, Sigrid; Link, Vera; Woischke, Christine; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Herzen, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Current clinical imaging methods face limitations in the detection and correct characterization of different subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), while these are important for therapy and prognosis. The present study evaluates the potential of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) for visualization and characterization of human RCC subtypes. The imaging results for 23 ex vivo formalin-fixed human kidney specimens obtained with phase-contrast CT were compared to the results of the absorption-based CT (gbCT), clinical CT and a 3T MRI and validated using histology. Regions of interest were placed on each specimen for quantitative evaluation. Qualitative and quantitative gbPC-CT imaging could significantly discriminate between normal kidney cortex (54 ± 4 HUp) and clear cell (42 ± 10), papillary (43 ± 6) and chromophobe RCCs (39 ± 7), p < 0.05 respectively. The sensitivity for detection of tumor areas was 100%, 50% and 40% for gbPC-CT, gbCT and clinical CT, respectively. RCC architecture like fibrous strands, pseudocapsules, necrosis or hyalinization was depicted clearly in gbPC-CT and was not equally well visualized in gbCT, clinical CT and MRI. The results show that gbPC-CT enables improved discrimination of normal kidney parenchyma and tumorous tissues as well as different soft-tissue components of RCCs without the use of contrast media.

  10. Qualitative and Quantitative Imaging Evaluation of Renal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes with Grating-based X-ray Phase-contrast CT

    PubMed Central

    Braunagel, Margarita; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Marschner, Mathias; De Marco, Fabio; Viermetz, Manuel; Notohamiprodjo, Susan; Hellbach, Katharina; Auweter, Sigrid; Link, Vera; Woischke, Christine; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Herzen, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Current clinical imaging methods face limitations in the detection and correct characterization of different subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), while these are important for therapy and prognosis. The present study evaluates the potential of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) for visualization and characterization of human RCC subtypes. The imaging results for 23 ex vivo formalin-fixed human kidney specimens obtained with phase-contrast CT were compared to the results of the absorption-based CT (gbCT), clinical CT and a 3T MRI and validated using histology. Regions of interest were placed on each specimen for quantitative evaluation. Qualitative and quantitative gbPC-CT imaging could significantly discriminate between normal kidney cortex (54 ± 4 HUp) and clear cell (42 ± 10), papillary (43 ± 6) and chromophobe RCCs (39 ± 7), p < 0.05 respectively. The sensitivity for detection of tumor areas was 100%, 50% and 40% for gbPC-CT, gbCT and clinical CT, respectively. RCC architecture like fibrous strands, pseudocapsules, necrosis or hyalinization was depicted clearly in gbPC-CT and was not equally well visualized in gbCT, clinical CT and MRI. The results show that gbPC-CT enables improved discrimination of normal kidney parenchyma and tumorous tissues as well as different soft-tissue components of RCCs without the use of contrast media. PMID:28361951

  11. Texture analysis of high-resolution dedicated breast (18) F-FDG PET images correlates with immunohistochemical factors and subtype of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Moscoso, Alexis; Ruibal, Álvaro; Domínguez-Prado, Inés; Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; Herranz, Míchel; Albaina, Luis; Argibay, Sonia; Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús; Pardo-Montero, Juan; Aguiar, Pablo

    2017-09-21

    PET images showed new and stronger correlations with immunohistochemical factors and immunohistochemical subtype of breast cancer compared to whole-body PET.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy reveal differential hippocampal changes in anhedonic and resilient subtypes of the chronic mild stress rat model.

    PubMed

    Delgado y Palacios, Rafael; Campo, Adriaan; Henningsen, Kim; Verhoye, Marleen; Poot, Dirk; Dijkstra, Jouke; Van Audekerke, Johan; Benveniste, Helene; Sijbers, Jan; Wiborg, Ove; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2011-09-01

    Repeated exposure to mild stressors induces anhedonia-a core symptom of major depressive disorder-in up to 70% of the stress-exposed rats, whereas the remaining show resilience to stress. This chronic mild stress (CMS) model is well documented as an animal model of major depressive disorder. We examined the morphological, microstructural, and metabolic characteristics of the hippocampus in anhedonic and stress resilient rats that may mark the differential behavioral outcome. Anhedonic (n = 8), resilient (n = 8), and control (n = 8) rats were subjected to in vivo diffusion kurtosis imaging, high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Diffusion kurtosis parameters were decreased in both CMS-exposed groups. A significant inward displacement in the ventral part of the right hippocampus was apparent in the resilient subjects and an increase of the glutamate:total creatine ratio and N-acetylaspartylglutamate:total creatine was observed in the anhedonic subjects. Diffusion kurtosis imaging discloses subtle substructural changes in the hippocampus of CMS-exposed animals irrespective of their anhedonic or resilient nature. In contrast, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging-based shape change analysis of the hippocampus allowed discrimination of these two subtypes of stress sensitivity. Although the precise mechanism discriminating their behavior is yet to be elucidated, the present study underlines the role of the hippocampus in the etiology of depression and the induction of anhedonia. Our results reflect the potency of noninvasive magnetic resonance methods in preclinical settings with key translational benefit to and from the clinic. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Powerful antinociceptive effects of the cone snail venom-derived subtype-selective NMDA receptor antagonists conantokins G and T.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Annika B; Gilbert, Heather; McCabe, R Tyler; Basbaum, Allan I

    2003-01-01

    Subunit non-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists reduce injury-induced pain behavior, but generally produce unacceptable side effects. In this study, we examined the antinociceptive and motor effects of cone snail venom-derived peptides, conantokins G and T (conG and conT), which are selective inhibitors of the NR2B or NR2A and NR2B subtypes of the NMDA receptor, respectively. We tested the effects of conG and conT in models of tissue (formalin test), nerve injury (partial sciatic nerve ligation) and inflammation-induced (intraplantar Complete Freund's Adjuvant; CFA) pain in mice. In the formalin test, intrathecal (i.t.) conG or conT suppressed the ongoing pain behavior (ED(50) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), 11 (7-19) and 19 (11-33), respectively) at doses that were 17-27 times lower than those required to impair motor function (accelerating rotarod treadmill test: ED(50) and 95% CI, 300 (120-730) and 320 (190-540) pmol, respectively). By comparison, SNX-111, an N-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel antagonist that is also derived from cone snail venom, produced significant motor impairment at a dose (3.0 pmol, i.t.) that was only partially efficacious in the formalin test. Furthermore, conG reversed the allodynia produced by nerve injury, with greater potency on thermal (ED50 and 95% CI, 24 (10-55) pmol) than on mechanical allodynia (59 (33-105) pmol). Finally, a single dose of conG (100 pmol, i.t.) also reduced CFA-evoked thermal and mechanical allodynia. Taken together, these results demonstrate that conantokins exhibit potent antinociceptive effects in several models of injury-induced pain. The study supports the notion that drugs directed against subtypes of the NMDA receptor, by virtue of their reduced side-effect profile, hold promise as novel therapeutic agents for the control of pain.

  14. Molecular profiles of thyroid cancer subtypes: Classification based on features of tissue revealed by mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska, Monika; Diehl, Hanna C; Mrukwa, Grzegorz; Kalinowska-Herok, Magdalena; Gawin, Marta; Chekan, Mykola; Elm, Julian; Drazek, Grzegorz; Krawczyk, Anna; Lange, Dariusz; Meyer, Helmut E; Polanska, Joanna; Henkel, Corinna; Widlak, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    Determination of the specific type of thyroid cancer is crucial for the prognosis and selection of treatment of this malignancy. However, in some cases appropriate classification is not possible based on histopathological features only, and it might be supported by molecular biomarkers. Here we aimed to characterize molecular profiles of different thyroid malignancies using mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) which enables the direct annotation of molecular features with morphological pictures of an analyzed tissue. Fifteen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens corresponding to five major types of thyroid cancer were analyzed by MALDI-MSI after in-situ trypsin digestion, and the possibility of classification based on the results of unsupervised segmentation of MALDI images was tested. Novel method of semi-supervised detection of the cancer region of interest (ROI) was implemented. We found strong separation of medullary cancer from malignancies derived from thyroid epithelium, and separation of anaplastic cancer from differentiated cancers. Reliable classification of medullary and anaplastic cancers using an approach based on automated detection of cancer ROI was validated with independent samples. Moreover, extraction of spectra from tumor areas allowed the detection of molecular components that differentiated follicular cancer and two variants of papillary cancer (classical and follicular). We concluded that MALDI-MSI approach is a promising strategy in the search for biomarkers supporting classification of thyroid malignant tumors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Vascular Risk Factor Profiles Differ Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Defined Subtypes of Younger-Onset Lacunar Stroke.

    PubMed

    Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Markus, Hugh S

    2017-09-01

    Differing associations of vascular risk factors with lacunar infarct have been reported, which is likely because of diagnostic differences and possible heterogeneity in the pathogenesis underlying lacunar infarction. In a large magnetic resonance imaging-verified cohort of lacunar infarct patients, we investigated the risk factor profile of lacunar infarction and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics. One thousand twenty-three patients with lacunar infarction (mean age, 56.7; SD, 8.5) were recruited from 72 stroke centers throughout the United Kingdom as part of the UK Young Lacunar Stroke DNA Study. Risk factor profiles were compared with 1961 stroke-free population controls with similar age. Furthermore, we tested risk factor profiles of lacunar stroke patients for association with the presence of multiple lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities (WMH), and location of the acute lacunar infarct. Hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.85-2.64), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.61-2.73), hyperlipidemia (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.46-2.07), and smoking (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.39-1.96) were independently associated in lacunar infarct patients compared with healthy controls. Patients with multiple lacunar infarcts were more likely to be men (OR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.81-3.53) and have hypertension (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12-2.04) compared with patients with a single lacunar infarct, independent of other vascular risk factors. The presence of moderate-to-severe WMH versus no or mild WMH was independently associated with increased age (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12-2.04), hypertension (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.44-2.95), and impaired renal function (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98). In this magnetic resonance imaging-verified lacunar stroke population, we identified a distinct risk factor profile in the group as a whole. However, there were differing risk factor profiles according to the presence of multiple lacunar infarcts and confluent WMH. The

  16. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  17. Classification of M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ receptor subtypes in vivo by autoradiography using (/sup 125/I) (R,R) 4IQNB: Implications for imaging receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.E.; Moody, T.; Kzeszotarski, W.J.; Schneidau, T.S.; Jagoda, E.M.; Reba, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    (/sup 125/I) (R,R) 3-Quinuclidinyl 4-Iodobenzilate (4IQNB) is a high affinity radiotracer for the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor which exhibits differential kinetics of dissociation from the receptor subtypes, M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/. The authors have determined the relative percentages of M/sub 1/ to M/sub 2/-receptor subtype in six structures of rat brain by equilibrium competition using the selective antagonist, QNX, and by analysis of the off-rate profiles for 4IQNB. The results are comparable and provide: (% M/sub 1/) caudate nucleus - 100%, hippocampus - 92%, cortex - 82%, thalamus - 6%, superior + inferior colliculi - 41%, and pons - 23%. To determine the relative proportions of M/sub 1/ to M/sub 2/ receptors in vivo we examined the distribution of 4IQNB at 2 h and 24 h by autoradiography. At 2 h, both M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ receptors will be labeled but at 24 h only the M/sub 1/ receptor will retain radiotracer. At 2 h, all structures of the brain are variably labeled with the cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, olfactory nuclei, nucleus accumbens, pontine nuclei, and anteroventral thalamic nucleus (AV) most heavily labeled. At 24 h, both the pontine and AV, as well as the less heavily labeled hypothalamus, superior colliculus and mesencephalic nuclei, are devoid of radiotracer thus indicating predominantly M/sub 2/ receptor. Quantitation is necessary to determine possible washout of activity from the M/sub 2/ receptors in cortex. Similar time studies in man should provide distinctions between the M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ receptor rich structures and the preferential loss of a subtype of receptor due to disease.

  18. Vascular Risk Factor Profiles Differ Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Defined Subtypes of Younger-Onset Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Hugh S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Differing associations of vascular risk factors with lacunar infarct have been reported, which is likely because of diagnostic differences and possible heterogeneity in the pathogenesis underlying lacunar infarction. In a large magnetic resonance imaging–verified cohort of lacunar infarct patients, we investigated the risk factor profile of lacunar infarction and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics. Methods— One thousand twenty-three patients with lacunar infarction (mean age, 56.7; SD, 8.5) were recruited from 72 stroke centers throughout the United Kingdom as part of the UK Young Lacunar Stroke DNA Study. Risk factor profiles were compared with 1961 stroke-free population controls with similar age. Furthermore, we tested risk factor profiles of lacunar stroke patients for association with the presence of multiple lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities (WMH), and location of the acute lacunar infarct. Results— Hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.85–2.64), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.61–2.73), hyperlipidemia (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.46–2.07), and smoking (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.39–1.96) were independently associated in lacunar infarct patients compared with healthy controls. Patients with multiple lacunar infarcts were more likely to be men (OR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.81–3.53) and have hypertension (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12–2.04) compared with patients with a single lacunar infarct, independent of other vascular risk factors. The presence of moderate-to-severe WMH versus no or mild WMH was independently associated with increased age (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12–2.04), hypertension (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.44–2.95), and impaired renal function (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82–0.98). Conclusions— In this magnetic resonance imaging–verified lacunar stroke population, we identified a distinct risk factor profile in the group as a whole. However, there were differing risk factor profiles

  19. Correlation between qualitative balance indices, dynamic posturography and structural brain imaging in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and its subtypes.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Shaik Afsar; Yadav, Ravi; Ganeshan, Mohan; Saini, Jitender; Gupta, Anupam; Sandhya, M; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To compare the clinical, balance, and radiological profile of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) of Richardson type (PSP-R) and Parkinsonian type (PSP-P). Twenty-nine patients with PSP (PSP-R: 17, PSP-P: 12) satisfying the probable/possible National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-PSP criteria were recruited and assessed with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III, PSP rating scale (PSPRS), Berg balance scale (BBS), Tinetti performance-oriented mobility assessment gait and total (TPG and TPT) score, dynamic posturography (DP), and magnetic resonance imaging. Data were compared with 30 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The mean ages of PSP-R, PSP-P, and controls were comparable (62.5 ± 6.6, 59 ± 8.9, and 59.8 ± 7.6 years). The PSP group had significantly poor DP scores and more radiological abnormalities than controls. The PSPRS, TPG, and TPT scores were significantly more impaired in PSP-R compared to PSP-P (P = 0.045, P = 0.031, and P = 0.037, respectively). In DP, the limits of overall stability were most significant (P < 0.001) and PSP-R had lower scores. PSP-R compared to PSP-P had more often "Humming Bird" sign (P < 0.001), "Morning Glory" sign (P < 0.008), and generalized cortical atrophy (P < 0.001). The area of midbrain (P < 0.002) and midbrain/pons ratio (P < 0.013) was significantly lower in PSP-R. In PSP-P, the overall balance index significantly correlated with BBS, TPG, and TPT (r = -0.79, P = 0.002; r = -0.772, P = 0.003; and r = -0.688, P = 0.013) and the midbrain axial anterior-posterior diameter significantly correlated with the TPG and TPT (r = 0.74, P = 0.01; r = 0.66, P = 0.018). While balance and radiological abnormalities were more severe in PSP-R, the qualitative and quantitative measurements of severity of balance in PSP-P rather than PSP-R was a better reflection of the pathology of the midbrain.

  20. [A study on the predictive and evaluational value of molecular subtypes and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-qing; Ye, Jing-ming; Xu, Ling; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Jian-xin; Duan, Xue-ning; Liu, Yin-hua

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the predictive value of molecular subtypes and the evaluational value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. From January 2010 to December 2011, the 79 patients diagnosed as primary invasive breast cancer, having received 6 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and finished the mastectomy or the breast conserving surgery entered this study. A total of 79 patients participated in this prospective study. There were 6 (7.6%) luminal A cases, 42 (53.2%) luminal B cases, 14 HER-2 (17.7%) positive cases and 17 (21.5%) triple negative cases. The associations between molecular subtypes and clinical response as well as the pathological response were analyzed. The predictive value of molecular subtypes for the neoadjuvant chemotherapy was studied. Clinical effective rate was 85.3% (66/79). There was no statistical correlation between molecular subtypes and clinical effective rate. Pathologic effective rate was 79.7% (63/79). There was no statistical correlation between molecular subtypes and pathologic effective rate. Twenty-seven case achieved pathologic complete remission (pCR) in all the patients. No case achieved pCR in the patients classified as Luminal A. Twelve cases (28.6%, 12/42) achieved pCR in the luminal B patients.Five cases (5/14) achieved pCR in the HER-2 overexpression patients. Ten cases (10/17) achieved pCR in the triple-negative patients. There was a statistical correlation between the molecular subtypes and the pCR rate (P = 0.039), and between clinical evaluation by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and evaluation of pathological response (r = 0.432, P = 0.000). Molecular subtypes and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI have a good value of predicting and evaluating the response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on breast cancer.

  1. Neurocognitive subtypes of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Andrés; Muñoz, Claudia; Ocampo, María V; Quintero, Claudia; Escobar, Marcela; Botero, Sonia; Marín, Catalina; Jaramillo, Luis E; Sánchez, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Losada, Jorge; Ospina-Duque, Jorge; Palacio, Carlos; C Arango, Juan; Valencia, Ana V; Aguirre-Acevedo, Daniel C; García, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    To empirically identify schizophrenia neurocognitive subtypes and establish their association with clinical characteristics. Sustained attention, executive function, facial emotion recognition, verbal learning, and working memory tests were applied to 253 subjects with schizophrenia. We identified neurocognitive subtypes by a latent class analysis of the tests results. After, we made a search for the association of these subtypes with clinic characteristics. We identified four neurocognitive subtypes: 1) “Global cognitive deficit”, 2) “Memory and executive function deficit”, 3) “Memory and facial emotion recognition deficit,” and 4) “Without cognitive deficit.” In comparison with the subtype “without cognitive deficit,” we found that the “memory and executive function deficit subtype” and the “global cognitive deficit subtype” had a higher frequency of male, unemployed, severe impairment, and adherence to treatment participants. However, in the “global cognitive deficit subtype” the differences were higher and there was also a lower frequency of past major depressive episodes (OR 0.39; 95%CI: 0.16 to 0.97). The “memory and facial recognition deficit subtype” had a higher probability of severe impairment (OR 5.52; 95%CI: 1.89 to 16.14) and unemployed (OR 2.43; 95%CI: 1.06 to 5.55) participants, but also a lower probability of past depressive episodes (OR 0.21; 95%CI: 0.07 to 0.66). Our results suggest the existence of four neurocognitive subtypes in schizophrenia with a spectrum of dysfunction and severity. We found higher dysfunction in those with worse cognitive dysfunction, and higher affective psychopathology and less treatment adherence in those with less cognitive dysfunction.

  2. Subtype-specific promoter-driven action potential imaging for precise disease modelling and drug testing in hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhifen; Xian, Wenying; Bellin, Milena; Dorn, Tatjana; Tian, Qinghai; Goedel, Alexander; Dreizehnter, Lisa; Schneider, Christine M.; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Ng, Judy King Man; Hinkel, Rabea; Pane, Luna Simona; Mummery, Christine L.; Lipp, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Aims Cardiomyocytes (CMs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are increasingly used in disease modelling and drug evaluation. However, they are typically a heterogeneous mix of ventricular-, atrial-, and nodal-like cells based on action potentials (APs) and gene expression. This heterogeneity and the paucity of methods for high-throughput functional phenotyping hinder the full exploitation of their potential. We aimed at developing a method for rapid, sequential, and subtype-specific phenotyping of hiPSC-CMs with respect to AP morphology and single-cell arrhythmias. Methods and results We used cardiac lineage-specific promoters to drive the expression of a voltage-sensitive fluorescent protein (VSFP-CR) in hiPSC-CMs, enabling subtype-specific optical AP recordings. In a patient-specific hiPSC model of long-QT syndrome type 1, AP prolongation and frequent early afterdepolarizations were evident in mutant ventricular- and atrial like, but not in nodal-like hiPSC-CMs compared with their isogenic controls, consistent with the selective expression of the disease-causing gene. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of sequentially probing a cell over several days to investigate genetic rescue of the disease phenotype and to discern CM subtype-specific drug effects. Conclusion By combining a genetically encoded membrane voltage sensor with promoters that drive its expression in the major subtypes of hiPSC-CMs, we developed a convenient system for disease modelling and drug evaluation in the relevant cell type, which has the potential to advance the emerging utility of hiPSCs in cardiovascular medicine. PMID:28182242

  3. Characterisation of the contribution of the GABA-benzodiazepine α1 receptor subtype to [(11)C]Ro15-4513 PET images.

    PubMed

    Myers, James F M; Rosso, Lula; Watson, Ben J; Wilson, Sue J; Kalk, Nicola J; Clementi, Nicoletta; Brooks, David J; Nutt, David J; Turkheimer, Federico E; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2012-04-01

    This positron emission tomography (PET) study aimed to further define selectivity of [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding to the GABARα5 relative to the GABARα1 benzodiazepine receptor subtype. The impact of zolpidem, a GABARα1-selective agonist, on [(11)C]Ro15-4513, which shows selectivity for GABARα5, and the nonselective benzodiazepine ligand [(11)C]flumazenil binding was assessed in humans. Compartmental modelling of the kinetics of [(11)C]Ro15-4513 time-activity curves was used to describe distribution volume (V(T)) differences in regions populated by different GABA receptor subtypes. Those with low α5 were best fitted by one-tissue compartment models; and those with high α5 required a more complex model. The heterogeneity between brain regions suggested spectral analysis as a more appropriate method to quantify binding as it does not a priori specify compartments. Spectral analysis revealed that zolpidem caused a significant V(T) decrease (~10%) in [(11)C]flumazenil, but no decrease in [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding. Further analysis of [(11)C]Ro15-4513 kinetics revealed additional frequency components present in regions containing both α1 and α5 subtypes compared with those containing only α1. Zolpidem reduced one component (mean±s.d.: 71%±41%), presumed to reflect α1-subtype binding, but not another (13%±22%), presumed to reflect α5. The proposed method for [(11)C]Ro15-4513 analysis may allow more accurate selective binding assays and estimation of drug occupancy for other nonselective ligands.

  4. Subtyping Stuttering II

    PubMed Central

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V.; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C.; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter, efforts to identify and characterize subtypes of stuttering have had limited influence on theoretical or clinical understanding of the disorder. This manuscript briefly highlights research on language and temperament in young children who stutter, and considers whether the results can provide guidance for efforts to more effectively investigate and elucidate subtypes in childhood stuttering. Issues from the literature that appear relevant to research on stuttering subtypes include: (a) the question of whether stuttering is best characterized as categorical or continuous; (b) interpretation of individual differences in skills and profiles; and (c) the fact that, during the preschool years, the interaction among domains such as language and temperament are changing very rapidly, resulting in large differences in developmental profiles within relatively brief chronological age periods. PMID:17825669

  5. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  6. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  7. Subtyping adolescents with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eunice Y; Le Grange, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    Cluster analyses of eating disorder patients have yielded a "dietary-depressive" subtype, typified by greater negative affect, and a "dietary" subtype, typified by dietary restraint. This study aimed to replicate these findings in an adolescent sample with bulimia nervosa (BN) from a randomized controlled trial and to examine the validity and reliability of this methodology. In the sample of BN adolescents (N=80), cluster analysis revealed a "dietary-depressive" subtype (37.5%) and a "dietary" subtype (62.5%) using the Beck Depression Inventory, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Eating Disorder Examination Restraint subscale. The "dietary-depressive" subtype compared to the "dietary" subtype was significantly more likely to: (1) report co-occurring disorders, (2) greater eating and weight concerns, and (3) less vomiting abstinence at post-treatment (all p's<.05). The cluster analysis based on "dietary" and "dietary-depressive" subtypes appeared to have concurrent validity, yielding more distinct groups than subtyping by vomiting frequency. In order to assess the reliability of the subtyping scheme, a larger sample of adolescents with mixed eating and weight disorders in an outpatient eating disorder clinic (N=149) was subtyped, yielding similar subtypes. These results support the validity and reliability of the subtyping strategy in two adolescent samples.

  8. Automated cGMP-compliant radiosynthesis of [(18) F]-(E)-PSS232 for brain PET imaging of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Young; Son, Jeongmin; Yun, Mijin; Ametamey, Simon M; Chun, Joong-Hyun

    2017-09-25

    (E)-3-(Pyridin-2-yl ethynyl)cyclohex-2-enone O-(3-(2-[(18) F]-fluoroethoxy)propyl) oxime ([(18) F]-(E)-PSS232, [(18) F]2a) is a recently developed radiotracer that can be used to visualize metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5 ) in vivo. The mGlu5 has become an attractive therapeutic and diagnostic target owing to its role in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Several carbon-11- and fluorine-18-labelled radiotracers have been developed to measure mGlu5 receptor occupancy in the human brain. The radiotracer [(18) F]2a, which is used as an analogue for [(11) C]ABP688 ([(11) C]1) and has a longer physical half-life, is a selective radiotracer that exhibits high binding affinity for mGlu5 . Herein, we report the fully automated radiosynthesis of [(18) F]2a using a commercial GE TRACERlab(TM) FX-FN synthesizer for routine production and distribution to nearby satellite clinics. Nucleophilic substitution of the corresponding mesylate precursor with cyclotron-produced [(18) F]fluoride ion at 100 °C in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification and formulation, readily provided [(18) F]2a with a radiochemical yield of 40 ± 2% (decay corrected, n = 5) at the end of synthesis. Radiochemical purity for the [(18) F]-(E)-conformer was greater than 95%. Molar activity was determined to be 63.6 ± 9.6 GBq/μmol (n = 5), and the overall synthesis time was 70 min. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. HIV-1 subtypes in Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Stanojevic, Maja; Papa, Anna; Papadimitriou, Evagelia; Zerjav, Sonja; Jevtovic, Djordje; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jovanovic, Tanja; Antoniadis, Antonis

    2002-05-01

    To gain insight concerning the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses associated with the HIV-1 epidemic in Yugoslavia, 45 specimens from HIV-1-infected individuals were classified into subtypes by sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase (pol) region of the viral genome. Forty-one of 45 specimens (91.2%) were identified as pol subtype B, 2 of 45 as subtype C (4.4%), 1 of 45 as CRF01_AE (2.2%), and 1 as CRF02_AG recombinant (2.2%). Nucleotide divergence among subtype B sequences was 4.8%. Results of this study show that among HIV-1-infected patients in Yugoslavia subtype B predominates (91.5%), whereas non-B subtypes are present at a low percentage, mostly related to travel abroad.

  10. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Radioligands Based on 3-[5-(Pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl]benzonitrile for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoko; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Ogawa, Masanao; Kurihara, Yusuke; Nengaki, Nobuki; Kumata, Katsushi; Yui, Joji; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Zhang, Yiding; Kawamura, Kazunori; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2016-04-28

    We found out 3-[5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl]benzonitrile analogues as the candidate for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5). Among these compounds, 3-methyl-5-(5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl)benzonitrile (10) exhibited high binding affinity (Ki = 9.4 nM) and moderate lipophilicity (cLogD, 2.4). Subsequently, [(11)C]10 was radiosynthesized at 25 ± 14% radiochemical yield (n = 11) via C-[(11)C]methylation of the arylstannyl precursor 15 with [(11)C]methyl iodide. In vitro autoradiography and PET assessments using [(11)C]10 showed high specific binding in the striatum and hippocampus, two brain regions enriched with mGluR5. Moreover, test-retest PET studies with [(11)C]10 indicated high reliability to quantify mGluR5 density, such as the intraclass correlation coefficient (0.90) and Pearson r (0.91) in the striatum of rat brain. We demonstrated that [(11)C]10 is a useful PET ligand for imaging and quantitative analysis of mGluR5. Furthermore, [(11)C]10 might be modified using its skeleton as a lead compound.

  11. Personality subtypes of suicidal adults.

    PubMed

    Ortigo, Kile M; Westen, Drew; Bradley, Bekh

    2009-09-01

    Research into personality factors related to suicidality suggests substantial variability among suicide attempters. A potentially useful approach that accounts for this complexity is personality subtyping. As part of a large sample looking at personality pathology, this study used Q-factor analysis to identify subtypes of 311 adult suicide attempters using Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-II personality profiles. Identified subtypes included internalizing, emotionally dysregulated, dependent, hostile-isolated, psychopathic, and anxious somatizing. Subtypes differed in hypothesized ways on criterion variables that address their construct validity, including adaptive functioning, Axis I and II comorbidity, and etiology-related variables (e.g., history of abuse). Furthermore, dimensional ratings of the subtypes predicted adaptive functioning above DSM-based diagnoses and symptoms.

  12. Lobular breast cancer--the most common special subtype or a most special common subtype?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-28

    Lobular breast cancer is not only the second most common breast cancer subtype, known for decades, but also a tumour entity that still poses many unresolved questions. These include questions about the targets and cooperation partners of E-cadherin, the best model systems for translational research, and the best tools for detection, surveillance and therapy. Leading experts review the molecular and cellular bases, the model systems, the histopathology and profiling approaches, risk factors, imaging tools and therapeutic options for lobular breast cancer.

  13. Quantitative template for subtyping primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Mesulam, Marsel; Wieneke, Christina; Rogalski, Emily; Cobia, Derin; Thompson, Cynthia; Weintraub, Sandra

    2009-12-01

    The syndrome of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is diagnosed when a gradual failure of word usage or comprehension emerges as the principal feature of a neurodegenerative disease. To provide a quantitative algorithm for classifying PPA into agrammatic (PPA-G), semantic (PPA-S), and logopenic (PPA-L) variants, each of which is known to have a different probability of association with Alzheimer disease vs frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Prospective study. University medical center. Sixteen consecutively enrolled patients with PPA who underwent neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance imaging recruited nationally in the United States as part of a longitudinal study. A 2-dimensional template that reflects performance on tests of syntax (Northwestern Anagram Test) and lexical semantics (Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Fourth Edition) classified all 16 patients in concordance with a clinical diagnosis that had been made before the administration of quantitative tests. All 3 PPA subtypes had distinctly asymmetrical atrophy of the left perisylvian language network. Each subtype also had distinctive peak atrophy sites: PPA-G in the inferior frontal gyrus (Broca area), PPA-S in the anterior temporal lobe, and PPA-L in Brodmann area 37. Once an accurate root diagnosis of PPA is made, subtyping can be quantitatively guided using a 2-dimensional template based on orthogonal tasks of grammatical competence and word comprehension. Although the choice of tasks and the precise cutoff levels may need to be adjusted to fit linguistic and educational backgrounds, these 16 patients demonstrate the feasibility of using a simple algorithm for clinicoanatomical classification in PPA. Prospective studies will show whether this subtyping can improve clinical prediction of the underlying neuropathologic condition.

  14. Clinically-inspired automatic classification of ovarian carcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    BenTaieb, Aïcha; Nosrati, Masoud S; Li-Chang, Hector; Huntsman, David; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Context: It has been shown that ovarian carcinoma subtypes are distinct pathologic entities with differing prognostic and therapeutic implications. Histotyping by pathologists has good reproducibility, but occasional cases are challenging and require immunohistochemistry and subspecialty consultation. Motivated by the need for more accurate and reproducible diagnoses and to facilitate pathologists’ workflow, we propose an automatic framework for ovarian carcinoma classification. Materials and Methods: Our method is inspired by pathologists’ workflow. We analyse imaged tissues at two magnification levels and extract clinically-inspired color, texture, and segmentation-based shape descriptors using image-processing methods. We propose a carefully designed machine learning technique composed of four modules: A dissimilarity matrix, dimensionality reduction, feature selection and a support vector machine classifier to separate the five ovarian carcinoma subtypes using the extracted features. Results: This paper presents the details of our implementation and its validation on a clinically derived dataset of eighty high-resolution histopathology images. The proposed system achieved a multiclass classification accuracy of 95.0% when classifying unseen tissues. Assessment of the classifier's confusion (confusion matrix) between the five different ovarian carcinoma subtypes agrees with clinician's confusion and reflects the difficulty in diagnosing endometrioid and serous carcinomas. Conclusions: Our results from this first study highlight the difficulty of ovarian carcinoma diagnosis which originate from the intrinsic class-imbalance observed among subtypes and suggest that the automatic analysis of ovarian carcinoma subtypes could be valuable to clinician's diagnostic procedure by providing a second opinion. PMID:27563487

  15. Potential of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Characterization of Malignant, Benign, and Healthy Breast Tissues and Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Uma; Sah, Rani G.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Parshad, Rajinder; Seenu, Vurthaluru; Mathur, Sandeep R.; Hari, Smriti; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R.

    2016-01-01

    The role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the diagnosis of breast cancer and its association with molecular biomarkers was investigated in 259 patients with breast cancer, 67 with benign pathology, and 54 healthy volunteers using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 1.5 T. In 59 breast cancer patients, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) was also acquired. Mean ADC of malignant lesions was significantly lower (1.02 ± 0.17 × 10−3 mm2/s) compared to benign (1.57 ± 0.26 × 10−3 mm2/s) and healthy (1.78 ± 0.13 × 10−3 mm2/s) breast tissues. A cutoff ADC value of 1.23 × 10−3 mm2/s (sensitivity 92.5%; specificity 91.1%; area under the curve 0.96) to differentiate malignant from benign diseases was arrived by receiver operating curve analysis. In 10/59 breast cancer patients, indeterminate DCE curve was seen, while their ADC value was indicative of malignancy, implying the potential of the addition of DWI in increasing the specificity of DCEMRI data. Further, the association of ADC with tumor volume, stage, hormonal receptors [estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor (HER2)], and menopausal status was investigated. A significant difference was seen in tumor volume between breast cancer patients of stages IIA and IIIA, IIB and IIIA, and IIB and III (B + C), respectively (P < 0.05). Patients with early breast cancer (n = 52) had significantly lower ADC and tumor volume than those with locally advanced breast cancer (n = 207). No association was found in ADC and tumor volume with the menopausal status. Breast cancers with ER−, PR−, and triple-negative (TN) status showed a significantly larger tumor volume compared to ER+, PR+, and non-triple-negative (nTN) cancers, respectively. Also, TN tumors showed a significantly higher ADC compared to ER+, PR+, and nTN cancers. Patients with ER− and TN cancers were younger than those with ER+ and nTN cancers

  16. [The second generation universal oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of influenza virus A].

    PubMed

    Kostina, E V; Riabinin, V A; Maksakova, G A; Siniakov, A N

    2012-01-01

    The microchip for influenza A subtyping was developed, functioning on a principle "one spot--one subtype". Each spot contains the set of oligonucleotide probes, specific for a particular subtype of hemagglutinin, neuraminidase or matrix gene. Reliability of the proposed chip version is the same as for earlier created in our group full-size microchip for separate hemagglutinin and neuraminidase subtyping. To visualize the image, analyzed DNA can be labeled by either fluorescent dye or biotin with the further fixation in system streptavidin-gold nanoparticles and image development by silver precipitation. In the second case common version of scanner can be used for the image analysis, that essentially simplifies procedure of influenza A subtyping.

  17. Identification of human immunodeficiency virus subtypes with distinct patterns of sensitivity to serum neutralization.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng-Mayer, C; Homsy, J; Evans, L A; Levy, J A

    1988-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 displays a high degree of genetic variation, especially in the glycoprotein (gp120) domain of the envelope gene. To determine whether this genomic heterogeneity leads to the expression of independent HIV subtypes, 12 sera from HIV type 1 antibody-positive individuals were tested for their ability to neutralize 20 HIV isolates of various origins. Four distinct HIV subtypes with different sensitivity to serum neutralization were identified. These results suggest that a finite number of HIV subtypes exist and that the combined use of selected HIV isolates representing several subtypes may be necessary for the development of an effective vaccine. Images PMID:3357892

  18. Computerized image analysis for identifying triple-negative breast cancers and differentiating them from other molecular subtypes of breast cancer on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Agner, Shannon C; Rosen, Mark A; Englander, Sarah; Tomaszewski, John E; Feldman, Michael D; Zhang, Paul; Mies, Carolyn; Schnall, Mitchell D; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-07-01

    To determine the feasibility of using a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to differentiate among triple-negative breast cancer, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-positive cancer, and benign fibroadenoma lesions on dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) images. This is a retrospective study of prospectively acquired breast MR imaging data collected from an institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study between 2002 and 2007. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. The authors collected DCE MR images from 65 women with 76 breast lesions who had been recruited into a larger study of breast MR imaging. The women had triple-negative (n = 21), ER-positive (n = 25), HER2-positive (n = 18), or fibroadenoma (n = 12) lesions. All lesions were classified as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category 4 or higher on the basis of previous imaging. Images were subject to quantitative feature extraction, feed-forward feature selection by means of linear discriminant analysis, and lesion classification by using a support vector machine classifier. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) was calculated for each of five lesion classification tasks involving triple-negative breast cancers. For each pair-wise lesion type comparison, linear discriminant analysis helped identify the most discriminatory features, which in conjunction with a support vector machine classifier yielded an Az of 0.73 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59, 0.87) for triple-negative cancer versus all non-triple-negative lesions, 0.74 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.88) for triple-negative cancer versus ER- and HER2-positive cancer, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.91) for triple-negative versus ER-positive cancer, 0.74 (95% CI: 0.58, 0.89) for triple-negative versus HER2-positive cancer, and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.00) for triple-negative cancer versus fibroadenoma. Triple-negative cancers

  19. Computerized Image Analysis for Identifying Triple-Negative Breast Cancers and Differentiating Them from Other Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer on Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Images: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Shannon C.; Rosen, Mark A.; Englander, Sarah; Tomaszewski, John E.; Feldman, Michael D.; Zhang, Paul; Mies, Carolyn; Schnall, Mitchell D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility of using a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to differentiate among triple-negative breast cancer, estrogen receptor (ER)–positive cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)–positive cancer, and benign fibroadenoma lesions on dynamic contrast material–enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) images. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective study of prospectively acquired breast MR imaging data collected from an institutional review board–approved, HIPAA-compliant study between 2002 and 2007. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. The authors collected DCE MR images from 65 women with 76 breast lesions who had been recruited into a larger study of breast MR imaging. The women had triple-negative (n = 21), ER-positive (n = 25), HER2-positive (n = 18), or fibroadenoma (n = 12) lesions. All lesions were classified as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category 4 or higher on the basis of previous imaging. Images were subject to quantitative feature extraction, feed-forward feature selection by means of linear discriminant analysis, and lesion classification by using a support vector machine classifier. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) was calculated for each of five lesion classification tasks involving triple-negative breast cancers. Results For each pair-wise lesion type comparison, linear discriminant analysis helped identify the most discriminatory features, which in conjunction with a support vector machine classifier yielded an Az of 0.73 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59, 0.87) for triple-negative cancer versus all non–triple-negative lesions, 0.74 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.88) for triple-negative cancer versus ER- and HER2-positive cancer, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.91) for triple-negative versus ER-positive cancer, 0.74 (95% CI: 0.58, 0.89) for triple-negative versus HER2-positive cancer, and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.00) for triple-negative cancer

  20. QUANTITATIVE TEMPLATE FOR SUBTYPING PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE APHASIA

    PubMed Central

    Mesulam, Marsel; Wieneke, Christina; Rogalski, Emily; Cobia, Derin; Thompson, Cynthia; Weintraub, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Objective To provide a quantitative algorithm for classifying primary progressive aphasia (PPA) into agrammatic (PPA-G), semantic (PPA-S) and logopenic (PPA-L) variants, each of which is known to have a different probability of association with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) versus frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Design Prospectively and consecutively enrolled 16 PPA patients tested with neuropsychological instruments and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Setting University medical center. Participants PPA patients recruited nationally in the USA as part of a longitudinal study. Results A two-dimensional template, reflecting performance on tests of syntax (Northwestern Anagram Test) and lexical semantics (Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test), classified all 16 patients in concordance with a clinical diagnosis that had been made prior to the administration of the quantitative tests. All three subtypes had distinctly asymmetrical atrophy of the left perisylvian language network. Each subtype also had distinctive peak atrophy sites. Only PPA-G had peak atrophy in the IFG (Broca’s area), only PPA-S had peak atrophy in the anterior temporal lobe, and only PPA-L had peak atrophy in area 37. Conclusions Once an accurate root diagnosis of PPA is made, subtyping can be quantitatively guided using a two-dimensional template based on orthogonal tasks of grammatical competence and word comprehension. Although the choice of tasks and precise cut-off levels may evolve in time, this set of 16 patients demonstrates the feasibility of using a simple algorithm for clinico-anatomical classification in PPA. Prospective studies will show whether this suptyping can improve the clinical prediction of underlying neuropathology. PMID:20008661

  1. Electrophysiological Correlates of Dyslexic Subtypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Jane M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The construct validity of Boder's typology of dyslexia was investigated using quantified electroencephalography with 39 children (ages 7-11) during a reading task and at rest. Results supported beta frequency differences in anticipated regions by dyslexia subtype during the reading task. However, the direction of difference hypothesis was not…

  2. Two Unique Glioma Subtypes Revealed.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 1,122 diffuse glioma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed two new subtypes of this common brain cancer, with molecular and clinical features that diverge from the norm. The study findings also support the use of DNA methylation profiles to improve glioma classification and treatment.

  3. Asymmetry of cortical decline in subtypes of primary progressive aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Cobia, Derin; Martersteck, Adam; Rademaker, Alfred; Wieneke, Christina; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, M.-Marsel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to provide quantitative measures of changes in cortical atrophy over a 2-year period associated with 3 subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) using whole-brain vertex-wise and region-of-interest (ROI) neuroimaging methods. The purpose was to quantitate disease progression, establish an empirical basis for clinical expectations, and provide outcome measures for therapeutic trials. Methods: Changes in cortical thickness and volume loss as well as neuropsychological performance were assessed at baseline and 2-year follow-up in 26 patients who fulfilled criteria for logopenic (8 patients), agrammatic (10 patients), and semantic (8 patients) PPA subtypes. Whole-brain vertex-wise and ROI imaging analysis were conducted using the FreeSurfer longitudinal pipeline. Results: Clinical deficits and cortical atrophy patterns showed distinct patterns of change among the subtypes over 2 years. Results confirmed that progression for each of the 3 subtypes showed left greater than right hemisphere asymmetry. An ROI analysis also revealed that progression was greater within, rather than outside, the language network. Conclusions: Preferential neurodegeneration of the left hemisphere language network is a common denominator for all 3 PPA subtypes, even as the disease progresses. Using a focal cortical language network ROI as an outcome measure of disease progression appears to be more sensitive than whole-brain or ventricular volume measures of change and may be helpful for designing future clinical trials in PPA. PMID:25165386

  4. Asymmetry of cortical decline in subtypes of primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Emily; Cobia, Derin; Martersteck, Adam; Rademaker, Alfred; Wieneke, Christina; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, M-Marsel

    2014-09-23

    The aim of this study was to provide quantitative measures of changes in cortical atrophy over a 2-year period associated with 3 subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) using whole-brain vertex-wise and region-of-interest (ROI) neuroimaging methods. The purpose was to quantitate disease progression, establish an empirical basis for clinical expectations, and provide outcome measures for therapeutic trials. Changes in cortical thickness and volume loss as well as neuropsychological performance were assessed at baseline and 2-year follow-up in 26 patients who fulfilled criteria for logopenic (8 patients), agrammatic (10 patients), and semantic (8 patients) PPA subtypes. Whole-brain vertex-wise and ROI imaging analysis were conducted using the FreeSurfer longitudinal pipeline. Clinical deficits and cortical atrophy patterns showed distinct patterns of change among the subtypes over 2 years. Results confirmed that progression for each of the 3 subtypes showed left greater than right hemisphere asymmetry. An ROI analysis also revealed that progression was greater within, rather than outside, the language network. Preferential neurodegeneration of the left hemisphere language network is a common denominator for all 3 PPA subtypes, even as the disease progresses. Using a focal cortical language network ROI as an outcome measure of disease progression appears to be more sensitive than whole-brain or ventricular volume measures of change and may be helpful for designing future clinical trials in PPA. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Sleep quality subtypes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Magee, Christopher A; Reddy, Prasuna; Robinson, Laura; McGregor, Alisha

    2016-12-01

    Poor sleep quality could be a risk factor for obesity. This article utilized a person-centered approach to investigate whether distinct sleep quality subtypes were associated with obesity directly, and indirectly via physical activity. The sample included 8,932 Australian employees who participated in the Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey. Structured interviews and self-report questionnaires collected information on sleep quality, obesity, and relevant demographic, health, and work-related variables. Latent class analysis identified distinct subtypes of sleep quality. General linear modeling examined the associations of sleep quality subtypes with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Multicategorical mediation models examined indirect paths linking sleep quality classes with obesity via physical activity. Five distinct sleep quality subtypes were identified: Poor Sleepers (20.0%), Frequent Sleep Disturbances (19.2%), Minor Sleep Disturbances (24.5%), Long Sleepers (9.6%), and Good Sleepers (26.7%). BMI, waist circumference, and physical activity differed among the sleep quality subtypes, with similar results observed for males and females. For example, Poor Sleepers had the highest BMIs, followed by Frequent Sleep Disturbances and Minor Sleep Disturbances; Long Sleepers and Good Sleepers had the lowest BMIs. Mediation analyses indicated that low levels of physical activity linked the Poor Sleep, Frequent Sleep Disturbance, and Long Sleep classes with higher BMI. These results provide new insights into the nature of sleep quality in employees. In particular, distinct sleep quality patterns had differing associations with measures of obesity, suggesting the need for tailored workplace interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Subtypes of nonmedical prescription drug misuse

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; Boyd, Carol J.; Teter, Christian J.

    2010-01-01

    This study used three characteristics (i.e., motive, route of administration, and co-ingestion with alcohol) of nonmedical prescription drug misuse across four separate classes (i.e., pain, sedative/anxiety, sleeping and stimulant medications) to examine subtypes and drug related problems. A Web survey was self-administered by a randomly selected sample of 3,639 undergraduate students attending a large Midwestern 4-year U.S. university. Self-treatment subtypes were characterized by motives consistent with the prescription drug's pharmaceutical main indication, oral only routes of administration, and no co-ingestion with alcohol. Recreational subtypes were characterized by recreational motives, oral or non-oral routes, and co-ingestion. Mixed subtypes consisted of other combinations of motives, routes, and co-ingestion. Among those who reported nonmedical prescription drug misuse, approximately 13% were classified into the recreational subtype, while 39% were in the self-treatment subtype, and 48% were in the mixed subtype. There were significant differences in the subtypes in terms of gender, race and prescription drug class. Approximately 50% of those in subtypes other than self-treatment screened positive for drug abuse. The odds of substance use and abuse were generally lower among self-treatment subtypes than other subtypes. The findings indicate subtypes should be considered when examining nonmedical prescription drug misuse, especially for pain medication. PMID:19278795

  7. NMDA receptor surface mobility depends on NR2A-2B subunits

    PubMed Central

    Groc, Laurent; Heine, Martin; Cousins, Sarah L.; Stephenson, F. Anne; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The NR2 subunit composition of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) varies during development, and this change is important in NMDAR-dependent signaling. In particular, synaptic NMDAR switch from containing mostly NR2B subunit to a mixture of NR2B and NR2A subunits. The pathways by which neurons differentially traffic NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs are poorly understood. Using single-particle and -molecule approaches and specific antibodies directed against NR2A and NR2B extracellular epitopes, we investigated the surface mobility of native NR2A and NR2B subunits at the surface of cultured neurons. The surface mobility of NMDARs depends on the NR2 subunit subtype, with NR2A-containing NMDARs being more stable than NR2B-containing ones, and NR2A subunit overexpression stabilizes surface NR2B-containing NMDARs. The developmental change in the synaptic surface content of NR2A and NR2B subunits was correlated with a developmental change in the time spent by the subunits within synapses. This suggests that the switch in synaptic NMDAR subtypes depends on the regulation of the receptor surface trafficking. PMID:17124177

  8. Subtypes of paranoia in a nonclinical sample.

    PubMed

    Combs, Dennis R; Penn, David L; Chadwick, Paul; Trower, Peter; Michael, Christopher O; Basso, Michael R

    2007-11-01

    Previous research has proposed that there may be subtypes of paranoia with different patterns of performance on symptom and clinical measures. However, there has been little empirical examination of whether distinct subtypes actually exist. Recent research has suggested that paranoia can be found in normal individuals and exists on a continuum. Thus, it is possible that evidence for subtypes of paranoia can be derived from nonclinical samples. From a total of 723 participants, we identified 114 college students who showed elevated levels of paranoia as determined by two measures of paranoid ideation. The remaining sample of 609 persons served as the nonparanoid control group. All participants completed measures of depression, self-esteem, and social anxiety. Scores from the high subclinical group was subjected to cluster analysis to derive homogeneous subtypes. Participants also completed a measure of attributional style, the IPSAQ, which was used to validate the subtypes and was not used in the cluster analysis. Based on the cluster analysis, three subtypes were derived. Each subtype showed a different pattern of scores on measures of depression, self-esteem, and anxiety. There were also additional differences on the externalising and personalising bias scores from the IPSAQ between the subtypes. We conclude that there is preliminary evidence for the presence of subtypes among nonclinical samples and discuss the patterns of performance in relation to previous research on subtypes of paranoia. The implications of these subtypes for the study of paranoia are discussed.

  9. Diabetes and Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bronsveld, Heleen K.; Jensen, Vibeke; Vahl, Pernille; De Bruin, Marie L.; Cornelissen, Sten; Sanders, Joyce; Auvinen, Anssi; Haukka, Jari; Andersen, Morten; Vestergaard, Peter; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Women with diabetes have a worse survival after breast cancer diagnosis compared to women without diabetes. This may be due to a different etiological profile, leading to the development of more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin and non-insulin treated women with diabetes develop specific clinicopathological breast cancer subtypes compared to women without diabetes. Methods and Findings This cross-sectional study included randomly selected patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2000–2010. Stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis (≤50 and >50 years), women with diabetes were 2:1 frequency-matched on year of birth and age at breast cancer diagnosis (both in 10-year categories) to women without diabetes, to select ~300 patients with tumor tissue available. Tumor MicroArrays were stained by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER, PR), HER2, Ki67, CK5/6, CK14, and p63. A pathologist scored all stains and revised morphology and grade. Associations between diabetes/insulin treatment and clinicopathological subtypes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Morphology and grade were not significantly different between women with diabetes (n = 211) and women without diabetes (n = 101), irrespective of menopausal status. Premenopausal women with diabetes tended to have more often PR-negative (OR = 2.44(95%CI:1.07–5.55)), HER2-negative (OR = 2.84(95%CI:1.11–7.22)), and basal-like (OR = 3.14(95%CI:1.03–9.60) tumors than the women without diabetes, with non-significantly increased frequencies of ER-negative (OR = 2.48(95%CI:0.95–6.45)) and triple negative (OR = 2.60(95%CI:0.88–7.67) tumors. After adjustment for age and BMI, the associations remained similar in size but less significant. We observed no evidence for associations of clinicopathological subtypes with diabetes in postmenopausal women, or with insulin treatment in general. Conclusions We found no

  10. Clinically relevant molecular subtypes in leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiangqian; Jo, Vickie Young; Mills, Anne M.; Zhu, Shirley X.; Lee, Cheng-Han; Espinosa, Inigo; Nucci, Marisa Rose; Varma, Sushama; Forgó, Erna; Hastie, Trevor; Anderson, Sharon; Ganjoo, Kristen; Beck, Andrew H.; West, Robert B.; Fletcher, Christopher; van de Rijn, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) is a malignant neoplasm with smooth muscle differentiation. Little is known about its molecular heterogeneity and no targeted therapy currently exists for LMS. Recognition of different molecular subtypes is necessary to evaluate novel therapeutic options. In a previous study on 51 LMS, we identified three molecular subtypes in LMS. The current study was performed to determine whether the existence of these subtypes could be confirmed in independent cohorts. Experimental Design 99 cases of LMS were expression profiled with 3′end RNA-Sequencing (3SEQ). Consensus Clustering was conducted to determine the optimal number of subtypes. Results We identified 3 LMS molecular subtypes and confirmed this finding by analyzing publically available data on 82 LMS from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We identified two new FFPE tissue-compatible diagnostic immunohistochemical markers; LMOD1 for subtype I LMS and ARL4C for subtype II LMS. An LMS tissue microarray with known clinical outcome was used to show that subtype I LMS is associated with good outcome in extrauterine LMS while subtype II LMS is associated with poor prognosis in both uterine and extrauterine LMS. The LMS subtypes showed significant differences in expression levels for genes for which novel targeted therapies are being developed, suggesting that LMS subtypes may respond differentially to these targeted therapies. Conclusion We confirm the existence of 3 molecular subtypes in LMS using two independent datasets and show that the different molecular subtypes are associated with distinct clinical outcomes. The findings offer an opportunity for treating LMS in a subtype-specific targeted approach. PMID:25896974

  11. Development of a novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtyping tool, Subtype Analyzer (STAR): analysis of subtype distribution in London.

    PubMed

    Gale, Catherine V; Myers, Richard; Tedder, Richard S; Williams, Ian G; Kellam, Paul

    2004-05-01

    We have developed a high throughput computational tool for assigning subtype to HIV-1, based solely on protease and reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) amino acid sequence, generated routinely for clinical assessment of genotypic drug resistance. Subtype-specific profiles were created by generation of position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) from multiple amino acids alignments of HIV-1 sequence data from GenBank, phylogenetically divided into subtypes A, AG, B, C, D, F/K, G, H, and J and the separate groups N and O. Query sequences of unknown subtype are aligned with these profiles and a score is derived by comparing each amino acid position in the unknown sequence to the normalized frequency distribution of amino acids at the corresponding positions in the subtype alignments. The highest score is used to assign subtype to the query sequence. Leave one out cross-validation analysis showed the Subtype Analyzer (STAR) was 99% accurate in subtype assignation. STAR can be updated with additional subtype-specific sequence data from sequence databases. STAR was used to classify HIV-1 PR-RT sequences from 843 HIV-1 clinical isolates submitted for drug resistance profiling in London. Within this dataset 26.9% of sequences were classified by STAR as non-B subtypes.

  12. HIV-1 LTR subtype and perinatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Blackard, J T; Renjifo, B; Fawzi, W; Hertzmark, E; Msamanga, G; Mwakagile, D; Hunter, D; Spiegelman, D; Sharghi, N; Kagoma, C; Essex, M

    2001-09-01

    Multiple subtypes of HIV-1 have been identified; however, there is little data on the relative transmissibility of viruses belonging to different subtypes. A matched case-control study addressed whether viruses with different long terminal repeat (LTR) subtypes were transmitted equally from mother to infant. The LTR subtype was determined for 45 matched cases and controls who participated in a clinical trial in Tanzania. HIV-1 subtypes A, C, and D and intersubtype recombinant sequences were identified. Exact matched logistic regression analysis showed that viruses containing subtype A or intersubtype recombinant LTRs were 3.2 and 4.8 times more likely to be transmitted from mother to infant than viruses with subtype D LTRs. Viruses containing subtype C LTRs were 6.1 times more likely to be transmitted than those with subtype D LTRs. These differences in transmission were independent of maternal CD4 at enrollment. Thus, it appears that HIV-1 subtype may be associated with differing rates of perinatal transmission in Tanzania. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Rhinitis Subtypes, Endotypes, and Definitions.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Guibas, George V

    2016-05-01

    Rhinitis is often seen as posing a small burden. However, rhinitis is a complex disease that is underpinned by a plethora of different mechanisms and causes. Rhinitis is frequently associated with other comorbid conditions but, by itself, is a source of considerable morbidity for patients and creates a significant financial burden on health systems worldwide. This article approaches this condition from both a phenotypic and mechanistic standpoint, focusing on the complexity of characterizing these subtypes. Developing a clearer demarcation of the currently obscure rhinitis phenotypes and endotypes will substantially improve their future prevention and treatment.

  14. [Translating Hysteria: PTSD dissociative subtype].

    PubMed

    Levy Yeyati, Elena

    2016-03-01

    To address the symptoms of depersonalization and derealization a specific dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder has been included in DSM-5. Depersonalization and derealization have been defined as acute and chronic symptoms of dissociative disorders since DSM-III. Dissociative disorders with chronic features are often diagnosed in North America, Canada and other European countries, but this is not the case in Argentina. Dissociative disorders have clinical and historical features that are strongly connected with hysteria. The latter is included in ICD-10 within the guidelines for diagnoses of dissociative disorders. This would be one of the reasons for not using dissociative disorders with chronic presentations of symptoms like depersonalization and derealization in countries other than North America or Canada: instead hysteria keeps on been used. The relation between trauma, dissociation and hysteria has been explained in different ways depending on the underlying theory (i.e. Janet's or Freud's). Janet's conceptualizations have had decisive influence in DSM formulations in chronic forms of dissociative disorders. Janet's and Freud's theories lead to different consequences on psychotherapy: hypnosis or psychoanalysis. The aim of this article is to show that the authors of PTSD dissociative subtype are in search of a cross-cultural validity of the construct which might be able to exert a more global influence.

  15. Review of renal cell carcinoma and its common subtypes in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Low, Gavin; Huang, Guan; Fu, Winnie; Moloo, Zaahir; Girgis, Safwat

    2016-01-01

    Representing 2%-3% of adult cancers, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 90% of renal malignancies and is the most lethal neoplasm of the urologic system. Over the last 65 years, the incidence of RCC has increased at a rate of 2% per year. The increased incidence is at least partly due to improved tumor detection secondary to greater availability of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging modalities over the last few decades. Most RCCs are asymptomatic at discovery and are detected as unexpected findings on imaging performed for unrelated clinical indications. The 2004 World Health Organization Classification of adult renal tumors stratifies RCC into several distinct histologic subtypes of which clear cell, papillary and chromophobe tumors account for 70%, 10%-15%, and 5%, respectively. Knowledge of the RCC subtype is important because the various subtypes are associated with different biologic behavior, prognosis and treatment options. Furthermore, the common RCC subtypes can often be discriminated non-invasively based on gross morphologic imaging appearances, signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, and the degree of tumor enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging examinations. In this article, we review the incidence and survival data, risk factors, clinical and biochemical findings, imaging findings, staging, differential diagnosis, management options and post-treatment follow-up of RCC, with attention focused on the common subtypes. PMID:27247714

  16. Discovery and validation of breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kapp, Amy V; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Langerød, Anita; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Bukholm, Ida RK; Nicolau, Monica; Brown, Patrick O; Tibshirani, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies demonstrated breast cancer tumor tissue samples could be classified into different subtypes based upon DNA microarray profiles. The most recent study presented evidence for the existence of five different subtypes: normal breast-like, basal, luminal A, luminal B, and ERBB2+. Results Based upon the analysis of 599 microarrays (five separate cDNA microarray datasets) using a novel approach, we present evidence in support of the most consistently identifiable subtypes of breast cancer tumor tissue microarrays being: ESR1+/ERBB2-, ESR1-/ERBB2-, and ERBB2+ (collectively called the ESR1/ERBB2 subtypes). We validate all three subtypes statistically and show the subtype to which a sample belongs is a significant predictor of overall survival and distant-metastasis free probability. Conclusion As a consequence of the statistical validation procedure we have a set of centroids which can be applied to any microarray (indexed by UniGene Cluster ID) to classify it to one of the ESR1/ERBB2 subtypes. Moreover, the method used to define the ESR1/ERBB2 subtypes is not specific to the disease. The method can be used to identify subtypes in any disease for which there are at least two independent microarray datasets of disease samples. PMID:16965636

  17. Prehospital Identification of Stroke Subtypes in Chinese Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hai-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Chao; Sun, Yong-An; Lyu, Pu; Cui, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhen, Zhi-Gang; Huang, Yi-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Differentiating intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from cerebral infarction as early as possible is vital for the timely initiation of different treatments. This study developed an applicable model for the ambulance system to differentiate stroke subtypes. Methods: From 26,163 patients initially screened over 4 years, this study comprised 1989 consecutive patients with potential first-ever acute stroke with sudden onset of the focal neurological deficit, conscious or not, and given ambulance transport for admission to two county hospitals in Yutian County of Hebei Province. All the patients underwent cranial computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the final diagnosis based on stroke criteria. Correlation with stroke subtype clinical features was calculated and Bayes’ discriminant model was applied to discriminate stroke subtypes. Results: Among the 1989 patients, 797, 689, 109, and 394 received diagnoses of cerebral infarction, ICH, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and other forms of nonstroke, respectively. A history of atrial fibrillation, vomiting, and diabetes mellitus were associated with cerebral infarction, while vomiting, systolic blood pressure ≥180 mmHg, and age <65 years were more typical of ICH. For noncomatose stroke patients, Bayes’ discriminant model for stroke subtype yielded a combination of multiple items that provided 72.3% agreement in the test model and 79.3% in the validation model; for comatose patients, corresponding agreement rates were 75.4% and 73.5%. Conclusions: The model herein presented, with multiple parameters, can predict stroke subtypes with acceptable sensitivity and specificity before CT scanning, either in alert or comatose patients. This may facilitate prehospital management for patients with stroke. PMID:27098788

  18. Influenza subtype identification with molecular methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene sequencing and RT-PCR based methods are the molecular alternative to serology for the identification of influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigenic subtypes. Compared to serology both RT-PCR and sequencing are preferred subtyping methods because of the number of reference reagents...

  19. Statistical support for subtypes in posttraumatic stress disorder: the how and why of subtype analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalenberg, Constance J; Glaser, Dale; Alhassoon, Omar M

    2012-08-01

    A number of researchers have argued for the existence of different subtypes of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In the current paper we present criteria by which to assess these putative subtypes, clarify potential pitfalls of the statistical methods employed to determine them, and propose alternative methods for such determinations. Specifically, three PTSD subtypes are examined: (1) complex PTSD, (2) externalizing/internalizing PTSD, and (3) dissociative/nondissociative PTSD. In addition, three criteria are proposed for subtype evaluation, these are the need for (1) reliability and clarity of definition, (2) distinctions between subtypes either structurally or by mechanism, and (3) clinical meaningfulness. Common statistical evidence for subtyping, such as statistical mean difference and cluster analysis, are presented and evaluated. Finally, more robust statistical methods are suggested for future research on PTSD subtyping. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Roles of ON Cone Bipolar Cell Subtypes in Temporal Coding in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Fyk-Kolodziej, Bozena; Cohn, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In the visual system, diverse image processing starts with bipolar cells, which are the second-order neurons of the retina. Thirteen subtypes of bipolar cells have been identified, which are thought to encode different features of image signaling and to initiate distinct signal-processing streams. Although morphologically identified, the functional roles of each bipolar cell subtype in visual signal encoding are not fully understood. Here, we investigated how ON cone bipolar cells of the mouse retina encode diverse temporal image signaling. We recorded bipolar cell voltage changes in response to two different input functions: sinusoidal light and step light stimuli. Temporal tuning in ON cone bipolar cells was diverse and occurred in a subtype-dependent manner. Subtypes 5s and 8 exhibited low-pass filtering property in response to a sinusoidal light stimulus, and responded with sustained fashion to step-light stimulation. Conversely, subtypes 5f, 6, 7, and XBC exhibited bandpass filtering property in response to sinusoidal light stimuli, and responded transiently to step-light stimuli. In particular, subtypes 7 and XBC were high-temporal tuning cells. We recorded responses in different ways to further examine the underlying mechanisms of temporal tuning. Current injection evoked low-pass filtering, whereas light responses in voltage-clamp mode produced bandpass filtering in all ON bipolar cells. These findings suggest that cone photoreceptor inputs shape bandpass filtering in bipolar cells, whereas intrinsic properties of bipolar cells shape low-pass filtering. Together, our results demonstrate that ON bipolar cells encode diverse temporal image signaling in a subtype-dependent manner to initiate temporal visual information-processing pathways. PMID:24966376

  1. Histological subtypes of periocular basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert; Sun, Michelle T; Huilgol, Shyamala C; Madge, Simon; Selva, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    To determine the proportion of different subtypes of periocular BCC in South Australia. Retrospective review. One thousand seven hundred thirteen consecutive periocular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) excision specimens. Histological analysis of consecutive periocular BCC specimens. Date of resection, patient age at resection, gender, tumour location, histological subtype and perineural invasion. From 2006 to 2012, a total of 1713 consecutive periocular BCC excision specimens were analysed. The mean age at resection was 68.8 years (median: 71, range: 21-101). Most specimens (56.4%) were removed from male patients. 52.7% involved the lower eyelid, 29.0% the medial canthus, 10.9% the lateral canthus and 7.5% the upper eyelid. The main histological subtypes identified were nodular (65.7%), infiltrative (17.5%), superficial (12.6%) and micronodular (4.2%). Of the specimens, 25.6% had more than one subtype. The most common subtype combinations were nodular with infiltrative (49.7%), and nodular with superficial (26.0%). The majority of periocular BCC were located on the lower lid and classified histologically as nodular. Infiltrative BCC occurred more frequently than the superficial subtype. As the proportion of mixed BCC containing aggressive subtypes is high, surgical excision with margin control should be considered for periocular BCC. © 2014 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  2. Neural network subtyping of depression.

    PubMed

    Florio, T M; Parker, G; Austin, M P; Hickie, I; Mitchell, P; Wilhelm, K

    1998-10-01

    To examine the applicability of a neural network classification strategy to examine the independent contribution of psychomotor disturbance (PMD) and endogeneity symptoms to the DSM-III-R definition of melancholia. We studied 407 depressed patients with the clinical dataset comprising 17 endogeneity symptoms and the 18-item CORE measure of behaviourally rated PMD. A multilayer perception neural network was used to fit non-linear models of varying complexity. A linear discriminant function analysis was also used to generate a model for comparison with the non-linear models. Models (linear and non-linear) using PMD items only and endogeneity symptoms only had similar rates of successful classification, while non-linear models combining both PMD and symptoms scores achieved the best classifications. Our current non-linear model was superior to a linear analysis, a finding which may have wider application to psychiatric classification. Our non-linear analysis of depressive subtypes supports the binary view that melancholic and non-melancholic depression are separate clinical disorders rather than different forms of the same entity. This study illustrates how non-linear modelling with neural networks is a potentially fruitful approach to the study of the diagnostic taxonomy of psychiatric disorders and to clinical decision-making.

  3. Atypical depression: a valid subtype?

    PubMed

    Parker, Gordon B

    2007-01-01

    The concept of atypical depression has evolved over the past several decades, yet remains inadequately defined. As currently defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), the main criterion of atypical depression is the presence of mood reactivity in combination with at least 2 of 4 secondary criteria (hypersomnia, hyperphagia and weight gain, leaden paralysis, and oversensitivity to criticism and rejection). The focus on mood reactivity as the primary distinguishing criterion remains questionable among researchers who have been unable to verify the primacy of this symptom in relation to the other diagnostic criteria for atypical depression. A model challenging the DSM-IV-TR definition of atypical depression has been developed, redefining the disorder as a dimensional nonmelancholic syndrome in which individuals with a personality subtype of "interpersonal rejection sensitivity" have a tendency toward the onset of anxiety disorders and depression, thereby exhibiting a variety of dysregulated emotional and self-consolatory responses. This reformulated definition of atypical depression (in arguing for the primacy of a personality style or rejection sensitivity as against mood reactivity) may lead to a better understanding and recognition of the disorder and its symptoms as well as other "spectrum" disorders within the scope of major depression.

  4. Brain structure and function correlates of cognitive subtypes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Daniel; Walton, Esther; Naylor, Melissa; Roessner, Veit; Lim, Kelvin O; Charles Schulz, S; Gollub, Randy L; Calhoun, Vince D; Sponheim, Scott R; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2015-10-30

    Stable neuropsychological deficits may provide a reliable basis for identifying etiological subtypes of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to identify clusters of individuals with schizophrenia based on dimensions of neuropsychological performance, and to characterize their neural correlates. We acquired neuropsychological data as well as structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging from 129 patients with schizophrenia and 165 healthy controls. We derived eight cognitive dimensions and subsequently applied a cluster analysis to identify possible schizophrenia subtypes. Analyses suggested the following four cognitive clusters of schizophrenia: (1) Diminished Verbal Fluency, (2) Diminished Verbal Memory and Poor Motor Control, (3) Diminished Face Memory and Slowed Processing, and (4) Diminished Intellectual Function. The clusters were characterized by a specific pattern of structural brain changes in areas such as Wernicke's area, lingual gyrus and occipital face area, and hippocampus as well as differences in working memory-elicited neural activity in several fronto-parietal brain regions. Separable measures of cognitive function appear to provide a method for deriving cognitive subtypes meaningfully related to brain structure and function. Because the present study identified brain-based neural correlates of the cognitive clusters, the proposed groups of individuals with schizophrenia have some external validity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of smoke inhalation on alveolar surfactant subtypes in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Oulton, M. R.; Janigan, D. T.; MacDonald, J. M.; Faulkner, G. T.; Scott, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of smoke inhalation on alveolar surfactant subtypes were examined in mice exposed for 30 minutes to smoke generated from the burning of a flexible polyurethane foam. At 4 or 12 hours after the exposure, three surfactant pellets, P10, P60, and P100, and a supernatant, S100, were prepared by sequential centrifugation of lavage fluids at 10,000 g for 30 minutes (P10), 60,000 g for 60 minutes (P60), and 100,000 g for 15 hours (P100 and S100). Phospholipid analysis and electron microscopy were performed on each fraction. Smoke exposure dramatically altered the normal distributions of these fractions: it significantly increased the phospholipid content of the heavier subtype, P10, which is thought to represent newly secreted surfactant; had no effect on the intermediate form, P60; and dramatically increased the phospholipid content (approximately fivefold) of the lighter subtypes, P100 and S100, which are believed to represent catabolic end-products of alveolar surfactant. Only P100 was structurally altered by the smoke. These results represent alterations of the normal metabolic processing of alveolar surfactant. Whereas the mechanism is yet to be defined, it seems to involve a small but significant increase in the newly secreted surfactant, as well as an excessively high accumulation of the structurally altered catabolic forms of the secreted surfactant. Images Figure 3 PMID:7943183

  6. Resting-state connectivity biomarkers define neurophysiological subtypes of depression.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, Andrew T; Grosenick, Logan; Downar, Jonathan; Dunlop, Katharine; Mansouri, Farrokh; Meng, Yue; Fetcho, Robert N; Zebley, Benjamin; Oathes, Desmond J; Etkin, Amit; Schatzberg, Alan F; Sudheimer, Keith; Keller, Jennifer; Mayberg, Helen S; Gunning, Faith M; Alexopoulos, George S; Fox, Michael D; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Voss, Henning U; Casey, B J; Dubin, Marc J; Liston, Conor

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers have transformed modern medicine but remain largely elusive in psychiatry, partly because there is a weak correspondence between diagnostic labels and their neurobiological substrates. Like other neuropsychiatric disorders, depression is not a unitary disease, but rather a heterogeneous syndrome that encompasses varied, co-occurring symptoms and divergent responses to treatment. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a large multisite sample (n = 1,188), we show here that patients with depression can be subdivided into four neurophysiological subtypes ('biotypes') defined by distinct patterns of dysfunctional connectivity in limbic and frontostriatal networks. Clustering patients on this basis enabled the development of diagnostic classifiers (biomarkers) with high (82-93%) sensitivity and specificity for depression subtypes in multisite validation (n = 711) and out-of-sample replication (n = 477) data sets. These biotypes cannot be differentiated solely on the basis of clinical features, but they are associated with differing clinical-symptom profiles. They also predict responsiveness to transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy (n = 154). Our results define novel subtypes of depression that transcend current diagnostic boundaries and may be useful for identifying the individuals who are most likely to benefit from targeted neurostimulation therapies.

  7. Anatomic mapping of molecular subtypes in diffuse glioma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qisheng; Lian, Yuxi; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Liang

    2017-09-15

    Tumor location served as an important prognostic factor in glioma patients was considered to postulate molecular features according to cell origin theory. However, anatomic distribution of unique molecular subtypes was not widely investigated. The relationship between molecular phenotype and histological subgroup were also vague based on tumor location. Our group focuses on the study of glioma anatomic location of distinctive molecular subgroups and histology subtypes, and explores the possibility of their consistency based on clinical background. We retrospectively reviewed 143 cases with both molecular information (IDH1/TERT/1p19q) and MRI images diagnosed as cerebral diffuse gliomas. The anatomic distribution was analyzed between distinctive molecular subgroups and its relationship with histological subtypes. The influence of tumor location, molecular stratification and histology diagnosis on survival outcome was investigated as well. Anatomic locations of cerebral diffuse glioma indicate varied clinical outcome. Based on that, it can be stratified into five principal molecular subgroups according to IDH1/TERT/1p19q status. Triple-positive (IDH1 and TERT mutation with 1p19q codeletion) glioma tended to be oligodendroglioma present with much better clinical outcome compared to TERT mutation only group who is glioblastoma inclined (median overall survival 39 months VS 18 months). Five molecular subgroups were demonstrated with distinctive locational distribution. This kind of anatomic feature is consistent with its corresponding histological subtypes. Each molecular subgroup in glioma has unique anatomic location which indicates distinctive clinical outcome. Molecular diagnosis can be served as perfect complementary tool for the precise diagnosis. Integration of histomolecular diagnosis will be much more helpful in routine clinical practice in the future.

  8. Lipomatous meningioma: A rare subtype of benign metaplastic meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Mehmet Onur; Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Tanrıverdi, Osman; Özmen, Sevilay Akalp

    2017-01-01

    Lipomatous meningiomas are extremely rare subtypes of benign meningiomas and are classified as metaplastic meningioma in the World Health Organization classification. We present a 77-year-old man presented with the history of a gradually intensifying headache for the last 3 months. A right frontoparietal mass was detected on his cranial magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was operated on via a right frontoparietal craniotomy, and histopathological diagnosis was lipomatous meningioma. Distinctive characteristics of lipomatous meningiomas were discussed with special emphasis to importance of immunohistochemical examinations, particularly for its differentiation from the tumors showing similar histology though having more aggressive character. PMID:28149104

  9. MORPHOMETRIC SUBTYPING FOR A PANEL OF BREAST CANCER CELL LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joe W.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-05-08

    A panel of cell lines of diverse molecular background offers an improved model system for high-content screening, comparative analysis, and cell systems biology. A computational pipeline has been developed to collect images from cell-based assays, segment individual cells and colonies, represent segmented objects in a multidimensional space, and cluster them for identifying distinct subpopulations. While each segmentation strategy can vary for different imaging assays, representation and subpopulation analysis share a common thread. Application of this pipeline to a library of 41 breast cancer cell lines is demonstrated. These cell lines are grown in 2D and imaged through immunofluorescence microscopy. Subpopulations in this panel are identified and shown to correlate with previous subtyping literature that was derived from transcript data.

  10. How specific is specific phobia? Different neural response patterns in two subtypes of specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Lueken, Ulrike; Kruschwitz, Johann Daniel; Muehlhan, Markus; Siegert, Jens; Hoyer, Jürgen; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Specific phobia of the animal subtype has been employed as a model disorder exploring the neurocircuitry of anxiety disorders, but evidence is lacking whether the detected neural response pattern accounts for all animal subtypes, nor across other phobia subtypes. The present study aimed at directly comparing two subtypes of specific phobia: snake phobia (SP) representing the animal, and dental phobia (DP) representing the blood-injection-injury subtype. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), brain activation and skin conductance was measured during phobogenic video stimulation in 12 DP, 12 SP, and 17 healthy controls. For SP, the previously described activation of fear circuitry structures encompassing the insula, anterior cingulate cortex and thalamus could be replicated and was furthermore associated with autonomic arousal. In contrast, DP showed circumscribed activation of the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (PFC/OFC) when directly compared to SP, being dissociated from autonomic arousal. Results provide preliminary evidence for the idea that snake and dental phobia are characterized by distinct underlying neural systems during sustained emotional processing with evaluation processes in DP being controlled by orbitofrontal areas, whereas phobogenic reactions in SP are primarily guided by limbic and paralimbic structures. Findings support the current diagnostic classification conventions, separating distinct subtypes in DSM-IV-TR. They highlight that caution might be warranted though for generalizing findings derived from animal phobia to other phobic and anxiety disorders. If replicated, results could contribute to a better understanding of underlying neurobiological mechanisms of specific phobia and their respective classification.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide subtypes of Haemophilus influenzae type b from an outbreak of invasive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, T J; Pichichero, M E

    1984-01-01

    Thirty isolates of Haemophilus influenzae type b were obtained during an outbreak of invasive H. influenzae type b disease and were classified by the electrophoretic profile of their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPS was extracted by a rapid micromethod and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The isolates could be divided into 1 of 14 subtypes based on the profile of two to four bands. No subtype was predominant. However, all isolates obtained from duplicate sites of the same individual were of the same subtype. Isolates obtained from two patients (6 weeks apart) who attended the same day-care center differed in LPS subtype but were identical in their major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile. Nasopharyngeal cultures were obtained from healthy children, their immediate families, and employees of the day-care center. Of 13 H. influenzae isolates examined from these contacts, only 1 was type b, which was obtained from a day-care worker and had the same LPS subtype and major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile as one of the disease isolates. The remaining nasopharyngeal isolates were untypable, and most, but not all, were different in LPS pattern. Thus, LPS subtyping of H. influenzae type b may be useful in examining the predominance or transmission of a strain during an outbreak and may distinguish some strains not differentiated by outer membrane protein pattern. Images PMID:6333433

  12. Genetic Subtype Differences in Neural Circuitry of Food Motivation in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Holsen, Laura M.; Zarcone, Jennifer R.; Chambers, Rebecca; Butler, Merlin G.; Bittel, Douglas C.; Brooks, William M.; Thompson, Travis I.; Savage, Cary R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Differences in behavioral phenotypes between the two most common subtypes of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) [chromosome 15q deletions and maternal uniparental disomy 15 (UPD)] indicate that distinct neural networks may be affected. Though both subtypes display hyperphagia, the deletion subgroup demonstrates reduced behavioral inhibition around food, whereas those with UPD are generally more able to maintain cognitive control over food intake impulses. Objective To examine the neural basis of phenotypic differences to better understand relationships between genetic subtypes and behavioral outcomes. We predicted greater food motivation circuitry activity in the deletion subtype and greater activity in higher order cognitive regions in the UPD group, especially after eating. Design and Subjects Nine individuals with PWS due to UPD and 9 individuals with PWS due to (type 2) deletion, matched for age, gender, and BMI, underwent fMRI scanning while viewing food images during two food motivation states: one before (pre-meal) and one after (post-meal) eating a standardized 500 kcal meal. Results Both PWS subgroups demonstrated greater activity in response to food pre- and post-meal compared to the healthy-weight group. Compared to UPD, the deletion subtype showed increased food motivation network activation both pre- and post-meal, especially in the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala. In contrast, the UPD group demonstrated greater activation than the deletion subtype post-meal in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. Conclusion These preliminary findings are the first functional neuroimaging findings to support divergent neural mechanisms associated with behavioral phenotypes in genetic subtypes of PWS. Results are discussed within the framework of genetic mechanisms such as haploinsufficiency and gene dosage effects and their differential influence on deletion and UPD subtypes, respectively. PMID:19048015

  13. Subunit vaccine efficacy against Botulinum neurotoxin subtypes.

    PubMed

    Henkel, James S; Tepp, William H; Przedpelski, Amanda; Fritz, Robert B; Johnson, Eric A; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2011-10-13

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are classified into 7 serotypes (A-G) based upon neutralization by serotype-specific anti-sera. Several recombinant serotype-specific subunit BoNT vaccines have been developed, including a subunit vaccine comprising the receptor binding domain (HCR) of the BoNTs. Sequencing of the genes encoding BoNTs has identified variants (subtypes) that possess up to 32% primary amino acid variation among different BoNT serotypes. Studies were conducted to characterize the ability of the HCR of BoNT/A to protect against challenge by heterologous BoNT/A subtypes (A1-A3). High dose vaccination with HCR/A subtypes A1-A4 protected mice from challenge by heterologous BoNT/A subtype A1-A3, while low dose HCR vaccination yielded partial protection to heterologous BoNT/A subtype challenge. Absolute IgG titers to HCRs correlated to the dose of HCR used for vaccination, where HCR/A1 elicited an A1 subtype-specific IgG response, which was not observed with HCR/A2 vaccination. Survival of mice challenged to heterologous BoNT/A2 following low dose HCR/A1 vaccination correlated with elevated IgG titers directed to the denatured C-terminal sub-domain of HCR/A2, while survival of mice to heterologous BoNT/A1 following low dose HCR/A2 vaccination correlated to elevated IgG titers directed to native HCRc/A1. This implies that low dose vaccinations with HCR/A subtypes elicit unique IgG responses, and provides a basis to define how the host develops a neutralizing immune response to BoNT intoxication. These results may provide a reference for the development of pan-BoNT vaccines.

  14. Is the Inattentive Subtype of ADHD Different from the Combined/Hyperactive Subtype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grizenko, Natalie; Paci, Michael; Joober, Ridha

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the ADHD combined/hyperactive subtype (ADHD/CH) to the ADHD inattentive subtype (ADHD/I) on the level of comorbidity, treatment response, and possible etiological factors. Method: A total of 371 clinically referred children diagnosed with ADHD aged between 6 and 12 years are recruited for a double-blind, placebo-controlled…

  15. Is the Inattentive Subtype of ADHD Different from the Combined/Hyperactive Subtype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grizenko, Natalie; Paci, Michael; Joober, Ridha

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the ADHD combined/hyperactive subtype (ADHD/CH) to the ADHD inattentive subtype (ADHD/I) on the level of comorbidity, treatment response, and possible etiological factors. Method: A total of 371 clinically referred children diagnosed with ADHD aged between 6 and 12 years are recruited for a double-blind, placebo-controlled…

  16. Characterization of Mycobacterium Abscessus Subtypes in Shanghai of China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Liulin; Li, Bing; Chu, Haiqing; Huang, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhang, Jingbo; Gui, Tao; Xu, Liyun; Zhao, Lan; Sun, Xiwen; Xiao, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the epidemic characteristics of Mycobacterium abscessus in Shanghai. Fifty-five strains from 55 M. abscessus pulmonary disease patients were isolated. Drug sensitivity was measured by a broth microdilution method. Subtypes of M. abscessus were identified by DNA sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mining spanning tree (MST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to analyze sequence types (ST) and clonal complexes (CC). Clinical manifestations were assessed by CT imaging. We identified 42 A isolates, 11 M, and 2 B-subtypes. A and M were highly sensitive to tigecycline and amikacin (97.6–100%). The A-type easily developed drug resistance against clarithromycin. Both types were highly resistance to sulfonamides, moxifloxacin, doxycycline, imipenem, and tobramycin. MLST analysis identified 41 STs including 32 new STs. The MST algorithm distributed 55 isolates into 12 separate CC. The PFGE analysis exhibited 53 distinct restriction patterns and the M-type was closely clustered according to their ST and CC numbers. CT imaging showed that tree-in-bud and patch shadow were commonly observed in M-type, whereas pulmonary cavities were often found in A-type infection patients (P < 0.001). ST1 in A and ST23 in M-type were the main epidemic strains in Shanghai. The M-type appeared to be prone to epidemic nosocomial transmission. PMID:26817866

  17. BMP and Notch interaction in CRC subtypes.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Shazia; Bansal, Mukesh; Guarnieri, Paolo; Davis, Hayley; Zen, Ayman Al Haj; Baran, Brygida; Pinna, Claudia Maria Assunta; Rahman, Haseeb; Biswas, Sujata; Bardella, Chiara; Jeffery, Rosemary; Wang, Lai Mun; East, James Edward; Lewis, Annabelle; Tomlinson, Ian; Leedham, Simon John

    2017-03-15

    The functional role of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signalling in colorectal cancer (CRC) is poorly defined, with contradictory results in cancer cell line models reflecting the inherent difficulties of assessing a signalling pathway that is context dependent and subject to genetic constraints. By assessing the transcriptional response of a diploid human colonic epithelial cell line to BMP ligand stimulation we generated a prognostic BMP signalling signature, which was applied to multiple CRC datasets to investigate BMP heterogeneity across CRC molecular subtypes. We linked BMP and Notch signalling pathway activity and function in human colonic epithelial cells, and normal and neoplastic tissue. BMP induced Notch through a γ-secretase independent interaction, regulated by the SMAD proteins. In homeostasis, BMP/Notch co-localisation was restricted to cells at the top of the intestinal crypt, with more widespread interaction in some human CRC samples. BMP signalling was downregulated in the majority of CRC, but was conserved specifically in mesenchymal subtype tumours, where it interacts with Notch to induce an EMT phenotype. In intestinal homeostasis, BMP-Notch pathway crosstalk is restricted to differentiating cells through stringent pathway segregation. Conserved BMP activity and loss of signalling stringency in mesenchymal subtype tumours promotes synergistic BMP/Notch interaction, and this correlates with poor patient prognosis. BMP signalling heterogeneity across CRC subtypes and cell lines can account for previous experimental contradictions. Crosstalk between the BMP and Notch pathways will render mesenchymal subtype CRC insensitive to γ-secretase inhibition unless BMP activation is concomitantly addressed.

  18. GABAA receptor subtype involvement in addictive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Stephens, D N; King, S L; Lambert, J J; Belelli, D; Duka, T

    2017-01-01

    GABAA receptors form the major class of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the mammalian brain. This review sets out to summarize the evidence that variations in genes encoding GABAA receptor isoforms are associated with aspects of addictive behaviour in humans, while animal models of addictive behaviour also implicate certain subtypes of GABAA receptor. In addition to outlining the evidence for the involvement of specific subtypes in addiction, we summarize the particular contributions of these isoforms in control over the functioning of brain circuits, especially the mesolimbic system, and make a first attempt to bring together evidence from several fields to understanding potential involvement of GABAA receptor subtypes in addictive behaviour. While the weight of the published literature is on alcohol dependency, the underlying principles outlined are relevant across a number of different aspects of addictive behaviour. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  19. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  20. Subtypes of anorgasmia via mathematical taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Derogatis, L R; Schmidt, C W; Fagan, P J; Wise, T N

    1989-01-01

    Seventy-six women who presented with a principal complaint of anorgasmia were partitioned into four distinct subtypes on the basis of psychosexual and psychological symptoms using hierarchical cluster analysis, a mathematical taxonomic method. The classification was accomplished with data from the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory (DSFI) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Comparisons involving age, race, marital status, and social class demonstrated no significant differences between the four subtypes; however, statistical analyses of psychosexual, psychological symptom, and chart-review variables (including psychiatric diagnosis) revealed very significant distinctions between the four groups. From the resulting typology, anorgasmic subtypes were presumptively identified as "low desire" (n = 21), "histrionic/marital conflict" (n = 20) "psychiatric disorder" (n = 12) and "constitutional" (n = 16). Implications of the typology for etiologic and optimal treatment decisions concerning anorgasmia are discussed.

  1. Subcortical Volumes Differ in Parkinson’s Disease Motor Subtypes: New Insights into the Pathophysiology of Disparate Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Herman, Talia; Jacob, Yael; Kliper, Efrat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffery M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can be classified, based on their motor symptoms into the Postural Instability Gait Difficulty (PIGD) subtype or the Tremor Dominant (TD) subtype. Gray matter changes between the subtypes have been reported using whole brain Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM), however, the evaluation of subcortical gray matter volumetric differences between these subtypes using automated volumetric analysis has only been studied in relatively small sample sizes and needs further study to confirm that the negative findings were not due to the sample size. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate volumetric changes in subcortical regions and their association with PD motor subtypes. Methods: Automated volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis quantified the subcortical gray matter volumes of patients with PD in the PIGD subtype (n = 30), in the TD subtype (n = 30), and in 28 healthy controls (HCs). Results: Significantly lower amygdala and globus pallidus gray matter volume was detected in the PIGD, as compared to the TD subtype, with a trend for an association between globus pallidus degeneration and higher (worse) PIGD scores. Furthermore, among all the patients with PD, higher hippocampal volumes were correlated with a higher (better) dual tasking gait speed (r = 0.30, p < 0.002) and with a higher global cognitive score (r = 0.36, p < 0.0001). Lower putamen volume was correlated with a higher (worse) freezing of gait score (r = −0.28, p < 0.004), an episodic symptom which is common among the PIGD subtype. As expected, differences detected between HCs and patients in the PD subgroups included regions within the amygdala and the dorsal striatum but not the ventral striatum, a brain region that is generally considered to be more preserved in PD. Conclusions: The disparate patterns of subcortical degeneration can explain some of the differences in symptoms between the PD subtypes such as gait disturbances and cognitive functions

  2. Conservation and variation in the hemagglutinins of Hong Kong subtype influenza viruses during antigenic drift.

    PubMed Central

    Both, G W; Sleigh, M J

    1981-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence was determined for the hemagglutinin gene of the Hong Kong subtype influenza strain A/Bangkok/1/79. The amino acid sequence predicted from these data shows a total of 36 amino acid changes as compared with hemagglutinin for a 1968 Hong Kong strain, 11 more than had occurred in a 1975 strain. The distribution of these changes confirmed that there are conserved and highly variable regions in hemagglutinin as the viral gene evolves during antigenic drift in the Hong Kong subtype. Of the four variable regions found in this study, only two have been seen previously. Correlation of highly variable areas in the hemagglutinins of Hong Kong subtype field strains with sites of amino acid changes in antigenically distinct influenza variants enabled us to predict likely antigenic regions of the protein. The results support and extend similar predictions made recently, based on the three-dimensional arrangement of hemagglutinin from a 1968 influenza strain. Images PMID:6169840

  3. Behavioral Subtypes of Attention Deficit Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykman, Roscoe A.; Ackerman, Peggy T.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews research on three behavioral subtypes of attention deficit disorder (ADD): (1) without hyperactivity (ADD/WO), (2) with hyperactivity, and (3) with hyperactivity and aggression (ADDHA). Children with ADDHA appear to be at increased risk of having oppositional and conduct disorders, whereas children with ADD/WO show symptoms…

  4. Statistical methods for studying disease subtype heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Molin; Spiegelman, Donna; Kuchiba, Aya; Lochhead, Paul; Kim, Sehee; Chan, Andrew T; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tamimi, Rulla; Tworoger, Shelley S; Giovannucci, Edward; Rosner, Bernard; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-02-28

    A fundamental goal of epidemiologic research is to investigate the relationship between exposures and disease risk. Cases of the disease are often considered a single outcome and assumed to share a common etiology. However, evidence indicates that many human diseases arise and evolve through a range of heterogeneous molecular pathologic processes, influenced by diverse exposures. Pathogenic heterogeneity has been considered in various neoplasms such as colorectal, lung, prostate, and breast cancers, leukemia and lymphoma, and non-neoplastic diseases, including obesity, type II diabetes, glaucoma, stroke, cardiovascular disease, autism, and autoimmune disease. In this article, we discuss analytic options for studying disease subtype heterogeneity, emphasizing methods for evaluating whether the association of a potential risk factor with disease varies by disease subtype. Methods are described for scenarios where disease subtypes are categorical and ordinal and for cohort studies, matched and unmatched case-control studies, and case-case study designs. For illustration, we apply the methods to a molecular pathological epidemiology study of alcohol intake and colon cancer risk by tumor LINE-1 methylation subtypes. User-friendly software to implement the methods is publicly available.

  5. A Taxometric Investigation of Developmental Dyslexia Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Beth A.; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with…

  6. Psychosocial Dimensions of Learning Disability Subtypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rourke, Byron P.; Fuerst, Darren E.

    1996-01-01

    Evidence bearing on the relationships between profiles of neuropsychological assets and deficits, subtypes of learning disabilities, and patterns and degrees of psychosocial functioning is reviewed. Conclusions related to the neurodevelopmental bases of psychosocial functioning in children with nonverbal learning disabilities are emphasized. (SLD)

  7. Subtyping Male Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Westen, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence is a serious problem with far-reaching consequences. This study applies a new methodology to derive subtypes of male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. As part of a larger National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study, a national sample of randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists describe 188 adult male…

  8. A Taxometric Investigation of Developmental Dyslexia Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Beth A.; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with…

  9. Reading development subtypes and their early characteristics.

    PubMed

    Torppa, Minna; Tolvanen, Asko; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Eklund, Kenneth; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Leskinen, Esko; Lyytinen, Heikki

    2007-06-01

    The present findings are drawn from the Jyväskylä Longitudinal Study of Dyslexia (JLD), in which approximately 100 children with familial risk of dyslexia and 100 control children have been followed from birth. In this paper we report data on the reading development of the JLD children and their classmates, a total of 1,750 children from four measurement points during the first two school years. In the total sample, we examined whether heterogeneous developmental paths can be identified based on profiles of word recognition and reading comprehension. Secondly, we studied what kind of early language and literacy skill profiles and reading experiences characterize the children with differing reading development in the follow-up sample. The mixture modeling procedure resulted in five subtypes: (1) poor readers, (2) slow decoders, (3) poor comprehenders, (4) average readers, and (5) good readers. The children with familial risk for dyslexia performed on average at a lower level in all reading tasks than both their classmates and the controls, and they were overrepresented in slow decoders subtype. Differences between the subtypes were found in the early language and literacy skill development, as well as in the reading experiences of the reading subtypes.

  10. Subtyping Male Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Westen, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence is a serious problem with far-reaching consequences. This study applies a new methodology to derive subtypes of male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. As part of a larger National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study, a national sample of randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists describe 188 adult male…

  11. Parkinson's disease motor subtypes and mood.

    PubMed

    Burn, David J; Landau, Sabine; Hindle, John V; Samuel, Michael; Wilson, Kenneth C; Hurt, Catherine S; Brown, Richard G

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is heterogeneous, both in terms of motor symptoms and mood. Identifying associations between phenotypic variants of motor and mood subtypes may provide clues to understand mechanisms underlying mood disorder and symptoms in Parkinson's disease. A total of 513 patients were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and separately classified into anxious, depressed, and anxious-depressed mood classes based on latent class analysis of a semistructured interview. Motor subtypes assessed related to age-of-onset, rate of progression, presence of motor fluctuations, lateralization of motor symptoms, tremor dominance, and the presence of postural instability and gait symptoms and falls. The directions of observed associations tended to support previous findings with the exception of lateralization of symptoms, for which there were no consistent or significant results. Regression models examining a range of motor subtypes together indicated increased risk of anxiety in patients with younger age-of-onset and motor fluctuations. In contrast, depression was most strongly related to axial motor symptoms. Different risk factors were observed for depressed patients with and without anxiety, suggesting heterogeneity within Parkinson's disease depression. Such association data may suggest possible underlying common risk factors for motor subtype and mood. Combined with convergent evidence from other sources, possible mechanisms may include cholinergic system damage and white matter changes contributing to non-anxious depression in Parkinson's disease, while situational factors related to threat and unpredictability may contribute to the exacerbation and maintenance of anxiety in susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Altered Epigenetic Mechanisms in Thyroid Cancer Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Zarkesh, Maryam; Zadeh-Vakili, Azita; Azizi, Fereidoun; Foroughi, Forough; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2017-10-06

    Thyroid carcinoma (TC) is the most frequent malignant neoplasm of the endocrine system. Molecular methods for diagnosis of invasive thyroid disease can be effectively adopted. Epigenetic factors play an important role in the diversity patterns of gene expression and the phenotypic and biological characteristics of TC subtypes. We aimed to review epigenetic changes in the main subtypes of TC, along with a presentation of the methods that have examined these changes, and active clinical trials for the treatment of advanced TCs targeting epigenetic changes. A literature analysis was performed in MEDLINE using PubMed, Elsevier, and Google Scholar for studies published up to 2016, using the keywords: "Epigenetic alterations" OR "Epigenetic changes", "thyroid cancers", "papillary thyroid cancer", "medullary thyroid cancer", "follicular thyroid cancer", and "anaplastic thyroid cancer", which resulted in 310 articles in English. All related abstracts were reviewed and studies were included that were published in English, had available full text, and determined the details of the methods and materials associated with the epigenetic patterns of TC and its subtypes (100 articles). Analysis of epigenetic alterations in TC subtypes helps to identify pathogenesis and can play an important role in the classification and diagnosis of tumors. Epigenetic mechanisms, especially aberrant methylation of DNA and microRNAs (miRs), are likely to play an important role in thyroid tumorigenesis. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of histone modification mechanisms in TC development.

  13. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Subtypes. Transitions over Time

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Cristóbal; Arostegui, Inmaculada; Aburto, Myriam; Moraza, Javier; Quintana, José M.; García-Loizaga, Amaia; Basualdo, Luis V.; Aramburu, Amaia; Aizpiri, Susana; Uranga, Ane; Capelastegui, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Although subtypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are recognized, it is unknown what happens to these subtypes over time. Our objectives were to assess the stability of cluster-based subtypes in patients with stable disease and explore changes in clusters over 1 year. Methods Multiple correspondence and cluster analysis were used to evaluate data collected from 543 stable patients included consecutively from 5 respiratory outpatient clinics. Results Four subtypes were identified. Three of them, A, B, and C, had marked respiratory profiles with a continuum in severity of several variables, while the fourth, subtype D, had a more systemic profile with intermediate respiratory disease severity. Subtype A was associated with less dyspnea, better health-related quality of life and lower Charlson comorbidity scores, and subtype C with the most severe dyspnea, and poorer pulmonary function and quality of life, while subtype B was between subtypes A and C. Subtype D had higher rates of hospitalization the previous year, and comorbidities. After 1 year, all clusters remained stable. Generally, patients continued in the same subtype but 28% migrated to another cluster. Together with movement across clusters, patients showed changes in certain characteristics (especially exercise capacity, some variables of pulmonary function and physical activity) and changes in outcomes (quality of life, hospitalization and mortality) depending on the new cluster they belonged to. Conclusions Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease clusters remained stable over 1 year. Most patients stayed in their initial subtype cluster, but some moved to another subtype and accordingly had different outcomes. PMID:27611911

  14. The Neuroanatomy of Genetic Subtype Differences in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn A.; Holsen, Laura M.; Lepping, Rebecca J.; Perea, Rodrigo; Butler, Merlin G.; Brooks, William M.; Savage, Cary R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Despite behavioral differences between genetic subtypes of Prader-Willi syndrome, no studies have been published characterizing brain structure in these subgroups. Our goal was to examine differences in the brain structure phenotype of common subtypes of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) [chromosome 15q deletions and maternal uniparental disomy 15 (UPD)]. Methods Fifteen individuals with PWS due to a typical deletion ((DEL) Type I; n=5, Type II; n=10), 8 with PWS due to UPD, and 25 age-matched healthy-weight individuals (HWC) participated in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. A custom voxel-based morphometry processing stream was used to examine regional differences in gray and white matter volume between groups, covarying for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Results Overall, compared to HWC, PWS individuals had lower gray matter volumes that encompassed the prefrontal, orbitofrontal and temporal cortices, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, and lower white matter volumes in the brain stem, cerebellum, medial temporal and frontal cortex. Compared to UPD, the DEL subtypes had lower gray matter volume primarily in the prefrontal and temporal cortices, and lower white matter in the parietal cortex. The UPD subtype had more extensive lower gray and white matter volumes in the orbitofrontal and limbic cortices compared to HWC. Conclusions These preliminary findings are the first structural neuroimaging findings to support potentially separate neural mechanisms mediating the behavioral differences seen in these genetic subtypes. PMID:22241551

  15. The neuroanatomy of genetic subtype differences in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Honea, Robyn A; Holsen, Laura M; Lepping, Rebecca J; Perea, Rodrigo; Butler, Merlin G; Brooks, William M; Savage, Cary R

    2012-03-01

    Despite behavioral differences between genetic subtypes of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), no studies have been published characterizing brain structure in these subgroups. Our goal was to examine differences in the brain structure phenotype of common subtypes of PWS [chromosome 15q deletions and maternal uniparental disomy 15 (UPD)]. Fifteen individuals with PWS due to a typical deletion [(DEL) type I; n = 5, type II; n = 10], eight with PWS due to UPD, and 25 age-matched healthy-weight individuals (HWC) participated in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. A custom voxel-based morphometry processing stream was used to examine regional differences in gray and white matter volume (WMV) between groups, covarying for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Overall, compared to HWC, PWS individuals had lower gray matter volumes (GMV) that encompassed the prefrontal, orbitofrontal and temporal cortices, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, and lower WMVs in the brain stem, cerebellum, medial temporal, and frontal cortex. Compared to UPD, the DEL subtypes had lower GMV primarily in the prefrontal and temporal cortices, and lower white matter in the parietal cortex. The UPD subtype had more extensive lower gray and WMVs in the orbitofrontal and limbic cortices compared to HWC. These preliminary findings are the first structural neuroimaging findings to support potentially separate neural mechanisms mediating the behavioral differences seen in these genetic subtypes.

  16. Classifying distinct basal cell carcinoma subtype by means of dermatoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Longo, Caterina; Lallas, Aimilios; Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Rabinovitz, Harold; Moscarella, Elvira; Ciardo, Silvana; Zalaudek, Iris; Oliviero, Margaret; Losi, Amanda; Gonzalez, Salvador; Guitera, Pascale; Piana, Simonetta; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    The current guidelines for the management of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) suggest a different therapeutic approach according to histopathologic subtype. Although dermatoscopic and confocal criteria of BCC have been investigated, no specific studies were performed to evaluate the distinct reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) aspects of BCC subtypes. To define the specific dermatoscopic and confocal criteria for delineating different BCC subtypes. Dermatoscopic and confocal images of histopathologically confirmed BCCs were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of predefined criteria. Frequencies of dermatoscopic and confocal parameters are provided. Univariate and adjusted odds ratios were calculated. Discriminant analyses were performed to define the independent confocal criteria for distinct BCC subtypes. Eighty-eight BCCs were included. Dermatoscopically, superficial BCCs (n=44) were primarily typified by the presence of fine telangiectasia, multiple erosions, leaf-like structures, and revealed cords connected to the epidermis and epidermal streaming upon RCM. Nodular BCCs (n=22) featured the classic dermatoscopic features and well outlined large basaloid islands upon RCM. Infiltrative BCCs (n=22) featured structureless, shiny red areas, fine telangiectasia, and arborizing vessels on dermatoscopy and dark silhouettes upon RCM. The retrospective design. Dermatoscopy and confocal microscopy can reliably classify different BCC subtypes. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gastric intestinal metaplasia: subtypes and natural history

    PubMed Central

    El-Zimaity, H; Ramchatesingh, J; Ali, S; Graham, D

    2001-01-01

    Background—It has been suggested that the subtyping of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach is useful in stratifying patients with regard to risk of developing gastric cancer. Aim—To determine whether subtyping intestinal metaplasia provided useful information regarding the natural history of intestinal metaplasia. Methods—The study used large cup gastric biopsy specimens from predetermined locations (gastric mapping). Follow up biopsies were obtained at one, two, and/or nine years. Biopsies with intestinal metaplasia were stained with high iron diamine/Alcian blue (HID/AB) to determine whether they expressed neutral mucins, sialomucins, or sulphomucins. Results—Seventy nine patients with intestinal metaplasia were studied and characterised with regard to the most advanced subtype of intestinal metaplasia. The most severe type of intestinal metaplasia was type II in 33 patients and type III in 34 patients. Helicobacter pylori was cured in 67 patients. Follow up showed that changes in type of metaplasia (apparent regression or progression) occurred in both directions and were independent of H pylori status. For example, biopsy sites with "loss" of metaplasia at a follow up visit might have it "reappear" at a subsequent visit. During follow up, no patient developed gastric dysplasia or died from gastric cancer. Conclusion—HID subtyping did not provide useful information to the clinician or the pathologist. The data are consistent with the notion that the pattern, extent, and severity of atrophy with/without intestinal metaplasia is a far more important predictor of increased cancer risk than intestinal metaplasia subtype. Key Words: Helicobacter pylori • intestinal metaplasia • high iron diamine • gastric cancer PMID:11533073

  18. Muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity of novel heterocyclic QNB analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgold, J.; Cohen, V.I.; Paek, R.; Reba, R.C. )

    1991-01-01

    In an effort at synthesizing centrally-active subtype-selective antimuscarinic agents, the authors derivatized QNB (quinuclidinyl benzilate), a potent muscarinic antagonist, by replacing one of the phenyl groups with less lipophilic heterocyclic moieties. The displacement of ({sup 3}H)-N-methyl scopolamine binding by these novel compounds to membranes from cells expressing ml - m4 receptor subtypes was determined. Most of the novel 4-bromo-QNB analogues were potent and slightly selective for ml receptors. The 2-thienyl derivative was the most potent, exhibiting a 2-fold greater potency than BrQNB at ml receptors, and a 4-fold greater potency than BrQNB at ml receptors, and a 4-fold greater potency at m2 receptors. This compound was also considerably less lipophilic than BrQNB as determined from its retention time on C18 reverse phase HPLC. This compound may therefore be useful both for pharmacological studies and as a candidate for a radioiodinated SPECT imaging agent for ml muscarinic receptors in human brain.

  19. Identifying molecular subtypes related to clinicopathologic factors in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal tumors and usually presented with locally advanced and distant metastasis disease, which prevent curative resection or treatments. In this regard, we considered identifying molecular subtypes associated with clinicopathological factor as prognosis factors to stratify PDAC for appropriate treatment of patients. Results In this study, we identified three molecular subtypes which were significant on survival time and metastasis. We also identified significant genes and enriched pathways represented for each molecular subtype. Considering R0 resection patients included in each subtype, metastasis and survival times are significantly associated with subtype 1 and subtype 2. Conclusions We observed three PDAC molecular subtypes and demonstrated that those subtypes were significantly related with metastasis and survival time. The study may have utility in stratifying patients for cancer treatment. PMID:25560450

  20. Molecular Subtyping of Serous Ovarian Tumors Reveals Multiple Connections to Intrinsic Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Johansson, Ida; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Kimbung, Siker; Jönsson, Mats; Bonde, Jesper Hansen; Kannisto, Päivi; Måsbäck, Anna; Malander, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transcriptional profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer has revealed molecular subtypes correlating to biological and clinical features. We aimed to determine gene expression differences between malignant, benign and borderline serous ovarian tumors, and investigate similarities with the well-established intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Methods Global gene expression profiling using Illumina's HT12 Bead Arrays was applied to 59 fresh-frozen serous ovarian malignant, benign and borderline tumors. Nearest centroid classification was performed applying previously published gene profiles for the ovarian and breast cancer subtypes. Correlations to gene expression modules representing key biological breast cancer features were also sought. Validation was performed using an independent, publicly available dataset. Results 5,944 genes were significantly differentially expressed between benign and malignant serous ovarian tumors, with cell cycle processes enriched in the malignant subgroup. Borderline tumors were split between the two clusters. Significant correlations between the malignant serous tumors and the highly aggressive ovarian cancer signatures, and the basal-like breast cancer subtype were found. The benign and borderline serous tumors together were significantly correlated to the normal-like breast cancer subtype and the ovarian cancer signature derived from borderline tumors. The borderline tumors in the study dataset, in addition, also correlated significantly to the luminal A breast cancer subtype. These findings remained when analyzed in an independent dataset, supporting links between the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and breast cancer beyond those recently acknowledged. Conclusions These data link the transcriptional profiles of serous ovarian cancer to the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer, in line with the shared clinical and molecular features between high-grade serous ovarian cancer and basal-like breast

  1. Molecular subtyping of serous ovarian tumors reveals multiple connections to intrinsic breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Johansson, Ida; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Kimbung, Siker; Jönsson, Mats; Bonde, Jesper Hansen; Kannisto, Päivi; Måsbäck, Anna; Malander, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer has revealed molecular subtypes correlating to biological and clinical features. We aimed to determine gene expression differences between malignant, benign and borderline serous ovarian tumors, and investigate similarities with the well-established intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Global gene expression profiling using Illumina's HT12 Bead Arrays was applied to 59 fresh-frozen serous ovarian malignant, benign and borderline tumors. Nearest centroid classification was performed applying previously published gene profiles for the ovarian and breast cancer subtypes. Correlations to gene expression modules representing key biological breast cancer features were also sought. Validation was performed using an independent, publicly available dataset. 5,944 genes were significantly differentially expressed between benign and malignant serous ovarian tumors, with cell cycle processes enriched in the malignant subgroup. Borderline tumors were split between the two clusters. Significant correlations between the malignant serous tumors and the highly aggressive ovarian cancer signatures, and the basal-like breast cancer subtype were found. The benign and borderline serous tumors together were significantly correlated to the normal-like breast cancer subtype and the ovarian cancer signature derived from borderline tumors. The borderline tumors in the study dataset, in addition, also correlated significantly to the luminal A breast cancer subtype. These findings remained when analyzed in an independent dataset, supporting links between the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and breast cancer beyond those recently acknowledged. These data link the transcriptional profiles of serous ovarian cancer to the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer, in line with the shared clinical and molecular features between high-grade serous ovarian cancer and basal-like breast cancer, and suggest that biomarkers and

  2. IDENTIFYING PANIC DISORDER SUBTYPES USING FACTOR MIXTURE MODELING.

    PubMed

    Pattyn, Thomas; Van Den Eede, Filip; Lamers, Femke; Veltman, Dick; Sabbe, Bernard G; Penninx, Brenda W

    2015-07-01

    The clinical presentation of panic disorder (PD) is known to be highly heterogeneous, complicating research on its etiology, neurobiological pathways, and treatment. None of the attempts to identify PD subtypes have been independently reproduced, rendering the current literature inconclusive. Using a data-driven, case-centered approach (factor mixture modeling) on a broad range of anxiety symptoms assessed with the Beck anxiety inventory, the present study identifies PD disorder subtypes in a large (n = 658), well-documented mixed-population sample from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA), with subtypes being validated and detailed using a variety of clinical characteristics. A three-class, one-factor model proved superior to all other possible models (Bayesian information criterion = 13,200; Lo-Mendel-Rubin = 0.0295; bootstrapped likelihood ratio test ≤ 0.0001), with the first class, a cognitive-autonomic subtype, accounting for 29.8%, the second class, the autonomic subtype, for 29.9%, and a third class, the aspecific subtype, for 40.3% of the population. The cognitive-autonomic and autonomic subtypes showed significant differences compared to the aspecific subtype (e.g., comorbidity and suicide attempts) but on severity differed between themselves only. Three qualitatively different PD subtypes were identified: a severe cognitive-autonomic subtype, a moderate autonomic subtype, and a mild aspecific subtype. Qualitative and quantitative differences were related to severity and clinical properties such as comorbidity, suicide attempts, sleep, and sense of mastery. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of beta-adrenoceptor subtypes in guinea-pig kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Lew, R.; Summers, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of beta-adrenoceptor subtypes in slide-mounted sections of guinea-pig kidney has been examined by the technique of in vitro labelling combined with autoradiography. Binding of (-)-[125I]-cyanopindolol (Cyp) to kidney sections equilibrated and dissociated slowly, was saturable and stereoselective with respect to the isomers of propranolol and pindolol. These characteristics were appropriate for binding to beta-adrenoceptors. Delineation of beta-adrenoceptor subtypes was achieved by use of betaxolol (beta 1-adrenoceptors) and ICI 118,551 (beta 2-adrenoceptors) and computer assisted curve fitting techniques. Both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors were present in the proportions 1:2. 3H-Ultrofilm images of (-)-[125I]-Cyp binding to guinea-pig kidney sections showed localized patches of binding in the cortex and concentrated binding in the outer stripe of the medulla. Cortical receptors were of the beta 1 subtype and those associated with the outer stripe of the medulla were of the beta 2-adrenoceptor subtype. beta 1-Adrenoceptors were concentrated over glomeruli and beta 2-adrenoceptors over the straight portion of the proximal tubule. Images Figure 4 PMID:2992660

  4. A taxometric investigation of developmental dyslexia subtypes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Beth A; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W

    2012-02-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with severe reading disorders. Latent characteristics of the sample are assessed in regard to posited subtypes with phonological deficits and naming speed deficits, thus extending prior work by addressing whether these deficits embody separate classes of individuals. Findings support separate taxa of dyslexia with and without phonological deficits. Different latent structure for naming speed deficits was found depending on the definitional criterion used to define dyslexia. Non-phonologically based forms of dyslexia showed particular difficulty with naming speed and reading fluency. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Suicide by cop: clinical risks and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Lauren; Allwood, Maureen; Fava, Joanna; Arias, Elizabeth; Pinizzotto, Anthony; Schlesinger, Louis

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether clinical classification schemes from general suicide research are applicable for cases of suicide by cop (SbC) and whether there are indicators as to why the police might be engaged in the suicide. Using archival law enforcement data, 13 clinical risks were examined among 68 cases of SbC using exploratory factor analysis and k-means cluster analysis. Three subtypes of SbC cases emerged: Mental Illness, Criminality, and Not Otherwise Specified. The subtypes varied significantly on their levels of mental illness, substance use, and criminal activity. Findings suggest that reducing fragmentation between law enforcement and mental health service providers might be a crucial goal for suicide intervention and prevention, at least among cases of SbC.

  6. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment.

  7. Neuroanatomical profiles of alexithymia dimensions and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Goerlich-Dobre, Katharina Sophia; Votinov, Mikhail; Habel, Ute; Pripfl, Juergen; Lamm, Claus

    2015-10-01

    Alexithymia, a major risk factor for a range of psychiatric and neurological disorders, has been recognized to comprise two dimensions, a cognitive dimension (difficulties identifying, analyzing, and verbalizing feelings) and an affective one (difficulties emotionalizing and fantasizing). Based on these dimensions, the existence of four distinct alexithymia subtypes has been proposed, but never empirically tested. In this study, 125 participants were assigned to four groups corresponding to the proposed alexithymia subtypes: Type I (impairment on both dimensions), Type II (impairment on the cognitive, but not the affective dimension), Type III (impairment on the affective, but not the cognitive dimension), and Lexithymics (no impairment on either dimension). By means of voxel-based morphometry, associations of the alexithymia dimensions and subtypes with gray and white matter volumes were analyzed. Type I and Type II alexithymia were characterized by gray matter volume reductions in the left amygdala and the thalamus. The cognitive dimension was further linked to volume reductions in the right amygdala, left posterior insula, precuneus, caudate, hippocampus, and parahippocampus. Type III alexithymia was marked by volume reduction in the MCC only, and the affective dimension was further characterized by larger sgACC volume. Moreover, individuals with the intermediate alexithymia Types II and III showed gray matter volume reductions in distinct regions, and had larger corpus callosum volumes compared to Lexithymics. These results substantiate the notion of a differential impact of the cognitive and affective alexithymia dimensions on brain morphology and provide evidence for separable neuroanatomical representations of the different alexithymia subtypes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Untypeable hepatitis C virus subtypes in Pakistan: A neglected section.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Waheed; Nasim, Zeeshan; Zahir, Fazli; Ali, Shahid; Ali, Abid; Iqbal, Aqib; Munir, Iqbal

    2016-12-01

    Diagnostically untypeable subtypes contribute a considerable percent of hepatitis C virus (HCV) subtypes in Pakistan. In the present study, chronically infected HCV patients with known viremia were subjected to HCV genotyping. Among the total retrieved samples, 92.7% (64/69) were found typeable while 7.24% (5/69) were diagnostically untypeable. In conclusion, the presence of large number of untypeable HCV subtypes emphasizes the need of an updated type-specific genotyping assay and consideration of primers for proportionally rare subtypes to minimize the number of untypeable HCV subtypes.

  9. Molecular Subtyping to Detect Human Listeriosis Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Sauders, Brian D.; Fortes, Esther D.; Morse, Dale L.; Dumas, Nellie; Kiehlbauch, Julia A.; Schukken, Ynte; Hibbs, Jonathan R.

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the diversity (Simpson’s Index, D) and distribution of Listeria monocytogenes in human listeriosis cases in New York State (excluding New York City) from November 1996 to June 2000 by using automated ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). We applied a scan statistic (p<0.05) to detect listeriosis clusters caused by a specific Listeria monocytogenes subtype. Of 131 human isolates, 34 (D=0.923) ribotypes and 74 (D=0.975) PFGE types were found. Nine (31% of cases) clusters were identified by ribotype or PFGE; five (18% of cases) clusters were identified by using both methods. Two of the nine clusters (13% of cases) identified corresponded with investigated multistate listeriosis outbreaks. While most human listeriosis cases are considered sporadic, highly discriminatory molecular subtyping approaches thus indicated that 13% to 31% of cases reported in New York State may represent single-source clusters. Listeriosis control and reduction efforts should include broad-based subtyping of human isolates and consider that a large number of cases may represent outbreaks. PMID:12781006

  10. Subtyping of STEC by MLVA in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Ana V.; Sanso, Andrea M.; Parma, Alberto E.; Lucchesi, Paula M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes serious human illness such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Argentina has the world’s highest rate of this syndrome, which is the leading cause of acute renal failure among children. E. coli O157:H7 is the most common cause of HUS, but a substantial and growing proportion of this illness is caused by infection due to non-O157 strains. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has become an established technique to subtype STEC. This review will address the use of routine STEC subtyping by MLVA in order to type this group of isolates and to get insight into the genetic diversity of native STEC. With regard to these objectives we modified and adapted two MLVA protocols, one exclusive for O157 and the other, a generic E. coli assay. A total of 202 STEC isolates, from different sources and corresponding to 20 serotypes, have been MLVA genotyped in our laboratory. In our experience, MLVA constitutes a very sensitive tool and enables us to perform an efficient STEC subtyping. The diversity found in many serotypes may be useful for future epidemiological studies of STEC clonality, applied to O157 as well as to non-O157 isolates. PMID:22919698

  11. Clinical subtypes and genetic heterogeneity: of lumping and splitting in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    von Coelln, Rainer; Shulman, Lisa M

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies on clinical, genetic and pathological heterogeneity of Parkinson disease have renewed the old debate whether we should think of Parkinson disease as one disease with variations, or as a group of independent diseases that happen to present with similar phenotypes. Here, we provide an overview of where the debate is coming from, and how recent findings in clinical subtyping, genetics and clinico-pathological correlation have shaped this controversy over the last few years. New and innovative clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson disease have been proposed and await validation. Studies using functional imaging or wearable biosensors, as well as biomarker studies, provide new support for the validity of the traditional clinical subtypes of Parkinson disease (tremor-dominant versus akinetic-rigid or postural instability/gait difficulty). A recent cluster analysis (as unbiased data-driven approach to subtyping) included a wide spectrum of nonmotor variables, and showed correlation of the proposed subtypes with disease progression in a longitudinal analysis. New genetic factors contributing to Parkinson disease susceptibility continue to be identified, including rare mutations causing monogenetic disease, common variants with small effect size and risk factors (like mutations in the gene for glucocerebrosidase) that fall in between the two other categories. Recent studies show some limited correlation between genetic factors and clinical heterogeneity. Despite some variations in patterns of pathology, Lewy bodies are still the hallmark of Parkinson disease, including the vast majority of genetic subgroups. Evidence of clinical, genetic and pathological heterogeneity of Parkinson disease continues to emerge, but clearly defined subtypes that hold up in more than one of these domains remain elusive. For research to identify such subtypes, splitting is likely the way forward; until then, for clinical practice, lumping remains the more pragmatic approach.

  12. Difference in the Location and Risk Factors of Cerebral Microbleeds According to Ischemic Stroke Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Yoon, Youngshin; Sohn, Hoyon; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S.; Kwon, Sun U.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The location of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) may differ according to ischemic stroke subtype, and the underlying pathomechanism may differ by their location. Here, we investigated the characteristics of CMBs according to various ischemic stroke subtypes to verify this issue. Methods Patients with acute ischemic stroke were consecutively included. The presence of CMBs was determined by gradient echo image sequence. The distribution of CMBs was classified as deep, lobar, or diffuse (both deep and lobar). The prevalence, risk factors, and distribution of CMBs were compared among patients with different stroke subtypes. Factors associated with the distribution of CMBs were investigated. Results Among the 1033 patients included in this study, ischemic stroke subtypes were classified as large artery atherosclerosis (LAA; n=432), small vessel occlusion (SVO; n=304), and cardioembolism (CE; n=297). The prevalence of CMBs was highest in patients with SVO (40.5%), followed by CE (33.0%) and LAA (24.8%; P<0.001). The locations of CMBs was different according to subtype (P=0.004). CE [odds ratio (OR)=1.85 (1.02-3.34); P=0.042] and the use of antithrombotics [OR=1.80 (1.10-2.94); P=0.019] were associated with lobar CMBs, and old age [OR=1.02 (1.00-1.04); P=0.015] and hypertension [OR=1.61 (1.08-2.40); P=0.020] were associated with deep CMBs. Conclusions CMBs were frequently located in the lobar area in patients with CE. Previous use of antithrombotic agents is associated with lobar CMBs. The pathogenic mechanism of CMB may differ according to ischemic stroke subtype and location. PMID:27733027

  13. Difference in the Location and Risk Factors of Cerebral Microbleeds According to Ischemic Stroke Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Joon; Yoon, Youngshin; Sohn, Hoyon; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S; Kwon, Sun U

    2016-09-01

    The location of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) may differ according to ischemic stroke subtype, and the underlying pathomechanism may differ by their location. Here, we investigated the characteristics of CMBs according to various ischemic stroke subtypes to verify this issue. Patients with acute ischemic stroke were consecutively included. The presence of CMBs was determined by gradient echo image sequence. The distribution of CMBs was classified as deep, lobar, or diffuse (both deep and lobar). The prevalence, risk factors, and distribution of CMBs were compared among patients with different stroke subtypes. Factors associated with the distribution of CMBs were investigated. Among the 1033 patients included in this study, ischemic stroke subtypes were classified as large artery atherosclerosis (LAA; n=432), small vessel occlusion (SVO; n=304), and cardioembolism (CE; n=297). The prevalence of CMBs was highest in patients with SVO (40.5%), followed by CE (33.0%) and LAA (24.8%; P<0.001). The locations of CMBs was different according to subtype (P=0.004). CE [odds ratio (OR)=1.85 (1.02-3.34); P=0.042] and the use of antithrombotics [OR=1.80 (1.10-2.94); P=0.019] were associated with lobar CMBs, and old age [OR=1.02 (1.00-1.04); P=0.015] and hypertension [OR=1.61 (1.08-2.40); P=0.020] were associated with deep CMBs. CMBs were frequently located in the lobar area in patients with CE. Previous use of antithrombotic agents is associated with lobar CMBs. The pathogenic mechanism of CMB may differ according to ischemic stroke subtype and location.

  14. Radiomic analysis reveals DCE-MRI features for prediction of molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming; Li, Hui; Wang, Shijian; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of features derived from breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and to incorporated clinical information to predict the molecular subtypes of breast cancer. In particular, 60 breast cancers with the following four molecular subtypes were analyzed: luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-over-expressing and basal-like. The breast region was segmented and the suspicious tumor was depicted on sequentially scanned MR images from each case. In total, 90 features were obtained, including 88 imaging features related to morphology and texture as well as dynamic features from tumor and background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and 2 clinical information-based parameters, namely, age and menopausal status. An evolutionary algorithm was used to select an optimal subset of features for classification. Using these features, we trained a multi-class logistic regression classifier that calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The results of a prediction model using 24 selected features showed high overall classification performance, with an AUC value of 0.869. The predictive model discriminated among the luminal A, luminal B, HER2 and basal-like subtypes, with AUC values of 0.867, 0.786, 0.888 and 0.923, respectively. An additional independent dataset with 36 patients was utilized to validate the results. A similar classification analysis of the validation dataset showed an AUC of 0.872 using 15 image features, 10 of which were identical to those from the first cohort. We identified clinical information and 3D imaging features from DCE-MRI as candidate biomarkers for discriminating among four molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

  15. Radiomic analysis reveals DCE-MRI features for prediction of molecular subtypes of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ming; Li, Hui; Wang, Shijian; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of features derived from breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and to incorporated clinical information to predict the molecular subtypes of breast cancer. In particular, 60 breast cancers with the following four molecular subtypes were analyzed: luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-over-expressing and basal-like. The breast region was segmented and the suspicious tumor was depicted on sequentially scanned MR images from each case. In total, 90 features were obtained, including 88 imaging features related to morphology and texture as well as dynamic features from tumor and background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and 2 clinical information-based parameters, namely, age and menopausal status. An evolutionary algorithm was used to select an optimal subset of features for classification. Using these features, we trained a multi-class logistic regression classifier that calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The results of a prediction model using 24 selected features showed high overall classification performance, with an AUC value of 0.869. The predictive model discriminated among the luminal A, luminal B, HER2 and basal-like subtypes, with AUC values of 0.867, 0.786, 0.888 and 0.923, respectively. An additional independent dataset with 36 patients was utilized to validate the results. A similar classification analysis of the validation dataset showed an AUC of 0.872 using 15 image features, 10 of which were identical to those from the first cohort. We identified clinical information and 3D imaging features from DCE-MRI as candidate biomarkers for discriminating among four molecular subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:28166261

  16. Combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma with stem cell features, ductal plate malformation subtype: a case report and proposal of a new subtype.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    In the current WHO blue book, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma (C-HCC-CC) was classified into two types; classical type and type with stem cell features. The latter is extremely rare, and is subcategorized into the following three subtypes; typical subtype, intermediate cell subtype, and cholangiocellular subtype. Recently, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) with features of ductal plate malformations (DPM) have been reported, and the ICC with DPM was proposed as a subtype of ICC. The author herein reports a case of C-HCC-CC with stem cell features. Characteristically, the CC element showed features of DPM. A 51-year-old man of HBV carrier was found to have high AFP. A laboratory test showed an elevated AFP (395 ng/ml, normal 9-10) and hepatitis B virus-related antigens and antibodies. Liver and ductal enzymes and PIVKAII were within normal ranges. Imaging modalities including CT identified a small liver tumor. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was suspected, and the resection of the hepatic tumor was performed. Grossly, the liver tumor is well-defined white solid tumor measuring 22x16x23 mm. Microscopically, the tumor was a C-HCC-CC, and was composed of following three elements: well differentiated HCC, well differentiated cholangiocarcinoma (CC), and intermediate tumor element. Characteristically, the CC cells formed tortuous markedly irregular tubules with intraluminal cell projections, bridge formations, intraluminal tumor biliary cells; such features very resembled the ductal plate (DP) and DPM. Immunohistochemically, the cells of CC element were positive for stem cell antigens (KIT (CD117), CD56, EMA, CD34), HepPar1, EpCAM, cytokeratin (CK) CAM5.2, AE1/3, CK34BE12 (focal), CK7, CK8, CK18, CK19, CA19-9, p53, MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, and Ki-67 (labeling=25%). They were negative for CEA, CK5/6, CK20, NSE, chromogranin, synaptophysin, and p63. No mucins were found by histochemically. The background liver showed chronic hepatitis B (a1, f3). Very

  17. Metabolomic Identification of Subtypes of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Cristina; Fernández-Ramos, David; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Arranz, Ibon; Navasa, Nicolás; Van Liempd, Sebastiaan M; Lavín Trueba, José L; Mayo, Rebeca; Ilisso, Concetta P; de Juan, Virginia G; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; delaCruz-Villar, Laura; Mincholé, Itziar; Robinson, Aaron; Crespo, Javier; Martín-Duce, Antonio; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Sann, Holger; Platon, Julian; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Aspichueta, Patricia; Noureddin, Mazen; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Anguita, Juan; Aransay, Ana M; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz; Lu, Shelly C; Mato, José M

    2017-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a consequence of defects in diverse metabolic pathways that involve hepatic accumulation of triglycerides. Features of these aberrations might determine whether NAFLD progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We investigated whether the diverse defects observed in patients with NAFLD are caused by different NAFLD subtypes with specific serum metabolomic profiles, and whether these can distinguish patients with NASH from patients with simple steatosis. We collected liver and serum from methionine adenosyltransferase 1a knockout (MAT1A-KO) mice, which have chronically low levels of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) and spontaneously develop steatohepatitis, as well as C57Bl/6 mice (controls); the metabolomes of all samples were determined. We also analyzed serum metabolomes of 535 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD (353 with simple steatosis and 182 with NASH) and compared them with serum metabolomes of mice. MAT1A-KO mice were also given SAMe (30 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks); liver samples were collected and analyzed histologically for steatohepatitis. Livers of MAT1A-KO mice were characterized by high levels of triglycerides, diglycerides, fatty acids, ceramides, and oxidized fatty acids, as well as low levels of SAMe and downstream metabolites. There was a correlation between liver and serum metabolomes. We identified a serum metabolomic signature associated with MAT1A-KO mice that also was present in 49% of the patients; based on this signature, we identified 2 NAFLD subtypes. We identified specific panels of markers that could distinguish patients with NASH from patients with simple steatosis for each subtype of NAFLD. Administration of SAMe reduced features of steatohepatitis in MAT1A-KO mice. In an analysis of serum metabolomes of patients with NAFLD and MAT1A-KO mice with steatohepatitis, we identified 2 major subtypes of NAFLD and markers that differentiate steatosis from NASH in each subtype. These might be

  18. Variability of Delirium Motor Subtype Scale-Defined Delirium Motor Subtypes in Elderly Adults with Hip Fracture: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, Rikie M; van Munster, Barbara C; Adamis, Dimitrios; de Jonghe, Annemarieke; Meagher, David J; de Rooij, Sophia E J A

    2017-02-01

    To examine changes in motor subtype profile in individuals with delirium. Observational, longitudinal study; substudy of a multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Departments of surgery and orthopedics, Academic Medical Center and Tergooi Hospital, the Netherlands. Elderly adults acutely admitted for hip fracture surgery who developed delirium according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, for 2 days or longer (n = 76, aged 86.4 ± 6.1, 68.4% female). Delirium Motor Subtype Scale (DMSS), Delirium Rating Scale R98 (DRS-R98), comorbidity, and function. Median delirium duration was 3 days (interquartile range 2.0 days). At first assessment, the hyperactive motor subtype was most common (44.7%), followed by hypoactive motor subtype (28.9%), mixed motor subtype (19.7%), and no motor subtype (6.6%). Participants with no motor subtype had lower DRS-R98 scores than those with the other subtypes (P < .001). The DMSS-defined motor subtype of 47 (61.8%) participants changed over time. Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living, Charlson Comorbidity Index, cognitive impairment, age, sex, and delirium duration or severity were not associated with change in motor subtype. Motor subtype profile was variable in the majority of participants, although changes that occurred were often related to changes from or to no motor subtype, suggesting evolving or resolving delirium. Changes appeared not be associated with demographic or clinical characteristics, suggesting that evidence from cross-sectional studies of motor subtypes could be applied to many individuals with delirium. Further longitudinal studies should be performed to clarify the stability of motor subtypes in different clinical populations. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Influenza in the USSR in 1977: recurrence of influenzavirus A subtype H1N1*

    PubMed Central

    Zakstelskaja, L. Ja.; Yakhno, M. A.; Isačenko, V. A.; Molibog, E. V.; Hlustov, S. A.; Antonova, I. V.; Klitsunova, N. V.; Vorkunova, G. K.; Bukrinskaja, A. G.; Bykovsky, A. F.; Hohlova, G. G.; Ivanova, V. T.; Ždanov, V. M.

    1978-01-01

    Early in November 1977, several outbreaks of influenza were reported in the far eastern region of the USSR. The epidemic spread rapidly throughout the country affecting mainly people under the age of 20 years. Most of the strains of virus isolated were found to be influenza A subtype H1N1. The serological characterization of the strains is described in this paper. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:310733

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtypes Prevalence in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Wen-jie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To study the epidemic characteristics, transmission sources and routes of various subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and sequence variations in Henan, central China. To provide theoretical foundation for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention strategy in this region where the primary HIV transmission route was through former paid blood donation. Materials and Methods HIV-1 gene env and gag were amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 1,287 HIV-1 confirmed samples in Henan. Results Among 1,287 samples, 5 HIV-1 strains were found including subtypes B' (95.9%), C (0.47%) and recombinant subtypes CRF 07_BC (1.09%), CRF 08_BC (1.79%) and CRF 01_AE (0.78%). Phylogenetic tree analysis found that 1,234 Henan subtype B' were closely related to those commonly found in Thailand, and were distantly related to other international subtypes. The dominant strain in former blood plasma donors (FPDs) was subtype B', and the dominant strains in sexual transmission were subtype B' and BC. Among HIV patients who were most likely infected through routes other than paid blood donation, the percentage of non-B' subtypes was much higher than those of FPD. Conclusion These findings suggest that the prevailing strain of HIV-1 in Henan is subtype B', similar to the B' subtype found in Thailand. In addition, for the first time we found subtypes C and recombinant subtypes CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE in this region. Indicating that the subtype feature of HIV-1 became more complicated than before in central China. PMID:19881967

  1. Subtypes of major depression in substance dependence.

    PubMed

    Niciu, Mark J; Chan, Grace; Gelernter, Joel; Arias, Albert J; Douglas, Kara; Weiss, Roger; Anton, Raymond F; Farrer, Lindsay; Cubells, Joseph F; Kranzler, Henry R

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated features that differentiate subtypes of major depressive episode (MDE) in the context of substance dependence (SD). Design  Secondary data analysis using pooled data from family-based and case-control genetic studies of SD. Community recruitment through academic medical centers. A total of 1929 unrelated subjects with alcohol and/or drug dependence. Demographics, diagnostic criteria for psychiatric and substance use disorders and related clinical features were obtained using the Semi-Structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism. We compared four groups: no life-time MDE (no MDE), independent MDE only (I-MDE), substance-induced MDE only (SI-MDE) and both types of MDE. Psychiatric measures were better predictors of MDE subtype than substance-related or socio-demographic ones. Subjects with both types of MDE reported more life-time depressive symptoms and comorbid anxiety disorders and were more likely to have attempted suicide than subjects with I-MDE or SI-MDE. Subjects with both types of MDE, like those with I-MDE, were also more likely than subjects with SI-MDE to be alcohol-dependent only than either drug-dependent only or both alcohol- and drug-dependent. SD individuals with both types of MDE have greater psychiatric severity than those with I-MDE only or SI-MDE only. These and other features that distinguish among the MDE subtypes have important diagnostic and potential therapeutic implications. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  2. Diagnostic transitions in mild cognitive impairment subtypes.

    PubMed

    Forlenza, Orestes Vicente; Diniz, Breno Satler; Nunes, Paula Villela; Memória, Claudia Maia; Yassuda, Monica Sanches; Gattaz, Wagner Farid

    2009-12-01

    At least for a subset of patients, the clinical diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may represent an intermediate stage between normal aging and dementia. Nevertheless, the patterns of transition of cognitive states between normal cognitive aging and MCI to dementia are not well established. In this study we address the pattern of transitions between cognitive states in patients with MCI and healthy controls, prior to the conversion to dementia. 139 subjects (78% women, mean age, 68.5 +/- 6.1 years; mean educational level, 11.7 +/- 5.4 years) were consecutively assessed in a memory clinic with a standardized clinical and neuropsychological protocol, and classified as cognitively healthy (normal controls) or with MCI (including subtypes) at baseline. These subjects underwent annual reassessments (mean duration of follow-up: 2.7 +/- 1.1 years), in which cognitive state was ascertained independently of prior diagnoses. The pattern of transitions of the cognitive state was determined by Markov chain analysis. The transitions from one cognitive state to another varied substantially between MCI subtypes. Single-domain MCI (amnestic and non-amnestic) more frequently returned to normal cognitive state upon follow-up (22.5% and 21%, respectively). Among subjects who progressed to Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common diagnosis immediately prior conversion was multiple-domain MCI (85%). The clinical diagnosis of MCI and its subtypes yields groups of patients with heterogeneous patterns of transitions between one given cognitive state to another. The presence of more severe and widespread cognitive deficits, as indicated by the group of multiple-domain amnestic MCI may be a better predictor of AD than single-domain amnestic or non-amnestic deficits. These higher-risk individuals could probably be the best candidates for the development of preventive strategies and early treatment for the disease.

  3. Acetylcholine nicotinic receptor subtypes in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Criado, Manuel

    2017-08-08

    In the adrenal gland, acetylcholine released on stimulation of the sympathetic splanchnic nerve activates neuronal-type nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in chromaffin cells and triggers catecholamine secretion. At least two subtypes of nAChRs have been described in bovine chromaffin cells. The main subtype, a heteromeric assembly of α3, β4 and perhaps α5 subunits, is involved in the activation step of the catecholamine secretion process and is not blocked by the snake toxin α-bungarotoxin. The other is α-bungarotoxin-sensitive, and its functional role has not yet been well defined. The α7 subunit conforms the homomeric structure of this subtype. All nAChR subunits share the same molecular organization and structural data at atomic resolution level are now available for some homomeric and heteromeric ensembles. The α3, β4 and α5 subunits are clustered in genomes of different species, with the transcription factor Sp1 playing a co-ordinating role in the transcriptional regulation of these three subunits. The transcription factor Egr-1 controls the differential expression of α7 nAChR in adrenergic chromaffin cells, as happens with the enzyme phenylethanolamine N-methyl transferase. For unknown reasons, whole cell currents observed in bovine chromaffin cells clearly differ of the ones observed when different combinations of subunit RNAs are injected in oocytes. In addition to the typical nicotinic ligands, a variety of unrelated substances with clinical relevance can target nAChRs in chromaffin cells and, therefore, affect catecholamine secretion. They can act as agonists, antagonists or allosteric modulators.

  4. Radiogenomics of glioblastoma: a pilot multi-institutional study to investigate a relationship between tumor shape features and tumor molecular subtype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnek, Nicholas M.; Clark, Kal; Peters, Katherine B.; Collins, Leslie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2016-03-01

    Genomic subtype has been shown to be an important predictor of therapy response for patients with glioblastomas. Unfortunately, obtaining the genomic subtype is an expensive process that is not typically included in the standard of care. It is therefore of interest to investigate potential surrogates of molecular subtypes that use standard diagnostic data such as magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In this study, we analyze the relationship between tumor genomic subtypes, proposed by Verhaak et al, 2010, and novel features that capture the shape of abnormalities as seen in fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images. In our study, we used data from 54 patients with glioblastomas from four institutions provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA). We explore five shape features calculated by computer algorithms implemented in our laboratory that assess shape both in individual slices and in rendered three-dimensional tumor volumes. The association between each feature and molecular subtype was assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. We show that the two dimensional measures of edge complexity are significant discriminators between mesenchymal and classical tumors. These preliminary findings show promise for an imaging-based surrogate of molecular subtype and contribute to the understanding of the relationship between tumor biology and its radiology phenotype.

  5. Seventh Symposium on Subtypes of Musccarinic Receptors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    grants GM07270, HL07312, GM07750 and NS07332. References 1. N.M. NATHANSON, The Muscarinic Receptors, J.A. Brown (ed), 419-454, The Humana Press...R.A., MALENKAR.C. and KAUTERJ.A. Physiol.Revs. 70 514-565 (1990). 6. NORTHR.A. Muscarinic receptor subtypes, J.H.Brown (ed), 341-373, Humana , Clifton...Giannella Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, and *Istituto di Farmacologia, Sezione di Anatomia Umana, Universita di Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy

  6. Catatonia in autism: a distinct subtype?

    PubMed

    Ghaziuddin, M; Quinlan, P; Ghaziuddin, N

    2005-01-01

    Catatonia is a life-threatening disorder characterized by motor abnormalities, mutism, and disturbances of behaviour, which is increasingly being diagnosed in persons with autism. In this report, we describe the presentation and course of catatonia in an adolescent with autism who responded to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The illness started with depressive symptoms, but the predominant feature was one of extreme obsessive slowing and immobility. We propose that catatonia should be ruled out as a cause of regression sometimes seen in adolescents with autism, and that catatonia of autism may index a distinct subtype with a particularly poor outcome.

  7. Right hemisphere brain morphology, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtype, and social comprehension.

    PubMed

    Miller, Scott R; Miller, Carlin J; Bloom, Juliana S; Hynd, George W; Craggs, Jason G

    2006-02-01

    Social comprehension involves empathy for others' experiences and appropriate responses to nonverbal cues. Previous research using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has suggested a relationship between brain morphology and psychiatric syndromes, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), that typically entail social difficulties. The right hemisphere, specifically, has been associated with social skill deficits, and numerous studies have also associated ADHD with social skill deficits. No studies, however, have examined the association of ADHD subtype with both social comprehension and right-hemisphere morphology. Fifty-nine children (6-12 years old) underwent MRI, from which the right hemisphere was classified into four morphologic subtypes. Children were also grouped by ADHD subtype or clinical control status. From Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC) items, a social comprehension subscale was constructed. Analyses revealed significant differences in social comprehension based on ADHD subtype. Differences in social comprehension based on ADHD status were especially pronounced in children with atypical right-hemisphere morphology. Thus, the diagnosis of ADHD might be associated with underlying risk in the area of social comprehension, especially for children with atypical right-hemisphere morphology.

  8. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  9. Image

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Amber; Harsch, Tim; Pitt, Julie; Firpo, Mike; Lekin, April; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2007-08-31

    The computer side of the IMAGE project consists of a collection of Perl scripts that perform a variety of tasks; scripts are available to insert, update and delete data from the underlying Oracle database, download data from NCBI's Genbank and other sources, and generate data files for download by interested parties. Web scripts make up the tracking interface, and various tools available on the project web-site (image.llnl.gov) that provide a search interface to the database.

  10. A CLINICAL STUDY OF POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE SUBTYPES OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Suresh K.; Kulhara, Parmanand

    1988-01-01

    SUMMARY Using a cross-sectional phenomenological approach, 40 schizophrenic patients satisfying Research Diagnostic Criteria were divided into positive, negative and mixed subtypes. On variables like age, duration of illness, and premorbid adjustment significant differences emerged between positive and negative subtypes. No significant differences were found when positive and negative subtypes were compared on variables like intelligence, memory, history of treatment with neuroleptics and electroconvulsive therapy and past and family history of schizophrenia. The results are compared with other studies. PMID:21927337

  11. Postmaturity in a genetic subtype of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Chow, E. W. C.; Husted, J.; Weksberg, R.; Bassett, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether postmaturity (gestation > 41 weeks), small for gestational age (SGA), and other pregnancy and birth complications that may elevate risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, are associated with elevated risk for schizophrenia in 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (22qDS), a genetic subtype of schizophrenia. Method Antepartum and intrapartum features were examined in 20 adults with 22qDS-schizophrenia and three comparison groups: newborn encephalopathy (n = 164) and healthy newborn controls (n = 400) from Badawi et al.’s (Br Med J 1998, 317: 1549) study, and 16 non-psychotic 22qDS adults (22qDS-NP). Results Postmaturity (OR 13.0, 95% CI 3.95, 42.77; P < 0.001) and SGA (OR 3.59, 95% CI 1.23, 10.5; P = 0.03) were more prevalent in 22qDS-SZ than controls. Postmaturity was non-significantly more prevalent in 22qDS-SZ than in newborn encephalopathy (P = 0.06) or 22qDS-NP (P = 0.2). SGA showed similar rates in the two 22qDS groups and newborn encephalopathy, but was more prevalent in 22qDS-NP than controls (P = 0.05). Conclusion The results suggest that postmaturity may be associated with expression of schizophrenia in a 22qDS subtype of schizophrenia. SGA may be a non-specific marker of neurodevelopmental disturbance. PMID:12956826

  12. Osteogenic sarcoma. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma subtype.

    PubMed

    Ballance, W A; Mendelsohn, G; Carter, J R; Abdul-Karim, F W; Jacobs, G; Makley, J T

    1988-08-15

    A distinctly different entity from the now well-delineated malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) of bone is the MFH histopathologic subtype of osteogenic sarcoma. Although uncommon, recently the authors have encountered six cases of this neoplasm, in each of which the soft tissue component was devoid of bone elements and was microscopically indistinguishable from MFH of bone or soft tissue. Neoplastic osteoid and woven bone were present in the osseous component of each tumor, however. Radiologically, the lesions generally were osteoblastic but focally osteolytic with features typical of osteogenic sarcoma. Pain was the most common presenting symptom. There was no age or sex predilection. Immunocytochemical staining showed strong positivity with alpha-1-antichymotrypsin within malignant bizarre giant cells and occasional neoplastic osteoblasts in five cases. The biological behavior followed a very aggressive course. Four of the six patients developed pulmonary metastases 6 to 12 months after initial surgery; one patient presented initially with pulmonary metastases. Adequate tumor sampling as well as optimal correlation with clinical and radiographic information are required to distinguish the MFH subtype of osteogenic sarcoma from MFH of bone, both being high-grade neoplasms, however.

  13. Distinct methylation profiles of glioma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Karen; Rohde, Klaus; Zeller, Constanze; Szymas, Janusz; Vogel, Siegfried; Marczinek, Karola; Thiel, Gundula; Nürnberg, Peter; Laird, Peter W

    2003-08-10

    Gliomas are tumors of the central nervous system with a wide spectrum of different tumor types. They range from pilocytic astrocytoma, with a generally good prognosis, to the extremely aggressive malignant glioblastoma. In addition to these 2 types of contrasting neoplasms, several other subtypes can be distinguished, each characterized by specific phenotypic, as well as genotypic features. Recently, the epigenotype, as evident from differentially methylated DNA loci, has been proposed to be useful as a further criterion to distinguish between tumor types. In our study, we screened 139 tissue samples, including 33 pilocytic astrocytomas, 46 astrocytomas of different grades, 7 oligoastrocytomas, 10 oligodendrogliomas, 10 glioblastoma multiforme samples and 33 control tissues, for methylation at CpG islands of 15 different gene loci. We used the semiquantitative high throughput method MethyLight to analyze a gene panel comprising ARF, CDKN2B, RB1, APC, CDH1, ESR1, GSTP1, TGFBR2, THBS1, TIMP3, PTGS2, CTNNB1, CALCA, MYOD1 and HIC1. Seven of these loci showed tumor specific methylation changes. We found tissue as well as grade specific methylation profiles. Interestingly, pilocytic astrocytomas showed no evidence of CpG island hypermethylation, but were significantly hypomethylated, relative to control tissues, at MYOD1. Our results show that glioma subtypes have characteristic methylation profiles and, with the exception of pilocytic astrocytomas, show both locus specific hyper- as well as hypomethylation. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Revisiting the Derivation of Batterer Subtypes: Towards Profiling the Abuser.

    PubMed

    Brasfield, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    Research directed toward profiling an abuser to develop effective treatment modalities should consider the framework for how batterer subtypes were developed. This article evaluates a seminal work in batterer typology for a review of its method and findings. Findings indicate that the formation of batterer subtypes rely on unstable theory and methods: (a) Variables were not held constant, (b) Theoretical constructs lack clarity, (c) There were unclear boundaries for subtypes. A re-evaluation of this particular line of typology research should address the utility and relevance of these batterer subtypes in an effort to address methodological implications that may help profile and treat abusers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Proposed reference sequences for Hepatitis E virus subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Donald B.; Simmonds, Peter; Izopet, Jacques; Oliveira-Filho, Edmilson F.; Ulrich, Rainer; Johne, Reimar; Konig, Matthias; Jameel, Shahid; Harrison, Tim J.; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Van der Poel, Wim H.M; Purdy, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The nomenclature of hepatitis E virus (HEV) subtypes in the literature is inconsistent and makes comparison of different studies problematic. We provide a table of complete genome reference sequences for each subtype. The criteria for subtype assignment vary between different genotypes and methodologies, and so a conservative pragmatic approach has been favoured. Updates to this table will be posted on the ICTV website (link). The use of common reference sequences will facilitate communication between researchers and help clarify the epidemiology of this important human pathogen. This subtyping procedure might be adopted for other Orthohepevirus taxa. PMID:26743685

  16. Genetic subtypes of HIV type 1 circulating in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Habekova, Monika; Takacova, M; Lysy, J; Mokras, M; Camacho, R; Truska, P; Stanekova, D

    2010-10-01

    Slovakia belongs to the group of European countries with a low prevalence of HIV infection. The major proportion of HIV-positive cases in Slovakia is still represented by MSM, followed by heterosexuals infected through unprotected sexual intercourse. This study was conducted to update the description of HIV subtypes circulating in Slovakia. HIV-1 partial pol gene sequences from 143 individuals were prospectively collected from 2004 to 2008 and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis based on HIV-1 partial pol gene sequences revealed the highest prevalence of HIV-1 B subtype (93.0 %), predominantly associated with the MSM group. Ten (7.0%) individuals were infected with HIV-1 non-B subtypes. The pure subtypes were more frequent (7; 4.9%) than CRFs (3; 2.1%) and their occurrence was as follows: subtype C (3; 2, 1%), subtype A (2; 1.4%), subtype F (2; 1.4%), CRF_01AE (1; 0.7%), CRF_02AG (1; 0.7%), and CRF08_BC (1; 0.7%). Data show slightly increasing HIV-1 subtype diversity, with HIV-1 subtype B still having the highest prevalence in the Slovak-infected population.

  17. Decreased gray matter volume is associated with the subtypes of psychotic symptoms in patients with antipsychotic-naïve mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease: A voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Min; Chung, Young-In; Park, Je-Min; Lee, Byung-Dae; Moon, Eunsoo; Jeong, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hak-Jin; Mun, Chi-Woong; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between brain regional gray matter volume and two subtypes of psychotic symptoms, namely paranoid and misidentification subtypes, in antipsychotic-naïve mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Forty AD patients with psychotic symptoms and 25 AD patients without psychotic symptoms were assessed for cognitive and functional impairment. Presence and subtype of psychotic symptoms were assessed by using the delusion and hallucination subscale of the Korean Neuropsychiatric Inventory (K-NPI). Structural MRI images were acquired on a 3 T scanner, and were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) for automated analysis. The misidentification subtype is associated with more severe gray matter atrophy, and paranoid subtype is associated with less severe gray matter atrophy compared to non-psychosis group. These results suggest that the misidentification, the paranoid subtype and the non-psychosis group have a distinct neural correlation.

  18. Somatostatin receptor subtypes, octreotide scintigraphy, and clinical response to octreotide treatment in patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kölby, L; Wängberg, B; Ahlman, H; Tisell, L E; Fjälling, M; Forssell-Aronsson, E; Nilsson, O

    1998-07-01

    Several types of neuroendocrine tumor express high numbers of somatostatin receptors (sstr). We have compared the expression of sstr subtypes with the outcome of octreotide scintigraphy in patients with carcinoids and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in comparison with Hürthle cell tumors. The effect of sstr activation (octreotide treatment) on tumor markers was also studied in patients with disseminated carcinoid tumors. Six patients with carcinoid tumors (four midgut and two foregut), and three patients with thyroid tumors (one MTC, one Hürthle cell carcinoma, and one Hürthle cell adenoma) were studied. Octreotide scintigraphy visualized tumor sites in all nine patients. Macroscopic tumor was verified at these sites at subsequent surgical exploration. Using Northern blotting and subtype-specific riboprobes, sstr could be detected in all tumors examined. All five sstr subtypes were detected in most of the carcinoid tumors. All six carcinoids expressed sstr2. This was in contrast to the findings for the thyroid tumors analyzed, which also expressed several sstr subtypes but in some cases lacked expression of sstr2. This was also the case for normal thyroid tissue. Clinically, octreotide treatment of the patients with midgut carcinoid tumors resulted in palliation of hormonal symptoms accompanied by a significant reduction of urinary 5-HIAA levels (28-71%). These results indicate that carcinoid tumors frequently express all five sstr subtypes. The thyroid tumors also expressed multiple sstr but could lack expression of sstr2. Nevertheless, these tumors were visualized by octreotide scintigraphy, indicating that sstr2 expression is not a prerequisite for tumor imaging.

  19. Brain and heart sodium channel subtype mRNA expression in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Yarowsky, P J; Krueger, B K; Olson, C E; Clevinger, E C; Koos, R D

    1991-01-01

    The expression of mRNAs coding for the alpha subunit of rat brain and rat heart sodium channels has been studied in adult and neonatal rat cerebral cortex using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Rat brain sodium channel subtype I, II, IIA, and III sequences were simultaneously amplified in the same PCR using a single oligonucleotide primer pair matched to all four subtype sequences. Identification of each subtype-specific product was inferred from the appearance of unique fragments when the product was digested with specific restriction enzymes. By using this RT-PCR method, products arising from mRNAs for all four brain sodium channel subtypes were identified in RNA extracted from adult rat cerebral cortex. The predominant component was type IIA with lesser levels of types I, II, and III. In contrast, the type II and IIA sequences were the predominant RT-PCR products in neonatal rat cortex, with slightly lower levels of type III and undetectable levels of type I. Thus, from neonate to adult, type II mRNA levels decrease relative to type IIA levels. Using a similar approach, we detected mRNA coding for the rat heart sodium channel in neonatal and adult rat cerebral cortex and in adult rat heart. These results reveal that mRNAs coding for the heart sodium channel and all four previously sequenced rat brain sodium channel subtypes are expressed in cerebral cortex and that type II and IIA channels may be differentially regulated during development. Images PMID:1658783

  20. [Imaging].

    PubMed

    Chevrot, A; Drapé, J L; Godefroy, D; Dupont, A M; Pessis, E; Sarazin, L; Minoui, A

    1997-01-01

    The panoply of imaging techniques useful in podology is essentially limited to X-rays. Standard "standing" and "lying" X-rays furnish most of the required information. Arthrography is sometimes performed, in particular for trauma or tumour of the ankle. CT scan and MRI make a decisive contribution in difficult cases, notably in fractures and in small fractures without displacement. The two latter techniques are useful in tendon, ligament and muscular disorders, where echography is also informative. Rigorous analysis of radiographies and a good knowledge of foot disorders make these imaging techniques efficacious.

  1. Molecular Subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal▿

    PubMed Central

    Castro, R.; Prieto, E.; Águas, M. J.; Manata, M. J.; Botas, J.; Martins Pereira, F.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken. PMID:19494073

  2. Stroke subtyping for genetic association studies? A comparison of the CCS and TOAST classifications.

    PubMed

    Lanfranconi, Silvia; Markus, Hugh S

    2013-12-01

    A reliable and reproducible classification system of stroke subtype is essential for epidemiological and genetic studies. The Causative Classification of Stroke system is an evidence-based computerized algorithm with excellent inter-rater reliability. It has been suggested that, compared to the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification, it increases the proportion of cases with defined subtype that may increase power in genetic association studies. We compared Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment and Causative Classification of Stroke system classifications in a large cohort of well-phenotyped stroke patients. Six hundred ninety consecutively recruited patients with first-ever ischemic stroke were classified, using review of clinical data and original imaging, according to the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment and Causative Classification of Stroke system classifications. There was excellent agreement subtype assigned by between Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment and Causative Classification of Stroke system (kappa = 0·85). The agreement was excellent for the major individual subtypes: large artery atherosclerosis kappa = 0·888, small-artery occlusion kappa = 0·869, cardiac embolism kappa = 0·89, and undetermined category kappa = 0·884. There was only moderate agreement (kappa = 0·41) for the subjects with at least two competing underlying mechanism. Thirty-five (5·8%) patients classified as undetermined by Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment were assigned to a definite subtype by Causative Classification of Stroke system. Thirty-two subjects assigned to a definite subtype by Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment were classified as undetermined by Causative Classification of Stroke system. There is excellent agreement between classification using Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment and Causative Classification of Stroke systems but no evidence that Causative

  3. Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  4. The Consensus Molecular Subtypes of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Simon, Iris M.; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W.; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H.; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression–based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (MSI Immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable, strong immune activation; CMS2 (Canonical, 37%), epithelial, chromosomally unstable, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (Metabolic, 13%), epithelial, evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (Mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor β activation, stromal invasion, and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intra-tumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC – with clear biological interpretability – and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype–based targeted interventions. PMID:26457759

  5. Odor identification in frontotemporal lobar degeneration subtypes.

    PubMed

    Magerova, Hana; Vyhnalek, Martin; Laczo, Jan; Andel, Ross; Rektorova, Irena; Kadlecova, Alexandra; Bojar, Martin; Hort, Jakub

    2014-12-01

    Odor identification impairment is a feature of several neurodegenerative disorders. Although neurodegenerative changes in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) subtypes involve areas important for olfactory processing, data on olfactory function in these patients are limited. An 18-item, multiple-choice odor identification test developed at our memory clinic, the Motol Hospital smell test, was administered to 9 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, 13 patients with the language variants, primary nonfluent aphasia (n = 7) and semantic dementia (n = 6), and 8 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. Compared to the control group (n = 15), all FTLD subgroups showed significant impairment of odor identification (P < .05). The differences between the FTLD subgroups were not significant. No correlation between odor identification and neuropsychological tests results was found. Our data suggest that odor identification impairment is a symptom common to FTLD syndromes, and it seems to be based on olfactory structure damage rather than cognitive decline.

  6. MALDI Profiling of Human Lung Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Nistal, Manuel; Calvo, Enrique; Madero, Rosario; Díaz, Esther; Camafeita, Emilio; de Castro, Javier; López, Juan Antonio; González-Barón, Manuel; Espinosa, Enrique; Fresno Vara, Juan Ángel

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteomics is expected to play a key role in cancer biomarker discovery. Although it has become feasible to rapidly analyze proteins from crude cell extracts using mass spectrometry, complex sample composition hampers this type of measurement. Therefore, for effective proteome analysis, it becomes critical to enrich samples for the analytes of interest. Despite that one-third of the proteins in eukaryotic cells are thought to be phosphorylated at some point in their life cycle, only a low percentage of intracellular proteins is phosphorylated at a given time. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we have applied chromatographic phosphopeptide enrichment techniques to reduce the complexity of human clinical samples. A novel method for high-throughput peptide profiling of human tumor samples, using Parallel IMAC and MALDI-TOF MS, is described. We have applied this methodology to analyze human normal and cancer lung samples in the search for new biomarkers. Using a highly reproducible spectral processing algorithm to produce peptide mass profiles with minimal variability across the samples, lineal discriminant-based and decision tree–based classification models were generated. These models can distinguish normal from tumor samples, as well as differentiate the various non–small cell lung cancer histological subtypes. Conclusions/Significance A novel, optimized sample preparation method and a careful data acquisition strategy is described for high-throughput peptide profiling of small amounts of human normal lung and lung cancer samples. We show that the appropriate combination of peptide expression values is able to discriminate normal lung from non-small cell lung cancer samples and among different histological subtypes. Our study does emphasize the great potential of proteomics in the molecular characterization of cancer. PMID:19890392

  7. Nicotinic acid receptor subtypes and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Soudijn, Willem; van Wijngaarden, Ineke; Ijzerman, Adriaan P

    2007-05-01

    Half a century ago, nicotinic acid (niacin) was introduced into the clinic as the first orally available drug to treat high cholesterol levels and to improve the balance between (V)low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL). Remarkably, its putative mechanism of action has only been recently elucidated, particularly because of the cloning of a G protein-coupled receptor (HM74A or GPR109A). This receptor responds to both nicotinic acid and the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate, the latter thought to be the more probable endogenous ligand for HM74A. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacology and medicinal chemistry of this receptor subtype and a related one (HM74 or GPR109B). Although still in its infancy, the ligand repertoire is developing, and a number of compound classes have now been described, among which are both full and partial agonists. Antagonists, however, are still lacking, thus compromising thorough pharmacological studies. Mutagenesis experiments have provided clues regarding the ligand binding site; in particular, an arginine residue in transmembrane domain 3 of the receptor seems to recognize the acidic moiety present in nicotinic acid and related substances. HM74A has also been linked to one of the major side effects of nicotinic acid, that is, flushing, since this receptor subtype also occurs in skin immune cells. It is not known yet whether HM74 is also present on these cells. Since nicotinic acid is one of the few available medicines that raise HDL ("good cholesterol") levels, HM74A and HM74 appear promising targets for future pharmacotherapy. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Simple Identification of Complex ADHD Subtypes Using Current Symptom Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Heather E.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Hay, David A.; Todd, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The results of the assessment of the accuracy of simple rules based on symptom count for assigning youths to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder subtypes show that having six or more total symptoms and fewer than three hyperactive-impulsive symptoms is an accurate predictor for the latent class sever inattentive subtype.

  9. Simple Identification of Complex ADHD Subtypes Using Current Symptom Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Heather E.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Hay, David A.; Todd, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The results of the assessment of the accuracy of simple rules based on symptom count for assigning youths to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder subtypes show that having six or more total symptoms and fewer than three hyperactive-impulsive symptoms is an accurate predictor for the latent class sever inattentive subtype.

  10. On the Bases of Two Subtypes of Development Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manis, Franklin R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied 51 dyslexic children, 51 age-matched normal readers, and 27 younger normal readers to explore whether there are different subtypes of developmental dyslexia, and whether developmental dyslexia represents delay or deviance. Found evidence to support two subtypes: surface and phonological dyslexia. (DR)

  11. Is Rett Syndrome a Subtype of Pervasive Developmental Disorders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Luke Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews whether Rett syndrome is a subtype of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). The paper analyzes internal and external diagnostic validity and discusses whether Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder or a mental disorder. The paper concludes that data support the idea of classifying Rett syndrome as a subtype of PDD.…

  12. Subtyping Stuttering II: Contributions from Language and Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V.; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C.; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter,…

  13. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pharmacologic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and medical management of symptoms are increasingly based on IBS subtype, so it is important to accurately differentiate patients. Few studies have classified subtypes of pediatric IBS, and conclusions have been challenged by methodologic l...

  14. Integrative Analysis of Prognosis Data on Multiple Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yawei; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    Summary In cancer research, profiling studies have been extensively conducted, searching for genes/SNPs associated with prognosis. Cancer is diverse. Examining the similarity and difference in the genetic basis of multiple subtypes of the same cancer can lead to a better understanding of their connections and distinctions. Classic meta-analysis methods analyze each subtype separately and then compare analysis results across subtypes. Integrative analysis methods, in contrast, analyze the raw data on multiple subtypes simultaneously and can outperform meta-analysis methods. In this study, prognosis data on multiple subtypes of the same cancer are analyzed. An AFT (accelerated failure time) model is adopted to describe survival. The genetic basis of multiple subtypes is described using the heterogeneity model, which allows a gene/SNP to be associated with prognosis of some subtypes but not others. A compound penalization method is developed to identify genes that contain important SNPs associated with prognosis. The proposed method has an intuitive formulation and is realized using an iterative algorithm. Asymptotic properties are rigorously established. Simulation shows that the proposed method has satisfactory performance and outperforms a penalization-based meta-analysis method and a regularized thresholding method. An NHL (non-Hodgkin lymphoma) prognosis study with SNP measurements is analyzed. Genes associated with the three major subtypes, namely DLBCL, FL, and CLL/SLL, are identified. The proposed method identifies genes that are different from alternatives and have important implications and satisfactory prediction performance. PMID:24766212

  15. Subtypes of Family Climate among Kibbutz Mothers of Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margalit, Malka; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Four subtypes of family climate were identified through analysis of the Sense of Coherence Scale, Family Environment Scale, and Global Measure of Satisfaction from Family, using 77 mothers of disabled children in Israeli kibbutzim. The four subtypes emphasized personal growth orientation, conflict orientation, nonsupportive disorganized…

  16. Inter- and intra-subtype variation of Blastocystis subtypes isolated from diarrheic and non-diarrheic patients in Iran.

    PubMed

    Alinaghizade, Atefe; Mirjalali, Hamed; Mohebali, Mehdi; Stensvold, Christen Rune; Rezaeian, Mostafa

    2017-02-24

    Blastocystis is a common intestinal parasitic protist infecting birds and mammals. Blastocystis comprises at least 17 subtypes (ST), of which ST1-ST9 have been detected in humans. Significant correlation between certain subtypes and pathogenicity remains to be established. Nevertheless, some studies suggest a potential linkage between subtypes (inter- and intra-subtype variation) and clinical manifestations. The aim of this study was to identify intra-subtype genetic variation of subtypes of Blastocystis in stools samples submitted by diarrheic and non-diarrheic patients. A 550-bp fragment of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal rRNA gene was amplified from 58 culture-positive samples isolated from diarrheic and non-diarrheic Iranian patients. PCR products were sequenced and sequences subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Intra-and inter-subtype variation was calculated. Based on comparison with reference sequences in GenBank, ST1, ST2 and ST3 were found in 18 (31.03%), 21 (36.22%), and 19 (32.75%) of the samples, respectively. Diarrheic stools were observed in eight (44.44%), 10 (47.61%), and nine (47.36%) patients with ST1, ST2, and ST3, respectively. No statistically significant correlation was found between subtypes and diarrhea (P=1.000). Multiple sequence alignment exhibited a within-subtype similarity of 98.76%, 97.17%, and 99.78% in ST1, ST2, and ST3, respectively. Highest similarity was seen among ST3 isolates, while lowest similarity was seen among ST2 isolates. Phylogenetic analysis did not suggest any correlation between diarrhea and intra-subtype variation. Inter- and intra-subtype variation in SSU rRNA gene appears not to reflect differences in the clinical outcome of Blastocystis carriage.

  17. Cryptosporidium Species and Subtypes and Clinical Manifestations in Children, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cama, Vitaliano A.; Bern, Caryn; Roberts, Jacqueline; Cabrera, Lilia; Sterling, Charles R.; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether clinical manifestations are associated with genotypes or subtypes of Cryptosporidium spp., we studied a 4-year longitudinal birth cohort of 533 children in Peru. A total of 156 infection episodes were found in 109 children. Data from first infections showed that C. hominis was associated with diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, general malaise, and increased oocyst shedding intensity and duration. In contrast, C. parvum, C. meleagridis, C. canis, and C. felis were associated with diarrhea only. C. hominis subtype families were identified (Ia, Ib, Id, and Ie); all were associated with diarrhea. Ib was also associated with nausea, vomiting, and general malaise. All C. parvum specimens belonged to subtype family IIc. Analysis of risk factors did not show associations with specific Cryptosporidium spp. genotypes or subtypes. These findings strongly suggest that Cryptosporidium spp. and subtypes are linked to different clinical manifestations in children. PMID:18826821

  18. Master regulators, regulatory networks, and pathways of glioblastoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Serdar; Li, Aiguo; Baysan, Mehmet; Fine, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor. GBM samples are classified into subtypes based on their transcriptomic and epigenetic profiles. Despite numerous studies to better characterize GBM biology, a comprehensive study to identify GBM subtype- specific master regulators, gene regulatory networks, and pathways is missing. Here, we used FastMEDUSA to compute master regulators and gene regulatory networks for each GBM subtype. We also ran Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on GBM expression dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas Project to compute GBM- and GBM subtype-specific pathways. Our analysis was able to recover some of the known master regulators and pathways in GBM as well as some putative novel regulators and pathways, which will aide in our understanding of the unique biology of GBM subtypes.

  19. Significant contribution of subtype G to HIV-1 genetic complexity in Nigeria identified by a newly developed subtyping assay specific for subtype G and CRF02_AG

    PubMed Central

    Heipertz, Richard A.; Ayemoba, Ojor; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Poltavee, Kultida; Pham, Phuc; Kijak, Gustavo H.; Lei, Esther; Bose, Meera; Howell, Shana; O'Sullivan, Anne Marie; Bates, Adam; Cervenka, Taylor; Kuroiwa, Janelle; Akintunde, Akindiran; Ibezim, Onyekachukwu; Alabi, Abraham; Okoye, Obumneke; Manak, Mark; Malia, Jennifer; Peel, Sheila; Maisaka, Mohammed; Singer, Darrell; O’Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Njoku, Ogbonnaya; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract While abundant sequence information is available from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE for HIV-1 vaccine design, sequences from West Africa are less represented. We sought to augment our understanding of HIV-1 variants circulating in 6 Nigerian cities as a step to subsequent HIV-1 vaccine development. The G/CRF02_AG multi-region hybridization assay (MHA) was developed to differentiate subtype G, CRF02_AG and their recombinants from other subtypes based on 7 HIV-1 segments. Plasma from 224 HIV-1 infected volunteers enrolled in a cohort examining HIV-1 prevalence, risk factor, and subtype from Makurdi (30), Abuja (18), Enugu (11), Kaduna (12), Tafa (95), and Ojo/Lagos (58) was analyzed using MHA. HIV-1 genomes from 42 samples were sequenced to validate the MHA and fully explore the recombinant structure of G and CRF02_AG variants. The sensitivity and specificity of MHA varied between 73–100% and 90–100%, respectively. The subtype distribution as identified by MHA among 224 samples revealed 38% CRF02_AG, 28% G, and 26% G/CRF02_AG recombinants while 8% remained nontypeable strains. In envelope (env) gp120, 38.84% of the samples reacted to a G probe while 31.25% reacted to a CRF02 (subtype A) probe. Full genome characterization of 42 sequences revealed the complexity of Nigerian HIV-1 variants. CRF02_AG, subtype G, and their recombinants were the major circulating HIV-1 variants in 6 Nigerian cities. High proportions of samples reacted to a G probe in env gp120 confirms that subtype G infections are abundant and should be considered in strategies for global HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27512845

  20. Improved virological outcome in White patients infected with HIV-1 non-B subtypes compared to subtype B.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Alexandra U; Ledergerber, Bruno; von Wyl, Viktor; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Bürgisser, Philippe; Rauch, Andri; Hirschel, Bernard; Cavassini, Matthias; Elzi, Luigia; Vernazza, Pietro L; Bernasconi, Enos; Held, Leonhard; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2011-12-01

    Antiretroviral compounds have been predominantly studied in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype B, but only ~10% of infections worldwide are caused by this subtype. The analysis of the impact of different HIV subtypes on treatment outcome is important. The effect of HIV-1 subtype B and non-B on the time to virological failure while taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) was analyzed. Other studies that have addressed this question were limited by the strong correlation between subtype and ethnicity. Our analysis was restricted to white patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study who started cART between 1996 and 2009. Cox regression models were performed; adjusted for age, sex, transmission category, first cART, baseline CD4 cell counts, and HIV RNA levels; and stratified for previous mono/dual nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor treatment. Included in our study were 4729 patients infected with subtype B and 539 with non-B subtypes. The most prevalent non-B subtypes were CRF02_AG (23.8%), A (23.4%), C (12.8%), and CRF01_AE (12.6%). The incidence of virological failure was higher in patients with subtype B (4.3 failures/100 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.0-4.5]) compared with non-B (1.8 failures/100 person-years; 95% CI, 1.4-2.4). Cox regression models confirmed that patients infected with non-B subtypes had a lower risk of virological failure than those infected with subtype B (univariable hazard ratio [HR], 0.39 [95% CI, .30-.52; P < .001]; multivariable HR, 0.68 [95% CI, .51-.91; P = .009]). In particular, subtypes A and CRF02_AG revealed improved outcomes (multivariable HR, 0.54 [95% CI, .29-.98] and 0.39 [95% CI, .19-.79], respectively). Improved virological outcomes among patients infected with non-B subtypes invalidate concerns that these individuals are at a disadvantage because drugs have been designed primarily for subtype B infections.

  1. Appreciating HIV-1 diversity: subtypic differences in ENV

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanakaran, S; Shen, Tongye; Lynch, Rebecca M; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M is responsible for the current AIDS pandemic and exhibits exceedingly high levels of viral genetic diversity around the world, necessitating categorization of viruses into distinct lineages, or subtypes. These subtypes can differ by around 35% in the envelope (Env) glycoproteins of the virus, which are displayed on the surface of the virion and are targets for both neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses. This diversity reflects the remarkable ability of the virus to adapt to selective pressures, the bulk of which is applied by the host immune response, and represents a serious obstacle for developing an effective vaccine with broad coverage. Thus, it is important to understand the underlying biological consequences of inter-subtype diversity. Recent studies have revealed that the HIV-1 subtypes exhibit phenotypic differences that result from subtle differences in Env structure, particularly within the highly immunogenic V3 domain, which participates directly in viral entry. This review will therefore explore current research that describes subtypic differences in Env at the genetic and phenotypic level, focusing in particular on V3, and highlighting recent discoveries about the unique features of subtype C Env, which is the most prevalent subtype globally.

  2. Elevated free fatty acid is associated with cardioembolic stroke subtype.

    PubMed

    Seo, Woo-Keun; Kim, Juyeon; Kim, Yoo Hwan; Kim, Ji Hyun; Oh, Kyungmi; Koh, Seong-Beom; Seo, Hong Seok

    2011-11-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs), an important energy substrate, have an association with cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, myocardial dysfunction and abnormal cardiac rhythm. However, limited reports are available on the association between FFAs and ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that plasma FFA concentration could be associated with an ischemic stroke, emphasizing the relationship between FFA and subtypes of ischemic stroke. A cross-sectional study examined the association between FFA concentration and subtypes of stroke and cerebral atherosclerosis from a hospital-based acute stroke registry. Data of 715 stroke patients were analyzed. The concentration of FFA was highest in the cardioembolic stroke subtype compared with the other stroke subtypes. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an increase in FFA concentration was significantly associated with the cardioembolic subtype after the adjustment of covariates. FFA concentration was also higher in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) than those without AF. According to the presence of atherosclerotic stenosis, no significantly difference of FFA concentration was found for intracranial and extracranial cerebral arterial atherosclerosis. Here we report a significant association between fasting FFA concentration and the cardioembolic stroke subtype. AF is suggested as the mediating factor between FFA and the cardioembolic stroke subtype.

  3. Subtyping stuttering II: contributions from language and temperament.

    PubMed

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter, efforts to identify and characterize subtypes of stuttering have had limited influence on theoretical or clinical understanding of the disorder. This manuscript briefly highlights research on language and temperament in young children who stutter, and considers whether the results can provide guidance for efforts to more effectively investigate and elucidate subtypes in childhood stuttering. Issues from the literature that appear relevant to research on stuttering subtypes include: (a) the question of whether stuttering is best characterized as categorical or continuous; (b) interpretation of individual differences in skills and profiles; and (c) the fact that, during the preschool years, the interaction among domains such as language and temperament are changing very rapidly, resulting in large differences in developmental profiles within relatively brief chronological age periods. The reader will be able to: (1) discuss possible associations of language ability and temperament to the development of stuttering in young children; (2) summarize the subtyping research from the literature on language ability and temperament in young children; (3) generate directions for future research of stuttering subtypes drawn from the literature related to language ability and temperament in young children.

  4. Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) Subtypes and Genetic Testing Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Anita S.D.; Sottile, Stephanie L.; Miller, Lindsey J.; Feely, Shawna M.E.; Siskind, Carly E; Shy, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) affects one in 2500 people and is caused by mutations in more than 30 genes. Identifying the genetic cause of CMT is often necessary for family planning, natural history studies and for entry into clinical trials. However genetic testing can be both expensive and confusing to patients and physicians. Methods We analyzed data from 1024 of our patients to determine the percentage and features of each CMT subtype within this clinic population. We identified distinguishing clinical and physiological features of the subtypes that could be used to direct genetic testing for patients with CMT. Findings Of 1024 patients evaluated, 787 received CMT diagnoses. Five hundred twenty-seven patients with CMT (67%) received a genetic subtype, while 260 did not have a mutation identified. The most common CMT subtypes were CMT1A, CMT1X, HNPP, CMT1B, and CMT2A. All other subtypes accounted for less than 1% each. Eleven patients had more than one genetically identified subtype of CMT. Patients with genetically identified CMT were separable into specific groups based on age of onset and the degree of slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities. Interpretation Combining features of the phenotypic and physiology groups allowed us to identify patients who were highly likely to have specific subtypes of CMT. Based on these results, we propose a strategy of focused genetic testing for CMT illustrated in a series of flow diagrams created as testing guides. PMID:21280073

  5. Label-free proteomic analysis of breast cancer molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Herrera, Ana Cristina; Corrêa, Stephany; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2014-11-07

    To better characterize the cellular pathways involved in breast cancer molecular subtypes, we performed a proteomic study using a label-free LC-MS strategy for determining the proteomic profile of Luminal A, Luminal-HER2, HER2-positive, and triple-negative (TN) breast tumors compared with healthy mammary tissue. This comparison aimed to identify the aberrant processes specific for each subtype and might help to refine our understanding regarding breast cancer biology. Our results address important molecular features (both specific and commonly shared) that explain the biological behavior of each subtype. Changes in proteins related to cytoskeletal organization were found in all tumor subtypes, indicating that breast tumors are under constant structural modifications to invade and metastasize. We also found changes in cell-adhesion processes in all molecular subtypes, corroborating that invasiveness is a common property of breast cancer cells. Luminal-HER2 and HER2 tumors also presented altered cell cycle regulation, as shown by the several DNA repair-related proteins. An altered immune response was also found as a common process in the Luminal A, Luminal-HER2, and TN subtypes, and complement was the most important pathway. Analysis of the TN subtype revealed blood coagulation as the most relevant biological process.

  6. Neuroprotective efficacy of poly-arginine R18 and NA-1 (TAT-NR2B9c) peptides following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Milani, Diego; Cross, Jane L; Anderton, Ryan S; Blacker, David J; Knuckey, Neville W; Meloni, Bruno P

    2017-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of R18 in a transient MCAO model and compared its effectiveness to the well-characterized neuroprotective NA-1 peptide. R18 and NA-1 peptides were administered intravenously (30, 100, 300, 1000nmol/kg), 60min after the onset of 90min of MCAO. Infarct volume, cerebral swelling and functional outcomes (neurological score, adhesive tape and rota-rod) were measured 24h after MCAO. R18 reduced total infarct volume by 35.1% (p=0.008), 24.8% (p=0.059), 12.2% and 9.6% for the respective 1000 to 30nmol/kg doses, while the corresponding doses of NA-1 reduced lesion volume by 26.1% (p=0.047), 16.6%, 16.5% and 7%, respectively. R18 also reduced hemisphere swelling by between 46.1% (1000 and 300nmol/kg; p=0.009) and 24.4% (100nmol/kg; p=0.066), while NA-1 reduced swelling by 25.7% (1000nmol/kg; p=0.054). In addition, several R18 and NA-1 treatment groups displayed a significant improvement in at least one parameter of the adhesive tape test. These results confirm the neuroprotective properties of R18, and suggest that the peptide is a more effective neuroprotective agent than NA-1. This provides strong justification for the continuing development of R18 as a neuroprotective treatment for stroke.

  7. Estradiol and the Relationship between Dendritic Spines, NR2B Containing NMDA Receptors, and the Magnitude of Long-Term Potentiation at Hippocampal CA3-CA1 Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Caroline C.; Vedder, Lindsey C.; McMahon, Lori L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary When circulating estrogen levels decline as a natural consequence of menopause and aging in women, there is an increased incidence of deficits in working memory. In many cases, these deficits are rescued by estrogen replacement therapy. These clinical data therefore highlight the importance of defining the biological pathways linking estrogen to the cellular substrates of learning and memory. It has been known for nearly two decades that estrogen enhances dendritic spine density on apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampus, a brain region required for learning. Interestingly, at synapses between CA3-CA1 pyramidal cells, estrogen has also been shown to enhance synaptic NMDA receptor current and the magnitude of long term potentiation, a cellular correlate of learning and memory. Given that synapse density, NMDAR function, and long term potentiation at CA3-CA1 synapses in hippocampus are associated with normal learning, it is likely that modulation of these parameters by estrogen facilitates the improvement in learning observed in rats, primates and humans following estrogen replacement. To facilitate the design of clinical strategies to potentially prevent or reverse the age-related decline in learning and memory during menopause, the relationship between the estrogen-induced morphological and functional changes in hippocampus must be defined and the role these changes play in facilitating learning must be elucidated. The aim of this report is to provide a summary of the proposed mechanisms by which this hormone increases synaptic function and in doing so, it briefly addresses potential mechanisms contributing to the estrogen-induced increase in synaptic morphology and plasticity, as well as important future directions. PMID:19596521

  8. Association between mammographic density and basal-like and luminal A breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer overall, but few studies have examined the association between mammographic density and specific subtypes of breast cancer, especially aggressive basal-like breast cancers. Because basal-like breast cancers are less frequently screen-detected, it is important to understand how mammographic density relates to risk of basal-like breast cancer. Methods We estimated associations between mammographic density and breast cancer risk according to breast cancer subtype. Cases and controls were participants in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). A total of 491 cases had mammograms within five years prior to and one year after diagnosis and 528 controls had screening or diagnostic mammograms close to the dates of selection into CBCS. Mammographic density was reported to the CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System categories. The expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and 2 (HER1 and HER2), and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6) were assessed by immunohistochemistry and dichotomized as positive or negative, with ER+ and/or PR+, and HER2- tumors classified as luminal A and ER-, PR-, HER2-, HER1+ and/or CK5/6+ tumors classified as basal-like breast cancer. Triple negative tumors were defined as negative for ER, PR and HER2. Of the 491 cases 175 were missing information on subtypes; the remaining cases included 181 luminal A, 17 luminal B, 48 basal-like, 29 ER-/PR-/HER2+, and 41 unclassified subtypes. Odds ratios comparing each subtype to all controls and case-case odds ratios comparing mammographic density distributions in basal-like to luminal A breast cancers were estimated using logistic regression. Results Mammographic density was associated with increased risk of both luminal A and basal-like breast cancers, although estimates were imprecise. The

  9. Oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of influenza A viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotchenko, S. A.; Vasin, A. V.; Sandybaev, N. T.; Plotnikova, M. A.; Chervyakova, O. V.; Smirnova, E. A.; Kushnareva, E. V.; Strochkov, V. M.; Taylakova, E. T.; Egorov, V. V.; Koshemetov, J. K.; Kiselev, O. I.; Sansyzbay, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Influenza is one of the most widespread respiratory viral diseases, infecting humans, horses, pigs, poultry and some other animal populations. Influenza A viruses (IAV) are classified into subtypes on the basis of the surface hemagglutinin (H1 to H16) and neuraminidase (N1 to N9) glycoproteins. The correct determination of IAV subtype is necessary for clinical and epidemiological studies. In this article we propose an oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping of IAV using universal one-step multisegment RT-PCR fluorescent labeling of viral gene segments. It showed to be an advanced approach for fast detection and identification of IAV.

  10. Longitudinal Stability of Phonological and Surface Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Olson, Richard K.; Wadsworth, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Limited evidence supports the external validity of the distinction between developmental phonological and surface dyslexia. We previously identified children age 8 to 13 meeting criteria for these subtypes (Peterson, Pennington, & Olson, 2013), and now report on their reading and related skills approximately 5 years later. Longitudinal stability of subtype membership was fair and appeared stronger for phonological than surface dyslexia. Phonological dyslexia was associated with a pronounced phonological awareness deficit, but subgroups otherwise had similar cognitive profiles. Subtype did not inform prognosis. Results provide modest evidence for the validity of the distinction, although not for its clinical utility. PMID:25429194

  11. [Genetic subtyping of HIV-1 strains by heteroduplex mobility assay].

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Su, L; Shao, J J

    1997-08-01

    DNA fragments of HIV-1 env gene were amplified by nested PCR from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 24 HIV-1 infected individuals. The PCR products were separated by melting and annealing with denatured PCR product prepared from reference plasimd of representative subtypes. Heteroduplex were then formed between the single-stranded DNA from the two sources and were analysed on polyacrylamide gels. The results from heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) were compared with HIV-1 subtype results determined by DNA sequencing. With advantages of high speed, low cost and high specificity, HMA is a reliable screening method for HIV-1 subtyping.

  12. CRISPR-cas Subtype I-Fb in Acinetobacter baumannii: Evolution and Utilization for Strain Subtyping

    PubMed Central

    Karah, Nabil; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Sahl, Jason W.; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are polymorphic elements found in the genome of some or all strains of particular bacterial species, providing them with a system of acquired immunity against invading bacteriophages and plasmids. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic pathogen with a remarkable capacity for clonal dissemination. In this study, we investigated the mode of evolution and diversity of spacers of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in a global collection of 76 isolates of A. baumannii obtained from 14 countries and 4 continents. The locus has basically evolved from a common ancestor following two main lineages and several pathways of vertical descent. However, this vertical passage has been interrupted by occasional events of horizontal transfer of the whole locus between distinct isolates. The isolates were assigned into 40 CRISPR-based sequence types (CST). CST1 and CST23-24 comprised 18 and 9 isolates, representing two main sub-clones of international clones CC1 and CC25, respectively. Epidemiological data showed that some of the CST1 isolates were acquired or imported from Iraq, where it has probably been endemic for more than one decade and occasionally been able to spread to USA, Canada, and Europe. CST23-24 has shown a remarkable ability to cause national outbreaks of infections in Sweden, Argentina, UAE, and USA. The three isolates of CST19 were independently imported from Thailand to Sweden and Norway, raising a concern about the prevalence of CST19 in Thailand. Our study highlights the dynamic nature of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in A. baumannii, and demonstrates the possibility of using a CRISPR-based approach for subtyping a significant part of the global population of A. baumannii. PMID:25706932

  13. CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb in Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution and utilization for strain subtyping.

    PubMed

    Karah, Nabil; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Sahl, Jason W; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are polymorphic elements found in the genome of some or all strains of particular bacterial species, providing them with a system of acquired immunity against invading bacteriophages and plasmids. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic pathogen with a remarkable capacity for clonal dissemination. In this study, we investigated the mode of evolution and diversity of spacers of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in a global collection of 76 isolates of A. baumannii obtained from 14 countries and 4 continents. The locus has basically evolved from a common ancestor following two main lineages and several pathways of vertical descent. However, this vertical passage has been interrupted by occasional events of horizontal transfer of the whole locus between distinct isolates. The isolates were assigned into 40 CRISPR-based sequence types (CST). CST1 and CST23-24 comprised 18 and 9 isolates, representing two main sub-clones of international clones CC1 and CC25, respectively. Epidemiological data showed that some of the CST1 isolates were acquired or imported from Iraq, where it has probably been endemic for more than one decade and occasionally been able to spread to USA, Canada, and Europe. CST23-24 has shown a remarkable ability to cause national outbreaks of infections in Sweden, Argentina, UAE, and USA. The three isolates of CST19 were independently imported from Thailand to Sweden and Norway, raising a concern about the prevalence of CST19 in Thailand. Our study highlights the dynamic nature of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in A. baumannii, and demonstrates the possibility of using a CRISPR-based approach for subtyping a significant part of the global population of A. baumannii.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains of subtypes B and E replicate in cutaneous dendritic cell-T-cell mixtures without displaying subtype-specific tropism.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, M; Frankel, S S; Mascola, J R; Trkola, A; Isdell, F; Birx, D L; Burke, D S; Ho, D D; Moore, J P

    1997-01-01

    A report that genetic subtype E human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains display a preferential tropism for Langerhans cells (epidermal dendritic cells [DCs]) compared to genetic subtype B strains suggested a possible explanation for the rapid heterosexual spread of subtype E strains in Thailand (L. E. Soto-Ramirez et al., Science 271:1291-1293, 1996). In an independent system, we applied subtype E and B isolates to skin leukocytes, since skin is a relevant model for the histologically comparable surfaces of the vagina and ectocervix. Isolates of both HIV-1 subtypes infected DC-T-cell mixtures, and no subtype-specific pattern of infection was observed. Purified DCs did not support the replication of strains of either subtype B or E. Our findings do not support the conclusion that subtype E strains have a preferential tropism for DCs, suggesting that other explanations for the rapid heterosexual spread of subtype E strains in Asia should be considered. PMID:9311895

  15. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  16. ADHD Symptoms and Subtypes: Relationship between Childhood and Adolescent Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Taanila, Anja; Miettunen, Jouko; Smalley, Susan L.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Moilanen, Irma K.

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) symptoms and subtypes in childhood and adolescence. The results conclude the persistence of ADHD from childhood to adolescence with specific symptoms contributing to persistent ADHD.

  17. Historical perspectives and guidelines for botulinum neurotoxin subtype nomenclature

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botulinum neurotoxins are diverse proteins. They are currently represented by at least seven serotypes and 40 subtypes. New clostridial strains that produce novel neurotoxin variants are being identified with increasing frequency, which presents challenges when organizing the nomenclature surroundin...

  18. Acromegaly: molecular expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Marcello D

    2006-01-01

    About a third of acromegalic patients are resistant to the currently commercially available somatostatin analogs (SA) octreotide and lanreotide. Such resistance is related to an overall reduction of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) density or to a differentiated expression of SSTR subtypes. There are five known SSTR subtypes. SSTR2 and SSTR5 are usually expressed in GH-secreting pituitary tumors, and both octreotide and lanreotide bind preferentially to SSTR2 and, to a lesser extent, to SSTR5. SA inhibitory effects on GH secretion and tumor cell proliferation can occur together or be dissociated events, depending on the tumor expression of SSTR subtypes involved in each mechanism. The development of specific somatostatin subtypes analogs, mainly for SSTR5, of a SSTR2-SSTR5 bispecific compound, and of a "universal" analog with high affinity to SSTR1, 2, 3, and 5 showed preliminary, albeit promising results for the treatment of resistant somatotropic adenomas.

  19. A Bayesian semiparametric factor analysis model for subtype identification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiehuan; Warren, Joshua L; Zhao, Hongyu

    2017-04-25

    Disease subtype identification (clustering) is an important problem in biomedical research. Gene expression profiles are commonly utilized to infer disease subtypes, which often lead to biologically meaningful insights into disease. Despite many successes, existing clustering methods may not perform well when genes are highly correlated and many uninformative genes are included for clustering due to the high dimensionality. In this article, we introduce a novel subtype identification method in the Bayesian setting based on gene expression profiles. This method, called BCSub, adopts an innovative semiparametric Bayesian factor analysis model to reduce the dimension of the data to a few factor scores for clustering. Specifically, the factor scores are assumed to follow the Dirichlet process mixture model in order to induce clustering. Through extensive simulation studies, we show that BCSub has improved performance over commonly used clustering methods. When applied to two gene expression datasets, our model is able to identify subtypes that are clinically more relevant than those identified from the existing methods.

  20. ADHD Symptoms and Subtypes: Relationship between Childhood and Adolescent Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Taanila, Anja; Miettunen, Jouko; Smalley, Susan L.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Moilanen, Irma K.

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) symptoms and subtypes in childhood and adolescence. The results conclude the persistence of ADHD from childhood to adolescence with specific symptoms contributing to persistent ADHD.

  1. Interpersonal subtypes in social phobia: diagnostic and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Cain, Nicole M; Pincus, Aaron L; Grosse Holtforth, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Interpersonal assessment may provide a clinically useful way to identify subtypes of social phobia. In this study, we examined evidence for interpersonal subtypes in a sample of 77 socially phobic outpatients. A cluster analysis based on the dimensions of dominance and love on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Circumplex Scales (Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 1990) found 2 interpersonal subtypes of socially phobic patients. These subtypes did not differ on pretreatment global symptom severity as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis, 1993) or diagnostic comorbidity but did exhibit differential responses to outpatient psychotherapy. Overall, friendly-submissive social phobia patients had significantly lower scores on measures of social anxiety and significantly higher scores on measures of well-being and satisfaction at posttreatment than cold-submissive social phobia patients. We discuss the results in terms of interpersonal theory and the clinical relevance of assessment of interpersonal functioning prior to beginning psychotherapy with socially phobic patients.

  2. Expression analysis of mammalian linker-histone subtypes.

    PubMed

    Medrzycki, Magdalena; Zhang, Yunzhe; Cao, Kaixiang; Fan, Yuhong

    2012-03-19

    Linker histone H1 binds to the nucleosome core particle and linker DNA, facilitating folding of chromatin into higher order structure. H1 is essential for mammalian development and regulates specific gene expression in vivo. Among the highly conserved histone proteins, the family of H1 linker histones is the most heterogeneous group. There are 11 H1 subtypes in mammals that are differentially regulated during development and in different cell types. These H1 subtypes include 5 somatic H1s (H1a-e), the replacement H1(0), 4 germ cell specific H1 subtypes, and H1x. The presence of multiple H1 subtypes that differ in DNA binding affinity and chromatin compaction ability provides an additional level of modulation of chromatin function. Thus, quantitative expression analysis of individual H1 subtypes, both of mRNA and proteins, is necessary for better understanding of the regulation of higher order chromatin structure and function. Here we describe a set of assays designed for analyzing the expression levels of individual H1 subtypes. mRNA expression of various H1 variant genes is measured by a set of highly sensitive and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays, which are faster, more accurate and require much less samples compared with the alternative approach of Northern blot analysis. Unlike most other cellular mRNA messages, mRNAs for most histone genes, including the majority of H1 genes, lack a long polyA tail, but contain a stem-loop structure at the 3' untranslated region (UTR). Therefore, cDNAs are prepared from total RNA by reverse transcription using random primers instead of oligo-dT primers. Realtime PCR assays with primers specific to each H1 subtypes are performed to obtain highly quantitative measurement of mRNA levels of individual H1 subtypes. Expression of housekeeping genes are analyzed as controls for normalization. The relative abundance of proteins of each H1 subtype and core histones is obtained through reverse phase high

  3. Development of a calcifying fibrous pseudotumour within a lesion of Castleman disease, hyaline-vascular subtype.

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, J L; Delplace, J; Roufosse, C; Laget, J P; Lespagnard, L

    1999-01-01

    A nine year old boy with localised Castleman disease of the hyaline-vascular subtype developed a calcifying fibrous pseudotumour. This pathological association does not appear to have been described before. In this case, the development of this very unusual soft tissue tumour-like process was thought to be related to a previous fine needle aspiration biopsy, which was performed because of lymphadenopathy localised to the right inguinal area. This case provides further evidence of the reactive nature of calcifying fibrous pseudotumour and also broadens the pathological spectrum of the stromal cell proliferation that occasionally supervenes within lesions of Castleman disease, hyaline-vascular type. Images PMID:10605414

  4. The biological effects of five feline IFN-alpha subtypes.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Susan L; Powell, Tim D; Sellins, Karen S; Radecki, Steven V; Cohen, J John; Milhausen, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    IFN-alpha has been shown to induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in animals. This report describes the biological activity of five recently identified feline IFN-alpha subtypes expressed in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line (rfeIFN-alpha1[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha2[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha5[CHO] and rfeIFN-alpha6[CHO]) and the feIFN-alpha6 subtype expressed in and purified from Pichia pastoris (rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]). The rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes were tested for antiviral activity against either Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or feline calicivirus (FCV) infected feline embryonic fibroblast cell line (AH927) or Crandell feline kidney cell line (CRFK). Antiviral activity was induced against both VSV and FCV infected AH927 cells and VSV infected CRFK cells by all five of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]. In addition, the IFN-alpha inducible Mx gene (associated with antiviral activity) was upregulated in vivo 24 h following treatment with rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris], compared to baseline levels seen prior to treatment. All of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris] exhibited antiproliferative activity in the FeT-J cell line (an IL-2 independent feline T-cell line). Both necrosis and apoptosis were observed in rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]-treated FeT-J cells. The rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO] subtype consistently exhibited lower antiviral and antiproliferative activity compared to that observed with the other four rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes. In summary, this paper demonstrates that five previously described feIFN-alpha subtypes induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in vitro and are capable of upregulating the feMx gene in vivo.

  5. DNA methylation epigenotypes in breast cancer molecular subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Identification of gene expression-based breast cancer subtypes is considered a critical means of prognostication. Genetic mutations along with epigenetic alterations contribute to gene-expression changes occurring in breast cancer. So far, these epigenetic contributions to sporadic breast cancer subtypes have not been well characterized, and only a limited understanding exists of the epigenetic mechanisms affected in those particular breast cancer subtypes. The present study was undertaken to dissect the breast cancer methylome and to deliver specific epigenotypes associated with particular breast cancer subtypes. Methods By using a microarray approach, we analyzed DNA methylation in regulatory regions of 806 cancer-related genes in 28 breast cancer paired samples. We subsequently performed substantial technical and biologic validation by pyrosequencing, investigating the top qualifying 19 CpG regions in independent cohorts encompassing 47 basal-like, 44 ERBB2+ overexpressing, 48 luminal A, and 48 luminal B paired breast cancer/adjacent tissues. With the all-subset selection method, we identified the most subtype-predictive methylation profiles in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results The approach efficiently recognized 15 individual CpG loci differentially methylated in breast cancer tumor subtypes. We further identified novel subtype-specific epigenotypes that clearly demonstrate the differences in the methylation profiles of basal-like and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that well-defined DNA methylation profiles enable breast cancer subtype prediction and support the utilization of this biomarker for prognostication and therapeutic stratification of patients with breast cancer. PMID:20920229

  6. Value and Methods for Molecular Subtyping of Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Mark; Pruett, Payton; Weidman, Martin

    Tracking sources of microbial contaminants has been a concern since the early days of commercial food processing; however, recent advances in the development of molecular subtyping methods have provided tools that allow more rapid and highly accurate determinations of these sources. Only individuals with an understanding of the molecular subtyping methods, and the epidemiological techniques used, can evaluate the reliability of a link between a food-manufacturing plant, a food, and a foodborne disease outbreak.

  7. Clinical differences among mild cognitive impairment subtypes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Weis, Holly; Stebbins, Glenn; Bernard, Bryan; Goetz, Christopher G

    2012-08-01

    Mild cognitive impairment is increasingly recognized as a construct in Parkinson's disease (PD) and occurs in about 25% of nondemented PD patients. Although executive dysfunction is the most frequent type of cognitive deficit in PD, the cognitive phenotype of PD mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) is broad. PD-MCI subtypes are represented by amnestic and nonamnestic domain impairment as well as single- and multiple-domain impairment. However, it is unclear whether patients with different PD-MCI subtypes also differ in other clinical characteristics in addition to cognitive profile. We studied 128 PD-MCI subjects at our Movement Disorders center, comparing clinical, motor, and behavioral characteristics across the PD-MCI subtypes. We found varying proportions of impairment subtypes: nonamnestic single domain, 47.7%; amnestic multiple domain, 24.2%; amnestic single domain, 18.8%; and nonamnestic multiple domain, 9.5%. Attentional/executive functioning and visuospatial abilities were the most frequently impaired domains. PD-MCI subtypes differed in their motor features, with nonamnestic multiple-domain PD-MCI subjects showing particularly pronounced problems with postural instability and gait. Differences among PD-MCI subtypes in age, PD duration, medication use, mood or behavioral disturbances, and vascular disease were not significant. Thus, in addition to differing cognitive profiles, PD-MCI subtypes differed in motor phenotype and severity but not in mood, behavioral, or vascular comorbidities. Greater postural instability and gait disturbances in the nonamnestic multiple-domain subtype emphasize shared nondopaminergic neural substrates of gait and cognition in PD. Furthermore, increased burden of cognitive dysfunction, rather than type of cognitive deficit, may be associated with greater motor impairment in PD-MCI.

  8. Developing a radiomics framework for classifying non-small cell lung carcinoma subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dongdong; Zang, Yali; Dong, Di; Zhou, Mu; Gevaert, Olivier; Fang, Mengjie; Shi, Jingyun; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Patient-targeted treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) has been well documented according to the histologic subtypes over the past decade. In parallel, recent development of quantitative image biomarkers has recently been highlighted as important diagnostic tools to facilitate histological subtype classification. In this study, we present a radiomics analysis that classifies the adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC). We extract 52-dimensional, CT-based features (7 statistical features and 45 image texture features) to represent each nodule. We evaluate our approach on a clinical dataset including 324 ADCs and 110 SqCCs patients with CT image scans. Classification of these features is performed with four different machine-learning classifiers including Support Vector Machines with Radial Basis Function kernel (RBF-SVM), Random forest (RF), K-nearest neighbor (KNN), and RUSBoost algorithms. To improve the classifiers' performance, optimal feature subset is selected from the original feature set by using an iterative forward inclusion and backward eliminating algorithm. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that radiomics features achieve encouraging classification results on both complete feature set (AUC=0.89) and optimal feature subset (AUC=0.91).

  9. Epidemic dynamics of two coexisting hepatitis C virus subtypes.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Bracho, Maria Alma; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Ortega, Enrique; del Olmo, Juan; Carnicer, Fernando; González-Candelas, Fernando; Moya, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects about 3% of the human population. Phylogenetic analyses have grouped its variants into six major genotypes, which have a star-like distribution and several minor subtypes. The most abundant genotype in Europe is the so-called genotype 1, with two prevalent subtypes, 1a and 1b. In order to explain the higher prevalence of subtype 1b over 1a, a large-scale sequence analysis (100 virus clones) has been carried out over 25 patients of both subtypes in two regions of the HCV genome: one comprising hypervariable region 1 and another including the interferon sensitivity-determining region. Neither polymorphism analysis nor molecular variance analysis (attending to intra- and intersubtype differences, age, sex and previous history of antiviral treatment) was able to show any particular difference between subtypes that might account for their different prevalence. Only the demographic history of the populations carrying both subtypes and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) for risk practice suggested that the route of transmission may be the most important factor to explain the observed difference.

  10. [Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Abar, A Elmi; Jlizi, A; Darar, H Youssouf; Ben Nasr, M; Abid, S; Kacem, M Ali Ben Hadj; Slim, A

    2012-01-01

    The authors had for aim to study the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes in a cohort of HIV positive patients in the hospital General Peltier of Djibouti. An epidemiological study was made on 40 HIV-1 positive patients followed up in the Infectious Diseases Department over three months. All patients sample were subtyped by genotyping. Thirty-five patients (15 men and 20 women) were found infected by an HIV-1 strain belonging to the M group. Genotyping revealed that - 66% of samples were infected with subtype C, 20% with CRF02_AG, 8.5% with B, 2.9% with CRF02_AG/C and 2.9% with K/C. In fact, Subtype C prevalence has been described in the Horn of Africa and a similar prevalence was previously reported in Djibouti. However our study describes the subtype B in Djibouti for the first time. It is the predominant subtype in the Western world. The detection of CRF02_AG strains indicates that they are still circulating in Djibouti, the only country in East Africa in which this recombinant virus was found. CRF02_AG recombinant isolates were primarily described in West and Central Africa. The presence of this viral heterogeneity, probably coming from the mixing of populations in Djibouti, which is an essential economic and geographical crossroads, incites us to vigilance in the surveillance of this infection.

  11. Baseline motor findings and Parkinson disease prognostic subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Ali H; Rajput, Michele L; Ferguson, Leslie W; Rajput, Alex

    2017-07-11

    To identify the significance of baseline motor features to the lifelong prognostic motor subtypes in a Parkinson disease (PD) cohort. In a previous study of 166 PD cases, we observed different prognosis in tremor-dominant, akinetic-rigid, and mixed subtypes. This study includes the same cases, but we excluded 10 cases with symptoms of ≥15 years duration at baseline. Relative severity of tremor, bradykinesia/akinesia, and rigidity at baseline were evaluated as predictors of the motor subtypes, which are known to have different prognosis. The most common motor subtype was mixed, followed by akinetic-rigid and then the tremor-dominant. Seventy cases were not receiving antiparkinsonian drugs at baseline. The prognostic subtypes could be predicted at baseline in 85% of all and in 91% of the treatment-naive cases. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were strong for the mixed and the akinetic-rigid but weak for the tremor-dominant subtype. Our data show that motor profile at baseline can predict prognosis in most PD cases. These findings can be incorporated into clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  12. STAT signaling in different breast cancer sub-types.

    PubMed

    Furth, Priscilla A

    2014-01-25

    This review summarizes information on expression of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)s 1, 2, 3, 4, 5a/b and 6 in cancer cells from different human breast cancer sub-types. STAT proteins, especially STATs 1, 3 and 5a/b are expressed in some but not all cancers from all of the different major breast cancer sub-types. However, well-designed studies comparing expression patterns at the protein level in cancer and surrounding stromal cells are still needed to fully examine links with prognosis and therapeutic response. Moreover, it is not yet known if distinct expression patterns of STAT proteins could have dissimilar impacts in different sub-types, especially between the luminal A and B ER+ sub-types and the different TNBC sub-types. Recent data indicating that STAT 5 can be activated secondary to a therapeutic intervention and mediate resistance suggests that expression patterns should not only be examined in pre-treatment but also post-treatment samples from different sub-types. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. )

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  14. Prognostic Value of Somatostatin Receptor Subtypes in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Song, Ki Byung; Kim, Song Cheol; Kim, Ji Hun; Seo, Dong-Wan; Hong, Seung-Mo; Park, Kwang-Min; Hwang, Dae Wook; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Young-Joo

    2016-02-01

    Studies on the expression of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of the SSTR subtypes via immunohistochemistry analyses and assess the correlation between SSTR subtype expression and prognosis. We examined 199 patients with PNET who underwent surgical resection between January 1995 and December 2010 at the Asan Medical Center. For all cases, medical records, including demographic data, clinical symptoms, radiological findings, postoperative treatment outcomes, and expression of SSTR subtypes, were carefully reviewed. In total, 162 (81.4%) PNETs expressed more than 1 SSTR subtype. Functioning PNET expressed significantly more SSTR subtypes, compared to nonfunctioning PNET. The SSTR2(+) and SSTR5(+) groups had better prognosis than the SSTR2(-) (P = 0.009) and SSTR5(-) groups (P = 0.03), respectively. In the grade 2 PNET of 2010 World Health Organization classification, the SSTR(+) group had better prognosis than SSTR(-) group. The expression of SSTR 2 and 5 were related with good prognosis of PNET. In World Health Organization grade 2 PNET, the SSTR(+) group had better prognosis than SSTR(-) group. The SSTR expression(+) by immunohistochemistry might be related with good prognosis of the patients with surgically resected PNET.

  15. [Genetic subtyping of HIV-1 in Liaoning province of China].

    PubMed

    Han, X; Jiang, Y; Shang, H

    2001-12-01

    To study the prevalence of HIV-1 in Liaoning province of China. Nuclear acids were extracted from blood samples of 16 HIV-1 infected individuals collected locally in Liaoning province of China from Jun. 1997 to Dec. 2000. The 0.7 kb or 1.2 kb segments of HIV-1 env gene were amplified using nested-PCR and the HIV-1 genetic subtypes were then assayed by heteroduplex mobility assay. Fifteen of 16 samples were positive by PCR amplification of HIV-1 env region and samples were found to be genetic subtype A,B',C,E. The proportion due to sexual transmission in all HIV infection was 31.25% (5/15), among which subtype B' (3/5) was the majority. A man who returned from Africa together with his spouse both had type A (2/5) infection. Intravenous drug users (IDUs) took up 31.25% (5/15) of all the HIV infections. Subtype C (2/4) and E were predominant among intravenous drug users. However, there was one IDU with subtype B or E. Nearly all blood recipients and blood donors were B' (4/5) except one with C. There have been several subtypes of HIV-1 existed in Liaoning province, demonstrating the complexity of HIV epidemology in Liaoning province and the difficulty conducting prevention and treatment.

  16. Subtyping pathological gamblers based on impulsivity, depression, and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, David M; Petry, Nancy M

    2010-12-01

    This study examined putative subtypes of pathological gamblers (PGs) based on the Pathways model, and it also evaluated whether the subtypes would benefit differentially from treatment. Treatment-seeking PGs (N = 229) were categorized into Pathways subtypes based on scores from questionnaires assessing anxiety, depression, and impulsivity. The Addiction Severity Index-Gambling assessed severity of gambling problems at baseline, posttreatment, and 12-month follow-up. Compared with behaviorally conditioned (BC) gamblers, emotionally vulnerable (EV) gamblers had higher psychiatric and gambling severity, and were more likely to have a parent with a psychiatric history. Antisocial impulsive (AI) gamblers also had elevated gambling and psychiatric severity relative to BC gamblers. They were more likely to have antisocial personality disorder and had the highest legal and family/social severity scores. They were also most likely to have a history of substance abuse treatment, history of inpatient psychiatric treatment, and a parent with a substance use or gambling problem. AI and EV gamblers experienced greater gambling severity throughout treatment than BC gamblers, but all three subtypes demonstrated similar patterns of treatment response. Thus, the three Pathways subtypes differ on some baseline characteristics, but subtyping did not predict treatment outcomes beyond a simple association with problem gambling severity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Subtype distribution of Blastocystis isolates in Sebha, Libya.

    PubMed

    Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Ithoi, Init; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Blastocystis is a genetically diverse and a common intestinal parasite of humans with a controversial pathogenic potential. This study was carried out to identify the Blastocystis subtypes and their association with demographic and socioeconomic factors among outpatients living in Sebha city, Libya. Blastocystis in stool samples were cultured followed by isolation, PCR amplification of a partial SSU rDNA gene, cloning, and sequencing. The DNA sequences of isolated clones showed 98.3% to 100% identity with the reference Blastocystis isolates from the Genbank. Multiple sequence alignment showed polymorphism from one to seven base substitution and/or insertion/deletion in several groups of non-identical nucleotides clones. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three assemblage subtypes (ST) with ST1 as the most prevalent (51.1%) followed by ST2 (24.4%), ST3 (17.8%) and mixed infections of two concurrent subtypes (6.7%). ST1 infection was significantly associated with female (P = 0.009) and low educational level (P = 0.034). ST2 was also significantly associated with low educational level (P= 0.008) and ST3 with diarrhoea (P = 0.008). Phylogenetic analysis of Libyan Blastocystis isolates identified three different subtypes; with ST1 being the predominant subtype and its infection was significantly associated with female gender and low educational level. More extensive studies are needed in order to relate each Blastocystis subtype with clinical symptoms and potential transmission sources in this community.