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Sample records for imaging oncogene expression

  1. Expression of Cellular Oncogenes in Human Malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamon, Dennis J.; Dekernion, Jean B.; Verma, Inder M.; Cline, Martin J.

    1984-04-01

    Cellular oncogenes have been implicated in the induction of malignant transformation in some model systems in vitro and may be related to malignancies in vivo in some vertebrate species. This article describes a study of the expression of 15 cellular oncogenes in fresh human tumors from 54 patients, representing 20 different tumor types. More than one cellular oncogene was transcriptionally active in all of the tumors examined. In 14 patients it was possible to study normal and malignant tissue from the same organ. In many of these patients, the transcriptional activity of certain oncogenes was greater in the malignant than the normal tissue. The cellular fes (feline sarcoma) oncogene, not previously known to be transcribed in mammalian tissue, was found to be active in lung and hematopoietic malignancies.

  2. Oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Compans, R.W.; Cooper, M.; Koprowski, H.; McConell, I.; Melchers, F.; Nussenzweig, V.; Oldstone, M.; Olsnes, S.; Saedler, H.; Vogt, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Roles of drosophila proto-oncogenes and growth factor homologs during development of the fly; Interaction of oncogenes with differentiation programs; Genetics of src: structure and functional organization of a protein tyrosine kinase; Structures and activities of activated abl oncogenes; Eukaryotic RAS proteins and yeast proteins with which they interact. This book presents up-to-data review articles on oncogenes. The editor includes five contributions which critically evaluate recent research in the field.

  3. Oncogenic Ras influences the expression of multiple lncRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Niida, Hiroyuki; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Shirasawa, Senji; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2016-08-01

    Recent ultrahigh-density tiling array and large-scale transcriptome analysis have revealed that large numbers of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcribed in mammals. Several lncRNAs have been implicated in transcriptional regulation, organization of nuclear structure, and post-transcriptional processing. However, the regulation of expression of lncRNAs is less well understood. Here, we show that the exogenous and endogenous expression of an oncogenic form of small GTPase Ras (called oncogenic Ras) decrease the expression of lncRNA ANRIL (antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus), which is involved in the regulation of cellular senescence. We also show that forced expression of oncogenic Ras increases the expression of lncRNA PANDA (p21 associated ncRNA DNA damage activated), which is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Microarray analysis demonstrated that expression of multiple lncRNAs fluctuated by forced expression of oncogenic Ras. These findings indicate that oncogenic Ras regulates the expression of a large number of lncRNAs including functional lncRNAs, such as ANRIL and PANDA.

  4. Characterization and developmental expression of a Drosophila ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Mozer, B; Marlor, R; Parkhurst, S; Corces, V

    1985-01-01

    We cloned a Drosophila melanogaster ras gene (Dmras64B) on the basis of its homology to the ras oncogen from Harvey murine sarcoma virus. This gene mapped at chromosomal position 64B on the left arm of the third chromosome. Sequencing of Dmras64B revealed extensive amino acid homology with the proteins encoded by the human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ras genes. The coding region of the Drosophila gene is interrupted by two introns located in different positions with respect to its human counterpart. Dmras64B encodes three different RNAs (1.6, 2.1, and 2.6 kilobases long) that are constantly expressed throughout the development of the fly. Images PMID:3921827

  5. Developmental-stage-dependent transcriptional response to leukaemic oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Assi, Salam A.; Tsoulaki, Olga; Gilmour, Jane; Lacaud, Georges; Bonifer, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterized by a block in myeloid differentiation the stage of which is dependent on the nature of the transforming oncogene and the developmental stage of the oncogenic hit. This is also true for the t(8;21) translocation that gives rise to the RUNX1-ETO fusion protein and initiates the most common form of human AML. Here we study the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells expressing an inducible RUNX1-ETO gene into blood cells as a model, combined with genome-wide analyses of transcription factor binding and gene expression. RUNX1-ETO interferes with both the activating and repressive function of its normal counterpart, RUNX1, at early and late stages of blood cell development. However, the response of the transcriptional network to RUNX1-ETO expression is developmental stage specific, highlighting the molecular mechanisms determining specific target cell expansion after an oncogenic hit. PMID:26018585

  6. Oncogene expression in vivo by ovarian adenocarcinomas and mixed-mullerian tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Kacinski, B. M.; Carter, D.; Kohorn, E. I.; Mittal, K.; Bloodgood, R. S.; Donahue, J.; Kramer, C. A.; Fischer, D.; Edwards, R.; Chambers, S. K.

    1989-01-01

    Six-micron paraffin sections of paraformaldehyde-fixed specimens of 24 ovarian benign and neoplastic specimens were assayed for tumor cell-specific oncogene expression by a sensitive, quantitative in situ hybridization technique with probes for 17 oncogenes, beta-actin, and E. coli beta-lactamase. In the benign, borderline, and invasive adenocarcinomas, multiple oncogenes, including neu, fes, fms, Ha-ras, trk, c-myc, fos, and PDGF-A chains, were expressed at significant levels relative to a housekeeping gene (beta-actin). In the mixed-Mullerian tumors, a rather different pattern of oncogene expression was observed, characterized primarily by expression of sis (PDGF-B chain). For the adenocarcinomas, statistical analysis demonstrated that expression of several genes (fms, neu, PDGF-A) was closely linked to others (c-fos, c-myc) known to have important roles in the control of cell proliferation, but only one gene, fms, correlated very strongly with clinicopathologic features (high FIGO histologic grade and high FIGO clinical stage) predictive of aggressive clinical behavior and poor outcome. The authors discuss the role that tumor epithelial cell expression of the fms gene product might play in the auto- and paracrine control of growth and dissemination of ovarian adenocarcinomas. Images FIG. 1 PMID:2556864

  7. Expression of proto-oncogenes in bovine preimplantation blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Tetens, F; Kliem, A; Tscheudschilsuren, G; Navarrete Santos, A; Fischer, B

    2000-05-01

    Proto-oncogenes are involved in the regulation of gene expression, for example after ligand binding to growth factor receptors. Expression of the proto-oncogenes c-fos, c-jun, c-ha-ras and c-myc was studied in in vivo grown and in vitro cultured bovine preimplantation blastocysts employing RT-PCR, ribonuclease protection assay and immunohistochemistry. Thirteen- and 14- day-old preimplantation blastocysts, i.e. stages before and during trophoblast elongation, were used. In in vivo-grown blastocysts c-fos, c-jun and c-ha-ras transcripts as well as c-Fos, c-Jun and c-Myc proteins were detected in all stages studied. Cultured blastocysts were treated with 10 nM epidermal growth factor and 10 nM transforming growth factor-alpha simultaneously. Epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-alpha treatment induced c-fos mRNA and c-Myc protein expression. The induction of downstream targets of the epidermal growth factor receptor by epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-alpha indicates a functional epidermal growth factor signal transduction pathway in elongating bovine blastocysts.

  8. A human oncogene of the RAS superfamily unmasked by expression cDNA cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, A M; Miki, T; Meyers, K A; Aaronson, S A

    1994-01-01

    As an approach to identify human oncogenes, we generated an expression cDNA library from an ovarian carcinoma line. A potent transforming gene was detected by transfection analysis and identified as TC21, a recently cloned member of the RAS gene superfamily. A single point mutation substituting glutamine for leucine at position 72 was shown to be responsible for activation of transforming properties. While the cDNA clone possessed high transforming activity, the ovarian tumor genomic DNA, which contained the mutated TC21 allele, failed to induce transformed foci. Thus, expression cDNA cloning made it possible to identify and isolate a human oncogene that has evaded detection by conventional approaches. Images PMID:8052619

  9. [Expression of proto-oncogenes and its role in spermatogenic cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-ling; Xu, Si-fan

    2005-07-01

    This article reviews the specific expression of many proto-oncogenes during male germ cell development. The normal expression of proto-oncogenes plays an important role in the regulation of spermatogonial mitosis, spermatocyte meiosis as well as spermiogenesis and sperm maturation.

  10. Gene expression array analyses predict increased proto-oncogene expression in MMTV induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Popken-Harris, Pamela; Kirchhof, Nicole; Harrison, Ben; Harris, Lester F

    2006-08-01

    Exogenous infection by milk-borne mouse mammary tumor viruses (MMTV) typically induce mouse mammary tumors in genetically susceptible mice at a rate of 90-95% by 1 year of age. In contrast to other transforming retroviruses, MMTV acts as an insertional mutagen and under the influence of steroid hormones induces oncogenic transformation after insertion into the host genome. As these events correspond with increases in adjacent proto-oncogene transcription, we used expression array profiling to determine which commonly associated MMTV insertion site proto-oncogenes were transcriptionally active in MMTV induced mouse mammary tumors. To verify our gene expression array results we developed real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for the common MMTV insertion site genes found in RIII/Sa mice (int-1/wnt-1, int-2/fgf-3, int-3/Notch 4, and fgf8/AIGF) as well as two genes that were consistently up regulated (CCND1, and MAT-8) and two genes that were consistently down regulated (FN1 and MAT-8) in the MMTV induced tumors as compared to normal mammary gland. Finally, each tumor was also examined histopathologically. Our expression array findings support a model whereby just one or a few common MMTV insertions into the host genome sets up a dominant cascade of events that leave a characteristic molecular signature.

  11. Retroviruses Hijack Chromatin Loops to Drive Oncogene Expression and Highlight the Chromatin Architecture around Proto-Oncogenic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Jillian M.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene. PMID:25799187

  12. Expression of int-2 oncogene in Kaposi's sarcoma lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y Q; Li, J J; Moscatelli, D; Basilico, C; Nicolaides, A; Zhang, W G; Poiesz, B J; Friedman-Kien, A E

    1993-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), such as basic FGF, have been implicated in the growth of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) cells in vitro. In the evaluation of the expression of the various genes of the different members of the FGF family and their receptors in fresh KS tissue specimens, int-2 was found to be expressed in more than half of the KS tumors examined. Using reverse transcription PCR, the expression of int-2 was detected in 21 of 38 (55.2%) fresh KS biopsy specimens. In contrast, int-2 mRNA transcripts were not found in normal appearing skin from the same patients except in one sample which was obtained from an AIDS patient with disseminated KS lesions. Sequence data confirmed that the amplified sequences were derived from int-2 mRNA with proper splicing. In addition, 12 nucleic acid alterations were identified in eight out of nine KS tumor samples sequenced. Using immunohistochemical methods, int-2 protein was detected in some of the spindle-shaped tumor cells surrounding the abnormal endothelial-lined vascular slits histologically characteristic of KS. Int-2 specific immunostaining was shown to be present in both the nuclei and cytoplasm of these spindle cells but was more pronounced in the nuclei. Neither amplification nor gross rearrangement of the int-2 gene was detected in KS lesions by Southern blot analysis. These results suggest that the expression of int-2 may play a role in the pathogenesis KS by stimulating local angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Images PMID:8450048

  13. Inhibition of oncogene expression by green tea and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, G; Han, C; Chen, J

    1995-01-01

    The effects of tea drinking on the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamine)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced mouse lung oncogene expression and the effect of topical application of the tea polyphenol component (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on 12-O-tedradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse skin oncogene expression were investigated. In the first experiment, mice were treated with NNK (1.3 mg/kg body wt ip) once a day for three days and were given 2% tea in drinking water during the whole experimental period. After four or eight weeks, the lung tissue of the mice treated with NNK displayed a significantly high level of expression in c-myc, c-raf, and c-H-ras oncogenes, and they were all inhibited by tea drinking with inhibitory rates of 50%, 20%, and 50%, respectively. In the second experiment, a single application of 10 nmol of TPA to mouse skin led to a marked increase in the transcripts' level of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene, protein kinase C (PKC) gene, and c-myc oncogene at four hours after TPA administration. Topical application of EGCG (1 or 5 mumol) one hour before the application of TPA inhibited all TPA-induced gene expression in a dose-dependent fashion. These results confirm the anticarcinogenic effects of tea and suggest that a possible mechanism is the effect of tea on carcinogen-induced oncogene expression.

  14. Polymorphic changes of cell phenotype caused by elevated expression of an exogenous NEU proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Tarakhovsky, A M; Resnikov, M; Zaichuk, T; Tugusheva, M V; Butenko, Z A; Prassolov, V S

    1990-03-01

    The NEU proto-oncogene encodes a 185,000 dalton transmembrane glycoprotein with extensive homology to epidermal growth factor receptor. In the current study the effect of exogenous NEU expression on phenotype and growth properties of cells established lines was examined. The replication defective retroviruses were used to express constitutively NEU cDNA in the Rat-1, NIH3T3 and Balb/c3T3 cells. In spite of the practically similar NEU mRNA and protein content in infected cells only in Balb/c3T3 cells, high NEU expression ultimately led to oncogenic transformation. The Rat-1 cells were practically insensitive to oncogenic action of NEU. Subpopulation divergency with respect to NEU-dependent transformation was also revealed in infected NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest the existence of unknown host-specific factor(s) determining the response of cells to NEU overexpression.

  15. Induction of p38δ Expression Plays an Essential Role in Oncogenic ras-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Jinny; Chen, Michelle; Lv, Dan; Luo, Na; Su, Weijun; Xiang, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a stable proliferative arrest that serves as a tumor-suppressing defense mechanism. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been implicated in oncogene-induced senescence and tumor suppression. However, the specific role of each of the four p38 isoforms in oncogene-induced senescence is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that p38δ mediates oncogene-induced senescence through a p53- and p16INK4A-independent mechanism. Instead, evidence suggests a link between p38δ and the DNA damage pathways. Moreover, we have discovered a novel mechanism that enhances the expression of p38δ during senescence. In this mechanism, oncogenic ras induces the Raf-1–MEK–extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, which, in turn, activates the AP-1 and Ets transcription factors that are bound to the p38δ promoter, leading to increased transcription of p38δ. These findings indicate that induction of the prosenescent function of p38δ by oncogenic ras is achieved through 2 mechanisms, transcriptional activation by the Raf-1–MEK–ERK–AP-1/Ets pathway, which increases the cellular concentration of the p38δ protein, and posttranslational modification by MKK3/6, which stimulates the enzymatic activity of p38δ. In addition, these studies identify the AP-1 and Ets transcription factors as novel signaling components in the senescence-inducing pathway. PMID:23878395

  16. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyanka L; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-08-23

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc-dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  17. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyanka L.; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc–dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  18. Cancer induction by restriction of oncogene expression to the stem cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Caro, María; Cobaleda, César; González-Herrero, Inés; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Sánchez-Beato, Margarita; Orfao, Alberto; Pintado, Belén; Flores, Teresa; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel; Jiménez, Rafael; Piris, Miguel A; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2009-01-01

    In human cancers, all cancerous cells carry the oncogenic genetic lesions. However, to elucidate whether cancer is a stem cell-driven tissue, we have developed a strategy to limit oncogene expression to the stem cell compartment in a transgenic mouse setting. Here, we focus on the effects of the BCR-ABLp210 oncogene, associated with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in humans. We show that CML phenotype and biology can be established in mice by restricting BCR-ABLp210 expression to stem cell antigen 1 (Sca1)+ cells. The course of the disease in Sca1-BCR-ABLp210 mice was not modified on STI571 treatment. However, BCR-ABLp210-induced CML is reversible through the unique elimination of the cancer stem cells (CSCs). Overall, our data show that oncogene expression in Sca1+ cells is all that is required to fully reprogramme it, giving rise to a full-blown, oncogene-specified tumour with all its mature cellular diversity, and that elimination of the CSCs is enough to eradicate the whole tumour. PMID:19037256

  19. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  20. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A; Woodman, Scott E; Kwong, Lawrence N

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy. PMID:26787600

  1. The contribution of tumor and host tissue factor expression to oncogene-driven gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Nathalie; Meehan, Brian; Garnier, Delphine; Hashemi, Maryam; Montermini, Laura; Lee, Tae Hoon; Milsom, Chloe; Pawlinski, Rafal; Ohlfest, John; Anderson, Mark; Mackman, Nigel; Rak, Janusz

    2014-11-14

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of glial brain tumors, associated with angiogenesis, thrombosis, and upregulation of tissue factor (TF), the key cellular trigger of coagulation and signaling. Since TF is upregulated by oncogenic mutations occurring in different subsets of human brain tumors we investigated whether TF contributes to tumourigenesis driven by oncogenic activation of EGFR (EGFRvIII) and RAS pathways in the brain. Here we show that TF expression correlates with poor prognosis in glioma, but not in GBM. In situ, the TF protein expression is heterogeneously expressed in adult and pediatric gliomas. GBM cells harboring EGFRvIII (U373vIII) grow aggressively as xenografts in SCID mice and their progression is delayed by administration of monoclonal antibodies blocking coagulant (CNTO 859) and signaling (10H10) effects of TF in vivo. Mice in which TF gene is disrupted in the neuroectodermal lineage exhibit delayed progression of spontaneous brain tumors driven by oncogenic N-ras and SV40 large T antigen (SV40LT) expressed under the control of sleeping beauty transposase. Reduced host TF levels in low-TF/SCID hypomorphic mice mitigated growth of glioma subcutaneously but not in the brain. Thus, we suggest that tumor-associated TF may serve as therapeutic target in the context of oncogene-driven disease progression in a subset of glioma.

  2. Expression of proto-oncogenes and gene mutation of sarcomeric proteins in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kai, H; Muraishi, A; Sugiu, Y; Nishi, H; Seki, Y; Kuwahara, F; Kimura, A; Kato, H; Imaizumi, T

    1998-09-21

    Several mutations of cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC) gene were reported in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Involvement of proto-oncogenes has been shown in the mechanism of experimental cardiac hypertrophy. This study sought to examine the effects of c-H-ras and c-myc expression in the steady-state myocardium on hypertrophic changes and to evaluate the possible interaction between beta-MHC mutation and proto-oncogene expression in HCM. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed in 17 HCM patients (5 beta-MHC mutations and 1 troponin T mutation) and 7 control subjects (no mutation). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed c-H-ras expression in all members of both groups. Cardiomyocyte size was correlated with the expression level of c-H-ras (P<0.001), and c-H-ras expression was upregulated in HCM patients (P<0.01). HCM patients with a beta-MHC mutation had the higher c-H-ras expression than did control subjects or patients without a mutation (P<0.01). c-myc mRNA was expressed in 7 of 17 HCM patients but not in control subjects. Myocyte size was greater in c-myc-positive HCM patients than in control subjects and c-myc-negative HCM patients (P<0.001 and P<0.05, respectively). The proto-oncogene expression did not affect clinical findings, myocardial fibrosis, or disarray. In conclusion, c-H-ras and c-myc expression in the steady-state myocardium may play a role in the hypertrophic mechanism in HCM. It is possible that ss-MHC gene mutation has some effect on the regulation of proto-oncogene expression in HCM.

  3. The MYC 3' Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Rennoll, Sherri A; Eshelman, Melanie A; Raup-Konsavage, Wesley M; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Yochum, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC) by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC). The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF) and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3' Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3' WRE) with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE) within the MYC 3' WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3' WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3' WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27223305

  4. Oncogenic Myc Induces Expression of Glutamine Synthetase through Promoter Demethylation.

    PubMed

    Bott, Alex J; Peng, I-Chen; Fan, Yongjun; Faubert, Brandon; Zhao, Lu; Li, Jinyu; Neidler, Sarah; Sun, Yu; Jaber, Nadia; Krokowski, Dawid; Lu, Wenyun; Pan, Ji-An; Powers, Scott; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Hatzoglou, Maria; Murphy, Daniel J; Jones, Russell; Wu, Song; Girnun, Geoffrey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2015-12-01

    c-Myc is known to promote glutamine usage by upregulating glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate that is catabolized in the TCA cycle. Here we report that in a number of human and murine cells and cancers, Myc induces elevated expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also termed glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. This is through upregulation of a Myc transcriptional target thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), which promotes active demethylation of the GS promoter and its increased expression. Elevated expression of GS promotes cell survival under glutamine limitation, while silencing of GS decreases cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth. Upon GS overexpression, increased glutamine enhances nucleotide synthesis and amino acid transport. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of Myc in inducing glutamine synthesis and suggest a molecular connection between DNA demethylation and glutamine metabolism in Myc-driven cancers.

  5. Oncogene mRNA Imaging with Radionuclide-PNA-Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wickstrom, Eric

    2008-03-19

    New cancer gene hybridization probes to carry radionuclides were made. Noninvasive technetium-99m gamma imaging of CCND1 cancer gene activity in human breast cancer tumors in mice was demonstrated, followed by noninvasive technetium-99m imaging of MYC cancer gene activity. Noninvasive imaging of CCND1 cancer gene activity in human breast cancer tumors in mice was demonstrated with a positron-emitting copper-64 probe, followed by noninvasive positron imaging of IRS1 cancer gene activity.

  6. Associations between clinical characteristics and oncogene expression in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Yu, D P; Zhou, S J; Song, X Y; Li, Y S; Xiao, N; Liu, Z D; Sun, X J; Zhao, Q Y; Liu, S K

    2014-10-31

    More than 40 oncogenes associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been identified with varied gene expression. The correlations between specific clinical characteristics and oncogene expression in NSCLC patients were examined. From October 2011 to September 2012, a total of 60 patients with NSCLC (male:female, 34:24; mean age, 59.5 ± 10.6 years; age range, 31-81 years) were diagnosed and evaluated for treatment with radical resection at a single facility. Eligible patients exhibiting tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage I-III NSCLC confirmed by post-surgical pathology were included. mRNA expression was detected by branched DNA-liquidchip technology (bDNA-LCT) and mutations were detected at EGFR exons 18, 19, 20, and 21, KRAS exons 2 and 3, BRAF and PIK3CA exons 9 and 20. Correlations between gene expression at mutations and clinical characteristics of gender, age, histological type, degree of differentiation, smoking status, immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluation of TTF-1, TNM staging, and discrete age ("nage") were examined. Significant associations were observed between IHC staining for TTF-1 and histological type (P = 0.00001) and with BRAC1, TYMS, RRM1, and TUBB3 expression (P = 0.0187, 0.0051, 0.024, and 0.0238, respectively). Significant cross-correlations were observed between TYMS, BRAC1, TOP2A, STMN1, TUBB3, and RRM1 expression (P < 0.05), but not between EGFR exon 21, KRAS exon 2, and PIK3CA exon 9 expression and any other mutation expression (P > 0.05). Relationships between clinical characteristics and oncogene expression in NSCLC, particularly those of TTF-1 level and smoking status, may be useful indicators of prognosis and development of anti-cancer drug resistance.

  7. Normal Expression of a Rearranged and Mutated c-myc Oncogene after Transfection into Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Adam; Hayday, Adrian

    1989-10-01

    Expression of the c-myc oncogene is deregulated in a variety of malignancies. Rearrangement and mutation of the c-myc locus is a characteristic feature of human Burkitt's lymphoma. Whether deregulation is solely a result of mutation of c-myc or whether it is influenced by the transformed B cell context has not been determined. A translocated and mutated allele of c-myc was stably transfected into fibroblasts. The rearranged allele was expressed indistinguishably from a normal c-myc gene: it had serum-regulated expression, was transcribed with normal promoter preference, and was strongly attenuated. Thus mutations by themselves are insufficient to deregulate c-myc transcription.

  8. Cellular oncogene expression following exposure of mice to {gamma}-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1991-06-12

    We examined the effects of total body exposure of BCF1 mice to {gamma}-rays (300 cGy) in modulating expression of cellular oncogenes in both gut and liver tissues. We selected specific cellular oncogenes (c-fos, c-myc, c-src, and c-H-ras), based on their normal expression in liver and gut tissues from untreated mice. As early as 5 min. following whole body exposure of BCF1 mice to {gamma}-rays we detected induction of mRNA specific for c-src and c-H-ras in both liver and gut tissues. c-fos RNA was slightly decreased in accumulation in gut but was unaffected in liver tissue from irradiated mice relative to untreated controls. c-myc mRNA accumulation was unaffected in all tissues examined. These experiments document that modulation of cellular oncogene expression can occur as an early event in tissues following irradiation and suggest that this modulation may play a role in radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  9. DEK Proto-Oncogene Expression Interferes with the Normal Epithelial Differentiation Program

    PubMed Central

    Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Morreale, Richard J.; Morris, Teresa A.; Mintz-Cole, Rachael A.; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Balsitis, Scott J.; Husseinzadeh, Nader; Witte, David P.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Lambert, Paul F.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the DEK gene is associated with multiple human cancers, but its specific roles as a putative oncogene are not well defined. DEK transcription was previously shown to be induced by the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncogene via E2F and Rb pathways. Transient DEK overexpression was able to inhibit both senescence and apoptosis in cultured cells. In at least the latter case, this mechanism involved the destabilization of p53 and the decreased expression of p53 target genes. We show here that DEK overexpression disrupts the normal differentiation program in a manner that is independent of either p53 or cell death. DEK expression was distinctly repressed upon the differentiation of cultured primary human keratinocytes, and stable DEK overexpression caused epidermal thickening in an organotypic raft model system. The observed hyperplasia involved a delay in keratinocyte differentiation toward a more undifferentiated state, and expansion of the basal cell compartment was due to increased proliferation, but not apoptosis. These phenotypes were accompanied by elevated p63 expression in the absence of p53 destabilization. In further support of bona fide oncogenic DEK activities, we report here up-regulated DEK protein levels in both human papilloma virus-positive hyperplastic murine skin and a subset of human squamous cell carcinomas. We suggest that DEK up-regulation may contribute to carcinoma development at least in part through increased proliferation and retardation of differentiation. PMID:19036808

  10. Expression of c-yes oncogene product in various animal tissues and spontaneous canine tumours.

    PubMed

    Rungsipipat, A; Tateyama, S; Yamaguchi, R; Uchida, K; Miyoshi, N

    1999-06-01

    An immunohistochemical study of various visceral organs of normal adult dogs, cats, pigs, horses, cows, and chickens (five of each species) and of 185 spontaneous canine tumours was carried out using paraffin wax sections and a commercially available antibody to the human c- yes oncogene product. Among the adult normal tissues of six animal species, epithelial cells of the proximal and distal renal tubules, the myocardium, hepatocytes, cerebellar Purkinje cells and adrenal cortical cells were positive for c- yes product. Among the foetal tissues of dogs and chickens, a positive reaction was observed on canine chorionic villi cells and chick yolk sac surface epithelium, and on epithelial cells of the renal tubules, hepatocytes and the myocardium. These findings suggest that the c- yes proto-oncogene may play a physiological role in the cell growth and metabolism of these adult and foetal tissues. Of the 185 tumours tested, 59 (31.9 per cent) expressed the c- yes oncogene product. The c- yes -positive tumours accounted for 44.4 per cent (12/27) of the skin tumours, 5.5 per cent (1/18) of the round cell tumours, 35. 7 per cent (10/28) of the soft tissue tumours, 21.4 per cent (3/14) of the testicular tumours, 29.1 per cent (23/79) of the mammary tumours, and 52.6 per cent (10/19) of the other tumours types. Expression of the c- yes oncogene appeared to be common in spontaneously arising canine tumours, and the degree of expression varied considerably by tumour type.

  11. Expression of ras oncogenes in cultured human cells alters the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of cytokine genes.

    PubMed Central

    Demetri, G D; Ernst, T J; Pratt, E S; Zenzie, B W; Rheinwald, J G; Griffin, J D

    1990-01-01

    Autonomous production of cytokines such as the hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), IL-1, or IL-6 has been demonstrated in numerous human and murine neoplasms, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of several paraneoplastic syndromes such as leukocytosis, fever, and hypercalcemia. Because of the high frequency with which mutations in ras protooncogenes have been detected in human tumors, as well as evidence linking ras gene products to activation of certain cellular functions, we investigated whether ras mutations might influence the regulation of cytokine genes. Normal human fibroblasts transfected with a mutant val12 H-ras oncogene expressed increased levels of mRNA transcripts encoding granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), and IL-1 beta compared with controls. Human mesothelioma cells transfected with a mutant asp12 N-ras oncogene exhibited similar alterations in cytokine gene expression. Estimates of transcriptional activity by nuclear run-on analysis revealed a selective increase in transcription only for the IL-1 gene. Analysis of mRNA half-life demonstrated a marked increase in the stability of numerous cytokine transcripts, including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1, and IL-6. The addition of anti-IL-1 neutralizing antibody to cultures of cells expressing ras mutants did not block the expression of any of the cytokines examined, suggesting that the baseline expression of GM-CSF, G-CSF, and IL-6 was not a secondary event due to the increased transcription of IL-1. These results indicate that mutations in ras genes may alter expression of several cytokine genes through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Images PMID:2212010

  12. Regulation of oncogene expression in T-DNA-transformed host plant cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Lee, Chil-Woo; Wehner, Nora; Imdahl, Fabian; Svetlana, Veselova; Weiste, Christoph; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang; Deeken, Rosalia

    2015-01-01

    Virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains integrate their T-DNA into the plant genome where the encoded agrobacterial oncogenes are expressed and cause crown gall disease. Essential for crown gall development are IaaH (indole-3-acetamide hydrolase), IaaM (tryptophan monooxygenase) and Ipt (isopentenyl transferase), which encode enzymes for the biosynthesis of auxin (IaaH, IaaM) and cytokinin (Ipt). Although these oncogenes are well studied as the tumor-inducing principle, nothing is known about the regulation of oncogene expression in plant cells. Our studies show that the intergenic regions (IGRs) between the coding sequences (CDS) of the three oncogenes function as promoters in plant cells. These promoters possess a eukaryotic sequence organization and cis-regulatory elements for the binding of plant transcription factors. WRKY18, WRKY40, WRKY60 and ARF5 were identified as activators of the Ipt promoter whereas IaaH and IaaM is constitutively expressed and no transcription factor further activates their promoters. Consistent with these results, the wrky triple mutant plants in particular, develops smaller crown galls than wild-type and exhibits a reduced Ipt transcription, despite the presence of an intact ARF5 gene. WRKY40 and WRKY60 gene expression is induced by A. tumefaciens within a few hours whereas the ARF5 gene is transcribed later during crown gall development. The WRKY proteins interact with ARF5 in the plant nucleus, but only WRKY40 together with ARF5 synergistically boosts the activation of the Ipt promoter in an auxin-dependent manner. From our data, we propose that A. tumefaciens initially induces WRKY40 gene expression as a pathogen defense response of the host cell. The WRKY protein is recruited to induce Ipt expression, which initiates cytokinin-dependent host cell division. With increasing auxin levels triggered by ubiquitous expression of IaaH and IaaM, ARF5 is activated and interacts with WRKY40 to potentiate Ipt expression and balance

  13. Expression of BCR-ABL1 oncogene relative to ABL1 gene changes overtime in chronic myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manu; Milani, Lili; Hermansson, Monica; Simonsson, Bengt; Markevaern, Berit; Syvaenen, Ann Christine; Barbany, Gisela

    2008-02-15

    Using a quantitative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay we have investigated the changes in the expression of the BCR-ABL1 oncogene relative to the wild-type ABL1 and BCR alleles in cells from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients not responding to therapy. The results show a progressive increase in the BCR-ABL1 oncogene expression at the expense of decreased expression of the ABL1 allele, not involved in the fusion. No relative changes in the expression of the two BCR alleles were found. These results demonstrate that allele-specific changes in gene expression, with selective, progressive silencing of the wild-type ABL1 allele in favor of the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 allele occur in CML patients with therapy-resistant disease.

  14. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-08-17

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8(+) T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms.

  15. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8+ T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms. PMID:26282919

  16. Tocopherol Succinate: Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymes and Oncogene Expression, and Hematopoietic Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vijay K.; Parekh, Vaishali I.; Brown, Darren S.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Mog, Steven R.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: A class of naturally occurring isoforms of tocopherol (tocols) was shown to have varying degrees of protection when administered before radiation exposure. We recently demonstrated that {alpha}-tocopherol succinate (TS) is a potential radiation prophylactic agent. Our objective in this study was to further investigate the mechanism of action of TS in mice exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiation. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of TS on expression of antioxidant enzymes and oncogenes by quantitative RT-PCR in bone marrow cells of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiated mice. Further, we tested the ability of TS to rescue and repopulate hematopoietic stem cells by analyzing bone marrow cellularity and spleen colony forming unit in spleen of TS-injected and irradiated mice. Results: Our results demonstrate that TS modulated the expression of antioxidant enzymes and inhibited expression of oncogenes in irradiated mice at different time points. TS also increased colony forming unit-spleen numbers and bone marrow cellularity in irradiated mice. Conclusions: Results provide additional support for the observed radioprotective efficacy of TS and insight into mechanisms.

  17. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-10-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8(+) T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms. PMID:26282919

  18. STAT5 Outcompetes STAT3 To Regulate the Expression of the Oncogenic Transcriptional Modulator BCL6

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Nelson, Erik A.; Yeh, Jennifer E.; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5 has been shown to drive cancer pathogenesis through dysregulation of genes involved in cell survival, growth, and differentiation. Although STAT3 and STAT5 are structurally related, they can have opposite effects on key genes, including BCL6. BCL6, a transcriptional repressor, has been shown to be oncogenic in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. BCL6 also plays an important role in breast cancer pathogenesis, a disease in which STAT3 and STAT5 can be activated individually or concomitantly. To determine the mechanism by which these oncogenic transcription factors regulate BCL6 transcription, we analyzed their effects at the levels of chromatin and gene expression. We found that STAT3 increases expression of BCL6 and enhances recruitment of RNA polymerase II phosphorylated at a site associated with transcriptional initiation. STAT5, in contrast, represses BCL6 expression below basal levels and decreases the association of RNA polymerase II at the gene. Furthermore, the repression mediated by STAT5 is dominant over STAT3-mediated induction. STAT5 exerts this effect by displacing STAT3 from one of the two regulatory regions to which it binds. These findings may underlie the divergent biology of breast cancers containing activated STAT3 alone or in conjunction with activated STAT5. PMID:23716595

  19. Pervasive transcription read-through promotes aberrant expression of oncogenes and RNA chimeras in renal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Ana R; Leite, Ana P; Carvalho, Sílvia; Matos, Mafalda R; Martins, Filipa B; Vítor, Alexandra C; Desterro, Joana MP; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; de Almeida, Sérgio F

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of cancer genes and non-canonical RNA species is a hallmark of cancer. However, the mechanisms driving such atypical gene expression programs are incompletely understood. Here, our transcriptional profiling of a cohort of 50 primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals that transcription read-through beyond the termination site is a source of transcriptome diversity in cancer cells. Amongst the genes most frequently mutated in ccRCC, we identified SETD2 inactivation as a potent enhancer of transcription read-through. We further show that invasion of neighbouring genes and generation of RNA chimeras are functional outcomes of transcription read-through. We identified the BCL2 oncogene as one of such invaded genes and detected a novel chimera, the CTSC-RAB38, in 20% of ccRCC samples. Collectively, our data highlight a novel link between transcription read-through and aberrant expression of oncogenes and chimeric transcripts that is prevalent in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09214.001 PMID:26575290

  20. Effect of sulfur dioxide on expression of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes from rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Juli; Meng, Ziqiang

    2010-06-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) is a ubiquitous air pollutant that is present in low concentrations in the urban air, and in higher concentrations in the working environment. In the present study, male Wistar rats were housed in exposure chambers and treated with 14.00 +/- 1.01, 28.00 +/- 1.77 and 56.00 +/- 3.44 mg m(-3) SO(2) for 6 h/day for 7 days, while control group was exposed to filtered air in the same condition. The mRNA and protein levels of proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, and Ki-ras) and tumor suppressor genes (p53, Rb, and p16) were analyzed in lungs using a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) assay and Western blot analysis. The results showed that mRNA and protein levels of c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, Ki-ras, and p53 in lungs were increased in a dose-dependent manner, while mRNA and protein levels of Rb and p16 were decreased in lungs of rats after SO(2) inhalation. These results lead to a conclusion that SO(2) exposure could activate expressions of proto-oncogenes and suppress expressions of tumor suppressor genes, which might relate to the molecular mechanism of cocarcinogenic properties and potential carcinogenic effects of SO(2). According to previous studies, the results also indicated that promoter genes of apoptosis and tumor suppressor genes could produce apoptotic signals to antagonize the growth signals that arise from oncogenes. Understanding its molecular controls will benefit development of treatments for many diseases.

  1. Effects of cadmium on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and proto-oncogene expression in zebrafish liver cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying Ying; Zhu, Jin Yong; Chan, King Ming

    2014-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the major transitional metal that has toxic effects in aquatic organisms and their associated ecosystem; however, its hepatic toxicity and carcinogenicity are not very well characterized. We used a zebrafish liver (ZFL) cell line as a model to investigate the mechanism of Cd-induced toxicity on hepatocytes. Our results showed that Cd can be effectively accumulated in ZFL cells in our exposure experiments. Cell cytotoxicity assays and flow cytometer measurements revealed that Cd(2+) stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers indicating potentially tumorigenic effects of Cd in ZFL cells. Gene expression profiles also indicated that Cd downregulated oncogenes p53 and rad51 and upregulated immediate response oncogenes, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible (gadd45) genes, and growth factors. We also found dramatic changes in the gene expression of c-jun and igf1rb at different exposure time points, supporting the notion that potentially tumorigenic of Cd-is involved in the activation of immediate early genes or genes related to apoptosis in cancer promotion.

  2. Investigating the Expression of Oncogenic and Tumor Suppressive MicroRNA in DLBCL.

    PubMed

    Handal, Brian; Enlow, Rossanna; Lara, Daniel; Bailey, Mark; Vega, Francisco; Hu, Peter; Lennon, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of lymphoma, accounting for 40 percent of newly diagnosed cases each year. DLBCL is an aggressive abnormal growth of tissue characterized by the accumulation of abnormal B-lymphocytes in the lymphatics of affected individuals. The goal of this study was to analyze microRNA (miRNA) as an alternative method of diagnosis and treatment for patients affected with the observed cancer. MiRNAs are small, non-coding, endogenous RNA that control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Emerging evidence suggests that miRNA-mediated gene regulation has a functional role in cancer and could prove to be crucial targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we provide a quantitative study on the expression of a diverse class of oncogenic and tumor suppressive miRNA that have shown to regulate oncoproteins involved in differentiation, proliferation, and/or apoptosis.

  3. Expression of the Pokemon proto-oncogene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wei; Liu, Fei; Tang, Feng-Zhu; Lan, Jiao; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Chen, Xing-Zhou; Ye, Hui-Lan; Cai, Yong-Lin

    2013-01-01

    To study the differentiated expression of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines and tissues, mRNA and protein expression levels of CNE1, CNE2, CNE3 and C666-1 were detected separately by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR and Western-blotting. The immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line NP69 was used as a control. The Pokemon protein expression level in biopsy specimens from chronic rhinitis patients and undifferentiated non keratinizing NPC patients was determined by Western-blotting and arranged from high to low: C666-1>CNE1>CNE2> CNE3>NP69. The Pokemon mRNA expression level was also arranged from high to low: CNE1>CNE2>NP69>C666-1>CNE3. Pokemon expression of NP69 and C666-1 obviously varied from mRNA to protein. The Pokemon protein level of NPC biopsy specimens was obviously higher than in chronic rhinitis. The data suggest that high Pokemon protein expression is closely associated with undifferentiated non-keratinizing NPC and may provide useful information for NPC molecular target therapy. PMID:24377524

  4. Expression of the Pokemon proto-oncogene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wei; Liu, Fei; Tang, Feng-Zhu; Lan, Jiao; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Chen, Xing-Zhou; Ye, Hui-Lan; Cai, Yong-Lin

    2013-01-01

    To study the differentiated expression of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines and tissues, mRNA and protein expression levels of CNE1, CNE2, CNE3 and C666-1 were detected separately by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR and Western-blotting. The immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line NP69 was used as a control. The Pokemon protein expression level in biopsy specimens from chronic rhinitis patients and undifferentiated non keratinizing NPC patients was determined by Western-blotting and arranged from high to low: C666-1>CNE1>CNE2> CNE3>NP69. The Pokemon mRNA expression level was also arranged from high to low: CNE1>CNE2>NP69>C666-1>CNE3. Pokemon expression of NP69 and C666-1 obviously varied from mRNA to protein. The Pokemon protein level of NPC biopsy specimens was obviously higher than in chronic rhinitis. The data suggest that high Pokemon protein expression is closely associated with undifferentiated non-keratinizing NPC and may provide useful information for NPC molecular target therapy.

  5. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-08-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  6. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  7. The oncogenic transcription factor c-Jun regulates glutaminase expression and sensitizes cells to glutaminase-targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lukey, Michael J.; Greene, Kai Su; Erickson, Jon W.; Wilson, Kristin F.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Many transformed cells exhibit altered glucose metabolism and increased utilization of glutamine for anabolic and bioenergetic processes. These metabolic adaptations, which accompany tumorigenesis, are driven by oncogenic signals. Here we report that the transcription factor c-Jun, product of the proto-oncogene JUN, is a key regulator of mitochondrial glutaminase (GLS) levels. Activation of c-Jun downstream of oncogenic Rho GTPase signalling leads to elevated GLS gene expression and glutaminase activity. In human breast cancer cells, GLS protein levels and sensitivity to GLS inhibition correlate strongly with c-Jun levels. We show that c-Jun directly binds to the GLS promoter region, and is sufficient to increase gene expression. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of c-Jun renders breast cancer cells dependent on GLS activity. These findings reveal a role for c-Jun as a driver of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, and suggest that cancers overexpressing JUN may be especially sensitive to GLS-targeted therapies. PMID:27089238

  8. The prognostic potential and oncogenic effects of PRR11 expression in hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Baohua; Yu, Wenlong; Li, Wenfeng; Yu, Guanzhen; Gao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    PRR11 is a newly identified oncogene in lung cancer, yet its role in others tumors remains unclear. Gastrointestinal tissue microarrays were used to evaluate PRR11 expression and its association with clinical outcome was analyzed in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Overexpression of PRR11 was observed in esophageal, gastric, pancreatic, colorectal, and hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Expression of PRR11 correlated with lymph node metastasis and CA199 level in two HC patient cohorts. After an R0 resection, a high level of PRR11 expression was found to be an independent indicator of recurrence (P = 0.001). In cell culture, PRR11 silencing resulted in decreased cellular proliferation, cell migration, tumor growth of QBC939 cells. Microarray analysis revealed that several genes involved in cell proliferation, cell adhesion, and cell migration were altered in PRR11-knockout cells, including: vimentin (VIM), Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1), early growth response protein (EGR1), and System A amino acid transporter1 (SNAT1). Silencing PRR11 inhibited the expression of UCHL1, EGR1, and SNAT1 proteins, with immunoassays revealing a significant correlation among the levels of these four proteins. These results indicate that PRR11 is an independent prognostic indicator for patients with HC. PMID:25971332

  9. Oncogenic kinase NPM/ALK induces expression of HIF1α mRNA.

    PubMed

    Marzec, M; Liu, X; Wong, W; Yang, Y; Pasha, T; Kantekure, K; Zhang, P; Woetmann, A; Cheng, M; Odum, N; Wasik, M A

    2011-03-17

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation mediated by the oncogenic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase remain only partially understood. In this study, we report that T-cell lymphoma (TCL) cells carrying the nucleophosmin (NPM)/ALK fusion protein (ALK+ TCL) strongly express hypoxia-induced factor 1α (HIF1α) mRNA, even under normoxic conditions, and markedly upregulate HIF1α protein expression under hypoxia. HIF1α expression is strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM/ALK, as shown in BaF3 cells transfected with wild-type NPM/ALK and kinase-inactive NPM/ALK K210R mutant and by the inhibition of the NPM/ALK function in ALK+ TCL cells by a small-molecule ALK inhibitor. NPM/ALK induces HIF1α expression by upregulating its gene transcription through its key signal transmitter signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which binds to the HIF1α gene promoter as shown by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and is required for HIF1α gene expression as demonstrated by its small interfering RNA-mediated depletion. In turn, depletion of HIF1α increases mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation, cell growth and proliferation and decreases vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis. These results identify a novel cell-transforming property of NPM/ALK, namely its ability to induce the expression of HIF1α, a protein with an important role in carcinogenesis. These results also provide another rationale to therapeutically target NPM/ALK and STAT3 in ALK+ TCL.

  10. Regulation of the expression of proto-oncogenes by autocrine embryotropins in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xing Liang; O'Neill, C

    2011-06-01

    Autocrine embryotropins act as survival signals for the preimplantation embryo. In this study we examined the role of Paf in the transcription of the key proto-oncogenes Bcl2 and Fos. Transcripts were detected in oocytes and some cohorts of zygotes but not in cohorts of 2-cell, 8-cell, and blastocyst stage embryos. Immunolocalization of BCL2 and FOS showed little staining in oocytes and zygotes but increased staining in the embryo from the 2-cell to blastocyst stage. Paf (37 nM) treatment of 2-cell embryos caused an alpha-amanitin (26 μM)-sensitive increase in Bcl2 and Fos transcripts 20 min after treatment that subsided by 40 min. This increase was blocked by inhibition of calcium (by BAPTA-AM) or phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling (by LY294002). Paf challenge also caused increased staining of BCL2 and FOS. Increased staining of FOS required new protein synthesis that had a half-life of 2-4 h after Paf challenge. Only a small proportion (∼12%) of individual 2-cell embryos collected from the reproductive tract had detectable Bcl2 and Fos. This dichotomous pattern of transcript expression is consistent with the known periodic actions of Paf (which has a periodicity of ∼90 min) and the relatively short half-life of the resulting transcripts. A BCL2 antagonist (HA14-1) caused a dose-dependent decrease in the capacity of cultured zygotes to develop to morphological blastocysts, which was partially reversed by the simultaneous addition of Paf to medium. The results show that Paf induces periodic transient transcriptions of key proto-oncogenes that result in the persistent presence of the resulting proteins in the preimplantation phase of development.

  11. Expression of Id proteins is regulated by the Bcl-3 proto-oncogene in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, K; Saamarthy, K; Syed Khaja, A S; Bjartell, A; Massoumi, R

    2013-03-21

    B-cell leukemia 3 (Bcl-3) is a member of the inhibitor of κB family, which regulates a wide range of biological processes by functioning as a transcriptional activator or as a repressor of target genes. As high levels of Bcl-3 expression and activation have been detected in different types of human cancer, Bcl-3 has been labeled a proto-oncogene. Our study uncovered a markedly upregulated Bcl-3 expression in human prostate cancer (PCa), where inflammatory cell infiltration was observed. Elevated Bcl-3 expression in PCa was dependent on the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6-mediated STAT3 activation. Microarray analyses, using Bcl-3 knockdown in PCa cells, identified the inhibitor of DNA-binding (Id) family of helix-loop-helix proteins as potential Bcl-3-regulated genes. Bcl-3 knockdown reduced the abundance of Id-1 and Id-2 proteins and boosted PCa cells to be more receptive to undergoing apoptosis following treatment with anticancer drug. Our data imply that inactivation of Bcl-3 may lead to sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis, thus suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy in PCa treatment.

  12. Posttranscriptional regulation of cellular gene expression by the c-myc oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, G.C.; Cole, M.D. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-01-01

    The c-myc oncogene has been implicated in the development of many different cancers, yet the mechanism by which the c-myc protein alters cellular growth control has proven elusive. The authors used a cDNA hybridization difference assay to isolate two genes, mr1 and mr2, that were constitutively expressed (i.e., deregulated) in rodent fibroblast cell lines immortalized by transfection of a viral promoter-linked c-myc gene. Both cDNAs were serum inducible in quiescent G/sub o/ fibroblasts, suggesting that they are functionally related to cellular proliferative processes. Although there were significant differences in cytoplasmic mRNA levels between myc-immortalized and control cells, the rates of transcription and mRNA turnover of both genes were similar, suggesting that c-myc regulates mr1 and mr2 expression by some nuclear posttranscriptional mechanism. Their results provide evidence that c-myc can rapidly modulate cellular gene expression and suggest that c-myc may function in gene regulation at the level of RNA export, splicing, or nuclear RNA turnover.

  13. Tissue-specific expression and developmental regulation of the human fgr proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, T.J. . Dept. of Medicine); Connolly, N.L.; Senior, R.M. ); Katamine, S.; Cheah, M.S.C.; Robbins

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the authors show that c-fgr proto-oncogene expression is limited to normal peripheral blood granulocytes, monocytes, and alveolar macrophages, all of which contain 50 to 100 copies of c-fgr mRNA per cell. The c-fgr RNA molecules in these cells consisted of partially spliced transcripts containing intron 7 and completely spliced molecules capable of encoding the predicted p55 c-fgr protein. The splicing of intron 7 appeared to occur after the splicing of most of the other introns; partially spliced molecules containing intron 7 did not appear to be transported into the cytoplasm. Very low levels of fgr transcripts were also present in U937 promonocytic cells and increased in abundance with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced differentiation. The level of fgr transcripts began to increase 2 to 4 after TPA addition peaked at 8 h, and subsequently declined. Since the authors found that the half-life of fgr mRNA was longer than 8 h, these changes are best explained by transient transcriptional activation of fgr during TPA-induced differentiation, although nuclear runoff experiments were not sensitive enough to detect this event. Their results demonstrate that the c-fgr gene is expressed in a tissue- and development-specific fashion and suggest that constitutive expression of c-fgr in U937 cells is regulated by a labile transcriptional repressor.

  14. Comparative analysis of the expression and oncogenic activities of Xenopus c-, N-, and L-myc homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber-Agus, N; Torres, R; Horner, J; Lau, A; Jamrich, M; DePinho, R A

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based cloning strategy allowed for the isolation of two distinct Xenopus L-myc genes, as well as previously isolated xc- and xN-myc genes, thus demonstrating that these three well-defined members of the mammalian myc gene family are present in lower vertebrates as well. Comparison of the Xenopus and mammalian Myc families revealed a high degree of structural relatedness at the gene and protein levels; this homology was consistent with the ability of the xc-myc1 and xN-myc1 genes to function as oncogenes in primary mammalian cells. In contrast, the xL-myc1 gene was found to be incapable of transforming rat embryo fibroblast cells, and this inactivity may relate to localized but significant differences in its putative transactivation domain. Analysis of xc-, xN-, and xL-myc gene expression demonstrated that (i) all three genes were highly expressed during oogenesis and their transcripts accumulated as abundant maternal mRNAs, (ii) each gene exhibited a distinctive pattern of expression during embryogenesis and in adult tissues, and (iii) the xL-myc1 and xL-myc2 genes were coordinately expressed in the maternal and zygotic genomes. The markedly high expression of the Xenopus myc gene family in differentiated tissues, such as the central nervous system and kidney, contrasts sharply with the low levels observed in mammalian adult tissues. These differences may reflect unique functions of the Myc family proteins in processes specific to amphibians, such as tissue regeneration. Images PMID:8455622

  15. Identification of lung cancer oncogenes based on the mRNA expression and single nucleotide polymorphism profile data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Mei, Q; Ai, Y Q; Li, R Q; Chang, L; Li, Y F; Xia, Y X; Li, W H; Chen, Y

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the oncogenes associated with lung cancer based on the mRNA and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) profile data. The mRNA expression profile data of GSE43458 (80 cancer and 30 normal samples) and SNP profile data of GSE33355 (61 pairs of lung cancer samples and control samples) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Common genes between the mRNA profile and SNP profile were identified as the lung cancer oncogenes. Risk subpathways of the selected oncogenes with the SNP locus were analyzed using the iSubpathwayMiner package in R. Moreover, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of the oncogenes was constructed using the HPRD database and then visualized using the Cytoscape. Totally, 3004 DEGs (1105 up-regulated and 1899 down-regulated) and 125 significant SNPs closely related to 174 genes in the lung cancer samples were identified. Also, 39 common genes, like PFKP (phosphofructokinase, platelet) and DGKH-rs11616202 (diacylglycerol kinase, eta) that enriched in sub-pathways such as galactose metabolism, fructose and mannose metabolism, and pentose phosphate pathway, were identified as the lung cancer oncogenes. Besides, PIK3R1 (phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit 1), RORA (RAR-related orphan receptor A), MAGI3 (membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 3), PTPRM (protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type, M), and BMP6 (bone morphogenetic protein 6) were the hub genes in PPI network. Our study suggested that PFKP and DGKH that enriched in galactose metabolism, fructose and mannose metabolism pathway, as well as PIK3R1, RORA, and MAGI3, may be the lung cancer oncogenes.

  16. ZYG11A serves as an oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer and influences CCNE1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Qi; Chen, Chen; Yin, Rong; Huang, Xing; Wang, Xuan; Shi, Run; Xu, Lin; Ren, Binhui

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, we identified ZYG11A as a potential oncogene. We determined the expression of ZYG11A in NSCLC tissues and explored its clinical significance. And also evaluated the effects of ZYG11A on NSCLC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that ZYG11A is hyper-expressed in NSCLC tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues, and increased expression of ZYG11A is associated with a poor prognosis (HR: 2.489, 95%CI: 1.248-4.963, p = 0.010). ZYG11A knockdown induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits proliferation, migration, and invasion of NSCLC cells. ZYG11A knockdown also results in decreased expression of CCNE1. Over-expression of CCNE1 in cells with ZYG11A knockdown restores their oncogenic activities. Our data suggest that ZYG11A may serve as a novel oncogene promoting tumorigenicity of NSCLC cells by inducing cell cycle alterations and increasing CCNE1 expression. PMID:26771237

  17. The MYC 3′ Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Eshelman, Melanie A.; Raup-Konsavage, Wesley M.; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC) by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC). The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF) and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3′ Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3′ WRE) with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE) within the MYC 3′ WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3′ WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3′ WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27223305

  18. MicroRNA-205 downregulates mixed-lineage-AF4 oncogene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Liping; Li, Jingxin; Zheng, Dehua; Li, Yonghui; Gao, Xiaoning; Xu, Chengwang; Gao, Li; Wang, Lili; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid/lymphoid or mixed-lineage AF4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MLL-AF4 ALL) is a pediatric leukemia that occurs rarely in adults. MLL-AF4 ALL is typically characterized by the presence of chromosomal translocation (t(4;1l)(q21;q23)), leading to expression of MLL-AF4 fusion protein. Although MLL-AF4 fusion protein triggers a molecular pathogenesis and hematological presentations that are unique to leukemias, the precise role of this oncogene in leukemogenesis remains unclear. Previous studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRs) might modulate the expression of MLL-AF4 ALL fusion protein, thereby suggesting the involvement of miR in progression or suppression of MLL-AF4 ALL. We have previously demonstrated that miR-205 negatively regulates transcription of an MLL-AF4 luciferase reporter. Here, we report that exogenous expression of miR-205 in MLL-AF4 human cell lines (RS4;11 and MV4-11) inversely regulates the expression of MLL-AF4 at both messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein level. Furthermore, miR-205 significantly induced apoptosis in MLL-AF4 cells as evidenced by Annex in V staining using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. The proliferative capacity of leukemic cells was suppressed by miR-205. The addition of an miR-205 inhibitor was able to restore the observed effects. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that miR-205 may have potential value as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of MLL-AF4 ALL. PMID:24009426

  19. Expression of growth factors, proto-oncogenes, and p53 in nasopharyngeal angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Nagai, M A; Butugan, O; Logullo, A; Brentani, M M

    1996-02-01

    Biopsies from 25 juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) and respective normal inferior turbinates were examined and compared. The expression patterns of the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for various growth factors possibly involved in the growth of mesenchymal cells, as well as angiogenesis and fibrosis, were also compared. These growth factors included insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factors-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and platelet-derived growth factors (PDGF-A and PDGF-B). Quantification of mRNA coding for proto-oncogenes and suppressor genes related to proliferation (i.e., c-myc, c-fos, p53) was also undertaken. Tumor and turbinates expressed similar levels of bFGF, VEGF, TGF-beta1, c-myc, c-fos, and PDGF-A mRNAs. The presence of TGF-beta1 protein was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in several structures that characterize the lesions of JNA, which suggests that TGF-beta1 may play a role in the development of the fibrous component of this tumor. PDGF-B and p53 were overexpressed (i.e., twice the mean level found in turbinates) in 50% and 32% of JNAs, respectively but there was no statistical significance when compared with controls. Statistically significant increased expression of IGF-II mRNA was observed in JNA (P = .04). IGF-II mRNA levels were correlated to p53 (P = .05) and PDGF-B (P = .034), indicating a possible synergistic action of such factors in JNA. The results of this study suggest that IGF-II might be a potential growth regulator of nasopharyngeal angiofibromas.

  20. Merkel cell carcinoma subgroups by Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA relative abundance and oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Kishor; Goedert, James J.; Modali, Rama; Preiss, Liliana; Ayers, Leona W.

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous malignancy of dermal neuroendocrine cells. To investigate this heterogeneity, we developed a tissue microarray (TMA) to characterize immunohistochemical staining of candidate tumor cell proteins and a quantitative PCR assay to detect MCPyV and measure viral loads. MCPyV was detected in 19 of 23 (74%) primary MCC tumors, but 8 of these had less than 1 viral copy per 300 cells. Viral abundance of 0.06–1.2viral copies/cell was directly related to presence of retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) and terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TdT) by immunohistochemical staining (P≤0.003). Higher viral abundance tumors tended to be associated with less p53 expression, younger age at diagnosis, and longer survival (P≤0.08). These data suggest that MCC may arise through different oncogenic pathways, including ones independent of pRb and MCPyV. PMID:19551862

  1. Proto-oncogene expression during terminal differentiation of cardiac and skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, W.C.; Lanson, N.A. Jr.; Springhorn, J.P.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the expression of 17 different protooncogenes in proliferating and terminally differentiating cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. Cardiac muscle cells at various periods during differentiation were obtained from the rat. The L6 skeletal muscle cell line and a primary culture of human skeletal muscle satellite cells were the source of skeletal muscle cells. Total cellular RNA was isolated by the quanidinium procedure and purified by CsCl. RNA was separated on 1.2% agarose-formaldehyde gels and blotted onto Zeta-Probe nylon membranes. DNA probes, labeled with /sup 32/P, were generated by nick translation of purified DNA fragments or recombinant plasmid DNA. Northern blots were hybridized with /sup 32/P-DNA in 50% formamide, 1 mM EDTA, 7% SDS, 0.5 M NaHPO/sub 4/, 0.5 mg/ml denatured herring testes DNA and washed in 1 mM EDTA, 40 mM NaHPO/sub 4/ and 5% SDS. As positive controls, to assess DNA synthesis and cell proliferation, human histone H/sub 4/ and thymidine kinase were used as probes; rat cardiac muscle myosin heavy chain and M creatine kinase served to assess muscle cell differentiation. Results of these studies indicate that several of these oncogenes may be involved with the regulation of cell proliferation and terminal cell differentiation in striated muscle.

  2. c-Myc oncogene expression in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Moosvi, Zama; Rekha, K

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of c-Myc oncogene in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst were selected and primary monoclonal mouse anti-human c-Myc antibody was used in a dilution of 1: 50. Statistical Analysis was performed using Mann Whitney U test. Results: 80% positivity was observed in ameloblastoma, AOT and OKC; 50% positivity in radicular cyst and 20% positivity in dentigerous cyst. Comparison of c-Myc expression between ameloblastoma and AOT did not reveal significant results. Similarly, no statistical significance was observed when results of OKC were compared with ameloblastoma and AOT. In contrast, significant differences were seen on comparison of dentigerous cyst with ameloblastoma and AOT and radicular cyst with AOT. Conclusion: From the above data we conclude that (1) Ameloblastoma and AOT have similar proliferative potential and their biologic behavior cannot possibly be attributed to it. (2) OKC has an intrinsic growth potential which is absent in other cysts and reinforces its classification as keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:23798830

  3. VAV3 Oncogene Expression in Colorectal Cancer: Clinical Aspects and Functional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Uen, Yih-Huei; Fang, Chia-Lang; Hseu, You-Cheng; Shen, Pei-Chun; Yang, Hsin-Ling; Wen, Kuo-Shan; Hung, Shih-Ting; Wang, Lu-Hai; Lin, Kai-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, the current therapeutic approaches for advanced CRC are ineffective. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the VAV3 oncogene in tumor progression and in the prognosis of human CRC. The two patient cohorts in this study comprised 354 CRC cases from 1998 to 2005 with documented pathologic and clinical factors and clinical outcomes. VAV3 protein levels were significantly correlated with the depth of invasion (P = 0.0259), the nodal status (P < 0.0001), distant metastasis (P = 0.0354), the stage (P < 0.0001), and poor disease-free survival (P = 0.003). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that VAV3 overexpression is an independent prognostic marker for CRC (P = 0.041). In vitro experiments indicated that VAV3 knockdown inhibited CRC cell growth, spread, and xenograft proliferation. Mechanistic studies further revealed that VAV3 overexpression could dysregulate the expression of cell cycle control- and metastasis-related molecules by activating the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in both CRC cells and xenografts. This study suggests that VAV3 overexpression could be a useful marker for predicting the outcomes of CRC patients and that VAV3 targeting represents a potential modality for treating CRC. PMID:25791293

  4. Notch-1 expression levels in 3T3-L1 cells influence ras signaling and transformation by oncogenic ras.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hidalgo, M J; Garcés, C; Laborda, J

    1999-04-01

    Notch proteins participate in interactions between several cell types involved on the specification of numerous cell fates during development. We previously showed that enforced downregulation of Notch-1 expression prevented adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells. Since adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells can be induced by oncogenic ras, we studied whether this was also the case in 3T3-L1 cells with decreased levels of Notch-1 expression. We found that oncogenic ras induces transformation and not differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells with diminished levels of Notch-1. This result suggests that Notch-1 is implicated in the interpretation of signals leading to activation of p21 Ras.

  5. c-erbB-2 oncogene expression in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Kärjä, V; Syrjänen, S; Kataja, V; Syrjänen, K

    1994-01-01

    Prompted by recent findings on the amplification of c-erbB-2 (HER-2, neu) oncogene in salivary gland tumours, the present study was conducted to analyse the expression of c-erbB-2 in both benign and malignant salivary gland tumours, with special emphasis on its prognostic significance and relevance to clinical data. A series of 219 salivary gland tumours (with pertinent clinical data), including 103 malignant and 116 benign tumours, were analysed immunohistochemically using a monoclonal antibody to c-erbB-2 protein. Smoking was not a risk factor for malignant tumours, smokers being equally represented in both groups: 18.4 and 21.6% in malignant and benign series, respectively. Multi-variate analysis of the extensive clinical data did not disclose any other risk factors either. Cellular membrane staining for c-erbB-2 was present in 36 (35.0%) carcinomas and 41 (35.3%) benign tumours. Among the malignant tumours, c-erbB-2 expression was most frequent in adenoid cystic carcinomas (57.7%) followed by adenocarcinomas (39.3%). Among the benign tumours, 47% of Warthin's tumours and 33.3% of the pleomorphic adenomas showed staining for c-erbB-2. The highest prevalence of c-erbB-2 immunoreactivity was seen in adenocarcinomas of the parotid gland (81.8%), followed by undifferentiated carcinomas (75%) and adenoid cystic carcinomas (73.3%) in that location. Age at diagnosis, number of recurrences, analysis as well as time to relapse or metastases were similar in c-erbB-2-positive and -negative malignant tumours. Also mortality in c-erbB-2-positive and -negative salivary gland cancers was similar.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia Kasumi-1 cells to binase toxic action depends on the expression of KIT and АML1-ETO oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Spirin, Pavel V; Fedorova, Tatiana V; Kretova, Olga V; Tchurikov, Nickolai A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Ilinskaya, Olga N; Makarov, Alexander A

    2011-12-01

    Some RNases selectively attack malignant cells, triggering an apoptotic response, and therefore are considered as alternative chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we studied the effects of Bacillus intermedius RNase (binase) on murine myeloid progenitor cells FDC-P1; transduced FDC-P1 cells ectopically expressing mutated human KIT N822K oncogene and/or human AML1-ETO oncogene; and human leukemia Kasumi-1 cells expressing both of these oncogenes. Expression of both KIT and AML1-ETO oncogenes makes FDC-P1 cells sensitive to the toxic effects of binase. Kasumi-1 cells were the most responsive to the toxic actions of binase among the cell lines used in this work with an IC50 value of 0.56 µM. Either blocking the functional activity of the KIT protein with imatinib or knocking-down oncogene expression using lentiviral vectors producing shRNA against AML1-ETO or KIT eliminated the sensitivity of Kasumi-1 cells to binase toxic action and promoted their survival, even in the absence of KIT-dependent proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways. Here we provide evidence that the cooperative effect of the expression of mutated KIT and AML1-ETO oncogenes is crucial for selective toxic action of binase on malignant cells. These findings can facilitate clinical applications of binase providing a useful screen based on the presence of the corresponding target oncogenes in malignant cells.

  7. Estrogens and human papilloma virus oncogenes regulate human ether-à-go-go-1 potassium channel expression.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Lorenza; Ceja-Ochoa, Irais; Restrepo-Angulo, Iván; Larrea, Fernando; Avila-Chávez, Euclides; García-Becerra, Rocío; Borja-Cacho, Elizabeth; Barrera, David; Ahumada, Elías; Gariglio, Patricio; Alvarez-Rios, Elizabeth; Ocadiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Garcia-Villa, Enrique; Hernández-Gallegos, Elizabeth; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Morales, Angélica; Ordaz-Rosado, David; García-Latorre, Ethel; Escamilla, Juan; Sánchez-Peña, Luz Carmen; Saqui-Salces, Milena; Gamboa-Dominguez, Armando; Vera, Eunice; Uribe-Ramírez, Marisela; Murbartián, Janet; Ortiz, Cindy Sharon; Rivera-Guevara, Claudia; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, Andrea; Camacho, Javier

    2009-04-15

    Ether-à-go-go-1 (Eag1) potassium channels are potential tools for detection and therapy of numerous cancers. Here, we show human Eag1 (hEag1) regulation by cancer-associated factors. We studied hEag1 gene expression and its regulation by estradiol, antiestrogens, and human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes (E6/E7). Primary cultures from normal placentas and cervical cancer tissues; tumor cell lines from cervix, choriocarcinoma, keratinocytes, and lung; and normal cell lines from vascular endothelium, keratinocytes, and lung were used. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) experiments and Southern blot analysis showed Eag1 expression in all of the cancer cell types, normal trophoblasts, and vascular endothelium, in contrast to normal keratinocytes and lung cells. Estradiol and antiestrogens regulated Eag1 in a cell type-dependent manner. Real-time RT-PCR experiments in HeLa cells showed that Eag1 estrogenic regulation was strongly associated with the expression of estrogen receptor-alpha. Eag1 protein was detected by monoclonal antibodies in normal placenta and placental blood vessels. Patch-clamp recordings in normal trophoblasts treated with estradiol exhibited potassium currents resembling Eag1 channel activity. Eag1 gene expression in keratinocytes depended either on cellular immortalization or the presence of HPV oncogenes. Eag1 protein was found in keratinocytes transfected with E6/E7 HPV oncogenes. Cell proliferation of E6/E7 keratinocytes was decreased by Eag1 antibodies inhibiting channel activity and by the nonspecific Eag1 inhibitors imipramine and astemizole; the latter also increased apoptosis. Our results propose novel oncogenic mechanisms of estrogen/antiestrogen use and HPV infection. We also suggest Eag1 as an early indicator of cell proliferation leading to malignancies and a therapeutic target at early stages of cellular hyperproliferation. PMID:19351862

  8. Normal ABL1 is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic target in human and mouse leukemias expressing oncogenic ABL1 kinases.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Yashodhara; Koptyra, Mateusz; Hoser, Grazyna; Kantekure, Kanchan; Roy, Darshan; Gornicka, Barbara; Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Bolton-Gillespie, Elisabeth; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Müschen, Markus; Valent, Peter; Wasik, Mariusz A; Richardson, Christine; Hantschel, Oliver; van der Kuip, Heiko; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2016-04-28

    Leukemias expressing constitutively activated mutants of ABL1 tyrosine kinase (BCR-ABL1, TEL-ABL1, NUP214-ABL1) usually contain at least 1 normal ABL1 allele. Because oncogenic and normal ABL1 kinases may exert opposite effects on cell behavior, we examined the role of normal ABL1 in leukemias induced by oncogenic ABL1 kinases. BCR-ABL1-Abl1(-/-) cells generated highly aggressive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-blast phase-like disease in mice compared with less malignant CML-chronic phase-like disease from BCR-ABL1-Abl1(+/+) cells. Additionally, loss of ABL1 stimulated proliferation and expansion of BCR-ABL1 murine leukemia stem cells, arrested myeloid differentiation, inhibited genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis, and facilitated accumulation of chromosomal aberrations. Conversely, allosteric stimulation of ABL1 kinase activity enhanced the antileukemia effect of ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib and ponatinib) in human and murine leukemias expressing BCR-ABL1, TEL-ABL1, and NUP214-ABL1. Therefore, we postulate that normal ABL1 kinase behaves like a tumor suppressor and therapeutic target in leukemias expressing oncogenic forms of the kinase. PMID:26864341

  9. MEF2B mutations lead to deregulated expression of the BCL6 oncogene in Diffuse Large B cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Carol Y.; Dominguez-Sola, David; Fabi, Melissa; Lorenz, Ivo C.; Hussein, Shafinaz; Bansal, Mukesh; Califano, Andrea; Pasqualucci, Laura; Basso, Katia; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    The MEF2B gene encodes a transcriptional activator and is found mutated in ∼11% of diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) and ∼12% of follicular lymphomas. Here, we show that MEF2B directly activates the transcription of the proto-oncogene BCL6 in normal germinal-center B cells and is required for DLBCL proliferation. MEF2B mutations enhance MEF2B transcriptional activity either by disrupting its interaction with the co-repressor CABIN1, or by rendering it insensitive to phosphorylation- and sumoylation-mediated inhibitory signaling events. Consequently, Bcl-6 transcriptional activity is deregulated in DLBCL harboring MEF2B mutations. Thus, somatic mutations of MEF2B may contribute to lymphomagenesis by deregulating the expression of the BCL6 oncogene, and MEF2B may represent an alternative target to block Bcl-6 activity in DLBCLs. PMID:23974956

  10. Regulation of proto-oncogene expression in adult and developing lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Molinar-Rode, R; Smeyne, R J; Curran, T; Morgan, J I

    1993-01-01

    Activation of immediate-early gene expression has been associated with mitogenesis, differentiation, nerve cell depolarization, and recently, terminal differentiation processes and programmed cell death. Previous evidence also suggested that immediate-early genes play a role in the physiology of the lungs (J. I. Morgan, D. R. Cohen, J. L. Hempstead, and T. Curran, Science 237:192-197, 1987). Therefore, we analyzed c-fos expression in adult and developing lung tissues. Seizures elicited by chemoconvulsants induced expression of mRNA for c-fos, c-jun, and junB and Fos-like immunoreactivity in lung tissue. The use of pharmacological antagonists and adrenalectomy indicated that this increased expression was neurogenic. Interestingly, by using a fos-lacZ transgenic mouse, it was shown that Fos-LacZ expression in response to seizure occurred preferentially in clusters of epithelial cells at the poles of the bronchioles. This was the same location of Fos-LacZ expression detected during early lung development. These data imply that pharmacological induction of immediate-early gene expression in adult mice recapitulates an embryological program of gene expression. Images PMID:8497249

  11. Proto-oncogene c-fos expression in growth regions of fetal bone and mesodermal web tissue.

    PubMed

    Dony, C; Gruss, P

    The phylogenic conservation of the proto-oncogene c-fos suggests that this gene product is required for normal metabolic processes. Investigations into the transcription pattern of c-fos in normal tissues and cells have revealed expression during development, differentiation and growth which is dependent to a large extent on external signals transferred by growth factors. The complex pattern of stage and tissue-specific expression has raised the hypothesis that the c-fos gene product might function in the control of either proliferation or differentiation. However, no detailed analysis is yet available concerning the normal expression of c-fos during embryonic and fetal development. Interestingly, recent data derived from studies in transgenic mice reveal that the biological effect of overexpression of exogenous fos is restricted to the developing bone tissue and T-cell development of the mice, perhaps signifying that these cells represent a physiological target tissue of the proto-oncogene fos. Thus, to gain deeper insight into the functional role of the c-fos gene product during physiological processes, it is a requirement to carry out a detailed analysis of the localization and cell-type specificity of c-fos expression in normal mouse embryos. Using the technique of in situ hybridization, we demonstrate here that stage-specific expression of the proto-oncogene c-fos in mouse embryos is restricted to the perichondrial growth regions of the cartilaginous skeleton. Moreover, we found strong c-fos transcription in web-forming mesodermal cells, which are also characterized by a stage-specific high growth capacity. Our results suggest a tissue-specific regulatory role of c-fos during differentiation-dependent growth processes of fetal bone and mesodermal web tissue.

  12. Synergistic Induction of Potential Warburg Effect in Zebrafish Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Co-Transgenic Expression of Myc and xmrk Oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Zheng, Weiling; Li, Hankun; Li, Caixia; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have generated inducible liver tumor models by transgenic expression of Myc or xmrk (activated EGFR homolog) oncogenes in zebrafish. To investigate the interaction of the two oncogenes, we crossed the two transgenic lines and observed more severe and faster hepatocarcinogenesis in Myc/xmrk double transgenic zebrafish than either single transgenic fish. RNA-Seq analyses revealed distinct changes in many molecular pathways among the three types of liver tumors. In particular, we found dramatic alteration of cancer metabolism based on the uniquely enriched pathways in the Myc/xmrk tumors. Critical glycolytic genes including hk2, pkm and ldha were significantly up-regulated in Myc/xmrk tumors but not in either single oncogene-induced tumors, suggesting a potential Warburg effect. In RT-qPCR analyses, the specific pkm2 isoformin Warburg effect was found to be highly enriched in the Myc/xmrk tumors but not in Myc or xmrk tumors, consistent with the observations in many human cancers with Warburg effect. Moreover, the splicing factor genes (hnrnpa1, ptbp1a, ptbp1b and sfrs3b) responsible for generating the pkm isoform were also greatly up-regulated in the Myc/xmrk tumors. As Pkm2 isoform is generally inactive and causes incomplete glycolysis to favor anabolism and tumor growth, by treatment with a Pkm2-specific activator, TEPP-46, we further demonstrated that activation of Pkm2 suppressed the growth of oncogenic liver as well as proliferation of liver cells. Collectively, our Myc/xmrk zebrafish model suggests synergetic effect of EGFR and MYC in triggering Warburg effect in the HCC formation and may provide a promising in vivo model for Warburg effect.

  13. A gene related to the proto-oncogene fps/fes is expressed at diverse times during the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Katzen, A L; Montarras, D; Jackson, J; Paulson, R F; Kornberg, T; Bishop, J M

    1991-01-01

    The proto-oncogene fps/fes encodes a distinctive type of protein-tyrosine kinase. We identified a Drosophila gene (dfps85D) whose product resembles the proteins encoded by vertebrate fps/fes and the closely related gene fer. dfps85D is located at chromosomal position 85D10-13 and is unlikely to correspond to any previously defined genetic locus in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of the gene is entirely zygotic in origin and occurs throughout the life cycle. But hybridization in situ revealed that the pattern of expression is specialized and evolves in a provocative manner. The most notable feature of expression is the diversity of developmental periods, tissues, and cells in which it occurs. In some tissues, expression is transient; in others, it is continuous. Expression occurs in both mitotic and terminally differentiated tissue and, at various times in development, is prominent in imaginal disks, gut, muscle, testes, ovaries, retina, and other neural tissues. It appears that the use of dfps85D is more diversified than that of other Drosophila protein-tyrosine kinases reported to date and contrasts sharply with the restricted expression of fps itself in vertebrates. The detailed description of expression provided here will help guide the search for mutants in dfps85D. Images PMID:1898762

  14. Oncogenic Kras Expression in Postmitotic Neurons Leads to S100A8-S100A9 Protein Overexpression and Gliosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Myung-Jeom; Liu, Yangang; Zhong, Xiaofen; Du, Juan; Peterson, Nicholas; Kong, Guangyao; Li, Hongda; Wang, Jinyong; Salamat, Shahriar; Chang, Qiang; Zhang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that up-regulation of Ras signaling in neurons promotes gliosis and astrocytoma formation in a cell nonautonomous manner. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. To address this question, we generated compound mice (LSL Kras G12D/+;CamKII-Cre) that express oncogenic Kras from its endogenous locus in postmitotic neurons after birth. These mice developed progressive gliosis, which is associated with hyperactivation of Ras signaling pathways. Microarray analysis identified S100A8 and S100A9 as two secreted molecules that are significantly overexpressed in mutant cortices. In contrast to their usual predominant expression in myeloid cells, we found that overexpression of S100A8 and S100A9 in the mutant cortex is primarily in neurons. This neuronal expression pattern is associated with increased infiltration of microglia in mutant cortex. Moreover, purified S100A8-S100A9 but not S100A8 or S100A9 alone promotes growth of primary astrocytes in vitro through both TLR4 and receptor of advanced glycation end product receptors. In summary, our results identify overexpression of S100A8-S100A9 in neurons as an early step in oncogenic Kras-induced gliosis. These molecules expressed in nonhematopoietic cells may be involved in tumorigenesis at a stage much earlier than what has been reported previously. PMID:22577135

  15. Gene expression profiling to define the cell intrinsic role of the SKI proto-oncogene in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian J J; Walkley, Carl R; Singbrant, Sofie

    2014-12-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced gene signatures associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation. Here we provide detailed experimental methods and analysis for the gene expression profiling described in our recently published study of Singbrant et al. (2014) in Haematologica. Our data sets (available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE39457) provide a resource for exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms of the involvement of the proto-oncogene SKI in hematopoietic stem cell function and development of myeloid neoplasms.

  16. Effects of sulfur dioxide derivatives on expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guohua; Meng, Ziqiang

    2009-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) is a major air pollutant suspected to act as a promoter or co-carcinogen. The present study was designed to investigate whether SO(2) derivatives (bisulfite and sulfite) had effects on the expression of several proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in cultured human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells. The mRNA and protein levels were measured by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively, following exposure to differing SO(2)-derivative concentrations and exposure times. SO(2) derivatives caused mRNA and protein over-expression of c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc at all tested doses (0.001-2mM). Over-expression of H-ras and p53 were observed in cells receiving the highest concentration (0.1-2mM), as well as the under-expression of p16 and Rb. The over-expression of c-fos and c-jun was observed after 24h recovery. The expression of c-myc and H-ras decreased to base line levels while the p53 expression decreased compared with control after 24h recovery. The mRNA and protein expression of p16 and Rb remained at initial levels after 24h recovery. The data support the hypothesis that SO(2) derivatives could cause the activation of proto-oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and SO(2) derivatives may play a role in the pathogenesis of SO(2)-associated lung cancer.

  17. Nuclear Localization and DNA Binding Properties of a Protein Expressed by Human c-myc Oncogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Hakan; Leder, Philip

    1984-08-01

    Antisera to the human cellular myc oncogene product were used to identify a human c-myc specific protein with a molecular weight of 65,000. Subcellular fractionation showed that the human c-myc protein is predominantly found in the cell nucleus. The p65 Kc-myc protein binds to double- and single-stranded DNA as measured by a DNA affinity chromatography assay.

  18. Oncogenic KRAS regulates BMP4 expression in colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Duerr, Eva-Maria; Mizukami, Yusuke; Moriichi, Kentaro; Gala, Manish; Jo, Won-Seok; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Xavier, Ramnik J; Chung, Daniel C

    2012-05-15

    Activating mutations in the KRAS oncogene are common in colorectal cancer. However, the complete spectrum of KRAS targets that mediate its tumorigenic effect has not yet been fully delineated. We identified bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4), a transforming growth factor-β family member that regulates development and tissue homeostasis, as a new target of KRAS. In SW480, Hela, and 293 cells, oncogenic KRAS(V12) downregulated BMP4 RNA levels, a BMP4 promoter luciferase construct, and Bmp4 protein levels. The MEK inhibitor PD98059 but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 blocked this downregulation of BMP4. To identify the region of the BMP4 promoter that mediated this regulation by KRAS, serial 5'-deletions of the promoter were generated. An inhibitory region was identified between -3,285 and -3,258 bp in the Bmp4 promoter. In summary, oncogenic KRAS can downregulate Bmp4 through a transcriptional pathway that depends on ERK. These findings point to a unique link between two pathways that are frequently altered in colon cancer.

  19. Oncogenes and surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Bartow, S A

    1987-08-01

    The discovery of oncogenes began with identification of genetic material in viruses capable of causing neoplasia in animals. Through processes of "transduction" and "insertional mutagenesis," RNA/retroviruses may (1) alter directly, (2) alter expression of, or (3) move pieces of host cellular genome in ways that they become potential agents of neoplastic transformation. The pieces of host cellular genome, either affected in situ by viral gene insertion or transduced by the virus, are known as oncogenes. Approximately 20 oncogenes have been identified. Although they have yet to be proven to be sufficient or necessary for neoplastic transformation, the evidence for their playing a part in the transformation process is mounting. The functions of the protein products of the various oncogenes are closely related to those of proteins involved in normal cell regulatory and cycle activities. Study of the oncogene products and their functions serves to elucidate the basic character of neoplasia. The functional classes of oncogenes with specific examples of genomic amplification, altered mRNA or protein product expression, or mutational deletion associated with human neoplasia are reviewed herein. Since the techniques for detecting oncogene DNA and mRNA alterations are rapidly becoming a part of our diagnostic armamentarium, surgical pathologists should be prepared for the imminent use of such molecular techniques and information in diagnosis and prognosis of human neoplasia.

  20. Immunohistochemichal Assessment of the CrkII Proto-oncogene Expression in Common Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors and Pleomorphic Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Askari, Mitra; Darabi, Masoud; Jahanzad, Esa; Mostakhdemian Hosseini, Zahra; Musavi Chavoshi, Marjan; Darabi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various morphologies are seen in different salivary gland tumorsor within an individual tumor, and the lesions show divers biological behaviors. Experimental results support the hypothesis that increased CrkII proto-oncogene is associated with cytokine-induced tumor initiation and progression by altering cell motility signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to assess the CrkII expression in common malignant salivary gland tumors and pleomorphic ade-noma. Materials and methods. Immunohistochemical analysis of CrkII expression was performed on paraffin blocks of 64 car-cinomas of salivary glands, 10 pleomorphic adenomas, and 10 normal salivary glands. Biopsies were subjected to immu-nostaining with EnVision detection system using monoclonal anti-CrkII. Evaluation of immunoreactivity of CrkII was based on the immunoreaction intensity and percentage of stained tumor cells which were scored semi-quantitatively on a scale with four grades 0 to 3. Kruskal-wallis test and additional Mann-Whitney statistical test were used for analysis of CrkII expression levels. Results. Increased expression of CrkII was seen (P=0.005) in malignant tumors including: mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma, but CrkII expression in acinic cell carcinoma was weak. CrkII expression in pleomorphic adenoma was weak or negative. A weak staining was sparsely seen in normal acinar serous cell. Conclusion. Increased expression of CrkII and its higher intensity of staining in tumors with more aggressive biologic behavior in carcinomas of salivary gland is consistent with a role for this proto-oncogene in salivary gland tumorigenesis and cancer progression.

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 is a tumor promoter target in initiated cells that express oncogenic Ras.

    PubMed

    Warmka, Janel K; Mauro, Laura J; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V

    2004-08-01

    We have capitalized on the unique properties of the skin tumor promoter palytoxin, which does not activate protein kinase C, to investigate alternative mechanisms by which major signaling molecules can be modulated during carcinogenesis. We report here that palytoxin activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) through a novel mechanism that involves inactivation of an ERK phosphatase in keratinocytes derived from initiated mouse skin (308 cells). Use of U0126 revealed that palytoxin requires the ERK kinase MEK to stimulate ERK activity, although palytoxin did not activate MEK. We found that 308 keratinocytes highly express mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 (MKP-3), which selectively inactivates ERK. Palytoxin induced the loss of MKP-3 in a manner that corresponded to increased ERK phosphorylation. Complementary studies showed that sustained expression of exogenous MKP-3 inhibited palytoxin-stimulated ERK activation. As is characteristic of initiated keratinocytes, 308 cells express activated H-Ras. To investigate whether expression of oncogenic Ras is key to palytoxin-stimulated ERK activation, we determined how palytoxin affected ERK and MKP-3 in MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and in H-ras MCF10A cells, which stably express activated H-Ras. Palytoxin did not affect ERK activity in MCF10A cells, which had no detectable MKP-3. Like 308 cells, H-ras MCF10A cells highly express MKP-3. Strikingly, palytoxin stimulated ERK activity and induced a corresponding loss of MKP-3 in H-ras MCF10A cells. These studies indicate that in initiated cells palytoxin unleashes ERK activity by down-regulating MKP-3, an ERK inhibitor, and further suggest that MKP-3 may be a vulnerable target in cells that express oncogenic Ras.

  2. Growth hormone induces expression of c-jun and jun B oncogenes and employs a protein kinase C signal transduction pathway for the induction of c-fos oncogene expression.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, M C; de Groot, R P; Herrmann-Erlee, M P; Koornneef, I; Kruijer, W; Kramer, Y M

    1991-04-01

    Although the structure of several members of the GH receptor family has been defined, signal transduction following GH binding to its receptor has not been elucidated. Mouse osteoblasts were used to study the effect of GH on immediate early gene expression and, subsequently, the cellular signal(s) mediating this expression were analysed. GH rapidly and transiently induced the expression of c-jun and jun B in concert with the already reported expression of c-fos. The GH-induced expression of c-fos was completely blocked by the protein kinase inhibitors staurosporine and H7, indicating that the action of GH is mediated by one or several protein kinases. We next analysed the identity of the putative protein kinases in more detail by using a more specific protein kinase inhibitor, namely the ether-lipid 1-O-alkyl-2-O-methylglycerol, understood to be an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC). Data obtained from these studies revealed that GH-induced expression of c-fos is mediated by PKC. In addition, we observed a profound increase in formation of the PKC activator diacyglycerol upon addition of GH, a natural activator of PKC. In conclusion, upon binding of GH to mouse osteoblasts, the receptor-mediated cellular signal involves diacyglycerol formation and activation of PKC, leading to the induction of oncogene expression. Finally, the expression of c-fos, c-jun and jun B results in an increased binding of protein complexes to AP-1 binding sites.

  3. Tumours derived from HTLV-I tax transgenic mice are characterized by enhanced levels of apoptosis and oncogene expression.

    PubMed

    Hall, A P; Irvine, J; Blyth, K; Cameron, E R; Onions, D E; Campbell, M E

    1998-10-01

    In order to investigate the role that the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) tax oncogene plays in apoptosis and transformation in vivo, four lines of HTLV-I tax transgenic mice were generated under the regulatory control of the CD3-epsilon promoter-enhancer sequence. These mice develop a variety of phenotypes including mesenchymal tumours, which develop at wound sites, and salivary and mammary adenomas. In situ DNA fragment labelling and immunocytochemical analysis of these tumours reveals that they display enhanced levels of apoptosis, which is associated with elevated levels of Myc, Fos, Jun, and p53 protein expression. Furthermore, double immunofluorescent staining shows that Tax expression and apoptosis co-localize, indicating that Tax expression is closely associated with apoptosis in vivo. PMID:9924438

  4. Mutations, expression and genomic instability of the H-ras proto-oncogene in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Kiaris, H.; Spandidos, D. A.; Jones, A. S.; Vaughan, E. D.; Field, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    Mutation and overexpression are the main activating mechanisms for the ras family of genes in human cancer and the variable tandem repeat (VTR) located at the 3' end of H-ras has been associated with this risk. In the present study, we have analysed the relative levels of expression of H-ras mRNA in 26 samples of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (competitive RT-PCR) and also investigated whether there is an association between ras expression and alterations in the 3'-VTR region. In addition, we have studied the incidence of point mutations in codon 12 of H-ras, codons 12 and 13 of K-ras and codon 61 of N-ras in 120 SCCHN samples. Our results indicate that only two samples carry mutations, both of which are located in codon 12 of K-ras, but that overexpression of the H-ras proto-oncogene is a frequent event in SCCHN [54% (14/26)] and is associated with a favourable prognosis: 3 of 14 patients with H-ras overexpression have died, whereas 9 of 12 patients with low levels of H-ras expression have died. We have also undertaken an analysis of these results together with our previous investigations on microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in SCCHN, but no associations were found. We therefore conclude that ras mutations are an infrequent event in the progression of the SCCHN in the Western world, whereas overexpression of the H-ras proto-oncogene is a common event. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7599040

  5. Expression of the human ETS-2 oncogene in normal fetal tissues and in the brain of a fetus with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Baffico, M; Perroni, L; Rasore-Quartino, A; Scartezzini, P

    1989-10-01

    The expression of the ETS-2 proto-oncogene, located on chromosome 21, in normal fetal tissues and in neural tissue of a fetus affected by Down syndrome has been investigated. The results show that the ETS-2 proto-oncogene is expressed in almost all the tissues examined and that it is transcribed at constant levels in neural tissue between the 13th and 24th weeks. ETS-2 expression appeared to be slightly increased in Down syndrome brain compared with that of normal controls of the same gestational age.

  6. Expression of the human ETS-2 oncogene in normal fetal tissues and in the brain of a fetus with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Baffico, M; Perroni, L; Rasore-Quartino, A; Scartezzini, P

    1989-10-01

    The expression of the ETS-2 proto-oncogene, located on chromosome 21, in normal fetal tissues and in neural tissue of a fetus affected by Down syndrome has been investigated. The results show that the ETS-2 proto-oncogene is expressed in almost all the tissues examined and that it is transcribed at constant levels in neural tissue between the 13th and 24th weeks. ETS-2 expression appeared to be slightly increased in Down syndrome brain compared with that of normal controls of the same gestational age. PMID:2529204

  7. The Circular RNA Cdr1as Act as an Oncogene in Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Targeting miR-7 Expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Gong, Xuejun; Sun, Lei; Zhou, Qiying; Lu, Baoling; Zhu, Liying

    2016-01-01

    CircRNAs are a class of endogenous RNA that regulates gene expression at the post-transcriptional or transcriptionallevel through interacting with other molecules or microRNAs. Increasing studies have demonstrated that circRNAs play a crucial role in biology processes. CircRNAs are proved as potentialbiomarkers in many diseases including cancers. However, the role of Cdr1as in Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be elucidated. We demonstrated that Cdr1as expression was upregulated in HCC tissues compared with the adjacent non-tumor tissues. In addtion, miR-7 expression was downregulated in HCC tissues compared with the adjacent non-tumor tissues. Moreover, the expression level of miR-7 was inversely correlated with that in HCC tissues. Knockdown of Cdr1as suppressed the HCC cell proliferation and invasion. Overexpression of miR-7 inhibited the HCC cell proliferation and invasion. Overexpression of miR-7 could suppress the direct target gene CCNE1 and PIK3CD expression. Knockdown of Cdr1as suppressed the expression of miR-7 and also inhibited the CCNE1 and PIK3CD expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Cdr1as suppressed the HCC cell proliferation and invasion through targeting miR-7. These data suggested that Cdr1as acted as an oncogene partly through targeting miR-7 in HCC. PMID:27391479

  8. The Circular RNA Cdr1as Act as an Oncogene in Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Targeting miR-7 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Gong, Xuejun; Sun, Lei; Zhou, Qiying; Lu, Baoling; Zhu, Liying

    2016-01-01

    CircRNAs are a class of endogenous RNA that regulates gene expression at the post-transcriptional or transcriptionallevel through interacting with other molecules or microRNAs. Increasing studies have demonstrated that circRNAs play a crucial role in biology processes. CircRNAs are proved as potentialbiomarkers in many diseases including cancers. However, the role of Cdr1as in Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be elucidated. We demonstrated that Cdr1as expression was upregulated in HCC tissues compared with the adjacent non-tumor tissues. In addtion, miR-7 expression was downregulated in HCC tissues compared with the adjacent non-tumor tissues. Moreover, the expression level of miR-7 was inversely correlated with that in HCC tissues. Knockdown of Cdr1as suppressed the HCC cell proliferation and invasion. Overexpression of miR-7 inhibited the HCC cell proliferation and invasion. Overexpression of miR-7 could suppress the direct target gene CCNE1 and PIK3CD expression. Knockdown of Cdr1as suppressed the expression of miR-7 and also inhibited the CCNE1 and PIK3CD expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Cdr1as suppressed the HCC cell proliferation and invasion through targeting miR-7. These data suggested that Cdr1as acted as an oncogene partly through targeting miR-7 in HCC. PMID:27391479

  9. Inhibition of carcinogen induced c-Ha-ras and c-fos proto-oncogenes expression by dietary curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Limtrakul, Porn-ngarm; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Lipigorngoson, Suwiwek; Dunn, Floyd W

    2001-01-01

    Background We investigated the chemopreventive action of dietary curcumin on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12,0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted skin tumor formation in Swiss albino mice. Curcumin, a yellow coloring matter isolated from roots of Curcuma longa Linn, is a phenolic compound possessing antioxidant, free radical scavenger, and antiinflammatory properties. It has been shown by previously reported work that TPA-induced skin tumors were inhibited by topical application of curcumin, and curcumin has been shown to inhibit a variety of biological activities of TPA. Topical application of curcumin was reported to inhibit TPA-induced c-fos, c-jun and c-myc gene expression in mouse skin. This paper reports the effects of orally administered curcumin, which was consumed as a dietary component at concentrations of 0.2 % or 1 %, in ad libitum feeding. Results Animals in which tumors had been initiated with DMBA and promoted with TPA experienced significantly fewer tumors and less tumor volume if they ingested either 0.2% or 1% curcumin diets. Also, the dietary consumption of curcumin resulted in a significantly decreased expression of ras and fos proto-oncogenes in the tumorous skin, as measured by enhanced chemiluminesence Western blotting detection system (Amersham). Conclusions Whereas earlier work demonstrated that topical application of curcumin to mouse skin inhibited TPA-induced expression of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc oncogenes, our results are the first to show that orally consumed curcumin significantly inhibited DMBA- and TPA-induced ras and fos gene expression in mouse skin. PMID:11231886

  10. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein Regulates the Expression and Metabolic Functions of Wild-Type and Oncogenic IDH1.

    PubMed

    Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Dibble, Christian C; Asara, John M; Manning, Brendan D

    2016-09-15

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) is a major transcriptional regulator of the enzymes underlying de novo lipid synthesis. However, little is known about the SREBP-mediated control of processes that indirectly support lipogenesis, for instance, by supplying reducing power in the form of NAPDH or directing carbon flux into lipid precursors. Here, we characterize isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) as a transcriptional target of SREBP across a spectrum of cancer cell lines and human cancers. IDH1 promotes the synthesis of lipids specifically from glutamine-derived carbons. Neomorphic mutations in IDH1 occur frequently in certain cancers, leading to the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). We found that SREBP induces the expression of oncogenic IDH1 and influences 2-HG production from glucose. Treatment of cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol or statins, which respectively inhibit or activate SREBP, further supports SREBP-mediated regulation of IDH1 and, in cells with oncogenic IDH1, carbon flux into 2-HG. PMID:27354064

  11. Rac1 signaling protects monocytic AML cells expressing the MLL-AF9 oncogene from caspase-mediated apoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Hinterleitner, C; Huelsenbeck, J; Henninger, C; Wartlick, F; Schorr, A; Kaina, B; Fritz, G

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the relevance of signaling mechanisms regulated by the Ras-homologous GTPase Rac1 for survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells harbouring the MLL-AF9 oncogene due to t(9;11)(p21;q23) translocation. Monocytic MLL-AF9 expressing cells (MM6, THP-1) were hypersensitive to both small-molecule inhibitors targeting Rac1 (EHT 1864, NSC 23766) (IC50EHT ~12.5 μM) and lipid lowering drugs (lovastatin, atorvastatin) (IC50Lova ~7.5 μM) as compared to acute myelocytic leukemia (NOMO-1, HL60) and T cell leukemia (Jurkat) cells (IC50EHT >30 μM; IC50Lova >25 μM). Hypersensitivity of monocytic cells following Rac1 inhibition resulted from caspase-driven apoptosis as shown by profound activation of caspase-8,-9,-7,-3 and substantial (~90 %) decrease in protein expression of pro-survival factors (survivin, XIAP, p-Akt). Apoptotic death was preceded by S139-posphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a prototypical surrogate marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Taken together, abrogation of Rac1 signaling causes DSBs in acute monocytic leukemia cells harbouring the MLL-AF9 oncogene, which, together with downregulation of survivin, XIAP and p-Akt, results in massive induction of caspase-driven apoptotic death. Apparently, Rac1 signaling is required for maintaining genetic stability and maintaining survival in specific subtypes of AML. Hence, targeting of Rac1 is considered a promising novel strategy to induce lethality in MLL-AF9 expressing AML. PMID:23624644

  12. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Controls Cell Cycle Progression by Regulating the Expression of Oncogenic Transcription Factor B-MYB

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Vidisha; Shen, Zhen; Chakraborty, Arindam; Giri, Sumanprava; Freier, Susan M.; Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yongqing; Gorospe, Myriam; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Lal, Ashish; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2013-01-01

    The long noncoding MALAT1 RNA is upregulated in cancer tissues and its elevated expression is associated with hyper-proliferation, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We demonstrate that MALAT1 levels are regulated during normal cell cycle progression. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses in normal human diploid fibroblasts reveal that MALAT1 modulates the expression of cell cycle genes and is required for G1/S and mitotic progression. Depletion of MALAT1 leads to activation of p53 and its target genes. The cell cycle defects observed in MALAT1-depleted cells are sensitive to p53 levels, indicating that p53 is a major downstream mediator of MALAT1 activity. Furthermore, MALAT1-depleted cells display reduced expression of B-MYB (Mybl2), an oncogenic transcription factor involved in G2/M progression, due to altered binding of splicing factors on B-MYB pre-mRNA and aberrant alternative splicing. In human cells, MALAT1 promotes cellular proliferation by modulating the expression and/or pre-mRNA processing of cell cycle–regulated transcription factors. These findings provide mechanistic insights on the role of MALAT1 in regulating cellular proliferation. PMID:23555285

  13. Expressions of c-jun and jun-B proto-oncogenes in odontoblasts during development of bovine tooth germs.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, C; Terashita, M

    1997-04-01

    c-jun and jun-B genes are among the nuclear proto-oncogenes induced by growth factors such as the TGF-beta superfamily and play important roles in cell differentiation. These gene products enhance expressions of proteins including osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagens. On the other hand, it is well-known that the TGF-beta superfamily affects odontoblast differentiation, and that differentiated odontoblasts express extracellular and membrane proteins as described above. However, there are few reports of factors that participate in the transcriptional regulation of odontoblasts. Especially, little is known about the expression of c-jun and jun-B genes. In this study, we focused on the examination of expressions of c-jun and jun-B genes in dental papillae of bovine tooth germs. Using in situ hybridization, we found that these genes were expressed only in the odontoblastic lineage, but not in other dental papilla cells. Levels of c-jun and jun-B mRNAs increased along the gradient of differentiation of odontoblasts. These levels of c-jun mRNAs were maintained in both young and mature odontoblasts. However, unlike the c-jun gene, expression of the jun-B gene became sparse in mature odontoblasts compared with young odontoblasts. For further analysis, Northern hybridization of total RNA extracted from differentiated odontoblasts was performed for the examination of levels of jun-B mRNAs, indicating that levels of jun-B mRNAs of mature odontoblasts were clearly less than those of young odontoblasts. These results suggest that c-jun and jun-B genes may participate in the transcriptional regulation of odontoblasts of bovine tooth germs, and may control the odontoblast phenotype. Furthermore, our results suggest that these genes can be markers of odontoblasts during dentinogenesis; especially, high expression of jun-B gene can be a marker of young odontoblasts that start to form the new dentin matrix. PMID:9126177

  14. Oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK induces expression of the growth-promoting receptor ICOS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hongyi; Kantekure, Kanchan; Paterson, Jennifer C; Liu, Xiaobin; Schaffer, Andras; Paulos, Chrystal; Milone, Michael C; Odum, Niels; Turner, Suzanne; Marafioti, Teresa; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2011-09-15

    Here we report that T-cell lymphoma cells carrying the NPM-ALK fusion protein (ALK(+) TCL) frequently express the cell-stimulatory receptor ICOS. ICOS expression in ALK(+) TCL is moderate and strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM-ALK. NPM-ALK induces ICOS expression via STAT3, which triggers the transcriptional activity of the ICOS gene promoter. In addition, STAT3 suppresses the expression of miR-219 that, in turn, selectively inhibits ICOS expression. ALK(+) TCL cell lines display extensive DNA methylation of the CpG island located within intron 1, the putative enhancer region, of the ICOS gene, whereas cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell lines, which strongly express ICOS, show no methylation of the island. Treatment of the ALK(+) TCL cell lines with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor reversed the CpG island methylation and augmented the expression of ICOS mRNA and protein. Stimulation of the ICOS receptor with anti-ICOS antibody or ICOS ligand-expressing B cells markedly enhanced proliferation of the ALK(+) TCL cells. These results demonstrate that NPM-ALK, acting through STAT3 as the gene transcriptional activator, induces the expression of ICOS, a cell growth promoting receptor. These data also show that the DNA methylation status of the intronic CpG island affects transcriptional activity of the ICOS gene and, consequently, modulates the concentration of the expressed ICOS protein.

  15. Transient expression of Bcl6 is sufficient for oncogenic function and induction of mature B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael R; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Liu, Chih Long; Dai, Bo; González-Herrero, Inés; García-Ramírez, Idoia; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Orfao, Alberto; Pintado, Belén; Flores, Teresa; Blanco, Oscar; Jiménez, Rafael; Martínez-Climent, Jose Angel; Criado, Francisco Javier García; Cenador, María Begoña García; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Lossos, Izidore S; Majeti, Ravindra; Melnick, Ari; Cobaleda, César; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma and can be separated into two subtypes based upon molecular features with similarities to germinal center B-cells (GCB-like) or activated B-cells (ABC-like). Here we identify gain of 3q27.2 as being significantly associated with adverse outcome in DLBCL and linked with the ABC-like subtype. This lesion includes the BCL6 oncogene, but does not alter BCL6 transcript levels or target-gene repression. Separately, we identify expression of BCL6 in a subset of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). We therefore hypothesize that BCL6 may act by hit-and-run oncogenesis. We model this by transiently expressing Bcl6 within murine HSPCs, and find it causes mature B-cell lymphomas that lack Bcl6 expression and target-gene repression, are transcriptionally similar to post-GCB cells, and show epigenetic changes that are conserved from HSPCs to mature B-cells. Together these results suggest that Bcl6 may function in a hit-and-run role in lymphomagenesis. PMID:24887457

  16. Transient expression of Bcl6 is sufficient for oncogenic function and induction of mature B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael R; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Long Liu, Chih; Dai, Bo; González-Herrero, Inés; García-Ramírez, Idoia; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Orfao, Alberto; Pintado, Belén; Flores, Teresa; Blanco, Oscar; Jiménez, Rafael; Martínez-Climent, Jose Angel; Criado, Francisco Javier García; Cenador, María Begoña García; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Lossos, Izidore S; Majeti, Ravindra; Melnick, Ari; Cobaleda, César; Alizadeh, Ash A; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2014-06-02

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma and can be separated into two subtypes based upon molecular features with similarities to germinal centre B-cells (GCB-like) or activated B-cells (ABC-like). Here we identify gain of 3q27.2 as being significantly associated with adverse outcome in DLBCL and linked with the ABC-like subtype. This lesion includes the BCL6 oncogene, but does not alter BCL6 transcript levels or target-gene repression. Separately, we identify expression of BCL6 in a subset of human haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). We therefore hypothesize that BCL6 may act by 'hit-and-run' oncogenesis. We model this hit-and-run mechanism by transiently expressing Bcl6 within murine HSPCs, and find that it causes mature B-cell lymphomas that lack Bcl6 expression and target-gene repression, are transcriptionally similar to post-GCB cells, and show epigenetic changes that are conserved from HSPCs to mature B-cells. Together, these results suggest that BCL6 may function in a 'hit-and-run' role in lymphomagenesis.

  17. Expression of oncogenic K-ras from its endogenous promoter leads to a partial block of erythroid differentiation and hyperactivation of cytokine-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yangang; Beard, Caroline; Tuveson, David A; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Jacks, Tyler E; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-06-15

    When overexpressed in primary erythroid progenitors, oncogenic Ras leads to the constitutive activation of its downstream signaling pathways, severe block of terminal erythroid differentiation, and cytokine-independent growth of primary erythroid progenitors. However, whether high-level expression of oncogenic Ras is required for these phenotypes is unknown. To address this issue, we expressed oncogenic K-ras (K-ras(G12D)) from its endogenous promoter using a tetracycline-inducible system. We show that endogenous K-ras(G12D) leads to a partial block of terminal erythroid differentiation in vivo. In contrast to results obtained when oncogenic Ras was overexpressed from retroviral vectors, endogenous levels of K-ras(G12D) fail to constitutively activate but rather hyperactivate cytokine-dependent signaling pathways, including Stat5, Akt, and p44/42 MAPK, in primary erythroid progenitors. This explains previous observations that hematopoietic progenitors expressing endogenous K-ras(G12D) display hypersensitivity to cytokine stimulation in various colony assays. Our results support efforts to modulate Ras signaling for treating hematopoietic malignancies.

  18. Oncogenes and growth control

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, P.; Graf, T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: A Role for Proto-Oncogenes in Differentiation.; The ras Gene Family; Regulation of Human Globin Gene Expression; Regulation of Gene Expression by Steroid Hormones; The Effect of DNA Methylation on DNA-Protein Interactions and on the Regulation of Gene Expression; and Trans-Acting Elements Encoded in Immediate Early Genes of DNA Tumor Viruses.

  19. Expression of galaxin and oncogene homologs in growth anomaly in the coral Montipora capitata.

    PubMed

    Spies, Narrissa P; Takabayashi, Misaki

    2013-06-13

    Growth anomaly (GA) is a coral disease characterized by enlarged skeletal lesions. Although negative effects of GA on several of coral's biological functions have been determined, the etiology and molecular pathology of this disease is very poorly understood. We studied the expression of 5 genes suspected to play a role in pathological development of GA in the endemic Hawaiian coral Montipora capitata, which is particularly susceptible to this disease. Transcript abundances of the 5 target genes in healthy tissue, GA-affected tissue, and unaffected tissue (apparently healthy tissue adjacent to GA) relative to 3 internal control genes (actin, NADH, and rpS3) were compared using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Galaxin, which codes for a protein suspected to be involved in calcification and thus hypothesized to be differentially expressed in GA, was up-regulated in unaffected tissue but remained at baseline levels in GA tissue. The gene expressions of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) remained unchanged in GA tissue. The expression of tyrosine protein kinase (TPK) and βγ-crystallin (BGC) were both down-regulated. These expression patterns were all inconsistent with the expression patterns of homologous genes in neoplastic diseases featuring similar morphological symptoms in humans. These expression data therefore suggest that the calcification mechanism is likely not enhanced in coral GA and that coral GA is not a malignant neoplasia. PMID:23759562

  20. Expression of MALT1 oncogene in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells recapitulates the pathogenesis of human lymphoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Fontán, Lorena; Gonzalez-Herrero, Ines; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Segura, Victor; Aznar, M. Angela; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I.; Abollo-Jimenez, Fernando; Bertolo, Cristina; Peñuelas, Ivan; Garcia-Criado, Francisco J.; García-Cenador, María B.; Tousseyn, Thomas; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Garcia-Bragado, Federico; McPhail, Ellen D.; Lossos, Izidore S.; Du, Ming-Qing; Flores, Teresa; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M.; Gonzalez, Marcos; Salar, Antonio; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Conde, Eulogio; Siebert, Reiner; Sagaert, Xavier; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MALT1 gene are hallmarks of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. To date, targeting these translocations to mouse B cells has failed to reproduce human disease. Here, we induced MALT1 expression in mouse Sca1+Lin− hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which showed NF-κB activation and early lymphoid priming, being selectively skewed toward B-cell differentiation. These cells accumulated in extranodal tissues and gave rise to clonal tumors recapitulating the principal clinical, biological, and molecular genetic features of MALT lymphoma. Deletion of p53 gene accelerated tumor onset and induced transformation of MALT lymphoma to activated B-cell diffuse large-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). Treatment of MALT1-induced lymphomas with a specific inhibitor of MALT1 proteolytic activity decreased cell viability, indicating that endogenous Malt1 signaling was required for tumor cell survival. Our study shows that human-like lymphomas can be modeled in mice by targeting MALT1 expression to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, demonstrating the oncogenic role of MALT1 in lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, this work establishes a molecular link between MALT lymphoma and ABC-DLBCL, and provides mouse models to test MALT1 inhibitors. Finally, our results suggest that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of human mature B-cell lymphomas. PMID:22689981

  1. Hypomethylation and increased expression of the putative oncogene ELMO3 are associated with lung cancer development and metastases formation

    PubMed Central

    Søes, Signe; Daugaard, Iben Lyster; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Carus, Andreas; Mattheisen, Manuel; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Hager, Henrik; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2014-01-01

    Numerous genetic and epigenetic events driving tumorigenesis have been characterized. However, knowledge is lacking on the particular events required for the metastatic spread of cancer cells. The engulfment and cell motility 3 (ELMO3) gene plays an important role for the migratory potential of cells, but have not previously been studied in primary samples from cancer patients. We collected material from primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors and paired brain or adrenal gland metastases from 26 patients and from 26 primary tumor samples from metastasis-free patients matched for age, gender, histology, T-stage, smoking status, and proportion of tumor cells. Using reverse transcriptase–quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) ELMO3 was shown to be overexpressed in primary tumors from patients with distant metastases compared to normal lung tissue (p<0.001), and compared to primary tumors from metastasis-free patients (p<0.001). The increased expression coincided with decreased methylation levels of the ELMO3 promoter region. High expression and hypomethylation of ELMO3 were also observed when studying the paired brain and adrenal gland metastases. In conclusion, the putative oncogene, ELMO3, is overexpressed in NSCLC in combination with hypomethylation of its promoter and these cancer-specific events are associated with the formation of metastases. PMID:25594031

  2. Active macropinocytosis induction by stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and oncogenic Ras expression potentiates cellular uptake efficacy of exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko Bailey; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are approximately 100-nm vesicles that consist of a lipid bilayer of cellular membranes secreted in large quantities from various types of normal and disease-related cells. Endocytosis has been reported as a major pathway for the cellular uptake of exosomes; however, the detailed mechanisms of their cellular uptake are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate the active induction of macropinocytosis (accompanied by actin reorganisation, ruffling of plasma membrane, and engulfment of large volumes of extracellular fluid) by stimulation of cancer-related receptors and show that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor significantly enhances the cellular uptake of exosomes. We also demonstrate that oncogenic K-Ras-expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells exhibit intensive macropinocytosis that actively transports extracellular exosomes into the cells compared with wild-type K-Ras-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Furthermore, encapsulation of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin with EGF in exosomes using our simple electroporation method produces superior cytotoxicity via the enhanced cellular uptake of exosomes. Our findings contribute to the biological, pharmaceutical, and medical research fields in terms of understanding the macropinocytosis-mediated cellular uptake of exosomes with applications for exosomal delivery systems. PMID:26036864

  3. Active macropinocytosis induction by stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and oncogenic Ras expression potentiates cellular uptake efficacy of exosomes.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko Bailey; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2015-06-03

    Exosomes are approximately 100-nm vesicles that consist of a lipid bilayer of cellular membranes secreted in large quantities from various types of normal and disease-related cells. Endocytosis has been reported as a major pathway for the cellular uptake of exosomes; however, the detailed mechanisms of their cellular uptake are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate the active induction of macropinocytosis (accompanied by actin reorganisation, ruffling of plasma membrane, and engulfment of large volumes of extracellular fluid) by stimulation of cancer-related receptors and show that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor significantly enhances the cellular uptake of exosomes. We also demonstrate that oncogenic K-Ras-expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells exhibit intensive macropinocytosis that actively transports extracellular exosomes into the cells compared with wild-type K-Ras-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Furthermore, encapsulation of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin with EGF in exosomes using our simple electroporation method produces superior cytotoxicity via the enhanced cellular uptake of exosomes. Our findings contribute to the biological, pharmaceutical, and medical research fields in terms of understanding the macropinocytosis-mediated cellular uptake of exosomes with applications for exosomal delivery systems.

  4. Posttranscriptional Suppression of Proto-Oncogene c-fms Expression by Vigilin in Breast Cancer ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Yi, Xiaofang; Lamb, Tiffany; Menzl, Ina; Baker, Terri; Shapiro, David J.; Chambers, Setsuko K.

    2011-01-01

    cis-acting elements found in 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) are regulatory signals determining mRNA stability and translational efficiency. By binding a novel non-AU-rich 69-nucleotide (nt) c-fms 3′ UTR sequence, we previously identified HuR as a promoter of c-fms proto-oncogene mRNA. We now identify the 69-nt c-fms mRNA 3′ UTR sequence as a cellular vigilin target through which vigilin inhibits the expression of c-fms mRNA and protein. Altering association of either vigilin or HuR with c-fms mRNA in vivo reciprocally affected mRNA association with the other protein. Mechanistic studies show that vigilin decreased c-fms mRNA stability. Furthermore, vigilin inhibited c-fms translation. Vigilin suppresses while HuR encourages cellular motility and invasion of breast cancer cells. In summary, we identified a competition for binding the 69-nt sequence, through which vigilin and HuR exert opposing effects on c-fms expression, suggesting a role for vigilin in suppression of breast cancer progression. PMID:20974809

  5. Pesticides and oncogenic modulation.

    PubMed

    Vakonaki, Elena; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides constitute a diverse class of chemicals used for the protection of agricultural products. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can cause malignant transformation of cells in in vitro and in vivo models. In the current minireview a comprehensive summary of recent in vitro findings is presented along with data reported from human population studies, regarding the impact of pesticide exposure on activation or dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Substantial mechanistic work suggests that pesticides are capable of inducing mutations in oncogenes and increase their transcriptional expression in vitro, whereas human population studies indicate associations between pesticide exposure levels and mutation occurrence in cancer-related genes. Further work is required to fully explore the exact mechanisms by which pesticide exposure affects the integrity and normal function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human populations.

  6. Stat3 induces oncogenic Skp2 expression in human cervical carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hanhui; Zhao, Wenrong; Yang, Dan

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of Skp2 by IL-6 or Stat3 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stat3 activates Skp2 expression through bound to its promoter region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stat3 activates Skp2 expression through recruitment of P300. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stat3 activation decreases the P27 stability. -- Abstract: Dysregulated Skp2 function promotes cell proliferation, which is consistent with observations of Skp2 over-expression in many types of human cancers, including cervical carcinoma (CC). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying elevated Skp2 expression have not been fully explored. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) induced Stat3 activation is viewed as crucial for multiple tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that Skp2 is a direct transcriptional target of Stat3 in the human cervical carcinoma cells. Our data show that IL-6 administration or transfection of a constitutively activated Stat3 in HeLa cells activates Skp2 mRNA transcription. Using luciferase reporter and ChIP assays, we show that Stat3 binds to the promoter region of Skp2 and promotes its activity through recruiting P300. As a result of the increase of Skp2 expression, endogenous p27 protein levels are markedly decreased. Thus, our results suggest a previously unknown Stat3-Skp2 molecular network controlling cervical carcinoma development.

  7. Changes in cortical cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix gene expression in prostate cancer are related to oncogenic ERG deregulation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cortical cytoskeleton network connects the actin cytoskeleton to various membrane proteins, influencing cell adhesion, polarity, migration and response to extracellular signals. Previous studies have suggested changes in the expression of specific components in prostate cancer, especially of 4.1 proteins (encoded by EPB41 genes) which form nodes in this network. Methods Expression of EPB41L1, EPB41L2, EPB41L3 (protein: 4.1B), EPB41L4B (EHM2), EPB41L5, EPB49 (dematin), VIL2 (ezrin), and DLG1 (summarized as „cortical cytoskeleton" genes) as well as ERG was measured by quantitative RT-PCR in a well-characterized set of 45 M0 prostate adenocarcinoma and 13 benign tissues. Hypermethylation of EPB41L3 and GSTP1 was compared in 93 cancer tissues by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of 4.1B was further studied by immunohistochemistry. Results EPB41L1 and EPB41L3 were significantly downregulated and EPB41L4B was upregulated in cancer tissues. Low EPB41L1 or high EPB41L4B expression were associated with earlier biochemical recurrence. None of the other cortical cytoskeleton genes displayed expression changes, in particular EPB49 and VIL2, despite hints from previous studies. EPB41L3 downregulation was significantly associated with hypermethylation of its promoter and strongly correlated with GSTP1 hypermethylation. Protein 4.1B was detected most strongly in the basal cells of normal prostate epithelia. Its expression in carcinoma cells was similar to the weaker one in normal luminal cells. EPB41L3 downregulation and EPB41L4B upregulation were essentially restricted to the 22 cases with ERG overexpression. Expression changes in EPB41L3 and EPB41L4B closely paralleled those previously observed for the extracellular matrix genes FBLN1 and SPOCK1, respectively. Conclusions Specific changes in the cortical cytoskeleton were observed during prostate cancer progression. They parallel changes in the expression of extracellular matrix components and all together

  8. Global expression profiling reveals gain-of-function onco-genic activity of a mutated thyroid hormone receptor in thyroid carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Mishra, Alok; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are critical in regulating gene expression in normal physiological processes. Decreased expression and/or somatic mutations of TRs have been shown to be associated several types of human cancers including liver, breast, lung, and thyroid. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which mutated TRs promote carcinogenesis, an animal model of follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) (Thrbpv/pv mice) was used in the present study. The Thrbpv/pv mouse harbors a knockin dominant negative PV mutation, identified in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone. To understand whether oncogenic actions of PV involve not only the loss of normal TR functions but also gain-of-function activities, we compared the gene expression profiles of thyroid lesions in Thrbpv/pv mice and Thra1-/- Thrb-/- mice that also spontaneously develop FTC, but with less severe malignancy. Analysis of the cDNA microarray data derived from microdissected thyroid tumor cells of these two mice showed contrasting global gene expression profiles. With stringent selection using 2.5-fold change (p<0.01) in cDNA microarray analysis, 241 genes with altered gene expression were identified. Nearly half of the genes (n=103: 42.7% of total) with altered gene expression in thyroid tumor cells of Thrbpv/pv mice were associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis; some of these genes function as oncogenes in human thyroid cancers. The remaining genes were found to function in transcriptional regulation, RNA processing, cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cytoskeleton modification. These results indicate that the more aggressive thyroid tumor progression in Thrbpv/pv mice was not due simply to the loss of tumor suppressor functions of TR via mutation but also, importantly, to gain-of-function in the oncogenic activities of PV to drive thyroid carcinogenesis. Thus, the present study identifies a novel mechanism by which a mutated TRβ evolves with an oncogenic advantage to promote

  9. Intragenic integration in DLC1 sustains factor VIII expression in primary human cells without insertional oncogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Sivalingam, J; Phan, T T; Kon, O L

    2014-01-01

    Techniques enabling precise genome modifications enhance the safety of gene-based therapy. DLC1 is a hot spot for phiC31 integrase-mediated transgene integration in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that integration of a coagulation factor VIII transgene into intron 7 of DLC1 supports durable expression of factor VIII in primary human umbilical cord-lining epithelial cells. Oligoclonal cells with factor VIII transgene integrated in DLC1 did not have altered expression of DLC1 or neighbouring genes within a 1-Mb interval. Only 1.9% of all expressed genes were transcriptionally altered; most were downregulated and mapped to cell cycle and DNA repair pathways. DLC1-integrated cells were not tumourigenic in vivo and were normal by high-resolution genomic DNA copy number analysis. Our data identify DLC1 as a locus for durable transgene expression that does not incur features of insertional oncogenesis, thus expanding options for developing ex vivo cell therapy mediated by site-specific integration methods. PMID:24553346

  10. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. Importance   Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an

  11. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. IMPORTANCE  : Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an accumulation of DNA

  12. Proto-oncogenes and p53 protein expression in normal cervical stratified squamous epithelium and cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ngan, H Y; Liu, S S; Yu, H; Liu, K L; Cheung, A N

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study was to study the protein expression of six proto-oncogenes (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), c-fms, c-myc, c-kit, c-erbB-2 and pan-ras) and one tumour suppressor gene (TP53), by immunohistochemical staining of normal cervical stratified squamous epithelium and cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). Paraffin sections of 45 normal cervical specimens, 38 CIN grade one (CIN1), 37 CIN2 and 43 CIN3 were studied. An immunohistochemical (IHC) score was derived from the intensity of staining and the percentages of cells stained. In normal cervical specimens, a higher IHC score was found with EGFR and c-fms in superficial (S), intermediate (I) and parabasal (PB) cells compared with basal cells. In contrast, a higher IHC score was found with c-erbB-2 in basal cells in normal cervical specimens. Dysplastic cells in CIN had a higher IHC score with c-myc and c-erbB-2 than normal S/I and PB cells. Dysplastic cells had a higher score with EGFR than normal basal cells. However, a higher IHC score with EGFR and c-fms was found in normal S/I cells than dysplastic cells. These findings suggested that EGFR and c-fms were activated in more differentiated normal cells but were less active in less differentiated normal basal cells. However, EGFR was reactivated in dysplastic cells. Meanwhile, c-erbB-2 was activated in less differentiated normal basal cells and dysplastic cells, and was less active in differentiated normal cells. c-myc was activated in dysplastic cells. c-fms was more active in more differentiated normal cells and was not activated in less differentiated or dysplastic cells. c-kit, pan-ras and TP53 were not activated in normal nor dysplastic cervical cells. These results suggest EGFR, c-erbB-2 and c-myc may be important proto-oncogenes in CIN and that antibodies or anti-genes targeted against them may alter the progress of CIN to invasive cancer.

  13. Vanadium as a modulator of cellular regulatory cascades and oncogene expression.

    PubMed

    Stern, A; Yin, X; Tsang, S S; Davison, A; Moon, J

    1993-01-01

    Vanadium, a trace metal in the environment and in biological systems, influences the behavior of enzymes, mimics and regulates growth factor activity, is a potential mutagenic and carcinogenic agent, and regulates gene expression. The diverse biological actions of vanadium result from its capacity to function as an oxyanion, oxycation, or prooxidant. Vanadium is found in water, rocks, and soils in low concentration and in relatively high concentrations in coal and oil deposits. Vanadium compounds at much higher concentrations than are typically ingested are being considered in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The actions of insulin and vanadium on the insulin receptor are similar, but the mechanisms are not identical. Vanadium modulates growth-factor-mediated signal transduction pathways. Vanadium promotes cell transformation and diminishes cell adhesion. Consistent with its mitogenic action and its capacity to mimic mitogenic growth factors, vanadium stimulates expression of protooncogenes. In particular, oxygen-derived active species are involved in the expression of the jun protooncogene in the presence of vanadium. The unique cellular activity of vanadium makes it a tool of unparalleled potential for studying mechanisms of cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism.

  14. Elevated expression of UBE2T exhibits oncogenic properties in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Mingxin; Kwon, Yongwon; Wang, Yongsheng; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2T (UBE2T) is reported in human prostate cancer. However, whether UBE2T plays any functional role in prostate cancer development remains unknown. We here report the first functional characterization of UBE2T in prostate carcinogenesis. Prostate cancer tissue array analysis confirmed upregulation of UBE2T in prostate cancer, especially these with distant metastasis. Moreover, higher level of UBE2T expression is associated with poorer prognosis of prostate cancer patients. Ectopic expression of UBE2T significantly promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation, motility and invasion, while UBE2T depletion by shRNA significantly inhibits these abilities of prostate cancer cells. Xenograft mouse model studies showed that overexpression of UBE2T promotes whereas UBE2T depletion inhibits tumor formation and metastasis significantly. Collectively, we identify critical roles of UBE2T in prostate cancer development and progression. These findings may serve as a framework for future investigations designed to more comprehensive determination of UBE2T as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26308072

  15. Elimination of B-RAF in Oncogenic C-RAF-expressing Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells Reduces MAPK Signal Intensity and Lung Tumor Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Zanucco, Emanuele; El-Nikhely, Nefertiti; Götz, Rudolf; Weidmann, Katharina; Pfeiffer, Verena; Savai, Rajkumar; Seeger, Werner; Ullrich, Axel; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are often greatly dependent on signaling cascades promoting cell growth or survival and may become hypersensitive to inactivation of key components within these signaling pathways. Ras and RAF mutations found in human cancer confer constitutive activity to these signaling molecules thereby converting them into an oncogenic state. RAF dimerization is required for normal Ras-dependent RAF activation and is required for the oncogenic potential of mutant RAFs. Here we describe a new mouse model for lung tumor development to investigate the role of B-RAF in oncogenic C-RAF-mediated adenoma initiation and growth. Conditional elimination of B-RAF in C-RAF BxB-expressing embryonic alveolar epithelial type II cells did not block adenoma formation. However, loss of B-RAF led to significantly reduced tumor growth. The diminished tumor growth upon B-RAF inactivation was due to reduced cell proliferation in absence of senescence and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, B-RAF elimination inhibited C-RAF BxB-mediated activation of the mitogenic cascade. In line with these data, mutation of Ser-621 in C-RAF BxB abrogated in vitro the dimerization with B-RAF and blocked the ability to activate the MAPK cascade. Taken together these data indicate that B-RAF is an important factor in oncogenic C-RAF-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:25096573

  16. ErbB2 oncogene expression supports the acute pancreatitis-chronic pancreatitis sequence.

    PubMed

    Standop, Jens; Standop, Silke; Itami, Atsushi; Nozawa, Fumiaki; Brand, Randall E; Büchler, Markus W; Pour, Parviz M

    2002-10-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis remains controversial. According to the general opinion, chronic pancreatitis is a de novo disease with a silent but progressive restructure of the pancreas in response to environmental, nutritional or genetic factors. The necrosis-fibrosis sequence hypothesis, on the other hand, postulates that relapsing attacks of acute pancreatitis with subsequent development of fibrosis leads to chronic pancreatitis. Since in our previous studies the expression of two anti-ErbB2 growth factor receptor (ErbB2) antibodies was shown to discriminate between primary chronic pancreatitis, normal tissue, and secondary chronic pancreatitis caused by pancreatic cancer, we studied the ErbB2 expression in tissues obtained from acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis to investigate a possible evolution of the ErbB2 expression pattern during the course of the disease. We subjected 14 normal pancreas, 15 chronic pancreatitis, and 12 acute pancreatitis (three with recurrent acute pancreatitis) specimens to immunohistochemical studies using polyclonal anti-ErbB2 antibodies from Santa Cruz and Dako. The immunoreactivity of islet cells in acute pancreatitis cases with the Santa Cruz antibody was less than that in normal pancreas in relation to the degree of tissue damage and fibrosis, and was negative in recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis tissues. The Dako antibody, on the other hand, revealed a membrane staining of ductal and ductular cells only in chronic pancreatitis specimens and in some areas of recurrent acute pancreatitis. In conclusion, the similarities in the immunoreactivity of anti-ErbB2 antibodies in recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis support the hypothesis that acute pancreatitis can be a forerunner of chronic pancreatitis.

  17. Differential expression of the ufo/axl oncogene in human leukemia-lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Challier, C; Uphoff, C C; Janssen, J W; Drexler, H G

    1996-05-01

    The ufo protein (also termed axl) is a member of a new family of receptor tyrosine kinases and is encoded by a transforming gene that was initially isolated from primary human myeloid leukemia cells by DNA-mediated transformation of NIH/3T3 cells. The ligand, Gas6, a protein S-related molecule lacking any known function yet, has recently been identified. We report the expression pattern of ufo mRNA in a panel of 76 human continuous leukemia-lymphoma cell lines. The gene was not expressed in cell lines derived from lymphoid malignancies (n=28), but transcription was seen in 3/11 myeloid, 0/6 monocytic, 9/13 erythroid and 11/18 megakaryocytic cell lines. Several cell lines were treated with phorbol ester leading to significant upregulation of the ufo message in constitutively positive cells. An apparent ufo mRNA overexpression was not found in any of the positive leukemia cell lines, but was identified in the drug-resistant subclones of the cervix carcinoma cell line HeLa. Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA did not provide evidence for gene amplification, but the HeLa subclones showed banding patterns suggestive of gene rearrangement. Two main ufo mRNA bands of 3.2 and 5.0 kb were identified; no differences in the half-lives (t1/2 = 2.5 h) of these two mRNA species could be identified. In summary, ufo, representing a novel type of receptor tyrosine kinase, is expressed solely in myeloid and erythro-megakaryocytic leukemias but not in lymphoid malignancies. These and previous data suggest an involvement of the ufo receptor tyrosine kinase in normal and malignant myelopoiesis; however, its exact role, if any, and mode of operation in leukemogenesis remains to be determined.

  18. Oncogenic signaling in Amphiregulin and EGFR-expressing PTEN-null human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kappler, Christiana S.; Guest, Stephen T.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Kratche, Zachary; Wilson, Robert C.; Ethier, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    A subset of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and loss of PTEN, and patients with these determinants have a poor prognosis. We used cell line models of EGFR-positive/PTEN null TNBC to elucidate the signaling networks that drive the malignant features of these cells and cause resistance to EGFR inhibitors. In these cells, amphiregulin (AREG)-mediated activation of EGFR results in up-regulation of fibronectin (FN1), which is known to be a mediator of invasive capacity via interaction with integrin β1. EGFR activity in this PTEN null background also results in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and activation of NF-κB. In addition, AKT is constitutively phosphorylated in these cells and is resistant to gefitinib. Expression profiling demonstrated that AREG-activated EGFR regulates gene expression differently than EGF-activated EGFR, and functional analysis via genome-scale shRNA screening identified a set of genes, including PLK1 and BIRC5, that are essential for survival of SUM-149 cells, but are uncoupled from EGFR signaling. Thus, our results demonstrate that in cells with constitutive EGFR activation and PTEN loss, critical survival genes are uncoupled from regulation by EGFR, which likely mediates resistance to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:25454348

  19. Perylene and coronene derivatives binding to G-rich promoter oncogene sequences efficiently reduce their expression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Emanuela; Altieri, Alessandro; Cianni, Lorenzo; Cingolani, Chiara; Iachettini, Sara; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Leonetti, Carlo; Cacchione, Stefano; Biroccio, Annamaria; Franceschin, Marco; Rizzo, Angela

    2016-06-01

    A novel approach to cancer therapeutics is emerging in the field of G-quadruplex (G4) ligands, small molecules designed to stabilize four-stranded structures that can form at telomeres as well as in other genomic sequences, including oncogene promoter sequences, 5'-UTR regions and introns. In this study, we investigated the binding activity of perylene and coronene derivatives PPL3C, CORON and EMICORON to G4 structures formed within the promoter regions of two important cancer-related genes, c-MYC and BCL-2, and their biochemical effects on gene and protein expression. In order to fully characterize the ability of the selected ligands to bind and stabilize the G4 structures originated by the c-MYC and BCL-2 promoter sequences, we performed electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements, Circular Dichroism (CD) spectra and polymerase stop assay. Altogether our results showed that the ligands had a high capacity in binding and stabilizing the G4 structures within the c-MYC and BCL-2 promoter sequences in vitro. Notably, when we evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting analysis, the effects of treatment with the different G4 ligands on c-MYC and BCL2 expression in a human melanoma cell line, EMICORON appeared the most effective compound in reducing the mRNA and protein levels of both genes. These results encourage to consider EMICORON as a promising example of multimodal class of an antineoplastic drug, affecting different tumor crucial pathways simultaneously: telomere maintenance (as previously described), cell proliferation and apoptosis via down-regulation of both c-MYC and BCL-2 (this paper).

  20. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-03-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors.

  1. Low Expression of miR-196b Enhances the Expression of BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 Oncogenes in Chronic Myeloid Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue; Zheng, Wenling; Song, Yanbin; Ma, Wenli; Yin, Hong

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can function as tumor suppressors or oncogene promoters during tumor development. In this study, low levels of expression of miR-196b were detected in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Bisulfite genomic sequencing PCR and methylation-specific PCR were used to examine the methylation status of the CpG islands in the miR-196b promoter in K562 cells, patients with leukemia and healthy individuals. The CpG islands showed more methylation in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia compared with healthy individuals (P<0.05), which indicated that low expression of miR-196b may be associated with an increase in the methylation of CpG islands. The dual-luciferase reporter assay system demonstrated that BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 are the target genes of miR-196b, which was consistent with predictions from bioinformatics software analyses. Further examination of cell function indicated that miR-196b acts to reduce BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 protein levels, decrease cell proliferation rate and retard the cell cycle. A low level of expression of miR-196b can cause up-regulation of BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 expression, which leads to the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. MiR-196b may represent an effective target for chronic myeloid leukemia therapy. PMID:23894305

  2. Cooperative antiproliferative effect of coordinated ectopic expression of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein and silencing of MYC oncogene expression in liver cancer cells: Therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuyu; Zhou, Xiaoling; Tone, Paul; Durkin, Marian E.; Popescu, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common types of cancer and has a very poor prognosis; thus, the development of effective therapies for the treatment of advanced HCC is of high clinical priority. In the present study, the anti-oncogenic effect of combined knockdown of c-Myc expression and ectopic restoration of deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) expression was investigated in human liver cancer cells. Expression of c-Myc in human HCC cells was knocked down by stable transfection with a Myc-specific short hairpin (sh) RNA vector. DLC1 expression in Huh7 cells was restored by adenovirus transduction, and the effects of DLC1 expression and c-Myc knockdown on Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) levels, cell proliferation, soft agar colony formation and cell invasion were measured. Downregulation of c-Myc or re-expression of DLC1 led to a marked reduction in RhoA levels, which was associated with decreases in cell proliferation, soft agar colony formation and invasiveness; this inhibitory effect was augmented with a combination of DLC1 transduction and c-Myc suppression. To determine whether liver cell-specific delivery of DLC1 was able to enhance the inhibitory effect of c-Myc knockdown on tumor growth in vivo, DLC1 vector DNA complexed with galactosylated polyethylene glycol-linear polyethyleneimine was administered by tail vein injection to mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of Huh7 cells transfected with shMyc or control shRNA. A cooperative inhibitory effect of DLC1 expression and c-Myc knockdown on the growth of Huh7-derived tumors was observed, suggesting that targeted liver cell delivery of DLC1 and c-Myc shRNA may serve as a possible gene therapy modality for the treatment of human HCC. PMID:27446476

  3. Immunohistochemical expression of the oncogenic molecules active Stat3 and survivin in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nikitakis, Nikolaos G.; Scheper, Mark A.; Papanicolaou, Vasileios S.; Sklavounou, Alexandra; Sauk, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and survivin have been shown to exert oncogenic effects in various human neoplasms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of the tyrosine phosphorylated (active) Stat3 and survivin in various benign and malignant salivary gland tumors (SGTs). Study design Eighty-six SGTs (65 malignant and 21 benign tumors of various histopathologic subtypes) were immunohistochemically stained with anti-survivin or anti-phosphorylated tyrosine-705 (p-tyr) Stat3 antibodies. Immunohistochemical reactivity was graded in a semi-quantitative manner; a combined score of immunohistochemical positivity (0–6) was calculated for each tumor by adding the individual scores for percentage of tumor cells (0–3) and intensity of staining (0–3). Results Survivin was immunohistochemically detected in all studied benign and malignant SGTs; p-tyr Stat3 was also detected in the majority (91%) of SGTs. The average combined scores for survivin and p-tyr Stat3 immunohistochemical expression in the studied malignant SGTs was 4.40 and 3.35, respectively; the corresponding combined scores for survivin and p-tyr Stat3 in the studied benign SGTs were 4.37 and 3.22, respectively. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) in p-tyr Stat3 or survivin expression were detected between the benign and malignant groups, or among the various examined histopathological subtypes of SGTs. In contrast, normal salivary gland elements in the vicinity of the studied tumors revealed only weak and focal survivin or p-tyr Stat3 immunoreactivity, mainly localized to ductal and mucous cells. Conclusions Our data indicate an almost universal expression of activated Stat3 and survivin in benign and malignant SGTs. Considering the well-established proliferative and anti-apoptotic properties of these molecules and their functional interrelationship, selective targeting techniques against Stat3 and/or survivin may represent promising

  4. Repression of CD24 surface protein expression by oncogenic Ras is relieved by inhibition of Raf but not MEK or PI3K

    PubMed Central

    Pallegar, Nikitha K.; Ayre, D. Craig; Christian, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    CD24 is a dynamically regulated cell surface protein. High expression of CD24 leads to progression of lung, prostrate, colon, and pancreatic cancers, among others. In contrast, low expression of CD24 leads to cell proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). Activating mutations in Ras are found in 30% of all human cancers. Oncogenic Ras constitutively stimulates the Raf, PI3K, and Ral GDS signaling pathways, leading to cellular transformation. Previous studies have shown that expression of oncogenic Ras in breast cancer cells generates CD24− cells from CD24+ cells. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of CD24− cells were not determined. Here, we demonstrate that oncogenic Ras (RasV12) expression suppresses CD24 mRNA, protein, and promoter levels when expressed in NIH/3T3 cells. Furthermore, activation of only the Raf pathway was sufficient to downregulate CD24 mRNA and protein expression to levels similar to those seen in with RasV12 expression. In contrast, activation of the PI3K pathway downregulated mRNA expression with a partial effect on protein expression whereas activation of the RalGDS pathway only partially affected protein expression. Surprisingly, inhibition of MEK with U0126 only partially restored CD24 mRNA expression but not surface protein expression. In contrast, inhibition of Raf with sorafenib did not restore CD24 mRNA expression but significantly increased the proportion of RasV12 cells expressing CD24. Therefore, the Raf pathway is the major repressor of CD24 mRNA and protein expression, with PI3K also able to substantially inhibit CD24 expression. Moreover, these data indicate that the levels of CD24 mRNA and surface protein are independently regulated. Although inhibition of Raf by sorafenib only partially restored CD24 expression, sorafenib should still be considered as a potential therapeutic strategy to alter CD24 expression in CD24− cells, such as BCSCs. PMID:26301220

  5. Elevated expression of proto-oncogenes accompany enhanced induction of heat-shock genes after exposure of rat embryos in utero to ionizing irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Higo, H.; Lee, J.Y.; Satow, Y.; Higo, K. )

    1989-01-01

    We have recently found that the effects of exposing rat embryos in utero to teratogens capable of producing cardiac anomalies were expressed later as enhanced induction of heat-shock proteins (hsp70 family) when embryonic hearts were cultured in vitro. However, it remained to be determined whether heat-shock proteins are induced in vivo after exposure to teratogens. The heat-shock response in some mammalian systems is known to be accompanied by elevated expression of proto-oncogenes. Using gene-specific DNA probes, we examined the levels of the expression (transcription) of heat-shock protein genes and two nuclear proto-oncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, in the embryos removed from irradiated pregnant mother rats 4 or 5 days after the irradiation. We found that the levels of expression in vivo of the hsp70 and c-myc genes in the irradiated embryos increased by approximately twofold as compared with those in the control. The expression in vivo of the c-fos gene was not detected in either the irradiated or non-irradiated embryos. After 0.5-hr incubation in vitro of the embryos, however, the expression of the c-fos gene in the irradiated embryos was highly enhanced whereas the control showed no changes. Although the exact functions of these gene products still remain obscure, the enhanced expression of hsp70 gene(s) and the nuclear proto-oncogenes observed in the present study may reflect repair of intracellular damages and/or regeneration of tissue by compensatory cell proliferation, processes that may disturb the normal program of organogenesis.

  6. The ether lipid 1-octadecyl-2-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine induces expression of fos and jun proto-oncogenes and activates AP-1 transcription factor in human leukaemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, F; Gajate, C; Modolell, M

    1994-01-01

    The ether lipid analogue 1-octadecyl-2-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3) has been recently shown to induce apoptosis in the human leukaemic HL-60 and U937 myeloid cell lines [Mollinedo, Martinez-Dalmau and Modolell (1993) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 192, 603-609]. We have found that ET-18-OCH3 is also able to promote apoptosis in the human leukaemic Jurkat T lymphoid cell line. This lymphoid cell line as well as the two myeloid HL-60 and U937 cell lines incorporated significant amounts of exogenously added radiolabelled ET-18-OCH3. Addition of ET-18-OCH3 to these human leukaemic cells induced an increase in the steady-state mRNA levels of fos and jun proto-oncogenes, components of the transcription factor AP-1. These increases in fos and jun mRNA levels were associated with the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor after addition of ET-18-OCH3 to human leukaemic cells, as assessed by an enhanced binding activity of transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate DNA sequence as well as by stimulation of transcription from an AP-1 enhancer element. These data demonstrate that the ether lipid ET-18-OCH3 can affect gene expression by inducing expression of fos and jun proto-oncogenes and by modulating the activity of transcription factor AP-1. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8092982

  7. Prevention of tumor growth driven by PIK3CA and HPV oncogenes by targeting mTOR signaling with metformin in oral squamous carcinomas expressing OCT3

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Dmitri; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Martin, Daniel; Schneider, Abraham; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Gangane, Nitin; Carey, Thomas E.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Komarck, Christine M.; Walline, Heather M.; William, William N.; Seethala, Raja R.; Ferris, Robert; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Most head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) exhibit a persistent activation of the PI3K-mTOR signaling pathway. We have recently shown that metformin, an oral antidiabetic drug that is also used to treat lipodystrophy in HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals, diminishes mTOR activity and prevents the progression of chemically-induced experimental HNSCC premalignant lesions. Here, we explored the preclinical activity of metformin in HNSCCs harboring PIK3CA mutations and HPV oncogenes, both representing frequent HNSCC alterations, aimed at developing effective targeted preventive strategies. The biochemical and biological effects of metformin were evaluated in representative HNSCC cells expressing mutated PIK3CA or HPV oncogenes (HPV+). The oral delivery of metformin was optimized to achieve clinical relevant blood levels. Molecular determinants of metformin sensitivity were also investigated, and their expression levels examined in a large collection of HNSCC cases. We found that metformin inhibits mTOR signaling and tumor growth in HNSCC cells expressing mutated PIK3CA and HPV oncogenes, and that these activities require the expression of organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3/SLC22A3), a metformin uptake transporter. Co-expression of OCT3 and the mTOR pathway activation marker pS6 were observed in most HNSCC cases, including those arising in HIV+ patients. Activation of the PI3K-mTOR pathway is a widespread event in HNSCC, including HPV− and HPV+ lesions arising in HIV+ patients, all of which co-express OCT3. These observations may provide a rationale for the clinical evaluation of metformin to halt HNSCC development from precancerous lesions, including in HIV+ individuals at risk of developing HPV-associated cancers. PMID:25681087

  8. The Jak2V617F oncogene associated with myeloproliferative diseases requires a functional FERM domain for transformation and for expression of the Myc and Pim proto-oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Wernig, Gerlinde; Gonneville, Jeffrey R; Crowley, Brian J; Rodrigues, Margret S; Reddy, Mamatha M; Hudon, Heidi E; Walz, Christoph; Reiter, Andreas; Podar, Klaus; Royer, Yohan; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Tomasson, Michael H; Griffin, James D; Gilliland, D Gary; Sattler, Martin

    2008-04-01

    The V617F activating point mutation in Jak2 is associated with a proportion of myeloproliferative disorders. In normal hematopoietic cells, Jak2 signals only when associated with a growth factor receptor, such as the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR). We sought to identify the molecular requirements for activation of Jak2V617F by introducing a point mutation in the FERM domain (Y114A), required for receptor binding. Whereas BaF3.EpoR cells are readily transformed by Jak2V617F to Epo independence, we found that the addition of the FERM domain mutation blocked transformation and the induction of reactive oxygen species. Further, while cells expressing Jak2V617F had constitutive activation of STAT5, cells expressing Jak2V617F/Y114A did not, suggesting that signaling is defective at a very proximal level. In addition, expression of the Myc and Pim proto-oncogenes by Jak2V617F was found to be FERM domain dependent. An inducible constitutively active STAT5 mutant expressed in BaF3 cells was sufficient to induce Myc and Pim. Finally, the FERM domain in Jak2V617F was also required for abnormal hematopoiesis in transduced primary murine fetal liver cells. Overall, our results suggest that constitutive activation of Jak2 requires an intact FERM domain for a transforming phenotype, and is necessary for activation of the major target of Jak2, STAT5.

  9. Differential induction of cytolytic susceptibility by E1A, myc, and ras oncogenes in immortalized cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J L; May, D L; Wilson, B A; Walker, T A

    1989-01-01

    The E1A oncogene of adenovirus serotypes 2 and 5 induces susceptibility to the cytolytic effects of natural killer lymphocytes and activated macrophages when expressed in infected and transformed mammalian cells (cytolysis-susceptible phenotype). E1A and the oncogenes v-myc, long-terminal-repeat-promoted c-myc, and activated c-ras share the ability to immortalize transfected low-passage rodent cells. The cytolytic phenotypes of well-characterized rodent cell lines immortalized by these three oncogenes were defined. In contrast to target cells expressing the intact E1A gene, myc- and ras-expressing, immortalized primary transfectants were resistant to lysis by both types of killer cell populations. The same patterns of susceptibility (E1A) and resistance (myc and ras) to cytolysis were observed in oncogene-transfected continuous rat (REF52) and mouse (NIH 3T3) cell lines, indicating that differences in the cytolytic phenotypes associated with expression of these oncogenes are not due to cell selection during immortalization. The results suggest that the E1A oncogene may possess a functional domain that is different from those of other oncogenes, such as myc and ras, and that the activity linked to this postulated domain is dissociable from the process of immortalization. Images PMID:2526229

  10. Oncogenic potential of CK2α and its regulatory role in EGF-induced HDAC2 expression in human liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung S; Chang, Young G; Bae, Hyun J; Eun, Jung W; Shen, Qingyu; Park, Se J; Shin, Woo C; Lee, Eun K; Park, Soha; Ahn, Young M; Park, Won S; Lee, Jung Y; Nam, Suk W

    2014-02-01

    Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) is aberrantly regulated and plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through regulation of cell-cycle components at the transcriptional level, but the underlying mechanism leading to oncogenic HDAC2 remains unknown. In this study, we show that expression of CK2α (casein kinase II α subunit) was up-regulated in a large cohort of human HCC patients, and that high expression of CK2α was significantly associated with poor prognosis of HCC patients in terms of five-year overall survival. It was also found that CK2α over-expression positively correlated with HDAC2 over-expression in a subset of HCCs. We observed that treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) elicited an increase in CK2α expression and Akt phosphorylation, causing induction of HDAC2 expression in liver cancer cells. It was also observed that ectopic expression of dominant-negative CK2α blocked EGF-induced HDAC2 expression, and that ectopic CK2α expression attenuated the suppressive effect of Akt knockdown on HDAC2 expression in liver cancer cells. Targeted disruption of CK2α influenced the cell cycle, causing a significant increase in the number of liver cancer cells remaining in G₂/M phase, and suppressed growth via repression of Cdc25c and cyclin B in liver cancer cells. Taken together, our findings suggest the oncogenic potential of CK2α in liver tumorigenesis. Furthermore, a regulatory mechanism for HDAC2 expression is proposed whereby EGF induces transcriptional activation of HDAC2 by CK2α/Akt activation in liver cancer cells. Therefore, this makes CK2α a promising target in cancer therapy.

  11. Prevention of tumor growth driven by PIK3CA and HPV oncogenes by targeting mTOR signaling with metformin in oral squamous carcinomas expressing OCT3.

    PubMed

    Madera, Dmitri; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Martin, Daniel; Schneider, Abraham; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Gangane, Nitin; Carey, Thomas E; McHugh, Jonathan B; Komarck, Christine M; Walline, Heather M; William, William N; Seethala, Raja R; Ferris, Robert L; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2015-03-01

    Most squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC) exhibit a persistent activation of the PI3K-mTOR signaling pathway. We have recently shown that metformin, an oral antidiabetic drug that is also used to treat lipodystrophy in HIV-infected (HIV(+)) individuals, diminishes mTOR activity and prevents the progression of chemically induced experimental HNSCC premalignant lesions. Here, we explored the preclinical activity of metformin in HNSCCs harboring PIK3CA mutations and HPV oncogenes, both representing frequent HNSCC alterations, aimed at developing effective targeted preventive strategies. The biochemical and biologic effects of metformin were evaluated in representative HNSCC cells expressing mutated PIK3CA or HPV oncogenes (HPV(+)). The oral delivery of metformin was optimized to achieve clinical relevant blood levels. Molecular determinants of metformin sensitivity were also investigated, and their expression levels were examined in a large collection of HNSCC cases. We found that metformin inhibits mTOR signaling and tumor growth in HNSCC cells expressing mutated PIK3CA and HPV oncogenes, and that these activities require the expression of organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3/SLC22A3), a metformin uptake transporter. Coexpression of OCT3 and the mTOR pathway activation marker pS6 were observed in most HNSCC cases, including those arising in HIV(+) patients. Activation of the PI3K-mTOR pathway is a widespread event in HNSCC, including HPV(-) and HPV(+) lesions arising in HIV(+) patients, all of which coexpress OCT3. These observations may provide a rationale for the clinical evaluation of metformin to halt HNSCC development from precancerous lesions, including in HIV(+) individuals at risk of developing HPV(-) associated cancers.

  12. Genistein suppresses proliferation and MET oncogene expression and induces EGR-1 tumor suppressor expression in immortalized human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singletary, Keith; Ellington, Allison

    2006-01-01

    Higher soy food intake has been hypothesized to be a major factor explaining the decreased breast cancer risk in Asian countries, compared to those regions of the world consuming predominantly Western-style diets. Consumption of soy isoflavones, particularly genistein, has received considerable attention as the soy component largely responsible for the protective effects hypothesized to result from soy food consumption. However, the impact of adult consumption of soy foods on breast cancer risk in pre-menopausal and menopausal women is not consistent. There are recent epidemiological reports that consumption of soy foods can most effectively reduce breast cancer risk when consumed early in life during the pre-pubertal or adolescent periods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of physiologically-relevant levels of genistein (0.5 microM and 1 microM), concentrations achievable in the plasma following soy food consumption, on proliferation and expression of select genes in the human breast epithelial cell model. Treatment of the non-neoplastic, immortalized human breast epithelial MCF-10F cells with these low concentrations of genistein was associated with decreased cell proliferation, down-regulation of the protooncogene MET, up-regulation of the breast tumor suppressor gene EGR-1, and up-regulation of the immediate-early response genes FOS and JUN. In addition, genistein treatment was associated with a significant increase in Egr-1 binding to the transcription factor Sp1. Taken together, these genistein-induced changes in gene expressions provide insights into potential mechanisms by which this isoflavone may protect human breast cells against neoplastic transformation. PMID:16619504

  13. [Atherosclerosis and oncogenes].

    PubMed

    Onraed-Dupriez, B

    1992-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a leading cause of mortality in the developed world, has mainly been studied with respect to the pathogenic role of lipids. However, over the last few years, a new avenue of research has stemmed from Benditt's monoclonal theory which linkens the atheroma plaque to a benign tumor developed from a single smooth muscle cell. Investigations into mechanisms capable of initiating this monoclonal cell growth have included studies of protooncogene activation. Barrett and Benditt have reported increased expression of the sis oncogene in the atheroma plaque; the product of this oncogene is very similar to the beta chain of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) which may play a role in the development of the atheroma plaque. These recent studies focusing on the earliest step of formation of the atheroma plaque, ie, cell growth, complement the pathophysiologic theories studied until now.

  14. Cribriform adenocarcinoma of minor salivary glands may express galectin-3, cytokeratin 19, and HBME-1 and contains polymorphisms of RET and H-RAS proto-oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Laco, Jan; Kamarádová, Kateřina; Vítková, Pavla; Sehnálková, Eva; Dvořáková, Sárka; Václavíková, Eliška; Sýkorová, Vlasta; Kašpírková, Jana; Skálová, Alena; Ryška, Aleš

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to further elucidate the immunohistochemical and genetic characteristics of cribriform adenocarcinoma of minor salivary glands (CAMSG). The study comprised five CAMSG from two males and three females, aged 21-72 years. Four tumors were localized at the base of tongue and one in the floor of mouth. At the time of diagnosis, four tumors had metastasised to regional lymph nodes. After tumor resection, two patients were treated by radiotherapy and one by chemoradiotherapy. During the follow-up (median 14 months), two patients developed lymph node metastasis. Microscopically, all tumors showed cribriform, papillary, follicular, and microcystic growth patterns. The tumor cells displayed vesicular nuclei with intranuclear grooves. Immunohistochemically, all tumors showed expression of cytokeratin (CK) 7, CK8, CK18, vimentin, smooth muscle actin, calponin, S-100 protein, and p16 protein. In addition, we observed expression of galectin-3, CK19, and HBME-1, but not of thyroglobulin and TTF-1. No mutations of RET, BRAF, K-RAS, H-RAS, and N-RAS proto-oncogenes were detected. However, in RET proto-oncogene, we found polymorphisms Gly691Ser (exon 11) and Ser904Ser (exon 15) in one case, p.Leu769Leu (exon 13) in one case, and variant p.IVS14-24 G/A of intron 14 in two cases, and in H-RAS proto-oncogene we found polymorphism 81 T-C (exon 1) in three cases. Thyroglobulin and TTF-1 are the only useful markers in the differential diagnosis between CAMSG and papillary thyroid carcinoma as both tumors may express galectin-3, CK19, and HBME-1. The RET, H-RAS, and N-RAS proto-oncoogenes are not mutated in CAMSG.

  15. E6 and E7 oncogene expression by human papilloma virus (HPV) and the aggressive behavior of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP).

    PubMed

    Shehata, Bahig M; Otto, Kristen J; Sobol, Steven E; Stockwell, Christina A; Foulks, Cora; Lancaster, Wayne; Gregoire, Lucie; Hill, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP), a chronic disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV), requires serial surgical procedures for debulking, resulting in debilitating long-term dysphonia, laryngeal scarring, and rarely malignant degeneration. Human papilloma virus 11 tumors have been widely accepted as more aggressive than HPV 6 tumors; however, the clinical course has been difficult to predict at disease onset, and the biologic mediators of proliferation have not been well characterized. A retrospective case review of 43 patients (4 months to 10 years at diagnosis) was performed on children treated for recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Patient charts were reviewed for demographic information, age at RLP diagnosis, approximate frequency of surgical intervention, and absolute number of surgical procedures performed. Human papilloma virus subtyping was performed. Expression analysis of the HPV-encoded E6 and E7 oncogenes was performed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen patients had subtype 11 (33%) and 29 patients had subtype 6 (67%). As expected, HPV 11 patients showed a more aggressive clinical course than HPV 6 patients. However, 38% of patients with subtype 6 (11 patients) followed a clinical course that mirrored the more severe subtype 11 patients. These patients expressed the disease at a younger age (P < 0.0002) and showed higher levels of E6 and E7 oncogenes compared to the patients with the more indolent course. Although HPV subtype and early onset of RLP are well characterized prognostic factors, our study documents the significance of E6 and E7 oncogene expression as potential biologic mediators of proliferation and thereby clinical behavior.

  16. An Oncogenic Role for Alternative NF-κB Signaling in DLBCL, Revealed Upon Deregulated BCL6 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baochun; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Wang, Zhe; Fröhler, Sebastian; Köchert, Karl; Qian, Yu; Koralov, Sergei B.; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Unitt, Christine; Rodig, Scott; Chen, Wei; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo; Alt, Frederick W.; Pasqualucci, Laura; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a complex disease comprising diverse subtypes and genetic profiles. Possibly due to the prevalence of genetic alterations activating canonical NF-κB activity, a role for oncogenic lesions that activate the alternative NF-κB pathway in DLBCL has remained elusive. Here we show that deletion/mutation of TRAF3, a negative regulator of the alternative NF-κB pathway, occurs in ∼15% of DLBCLs, and that it often coexists with BCL6 translocation, which prevents terminal B cell differentiation. Accordingly, in a mouse model constitutive activation of the alternative NF-κB pathway cooperates with BCL6 deregulation in DLBCL development. This work demonstrates a key oncogenic role for the alternative NF-κB pathway in DLBCL development. PMID:25921526

  17. The JAK2V617F oncogene requires expression of inducible phosphofructokinase/fructose-bisphosphatase 3 for cell growth and increased metabolic activity

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Mamatha M.; Fernandes, Margret S.; Deshpande, Anagha; Weisberg, Ellen; Inguilizian, Haig V.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Kung, Andrew L.; Levine, Ross L.; Griffin, James D.; Sattler, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are characterized by overproduction of myeloid lineage cells with frequent acquisition of oncogenic JAK2V617F kinase mutations. The molecular mechanisms that regulate energy requirements in these diseases are poorly understood. Transformed cells tend to rely on fermentation instead of more efficient oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. Our data in JAK2V617F-transformed cells show that growth and metabolic activity were strictly dependent on the presence of glucose. Uptake of glucose and cell surface expression of the glucose transporter Glut1 required the oncogenic tyrosine kinase. Importantly, JAK2V617F as well as active STAT5 increased the expression of the inducible rate-limiting enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3), which controls glycolytic flux through 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. PFKFB3 was required for JAK2V617F-dependent lactate production, oxidative metabolic activity and glucose uptake. Targeted knockdown of PFKFB3 also limited cell growth under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and blocked in vivo tumor formation in mice. Overall, these data suggest that inducible PFKFB3 is required for increased growth, metabolic activity and is regulated through active JAK2 and STAT5. Novel therapies that specifically block PFKFB3 activity or expression would therefore be expected to inhibit JAK2/STAT5-dependent malignancies and related cancers. PMID:21860432

  18. Lung-targeted expression of the c-Raf-1 kinase in transgenic mice exposes a novel oncogenic character of the wild-type protein.

    PubMed

    Kerkhoff, E; Fedorov, L M; Siefken, R; Walter, A O; Papadopoulos, T; Rapp, U R

    2000-04-01

    The c-Raf-1 kinase is a downstream effector of Ras signaling. Both proteins are highly oncogenic when they are mutationally activated, but only the Ras GTPase is frequently mutated in naturally occurring tumors. Although the c-Raf-1 protein was found to be amplified in different lung cancer cell lines, overexpression of the wild-type c-Raf-1 protein was shown to be insufficient to transform cultured cells. Here we have addressed the question of whether overexpression of the wild-type c-Raf-1 kinase can induce lung cancer in mice. We show that lung-targeted expression of oncogenically activated or wild-type c-Raf-1 proteins induces morphologically indistinguishable lung adenomas in transgenic mice. Compared with mice transgenic for the activated c-Raf-1-BxB, tumor development is delayed and occurs at a lower incidence in wild-type c-Raf-1 transgenic mice. Our studies show that the c-Raf-1 expression level is a critical parameter in tumor development and should be analyzed in more detail to evaluate its potential in the induction of cancer.

  19. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR), CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-receptors and Interleukin (IL) 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab)2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell-cell communication, immune responses

  20. HPV16 oncogene expression levels during early cervical carcinogenesis are determined by the balance of epigenetic chromatin modifications at the integrated virus genome

    PubMed Central

    Groves, I J; Knight, E L A; Ang, Q Y; Scarpini, C G; Coleman, N

    2016-01-01

    In cervical squamous cell carcinomas, high-risk human papillomavirus (HRHPV) DNA is usually integrated into host chromosomes. Multiple integration events are thought to be present within the cells of a polyclonal premalignant lesion and the features that underpin clonal selection of one particular integrant remain poorly understood. We previously used the W12 model system to generate a panel of cervical keratinocyte clones, derived from cells of a low-grade premalignant lesion naturally infected with the major HRHPV type, HPV16. The cells were isolated regardless of their selective advantage and differed only by the site of HPV16 integration into the host genome. We used this resource to test the hypothesis that levels of HPV16 E6/E7 oncogene expression in premalignant cells are regulated epigenetically. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the epigenetic landscape of the integrated HPV16 DNA in selected clones, in which levels of virus oncogene expression per DNA template varied ~6.6-fold. Across the cells examined, higher levels of virus expression per template were associated with more open chromatin at the HPV16 long control region, together with greater loading of chromatin remodelling enzymes and lower nucleosome occupancy. There were higher levels of histone post-translational modification hallmarks of transcriptionally active chromatin and lower levels of repressive hallmarks. There was greater abundance of the active/elongating form of the RNA polymerase-II enzyme (RNAPII-Ser2P), together with CDK9, the component of positive transcription elongation factor b complex responsible for Ser2 phosphorylation. The changes observed were functionally significant, as cells with higher HPV16 expression per template showed greater sensitivity to depletion and/or inhibition of histone acetyltransferases and CDK9 and less sensitivity to histone deacetylase inhibition. We conclude that virus gene expression per template following HPV16 integration is determined

  1. Drosophila homolog of the mammalian jun oncogene is expressed during embryonic development and activates transcription in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K; Chaillet, J R; Perkins, L A; Halazonetis, T D; Perrimon, N

    1990-01-01

    By means of low-stringency cross-species hybridization to Southern DNA blots, human c-jun sequences were used to identify a unique Drosophila melanogaster locus (Djun). The predicted DJun protein is highly homologous to members of the mammalian Jun family in both the DNA binding and leucine zipper regions. Djun was mapped by in situ hybridization to position 46E of the second chromosome. It encodes a 1.7-kilobase transcript constitutively expressed at all developmental stages. Functionally, Djun in cooperation with mouse c-fos can trans-activate activator protein 1 DNA binding site when introduced into mammalian cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Djun, much like its mammalian homolog, may activate transcription of genes involved in regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and development. Furthermore, the identification of Djun allows one to exploit the genetics of Drosophila to identify genes in signal transduction pathways involving Djun and thus c-jun. Images PMID:1696724

  2. Oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation find their sites of expression in the changes in time and space of the age-adjusted cancer incidence rate.

    PubMed

    Kodama, M; Kodama, T; Murakami, M

    2000-01-01

    profile in which the correlation coefficient r, a measure of fitness to the 2 equilibrium models, is converted to either +(r > 0) or -(0 > r) for each of the original-, the Rect-, and the Para-coordinates was found to be informative in identifying a group of tumors with sex discrimination of cancer risk (log AAIR changes in space) or another group of environmental hormone-linked tumors (log AAIR changes in time and space)--a finding to indicate that the r-profile of a given tumor, when compared with other neoplasias, may provide a clue to investigating the biological behavior of the tumor. 4) The recent risk increase of skin cancer of both sexes, being classified as an example of environmental hormone-linked neoplasias, was found to commit its ascension of cancer risk along the direction of the centrifugal forces of the time- and space-linked tumor suppressor gene inactivation plotted in the 2-dimension diagram. In conclusion, the centripetal force of oncogene activation and centrifugal force of tumor suppressor gene inactivation found their sites of expression in the distribution pattern of a cancer risk parameter, log AAIR, of a given neoplasias of both sexes on the 2-dimension diagram. The application of the least square method of Gauss to the log AAIR changes in time and space, and also with and without topological modulations of the original sets, when presented in terms of the r-profile, was found to be informative in understanding behavioral characteristics of human neoplaisias. PMID:11204489

  3. Ras-mediated cell cycle arrest is altered by nuclear oncogenes to induce Schwann cell transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, A J; Paterson, H F; Noble, M; Land, H

    1988-01-01

    The cellular responses to ras and nuclear oncogenes were investigated in purified populations of rat Schwann cells. v-Ha-ras and SV40 large T cooperate to transform Schwann cells, inducing growth in soft agar and allowing proliferation in the absence of added mitogens. Expression of large T alone reduces their growth factor requirements but is insufficient to induce full transformation. In contrast, expression of v-Ha-ras leads to proliferation arrest in Schwann cells expressing a temperature-sensitive mutant of large T at the restrictive temperature. Cells arrest in either the G1 or G2/M phases of the cell cycle, and can re-enter cell division at the permissive temperature even after prolonged periods at the restrictive conditions. Oncogenic ras proteins also inhibit DNA synthesis when microinjected into Schwann cells. Adenovirus E1a and c-myc oncogenes behave similarly to SV40 large T. They cooperate with Ha-ras oncogenes to transform Schwann cells, and prevent ras-induced growth arrest. Thus nuclear oncogenes fundamentally alter the response of Schwann cells to a ras oncogene from cell cycle arrest to transformation. Images PMID:3049071

  4. Downregulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor function and cytochrome P450 1A1 induction by expression of Ha-ras oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Reiners, J J; Jones, C L; Hong, N; Clift, R E; Elferink, C

    1997-06-01

    The immortalized human epithelial cell line MCF10A has the phenotypic characteristics of normal breast cells. Exposure of MCF10A cultures to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) stimulated the transcriptional activation of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), and CYP1B1, and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase. Northern blot hybridization and nuclear run-on assays demonstrated that transcriptional activation of these genes was suppressed in stably transfected cultures expressing an Ha-ras oncogene (the MCF10A-NeoT line). Similar suppression did not occur in stably transfected lines carrying the expression vector or a normal c-Ha-ras protooncogene. Western blot analyses and immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the lack of inducibility in MDF10A-NeoT cells reflected neither reductions in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator protein nor prevention of TCDD-induced AHR translocation to the nucleus. Suppression did correlate with reductions in DNA-AHR complex formation, as analyzed by gel retardation assays of soluble cell extracts treated in vitro with TCDD. The induction of Cyp1a-1 by TCDD was also analyzed in transgenic mice that expressed a v-Ha-ras oncogene exclusively in their keratinocytes. Relative to littermates lacking the transgene, the induction of Cyp1a-1 by TCDD was partially suppressed (about 50%) in the epidermises of v-Ha-ras-positive transgenic mice. However, normal levels of Cyp1a-1 induction occurred in the livers of the same mice. induction of Cyp1a-1 by TCDD was also suppressed (more than 98%) in chemically induced skin papillomas having Ha-ras mutations, relative to uninvolved surrounding skin. These studies suggest that the p21-ras protein controls signal transduction pathways capable of modulating AHR function.

  5. Multiple myeloma oncogene 1 (MUM1)/interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) upregulates monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG) gene expression in B-cell malignancy.

    PubMed

    Uranishi, M; Iida, S; Sanda, T; Ishida, T; Tajima, E; Ito, M; Komatsu, H; Inagaki, H; Ueda, R

    2005-08-01

    MUM1 (multiple myeloma oncogene 1)/IRF4 (interferon regulatory factor 4) is a transcription factor that is activated as a result of t(6;14)(p25;q32) in multiple myeloma. MUM1 expression is seen in various B-cell lymphomas and predicts an unfavorable outcome in some lymphoma subtypes. To elucidate its role in B-cell malignancies, we prepared MUM1-expressing Ba/F3 cells, which proliferated until higher cellular density than the parental cells, and performed cDNA microarray analysis to identify genes whose expression is regulated by MUM1. We found that the expression of four genes including FK506-binding protein 3 (FKBP3), the monokine induced by interferon-gamma(MIG), Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule (Faim) and Zinc-finger protein 94 was altered in the MUM1-expressing cells. We then focused on MIG since its expression was immediately upregulated by MUM1. In reporter assays, MUM1 activated the MIG promoter in cooperation with PU.1, and the interaction between MUM1 and the MIG promoter sequence was confirmed. The expression of MIG was correlated with that of MUM1 in B-CLL cell lines, and treatment with neutralizing antibodies against MIG and its receptor, CXCR3, slightly inhibited the proliferation of two MUM1-expressing lines. These results suggest that MUM1 plays roles in the progression of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia by regulating the expression of various genes including MIG. Leukemia (2005) 19, 1471-1478. doi:10.1038/sj.leu.2403833; published online 16 June 2005.

  6. CD11c gene expression in hairy cell leukemia is dependent upon activation of the proto-oncogenes ras and junD.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Fotini; Teodoridis, Jens M; Park, Heiyoung; Georgakis, Alexander; Farokhzad, Omid C; Böttinger, Erwin P; Da Silva, Nicolas; Rousselot, Philippe; Chomienne, Christine; Ferenczi, Katalin; Arnaout, M Amin; Shelley, C Simon

    2003-05-15

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disease, the cause of which is unknown. Diagnostic of HCL is abnormal expression of the gene that encodes the beta2 integrin CD11c. In order to determine the cause of CD11c gene expression in HCL the CD11c gene promoter was characterized. Transfection of the CD11c promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene indicated that it is sufficient to direct expression in hairy cells. Mutation analysis demonstrated that of predominant importance to the activity of the CD11c promoter is its interaction with the activator protein-1 (AP-1) family of transcription factors. Comparison of nuclear extracts prepared from hairy cells with those prepared from other cell types indicated that hairy cells exhibit abnormal constitutive expression of an AP-1 complex containing JunD. Functional inhibition of AP-1 expressed by hairy cells reduced CD11c promoter activity by 80%. Inhibition of Ras, which represents an upstream activator of AP-1, also significantly inhibited the CD11c promoter. Furthermore, in the hairy cell line EH, inhibition of Ras signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) reduced not only CD11c promoter activity but also reduced both CD11c surface expression and proliferation. Expression in nonhairy cells of a dominant-positive Ras mutant activated the CD11c promoter to levels equivalent to those in hairy cells. Together, these data indicate that the abnormal expression of the CD11c gene characteristic of HCL is dependent upon activation of the proto-oncogenes ras and junD.

  7. Aberrant microRNA expression likely controls RAS oncogene activation during malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial and stem cells by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Ngalame, Ntube N O; Tokar, Erik J; Person, Rachel J; Xu, Yuanyuan; Waalkes, Michael P

    2014-04-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs), a human carcinogen, potentially targets the prostate. iAs malignantly transforms the RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial line to CAsE-PE cells, and a derivative normal stem cell (SC) line, WPE-stem, to As-Cancer SC (As-CSC) line. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are noncoding but exert negative control on expression by degradation or translational repression of target mRNAs. Aberrant miRNA expression is important in carcinogenesis. A miRNA array of CAsE-PE and As-CSC revealed common altered expression in both for pathways concerning oncogenesis, miRNA biogenesis, cell signaling, proliferation, and tumor metastasis and invasion. The KRAS oncogene is overexpressed in CAsE-PE cells but not by mutation or promoter hypomethylation, and is intensely overexpressed in As-CSC cells. In both transformants, decreased miRNAs targeting KRAS and RAS superfamily members occurred. Reduced miR-134, miR-373, miR-155, miR-138, miR-205, miR-181d, miR-181c, and let-7 in CAsE-PE cells correlated with increased target RAS oncogenes, RAN, RAB27A, RAB22A mRNAs, and KRAS protein. Reduced miR-143, miR-34c-5p, and miR-205 in As-CSC correlated with increased target RAN mRNA, and KRAS, NRAS, and RRAS proteins. The RAS/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathways control cell survival, differentiation, and proliferation, and when dysregulated promote a cancer phenotype. iAs transformation increased expression of activated ERK kinase in both transformants and altered components of the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway including decreased PTEN and increases in BCL2, BCL-XL, and VEGF in the absence of AKT activation. Thus, dysregulated miRNA expression may be linked to RAS activation in both transformants.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of HPV16 integration in OSCC reveals no significant impact of physical status on viral oncogene and virally disrupted human gene expression.

    PubMed

    Olthof, Nadine C; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Kolligs, Jutta; Haesevoets, Annick; Henfling, Mieke; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Preuss, Simon F; Drebber, Uta; Wieland, Ulrike; Silling, Steffi; Lam, Wan L; Vucic, Emily A; Kremer, Bernd; Klussmann, Jens-P; Huebbers, Christian U

    2014-01-01

    Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 is an independent risk factor for the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC). However, it is unclear whether viral integration is an essential hallmark in the carcinogenic process of OSCC and whether HPV integration correlates with the level of viral gene transcription and influences the expression of disrupted host genes. We analyzed 75 patients with OSCC. HPV16-positivity was proven by p16(INK4A) immunohistochemistry, PCR and FISH. Viral integration was examined using DIPS- as well as APOT-PCR. Viral E2, E6 and E7 gene expression levels were quantified by quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-q)PCR. Expression levels of 7 human genes disrupted by the virus were extracted from mRNA expression profiling data of 32 OSCCs. Viral copy numbers were assessed by qPCR in 73 tumors. We identified 37 HPV16-human fusion products indicating viral integration in 29 (39%) OSCC. In the remaining tumors (61%) only episome-derived PCR products were detected. When comparing OSCC with or without an integration-derived fusion product, we did not find significant differences in the mean RNA expression of viral genes E2, E6 and E7 or the viral copy numbers per cell, nor did the RNA expression of the HPV-disrupted genes differ from either group of OSCC. In conclusion, our data do not support the hypothesis that integration affects the levels of viral and/or HPV-disrupted human gene transcripts. Thus constitutive, rather than a high level, of expression of oncogene transcripts appears to be required in HPV-related OSCC. PMID:24586376

  9. Facial expression recognition using thermal image.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guotai; Song, Xuemin; Zheng, Fuhui; Wang, Peipei; Omer, Ashgan

    2005-01-01

    Facial expression recognition will be studied in this paper using mathematics morphology, through drawing and analyzing the whole geometry characteristics and some geometry characteristics of the interesting area of Infrared Thermal Imaging (IRTI). The results show that geometry characteristic in the interesting region of different expression are obviously different; Facial temperature changes almost with the expression at the same time. Studies have shown feasibility of facial expression recognition on the basis of IRTI. This method can be used to monitor the facial expression in real time, which can be used in auxiliary diagnosis and medical on disease.

  10. A high level of liver-specific expression of oncogenic Kras(V12) drives robust liver tumorigenesis in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Emelyanov, Alexander; Koh, Chor Hui Vivien; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Lam, Siew Hong; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan; Parinov, Serguei; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2011-11-01

    Human liver cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) being the most common type. Aberrant Ras signaling has been implicated in the development and progression of human HCC, but a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this protein in hepatocarcinogenesis remains elusive. In this study, a stable in vivo liver cancer model using transgenic zebrafish was generated to elucidate Ras-driven tumorigenesis in HCC. Using the liver-specific fabp10 (fatty acid binding protein 10) promoter, we overexpressed oncogenic kras(V12) specifically in the transgenic zebrafish liver. Only a high level of kras(V12) expression initiated liver tumorigenesis, which progressed from hyperplasia to benign and malignant tumors with activation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK and Wnt-β-catenin pathways. Histological diagnosis of zebrafish tumors identified HCC as the main lesion. The tumors were invasive and transplantable, indicating malignancy of these HCC cells. Oncogenic kras(V12) was also found to trigger p53-dependent senescence as a tumor suppressive barrier in the pre-neoplastic stage. Microarray analysis of zebrafish liver hyperplasia and HCC uncovered the deregulation of several stage-specific and common biological processes and signaling pathways responsible for kras(V12)-driven liver tumorigenesis that recapitulated the molecular hallmarks of human liver cancer. Cross-species comparisons of cancer transcriptomes further defined a HCC-specific gene signature as well as a liver cancer progression gene signature that are evolutionarily conserved between human and zebrafish. Collectively, our study presents a comprehensive portrait of molecular mechanisms during progressive Ras-induced HCC. These observations indicate the validity of our transgenic zebrafish to model human liver cancer, and this model might act as a useful platform for drug screening and identifying new therapeutic targets. PMID:21729876

  11. Effect of cellular determination on oncogenic transformation by chemicals and oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, M A; Gonzales, F; Jones, P A

    1988-01-01

    Three developmentally determined myogenic cell lines derived from C3H 10T1/2 C18 (10T1/2) mouse embryo cells treated with 5-azacytidine were compared with the parental 10T1/2 line for their susceptibility to oncogenic transformation by 3-methylcholanthrene or the activated human c-Ha-ras oncogene. Neither the 10T1/2 cells nor the myogenic derivatives grew in soft agar or formed tumors in nude mice. In contrast to 10T1/2 cells, the three myogenic derivatives were not susceptible to transformation by 3-methylcholanthrene, so that cellular determination altered the response of 10T1/2 cells to chemical carcinogen. On the other hand, all cell types were transformed to a tumorigenic phenotype following transfection with the activated c-Ha-ras gene. The transfected myogenic cells expressed both the c-Ha-ras gene and the muscle determination gene MyoD1. In contrast to other reports, the presence of as many as six copies of the c-Ha-ras gene per genome did not prevent the formation of striated muscle cells which expressed immunologically detectable muscle-specific myosin. The expression of the c-Ha-ras gene does not therefore necessarily preclude the expression of the determination gene for myogenesis or prevent end-stage myogenic differentiation. Images PMID:2460742

  12. The DEK oncogene activates VEGF expression and promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in HIF-1α-dependent and -independent manners

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Lv, Zhaohui; Zhu, Jie; Lin, Jing; Ding, Lihua; Ye, Qinong

    2016-01-01

    The DEK oncogene is overexpressed in various cancers and overexpression of DEK correlates with poor clinical outcome. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most important regulator of tumor angiogenesis, a process essential for tumor growth and metastasis. However, whether DEK enhances tumor angiogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that DEK is a key regulator of VEGF expression and tumor angiogenesis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we found that DEK promoted VEGF transcription in breast cancer cells (MCF7, ZR75-1 and MDA-MB-231) by directly binding to putative DEK-responsive element (DRE) of the VEGF promoter and indirectly binding to hypoxia response element (HRE) upstream of the DRE through its interaction with the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), a master regulator of tumor angiogenesis and growth. DEK is responsible for recruitment of HIF-1α and the histone acetyltransferase p300 to the VEGF promoter. DEK-enhanced VEGF increases vascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation as well as angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane. DEK promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in nude mice in HIF-1α-dependent and -independent manners. Immunohistochemical staining showed that DEK expression positively correlates with the expression of VEGF and microvessel number in 58 breast cancer patients. Our data establish DEK as a sequence-specific binding transcription factor, a novel coactivator for HIF-1α in regulation of VEGF transcription and a novel promoter of angiogenesis. PMID:26988756

  13. Oncogenic kinase NPM/ALK induces through STAT3 expression of immunosuppressive protein CD274 (PD-L1, B7-H1).

    PubMed

    Marzec, Michal; Zhang, Qian; Goradia, Ami; Raghunath, Puthiyaveettil N; Liu, Xiaobin; Paessler, Michele; Wang, Hong Yi; Wysocka, Maria; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce A; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2008-12-30

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation caused by the oncogenic, chimeric nucleophosmin (NPM)/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) remain only partially understood, with most of the previous studies focusing mainly on the impact of NPM/ALK on cell survival and proliferation. Here we report that the NPM/ALK-carrying T cell lymphoma (ALK+TCL) cells strongly express the immunosuppressive cell-surface protein CD274 (PD-L1, B7-H1), as determined on the mRNA and protein level. The CD274 expression is strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM/ALK, as demonstrated by inhibition of the NPM/ALK function in ALK+TCL cells by the small molecule ALK inhibitor CEP-14083 and by documenting CD274 expression in IL-3-depleted BaF3 cells transfected with the wild-type NPM/ALK, but not the kinase-inactive NPM/ALK K210R mutant or empty vector alone. NPM/ALK induces CD274 expression by activating its key signal transmitter, transcription factor STAT3. STAT3 binds to the CD274 gene promoter in vitro and in vivo, as shown in the gel electromobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, and is required for the PD-L1 gene expression, as demonstrated by siRNA-mediated STAT3 depletion. These findings identify an additional cell-transforming property of NPM/ALK and describe a direct link between an oncoprotein and an immunosuppressive cell-surface protein. These results also provide an additional rationale to therapeutically target NPM/ALK and STAT3 in ALK+TCL. Finally, they suggest that future immunotherapeutic protocols for this type of lymphoma may need to include the inhibition of NPM/ALK and STAT3 to achieve optimal clinical efficacy.

  14. Forkhead Box M1 Is Essential for Nuclear Localization of Glioma-associated Oncogene Homolog 1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells by Promoting Importin-7 Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jianfei; Zhou, Aidong; Tan, Christina; Wu, Yamei; Lee, Hsueh-Te; Li, Wenliang; Xie, Keping; Huang, Suyun

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factors glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1), a primary marker of Hedgehog pathway activation, and Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) are aberrantly activated in a wide range of malignancies, including glioma. However, the mechanism of nuclear localization of GLI1 and whether FOXM1 regulates the Hedgehog signaling pathway are poorly understood. Here we found that FOXM1 promotes nuclear import of GLI1 in glioblastoma multiforme cells and thus increases the expression of its target genes. Conversely, knockdown of FOXM1 expression with FOXM1 siRNA abrogated its nuclear import and inhibited the expression of its target genes. Also, genetic deletion of FOXM1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts abolished nuclear localization of GLI1. We observed that FOXM1 directly binds to the importin-7 (IPO7) promoter and increases its promoter activity. IPO7 interacted with GLI1, leading to enhanced nuclear import of GLI1. Depletion of IPO7 by IPO7 siRNA reduced nuclear accumulation of GLI1. In addition, FOXM1 induced nuclear import of GLI1 by promoting IPO7 expression. Moreover, the FOXM1/IPO7/GLI1 axis promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. Finally, expression of FOXM1 was markedly correlated with that of GLI1 in human glioblastoma specimens. These data suggest that FOXM1 and GLI1 form a positive feedback loop that contributes to glioblastoma development. Furthermore, our study revealed a mechanism that controls nuclear import of GLI1 in glioblastoma multiforme cells. PMID:26085085

  15. The proto-oncogene Myc drives expression of the NK cell-activating NKp30 ligand B7-H6 in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Textor, Sonja; Bossler, Felicitas; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Pollmann, Julia; Fiegler, Nathalie; Arnold, Annette; Westermann, Frank; Waldburger, Nina; Breuhahn, Kai; Golfier, Sven; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2016-07-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate effector cells that are able to recognize and eliminate tumor cells through engagement of their surface receptors. NKp30 is a potent activating NK cell receptor that elicits efficient NK cell-mediated target cell killing. Recently, B7-H6 was identified as tumor cell surface expressed ligand for NKp30. Enhanced B7-H6 mRNA levels are frequently detected in tumor compared to healthy tissues. To gain insight in the regulation of expression of B7-H6 in tumors, we investigated transcriptional mechanisms driving B7-H6 expression by promoter analyses. Using luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we mapped a functional binding site for Myc, a proto-oncogene overexpressed in certain tumors, in the B7-H6 promoter. Pharmacological inhibition or siRNA/shRNA-mediated knock-down of c-Myc or N-Myc significantly decreased B7-H6 expression on a variety of tumor cells including melanoma, pancreatic carcinoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. In tumor cell lines from different origin and primary tumor tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), lymphoma and neuroblastoma, mRNA levels of c-Myc positively correlated with B7-H6 expression. Most importantly, upon inhibition or knock-down of c-Myc in tumor cells impaired NKp30-mediated degranulation of NK cells was observed. Thus, our data imply that Myc driven tumors could be targets for cancer immunotherapy exploiting the NKp30/B7-H6 axis.

  16. The proto-oncogene Myc drives expression of the NK cell-activating NKp30 ligand B7-H6 in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Textor, Sonja; Bossler, Felicitas; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Pollmann, Julia; Fiegler, Nathalie; Arnold, Annette; Westermann, Frank; Waldburger, Nina; Breuhahn, Kai; Golfier, Sven; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2016-07-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate effector cells that are able to recognize and eliminate tumor cells through engagement of their surface receptors. NKp30 is a potent activating NK cell receptor that elicits efficient NK cell-mediated target cell killing. Recently, B7-H6 was identified as tumor cell surface expressed ligand for NKp30. Enhanced B7-H6 mRNA levels are frequently detected in tumor compared to healthy tissues. To gain insight in the regulation of expression of B7-H6 in tumors, we investigated transcriptional mechanisms driving B7-H6 expression by promoter analyses. Using luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we mapped a functional binding site for Myc, a proto-oncogene overexpressed in certain tumors, in the B7-H6 promoter. Pharmacological inhibition or siRNA/shRNA-mediated knock-down of c-Myc or N-Myc significantly decreased B7-H6 expression on a variety of tumor cells including melanoma, pancreatic carcinoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. In tumor cell lines from different origin and primary tumor tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), lymphoma and neuroblastoma, mRNA levels of c-Myc positively correlated with B7-H6 expression. Most importantly, upon inhibition or knock-down of c-Myc in tumor cells impaired NKp30-mediated degranulation of NK cells was observed. Thus, our data imply that Myc driven tumors could be targets for cancer immunotherapy exploiting the NKp30/B7-H6 axis. PMID:27622013

  17. Enforced expression of the c-myc oncogene inhibits cell differentiation by precluding entry into a distinct predifferentiation state in G/sub 0//G/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, S.O.

    1988-04-01

    A broad base of data has implicated a role for the c-myc proto-oncogene in the control of the cell cycle and cell differentiation. To further define the role of myc in these processes, the authors examined the effect of enforced myc expression on several events that are thought to be important steps leading to the terminally differentiated state: (i) the ability to arrest growth in G/sub 0//G/sub 1/, (ii) the ability to replicate the genome upon initiation of the differentiation program, and (iii) the ability to loose responsiveness to mitogens and withdraw from the cell cycle. 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell lines expressing various levels of myc mRNA were established by transfection with a recombinant myc gene under the transcriptional control of the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) promoter. Cells that expressed high constitutive levels of pRSV myc mRNA arrested in G/sub 0//G/sub 1/ at densities similar to those of normal cells at confluence. Upon initiation of the differentiation program, such cells traversed the cell cycle with kinetics similar to those of normal cells and subsequently arrested in G/sub 0//G/sub 1/. Thus, enforced expression of myc had no effect on the ability of cells to arrest growth in G/sub 0//G/sub 1/ or to replicate the genome upon initiation of the differentiation program. Cells were then tested for their ability to reenter the cell cycle upon exposure to high concentrations of serum and for their capacity to differentiate. In contrast to normal cells, cells expressing high constitutive levels of myc RNA reentered the cell cycle when challenged with 30% serum and failed to terminally differentiate.

  18. Transcriptional expression of Epstein-Barr virus genes and proto-oncogenes in north African nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sbih-Lammali, F; Djennaoui, D; Belaoui, H; Bouguermouh, A; Decaussin, G; Ooka, T

    1996-05-01

    Cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) from North Africa show an unusual bimodal age distribution. As elsewhere, the tumor is closely associated with the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The expression of EBV genes and c-onc genes was studied in biopsy specimens from tumors at different clinical stages from 11 young (10 to 30-year-old) and 11 adult (30 to 65-year-old) patients. It was found that the two age groups do not differ in their pattern of gene expression, that there is a tendency for later stage biopsies to express more viral and c-onc transcripts, and that samples expressing larger numbers of EBV genes also tend to express many different c-onc specificities. PMID:8732865

  19. Oncogenic microRNA-155 and its target PU.1: an integrative gene expression study in six of the most prevalent lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Huskova, Hana; Korecka, Katarina; Karban, Josef; Vargova, Jarmila; Vargova, Karina; Dusilkova, Nina; Trneny, Marek; Stopka, Tomas

    2015-10-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 and its inhibitory microRNA-155 (miR-155) are important regulators of B-cell differentiation. PU.1 downregulation coupled with oncogenic miR-155 upregulation has been reported in lymphoid malignancies; however, these data have not been studied across different subtypes in relation to clinical outcomes. We studied expression of miR-155 and PU.1 in the six most prevalent human B-cell lymphomas (n = 131) including aggressive (DLBCL, HL, MCL) and indolent (B-CLL/SLL, MZL, FL) types. Levels of miR-155 and PU.1 inversely correlated in DLBCL, B-CLL/SLL, and FL tumor tissues. In HL tissues, an exceptionally high level of miR-155 was found in patients with unfavorable responses to first-line therapy and those who had shorter survival times. PU.1 downregulation was noted in B-CLL/SLL samples positive for the adverse prognostic markers CD38 and ZAP-70. Upregulation of miR-155 and downregulation of PU.1 expression are integral aspects of lymphoma biology that could mark aggressive behavior of some, but not all, lymphoma types.

  20. Imaging Transgene Expression with Radionuclide Imaging Technologies1

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, SS; Herschman, HR; Cherry, SR; Barrio, JR; Satyamurthy, N; Toyokuni, T; Phelps, ME; Larson, SM; Balaton, J; Finn, R; Sadelain, M; Tjuvajev, J

    2000-01-01

    Abstract A variety of imaging technologies are being investigated as tools for studying gene expression in living subjects. Noninvasive, repetitive and quantitative imaging of gene expression will help both to facilitate human gene therapy trials and to allow for the study of animal models of molecular and cellular therapy. Radionuclide approaches using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are the most mature of the current imaging technologies and offer many advantages for imaging gene expression compared to optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based approaches. These advantages include relatively high sensitivity, full quantitative capability (for PET), and the ability to extend small animal assays directly into clinical human applications. We describe a PET scanner (micro PET) designed specifically for studies of small animals. We review “marker/reporter gene” imaging approaches using the herpes simplex type 1 virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and the dopamine type 2 receptor (D2R) genes. We describe and contrast several radiolabeled probes that can be used with the HSV1-tk reporter gene both for SPECT and for PET imaging. We also describe the advantages/disadvantages of each of the assays developed and discuss future animal and human applications. PMID:10933072

  1. Hidden among the crowd: differential DNA methylation-expression correlations in cancer occur at important oncogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera Orgueira, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a frequent epigenetic mechanism that participates in transcriptional repression. Variations in DNA methylation with respect to gene expression are constant, and, for unknown reasons, some genes with highly methylated promoters are sometimes overexpressed. In this study we have analyzed the expression and methylation patterns of thousands of genes in five groups of cancer and normal tissue samples in order to determine local and genome-wide differences. We observed significant changes in global methylation-expression correlation in all the neoplasms, which suggests that differential correlation events are frequent in cancer. A focused analysis in the breast cancer cohort identified 1662 genes whose correlation varies significantly between normal and cancerous breast, but whose DNA methylation and gene expression patterns do not change substantially. These genes were enriched in cancer-related pathways and repressive chromatin features across various model cell lines, such as PRC2 binding and H3K27me3 marks. Substantial changes in methylation-expression correlation indicate that these genes are subject to epigenetic remodeling, where the differential activity of other factors break the expected relationship between both variables. Our findings suggest a complex regulatory landscape where a redistribution of local and large-scale chromatin repressive domains at differentially correlated genes (DCGs) creates epigenetic hotspots that modulate cancer-specific gene expression. PMID:26029238

  2. Genome-wide analysis of the rat colon reveals proximal-distal differences in histone modifications and proto-oncogene expression.

    PubMed

    Triff, Karen; Konganti, Kranti; Gaddis, Sally; Zhou, Beiyan; Ivanov, Ivan; Chapkin, Robert S

    2013-12-15

    Since disease susceptibility of the intestine exhibits an anatomical bias, we propose that the chromatin landscape, especially the site-specific epigenetic differences in histone modification patterns throughout the colonic longitudinal axis, contributes to the differential incidence of site-specific pathology. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the chromatin structure associated with gene expression profiles in the rat proximal and distal colon by globally correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation next-generation sequencing analysis (ChIP-Seq) with mRNA transcription (RNA-Seq) data. Crypts were isolated from the proximal and distal colonic regions from rats maintained on a semipurified diet, and mRNA gene expression profiles were generated by RNA-Seq. The remaining isolated crypts were formaldehyde-cross-linked and chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and RNA polymerase II. Globally, RNA-Seq results indicate that 9,866 genes were actively expressed, of which 540 genes were differentially expressed between the proximal and distal colon. Gene ontology analysis indicates that crypt location significantly affected both chromatin and transcriptional regulation of genes involved in enterocyte movement, lipid metabolism, lymphatic development, and immune cell trafficking. Gene function analysis indicates that the PI3-kinase signaling pathway was regulated in a site-specific manner, e.g., proto-oncogenes, JUN, FOS, and ATF, were upregulated in the distal colon. Middle and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) were also detected in the colon, including select lncRNAs formerly only detected in the rat nervous system. In summary, distinct combinatorial patterns of histone modifications exist in the proximal versus distal colon. These site-specific differences may explain the differential effects of chemoprotective agents on cell transformation in the ascending (proximal) and descending (distal) colon.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of the rat colon reveals proximal-distal differences in histone modifications and proto-oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Triff, Karen; Konganti, Kranti; Gaddis, Sally; Zhou, Beiyan; Ivanov, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Since disease susceptibility of the intestine exhibits an anatomical bias, we propose that the chromatin landscape, especially the site-specific epigenetic differences in histone modification patterns throughout the colonic longitudinal axis, contributes to the differential incidence of site-specific pathology. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the chromatin structure associated with gene expression profiles in the rat proximal and distal colon by globally correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation next-generation sequencing analysis (ChIP-Seq) with mRNA transcription (RNA-Seq) data. Crypts were isolated from the proximal and distal colonic regions from rats maintained on a semipurified diet, and mRNA gene expression profiles were generated by RNA-Seq. The remaining isolated crypts were formaldehyde-cross-linked and chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and RNA polymerase II. Globally, RNA-Seq results indicate that 9,866 genes were actively expressed, of which 540 genes were differentially expressed between the proximal and distal colon. Gene ontology analysis indicates that crypt location significantly affected both chromatin and transcriptional regulation of genes involved in enterocyte movement, lipid metabolism, lymphatic development, and immune cell trafficking. Gene function analysis indicates that the PI3-kinase signaling pathway was regulated in a site-specific manner, e.g., proto-oncogenes, JUN, FOS, and ATF, were upregulated in the distal colon. Middle and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) were also detected in the colon, including select lncRNAs formerly only detected in the rat nervous system. In summary, distinct combinatorial patterns of histone modifications exist in the proximal versus distal colon. These site-specific differences may explain the differential effects of chemoprotective agents on cell transformation in the ascending (proximal) and descending (distal) colon. PMID:24151245

  4. Transforming but not immortalizing oncogenes activate the transcription factor PEA1.

    PubMed Central

    Wasylyk, C; Imler, J L; Wasylyk, B

    1988-01-01

    The transcription factor PEA1 (a homologue of AP1 and c-jun) is highly active in several fibroblast cell lines, compared to its low activity in a myeloma and an embryo-carcinoma (EC) cell line. Serum components are essential to attain these high levels of PEA1 activity in fibroblasts. This serum requirement is abrogated by transformation with the oncogenes c-Ha-ras, v-src and polyoma middle T (Py-MT) but not by immortalization with polyoma large T (Py-LT), v-myc, c-myc or SV40 large T (SV40T). Expression in myeloma cells of the same transforming oncogenes, as well as v-mos and c-fos, activates PEA1, whereas expression of the same immortalizing oncogenes and EIA does not. These results suggest that a common target for transforming oncogenes is PEA1. Serum components have no effect on PEA1 activity in the myeloma and EC cell lines. In contrast, retinoic acid treatment of F9 EC cells augments PEA1 activity. These results suggest that transforming oncogene expression compensates for the absence of cell type-specific factors which are required to activate PEA1. Activation of PEA1 may lead to altered transcription of a set of transformation-related genes. Images PMID:3142763

  5. Detection of the bcl-2 t(14;18) Translocation and Proto-Oncogene Expression in Primary Intraocular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Dana J.; Shen, DeFen; Reed, George F.; Miyanaga, Masaru; Mochizuki, Manabu; Sen, H. Nida; Dahr, Samuel S.; Buggage, Ronald R.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma that initially infiltrates the retina, vitreous, or optic nerve head, with or without central nervous system involvement. This study examined the expression of the bcl-2 t(14;18) translocation, the bcl-10 gene, and high expression of bcl-6 mRNA in PIOL cells. METHODS Microdissection and PCR analysis were used to examine vitreous specimens in patients with PIOL for the presence of bcl-2 t(14;18) translocations, the bcl-10 gene, and expression of bcl-6 mRNA. A medical record review was also conducted to determine whether the bcl-2 t(14;18) translocation correlated with prognosis. RESULTS Forty of 72 (55%) PIOL patients expressed the bcl-2 t(14;18) translocation at the major breakpoint region. Fifteen of 68 (22%) patients expressed the translocation at the minor cluster region. The bcl-10 gene was detected in 6 of 26 (23%) patients, whereas 4 of 4 (100%) PIOL patients expressed higher levels of bcl-6 mRNA compared with inflammatory lymphocytes. An analysis of clinical outcome in 23 PIOL patients revealed no significant association between bcl-2 t(14;18) translocations and survival or relapse. However, patients with the translocation were significantly younger. CONCLUSIONS PIOL has unique molecular patterns of bcl-2, bcl-10, and bcl-6 when compared with other systemic lympho-mas. This study lays the foundation for future studies aimed at exploring the genotypic classification of PIOL based on the quantitative molecular framework of gene expression profil-ing, with the goal of providing useful adjuncts to the pathologic diagnosis of this complex disease. PMID:16799010

  6. Redox-modulating agents target NOX2-dependent IKKε oncogenic kinase expression and proliferation in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mukawera, Espérance; Chartier, Stefany; Williams, Virginie; Pagano, Patrick J.; Lapointe, Réjean; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a causative factor in carcinogenesis, but also in the development of resistance to current chemotherapies. The appropriate usage of redox-modulating compounds is limited by the lack of knowledge of their impact on specific molecular pathways. Increased levels of the IKKε kinase, as a result of gene amplification or aberrant expression, are observed in a substantial number of breast carcinomas. IKKε not only plays a key role in cell transformation and invasiveness, but also in the development of resistance to tamoxifen. Here, we studied the effect of in vitro treatment with the redox-modulating triphenylmethane dyes, Gentian Violet and Brilliant Green, and nitroxide Tempol on IKKε expression and cell proliferation in the human breast cancer epithelial cell lines exhibiting amplification of IKKε, MCF-7 and ZR75.1. We show that Gentian Violet, Brilliant Green and Tempol significantly decrease intracellular superoxide anion levels and inhibit IKKε expression and cell viability. Treatment with Gentian Violet and Brilliant Green was associated with a reduced cyclin D1 expression and activation of caspase 3 and/or 7. Tempol decreased cyclin D1 expression in both cell lines, while activation of caspase 7 was only observed in MCF-7 cells. Silencing of the superoxide-generating NOX2 NADPH oxidase expressed in breast cancer cells resulted in the significant reduction of IKKε expression. Taken together, our results suggest that redox-modulating compounds targeting NOX2 could present a particular therapeutic interest in combination therapy against breast carcinomas exhibiting IKKε amplification. PMID:26177467

  7. High Expression of the Newly Found Long Noncoding RNA Z38 Promotes Cell Proliferation and Oncogenic Activity in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Rilin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Yan; Yan, Feng; Hu, Shifan; Wang, Hongcan; Wang, Tingting; Li, Bin; Deng, Xiyun; Xiang, Shuanglin; Yang, Yinke; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) has great impacts on cancer origination and progression. In the current study, a newly found lncRNA Z38, which was identified through combining experiments of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and reverse dot-blotting, was found to have high expression in breast cancer. More importantly, inhibiting Z38 expression by gene silencing greatly suppressed breast cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, and treatment with Z38 siRNAs significantly induced cell apoptosis and inhibited tumor growth. In conclusion, the newly found lncRNA Z38, which plays important roles in breast cancer, may act as a candidate biomarker and therapeutic target in carcinomas. PMID:27053956

  8. Induction of c-myc and c-jun proto-oncogene expression in rat L6 myoblasts by cadmium is inhibited by zinc preinduction of the metallothionein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Abshire, M.K.; Buzard, G.S.; Shiraishi, Noriyuki; Waalkers, M.P.

    1996-07-01

    Certain proto-oncogenes transfer growth regulatory signals from the cell surface to the nucleus. These genes often show activation soon after cells are exposed to mitogenic stimulation but can also be activated as a nonmitogenic stress response. Cadmium (Cd) is a carcinogenic metal in humans and rodents and, though its mechanism of action is unknown, it could involve activation of such proto-oncogenes. Metallothionein (MT), a metal-inducible protein that binds Cd, can protect against many aspects of Cd toxicity, including genotoxicity and possibly carcinogenesis. Thus, the effects of Cd on expression of c-myc and c-jun in rat L6 myoblasts, and the effect of preactivation of the MT gene by Zn treatment on such oncogene expression, were studied. MT protein levels were measured using oligonucleotide hybridization and standardized to {beta}-actin levels. Cd (5 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}, 0-30 h) stimulated both c-myc and c-jun mRNA expression. An initial peak of activation of c-myc expression occurred 2 h after initiation of Cd exposure, and levels remained elevated throughout the assessment period. Zn pretreatment markedly reduced the activation of c-myc expression by Cd compared to cells not receiving Zn pretreatment. Cd treatment increased c-jun mRNA levels by up to 3.5-fold. Again, Zn pretreatment markedly reduced. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Exposure to airborne PM2.5 suppresses microRNA expression and deregulates target oncogenes that cause neoplastic transformation in NIH3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinxin; Shao, Mingming; Wu, Chen; Wang, Suhan; Li, Hongmin; Wei, Lixuan; Gao, Yanning; Tan, Wen; Cheng, Shujun; Wu, Tangchun; Yu, Dianke; Lin, Dongxin

    2015-01-01

    Long-term exposure to airborne PM2.5 is associated with increased lung cancer risk but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We characterized global microRNA and mRNA expression in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to PM2.5 organic extract and integrally analyzed microRNA-mRNA interactions. Foci formation and xenograft tumorigenesis in mice with NIH3T3 cells expressing genes targeted by microRNAs were performed to explore the oncogenic potential of these genes. We also detected plasma levels of candidate microRNAs in subjects exposed to different levels of air PM2.5 and examined the aberrant expression of genes targeted by these microRNAs in human lung cancer. Under our experimental conditions, treatment of cells with PM2.5 extract resulted in downregulation of 138 microRNAs and aberrant expression of 13 mRNAs (11 upregulation and 2 downregulation). In silico and biochemical analyses suggested SLC30A1, SERPINB2 and AKR1C1, among the upregulated genes, as target for miR-182 and miR-185, respectively. Ectopic expression of each of these genes significantly enhanced foci formation in NIH3T3 cells. Following subcutaneous injection of these cells into nude mice, fibrosarcoma were formed from SLC30A1- or SERPINB2-expressing cells. Reduced plasma levels of miR-182 were detected in subjects exposed to high level of PM2.5 than in those exposed to low level of PM2.5 (P = 0.043). Similar results were seen for miR-185 although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.328). Increased expressions of SLC30A1, SERPINB2 and AKR1C1 were detected in human lung cancer. These results suggest that modulation of miR-182 and miR-185 and their target genes may contribute to lung carcinogenesis attributable to PM2.5 exposure. PMID:26338969

  10. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Il-Rae; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong; Choi, Young-Whan; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Oh, Sangtaek; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1

  11. Crystallin gene expression and lentoid body formation in quail embryo neuroretina cultures transformed by the oncogenic retrovirus Mill Hill 2 or Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Simonneau, L; Crisanti, P; Lorinet, A M; Alliot, F; Courtois, Y; Calothy, G; Pessac, B

    1986-01-01

    The lens-specific proteins alpha and delta crystallins and lentoid bodies, structures that follow a differentiation pathway similar to that of the lens, regularly appear after 4 to 5 weeks in quail embryo neuroretina monolayer cultures. We have investigated the effects of the avian oncogenic retroviruses Mill Hill 2 and Rous sarcoma virus on this process. Quail embryo neuroretina cells transformed by Mill Hill 2 virus were established into permanent cultures that synthesized alpha and delta crystallins and contained stem cells for the production of lentoid bodies. In contrast, transformation with the Rous sarcoma virus mutant tsNY-68 blocked the appearance of mRNA crystallins, but cytoplasmic alpha and delta crystallin mRNA and alpha crystallin appeared 44 h after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. However, delta crystallins and lentoid bodies were only present after 7 days. The crystallins of transformed quail neuroretina cultures were immunologically indistinguishable from those of quail lenses and of normal quail embryo neuroretina cultures. Images PMID:3025609

  12. Structure, chromosome location, and expression of the mouse zinc finger gene Krox-20: multiple gene products and coregulation with the proto-oncogene c-fos.

    PubMed Central

    Chavrier, P; Janssen-Timmen, U; Mattéi, M G; Zerial, M; Bravo, R; Charnay, P

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the structure and the regulation of Krox-20, a mouse zinc finger-encoding gene which is transiently activated following serum stimulation of quiescent fibroblast cells in culture. The gene is localized on chromosome 10, band B5, in the mouse, and the homologous human gene also maps to chromosome 10 (region q21.1 to q22.1). Alternative splicing of the 5'-most intron of the Krox-20 gene gives rise to mRNAs encoding putative zinc finger proteins with different N termini. The first exon contains a sequence element with strong similarity to the c-fos proto-oncogene serum response element (SRE). This element can functionally substitute for the c-fos SRE, and it binds the same nuclear protein. It is probably responsible for the serum induction of Krox-20, possibly in combination with a weaker SRE located in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Our findings suggest that c-fos, Krox-20, and a number of immediate-early serum response genes are coregulated and that the SRE and its cognate protein are essential components of this regulatory pathway. Images PMID:2496302

  13. Combining High-Content Imaging and Phenotypic Classification Analysis of Senescence-Associated Beta-Galactosidase Staining to Identify Regulators of Oncogene-Induced Senescence.

    PubMed

    Chan, Keefe T; Paavolainen, Lassi; Hannan, Katherine M; George, Amee J; Hannan, Ross D; Simpson, Kaylene J; Horvath, Peter; Pearson, Richard B

    2016-09-01

    Hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTORC1 signaling pathway is a hallmark of the majority of sporadic human cancers. Paradoxically, chronic activation of this pathway in nontransformed cells promotes senescence, which acts as a significant barrier to malignant progression. Understanding how this oncogene-induced senescence is maintained in nontransformed cells and conversely how it is subverted in cancer cells will provide insight into cancer development and potentially identify novel therapeutic targets. High-throughput screening provides a powerful platform for target discovery. Here, we describe an approach to use RNAi transfection of a pre-established AKT-induced senescent cell population and subsequent high-content imaging to screen for senescence regulators. We have incorporated multiparametric readouts, including cell number, proliferation, and senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-βGal) staining. Using machine learning and automated image analysis, we also describe methods to classify distinct phenotypes of cells with SA-βGal staining. These methods can be readily adaptable to high-throughput functional screens interrogating the mechanisms that maintain and prevent senescence in various contexts. PMID:27552145

  14. Expression of c-kit, a proto-oncogene of the murine W locus, in cerebella of normal and neurological mutant mice: immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, H; Yoshiki, A; Nishikawa, S; Nishikawa, S; Kunisada, T; Sakakura, T; Amanuma, H; Kusakabe, M

    1992-10-01

    The c-kit proto-oncogene encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase and is allelic with the murine white-spoting (W) locus. Although no apparent defects in the brain have been reported in W mutant mice, brain tissue, especially cerebellum, shows a high level of c-kit transcription. In the present study, sites of c-kit expression in the cerebellum were exained by immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. Immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal antibody against c-Kit protein revealed that the c-Kit protein was localized close to the Purkinje cell soma in the region facing the granular cell layer. Similar distribution of the c-Kit protein was observed in cerebella of mutant mice in which the Purkinje cell (pcd) or the granular cell layer (weaver) is missing. These data suggest that the c-Kit protein is produced not by the Purkinje cell nor by the granular cell but by the cells present in the molecular layer and that the protein is then transported to the region around the Purkinje cell soma. This interpretation was supported by in situ hybridization analysis: cells containing the c-kit transcripts were found only in the molecular layer, while the granular and Purkinje cells were negative.

  15. Resveratrol prevents tumorigenesis in mouse model of Kras activated sporadic colorectal cancer by suppressing oncogenic Kras expression

    PubMed Central

    Saud, Shakir M.; Li, Weidong; Morris, Nicole L.; Matter, Matthias S.; Colburn, Nancy H.; Kim, Young S.; Young, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic and non-hereditary mutations account for the majority of colorectal cancers (CRC). After the loss of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) function and activation of the β-catenin/LEF signaling pathway, activating mutations in Kras are major drivers of sporadic CRC. Preventing the outgrowth of cells that develop sporadic mutations will decrease CRC. Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. We used a genetically engineered mouse model for sporadic CRC where the APC locus is knocked out and Kras is activated specifically in the distal colon to determine the effects of resveratrol on preventing and treating CRC. Feeding mice a diet supplemented with 150 or 300 ppm resveratrol (105 and 210mg daily human equivalent dose, respectively) before tumors were visible by colonoscopy resulted in a 60% inhibition of tumor production. In the 40% of mice that did develop tumors Kras expression was lost in the tumors. In a therapeutic assay where tumors were allowed to develop prior to treatment, feeding tumor bearing mice with resveratrol resulted in a complete remission in 33% of the mice and a 97% decrease in tumor size in the remaining mice. Analysis of miRNA expression in non-tumoral and tumoral colonic tissue of resveratrol treated mice showed an increased expression of miR-96, a miRNA previously shown to regulate Kras translation. These data indicate that resveratrol can prevent the formation and growth of colorectal tumors by downregulating Kras expression. PMID:25280562

  16. The Dioxin Receptor Regulates the Constitutive Expression of the Vav3 Proto-Oncogene and Modulates Cell Shape and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose M.; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Roman, Angel Carlos; Sauzeau, Vincent; Merino, Jaime M.; Bustelo, Xose R.

    2009-01-01

    The dioxin receptor (AhR) modulates cell plasticity and migration, although the signaling involved remains unknown. Here, we report a mechanism that integrates AhR into these cytoskeleton-related functions. Immortalized and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking AhR (AhR−/−) had increased cell area due to spread cytoplasms that reverted to wild-type morphology upon AhR re-expression. The AhR-null phenotype included increased F-actin stress fibers, depolarized focal adhesions, and enhanced spreading and adhesion. The cytoskeleton alterations of AhR−/− cells were due to down-regulation of constitutive Vav3 expression, a guanosine diphosphate/guanosine triphosphate exchange factor for Rho/Rac GTPases and a novel transcriptional target of AhR. AhR was recruited to the vav3 promoter and maintained constitutive mRNA expression in a ligand-independent manner. Consistently, AhR−/− fibroblasts had reduced Rac1 activity and increased activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase (Rock) pathway. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 shifted AhR+/+ fibroblasts to the null phenotype, whereas Rock inhibition changed AhR-null cells to the AhR+/+ morphology. Knockdown of vav3 transcripts by small interfering RNA induced cytoskeleton defects and changes in adhesion and spreading mimicking those of AhR-null cells. Moreover, vav3−/− MEFs, as AhR−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts, had increased cell area and enhanced stress fibers. By modulating Vav3-dependent signaling, AhR could regulate cell shape, adhesion, and migration under physiological conditions and, perhaps, in certain pathological states. PMID:19158396

  17. Oncogenic NanogP8 expression regulates cell proliferation and migration through the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in human gastric cancer – SGC-7901cell line

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Yao; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although elevated expression of NanogP8 has been detected in many human tumor tissues, its role in gastric tumorigenesis remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the function and regulatory mechanism of NanogP8 in gastric cancer. Methods In this study, NanogP8 cDNA was amplified by real time polymerase chain reaction from the human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901. The shRNA for RNA interference was established. The NanogP8, pAkt, Akt, pERK, ERK, p-mTOR, and mTOR proteins were detected by using the Western blot assay. Cell viability was evaluated by using the CCK-8 assay. Cell migration and invasion were also examined by using the transwell assay. Results The results indicated that the NanogP8 overexpression promoted proliferation and migration of SGC-7901 cell line, whereas its ablation exerted opposite effects. Interestingly, NanogP8 activated Akt, a key mediator of survival signals, and without affecting total Akt protein level. The NanogP8-increased gastric cell proliferation was downregulated by Akt inhibition. Our results further showed that increasing NanogP8 expression in human gastric cancer cells promoted cell proliferation by activating the AKT/mTOR pathway and further maintained gastric cell survival. Conclusion Our findings extend the knowledge regarding the oncogenic functions and proved that the NanogP8 regulates cell proliferation and migration by Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in human gastric cancer SGC-7901cell line. PMID:27563247

  18. Genomic amplification and high expression of EGFR are key targetable oncogenic events in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The dismal outcome of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) highlights the necessity of finding new therapeutic methods to benefit patients with this aggressive sarcoma. Our purpose was to investigate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a potential therapeutic target in MPNSTs. Patients and methods We performed a microarray based-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) profiling of two cohorts of primary MPNST tissue samples including 25 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) and 26 patients from Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute & Hospital (TMUCIH). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was used to validate the gene amplification detected by aCGH analysis. Another independent cohort of 56 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) MPNST samples was obtained to explore EGFR protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis. Cell biology detection and validation were performed on human MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and STS26T. Results aCGH and pathway analysis of the 51 MPNSTs identified significant gene amplification events in EGFR pathway, including frequent amplifications of EGFR gene itself, which was subsequently validated by FISH assay. High expression of EGFR protein was associated with poor disease-free and overall survival of human MPNST patients. In human MPNST cell lines ST88-14 and STS26T, inhibition of EGFR by siRNA or Gefitinib led to decreased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion accompanied by attenuation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. Conclusion These results suggest that EGFR is a potential therapeutic target for MPNST. PMID:24341609

  19. Imaging gene expression in single living cells

    PubMed Central

    Shav-Tal, Yaron; Singer, Robert H.; Darzacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Technical advances in the field of live-cell imaging have introduced the cell biologist to a new, dynamic, subcellular world. The static world of molecules in fixed cells has now been extended to the time dimension. This allows the visualization and quantification of gene expression and intracellular trafficking events of the studied molecules and the associated enzymatic processes in individual cells, in real time. PMID:15459666

  20. Regulation of Na+-H+ exchange in normal NIH-3T3 cells and in NIH-3T3 cells expressing the ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, N.E.; Knapik, J.; Strebel, F.; Tarpley, W.G.; Gorman, R.R.

    1989-04-01

    Our laboratory and others have demonstrated that Na+-H+ exchange can be regulated by two different pathways; one that is mediated by an inositol trisphosphate-stimulated increase in intracellular calcium activity, and one that is mediated by an increase in protein kinase C activity. To determine whether one of these pathways is more important than the other, or whether one pathway is physiologically relevant, we employed normal NIH-3T3 cells (3T3 cells) and NIH-3T3 cells expressing the EJ human bladder ras oncogene (EJ cells). The EJ cells were chosen because they provide a genetic model that does not exhibit serum- or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated inositol trisphosphate release or Ca2+ mobilization. It was found that serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange was more pronounced in EJ cells than in control 3T3 cells. As expected, serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in 3T3 cells was inhibited by chelating intracellular Ca2+ with the intracellular Ca2+ chelator quin2, by the intracellular Ca2+ antagonist 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8), and by the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine. In contrast, these agents did not inhibit serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells. Activators of protein kinase C (e.g., 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol or biologically active phorbol esters) were found to stimulate Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells to the same extent as serum. However, these agents were considerably less effective than serum in control 3T3 cells. Despite these findings, PDGF did not stimulate diacylglycerol levels in EJ cells.

  1. Autocrine inhibition of the c-fms proto-oncogene reduces breast cancer bone metastasis assessed with in vivo dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Justin J; Lux, Katie; Vogel, John S; Herrera, Wynetta D; Greco, Stephen; Woo, Ho-Hyung; AbuShahin, Nisreen; Pagel, Mark D; Chambers, Setsuko K

    2014-04-01

    Breast cancer cells preferentially home to the bone microenvironment, which provides a unique niche with a network of multiple bidirectional communications between host and tumor, promoting survival and growth of bone metastases. In the bone microenvironment, the c-fms proto-oncogene that encodes for the CSF-1 receptor, along with CSF-1, serves as one critical cytokine/receptor pair, functioning in paracrine and autocrine fashion. Previous studies concentrated on the effect of inhibition of host (mouse) c-fms on bone metastasis, with resulting decrease in osteolysis and bone metastases as a paracrine effect. In this report, we assessed the role of c-fms inhibition within the tumor cells (autocrine effect) in the early establishment of breast cancer cells in bone and the effects of this early c-fms inhibition on subsequent bone metastases and destruction. This study exploited a multidisciplinary approach by employing two non-invasive, in vivo imaging methods to assess the progression of bone metastases and bone destruction, in addition to ex vivo analyses using RT-PCR and histopathology. Using a mouse model of bone homing human breast cancer cells, we showed that an early one-time application of anti-human c-fms antibody delayed growth of bone metastases and bone destruction for at least 31 days as quantitatively measured by bioluminescence imaging and computed tomography, compared to controls. Thus, neutralizing human c-fms in the breast cancer cell alone decreases extent of subsequent bone metastasis formation and osteolysis. Furthermore, we are the first to show that anti-c-fms antibodies can impact early establishment of breast cancer cells in bone.

  2. Changes in the phenotype of human small cell lung cancer cell lines after transfection and expression of the c-myc proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, B E; Battey, J; Linnoila, I; Becker, K L; Makuch, R W; Snider, R H; Carney, D N; Minna, J D

    1986-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer growing in cell culture possesses biologic properties that allow classification into two categories: classic and variant. Compared with classic small cell lung cancer cell lines, variant lines have altered large cell morphology, shorter doubling times, higher cloning efficiencies in soft agarose, and very low levels of L dopa decarboxylase production and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. C-myc is amplified and expressed in some small cell lung cancer cell lines and all c-myc amplified lines studied to date display the variant phenotype. To investigate if c-myc amplification and expression is responsible for the variant phenotype, a normal human c-myc gene was transfected into a cloned classic small cell lung cancer cell line not amplified for or expressing detectable c-myc messenger RNA (mRNA). Clones were isolated with one to six copies of c-myc stably integrated into DNA that expressed c-myc mRNA. In addition, one clone with an integrated neo gene but a deleted c-myc gene was isolated and in this case c-myc was not expressed. C-myc expression in transfected clones was associated with altered large cell morphology, a shorter doubling time, and increased cloning efficiency, but no difference in L dopa decarboxylase levels and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. We conclude increased c-myc expression observed here in transfected clones correlates with some of the phenotypic properties distinguishing c-myc amplified variants from unamplified classic small cell lung cancer lines. Images PMID:3016030

  3. Inhibition of Prostaglandin Reductase 2, a Putative Oncogene Overexpressed in Human Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Induces Oxidative Stress-Mediated Cell Death Involving xCT and CTH Gene Expressions through 15-Keto-PGE2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Hee, Siow-Wey; Chen, Ing-Jung; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) is the enzyme that catalyzes 15-keto-PGE2, an endogenous PPARγ ligand, into 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2. Previously, we have reported a novel oncogenic role of PTGR2 in gastric cancer, where PTGR2 was discovered to modulate ROS-mediated cell death and tumor transformation. In the present study, we demonstrated the oncogenic potency of PTGR2 in pancreatic cancer. First, we observed that the majority of the human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues was stained positive for PTGR2 expression but not in the adjacent normal parts. In vitro analyses showed that silencing of PTGR2 expression enhanced ROS production, suppressed pancreatic cell proliferation, and promoted cell death through increasing 15-keto-PGE2. Mechanistically, silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 suppressed the expressions of solute carrier family 7 member 11 (xCT) and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH), two important providers of intracellular cysteine for the generation of glutathione (GSH), which is widely accepted as the first-line antioxidative defense. The oxidative stress-mediated cell death after silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 was further abolished after restoring intracellular GSH concentrations and cysteine supply by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and 2-Mercaptomethanol. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting PTGR2/15-keto-PGE2 for pancreatic cancer.

  4. Systematic multiplex polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses of changes in copy number and expression of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in cancer tissues and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Miyako; Metoki, Rikiya; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2004-10-01

    Systematic multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (SM RT-PCR) is distinguishable from other multiplex RT-PCR methods by (i) utilization of primers that amplify sequences that fall within a single exon of the genes, (ii) utilization of genomic DNA as a calibration standard, and (iii) optimized PCR conditions that allow amplification of bands of similar intensity using genomic DNA template. We previously developed the human experimental systems of 68 glycosyltransferase genes, 39 Hox genes, and 26 integrin subunit genes, and analyzed the expression of those genes in human adult tissues. Here we report the establishment of an SM RT-PCR system of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and the analysis of gene expression in human cancer tissues and cell lines. We also demonstrate that the SM RT-PCR system, which was developed for cDNA expression analysis, could also be used successfully for more exquisite analysis of copy number changes in genomic DNA. We observed a decrease in band intensity of HRAS, TP73, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B genes in most of the breast and prostate cancer cell lines examined. The decrease in copy number of HRAS proto-oncogene leads us to suspect the presence of tumor suppressor genes in the vicinity of this gene on chromosome 11p15.5.

  5. Inhibition of Prostaglandin Reductase 2, a Putative Oncogene Overexpressed in Human Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Induces Oxidative Stress-Mediated Cell Death Involving xCT and CTH Gene Expressions through 15-Keto-PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Hee, Siow-Wey; Chen, Ing-Jung; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) is the enzyme that catalyzes 15-keto-PGE2, an endogenous PPARγ ligand, into 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2. Previously, we have reported a novel oncogenic role of PTGR2 in gastric cancer, where PTGR2 was discovered to modulate ROS-mediated cell death and tumor transformation. In the present study, we demonstrated the oncogenic potency of PTGR2 in pancreatic cancer. First, we observed that the majority of the human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues was stained positive for PTGR2 expression but not in the adjacent normal parts. In vitro analyses showed that silencing of PTGR2 expression enhanced ROS production, suppressed pancreatic cell proliferation, and promoted cell death through increasing 15-keto-PGE2. Mechanistically, silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 suppressed the expressions of solute carrier family 7 member 11 (xCT) and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH), two important providers of intracellular cysteine for the generation of glutathione (GSH), which is widely accepted as the first-line antioxidative defense. The oxidative stress-mediated cell death after silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 was further abolished after restoring intracellular GSH concentrations and cysteine supply by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and 2-Mercaptomethanol. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting PTGR2/15-keto-PGE2 for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26820738

  6. High-content, full genome siRNA screen for regulators of oncogenic HRAS-driven macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Myles; Commisso, Cosimo; Ramirez, Craig; Garippa, Ralph; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2015-09-01

    Uptake of nutrients, such as glucose and amino acids, is critical to support cell growth and is typically mediated by cell surface transporters. An alternative mechanism for the bulk uptake of nutrients from the extracellular space is macropinocytosis, a nonclathrin, and nonreceptor-mediated endocytic process, in which extracellular fluid is taken up into large intracellular vesicles called macropinosomes. Oncogenic transformation leads to the increased metabolic activity of tumor cells, and in the Ras-driven tumor part of this enhanced activity is the stimulation of macropinocytosis. To measure oncogene-dependent macropinocytosis, we used HeLa cells expressing oncogenic HRAS(G12D) driven from a Tet-regulated promoter. Upon oncogenic HRAS expression, the cells undergo metabolic changes that include the elevation of macropinocytosis. We detected macropinocytosis through the uptake of lysine-fixable tetramethyl rhodamine (TMR)-Dextran (70 kDa) from the cell media into nascent intracellular macropinosomes. These macropinosomes were quantified by image-based high-content analysis, with the size, intensity, and position of macropinosomes measured. Using this model system, we ran a full genome-wide siRNA screen (siGenome™; GE) to identify genes involved in controlling oncogenic HRAS-dependent macropinocytosis. Hits from the primary screen were confirmed with siRNA reagents from a different library (GE, OTP), which allowed us to mitigate potential off-target effects. Candidate genes from this screen include known regulators of macropinocytosis as well as novel targets.

  7. TAD disruption as oncogenic driver.

    PubMed

    Valton, Anne-Laure; Dekker, Job

    2016-02-01

    Topologically Associating Domains (TADs) are conserved during evolution and play roles in guiding and constraining long-range regulation of gene expression. Disruption of TAD boundaries results in aberrant gene expression by exposing genes to inappropriate regulatory elements. Recent studies have shown that TAD disruption is often found in cancer cells and contributes to oncogenesis through two mechanisms. One mechanism locally disrupts domains by deleting or mutating a TAD boundary leading to fusion of the two adjacent TADs. The other mechanism involves genomic rearrangements that break up TADs and creates new ones without directly affecting TAD boundaries. Understanding the mechanisms by which TADs form and control long-range chromatin interactions will therefore not only provide insights into the mechanism of gene regulation in general, but will also reveal how genomic rearrangements and mutations in cancer genomes can lead to misregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. PMID:27111891

  8. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  9. MYC oncogene overexpression drives renal cell carcinoma in a mouse model through glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Emelyn H.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Dang, Vanessa M.; Gouw, Arvin M.; Gabay, Meital; Adam, Stacey J.; Bellovin, David I.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Philbrick, William M.; Garcia-Ocana, Adolfo; Casey, Stephanie C.; Li, Yulin; Dang, Chi V.; Zare, Richard N.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    The MYC oncogene is frequently mutated and overexpressed in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, there have been no studies on the causative role of MYC or any other oncogene in the initiation or maintenance of kidney tumorigenesis. Here, we show through a conditional transgenic mouse model that the MYC oncogene, but not the RAS oncogene, initiates and maintains RCC. Desorption electrospray ionization–mass-spectrometric imaging was used to obtain chemical maps of metabolites and lipids in the mouse RCC samples. Gene expression analysis revealed that the mouse tumors mimicked human RCC. The data suggested that MYC-induced RCC up-regulated the glutaminolytic pathway instead of the glycolytic pathway. The pharmacologic inhibition of glutamine metabolism with bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide impeded MYC-mediated RCC tumor progression. Our studies demonstrate that MYC overexpression causes RCC and points to the inhibition of glutamine metabolism as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of this disease. PMID:25964345

  10. Humoral and cellular responses raised against the human HER2 oncoprotein are cross-reactive with the homologous product of the new proto-oncogene, but do not protect rats against B104 tumors expressing mutated neu.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P; Gerder, M; Moros, Z; Feldmann, M

    1996-03-01

    The neu proto-oncogene encodes a plasma membrane protein belonging to the epidermal growth factor receptor family. The cell line B104, derived from BDIX rat neuroblastoma, carries a point mutation in neu, and forms a tumor when injected into these rats. The human homologue of the neu oncogene (here called HER2) is overexpressed in certain types of cancer. Rats were immunized with HER2 protein (HER2) to investigate a possible cross-reaction between the homologous proteins which could protect them against subsequent inoculation with B104. Specific antibody in the serum was measured by cell-based enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay and fluorescence immunocytochemistry, and delayed-type hypersensitivity by an ear assay. Sera from animals immunized with the HER2 extracellular domain (HER2-ECD) reacted with both HER2- and neu-expressing cells. In the ear assay, a significant cellular response to both HER-ECD (P < 0.05) and neu protein (P < 0.001) was observed in HER2-ECD-immunized rats. However, the growth of B104 tumors in rats was not affected by preimmunization with HER2-ECD. The results indicate that an autoreactive immune response to neu was induced by immunization with HER2-ECD, but was too weak to affect the growth of the neu-bearing tumor.

  11. Epstein-Barr Virus Proteins EBNA3A and EBNA3C Together Induce Expression of the Oncogenic MicroRNA Cluster miR-221/miR-222 and Ablate Expression of Its Target p57KIP2

    PubMed Central

    Bazot, Quentin; Paschos, Kostas; Skalska, Lenka; Kalchschmidt, Jens S.; Parker, Gillian A.; Allday, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    We show that two host-encoded primary RNAs (pri-miRs) and the corresponding microRNA (miR) clusters – widely reported to have cell transformation-associated activity – are regulated by EBNA3A and EBNA3C. Utilising a variety of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) carrying knockout-, revertant- or conditional-EBV recombinants, it was possible to demonstrate unambiguously that EBNA3A and EBNA3C are both required for transactivation of the oncogenic miR-221/miR-222 cluster that is expressed at high levels in multiple human tumours – including lymphoma/leukemia. ChIP, ChIP-seq, and chromosome conformation capture analyses indicate that this activation results from direct targeting of both EBV proteins to chromatin at the miR-221/miR-222 genomic locus and activation via a long-range interaction between enhancer elements and the transcription start site of a long non-coding pri-miR located 28kb upstream of the miR sequences. Reduced levels of miR-221/miR-222 produced by inactivation or deletion of EBNA3A or EBNA3C resulted in increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p57KIP2, a well-established target of miR-221/miR-222. MiR blocking experiments confirmed that miR-221/miR-222 target p57KIP2 expression in LCLs. In contrast, EBNA3A and EBNA3C are necessary to silence the tumour suppressor cluster miR-143/miR-145, but here ChIP-seq suggests that repression is probably indirect. This miR cluster is frequently down-regulated or deleted in human cancer, however, the targets in B cells are unknown. Together these data indicate that EBNA3A and EBNA3C contribute to B cell transformation by inhibiting multiple tumour suppressor proteins, not only by direct repression of protein-encoding genes, but also by the manipulation of host long non-coding pri-miRs and miRs. PMID:26153983

  12. Prospective on the potential of imaging gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Scott E; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2000-06-01

    The feasibility of the non-invasive imaging of gene expression is explored. Calculations of the possibility of the direct imaging of specific messenger RNA with radiolabeled antisense are discussed. In addition, possible mechanism for the amplification of the biological signal to enhance image detection are discussed.

  13. Ferritin reporter used for gene expression imaging by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenji; Fuma, Kazuya; Tabata, Kaori; Sawada, Makoto

    2009-10-23

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a minimally invasive way to provide high spatial resolution tomograms. However, MRI has been considered to be useless for gene expression imaging compared to optical imaging. In this study, we used a ferritin reporter, binding with biogenic iron, to make it a powerful tool for gene expression imaging in MRI studies. GL261 mouse glioma cells were over-expressed with dual-reporter ferritin-DsRed under {beta}-actin promoter, then gene expression was observed by optical imaging and MRI in a brain tumor model. GL261 cells expressing ferritin-DsRed fusion protein showed enhanced visualizing effect by reducing T2-weighted signal intensity for in vitro and in vivo MRI studies, as well as DsRed fluorescence for optical imaging. Furthermore, a higher contrast was achieved on T2-weighted images when permeating the plasma membrane of ferritin-DsRed-expressing GL261. Thus, a ferritin expression vector can be used as an MRI reporter to monitor in vivo gene expression.

  14. Myc oncogenes: the enigmatic family.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, K M; Birnie, G D

    1996-01-01

    The myc family of proto-oncogenes is believed to be involved in the establishment of many types of human malignancy. The members of this family have been shown to function as transcription factors, and through a designated target sequence bring about continued cell-cycle progression, cellular immortalization and blockages to differentiation in many lineages. However, while much of the recent work focusing on the c-myc oncogene has provided some very important advances, it has also brought to light a large amount of conflicting data as to the mechanism of action of the gene product. In this regard, it has now been shown that c-myc is effective in transcriptional repression as well as transcriptional activation and, perhaps more paradoxically, that it has a role in programmed cell death (apoptosis) as well as in processes of cell-cycle progression. In addition, particular interest has surrounded the distinct roles of the two alternative translation products of the c-myc gene, c-Myc 1 and c-Myc 2. The intriguing observation that the ratio of c-Myc 1 to c-Myc 2 increases markedly upon cellular quiescence led to the discovery that the enforced expression of the two proteins individually showed that c-Myc 2 stimulates cell growth, whereas c-Myc 1 appears to be growth suppressing. Clearly, the disparities in the activities of c-Myc, together with the consistent occurrence of mutations of c-myc in human malignancies, means that, although reaching an understanding of the functions of the myc gene family might not be simple, it remains well worthy of pursuit. PMID:8615760

  15. Silent assassin: oncogenic ras directs epigenetic inactivation of target genes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation is associated with genetic changes and epigenetic alterations. A study now shows that oncogenic Ras uses a complex and elaborate epigenetic silencing program to specifically repress the expression of multiple unrelated cancer-suppressing genes through a common pathway. These results suggest that cancer-related epigenetic modifications may arise through a specific and instructive mechanism and that genetic changes and epigenetic alterations are intimately connected and contribute to tumorigenesis cooperatively. PMID:18385037

  16. Oncogenic MicroRNAs: Key Players in Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Frixa, Tania; Donzelli, Sara; Blandino, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of non-coding RNAs that exert pivotal roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs are involved in many biological processes and slight modulations in their expression have been correlated with the occurrence of different diseases. In particular, alterations in the expression of miRNAs with oncogenic or tumor suppressor functions have been associated with carcinogenesis, malignant transformation, metastasis and response to anticancer treatments. This review will mainly focus on oncogenic miRNAs whose aberrant expression leads to malignancy. PMID:26694467

  17. Oncogenes in melanoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumour with poor prognosis in the metastatic stage. BRAF, NRAS, and KIT are three well-known oncogenes involved in melanoma pathogenesis. Targeting of mutated BRAF kinase has recently been shown to significantly improve overall survival of metastatic melanoma patients, underscoring the particular role of this oncogene in melanoma biology. However, recurrences regularly occur within several months, which supposedly involve further oncogenes. Moreover, oncogenic driver mutations have not been described for up to 30% of all melanomas. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the mutational landscape of melanoma, more recent studies used high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. A number of new oncogene candidates such as MAPK1/2, ERBB4, GRIN2A, GRM3, RAC1, and PREX2 were identified. Their particular role in melanoma biology is currently under investigation. Evidence for the functional relevance of some of these new oncogene candidates has been provided in in vitro and in vivo experiments. However, these findings await further validation in clinical studies. This review provides an overview on well-known melanoma oncogenes and new oncogene candidates, based on recent high-throughput sequencing studies. The list of genes discussed herein is of course not complete but highlights some of the most significant of recent findings in this area. The new candidates may support more individualized treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma patients in the future. PMID:24468268

  18. Regulation of oncogene-induced cell cycle exit and senescence by chromatin modifiers

    PubMed Central

    David, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Oncogene activation leads to dramatic changes in numerous biological pathways controlling cellular division, and results in the initiation of a transcriptional program that promotes transformation. Conversely, it also triggers an irreversible cell cycle exit called cellular senescence, which allows the organism to counteract the potentially detrimental uncontrolled proliferation of damaged cells. Therefore, a tight transcriptional control is required at the onset of oncogenic signal, coordinating both positive and negative regulation of gene expression. Not surprisingly, numerous chromatin modifiers contribute to the cellular response to oncogenic stress. While these chromatin modifiers were initially thought of as mere mediators of the cellular response to oncogenic stress, recent studies have uncovered a direct and specific regulation of chromatin modifiers by oncogenic signals. We review here the diverse functions of chromatin modifiers in the cellular response to oncogenic stress, and discuss the implications of these findings on the regulation of cell cycle progression and proliferation by activated oncogenes. PMID:22825329

  19. Principles of cancer therapy: oncogene and non-oncogene addiction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ji; Solimini, Nicole L; Elledge, Stephen J

    2009-03-01

    Cancer is a complex collection of distinct genetic diseases united by common hallmarks. Here, we expand upon the classic hallmarks to include the stress phenotypes of tumorigenesis. We describe a conceptual framework of how oncogene and non-oncogene addictions contribute to these hallmarks and how they can be exploited through stress sensitization and stress overload to selectively kill cancer cells. In particular, we present evidence for a large class of non-oncogenes that are essential for cancer cell survival and present attractive drug targets. Finally, we discuss the path ahead to therapeutic discovery and provide theoretical considerations for combining orthogonal cancer therapies. PMID:19269363

  20. Oncogenes in human testicular cancer: DNA and RNA studies.

    PubMed Central

    Peltomäki, P.; Alfthan, O.; de la Chapelle, A.

    1991-01-01

    Oncogene dosage and expression were studied in 16 testicular neoplasms, 14 of germ cell and two of non-germ cell origin. In comparison with normal DNA, tumour DNA of a total of eight patients (seven with germ cell neoplasm and one with testicular lymphoma) showed increased dosages of KRAS2, PDGFA, EGFR, MET and PDGFB. The most frequent (occurring in six tumours) and prominent (up to 3-4-fold) increases were detected in the dosages of KRAS2 (on chromosome 12p) and PDGFA (chromosome 7p), relative to a reference locus from chromosome 2. Importantly, there was a similar increase in 12p dosage in general in these tumours, suggesting the presence of the characteristic isochromosome 12p marker. On the contrary, possible 7p polysomy (assessed by molecular methods) did not explain the PDGFA (or EGFR) changes in all cases. NRAS, MYCN, CSFIR, MYB, MYC, ABL, HRASI, TP53, and ERBB2 did not reveal any consistent alterations in tumour DNA. In RNA dot blot assays the expression of KRAS2, PDGFA, EGFR, or MYC was generally not increased in the tumour samples when compared to that in normal testicular tissue of the same patients although there was interindividual variation in mRNA levels. It thus appears that while oncogene dosage changes occur in a proportion of testis cancers, they are often part of changes in large chromosomal regions or whole arms and are seldom accompanied by altered expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1829952

  1. Cigarette sidestream smoke induces histone H3 phosphorylation via JNK and PI3K/Akt pathways, leading to the expression of proto-oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Ibuki, Yuko; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Yoshida, Ikuma

    2014-06-01

    Post-translational modifications in histones have been associated with cancer. Although cigarette sidestream smoke (CSS) as well as mainstream smoke are carcinogens, the relationship between carcinogenicity and histone modifications has not yet been clarified. Here, we demonstrated that CSS induced phosphorylation of histones, involving a carcinogenic process. Treatment with CSS markedly induced the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 and 28 residues (H3S10 and H3S28), which was independent from the cell cycle, in the human pulmonary epithelial cell model, A549 and normal human lung fibroblasts, MRC-5 and WI-38. Using specific inhibitors and small interfering RNA, the phosphorylation of H3S10 was found to be mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. These pathways were different from that of the CSS-induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) mediated by Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ATM-Rad3-related (ATR) protein kinases. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the phosphorylation of H3S10 was increased in the promoter sites of the proto-oncogenes, c-fos and c-jun, which indicated that CSS plays a role in tumor promotion. Because the phosphorylation of H3S10 was decreased in the aldehyde-removed CSS and was significantly induced by treatment with formaldehyde, aldehydes are suspected to partially contribute to this phosphorylation. These findings suggested that any chemicals in CSS, including aldehydes, phosphorylate H3S10 via JNK and PI3K/Akt pathways, which is different from the DNA damage response, resulting in tumor promotion.

  2. Expression-invariant face recognition in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Bau, Tien C.; Healey, Glenn

    2014-10-01

    The performance of a face recognition system degrades when the expression in the probe set is different from the expression in the gallery set. Previous studies use either spatial or spectral information to address this problem. We propose an algorithm that uses spatial and spectral information for expression-invariant face recognition. The algorithm uses a set of three-dimensional Gabor filters to exploit spatial and spectral correlations, while principal-component analysis is used to model expression variation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm on a database of 200 subjects with neutral and smiling expressions and explore the dependence of the performance on image spatial resolution and training set size.

  3. In vivo study on the effects of microcystin extracts on the expression profiles of proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun and c-myc) in liver, kidney and testis of male Wistar rats injected i.v. with toxins.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiying; Xie, Ping; Li, Guangyu; Hao, Le; Xiong, Qian

    2009-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a potent liver tumor promoter, possessing potent tumor-promoting activity and weak initiating activity. Proto-oncogenes are known to be involved in the tumor-promoting mechanisms of microcystin-LR. However, few data are available on the effects of MCs on proto-oncogenes in the whole animal. To investigate the effects of MCs on the expression profile of the proto-oncogenes in different organs, male Wistar rats were injected intravenously with microcystin extracts at a dose of 86.7 mug MC-LR eq/kg bw (MC-LR eq, MC-LR equivalents). mRNA levels of three proto-oncogenes c-fos, c-jun and c-myc in liver, kidney and testis were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR at several time points post-injection. Significant induction of these genes at transcriptional level was observed in the three organs. In addition, the increase of mRNA expression of all three genes was much higher in liver than in kidney and testis. Meanwhile, the protein levels of c-Fos and c-Jun were investigated by western blotting. Both proteins were induced in the three organs. However, elevations of protein levels were much lower than those of mRNA levels. These findings suggest that the expression of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc might be one possible mechanism for the tumor-promoting activity and initiating activity of microcystins.

  4. Construction of recombinant Marek's disease virus (MDV) lacking the meq oncogene and co-expressing AIV-H9N2 HA and NA genes under control of exogenous promoters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Chen, Wenqing; Ma, Chengtai; Zhao, Peng; Duan, Luntao; Zhang, Fushou; Sun, Aijun; Li, Yanpeng; Su, Hongqin; Li, Sifei; Cui, He; Cui, Zhizhong

    2014-07-10

    To develop a recombinant Marek's disease virus (rMDV1) co-expressing the hemagglutinin gene (HA) and neuramidinase gene (NA) from a low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H9N2 strain and lacking the meq oncogene that shares homology with the Jun/Fos family of transcriptional factors, a wild strain of MDV GX0101 was used as parental virus, the HA and NA genes co-expression cassette under control of the CMV and SV40 early promoters was inserted at two meq sites of GX0101 to form a new meq knock-out mutant MDV (MZC12HA/NA) through homologous recombination. MZC12HA/NA was reconstituted by transfection of recombinant BAC-MDV DNA into the secondary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. Highly purified MZC12HA/NA was obtained after four rounds of plaque purification and proliferation. In vitro growth properties of recombinant virus were also inspected and concluded that the MZC12HA/NA had the same growth kinetics in CEF cultures as its parental wild type virus GX0101. Southern blot indicated that co-expression cassette was successfully inserted at two copies sites of meq gene, so two meq genes were knocked-out completely. RT-qPCR showed transcription and expression levels of the HA and NA genes were both significantly higher than that of GX0101 own pp38 gene. Indirect fluorescence antibody (IFA) test, and Western blot analyses indicated that HA and NA genes were co-expressed simultaneously under control of the different promoters but meq genes were not. These results herald a new and effective recombinant meq-deleted MDV-based AIV-H9N2 vaccine may be useful in protecting chickens from very virulent MDV and H9N2 challenges.

  5. NF-kB and c-Jun induce the expression of the oncogenic miR-221 and miR-222 in prostate carcinoma and glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Galardi, Silvia; Mercatelli, Neri; Farace, Maria G; Ciafrè, Silvia A

    2011-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent negative regulators of gene expression involved in all aspects of cell biology. They finely modulate virtually all physiological pathways in metazoans, and are deeply implicated in all main pathologies, among which cancer. Mir-221 and miR-222, two closely related miRNAs encoded in cluster from a genomic region on chromosome X, are strongly upregulated in several forms of human tumours. In this work, we report that the ectopic modulation of NF-kB modifies miR-221/222 expression in prostate carcinoma and glioblastoma cell lines, where we had previously shown their oncogenic activity. We identify two separate distal regions upstream of miR-221/222 promoter which are bound by the NF-kB subunit p65 and drive efficient transcription in luciferase reporter assays; consistently, the site-directed mutagenesis disrupting p65 binding sites or the ectopical inhibition of NF-kB activity significantly reduce luciferase activity. In the most distal enhancer region, we also define a binding site for c-Jun, and we show that the binding of this factor cooperates with that of p65, fully accounting for the observed upregulation of miR-221/222. Thus our work uncovers an additional mechanism through which NF-kB and c-Jun, two transcription factors deeply involved in cancer onset and progression, contribute to oncogenesis, by inducing miR-221/222 transcription. PMID:21245048

  6. NF-kB and c-Jun induce the expression of the oncogenic miR-221 and miR-222 in prostate carcinoma and glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Galardi, Silvia; Mercatelli, Neri; Farace, Maria G.; Ciafrè, Silvia A.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent negative regulators of gene expression involved in all aspects of cell biology. They finely modulate virtually all physiological pathways in metazoans, and are deeply implicated in all main pathologies, among which cancer. Mir-221 and miR-222, two closely related miRNAs encoded in cluster from a genomic region on chromosome X, are strongly upregulated in several forms of human tumours. In this work, we report that the ectopic modulation of NF-kB modifies miR-221/222 expression in prostate carcinoma and glioblastoma cell lines, where we had previously shown their oncogenic activity. We identify two separate distal regions upstream of miR-221/222 promoter which are bound by the NF-kB subunit p65 and drive efficient transcription in luciferase reporter assays; consistently, the site-directed mutagenesis disrupting p65 binding sites or the ectopical inhibition of NF-kB activity significantly reduce luciferase activity. In the most distal enhancer region, we also define a binding site for c-Jun, and we show that the binding of this factor cooperates with that of p65, fully accounting for the observed upregulation of miR-221/222. Thus our work uncovers an additional mechanism through which NF-kB and c-Jun, two transcription factors deeply involved in cancer onset and progression, contribute to oncogenesis, by inducing miR-221/222 transcription. PMID:21245048

  7. Investigation of Astragalus honey and propolis extract's cytotoxic effect on two human cancer cell lines and their oncogen and proapoptotic gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Hamzeh, Jamal; Mirian, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer is one of the major fatal human diseases. Natural products have been used in the treatment of cancer for long time. Bee products including honey and propolis have been introduced for malignancy treatment in recent decades. In this study cytotoxicity of bee products and their effects on the expression of proapoptotic genes have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxic effects of Astragalus honey, ethanol extract of propolis and a sugar solution (as control) against HepG2, 5637 and L929 cell lines have been evaluated by the MTT assay. Total RNAs of treated cells were isolated and p53 and Bcl-2 gene expression were evaluated, using real-time PCR. Results: Propolis IC50 values were 58, 30 and 15 μg/ml against L929, HepG2 and 5637, respectively. These values for honey were 3.1%, 2.4% and 1.9%, respectively. Propolis extract has increased the expression of the Bcl-2 gene in all cell lines whereas the honey decreased that significantly (P < 0.05). Also, we found that honey and propolis decreased p53 gene expression in HepG2 and 5637 significantly but not in L929 cells. The sugar solution increased the expression of p53 in two cancer cell lines but no significant changes were observed in the expression of this gene in L929 as normal mouse cell. Conclusion: By downregulation of Bcl-2 expression it could be concluded that the cytotoxicity of honey was more than two fold against tested cancer cells compared with the sugar solution. No significant changes were observed in the expression of p53 in honey-treated cells. Propolis had no significant effect on Bcl-2 and p53 gene expressions (P > 0.05). PMID:25789268

  8. Human papillomavirus oncogenic E6 protein regulates human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) expression via the tumor suppressor protein p53

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Hong; Wang, Liming; Jin, Jessica; Ghosh, Santosh K.; Kawsar, Hameem I.; Zender, Chad; Androphy, Elliot J.; Weinberg, Aaron; McCormick, Thomas S.; Jin, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Human β-defensin-3 (hBD3) is an epithelial cell-derived innate immune regulatory molecule overexpressed in oral dysplastic lesions and fosters a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Expression of hBD3 is induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway. Here we describe a novel pathway through which the high-risk human papillomavirus type-16 (HPV-16) oncoprotein E6 induces hBD3 expression in mucosal keratinocytes. Ablation of E6 by siRNA induces the tumor suppressor p53 and diminishes hBD3 in HPV-16 positive CaSki cervical cancer cells and UM-SCC-104 head and neck cancer cells. Malignant cells in HPV-16-associated oropharyngeal cancer overexpress hBD3. HPV-16 E6 induces hBD3 mRNA expression, peptide production and gene promoter activity in mucosal keratinocytes. Reduction of cellular levels of p53 stimulates hBD3 expression, while activation of p53 by doxorubicin inhibits its expression in primary oral keratinocytes and CaSki cells, suggesting that p53 represses hBD3 expression. A p53 binding site in the hBD3 gene promoter has been identified by using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). In addition, the p63 protein isoform ΔNp63α, but not TAp63, stimulated transactivation of the hBD3 gene and was co-expressed with hBD3 in head and neck cancer specimens. Therefore, high-risk HPV E6 oncoproteins may stimulate hBD3 expression in tumor cells to facilitate tumorigenesis of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. PMID:27034006

  9. Structure and transforming potential of the human cot oncogene encoding a putative protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, J; Higashi, T; Mukai, H; Ohuchi, T; Kakunaga, T

    1991-01-01

    A new transforming gene has been molecularly cloned from hamster SHOK cells transformed with DNA extracted from a human thyroid carcinoma cell line and named the cot (cancer Osaka thyroid) oncogene. cDNA sequencing disclosed that this oncogene codes for a protein with 415 amino acid residues, and computer matching showed 42 to 48% similarity matches with serine protein kinases. Its gene product was identified as a 52-kDa protein by transcription and translation in vitro. Expression of cot cDNA under transcriptional control by a retroviral long terminal repeat induced morphological transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as well as SHOK cells. Protein kinase activity associated with constructed p60gag-cot was detected by immune complex kinase assay with anti-gag antiserum. The cot oncogene was overexpressed in transformed SHOK cells and found to have a rearranged 3' end in the last coding exon, which probably resulted in a deletion and an altered C' terminus in the transforming protein. This DNA rearrangement appeared to have occurred during transfection of the tumor DNA into hamster SHOK cells and not in the original thyroid tumor. Images PMID:2072910

  10. Oncogenic osteomalacia: strange tumours in strange places.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D.; Bar, R. S.; Weidner, N.; Wener, M.; Lee, F.

    1985-01-01

    Two patients presented with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and were subsequently found to have small tumours unusual histopathology and location causing the osteomalacia. Each tumour was found after an intensive search for occult masses. Studies of vitamin D metabolism and renal tubular function before and after surgery yielded further insight into the pathophysiology of oncogenic osteomalacia. These cases demonstrate that microscopic quantities of tumour are capable of causing the syndrome and further illustrate the high index of suspicion often necessary to locate causative tumours in patients with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:4022870

  11. Discrimination of gender using facial image with expression change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniyada, Jun; Fukuda, Takahiro; Terada, Kenji

    2005-12-01

    By carrying out marketing research, the managers of large-sized department stores or small convenience stores obtain the information such as ratio of men and women of visitors and an age group, and improve their management plan. However, these works are carried out in the manual operations, and it becomes a big burden to small stores. In this paper, the authors propose a method of men and women discrimination by extracting difference of the facial expression change from color facial images. Now, there are a lot of methods of the automatic recognition of the individual using a motion facial image or a still facial image in the field of image processing. However, it is very difficult to discriminate gender under the influence of the hairstyle and clothes, etc. Therefore, we propose the method which is not affected by personality such as size and position of facial parts by paying attention to a change of an expression. In this method, it is necessary to obtain two facial images with an expression and an expressionless. First, a region of facial surface and the regions of facial parts such as eyes, nose, and mouth are extracted in the facial image with color information of hue and saturation in HSV color system and emphasized edge information. Next, the features are extracted by calculating the rate of the change of each facial part generated by an expression change. In the last step, the values of those features are compared between the input data and the database, and the gender is discriminated. In this paper, it experimented for the laughing expression and smile expression, and good results were provided for discriminating gender.

  12. Imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Lisok, Ala; Hu, Chaoxin; Maitra, Anirban; Pomper, Martin G

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Axl is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. •Axl overexpression confers invasive phenotype. •Axl imaging would be useful for therapeutic guidance and monitoring. •Axl expression imaging is demonstrated in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts. •Graded levels of Axl expression imaging is feasible. -- Abstract: The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is overexpressed in and leads to patient morbidity and mortality in a variety of cancers. Axl–Gas6 interactions are critical for tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of imaging graded levels of Axl expression in tumors using a radiolabeled antibody. We radiolabeled anti-human Axl (Axl mAb) and control IgG1 antibodies with {sup 125}I with high specific radioactivity and radiochemical purity, resulting in an immunoreactive fraction suitable for in vivo studies. Radiolabeled antibodies were investigated in severe combined immunodeficient mice harboring subcutaneous CFPAC (Axl{sup high}) and Panc1 (Axl{sup low}) pancreatic cancer xenografts by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging. Based on these results, the specificity of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb was also validated in mice harboring orthotopic Panc1 or CFPAC tumors and in mice harboring subcutaneous 22Rv1 (Axl{sup low}) or DU145 (Axl{sup high}) prostate tumors by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging studies at 72 h post-injection of the antibody. Both imaging and biodistribution studies demonstrated specific and persistent accumulation of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb in Axl{sup high} (CFPAC and DU145) expression tumors compared to the Axl{sup low} (Panc1 and 22Rv1) expression tumors. Axl expression in these tumors was further confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. No difference in the uptake of radioactivity was observed between the control [{sup 125}I]IgG1 antibody in the Axl{sup high} and Axl{sup low} expression tumors. These data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging Axl expression in pancreatic

  13. Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes for the therapy of cervical carcinoma elicit humoral and cell-mediated responses in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Around half million new cases of cervical cancer arise each year, making the development of an effective therapeutic vaccine against HPV a high priority. As the E6 and E7 oncoproteins are expressed in all HPV-16 tumour cells, vaccines expressing these proteins might clear an already established tumour and support the treatment of HPV-related precancerous lesions. Methods Three different immunisation regimens were tested in a pre-clinical trial in rabbits to evaluate the humoral and cell-mediated responses of a putative HPV-16 vaccine. Fowlpoxvirus (FP) recombinants separately expressing the HPV-16 E6 (FPE6) and E7 (FPE7) transgenes were used for priming, followed by E7 protein boosting. Results All of the protocols were effective in eliciting a high antibody response. This was also confirmed by interleukin-4 production, which increased after simultaneous priming with both FPE6 and FPE7 and after E7 protein boost. A cell-mediated immune response was also detected in most of the animals. Conclusion These results establish a preliminary profile for the therapy with the combined use of avipox recombinants, which may represent safer immunogens than vaccinia-based vectors in immuno-compromised individuals, as they express the transgenes in most mammalian cells in the absence of a productive replication. PMID:20409340

  14. Malignant transformation of CD4+ T lymphocytes mediated by oncogenic kinase NPM/ALK recapitulates IL-2-induced cell signaling and gene expression reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Michal; Halasa, Krzysztof; Liu, Xiaobin; Wang, Hong Y; Cheng, Mangeng; Baldwin, Donald; Tobias, John W; Schuster, Stephen J; Woetmann, Anders; Zhang, Qian; Turner, Suzanne D; Ødum, Niels; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2013-12-15

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), physiologically expressed only by nervous system cells, displays a remarkable capacity to transform CD4(+) T lymphocytes and other types of nonneural cells. In this study, we report that activity of nucleophosmin (NPM)/ALK chimeric protein, the dominant form of ALK expressed in T cell lymphomas (TCLs), closely resembles cell activation induced by IL-2, the key cytokine supporting growth and survival of normal CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Direct comparison of gene expression by ALK(+) TCL cells treated with an ALK inhibitor and IL-2-dependent ALK(-) TCL cells stimulated with the cytokine revealed a very similar, albeit inverse, gene-regulation pattern. Depending on the analysis method, up to 67% of the affected genes were modulated in common by NPM/ALK and IL-2. Based on the gene expression patterns, Jak/STAT- and IL-2-signaling pathways topped the list of pathways identified as affected by both IL-2 and NPM/ALK. The expression dependence on NPM/ALK and IL-2 of the five selected genes-CD25 (IL-2Rα), Egr-1, Fosl-1, SOCS3, and Irf-4-was confirmed at the protein level. In both ALK(+) TCL and IL-2-stimulated ALK(-) TCL cells, CD25, SOCS3, and Irf-4 genes were activated predominantly by the STAT5 and STAT3 transcription factors, whereas transcription of Egr-1 and Fosl-1 was induced by the MEK-ERK pathway. Finally, we found that Egr-1, a protein not associated previously with either IL-2 or ALK, contributes to the cell proliferation. These findings indicate that NPM/ALK transforms the target CD4(+) T lymphocytes, at least in part, by using the pre-existing, IL-2-dependent signaling pathways.

  15. Downregulation of the Spi-1/PU.1 oncogene induces the expression of TRIM10/HERF1, a key factor required for terminal erythroid cell differentiation and survival.

    PubMed

    Blaybel, Rand; Théoleyre, Orianne; Douablin, Alexandre; Baklouti, Faouzi

    2008-08-01

    Sustained expression of the Spi-1/PU.1 and Fli-1 oncoproteins blocks globin gene activation in mouse erythroleukemia cells; however, only Spi-1/PU.1 expression inhibits the inclusion of exon 16 in the mature 4.1R mRNA. This splicing event is crucial for a functional 4.1R protein and, therefore, for red blood cell membrane integrity. This report demonstrates that Spi-1/PU.1 downregulation induces the activation of TRIM10/hematopoietic RING finger 1 (HERF1), a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM)/RBCC protein family needed for globin gene transcription. Additionally, we demonstrate that TRIM10/HERF1 is required for the regulated splicing of exon 16 during late erythroid differentiation. Using inducible overexpression and silencing approaches, we found that: (1) TRIM10/HERF1 knockdown inhibits hemoglobin production and exon splicing and triggers cell apoptosis in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-induced cells; (2) TRIM10/HERF1 upregulation is required but is insufficient on its own to activate exon retention; (3) Fli-1 has no effect on TRIM10/HERF1 expression, whereas either DMSO-induced downregulation or shRNA-knockdown of Spi-1/PU.1 expression is sufficient to activate TRIM10/HERF1 expression; and (4) Spi-1/PU.1 knockdown triggers both the transcription and the splicing events independently of the chemical induction. Altogether, these data indicate that primary Spi-1/PU.1 downregulation acts on late erythroid differentiation through at least two pathways, one of which requires TRIM10/HERF1 upregulation and parallels the Spi-1/PU.1-induced Fli-1 shutoff regulatory cascade.

  16. Generation of fibrosarcomas in vivo by a retrovirus that expresses the normal B chain of platelet-derived growth factor and mimics the alternative splice pattern of the v-sis oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Pech, M; Gazit, A; Arnstein, P; Aaronson, S A

    1989-01-01

    A retrovirus containing the entire human platelet-derived growth factor B-chain (PDGF-B) gene was constructed in order to investigate the in vivo biological activity of its encoded growth factor. When this virus was introduced into newborn mice, it reproducibly generated fibrosarcomas at the site of inoculation. Proviruses in each fibrosarcoma analyzed had lost 149 nucleotides downstream of the PDGF-B coding region. This deletion originated from an alternative or aberrant splice event that occurred within exon 7 of the PDGF-B gene and mimicked the v-sis oncogene. Thus, deletion of this region may be necessary for efficient retrovirus replication or for more potent transforming function. Evidence that the normal growth factor coding sequence was unaltered derived from RNase protection studies and immunoprecipitation analysis. Tumors were generally polyclonal but demonstrated clonal subpopulations. Moreover, tumor-derived cell lines became monoclonal within a few tissue culture passages and rapidly formed tumors in vivo. These findings argue that overexpression of the normal human PDGF-B gene product under retrovirus control can induce the fully malignant phenotype. Images PMID:2649890

  17. Induction of MAP kinase phosphatase 3 through Erk/MAP kinase activation in three oncogenic Ras (H-, K- and N-Ras)-expressing NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Koo, JaeHyung; Wang, Sen; Kang, NaNa; Hur, Sun Jin; Bahk, Young Yil

    2016-01-01

    Ras oncoproteins are small molecular weight GTPases known for their involvement in oncogenesis, which operate in a complex signaling network with multiple effectors. Approximately 25% of human tumors possess mutations in a member of this family. The Raf1/MEK/Erk1/2 pathway is one of the most intensively studied signaling mechanisms. Different levels of regulation account for the inactivation of MAP kinases by MAPK phosphatases in a cell type- and stimuli-dependent manner. In the present study, using three inducible Ras-expressing NIH/3T3 cell lines, we demonstrated that MKP3 upregulation requires the activation of the Erk1/2 pathway, which correlates with the shutdown of this pathway. We also demonstrated, by applying pharmacological inhibitors and effector mutants of Ras, that induction of MKP3 at the protein level is positively regulated by the oncogenic Ras/Raf/MEK/Erk1/2 signaling pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 370-375] PMID:26818088

  18. TRAIL induces apoptosis in oral squamous carcinoma cells: a crosstalk with oncogenic Ras regulated cell surface expression of death receptor 5

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-jie; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Zhang, Yaqin; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Zhang, Baolin

    2013-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through its death receptors (DRs) 4 and/or 5 expressed on the surface of target cells. The selectivity of TRAIL towards cancer cells has promoted clinical evaluation of recombinant human TRAIL (rhTRAIL) and its agonistic antibodies in treating several major human cancers including colon and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, little is known about their ability in killing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we tested the apoptotic responses of a panel of seven human OSCC cell lines (HN31, HN30, HN12, HN6, HN4, Cal27, and OSCC3) to rhTRAIL and monoclonal antibodies against DR4 or DR5. We found that rhTRAIL is a potent inducer of apoptosis in most of the oral cancer cell lines tested both in vitro and in vivo. We also showed that DR5 was expressed on the surface of the tested cell lines which correlated with the cellular susceptibility to apoptosis induced by rhTRAIL and anti-DR5 antibody. By contrast, little or no DR4 was detected on the surface of OSCC3 and HN6 cells rendering cellular resistance to DR4 antibody and a reduced sensitivity to rhTRAIL. Notably, the overall TRAIL sensitivity correlated well with the levels of endogenous active Ras in the cell lines tested. Expression of a constitutively active Ras mutant (RasV12) in OSCC3 cells selectively upregulated surface expression of DR5, but not DR4, and restored TRAIL sensitivity. Our findings could have implications for the use of TRAIL receptor targeted therapies in the treatment of human OSCC tumors particularly the ones harboring constitutively active Ras mutant. PMID:23470485

  19. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  20. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  1. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  2. Imaging of gene expression in vivo with photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Zemp, Roger J.; Lungu, Gina; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    In the post-genomic era, there is an increasing interest in visualizing the expression of functional genes in vivo. With the assistance of the reporter gene technique, various imaging modalities have been adopted for this purpose. In vivo gene expression imaging promises to provide biologists with a powerful tool for deepening our understanding of developmental biology, expanding our knowledge of the genetic basis of disease, and advancing the development of medicine. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of imaging gene expression with photoacoustic imaging, which offers unique absorption contrast with ultrasonic resolution in vivo. We mark tumors in rats with the lacZ reporter gene. The lacZ gene encodes an enzyme β-galactosidase, which yields a dark blue product when acting on a colorimetric assay called X-gal. Photoacoustic tomography at 650nm clearly visualizes the presence of this blue product. The spectroscopic method can also potentially improve specificity. Considering how many staining methods are used in traditional biology, we believe that photoacoustic techniques will revolutionize the field of molecular imaging. The further development of reporter gene systems with high absorbing products in the NIR region is needed.

  3. Fas-associated Phosphatase 1 (Fap1) Influences βCatenin Activity in Myeloid Progenitor Cells Expressing the Bcr-abl Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiqi; Bei, Ling; Eklund, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Increased βcatenin activity correlates with leukemia stem cell expansion and disease progression in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We found previously that expression of the CML-related Bcr-abl oncoprotein in myeloid progenitor cells increases expression of Fas-associated phosphatase 1 (Fap1). This resulted in Fap1-dependent resistance to Fas-induced apoptosis in these cells. Fap1 also interacts with the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) protein, but the functional significance of this interaction is unknown. Apc participates in a complex that includes glycogen synthase kinase β (Gsk3β) and βcatenin. Assembly of this complex results in phosphorylation of βcatenin by Gsk3β, which facilitates βcatenin ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. In this study, we found increased association of Fap1 with the Apc complex in Bcr-abl+ myeloid progenitor cells. We also found Fap1-dependent inactivation of Gsk3β and consequent stabilization of βcatenin in these cells. Consistent with this, Bcr-abl+ cells exhibited a Fap1-dependent increase in βcatenin activity. Our studies identified Fap1-dependent Gsk3β inactivation as a molecular mechanism for increased βcatenin activity in CML. PMID:23519466

  4. Deep Sequence Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Integrated Analysis of Gene Expression, Alternative Splicing, and Single Nucleotide Variations in Lung Adenocarcinomas with and without Oncogenic KRAS Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kalari, Krishna R.; Rossell, David; Necela, Brian M.; Asmann, Yan W.; Nair, Asha; Baheti, Saurabh; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Younkin, Curtis S.; Baker, Tiffany; Carr, Jennifer M.; Tang, Xiaojia; Walsh, Michael P.; Chai, High-Seng; Sun, Zhifu; Hart, Steven N.; Leontovich, Alexey A.; Hossain, Asif; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Perez, Edith A.; Reisman, David N.; Fields, Alan P.; Thompson, E. Aubrey

    2012-01-01

    KRAS mutations are highly prevalent in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and tumors harboring these mutations tend to be aggressive and resistant to chemotherapy. We used next-generation sequencing technology to identify pathways that are specifically altered in lung tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Paired-end RNA-sequencing of 15 primary lung adenocarcinoma tumors (8 harboring mutant KRAS and 7 with wild-type KRAS) were performed. Sequences were mapped to the human genome, and genomic features, including differentially expressed genes, alternate splicing isoforms and single nucleotide variants, were determined for tumors with and without KRAS mutation using a variety of computational methods. Network analysis was carried out on genes showing differential expression (374 genes), alternate splicing (259 genes), and SNV-related changes (65 genes) in NSCLC tumors harboring a KRAS mutation. Genes exhibiting two or more connections from the lung adenocarcinoma network were used to carry out integrated pathway analysis. The most significant signaling pathways identified through this analysis were the NFκB, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways. A 27 gene mutant KRAS-specific sub network was extracted based on gene–gene connections from the integrated network, and interrogated for druggable targets. Our results confirm previous evidence that mutant KRAS tumors exhibit activated NFκB, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways and may be preferentially sensitive to target therapeutics toward these pathways. In addition, our analysis indicates novel, previously unappreciated links between mutant KRAS and the TNFR and PPARγ signaling pathways, suggesting that targeted PPARγ antagonists and TNFR inhibitors may be useful therapeutic strategies for treatment of mutant KRAS lung tumors. Our study is the first to integrate genomic features from RNA-Seq data from NSCLC and to define a first draft genomic landscape model that is unique to tumors with oncogenic KRAS mutations. PMID:22655260

  5. Differential protein expression and oncogenic gene network link tyrosine kinase ephrin B4 receptor to aggressive gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers.

    PubMed

    Liersch-Löhn, Britta; Slavova, Nadia; Buhr, Heinz J; Bennani-Baiti, Idriss M

    2016-03-01

    Transmembrane tyrosine-kinase Ephrin receptors promote tumor progression and/or metastasis of several malignancies including leukemia, follicular lymphoma, glioma, malignant pleural mesothelioma, papillary thyroid carcinoma, sarcomas and ovarian, breast, bladder and non-small cell lung cancers. They also drive intestinal stem cell proliferation and positioning, control intestinal tissue boundaries and are involved in liver, pancreatic and colorectal cancers, indicating involvement in additional digestive system malignancies. We investigated the role of Ephrin-B4 receptor (EPHB4), and its ligand EFNB2, in gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers in patient cohorts through computational, mathematical, molecular and immunohistochemical analyses. We show that EPHB4 is upregulated in preneoplastic gastroesophageal lesions and its expression further increased in gastroesophageal cancers in several independent cohorts. The closely related EPHB6 receptor, which also binds EFNB2, was downregulated in all tested cohorts, consistent with its tumor-suppressive properties in other cancers. EFNB2 expression is induced in esophageal cells by acidity, suggesting that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may constitute an early triggering event in activating EFNB2-EPHB4 signaling. Association of EPHB4 to both Barrett's esophagus and to advanced tumor stages, and its overexpression at the tumor invasion front and vascular endothelial cells intimate the notion that EPHB4 may be associated with multiple steps of gastroesophageal tumorigenesis. Analysis of oncogenomic signatures uncovered the first EPHB4-associated gene network (false discovery rate: 7 × 10(-90) ) composed of a five-transcription factor interconnected gene network that drives proliferation, angiogenesis and invasiveness. The EPHB4 oncogenomic network provides a molecular basis for its role in tumor progression and points to EPHB4 as a potential tumor aggressiveness biomarker and drug target in gastroesophageal

  6. Microarray-based gene expression profiling reveals genes and pathways involved in the oncogenic function of REG3A on pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianqian; Fu, Rong; Yin, Guoxiao; Liu, Xiulan; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Ming

    2016-03-10

    We previously reported that regenerating islet-derived protein 3 alpha (REG3A) exacerbates pancreatic malignancies. The mechanism of this effect has not been clearly elucidated. Here we first identified key differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and signal pathways in the pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990, compared to two control cell lines, by microarray analysis. We then identified key genes and pathways regulated by REG3A or the cytokine IL6 in SW1990 cells. Afterwards, these DEGs induced by REG3A or IL6 were subjected to KEGG pathway enrichment analysis and GO function analysis by the DAVID online tool. Ultimately, we constructed protein-protein interaction networks among the DEGs by Cytoscape. Among the three pancreatic cell lines, SW1990 exhibited highly deterioration with the activation of genes and pathways related to proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and invasion. As a result, 50 DEGs enriched in 11 pathways were identified in REG3A-treated SW1990 cells, and 28 DEGs enriched in 9 pathways were detected in IL6-treated cells. Overall, results of microarray analysis followed by qRT-PCR and Western blotting suggest that REG3A regulates pancreatic cell growth by increasing the expression of at least 8 genes: JAK1, STAT3, IL10, FOXM1, KRAS, MYC, CyclinD1, and c-fos; and activation of at least 4 signal pathways: TGFβ, PDGF, angiogenesis and RAS. Similar results were obtained with IL6 treatment. Regulation network analysis confirmed the cell growth related DEGs, and further uncovered three transcription factor families with immune functions regulated by REG3A.

  7. Avian sarcoma virus 17 carries the jun oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Y; Bos, T J; Davis, C; Starbuck, M; Vogt, P K

    1987-01-01

    Biologically active molecular clones of avian sarcoma virus 17 (ASV 17) contain a replication-defective proviral genome of 3.5 kilobases (kb). The genome retains partial gag and env sequences, which flank a cell-derived putative oncogene of 0.93 kb, termed jun. The jun gene lacks preserved coding domains of tyrosine-specific protein kinases. It also shows no significant nucleic acid homology with other known oncogenes. The probable transformation-specific protein in ASV 17-transformed cells is a 55-kDa gag-jun fusion product. Images PMID:3033666

  8. Oncogenic activation of the human trk proto-oncogene by recombination with the ribosomal large subunit protein L7a.

    PubMed Central

    Ziemiecki, A; Müller, R G; Fu, X C; Hynes, N E; Kozma, S

    1990-01-01

    The trk-2h oncogene, isolated from the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB 231 by genomic DNA-transfection into NIH3T3 cells, consists of the trk proto-oncogene receptor kinase domain fused to a N-terminal 41 amino acid activating sequence (Kozma, S.C., Redmond, S.M.S., Xiao-Chang, F., Saurer, S.M., Groner, B. and Hynes, N.E. (1988) EMBO J., 7, 147-154). Antibodies raised against a bacterially produced beta gal-trk receptor kinase fusion protein recognized a 44 kd phosphoprotein phosphorylated on serine, threonine and tyrosine in extracts of trk-2h transformed NIH3T3 cells. In vitro, in the presence of Mn2+/gamma ATP, this protein became phosphorylated extensively on tyrosine. Cells transformed by trk-2h did not, however, show an elevation in total phosphotyrosine. We have cloned and sequenced the cDNA encoding the amino terminal activating sequences of trk-2h (Kozma et al., 1988). The encoded protein has a high basic amino acid content and the gene is expressed as an abundant 1.2 kb mRNA in human, rat and mouse cells. Antipeptide antibodies raised against a C-terminal peptide recognized specifically a 30 kd protein on Western blots of human, rat and mouse cell extracts. Immunofluorescence revealed, in addition to granular cytoplasmic fluorescence, intense nucleolar staining. The high basic amino acid content and nucleolar staining prompted us to investigate whether the 30 kd protein could be a ribosomal protein. Western immunoblotting analysis of 2D-electrophoretically resolved ribosomal proteins indicated that the 30 kd protein is the ribosomal large subunit protein L7a.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. PMID:2403926

  9. Increased TGF-beta and decreased oncogene expression by omega-3 fatty acids in the spleen delays onset of autoimmune disease in B/W mice.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, G; Bysani, C; Venkatraman, J T; Tomar, V; Zhao, W

    1994-06-15

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanisms by which marine lipids rich in long chain omega-3 fatty acids inhibit autoimmune disease and prolong the survival rate in female (NZB/NZW) F1 (B/W) mice, an animal model for human SLE. Nutritionally adequate semipurified diets containing at 10% either corn oil (CO) or fish oil (FO) were fed from 1 mo of age and were monitored for proteinuria and survival. Proteinuria was detected earlier and became progressively severe in CO-fed mice. The average life span was significantly shortened by the CO diet (266.7 days +/- 12.5), whereas FO extended the survival significantly (402.1 days +/- 26.1; p < 0.001). A cross-sectional study at 6.5 mo of age revealed an increased proliferative response to T cell mitogens including bacterial superantigens and decreased serum anti-dsDNA Ab titers in the FO group compared with the CO group. Furthermore, splenocytes from the FO group when stimulated with Con A had higher IL-2 and lower IL-4 production similar to that of young (3.5 mo) mice. Flow cytometric analyses of splenocytes revealed lower Ig+, higher lymphocyte endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, and lower Pgp-1+ cells within CD4+ and CD8+ subsets in FO-fed mice. Also, elevated IL-2 and IL-4 and significantly higher TGF-beta 1 and lower c-myc and c-ras mRNA expression and higher TGF-beta 1 and significantly lower c-Myc and c-Ha-Ras proteins were detected in spleens of FO-fed mice. Fatty acid analysis revealed significantly higher linoleic (18:2 omega-6) and arachidonic (20:4 omega-6) acid levels in splenocytes of the CO-fed group and higher eicosapentaenoic (20:5 omega-3) and docosahexanoic (22:6 omega-3) acid levels in the FO-fed group, indicating that changes in membrane fatty acid composition may contribute to the altered immune function and gene expression during the development of murine SLE.

  10. TPR-MET oncogenic rearrangement: Detection by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the transcript and expression in human tumor cells lines

    SciTech Connect

    Soman, N.R.; Wogan, G.N. ); Rhim, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Activation of the MET protooncogene by a rearrangement involving the fusion of TPR and MET specific gene sequences has been observed in a human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS) treated in vitro with N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). No information has been available about the possible occurrence of this rearrangement in human tumors. To facilitate rapid screening of human cell lines and tumor samples for this specific gene rearrangement; the authors developed a sensitive detection method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of TPR-MET mRNA. cDNA was generated from cellular transcripts by using one of the PCR primers, which was then used as a template for PCR amplification of a 205-base-pair region carrying the breakpoint. An end-labeled internal probe was hybridized in solution to an aliquot of the PCR product for detecting amplification. Cells could be directly screened by the assay without prior isolation of RNA. A 205-base-pair DNA fragment characteristic of the TRP-MET rearrangement was detected in cell lines previously known to contain this altered sequence. The rearrangement was also detected at very low levels in the parental (nontransformed) cell line, HOS TE-85. A preliminary survey of cell lines derived from a variety of human tumors indicates that TPR-MET rearrangement occurred and was expressed at very low frequencies by cells from 7 of 14 tumors of nonhematopoietic origin.

  11. Continued withdrawal from the cell cycle and regulation of cellular genes in mouse erythroleukemia cells blocked in differentiation by the c-myc oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, J A; Parker, J M; Schuler, G D; Cole, M D

    1989-01-01

    Constitutive expression of the c-myc oncogene blocks dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-induced differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. During the first 12 h of treatment with DMSO, MEL cells undergo a temporary decrease in the level of c-myc mRNA, followed by a temporary withdrawal from the cell cycle. We found the same shutoff of DNA synthesis during the first 12 to 30 h after DMSO induction in normal MEL cells (which differentiate) and in c-myc-transfected MEL cells (which do not differentiate). We also examined whether deregulated c-myc expression grossly interfered with the regulation of gene expression during MEL cell differentiation. We used run-on transcription assays to monitor the rate of transcription of four oncogenes (c-myc, c-myb, c-fos, and c-K-ras); all except c-K-ras showed a rapid but temporary decrease in transcription after induction in both c-myc-transfected and control cells. Finally, we found the same regulation of cytoplasmic mRNA expression in both types of cells for four oncogenes and three housekeeping genes associated with growth. We conclude that in the MEL cell system, the effects of deregulated c-myc expression do not occur through a disruption of cell cycle control early in induction, nor do they occur through gross deregulation of gene expression. Images PMID:2657403

  12. Oncogenic kinase fusions: an evolving arena with innovative clinical opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tabbò, Fabrizio; Pizzi, Marco; Kyriakides, Peter W.; Ruggeri, Bruce; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer biology relies on intrinsic and extrinsic deregulated pathways, involving a plethora of intra-cellular and extra-cellular components. Tyrosine kinases are frequently deregulated genes, whose aberrant expression is often caused by major cytogenetic events (e.g. chromosomal translocations). The resulting tyrosine kinase fusions (TKFs) prompt the activation of oncogenic pathways, determining the biological and clinical features of the associated tumors. First reported half a century ago, oncogenic TKFs are now found in a large series of hematologic and solid tumors. The molecular basis of TKFs has been thoroughly investigated and tailored therapies against recurrent TKFs have recently been developed. This review illustrates the biology of oncogenic TKFs and their role in solid as well as hematological malignancies. We also address the therapeutic implications of TKFs and the many open issues concerning their clinical impact. PMID:26943776

  13. Mouse Elk oncogene maps to chromosome X and a novel Elk oncogene (Elk3) maps to chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Yoshitaka; Taketo, Makoto; Nozaki, Masami

    1995-03-20

    The Elk protein is a member of the Ets family found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Human ELK1 encoded by ELK1 binds alone or together with serum response factor to DNA and regulates gene expression in a variety of biological processes. Using a panel of interspecific backcross mice, we have mapped the Elk oncogene (Elk) and a novel type Elk oncogene (Elk3), closely related to ELK1. Elk maps to Chr X, and Elk3 maps to the proximal region of Chr 10. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Expression of the nuclear factor-kappaB and proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun are induced by low extracellular Mg2+ in aortic and cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: possible links to hypertension, atherogenesis, and stroke.

    PubMed

    Altura, Burton M; Kostellow, Adele B; Zhang, Aimin; Li, Wenyan; Morrill, Gene A; Gupta, Raj K; Altura, Bella T

    2003-09-01

    Proto-oncogene (c-fos, c-jun) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) expression, as well as DNA synthesis, in aortic and cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were upregulated by a decrease in extracellular magnesium ions ([Mg2+]o). Upregulation of these transcriptional factors was inversely proportional to the [Mg2+]o and occurred over the pathophysiologic range of serum Mg2+ found in patients presenting with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o), use of nifedipine or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors prevented the upregulation of the proto-oncogenes and DNA synthesis in VSMCs. These data show that [Mg2+]o may be an important, heretofore, overlooked natural modulator of proto-oncogene and NF-kappaB expression in VSMCs and that Ca2+ and PKC may play critical roles in induction of c-fos and c-jun in VSMCs induced by a decrease in [Mg2+]o. These results point to a role for low serum Mg2+ in potential development of hypertension, atherogenesis, vascular disease, and stroke.

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human dbl proto-oncogene: evidence that its overexpression is sufficient to transform NIH/3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ron, D; Tronick, S R; Aaronson, S A; Eva, A

    1988-01-01

    We isolated cDNA clones representing the human dbl proto-oncogene transcript. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a predicted protein of 925 amino acids. Using peptide antisera directed against specific proto-dbl peptides, a 115-kd protein was detected in COS cells transfected with an expression vector containing the entire coding region of proto-dbl. This mol. wt is consistent with that predicted from the open reading frame. We have previously shown that the dbl oncogene was generated by substitution of the 5' portion of proto-dbl with an unrelated human sequence. In this study we show that this rearrangement resulted in the loss of the 497 amino-terminal codons of the dbl proto-oncogene. Under the influence of a strong promoter proto-dbl could readily transform NIH/3T3 cells but its transforming activity was less than that of the dbl oncogene driven by the same promoter. Proto-dbl overexpression is, therefore, sufficient to transform NIH/3T3 cells, but specific structural alterations of its coding region significantly enhance its transforming activity. No apparent similarity was detected between the predicted proto-dbl product and other known proto-oncogenes. However, a stretch of 300 amino acids within the N-terminal half of proto-dbl showed structural similarity to the intermediate filament vimentin. This region in proto-dbl contains a heptad repeat motif characteristic of an alpha-helical coiled-coil structure. Taken together, these findings indicate that the human proto-dbl represents a new class of cellular oncogenes that may be related to cytoskeletal elements of the cell. Images PMID:3056717

  16. The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ion channels that are expressed in the cell membrane of all mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Recent findings suggest that nAChRs not only mediate nicotine addiction in the brain but also contribute to the development and progression of cancers directly induced by nicotine and its derived carcinogenic nitrosamines whereas deregulation of the nAChRs is observed in many cancers, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that SNPs nAChRs associate with risks of lung cancers and nicotine addiction. Emerging evidences suggest nAChRs are posited at the central regulatory loops of numerous cell growth and prosurvival signal pathways and also mediate the synthesis and release of stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters induced by their agonists. Thus nAChRs mediated cell signaling plays an important role in stimulating the growth and angiogenic and neurogenic factors and mediating oncogenic signal transduction during cancer development in a cell type specific manner. In this review, we provide an integrated view of nAChRs signaling in cancer, heightening on the oncogenic properties of nAChRs that may be targeted for cancer treatment. PMID:26981122

  17. Identification of an Oncogenic RAB Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Douglas B.; Zoncu, Roberto; Root, David E.; Sabatini, David M.; Sawyers, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    In an shRNA screen for genes that affect AKT phosphorylation, we identified the RAB35 small GTPase—a protein previously implicated in endomembrane trafficking—as a new regulator of the PI3K pathway. Depletion of RAB35 suppresses AKT phosphorylation in response to growth factors, whereas expression of a dominant active GTPase-deficient mutant of RAB35 constitutively activates the PI3K/AKT pathway. RAB35 functions downstream of growth factor receptors and upstream of PDK1 and mTORC2 and co-purifies with PI3K in immunoprecipitation assays. Two somatic RAB35 mutations found in human tumors generate alleles that constitutively activate PI3K/AKT signaling, suppress apoptosis, and transform cells in a PI3K-dependent manner. Furthermore, oncogenic RAB35 is sufficient to drive PDGFRα to LAMP2-positive endomembranes in the absence of ligand, suggesting there may be latent oncogenic potential in dysregulated endomembrane trafficking. PMID:26338797

  18. The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ion channels that are expressed in the cell membrane of all mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Recent findings suggest that nAChRs not only mediate nicotine addiction in the brain but also contribute to the development and progression of cancers directly induced by nicotine and its derived carcinogenic nitrosamines whereas deregulation of the nAChRs is observed in many cancers, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that SNPs nAChRs associate with risks of lung cancers and nicotine addiction. Emerging evidences suggest nAChRs are posited at the central regulatory loops of numerous cell growth and prosurvival signal pathways and also mediate the synthesis and release of stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters induced by their agonists. Thus nAChRs mediated cell signaling plays an important role in stimulating the growth and angiogenic and neurogenic factors and mediating oncogenic signal transduction during cancer development in a cell type specific manner. In this review, we provide an integrated view of nAChRs signaling in cancer, heightening on the oncogenic properties of nAChRs that may be targeted for cancer treatment. PMID:26981122

  19. Identification of an oncogenic RAB protein.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Douglas B; Zoncu, Roberto; Root, David E; Sabatini, David M; Sawyers, Charles L

    2015-10-01

    In a short hairpin RNA screen for genes that affect AKT phosphorylation, we identified the RAB35 small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase)-a protein previously implicated in endomembrane trafficking-as a regulator of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-OH kinase (PI3K) pathway. Depletion of RAB35 suppresses AKT phosphorylation in response to growth factors, whereas expression of a dominant active GTPase-deficient mutant of RAB35 constitutively activates the PI3K/AKT pathway. RAB35 functions downstream of growth factor receptors and upstream of PDK1 and mTORC2 and copurifies with PI3K in immunoprecipitation assays. Two somatic RAB35 mutations found in human tumors generate alleles that constitutively activate PI3K/AKT signaling, suppress apoptosis, and transform cells in a PI3K-dependent manner. Furthermore, oncogenic RAB35 is sufficient to drive platelet-derived growth factor receptor α to LAMP2-positive endomembranes in the absence of ligand, suggesting that there may be latent oncogenic potential in dysregulated endomembrane trafficking.

  20. The imaging performance of the SRC on Mars Express

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberst, J.; Schwarz, G.; Behnke, T.; Hoffmann, H.; Matz, K.-D.; Flohrer, J.; Hirsch, H.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Hauber, E.; Brinkmann, B.; Jaumann, R.; Williams, D.; Kirk, R.; Duxbury, T.; Leu, C.; Neukum, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Express spacecraft carries the pushbroom scanner high-resolution stereo camera (HRSC) and its added imaging subsystem super resolution channel (SRC). The SRC is equipped with its own optical system and a 1024??1024 framing sensor. SRC produces snapshots with 2.3 m ground pixel size from the nominal spacecraft pericenter height of 250 km, which are typically embedded in the central part of the large HRSC scenes. The salient features of the SRC are its light-weight optics, a reliable CCD detector, and high-speed read-out electronics. The quality and effective visibility of details in the SRC images unfortunately falls short of what has been expected. In cases where thermal balance cannot be reached, artifacts, such as blurring and "ghost features" are observed in the images. In addition, images show large numbers of blemish pixels and are plagued by electronic noise. As a consequence, we have developed various image improving algorithms, which are discussed in this paper. While results are encouraging, further studies of image restoration by dedicated processing appear worthwhile. The SRC has obtained more than 6940 images at the time of writing (1 September 2007), which often show fascinating details in surface morphology. SRC images are highly useful for a variety of applications in planetary geology, for studies of the Mars atmosphere, and for astrometric observations of the Martian satellites. This paper will give a full account of the design philosophy, technical concept, calibration, operation, integration with HRSC, and performance, as well as science accomplishments of the SRC. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Imaging gene expression in real-time using aptamers

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ilchung

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways are usually activated by external stimuli and are transient. The downstream changes such as transcription of the activated genes are also transient. Real-time detection of promoter activity is useful for understanding changes in gene expression, especially during cell differentiation and in development. A simple and reliable method for viewing gene expression in real time is not yet available. Reporter proteins such as fluorescent proteins and luciferase allow for non-invasive detection of the products of gene expression in living cells. However, current reporter systems do not provide for real-time imaging of promoter activity in living cells. This is because of the long time period after transcription required for fluorescent protein synthesis and maturation. We have developed an RNA reporter system for imaging in real-time to detect changes in promoter activity as they occur. The RNA reporter uses strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags), which can be expressed from a promoter of choice. The tobramycin, neomycin and PDC RNA aptamers have been utilized for this system and expressed in yeast from the GAL1 promoter. The IMAGEtag RNA kinetics were quantified by RT-qPCR. In yeast precultured in raffinose containing media the GAL1 promoter responded faster than in yeast precultured in glucose containing media. IMAGEtag RNA has relatively short half-life (5.5 min) in yeast. For imaging, the yeast cells are incubated with their ligands that are labeled with fluorescent dyes. To increase signal to noise, ligands have been separately conjugated with the FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) pairs, Cy3 and Cy5. With these constructs, the transcribed aptamers can be imaged after activation of the promoter by galactose. FRET was confirmed with three different approaches, which were sensitized emission, acceptor photobleaching and donor lifetime by FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging

  2. Imaging gene expression in real-time using aptamers

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Il Chung

    2011-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways are usually activated by external stimuli and are transient. The downstream changes such as transcription of the activated genes are also transient. Real-time detection of promoter activity is useful for understanding changes in gene expression, especially during cell differentiation and in development. A simple and reliable method for viewing gene expression in real time is not yet available. Reporter proteins such as fluorescent proteins and luciferase allow for non-invasive detection of the products of gene expression in living cells. However, current reporter systems do not provide for real-time imaging of promoter activity in living cells. This is because of the long time period after transcription required for fluorescent protein synthesis and maturation. We have developed an RNA reporter system for imaging in real-time to detect changes in promoter activity as they occur. The RNA reporter uses strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags), which can be expressed from a promoter of choice. The tobramycin, neomycin and PDC RNA aptamers have been utilized for this system and expressed in yeast from the GAL1 promoter. The IMAGEtag RNA kinetics were quantified by RT-qPCR. In yeast precultured in raffinose containing media the GAL1 promoter responded faster than in yeast precultured in glucose containing media. IMAGEtag RNA has relatively short half-life (5.5 min) in yeast. For imaging, the yeast cells are incubated with their ligands that are labeled with fluorescent dyes. To increase signal to noise, ligands have been separately conjugated with the FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) pairs, Cy3 and Cy5. With these constructs, the transcribed aptamers can be imaged after activation of the promoter by galactose. FRET was confirmed with three different approaches, which were sensitized emission, acceptor photobleaching and donor lifetime by FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging

  3. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses and ploidy in cervical lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Rihet, S; Lorenzato, M; Clavel, C

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To compare ploidy measurements obtained on tissue sections of selected low and high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions containing oncogenic HPV (types 16, 18 or 33) detected by in situ hybridisation (ISH) or PCR. METHODS: DNA ploidy was assessed by image cytometry after Feulgen staining of contiguous serial sections of eight lesions exhibiting atypical squamous cells or squamous atypia and 53 low and 63 high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in which HPV had been detected by ISH or PCR. RESULTS: Aneuploidy was strongly associated with the presence of oncogenic HPV, being detected in 50% of lesions with squamous atypia and 75.5% of the low and 95.2% of the high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. The multiploid profile was highly associated with high grade lesions and with the pattern of HPV DNA integration. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of aneuploidy is strongly suggestive of the presence of oncogenic HPV types. Combining the detection of HPV by ISH and PCR with DNA image cytometry may provide the pathologist and the physician with important prognostic information about low grade lesions, especially when these lesions have a multiploid DNA profile and contain oncogenic HPV. PMID:8944607

  4. Duplication of the MYB oncogene in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lahortiga, Idoya; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Graux, Carlos; Cauwelier, Barbara; Lambert, Frederic; Mentens, Nicole; Beverloo, H Berna; Pieters, Rob; Speleman, Frank; Odero, Maria D; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Marynen, Peter; Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Meijerink, Jules P P; Cools, Jan

    2007-05-01

    We identified a duplication of the MYB oncogene in 8.4% of individuals with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and in five T-ALL cell lines. The duplication is associated with a threefold increase in MYB expression, and knockdown of MYB expression initiates T cell differentiation. Our results identify duplication of MYB as an oncogenic event and suggest that MYB could be a therapeutic target in human T-ALL.

  5. Complex effects of Ras proto-oncogenes in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Roberto; Lopez-Barcons, Lluis; Ahn, Daniel; Garcia-Espana, Antonio; Yoon, Andrew; Matthews, Jeremy; Mangues, Ramon; Perez-Soler, Roman; Pellicer, Angel

    2004-04-01

    Ras proteins have been found mutated in about one-third of human tumors. In vitro, Ras has been shown to regulate distinct and contradictory effects, such as cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Nonetheless, the effects that the wild-type protein elicits in tumorigenesis are poorly understood. Depending on the type of tissue, Ras proto-oncogenes appear to either promote or inhibit the tumor phenotype. In this report, we treated wild-type and N-ras knockout mice with 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) to induce fibrosarcomas and found that MCA is more carcinogenic in wild-type mice than in knockout mice. After injecting different doses of a tumorigenic cell line, the wild-type mice exhibited a shorter latency of tumor development than the knockouts, indicating that there are N-ras-dependent differences in the stromal cells. Likewise, we have analyzed B-cell lymphomas induced by either N-methylnitrosourea or by the N-ras oncogene in mice that over-express the N-ras proto-oncogene and found that the over-expression of wild-type N-ras is able to increase the incidence of these lymphomas. Considered together, our results indicate that Ras proto-oncogenes can enhance or inhibit the malignant phenotype in vivo in different systems.

  6. Folate levels modulate oncogene-induced replication stress and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Noa; Maoz, Karin; Bester, Assaf C; Im, Michael M; Shewach, Donna S; Karni, Rotem; Kerem, Batsheva

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal instability in early cancer stages is caused by replication stress. One mechanism by which oncogene expression induces replication stress is to drive cell proliferation with insufficient nucleotide levels. Cancer development is driven by alterations in both genetic and environmental factors. Here, we investigated whether replication stress can be modulated by both genetic and non-genetic factors and whether the extent of replication stress affects the probability of neoplastic transformation. To do so, we studied the effect of folate, a micronutrient that is essential for nucleotide biosynthesis, on oncogene-induced tumorigenicity. We show that folate deficiency by itself leads to replication stress in a concentration-dependent manner. Folate deficiency significantly enhances oncogene-induced replication stress, leading to increased DNA damage and tumorigenicity in vitro. Importantly, oncogene-expressing cells, when grown under folate deficiency, exhibit a significantly increased frequency of tumor development in mice. These findings suggest that replication stress is a quantitative trait affected by both genetic and non-genetic factors and that the extent of replication stress plays an important role in cancer development. PMID:26197802

  7. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  8. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens: prime candidates for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-06-30

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer/testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic functions, including support of growth, survival and metastasis. This novel insight into the function of cancer/testis antigens has the potential to deliver more effective cancer vaccines. Moreover, immune targeting of oncogenic cancer/testis antigens in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapies or novel immunotherapies such as checkpoint blockade or adoptive transfer, represents a highly synergistic approach with the potential to improve patient survival.

  9. The contrasting oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles of FES.

    PubMed

    Greer, Peter A; Kanda, Shigeru; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    The FES gene was first discovered as a protein-tyrosine kinase-encoding retroviral oncogene. The ability of v-FES to transform cells in vitro and initiate cancer in vivo has been established by cell culture, engraftment and transgenic mouse studies. The corresponding cellular c-FES proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic FES protein-tyrosine kinase with restrained catalytic activity relative to its retrovirally encoded homologs. These observations have stimulated a search for mutations or inappropriate expression of c-FES in human cancers and research aimed at understanding the functions of the FES kinase and its potential involvement in cancer and other diseases. Paradoxically, although first identified as an oncogene, genetic evidence has also implicated c-fes as a potential tumor suppressor. This review will describe observations from basic and translational research which shapes our current understanding of the physiological, cellular and molecular functions of the FES protein-tyrosine kinase and its potential roles in tumorigenesis. We also propose a model to reconcile the conflicting oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles of c-FES in tumorigenesis.

  10. Oncogenic Brain Metazoan Parasite Infection

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Angela N.; Cress, Marshall C.; Gabor, Oroszi; Ding, Qing-Qing; Miller, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple observations suggest that certain parasitic infections can be oncogenic. Among these, neurocysticercosis is associated with increased risk for gliomas and hematologic malignancies. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with colocalization of a metazoan parasite, possibly cysticercosis, and a WHO grade IV neuroepithelial tumor with exclusively neuronal differentiation by immunohistochemical stains (immunopositive for synaptophysin, neurofilament protein, and Neu-N and not for GFAP, vimentin, or S100). The colocalization and temporal relationship of these two entities suggest a causal relationship. PMID:24151568

  11. (Oncogenic action of ionizing radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. As in past reports we will describe progress in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; (3) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. 72 refs., 6 tabs.

  12. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  13. Atlas of protein expression: image capture, analysis, and design of terabyte image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiahua; Maslen, Gareth; Warford, Anthony; Griffin, Gareth; Xie, Jane; Crowther, Sandra; McCafferty, John

    2006-03-01

    The activity of genes in health and disease are manifested through the proteins which they encode. Ultimately, proteins drive functional processes in cells and tissues and so by measuring individual protein levels, studying modifications and discovering their sites of action we will understand better their function. It is possible to visualize the location of proteins of interest in tissue sections using labeled antibodies which bind to the target protein. This procedure, known as immunohistochemistry (IHC), provides valuable information on the cellular and sub-cellular distribution of proteins in tissue. The project, atlas of protein expression, aims to create a quality, information rich database of protein expression profiles, which is accessible to the world-wide research community. For the long term archival value of the data, the accompanying validated antibody and protein clones will potentially have great research, diagnostic and possibly therapeutic potential. To achieve this we had introduced a number of novel technologies, e.g. express recombinant proteins, select antibodies, stain proteins present in tissue section, and tissue microarray (TMA) image analysis. These are currently being optimized, automated and integrated into a multi-disciplinary production process. We had also created infrastructure for multi-terabyte scale image capture, established an image analysis capability for initial screening and quantization.

  14. ARF and ATM/ATR cooperate in p53-mediated apoptosis upon oncogenic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Pauklin, Siim . E-mail: spauklin@ut.ee; Kristjuhan, Arnold; Maimets, Toivo; Jaks, Viljar

    2005-08-26

    Induction of apoptosis is pivotal for eliminating cells with damaged DNA or deregulated proliferation. We show that tumor suppressor ARF and ATM/ATR kinase pathways cooperate in the induction of apoptosis in response to elevated expression of c-myc, {beta}-catenin or human papilloma virus E7 oncogenes. Overexpression of oncogenes leads to the formation of phosphorylated H2AX foci, induction of Rad51 protein levels and ATM/ATR-dependent phosphorylation of p53. Inhibition of ATM/ATR kinases abolishes both induction of Rad51 and phosphorylation of p53, and remarkably reduces the level of apoptosis induced by co-expression of oncogenes and ARF. However, the induction of apoptosis is downregulated in p53-/- cells and does not depend on activities of ATM/ATR kinases, indicating that efficient induction of apoptosis by oncogene activation depends on coordinated action of ARF and ATM/ATR pathways in the regulation of p53.

  15. Molecular biology of oncogenic inflammatory processes. I. Non-oncogenic and oncogenic pathogens, intrinsic inflammatory reactions without pathogens, and microRNA/DNA interactions (Review).

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2012-02-01

    In some inflammasomes tumor cells are generated. The internal environment of the inflammasome is conducive to the induction of malignant transformation. Epigenetic changes initiate this process. The subverted stromal connective tissue cells act to promote and sustain the process of malignant trans-formation. In its early stages, the premalignant cells depend on paracrine circuitries for the reception of growth factors. The ligands are derived from the connective tissue, and the receptors are expressed on the recipient premalignant cells. The initial events are not a direct attack on the proto-oncogenes, and thus it may be entirely reversible. Epigenetic processes of hypermethylation of the genes at the promoters of tumor suppressor genes (to silence them), and deacetylation of the histones aimed at the promoters of proto-oncogenes (to activate them) are on-going. A large number of short RNA sequences (interfering, micro-, short hairpin, non-coding RNAs) silence tumor suppressor genes, by neutralizing their mRNAs. In a serial sequence oncogenes undergo amplifications, point-mutations, translocations and fusions. In its earliest stage, the process is reversible by demethylation of the silenced suppressor gene promoters (to reactivate them), or re-acetylation of the histones of the oncogene promoters, thus de-activating them. The external administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors usually leads to the restoration of histone acetylation. In time, the uncorrected processes solidify into constitutive and irreversible gene mutations. Some of the pathogens inducing inflammations with consquential malignant transformation contain oncogenic gene sequences (papilloma viruses, Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, hepatitis B and C viruses, Merkel cell polyoma virus, Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis). These induced malignancies may be multifocal. Other pathogens are devoid of any known oncogenic genomic sequences

  16. Development of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of the HER2 Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young K.; Evangelista, Jennifer; Aschenbach, Konrad; Johansson, Peter; Wen, Xinyu; Chen, Qingrong; Lee, Albert; Hempel, Heidi; Gheeya, Jinesh S.; Getty, Stephanie; Gomez, Romel; Khan, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have gained much interest as molecular recognition tools in biology, medicine and chemistry. This is due to high hybridization efficiency to complimentary oligonucleotides and stability of the duplexes with RNA or DNA. We have synthesized 15/16-mer PNA probes to detect the HER2 mRNA. The performance of these probes to detect the HER2 target was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence bead assays. The PNA probes have sufficiently discriminated between the wild type HER2 target and the mutant target with single base mismatches. Furthermore, the probes exhibited excellent linear concentration dependence between 0.4 to 400 fmol for the target gene. The results demonstrate potential application of PNAs as diagnostic probes with high specificity for quantitative measurements of amplifications or over-expressions of oncogenes. PMID:23593123

  17. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  18. Adenovirus E1A coding sequences that enable ras and pmt oncogenes to transform cultured primary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zerler, B; Moran, B; Maruyama, K; Moomaw, J; Grodzicker, T; Ruley, H E

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids expressing partial adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) coding sequences were tested for activities which facilitate in vitro establishment (immortalization) of primary baby rat kidney cells and which enable the T24 Harvey ras-related oncogene and the polyomavirus middle T antigen (pmt) gene to transform primary baby rat kidney cells. E1A cDNAs expressing the 289- and 243-amino acid proteins expressed both E1A transforming functions. Mutant hrA, which encodes a 140-amino acid protein derived from the amino-terminal domain shared by the 289- and 243-amino acid proteins, enabled ras (but not pmt) to transform and facilitated in vitro establishment to a low, but detectable, extent. These studies suggest that E1A functions which collaborate with ras oncogenes and those which facilitate establishment are linked. Furthermore, E1A transforming functions are not associated with activities of the 289-amino acid E1A proteins required for efficient transcriptional activation of viral early region promoters. Images PMID:3022137

  19. MYC oncogene in myeloid neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M Dolores; Albajar, Marta; Gomez-Casares, M Teresa; Batlle, Ana; León, Javier

    2013-02-01

    MYC is a transcription factor that regulates many critical genes for cell proliferation, differentiation, and biomass accumulation. MYC is one of the most prevalent oncogenes found to be altered in human cancer, being deregulated in about 50 % of tumors. Although MYC deregulation has been more frequently associated to lymphoma and lymphoblastic leukemia than to myeloid malignancies, a body of evidence has been gathered showing that MYC plays a relevant role in malignancies derived from the myeloid compartment. The myeloid leukemogenic activity of MYC has been demonstrated in different murine models. Not surprisingly, MYC has been found to be amplified or/and deregulated in the three major types of myeloid neoplasms: acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative neoplasms, including chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we review the recent literature describing the involvement of MYC in myeloid tumors.

  20. Oncogene regulation of tumor suppressor genes in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jimmy; Turner, Joel; McCarthy, Susan; Enkemann, Steve; Li, Chan Gong; Yan, Perally; Huang, Timothy; Yeatman, Timothy J

    2005-02-01

    We attempted to demonstrate whether there is an epigenetic link between oncogenes and tumor suppression genes in tumorigenesis. We designed a high throughput model to identify a candidate group of tumor suppressor genes potentially regulated by oncogenes. Gene expression profiling of mock-transfected versus v-src-transfected 3Y1 rat fibroblasts identified significant overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 1, the enzyme responsible for aberrant genome methylation, in v-src-transfected fibroblasts. Secondary microarray analyses identified a number of candidate tumor suppressor genes that were down-regulated by v-src but were also re-expressed following treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a potent demethylating agent. This candidate group included both tumor suppressor genes that are known to be silenced by DNA hypermethylation and those that have not been previously identified with promoter hypermethylation. To further validate our model, we identified tsg, a tumor suppressor gene that was shown to be down-regulated by v-src and found to harbor dense promoter hypermethylation. Our model demonstrates a cooperative relationship between oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes mediated through promoter hypermethylation.

  1. Targeting Bcl-2 stability to sensitize cells harboring oncogenic ras.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Ganapathy, Suthakar; Shen, Ling; Huang, Junchi; Yi, Bo; Zhou, Xiaodong; Dai, Wei; Chen, Changyan

    2015-09-01

    The pro-survival factor Bcl-2 and its family members are critical determinants of the threshold of the susceptibility of cells to apoptosis. Studies are shown that cells harboring an oncogenic ras were extremely sensitive to the inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) and Bcl-2 could antagonize this apoptotic process. However, it remains unrevealed how Bcl-2 is being regulated in this apoptotic process. In this study, we investigate the role of Bcl-2 stability in sensitizing the cells harboring oncogenic K-ras to apoptosis triggered by PKC inhibitor GO6976. We demonstrated that Bcl-2 in Swiss3T3 cells ectopically expressing or murine lung cancer LKR cells harboring K-ras rapidly underwent ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway after the treatment of GO6976, accompanied with induction of apoptosis. In this process, Bcl-2 formed the complex with Keap-1 and Cul3. The mutation of serine-17 and deletion of BH-2 or 4 was required for Bcl-2 ubiquitination and degradation, which elevate the signal threshold for the induction of apoptosis in the cells following PKC inhibition. Thus, Bcl-2 appears an attractive target for the induction of apoptosis by PKC inhibition in cancer cells expressing oncogenic K-ras. PMID:26041886

  2. Utilizing signature-score to identify oncogenic pathways of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chen, Hung-I Harry; Lu, Jo-Yang; Lin, Pei-Ying; Keller, Charles; Comerford, Sarah; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Chen, Yidong

    2013-01-01

    Extracting maximal information from gene signature sets (GSSs) via microarray-based transcriptional profiling involves assigning function to up and down regulated genes. Here we present a novel sample scoring method called Signature-score (S-score) which can be used to quantify the expression pattern of tumor samples from previously identified gene signature sets. A simulation result demonstrated an improved accuracy and robustness by S-score method comparing with other scoring methods. By applying the S-score method to cholangiocarcinoma (CAC), an aggressive hepatic cancer that arises from bile ducts cells, we identified enriched oncogenic pathways in two large CAC data sets. Thirteen pathways were enriched in CAC compared with normal liver and bile duct. Moreover, using S-score, we were able to dissect correlations between CAC-associated oncogenic pathways and Gene Ontology function. Two major oncogenic clusters and associated functions were identified. Cluster 1, which included beta-catenin and Ras, showed a positive correlation with the cell cycle, while cluster 2, which included TGF-beta, cytokeratin 19 and EpCAM was inversely correlated with immune function. We also used S-score to identify pathways that are differentially expressed in CAC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the more common subtype of liver cancer. Our results demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of S-score in assigning functional roles to tumor-associated gene signature sets and in identifying potential therapeutic targets for specific liver cancer subtypes. PMID:23905013

  3. SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun-Mi; Chae, Myounghee; Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Seo, Taegun; Jang, Ik-Soon; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Il-Chul; Lee, Je-Ho; Park, Junsoo

    2010-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an interferon-induced transcriptional activator that suppresses tumors by impeding cell proliferation. Recently, we demonstrated that the level of SUMOylated IRF-1 is elevated in tumor cells, and that SUMOylation of IRF-1 attenuates its tumor-suppressive function. Here we report that SUMOylated IRF-1 mimics IRF-2, an antagonistic repressor, and shows oncogenic potential. To demonstrate the role of SUMOylated IRF-1 in tumorigenesis, we used SUMO-IRF-1 recombinant protein. Stable expression of SUMO-IRF-1 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in focus formation and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Inoculation of SUMO-IRF-1-transfected cells into athymic nude mice resulted in tumor formation and infiltration of adipose tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that SUMO-IRF-1 transforms NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that SUMOylated IRF-1 may act as an oncogenic protein in tumor cells.

  4. Characterization and immunotherapeutic potential of a monoclonal antibody against a ras oncogene transformed cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.S. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Transformed cells express cell surface antigens not present, or present in diminished amounts on normal cells. Monoclonal antibodies can be used to identify and biochemically characterize tumor-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 45-2D9 was produced by immunization of BALB/c mice with a transformed cell line (45-2D9) induced by transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with a c-H-ras oncogene in DNA isolated from a human lung carcinoma. By immunoperoxidase staining, this antibody binds to the 45-342 cells as well as to the ras transformed primary and 3 secondary transfectants, including the one used to induce 45-342, but not to other ras transformed cell lines. Murine tumors as well as human fetal and most normal adult tissues are not stained. This antibody does bind to a variety of human tumors, including lung adenocarcinomas, as well as breast, colon and esophageal carcinomas. The ability of MoAb 45-2D9 to target ricin toxin A chain (RTA) and radio-isotopes to gp74 expressing cells was investigated. An immunotoxin generated by conjugating RTA to MoAb 45-2D9 inhibits protein and DNA synthesis by the 45-342 cells. Radiolabeled antibody specifically localizes to and can be used to image subcutaneous and pulmonary gp74 expressing tumors in nu/nu mice. Monoclonal antibodies against oncogene transformed cell lines may be useful for the detection and characterization of tumor-associated antigens as well as for the development of new tumor therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  5. Transformation by Raf and other oncogenes renders cells differentially sensitive to growth inhibition by a dominant negative c-jun mutant.

    PubMed

    Rapp, U R; Troppmair, J; Beck, T; Birrer, M J

    1994-12-01

    In NIH3T3 cells expressing active Raf-1 protein serine/threonine kinase (PSK) c-jun expression is constitutive while c-fos expression is attenuated. This alteration prompted us to determine whether oncogene transformation would render cells differentially sensitive to growth inhibition by a dominant negative mutant of c-jun, TAM 67. Growth inhibition was observed in three types of assays: (1) transfection of TAM 67 into cells stably transformed by a variety of oncogenes, (2) cotransfection of TAM 67 with oncogene expression plasmids into NIH3T3 cells and (3) titration of oncogene-expressing retroviruses on cells stably expressing TAM 67. The results clearly demonstrate that Raf-1 dependent oncogenes, which include receptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs)-, intracellular PTKs- and Ras-derived genes share the Raf phenotype of constitutive c-jun expression, attenuated c-fos induction, and high sensitivity to growth suppression by TAM 67. Additionally, the intracellular PSK oncogene, mos and the nuclear oncogenes c-myc, c-fos, and SV40 T antigen were TAM 67-sensitive for transformation. This universal pattern of altered growth regulation in oncogene transformed fibroblast cell lines highlights the potential usefulness of c-jun based inhibitors for control of tumor cell growth.

  6. Therapeutic opportunities involving cellular oncogenes: novel approaches fostered by biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Huber, B E

    1989-01-01

    Biotechnological processes are having a major impact on many industrial sectors, including the pharmaceutical industry. The contributions of recombinant DNA and hybridoma technologies to modern therapeutics include production of natural and unnatural peptides, subunit vaccines, monoclonal antibodies and nucleic acid hybridization probes for in vitro and in vivo diagnostics and biological imaging, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies as tissue-specific delivery systems or as agents to confer passive immunity, production of therapeutic targets for rational drug design, and the use of cloned enzymes as stereospecific catalysts in large-scale production of small medicinal molecules. Biotechnological advances have led to the identification of a discrete set of genes, oncogenes, which may be essential contributing factors for a great variety and number of human cancers. In addition, biotechnological innovations are fostering the exploitation of oncogenes as novel therapeutic targets for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Because oncogenes are activated in transformation by either qualitative or quantitative mechanisms, however, different biotechnology-based therapeutic approaches are required for each class.

  7. Oncogenic transformation of diverse gastrointestinal tissues in primary organoid culture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingnan; Nadauld, Lincoln; Ootani, Akifumi; Corney, David C.; Pai, Reetesh K.; Gevaert, Olivier; Cantrell, Michael A.; Rack, Paul G.; Neal, James T.; Chan, Carol W-M.; Yeung, Trevor; Gong, Xue; Yuan, Jenny; Wilhelmy, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Attardi, Laura D.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; Hung, Kenneth E.; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Ji, Hanlee P.; Kuo, Calvin J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of primary organoid cultures containing epithelial and mesenchymal elements to cancer modeling holds promise for combining the accurate multilineage differentiation and physiology of in vivo systems with the facile in vitro manipulation of transformed cell lines. Here, a single air-liquid interface culture method was used without modification to engineer oncogenic mutations into primary epithelial/mesenchymal organoids from mouse colon, stomach and pancreas. Pancreatic and gastric organoids exhibited dysplasia upon KrasG12D expression and/or p53 loss, and readily generated adenocarcinoma upon in vivo transplantation. In contrast, primary colon organoids required combinatorial Apc, p53, KrasG12D and Smad4 mutations for progressive transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma-like histology in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, recapitulating multi-hit models of colorectal cancer (CRC), and versus more promiscuous transformation of small intestinal organoids. Colon organoid culture functionally validated the microRNA miR-483 as a dominant driver oncogene at the Insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF2) 11p15.5 CRC amplicon, inducing dysplasia in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. These studies demonstrate the general utility of a highly tractable primary organoid system for cancer modeling and driver oncogene validation in diverse gastrointestinal tissues. PMID:24859528

  8. Oncogenic transformation of diverse gastrointestinal tissues in primary organoid culture.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingnan; Nadauld, Lincoln; Ootani, Akifumi; Corney, David C; Pai, Reetesh K; Gevaert, Olivier; Cantrell, Michael A; Rack, Paul G; Neal, James T; Chan, Carol W-M; Yeung, Trevor; Gong, Xue; Yuan, Jenny; Wilhelmy, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Attardi, Laura D; Plevritis, Sylvia K; Hung, Kenneth E; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Ji, Hanlee P; Kuo, Calvin J

    2014-07-01

    The application of primary organoid cultures containing epithelial and mesenchymal elements to cancer modeling holds promise for combining the accurate multilineage differentiation and physiology of in vivo systems with the facile in vitro manipulation of transformed cell lines. Here we used a single air-liquid interface culture method without modification to engineer oncogenic mutations into primary epithelial and mesenchymal organoids from mouse colon, stomach and pancreas. Pancreatic and gastric organoids exhibited dysplasia as a result of expression of Kras carrying the G12D mutation (Kras(G12D)), p53 loss or both and readily generated adenocarcinoma after in vivo transplantation. In contrast, primary colon organoids required combinatorial Apc, p53, Kras(G12D) and Smad4 mutations for progressive transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma-like histology in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, recapitulating multi-hit models of colorectal cancer (CRC), as compared to the more promiscuous transformation of small intestinal organoids. Colon organoid culture functionally validated the microRNA miR-483 as a dominant driver oncogene at the IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor-2) 11p15.5 CRC amplicon, inducing dysplasia in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. These studies demonstrate the general utility of a highly tractable primary organoid system for cancer modeling and driver oncogene validation in diverse gastrointestinal tissues.

  9. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  10. CRAF R391W is a melanoma driver oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Atefi, Mohammad; Titz, Bjoern; Tsoi, Jennifer; Avramis, Earl; Le, Allison; Ng, Charles; Lomova, Anastasia; Lassen, Amanda; Friedman, Michael; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Ribas, Antoni; Graeber, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 75% of melanomas have known driver oncogenic mutations in BRAF, NRAS, GNA11 or GNAQ, while the mutations providing constitutive oncogenic signaling in the remaining melanomas are not known. We established a melanoma cell line from a tumor with none of the common driver mutations. This cell line demonstrated a signaling profile similar to BRAF-mutants, but lacked sensitivity to the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. RNA-seq mutation data implicated CRAF R391W as the alternative driver mutation of this melanoma. CRAF R391W was homozygous and over expressed. These melanoma cells were highly sensitive to CRAF, but not BRAF knockdown. In reconstitution experiments, CRAF R391W, but not CRAF WT, transformed NIH3T3 cells in soft-agar colony formation assays, increased kinase activity in vitro, induced MAP kinase signaling and conferred vemurafenib resistance. MAP kinase inducing activity was dependent on CRAF dimerization. Thus, CRAF is a bona fide alternative oncogene for BRAF/NRAS/GNAQ/GNA11 wild type melanomas. PMID:27273450

  11. Suppression of Myc oncogenic activity by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Barna, Maria; Pusic, Aya; Zollo, Ornella; Costa, Maria; Kondrashov, Nadya; Rego, Eduardo; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Ruggero, Davide

    2008-12-18

    The Myc oncogene regulates the expression of several components of the protein synthetic machinery, including ribosomal proteins, initiation factors of translation, RNA polymerase III and ribosomal DNA. Whether and how increasing the cellular protein synthesis capacity affects the multistep process leading to cancer remains to be addressed. Here we use ribosomal protein heterozygote mice as a genetic tool to restore increased protein synthesis in Emu-Myc/+ transgenic mice to normal levels, and show that the oncogenic potential of Myc in this context is suppressed. Our findings demonstrate that the ability of Myc to increase protein synthesis directly augments cell size and is sufficient to accelerate cell cycle progression independently of known cell cycle targets transcriptionally regulated by Myc. In addition, when protein synthesis is restored to normal levels, Myc-overexpressing precancerous cells are more efficiently eliminated by programmed cell death. Our findings reveal a new mechanism that links increases in general protein synthesis rates downstream of an oncogenic signal to a specific molecular impairment in the modality of translation initiation used to regulate the expression of selective messenger RNAs. We show that an aberrant increase in cap-dependent translation downstream of Myc hyperactivation specifically impairs the translational switch to internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-dependent translation that is required for accurate mitotic progression. Failure of this translational switch results in reduced mitotic-specific expression of the endogenous IRES-dependent form of Cdk11 (also known as Cdc2l and PITSLRE), which leads to cytokinesis defects and is associated with increased centrosome numbers and genome instability in Emu-Myc/+ mice. When accurate translational control is re-established in Emu-Myc/+ mice, genome instability is suppressed. Our findings demonstrate how perturbations in translational control provide a highly specific outcome

  12. RAS oncogenes: weaving a tumorigenic web

    PubMed Central

    Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya; Grabocka, Elda; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    RAS proteins are essential components of signalling pathways that emanate from cell surface receptors. Oncogenic activation of these proteins owing to missense mutations is frequently detected in several types of cancer. A wealth of biochemical and genetic studies indicates that RAS proteins control a complex molecular circuitry that consists of a wide array of interconnecting pathways. In this Review, we describe how RAS oncogenes exploit their extensive signalling reach to affect multiple cellular processes that drive tumorigenesis. PMID:21993244

  13. p38alpha and p38gamma mediate oncogenic ras-induced senescence through differential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jinny; Hong, Lixin; Liao, Rong; Deng, Qingdong; Han, Jiahuai; Sun, Peiqing

    2009-04-24

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a tumor-suppressive defense mechanism triggered upon activation of certain oncogenes in normal cells. Recently, the senescence response to oncogene activation has been shown to act as a bona fide barrier to cancer development in vivo. Multiple previous studies have implicated the importance of the p38 MAPK pathway in oncogene-induced senescence. However, the contribution of each of the four p38 isoforms (encoded by different genes) to senescence induction is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrated that p38alpha and p38gamma, but not p38beta, play an essential role in oncogenic ras-induced senescence. Both p38alpha and p38gamma are expressed in primary human fibroblasts and are activated upon transduction of oncogenic ras. Small hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of p38alpha or p38gamma expression abrogated ras-induced senescence, whereas constitutive activation of p38alpha and p38gamma caused premature senescence. Furthermore, upon activation by oncogenic ras, p38gamma stimulated the transcriptional activity of p53 by phosphorylating p53 at Ser(33), suggesting that the ability of p38gamma to mediate senescence is at least partly achieved through p53. However, p38alpha contributed to ras-inducted senescence via a p53-indepdendent mechanism in cells by mediating ras-induced expression of p16(INK4A), another key senescence effector. These findings have identified p38alpha and p38gamma as essential components of the signaling pathway that regulates the tumor-suppressing senescence response, providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential involvement of the p38 isoforms in senescence induction.

  14. Identification of a provirally activated c-Ha-ras oncogene in an avian nephroblastoma via a novel procedure: cDNA cloning of a chimaeric viral-host transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Westaway, D; Papkoff, J; Moscovici, C; Varmus, H E

    1986-01-01

    Retrovirus without oncogenes often exert their neoplastic potential as insertional mutagens of cellular proto-oncogenes. This may be associated with the production of chimaeric viral-host transcripts; in these cases; activated cellular genes can be identified by obtaining cDNA clones of bipartite RNAs. This approach was used in the analysis of chicken nephroblastomas induced by myeloblastosis-associated virus (MAV). One tumor contained a novel mRNA species initiated within a MAV LTR. cDNA cloning revealed that this mRNA encodes a protein of 189 amino acids, identical to that of normal human Ha-ras-1 at 185 positions, including positions implicated in oncogenic activation of ras proto-oncogenes; there are no differences between the coding sequences of presumably normal Ha-ras cDNA clones from chicken lymphoma RNA and the tumor-derived cDNAs. The chimaeric mRNA in the nephroblastoma is at least 25-fold more abundant than c-Ha-ras mRNA in normal kidney tissue, and a 21-kd ras-related protein is present in relatively large amounts in the tumor. We conclude that a quantitative change in c-Ha-ras gene expression results from an upstream insertion mutation and presumably contributes to tumorigenesis in this single case. Little or no increase in c-Ha-ras RNA or protein was observed in other nephroblastomas. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 10. PMID:3011401

  15. REST regulates oncogenic properties of glioblastoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Mohamed M.; Sathyan, Pratheesh; Singh, Sanjay K.; Zinn, Pascal O.; Marisetty, Anantha L.; Liang, Shoudan; Gumin, Joy; El-Mesallamy, Hala Osman; Suki, Dima; Colman, Howard; Fuller, Gregory N.; Lang, Frederick F.; Majumder, Sadhan

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Although many GBM tumors are believed to be caused by self-renewing, glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells (GSCs), the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs are only now being unraveled. Here we showed that GSCs derived from GBM patient specimens express varying levels of the transcriptional repressor REST, suggesting heterogeneity across different GSC lines. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments indicated that REST maintains self-renewal of GSCs. High REST-expressing GSCs (HR-GSCs) produced tumors histopathologically distinct from those generated by low REST-expressing GSCs (LR-GSCs) in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models. Knockdown of REST in HR-GSCs resulted in increased survival in GSC-transplanted mice and produced tumors with higher apoptotic and lower invasive properties. Conversely, forced expression of exogenous REST in LR-GSCs produced decreased survival in mice and produced tumors with lower apoptotic and higher invasive properties, similar to HR-GSCs. Thus, based on our results, we propose that a novel function of REST is to maintain self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs and that REST can play a major role in mediating tumorigenicity in GBM. PMID:22228704

  16. Depletion of c-myc with specific antisense sequences reverses the transformed phenotype in ras oncogene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sklar, M D; Thompson, E; Welsh, M J; Liebert, M; Harney, J; Grossman, H B; Smith, M; Prochownik, E V

    1991-01-01

    ras oncogene-transformed NIH 3T3 cells expressing glucocorticoid-inducible antisense c-myc cDNA transcripts at levels sufficient to deplete c-myc protein lost their transformed morphology and the ability to grow in soft agar; their ability to form tumors in nude mice was also impaired. These changes were dependent on the continuous expression of the antisense sequences. No major effects on plating efficiencies, growth rates in monolayer culture, or immortalization were observed in the revertant cells, indicating that the observed effects were not a toxic consequence of c-myc protein depletion. Transfection with the same vector expressing c-myc in the sense orientation or other control vectors had no effect on transformation. These results suggest that a certain minimum level of expression of c-myc is required for the maintenance of ras transformation in NIH 3T3 cells. Images PMID:2046673

  17. Arf tumor suppressor promoter monitors latent oncogenic signals in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zindy, Frederique; Williams, Richard T.; Baudino, Troy A.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Skapek, Stephen X.; Cleveland, John L.; Roussel, Martine F.; Sherr, Charles J.

    2003-12-01

    Induction of the Arf tumor suppressor gene by elevated thresholds of mitogenic signals activates a p53-dependent transcriptional response that triggers either growth arrest or apoptosis, thereby countering abnormal cell proliferation. Conversely, Arf inactivation is associated with tumor development. Expression of Arf in tissues of adult mice is difficult to detect, possibly because its induction leads to the arrest or elimination of incipient tumor cells. We replaced coding sequences of exon 1 of the mouse cellular Arf gene with a cDNA encoding GFP, thereby producing Arf-null animals in which GFP expression is driven by the intact Arf promoter. The Arf promoter was induced in several biologic settings previously shown to elicit mouse p19Arf expression. Inactivation of Arf in this manner led to the outgrowth of tumor cells expressing GFP, thereby providing direct evidence that the Arf promoter monitors latent oncogenic signals in vivo.

  18. In vivo imaging of inducible tyrosinase gene expression with an ultrasound array-based photoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    Tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the production of melanin, has shown promise as a reporter of genetic activity. While green fluorescent protein has been used extensively in this capacity, it is limited in its ability to provide information deep in tissue at a reasonable resolution. As melanin is a strong absorber of light, it is possible to image gene expression using tyrosinase with photoacoustic imaging technologies, resulting in excellent resolutions at multiple-centimeter depths. While our previous work has focused on creating and imaging MCF-7 cells with doxycycline-controlled tyrosinase expression, we have now established the viability of these cells in a murine model. Using an array-based photoacoustic imaging system with 5 MHz center frequency, we capture interleaved ultrasound and photoacoustic images of tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 tumors both in a tissue mimicking phantom, and in vivo. Images of both the tyrosinase-expressing tumor and a control tumor are presented as both coregistered ultrasound-photoacoustic B-scan images and 3-dimensional photoacoustic volumes created by mechanically scanning the transducer. We find that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible with a signal level 12dB greater than that of the control tumor in vivo. Phantom studies with excised tumors show that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible at depths in excess of 2cm, and have suggested that our imaging system is sensitive to a transfection rate of less than 1%.

  19. Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses Activate the Tumor-Associated Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic. PMID:24604027

  20. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses activate the tumor-associated lens epithelial-derived growth factor (LEDGF) gene.

    PubMed

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-03-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic.

  1. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  2. Expression-invariant face recognition in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Bau, Tien C.; Healey, Glenn

    2011-10-01

    The performance of a face recognition system degrades when the expression in the probe set is different from the expression in the gallery set. Previous studies use either spatial or spectral information to address this problem. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that uses spatial and spectral information for expression-invariant face recognition. The algorithm uses a set of 3D Gabor filters to exploit spatial and spectral correlations, and a principal-component analysis (PCA) to model expression variation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm on a database of 200 subjects.

  3. Oncogenicity of the developmental transcription factor Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Matheu, Ander; Collado, Manuel; Wise, Clare; Manterola, Lorea; Cekaite, Lina; Tye, Angela J.; Canamero, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Schedl, Andreas; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; de Munain, Adolfo López; Briscoe, James; Serrano, Manuel; Lovell-Badge, Robin

    2012-01-01

    SOX9, a high mobility group (HMG) box transcription factor, plays critical roles during embryogenesis and its activity is required for development, differentiation and lineage commitment in various tissues including the intestinal epithelium. Here, we present functional and clinical data of a broadly important role for SOX9 in tumorigenesis. SOX9 was overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers, where its expression correlated with malignant character and progression. Gain of SOX9 copy number is detected in some primary colorectal cancers. SOX9 exhibited several pro-oncogenic properties, including the ability to promote proliferation, inhibit senescence and collaborate with other oncogenes in neoplastic transformation. In primary MEFs and colorectal cancer cells, SOX9 expression facilitated tumor growth and progression whilst its inactivation reduced tumorigenicity. Mechanistically, we have found that Sox9 directly binds and activates the promoter of the polycomb protein Bmi1, whose upregulation represses the tumor suppressor Ink4a/Arf locus. In agreement with this, human colorectal cancers showed a positive correlation between expression levels of SOX9 and BMI1 and a negative correlation between SOX9 and ARF in clinical samples. Taken together, our findings provide direct mechanistic evidence of the involvement of SOX9 in neoplastic pathobiology, particularly in colorectal cancer. PMID:22246670

  4. Processing, secretion, and biological properties of a novel growth factor of the fibroblast growth factor family with oncogenic potential.

    PubMed Central

    Delli-Bovi, P; Curatola, A M; Newman, K M; Sato, Y; Moscatelli, D; Hewick, R M; Rifkin, D B; Basilico, C

    1988-01-01

    We recently reported that the protein encoded in a novel human oncogene isolated from Kaposi sarcoma DNA was a growth factor with significant homology to basic and acidic fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). To study the properties of this growth factor (referred to as K-FGF) and the mechanism by which the K-fgf oncogene transforms cells, we have studied the production and processing of K-FGF in COS-1 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding the K-fgf cDNA. The results show that, unlike basic and acidic FGFs, the K-FGF protein is cleaved after a signal peptide, glycosylated, and efficiently secreted as a mature protein of 176 or 175 amino acids. Inhibition of glycosylation impaired secretion, and the stability of the secreted K-FGF was greatly enhanced by the presence of heparin in the cultured medium. We have used the conditioned medium from transfected COS-1 cells to test K-FGF biological activity. Similar to basic FGF, the K-FGF protein was mitogenic for fibroblasts and endothelial cells and induced the growth of NIH 3T3 mouse cells in serum-free medium. Accordingly, K-fgf-transformed NIH 3T3 cells grew in serum-free medium, consistent with an autocrine mechanism of growth. We have also expressed the protein encoded in the K-fgf protooncogene in COS-1 cells, and it was indistinguishable in its molecular weight, glycosylation, secretion, and biological activity from K-FGF. Taken together, these results suggest that the mechanism of activation of this oncogene is due to overexpression rather than to mutations in the coding sequences. Images PMID:3043199

  5. V-cbl, an oncogene from a dual-recombinant murine retrovirus that induces early B-lineage lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, W.Y.; Klinken, S.P. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD ); Hartley, J.W.; Morse, H.C. III ); Ruscetti, S.K. )

    1989-02-01

    Cas NS-1 is an acutely transforming murine retrovirus that induces pre-B and pro-B cell lymphomas. Molecular cloning showed it was generated from the ecotropic Cas-Br-M virus by sequential recombinations with endogenous retroviral sequences and a cellular oncogene. The oncogene sequence shows no homology with known oncogenes but some similarity to the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. A 100-kDa gag-cbl fusion protein, with no detectable kinase activity, is responsible for the cellular transformation. The cellular homologue of v-cbl, present in mouse and human DNA, is expressed in a range of hemopoietic lineages.

  6. Attempts on producing lymphoid cell line from Penaeus monodon by induction with SV40-T and 12S EIA oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Prabhakaran, Priyaja; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt of in vitro transformation, transfection mediated expression of Simian virus-40 (T) antigen (SV40-T) and transduction mediated expression of Adenovirus type 12 early region 1A (12S E1A) oncogene were performed in Penaeus monodon lymphoid cells. pSV3-neo vector encoding SV40-T oncogene and a recombinant baculovirus BacP2-12S E1A-GFP encoding 12S E1A oncogene under the control of hybrid promoters were used. Electroporation and lipofection mediated transformation of SV40-T in lymphoid cells confirmed the transgene expression by phenotypic variation and the expression of GFP in co-transfection experiment. The cells transfected by lipofection (≥ 5%) survived for 14 days with lower toxicity (30%), whilst on electroporation, most of the cells succumbed to death (60%) and survived cells lived up to 7 days. Transduction efficiency in primary lymphoid cells was more than 80% within 14 days of post-transduction, however, an incubation period of 7 days post-transduction was observed without detectable expression of 12S E1A. High level of oncogenic 12S E1A expression were observed after 14 day post-transduction and the proliferating cells survived for more than 90 days with GFP expression, however, without in vitro transformation and immortalization. The study put forth the requirement of transduction mediated 'specific' oncogene expression along with telomerase activation and epigenetic induction for the immortalization and establishment of shrimp cell line.

  7. Human genome: proto-oncogenes and proretroviruses.

    PubMed

    Kisselev, L L; Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Berditchevsky, F B; Tret'yakov, L D

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of the studies undertaken at the Laboratory for Molecular Bases of Oncogenesis (Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow) till middle of 1984 is presented. The human genome contains multiple dispersed nucleotide sequences related to the proto-oncogene mos and to proretroviral sequences in tight juxtaposition to each other. From sequencing appropriate cloned fragments of human DNA in phage and plasmid vectors it follows that one of these regions, NV-1, is a pseudogene of proto-mos with partial duplications and two Alu elements intervening its coding sequence, and the other, CL-1, seems to be also a mos-related gene with a deletion of the internal part of the structural gene. CL-1 is flanked by a proretroviral-like sequence including tRNAiMet binding site and U5 (part of the long terminal repeat). The proretroviral-like sequences are transcribed in 21-35S poly(A)+RNA abundant in normal and malignant human cells. Two hypotheses are proposed: endogenous retroviruses take part in amplification of at least some proto-oncogenes; proto-oncogenes are inactivated via insertion of movable genetic elements and conversion into pseudogenes. Potential oncogenicity of a normal human genome undergoes two controversial influences: it increases due to proto-oncogene amplification and decreases due to inactivation of some of them.

  8. Melanoma proliferation and chemoresistance controlled by the DEK oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Khodadoust, Michael S.; Verhaegen, Monique; Kappes, Ferdinand; Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Kim, David S.L.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Markovitz, David M.; Soengas, María S.

    2009-01-01

    Gain of chromosome 6p is a consistent feature of advanced melanomas. However, the identity of putative oncogene(s) associated with this amplification has remained elusive. The chromatin remodeling factor DEK is an attractive candidate as it maps to 6p (i.e. within common melanoma-amplified loci). Moreover, DEK expression is increased in metastatic melanomas, although the functional relevance of this induction remains unclear. Importantly, in other tumor types, DEK can display various tumorigenic effects, in part through its ability to promote proliferation and inhibit p53-dependent apoptosis. Here, we report a generalized upregulation of DEK protein in cells from aggressive melanomas. In addition, we provide genetic and mechanistic evidence to support a key role of DEK in the maintenance of malignant phenotypes of melanoma cells. Specifically, we show that long-term DEK downregulation by independent shRNAs resulted in premature senescence of a variety of melanoma cell lines. Short-term abrogation of DEK expression was also functionally relevant, as it attenuated the traditional resistance of melanomas to DNA damaging agents. Unexpectedly, DEK shRNA had no impact on p53 levels or p53-dependent apoptosis. Instead, we identified a new role for DEK in the transcriptional activation of the antiapoptotic MCL-1. Other MCL-1 related factors such as BCL-2 or BCL-xL were unaffected by changes in the endogenous levels of DEK, indicating a selective impact of this gene on the apoptotic machinery of melanoma cells. These results provide support for DEK as a long sought-after oncogene mapping at chromosome 6, with novel functions in melanoma proliferation and chemoresistance. PMID:19679545

  9. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Cornelia; Teichler, Sabine; Millahn, Axel; Stiewe, Thorsten; Krause, Michael; Stabla, Kathleen; Ross, Petra; Huynh, Minh; Illmer, Thomas; Mernberger, Marco; Barckhausen, Christina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1) in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC) driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16) and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25901794

  10. LTβR signalling preferentially accelerates oncogenic AKT-initiated liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Scarzello, Anthony J; Jiang, Qun; Back, Timothy; Dang, Hien; Hodge, Deborah; Hanson, Charlotte; Subleski, Jeffrey; Weiss, Jonathan M; Stauffer, Jimmy K; Chaisaingmongkol, Jitti; Rabibhadana, Siritida; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Ortaldo, John; Wang, Xin Wei; Norris, Paula S; Ware, Carl F; Wiltrout, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The relative contributions of inflammatory signalling and sequential oncogenic dysregulation driving liver cancer pathogenesis remain incompletely understood. Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) signalling is critically involved in hepatitis and liver tumorigenesis. Therefore, we explored the interdependence of inflammatory lymphotoxin signalling and specific oncogenic pathways in the progression of hepatic cancer. Design Pathologically distinct liver tumours were initiated by hydrodynamic transfection of oncogenic V-Akt Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homolog 1 (AKT)/β-catenin or AKT/Notch expressing plasmids. To investigate the relationship of LTβR signalling and specific oncogenic pathways, LTβR antagonist (LTβR-Fc) or agonist (anti-LTβR) were administered post oncogene transfection. Initiated livers/tumours were investigated for changes in oncogene expression, tumour proliferation, progression, latency and pathology. Moreover, specific LTβR-mediated molecular events were investigated in human liver cancer cell lines and through transcriptional analyses of samples from patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Results AKT/β-catenin-transfected livers displayed increased expression of LTβ and LTβR, with antagonism of LTβR signalling reducing tumour progression and enhancing survival. Conversely, enforced LTβR-activation of AKT/β-catenin-initiated tumours induced robust increases in proliferation and progression of hepatic tumour phenotypes in an AKT-dependent manner. LTβR-activation also rapidly accelerated ICC progression initiated by AKT/Notch, but not Notch alone. Moreover, LTβR-accelerated development coincides with increases of Notch, Hes1, c-MYC, pAKT and β-catenin. We further demonstrate LTβR signalling in human liver cancer cell lines to be a regulator of Notch, pAKTser473 and β-catenin. Transcriptome analysis of samples from patients with ICC links increased LTβR network expression with poor patient survival, increased

  11. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  12. Alpha-fetoprotein-targeted reporter gene expression imaging in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Il; Chung, Hye Kyung; Park, Ju Hui; Lee, Yong Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in Eastern Asia, and its incidence is increasing globally. Numerous experimental models have been developed to better our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of HCC and to evaluate novel therapeutic approaches. Molecular imaging is a convenient and up-to-date biomedical tool that enables the visualization, characterization and quantification of biologic processes in a living subject. Molecular imaging based on reporter gene expression, in particular, can elucidate tumor-specific events or processes by acquiring images of a reporter gene’s expression driven by tumor-specific enhancers/promoters. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various experimental HCC mouse models and we present in vivo images of tumor-specific reporter gene expression driven by an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) enhancer/promoter system in a mouse model of HCC. The current mouse models of HCC development are established by xenograft, carcinogen induction and genetic engineering, representing the spectrum of tumor-inducing factors and tumor locations. The imaging analysis approach of reporter genes driven by AFP enhancer/promoter is presented for these different HCC mouse models. Such molecular imaging can provide longitudinal information about carcinogenesis and tumor progression. We expect that clinical application of AFP-targeted reporter gene expression imaging systems will be useful for the detection of AFP-expressing HCC tumors and screening of increased/decreased AFP levels due to disease or drug treatment. PMID:27468205

  13. Alpha-fetoprotein-targeted reporter gene expression imaging in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Il; Chung, Hye Kyung; Park, Ju Hui; Lee, Yong Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun

    2016-07-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in Eastern Asia, and its incidence is increasing globally. Numerous experimental models have been developed to better our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of HCC and to evaluate novel therapeutic approaches. Molecular imaging is a convenient and up-to-date biomedical tool that enables the visualization, characterization and quantification of biologic processes in a living subject. Molecular imaging based on reporter gene expression, in particular, can elucidate tumor-specific events or processes by acquiring images of a reporter gene's expression driven by tumor-specific enhancers/promoters. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various experimental HCC mouse models and we present in vivo images of tumor-specific reporter gene expression driven by an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) enhancer/promoter system in a mouse model of HCC. The current mouse models of HCC development are established by xenograft, carcinogen induction and genetic engineering, representing the spectrum of tumor-inducing factors and tumor locations. The imaging analysis approach of reporter genes driven by AFP enhancer/promoter is presented for these different HCC mouse models. Such molecular imaging can provide longitudinal information about carcinogenesis and tumor progression. We expect that clinical application of AFP-targeted reporter gene expression imaging systems will be useful for the detection of AFP-expressing HCC tumors and screening of increased/decreased AFP levels due to disease or drug treatment. PMID:27468205

  14. ER functions of oncogenes and tumor suppressors: Modulators of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling.

    PubMed

    Bittremieux, Mart; Parys, Jan B; Pinton, Paolo; Bultynck, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signals that arise from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the major intracellular Ca(2+)-storage organelle, impact several mitochondrial functions and dictate cell survival and cell death processes. Furthermore, alterations in Ca(2+) signaling in cancer cells promote survival and establish a high tolerance towards cell stress and damage, so that the on-going oncogenic stress does not result in the activation of cell death. Over the last years, the mechanisms underlying these oncogenic alterations in Ca(2+) signaling have started to emerge. An important aspect of this is the identification of several major oncogenes, including Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Mcl-1, PKB/Akt, and Ras, and tumor suppressors, such as p53, PTEN, PML, BRCA1, and Beclin 1, as direct and critical regulators of Ca(2+)-transport systems located at the ER membranes, including IP3 receptors and SERCA Ca(2+) pumps. In this way, these proteins execute part of their function by controlling the ER-mitochondrial Ca(2+) fluxes, favoring either survival (oncogenes) or cell death (tumor suppressors). Oncogenic mutations, gene deletions or amplifications alter the expression and/or function of these proteins, thereby changing the delicate balance between oncogenes and tumor suppressors, impacting oncogenesis and favoring malignant cell function and behavior. In this review, we provided an integrated overview of the impact of the major oncogenes and tumor suppressors, often altered in cancer cells, on Ca(2+) signaling from the ER Ca(2+) stores. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen.

  15. Negative Selection and Chromosome Instability Induced by Mad2 Overexpression Delay Breast Cancer but Facilitate Oncogene-Independent Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Rowald, Konstantina; Mantovan, Martina; Passos, Joana; Buccitelli, Christopher; Mardin, Balca R; Korbel, Jan O; Jechlinger, Martin; Sotillo, Rocio

    2016-06-21

    Chromosome instability (CIN) is associated with poor survival and therapeutic outcome in a number of malignancies. Despite this correlation, CIN can also lead to growth disadvantages. Here, we show that simultaneous overexpression of the mitotic checkpoint protein Mad2 with Kras(G12D) or Her2 in mammary glands of adult mice results in mitotic checkpoint overactivation and a delay in tumor onset. Time-lapse imaging of organotypic cultures and pathologic analysis prior to tumor establishment reveals error-prone mitosis, mitotic arrest, and cell death. Nonetheless, Mad2 expression persists and increases karyotype complexity in Kras tumors. Faced with the selective pressure of oncogene withdrawal, Mad2-positive tumors have a higher frequency of developing persistent subclones that avoid remission and continue to grow.

  16. Repeat-element driven activation of proto-oncogenes in human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Björn; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    Recent data demonstrated that the aberrant activity of endogenous repetitive elements of the DNA in humans can drive the expression of proto-oncogenes. This article summarizes these results and gives an outlook on the impact of these findings on the pathogenesis and therapy of human cancer.

  17. Oncogenes, genes, and growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Guroff, G.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene; Structure and Expression of the Nerve Growth Factor Gene; The Erythropoietin Gene; The Interleukin-2 Gene; The Transferrin Gene; and The Transferrin Receptor Gene.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA binding sites of oncogenes: implications in cancer and pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Mayakannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2014-02-01

    Cancer, a complex genetic disease involving uncontrolled cell proliferation, is caused by inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. A vast majority of these cancer causing genes are known targets of microRNAs (miRNAs) that bind to complementary sequences in 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of messenger RNAs and repress them from translation. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring naturally in such miRNA binding regions can alter the miRNA:mRNA interaction and can significantly affect gene expression. We hypothesized that 3'UTR SNPs in miRNA binding sites of proto-oncogenes could abrogate their post-transcriptional regulation, resulting in overexpression of oncogenic proteins, tumor initiation, progression, and modulation of drug response in cancer patients. Therefore, we developed a systematic computational pipeline that integrates data from well-established databases, followed stringent selection criteria and identified a panel of 30 high-confidence SNPs that may impair miRNA target sites in the 3' UTR of 54 mRNA transcripts of 24 proto-oncogenes. Further, 8 SNPs amidst them had the potential to determine therapeutic outcome in cancer patients. Functional annotation suggested that altogether these SNPs occur in proto-oncogenes enriched for kinase activities. We provide detailed in silico evidence for the functional effect of these candidate SNPs in various types of cancer.

  19. Pancreatitis-induced Inflammation Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer by Inhibiting Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Carmen; Collado, Manuel; Navas, Carolina; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Cañamero, Marta; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Barbacid, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells of adult mice (≥P60) are resistant to transformation by some of the most robust oncogenic insults including expression of K-Ras oncogenes and loss of p16Ink4a/p19Arf or Trp53 tumor suppressors. Yet, these acinar cells yield pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (mPanIN) and ductal adenocarcinomas (mPDAC) if exposed to limited bouts of non-acute pancreatitis, providing they harbor K-Ras oncogenes. Pancreatitis contributes to tumor progression by abrogating the senescence barrier characteristic of low-grade mPanINs. Attenuation of pancreatitis-induced inflammation also accelerates tissue repair and thwarts mPanIN expansion. Patients with chronic pancreatitis display senescent PanINs, if they have received anti-inflammatory drugs. These results put forward the concept that anti-inflammatory treatment of people diagnosed with pancreatitis may reduce their risk of developing PDAC. PMID:21665147

  20. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: Transgenic animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Griep, A.E.; Lambert, P.F.

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice. 82 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging of inducible tyrosinase reporter gene expression in xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Paproski, Robert J.; Heinmiller, Andrew; Wachowicz, Keith; Zemp, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging hybrid imaging technology capable of breaking through resolution limits of pure optical imaging technologies imposed by optical-scattering to provide fine-resolution optical contrast information in deep tissues. We demonstrate the ability of multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging to estimate relative gene expression distributions using an inducible expression system and co-register images with hemoglobin oxygen saturation estimates and micro-ultrasound data. Tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin production, is used as a reporter gene owing to its strong optical absorption and enzymatic amplification mechanism. Tetracycline-inducible melanin expression is turned on via doxycycline treatment in vivo. Serial multi-wavelength imaging reveals very low estimated melanin expression in tumors prior to doxycycline treatment or in tumors with no tyrosinase gene present, but strong signals after melanin induction in tumors tagged with the tyrosinase reporter. The combination of new inducible reporters and high-resolution photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound technology is poised to bring a new dimension to the study of gene expression in vivo. PMID:24936769

  2. A facial expression image database and norm for Asian population: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Cho, Shu-ling; Horszowska, Katarzyna; Chen, Mei-Yen; Wu, Chia-Ching; Chen, Hsueh-Chih; Yeh, Yi-Yu; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2009-01-01

    We collected 6604 images of 30 models in eight types of facial expression: happiness, anger, sadness, disgust, fear, surprise, contempt and neutral. Among them, 406 most representative images from 12 models were rated by more than 200 human raters for perceived emotion category and intensity. Such large number of emotion categories, models and raters is sufficient for most serious expression recognition research both in psychology and in computer science. All the models and raters are of Asian background. Hence, this database can also be used when the culture background is a concern. In addition, 43 landmarks each of the 291 rated frontal view images were identified and recorded. This information should facilitate feature based research of facial expression. Overall, the diversity in images and richness in information should make our database and norm useful for a wide range of research.

  3. Radiohybridization PET imaging of KRAS G12D mRNA expression in human pancreas cancer xenografts with [(64)Cu]DO3A-peptide nucleic acid-peptide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, A; Zhang, K; Aruva, M R; Cardi, C A; Opitz, A W; Wagner, N J; Thakur, M L; Wickstrom, E

    2007-06-01

    There is a compelling need to image pancreas cancer at an early stage. Human pancreas cancer cells display elevated levels of KRAS protein due to high copy numbers of KRAS mRNA, and elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) due to overexpression of IGF1R mRNA. Therefore we hypothesized that pancreas cancer could be detected in vivo with a single probe that targets both KRAS mRNA and IGF1R. Because positron emission tomography (PET) is a sensitive imaging technique, we designed a probe incorporating the positron-emitting nuclide (64)Cu. The KRAS-specific hybridization probe consisted of 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethylaza)cyclododecane-10-aza-acetyl (DO3A) on the N-terminus of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) hybridization sequence (GCCATCAGCTCC) linked to a cyclized IGF1 peptide analog (d-Cys-Ser-Lys-Cys) on the C-terminus, for IGF1R-mediated endocytosis. A series of such KRAS radiohybridization probes with 0, 1, 2 or 3 mismatches to KRAS G12D mRNA, including exact matches to wild type KRAS mRNA and KRAS G12V mRNA, along with a double d(Ala) replacement IGF1 peptide control, were assembled by continuous solid phase synthesis. To test the hypothesis that KRAS-IGF1 dual probes could specifically image KRAS mRNA expression noninvasively in human IGF1R-overexpressing AsPC1 pancreas cancer xenografts in immunocompromised mice, [(64)Cu]PNA radiohybridization probes and controls were administered by tail vein. The [(64)Cu]KRAS-IGF1 radiohybridization probe yielded strong tumor contrast in PET images, 8.6 +/- 1.4-fold more intense in the center of human pancreas cancer xenografts than in the contralateral muscle at 4 h post-injection. Control experiments with single base KRASmismatches, an IGF1 peptide mismatch, and a breast cancer xenograft lacking KRAS activation yielded weak tumor contrast images. These experiments are consistent with our hypothesis for noninvasive PET imaging of KRAS oncogene expression in pancreas cancer xenografts. Imaging oncogene m

  4. INO80 governs superenhancer-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingying; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shu; Bennett, Brian D; He, Fan; Zhang, Yan; Xiong, Chengliang; Han, Leng; Diao, Lixia; Li, Pishun; Fargo, David C; Cox, Adrienne D; Hu, Guang

    2016-06-15

    Superenhancers (SEs) are large genomic regions with a high density of enhancer marks. In cancer, SEs are found near oncogenes and dictate cancer gene expression. However, how oncogenic SEs are regulated remains poorly understood. Here, we show that INO80, a chromatin remodeling complex, is required for SE-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma. The expression of Ino80, the SWI/SNF ATPase, is elevated in melanoma cells and patient melanomas compared with normal melanocytes and benign nevi. Furthermore, Ino80 silencing selectively inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenesis, and tumor maintenance in mouse xenografts. Mechanistically, Ino80 occupies >90% of SEs, and its occupancy is dependent on transcription factors such as MITF and Sox9. Ino80 binding reduces nucleosome occupancy and facilitates Mediator recruitment, thus promoting oncogenic transcription. Consistently, genes co-occupied by Ino80 and Med1 are selectively expressed in melanomas compared with melanocytes. Together, our results reveal an essential role of INO80-dependent chromatin remodeling in SE function and suggest a novel strategy for disrupting SEs in cancer treatment. PMID:27340176

  5. Affibody-mediated PET imaging of HER3 expression in malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Rosestedt, Maria; Andersson, Ken G.; Mitran, Bogdan; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Löfblom, John; Orlova, Anna; Ståhl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is involved in the progression of various cancers and in resistance to therapies targeting the HER family. In vivo imaging of HER3 expression would enable patient stratification for anti-HER3 immunotherapy. Key challenges with HER3-targeting are the relatively low expression in HER3-positive tumours and HER3 expression in normal tissues. The use of positron-emission tomography (PET) provides advantages of high resolution, sensitivity and quantification accuracy compared to SPECT. Affibody molecules, imaging probes based on a non-immunoglobulin scaffold, provide high imaging contrast shortly after injection. The aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility of PET imaging of HER3 expression using 68Ga-labeled affibody molecules. The anti-HER3 affibody molecule HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was successfully labelled with 68Ga with high yield, purity and stability. The agent bound specifically to HER3-expressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. At 3 h pi, uptake of 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was significantly higher in xenografts with high HER3 expression (BT474, BxPC-3) than in xenografts with low HER3 expression (A431). In xenografts with high expression, tumour-to-blood ratios were >20, tumour-to-muscle >15, and tumour-to-bone >7. HER3-positive xenografts were visualised using microPET 3 h pi. In conclusion, PET imaging of HER3 expression is feasible using 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA shortly after administration. PMID:26477646

  6. Evidence for long-range oncogene activation by hepadnavirus insertion.

    PubMed Central

    Fourel, G; Couturier, J; Wei, Y; Apiou, F; Tiollais, P; Buendia, M A

    1994-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis of host genes, a common oncogenic strategy of slow transforming retroviruses, has recently been described for a DNA virus of the hepadnavirus group: the woodchuck hepatitis virus. This virus causes insertional activation of myc genes, mainly the intronless N-myc2 oncogene, in > 50% of woodchuck liver tumours. In most remaining tumours, N-myc2 is overexpressed without any apparent genetic alteration. To elucidate the role of the virus in such cases, we have cloned and analysed single integration sites in four woodchuck tumours carrying wild-type myc alleles. All sites were clustered within < 20 kb in a single locus, in which scarce unique sequences showed no detectable transcriptional activity. By fluorescent in situ hybridization, N-myc2 and the new locus (win) were localized to the same region of the long arm of the woodchuck X chromosome, and a 150-180 kb intervening distance was deduced from pulse-field gel analysis. The detection of viral integrations in win in additional tumours that produced abundant N-myc2 transcripts further substantiates the link between these two loci in woodchuck tumorigenesis. We propose that efficient activation of the N-myc2 promoter by the hepadnavirus enhancer acting over a long distance might operate in liver cell transformation. Images PMID:8013453

  7. Characterization and recognition of mixed emotional expressions in thermal face image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Priya; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; De, Barin K.; Nasipuri, Mita

    2016-05-01

    Facial expressions in infrared imaging have been introduced to solve the problem of illumination, which is an integral constituent of visual imagery. The paper investigates facial skin temperature distribution on mixed thermal facial expressions of our created face database where six are basic expressions and rest 12 are a mixture of those basic expressions. Temperature analysis has been performed on three facial regions of interest (ROIs); periorbital, supraorbital and mouth. Temperature variability of the ROIs in different expressions has been measured using statistical parameters. The temperature variation measurement in ROIs of a particular expression corresponds to a vector, which is later used in recognition of mixed facial expressions. Investigations show that facial features in mixed facial expressions can be characterized by positive emotion induced facial features and negative emotion induced facial features. Supraorbital is a useful facial region that can differentiate basic expressions from mixed expressions. Analysis and interpretation of mixed expressions have been conducted with the help of box and whisker plot. Facial region containing mixture of two expressions is generally less temperature inducing than corresponding facial region containing basic expressions.

  8. Expression-invariant three-dimensional face reconstruction from a single image by facial expression generic elastic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeini, Ali; Faez, Karim; Moeini, Hossein

    2014-09-01

    An efficient method for expression-invariant three-dimensional (3-D) face reconstruction from a frontal face image with a variety of facial expressions (FE) using the FE generic elastic model (GEM) is proposed. Three generic models are employed for FE modeling in the generic elastic model (GEM) framework, which are combined based on the similarity distance around the lips. Exclusively, FE-GEM demonstrated that it is more precisely able to estimate a 3-D model of a frontal face, attaining a more robust and better quality 3-D face reconstruction under a variety of FEs compared to the original GEM approach. It is tested on an available 3-D face database and its accuracy and robustness are demonstrated compared to the GEM approach under a variety of FEs. Also, the FE-GEM method is tested on available two-dimensional face databases and a new synthesized pose is generated from gallery images for handling pose variations in face recognition.

  9. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Flavahan, William A.; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B.; Gillespie, Shawn M.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Suvà, Mario L.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas1,2. Mutant IDH protein produces a novel onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), that interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5′-methylcytosine hydroxylases3–7. TET enzymes catalyze a key step in the removal of DNA methylation8,9. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP)10,11, though the functional significance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hyper-methylation at CTCF binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to aberrantly interact with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and down-regulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wildtype gliomaspheres up-regulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  10. KIT oncogene inhibition drives intratumoral macrophage M2 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Michael J.; Zeng, Shan; Kim, Teresa S.; Sorenson, Eric C.; Ocuin, Lee M.; Balachandran, Vinod P.; Seifert, Adrian M.; Greer, Jonathan B.; Popow, Rachel; Crawley, Megan H.; Cohen, Noah A.; Green, Benjamin L.; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major component of the cancer microenvironment. Modulation of TAMs is under intense investigation because they are thought to be nearly always of the M2 subtype, which supports tumor growth. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common human sarcoma and typically results from an activating mutation in the KIT oncogene. Using a spontaneous mouse model of GIST and 57 freshly procured human GISTs, we discovered that TAMs displayed an M1-like phenotype and function at baseline. In both mice and humans, the KIT oncoprotein inhibitor imatinib polarized TAMs to become M2-like, a process which involved TAM interaction with apoptotic tumor cells leading to the induction of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factors. In human GISTs that eventually developed resistance to imatinib, TAMs reverted to an M1-like phenotype and had a similar gene expression profile as TAMs from untreated human GISTs. Therefore, TAM polarization depends on tumor cell oncogene activity and has important implications for immunotherapeutic strategies in human cancers. PMID:24323358

  11. A novel putative tyrosine kinase receptor with oncogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Janssen, J W; Schulz, A S; Steenvoorden, A C; Schmidberger, M; Strehl, S; Ambros, P F; Bartram, C R

    1991-11-01

    We have detected transforming activity by a tumorigenicity assay using NIH3T3 cells transfected with DNA from a chronic myeloproliferative disorder patient. Here, we report the cDNA cloning of the corresponding oncogene, designated UFO, in allusion to the as yet unidentified function of its protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 3116bp cDNA clone revealed a 2682-bp-long open reading frame capable of directing the synthesis of a 894 amino acid polypeptide. The predicted UFO protein exhibits characteristic features of a transmembrane receptor with associated tyrosine kinase activity. The UFO proto-oncogene maps to human chromosome 19q13.1 and is transcribed into two 5.0 kb and 3.2 kb mRNAs in human bone marrow and human tumor cell lines. The UFO locus is evolutionarily conserved between vertebrate species. A 4.0 kb mRNA of the murine UFO homolog is expressed in a variety of different mouse tissues. We thus have identified a novel element of the complex signaling network involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  12. Learning-based Segmentation Framework for Tissue Images Containing Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Musodiq; Ju, Tao; Carson, James P.; Warren, Joe; Chiu, Wah; Kakadiaris, Ioannis

    2007-05-01

    Abstract Associating specific gene activity with functional locations in the brain results in a greater understanding of the role of the gene. To perform such an association for the over 20,000 genes in the mammalian genome, reliable automated methods that characterize the distribution of gene expression in relation to a standard anatomical model are required. In this paper, we propose a new automatic method that results in the segmentation of gene expression images into distinct anatomical regions in which the expression can be quantified and compared with other images. Our contribution is a novel hybrid atlas that utilizes a statistical shape model based on a subdivision mesh, texture differentiation at region boundaries, and features of anatomical landmarks to delineate boundaries of anatomical regions in gene expression images. This atlas, which provides a common coordinate system for internal brain data, was trained on 36 images manually annotated by neuroanatomists and tested on 64 images. Our framework has achieved a mean overlap ratio of up to 91 § 7% in this challenging dataset. This tool for large-scale annotation will help scientists interpret gene expression patterns more efficiently.

  13. Disease-specific target gene expression profiling of molecular imaging probes: database development and clinical validation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lawrence Wing-Chi; Ngo, Connie Hiu-Ching; Wang, Fengfeng; Zhao, Moss Y; Zhao, Mengying; Law, Helen Ka-Wai; Wong, Sze Chuen Cesar; Yung, Benjamin Yat-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging probes can target abnormal gene expression patterns in patients and allow early diagnosis of disease. For selecting a suitable imaging probe, the current Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) provides descriptive and qualitative information on imaging probe characteristics and properties. However, MICAD does not support linkage with the expression profiles of target genes. The proposed Disease-specific Imaging Probe Profiling (DIPP) database quantitatively archives and presents the gene expression profiles of targets across different diseases, anatomic regions, and subcellular locations, providing an objective reference for selecting imaging probes. The DIPP database was validated with a clinical positron emission tomography (PET) study on lung cancer and an in vitro study on neuroendocrine cancer. The retrieved records show that choline kinase beta and glucose transporters were positively and significantly associated with lung cancer among the targets of 11C-choline and [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG), respectively. Their significant overexpressions corresponded to the findings that the uptake rate of FDG increased with tumor size but that of 11C-choline remained constant. Validated with the in vitro study, the expression profiles of disease-associated targets can indicate the eligibility of patients for clinical trials of the treatment probe. A Web search tool of the DIPP database is available at http://www.polyu.edu.hk/bmi/dipp/. PMID:25022454

  14. Vitamin D/Vitamin D Receptor Axis Regulates DNA Repair During Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Simona; Johnston, Rachel; Deng, Ou; Zhang, Junran; Gonzalo, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras expression is associated with activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, as evidenced by elevated DNA damage, primarily DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and activation of DNA damage checkpoints, which in primary human cells leads to entry into senescence. DDR activation is viewed as a physiological barrier against uncontrolled proliferation in oncogenic Ras-expressing cells, and arises in response to genotoxic stress due to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage DNA, and to hyper-replication stress. Although oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is considered a tumor suppressor mechanism, the accumulation of DNA damage in senescent cells is thought to cause genomic instability, eventually allowing secondary hits in the genome that promote tumorigenesis. To date, the molecular mechanisms behind DNA repair defects during OIS remain poorly understood. Here, we show that oncogenic Ras expression in human primary cells results in down-regulation of BRCA1 and 53BP1, two key factors in DNA DSBs repair by homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), respectively. As a consequence, Ras-induced senescent cells are hindered in their ability to recruit BRCA1 and 53BP1 to DNA damage sites. While BRCA1 is down-regulated at transcripts levels, 53BP1 loss is caused by activation of cathepsin L (CTSL)-mediated degradation of 53BP1 protein. Moreover, we discovered a marked down-regulation of vitamin D receptor (VDR) during OIS, and a role for the vitamin D/VDR axis regulating the levels of these DNA repair factors during OIS. This study reveals a new functional relationship between the oncogene Ras, the vitamin D/VDR axis, and the expression of DNA repair factors, in the context of OIS. The observed deficiencies in DNA repair factors in senescent cells could contribute to the genomic instability that allows senescence bypass and tumorigenesis. PMID:27041576

  15. Facial expression recognition based on image Euclidean distance-supervised neighborhood preserving embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Li, Yingjie; Li, Haibin

    2014-11-01

    High-dimensional data often lie on relatively low-dimensional manifold, while the nonlinear geometry of that manifold is often embedded in the similarities between the data points. These similar structures are captured by Neighborhood Preserving Embedding (NPE) effectively. But NPE as an unsupervised method can't utilize class information to guide the procedure of nonlinear dimensionality reduction. They ignore the geometrical structure information of local data points and the spatial information of pixels, which leads to the failure of classification. For this problem, a feature extraction method based on Image Euclidean Distance-Supervised NPE (IED-SNPE) is proposed, and is applied to facial expression recognition. Firstly, it employs Image Euclidean Distance (IED) to characterize the dissimilarity of data points. And then the neighborhood graph of the input data is constructed according to a certain kind of dissimilarity between data points. Finally, it fuses prior nonlinear facial expression manifold of facial expression images and class-label information to extract discriminative features for expression recognition. In the classification experiments on JAFFE facial expression database, IED-SNPE is used for feature extraction and compared with NPE, SNPE, and IED-NPE. The results reveal that IED-SNPE not only the local structure of expression manifold preserves well but also explicitly considers the spatial relationships among pixels in the images. So it excels NPE in feature extraction and is highly competitive with those well-known feature extraction methods.

  16. Modelling the perceptual similarity of facial expressions from image statistics and neural responses.

    PubMed

    Sormaz, Mladen; Watson, David M; Smith, William A P; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    The ability to perceive facial expressions of emotion is essential for effective social communication. We investigated how the perception of facial expression emerges from the image properties that convey this important social signal, and how neural responses in face-selective brain regions might track these properties. To do this, we measured the perceptual similarity between expressions of basic emotions, and investigated how this is reflected in image measures and in the neural response of different face-selective regions. We show that the perceptual similarity of different facial expressions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, happiness) can be predicted by both surface and feature shape information in the image. Using block design fMRI, we found that the perceptual similarity of expressions could also be predicted from the patterns of neural response in the face-selective posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS), but not in the fusiform face area (FFA). These results show that the perception of facial expression is dependent on the shape and surface properties of the image and on the activity of specific face-selective regions.

  17. Function of oncogenes in cancer development: a changing paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    Tumour-associated oncogenes induce unscheduled proliferation as well as genomic and chromosomal instability. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumour cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that oncogenes are only essential for the proliferation of some specific tumour cell types, but not all. Indeed, the latest studies of the interactions between the oncogene and its target cell have shown that oncogenes contribute to cancer development not only by inducing proliferation but also by developmental reprogramming of the epigenome. This provides the first evidence that tumorigenesis can be initiated by stem cell reprogramming, and uncovers a new role for oncogenes in the origin of cancer. Here we analyse these evidences and propose an updated model of oncogene function that can explain the full range of genotype–phenotype associations found in human cancer. Finally, we discuss how this vision opens new avenues for developing novel anti-cancer interventions. PMID:23632857

  18. Processing Facial Expressions of Emotion: Upright vs. Inverted Images

    PubMed Central

    Bimler, David L.; Skwarek, Slawomir J.; Paramei, Galina V.

    2012-01-01

    We studied discrimination of briefly presented upright vs. inverted emotional facial expressions (FEs), hypothesizing that inversion would impair emotion decoding by disrupting holistic FE processing. Stimuli were photographs of seven emotion prototypes, of a male and female poser (Ekman and Friesen, 1976), and eight intermediate morphs in each set. Subjects made speeded Same/Different judgments of emotional content for all upright (U) or inverted (I) pairs of FEs, presented for 500 ms, 100 times each pair. Signal Detection Theory revealed the sensitivity measure d′ to be slightly but significantly higher for the upright FEs. In further analysis using multidimensional scaling (MDS), percentages of Same judgments were taken as an index of pairwise perceptual similarity, separately for U and I presentation mode. The outcome was a 4D “emotion expression space,” with FEs represented as points and the dimensions identified as Happy–Sad, Surprise/Fear, Disgust, and Anger. The solutions for U and I FEs were compared by means of cophenetic and canonical correlation, Procrustes analysis, and weighted-Euclidean analysis of individual differences. Differences in discrimination produced by inverting FE stimuli were found to be small and manifested as minor changes in the MDS structure or weights of the dimensions. Solutions differed substantially more between the two posers, however. Notably, for stimuli containing elements of Happiness (whether U or I), the MDS structure showed signs of implicit categorization, indicating that mouth curvature – the dominant feature conveying Happiness – is visually salient and receives early processing. The findings suggest that for briefly presented FEs, Same/Different decisions are dominated by low-level visual analysis of abstract patterns of lightness and edge filters, but also reflect emerging featural analysis. These analyses, insensitive to face orientation, enable initial positive/negative Valence categorization of FEs

  19. Oncogenic c-kit transcript is a target for binase.

    PubMed

    Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Kretova, Olga V; Zelenikhin, Pavel V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Tchurikov, Nickolai A; Ilinskaya, Olga N; Makarov, Alexander A

    2010-07-01

    Mutational activation of c-Kit receptor tyrosine kinase is common in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). One such activating point mutation is the N822K replacement in the c-Kit protein. Here we investigate the selective cytotoxic effect of binase--RNase from Bacillus intermedius--on FDC-P1-N822K cells. These cells were derived from myeloid progenitor FDC-P1 cells, in which ectopic expression of N822K c-kit gene induces interleukin-3 independent growth. In order to determine whether the sensitivity of these cells to binase is caused by the expression of c-kit oncogene, the cytotoxicity of the RNase was studied in the presence of selective inhibitor of mutated c-Kit imatinib (Gleevec). Inhibition of mutated c-Kit protein leads to the loss of cell sensitivity to the apoptotic effect of binase, while the latter still decreases the amount of cellular RNA. Using green fluorescent protein as an expression marker for the c-Kit oncoprotein, we demonstrate that the elimination of c-Kit is the key factor in selective cytotoxicity of binase. Quantitative RT-PCR with RNA samples isolated from the binase-treated FDC-P1-N822K cells shows that binase treatment results in 41% reduction in the amount of с-kit mRNA. This indicates that the transcript of the activated mutant c-kit is the target for toxic action of binase. Thus, the combination of inhibition of oncogenic protein with the destruction of its mRNA is a promising approach to eliminating malignant cells.

  20. Global real-time quantification/reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for detecting proto-oncogenes associated with 14q32 chromosomal translocation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Emi; Uranishi, Miyuki; Iida, Shinsuke; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Nitta, Masakazu; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2005-04-01

    A global real-time quantitative/reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique for detecting the expression of six 14q32 chromosomal translocation-associated proto-oncogenes in marrow plasma cells was established and applied to myeloma specimens. This technique is an alternative method of detecting 14q32 rearrangements and allows investigation of the relationship between proto-oncogene expression and clinical features.

  1. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  2. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 interacts with oncogenic lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Venkitachalam, Srividya; Chueh, Fu-Yu; Leong, King-Fu; Pabich, Samantha; Yu, Chao-Lan

    2011-03-01

    Lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) plays a key role in T cell signal transduction and is tightly regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Lck can function as an oncoprotein when overexpressed or constantly activated by mutations. Our previous studies showed that Lck-induced cellular transformation could be suppressed by enforced expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), a SOCS family member involved in the negative feedback control of cytokine signaling. We observed attenuated Lck kinase activity in SOCS1-expressing cells, suggesting an important role of SOCS in regulating Lck functions. It remains largely unknown whether and how SOCS proteins interact with the oncogenic Lck kinase. Here, we report that among four SOCS family proteins, SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3 and CIS (cytokine-inducible SH2 domain containing protein), SOCS1 has the highest affinity in binding to the oncogenic Lck kinase. We identified the positive regulatory phosphotyrosine 394 residue in the kinase domain as the key interacting determinant in Lck. Additionally, the Lck kinase domain alone is sufficient to bind SOCS1. While the SH2 domain in SOCS1 is important in its association with the oncogenic Lck kinase, other functional domains may also contribute to overall binding affinity. These findings provide important mechanistic insights into the role of SOCS proteins as tumor suppressors in cells transformed by oncogenic protein tyrosine kinases.

  3. Macroautophagy and the Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Daniel; Vaccaro, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    The oncogene-induced senescence is emerging as a potent tumor suppressor mechanism and as a possible therapeutic target. Macroautophagy is intimately linked to the senescence condition setup, although its role has not been elucidated yet. Here, we discuss up-to-date concepts of senescence-related macroautophagy and evaluate the current trend of this growing research field, which has relevance in future perspectives toward therapeutic options against cancer. PMID:25324830

  4. In vivo imaging of clock gene expression in multiple tissues of freely moving mice.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Toshiyuki; Sutherland, Kenneth; Ishikawa, Masayori; Miyamoto, Naoki; Honma, Sato; Shirato, Hiroki; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Clock genes are expressed throughout the body, although how they oscillate in unrestrained animals is not known. Here, we show an in vivo imaging technique that enables long-term simultaneous imaging of multiple tissues. We use dual-focal 3D tracking and signal-intensity calibration to follow gene expression in a target area. We measure circadian rhythms of clock genes in the olfactory bulb, right and left ears and cortices, and the skin. In addition, the kinetic relationship between gene expression and physiological responses to experimental cues is monitored. Under stable conditions gene expression is in phase in all tissues. In response to a long-duration light pulse, the olfactory bulb shifts faster than other tissues. In Cry1(-/-) Cry2(-/-) arrhythmic mice circadian oscillation is absent in all tissues. Thus, our system successfully tracks circadian rhythms in clock genes in multiple tissues in unrestrained mice. PMID:27285820

  5. Progressive increases in the methylation status and heterochromatinization of the myoD CpG island during oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, W M; Eversole-Cire, P; Spruck, C H; Hustad, C M; Coetzee, G A; Gonzales, F A; Jones, P A

    1994-01-01

    Alterations in DNA methylation patterns are one of the earliest and most common events in tumorigenesis. Overall levels of genomic methylation often decrease during transformation, but localized regions of increased methylation have been observed in the same tumors. We have examined changes in the methylation status of the muscle determination gene myoD, which contains a CpG island, as a function of oncogenic transformation. This CpG island underwent de novo methylation during immortalization of 10T1/2 cells, and progressively more sites became methylated during the subsequent transformation of the cells to oncogenicity. The greatest increase in methylation occurred in the middle of the CpG island in exon 1 during transformation. Interestingly, no methylation was apparent in the putative promoter of myoD in either the 10T1/2 cell line or its transformed derivative. The large number of sites in the CpG island that became methylated during transformation was correlated with heterochromatinization of myoD as evidenced by a decreased sensitivity to cleavage of DNA in nuclei by MspI. A site in the putative promoter also became insensitive to MspI digestion in nuclei, suggesting that the chromatin structural changes extended beyond the areas of de novo methylation. Unlike Lyonized genes on the inactive X chromosome, whose timing of replication is shifted to late S phase, myoD replicated early in S phase in the transformed cell line. Methylation analysis of myoD in DNAs from several human tumors, which presumably do not express the gene, showed that hypermethylation also frequently occurs during carcinogenesis in vivo. Thus, the progressive increase in methylation of myoD during immortalization and transformation coinciding with a change in chromatin structure, as illustrated by the in vitro tumorigenic model, may represent a common mechanism in carcinogenesis for permanently silencing the expression of genes which can influence cell growth and differentiation. Images

  6. Active and dynamic information fusion for facial expression understanding from image sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongmian; Ji, Qiang

    2005-05-01

    This paper explores the use of multisensory information fusion technique with Dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs) for modeling and understanding the temporal behaviors of facial expressions in image sequences. Our facial feature detection and tracking based on active IR illumination provides reliable visual information under variable lighting and head motion. Our approach to facial expression recognition lies in the proposed dynamic and probabilistic framework based on combining DBNs with Ekman's Facial Action Coding System (FACS) for systematically modeling the dynamic and stochastic behaviors of spontaneous facial expressions. The framework not only provides a coherent and unified hierarchical probabilistic framework to represent spatial and temporal information related to facial expressions, but also allows us to actively select the most informative visual cues from the available information sources to minimize the ambiguity in recognition. The recognition of facial expressions is accomplished by fusing not only from the current visual observations, but also from the previous visual evidences. Consequently, the recognition becomes more robust and accurate through explicitly modeling temporal behavior of facial expression. In this paper, we present the theoretical foundation underlying the proposed probabilistic and dynamic framework for facial expression modeling and understanding. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach can accurately and robustly recognize spontaneous facial expressions from an image sequence under different conditions.

  7. Measuring Oncogenic Signaling Pathways in Cancer with PET: An Emerging Paradigm from Studies in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As parallel advances in cancer biology and drug development continue to elevate the role of targeted therapies in oncology, the need for imaging biomarkers that systematically measure the biology associated with therapeutic intervention has become more urgent. Although the molecular imaging community has a commitment to develop technologies to this end, few investigational radiotracers directly measure the biology of common oncogenic signaling pathways often addressed by targeted therapies. Visible progress has been achieved with a handful of radiotracers rationally designed to intercalate the patho-biology of prostate cancer, a molecularly heterogeneous disease nevertheless broadly defined by a fairly small repertoire of recurrent oncogenic lesions. PMID:23043150

  8. A novel dithiocarbamate derivative induces cell apoptosis through p53-dependent intrinsic pathway and suppresses the expression of the E6 oncogene of human papillomavirus 18 in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Qi, Hongxue; Li, Xiaobo; Hou, Xueling; Lu, Xueying; Xiao, Xiangwen

    2015-06-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) exhibit a broad spectrum of antitumor activities, however, their molecular mechanisms of antitumor have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have synthesized a series of novel dithiocarbamate derivatives. These DTCs were examined for cytotoxic activities against five human cancer cell lines. In this study, one of dithiocarbamate (DTC1) with higher potential for HeLa cells was chosen to investigate molecular mechanisms for its anti-tumor activities. DTC1 could inhibit proliferation, and highly induce apoptosis in HeLa cells by activating caspase-3, -6 and -9; moreover, activities of caspase-3, -6 and -9 were inhibited by pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, DTC1 decreased the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and increased expression of cytosol cytochrome c, Bak, Bax and p53 in a time-dependent manner but had no effect on the level of Rb. It was shown that DTC1 induced HeLa cells apoptosis through a p53-dependent pathway as tested by the wild type p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α. Additionally, the relative expression of E6 and E7 were evaluated in HPV18-positive (HeLa cells) by real-time PCR and western blotting. The results firstly demonstrated that DTC1 suppressed both expression of E6 mRNA and E6 oncoprotein, but had no effect on the expression of E7 mRNA and protein in HPV18. Our results suggested that DTC1 may serve as novel chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cervical cancer and potential anti-HPV virus candidates that merit further studies. PMID:25772545

  9. Co-expression of epidermal growth factor-receptor and c-erb B-2 proto-oncogene product in human salivary-gland adenocarcinoma cell line HSG and the implications for HSG cell autocrine growth.

    PubMed

    Kyakumoto, S; Kurokawa, R; Hoshino, M; Ota, M

    1994-07-01

    The autonomous proliferation of HSG cells is mediated by an autocrine growth factor, a 46K epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like molecule. The receptor for this molecule was investigated. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting revealed the expression of two possible receptor molecules, EGF-R and p185erbB-2, in HSG cells. Northern blotting also revealed the co-expression of 5.6-kb EGF-R mRNA and 4.6-kb c-erb B-2 mRNA. When the purified EGF-like molecule was added to the cultures, EGF-R but not p185erbB-2 was autophosphorylated. These results suggest that, although both EGF-R and p185erbB-2 are co-expressed in HSG cells, the EGF-R is the genuine receptor for the EGF-like molecule. However, there is a possibility that p185erB-2 is involved in the signal transduction system. This possibility was examined by using specific antibodies to human EGF-R (hEGF-R), p185erbB-2, and EGF to inhibit the functions of these molecules. Addition of these three antibodies to the cultures inhibited the growth of HSG cells. The antibodies to EGF-R and p185erbB-2 also caused morphological changes such as disturbances of the plasma membrane, and some cell death. Surprisingly, the effect of the anti-p185erbB-2 antibody on growth inhibition and morphology was stronger than that of the anti-hEGF-R antibody. Thus, p185erB-2 expressed in HSG cells has an important function in the signal transduction of HSG cell growth.

  10. A novel dithiocarbamate derivative induces cell apoptosis through p53-dependent intrinsic pathway and suppresses the expression of the E6 oncogene of human papillomavirus 18 in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Qi, Hongxue; Li, Xiaobo; Hou, Xueling; Lu, Xueying; Xiao, Xiangwen

    2015-06-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) exhibit a broad spectrum of antitumor activities, however, their molecular mechanisms of antitumor have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have synthesized a series of novel dithiocarbamate derivatives. These DTCs were examined for cytotoxic activities against five human cancer cell lines. In this study, one of dithiocarbamate (DTC1) with higher potential for HeLa cells was chosen to investigate molecular mechanisms for its anti-tumor activities. DTC1 could inhibit proliferation, and highly induce apoptosis in HeLa cells by activating caspase-3, -6 and -9; moreover, activities of caspase-3, -6 and -9 were inhibited by pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, DTC1 decreased the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and increased expression of cytosol cytochrome c, Bak, Bax and p53 in a time-dependent manner but had no effect on the level of Rb. It was shown that DTC1 induced HeLa cells apoptosis through a p53-dependent pathway as tested by the wild type p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α. Additionally, the relative expression of E6 and E7 were evaluated in HPV18-positive (HeLa cells) by real-time PCR and western blotting. The results firstly demonstrated that DTC1 suppressed both expression of E6 mRNA and E6 oncoprotein, but had no effect on the expression of E7 mRNA and protein in HPV18. Our results suggested that DTC1 may serve as novel chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cervical cancer and potential anti-HPV virus candidates that merit further studies.

  11. p38α and p38γ Mediate Oncogenic ras-induced Senescence through Differential Mechanisms*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Jinny; Hong, Lixin; Liao, Rong; Deng, Qingdong; Han, Jiahuai; Sun, Peiqing

    2009-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a tumor-suppressive defense mechanism triggered upon activation of certain oncogenes in normal cells. Recently, the senescence response to oncogene activation has been shown to act as a bona fide barrier to cancer development in vivo. Multiple previous studies have implicated the importance of the p38 MAPK pathway in oncogene-induced senescence. However, the contribution of each of the four p38 isoforms (encoded by different genes) to senescence induction is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrated that p38α and p38γ, but not p38β, play an essential role in oncogenic ras-induced senescence. Both p38α and p38γ are expressed in primary human fibroblasts and are activated upon transduction of oncogenic ras. Small hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of p38α or p38γ expression abrogated ras-induced senescence, whereas constitutive activation of p38α and p38γ caused premature senescence. Furthermore, upon activation by oncogenic ras, p38γ stimulated the transcriptional activity of p53 by phosphorylating p53 at Ser33, suggesting that the ability of p38γ to mediate senescence is at least partly achieved through p53. However, p38α contributed to ras-inducted senescence via a p53-indepdendent mechanism in cells by mediating ras-induced expression of p16INK4A, another key senescence effector. These findings have identified p38α and p38γ as essential components of the signaling pathway that regulates the tumor-suppressing senescence response, providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential involvement of the p38 isoforms in senescence induction. PMID:19251701

  12. The Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncogene Dysregulates the Cell Cycle and Contributes to Cervical Carcinogenesis through Two Independent Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shai, Anny; Brake, Tiffany; Somoza, Chamorro; Lambert, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of death due to cancer among women worldwide. Using transgenic mice to dissect the contributions of the human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes in cervical cancer, E7 was identified previously to be the dominant oncogene. Specifically, when treated with exogenous estrogen for 6 months, E7 transgenic mice developed cancer throughout the reproductive tract, but E6 transgenic mice did not. E6 contributed to carcinogenesis of the reproductive tract, as E6/E7 double transgenic mice treated for 6 months with estrogen developed larger cancers than E7 transgenic mice. In the current study, we investigated whether the E6 oncogene alone could cooperate with estrogen to induce cervical cancer after an extended estrogen treatment period of 9 months. We found that the E6 oncogene synergizes with estrogen to induce cervical cancer after 9 months, indicating that E6 has a weaker but detectable oncogenic potential in the reproductive tract compared with the E7 oncogene. Using transgenic mice that express mutant forms of HPV16 E6, we determined that the interactions of E6 with cellular α-helix and PDZ partners correlate with its ability to induce cervical carcinogenesis. In analyzing the tumors arising in E6 transgenic mice, we learned that E6 induces expression of the E2F-responsive genes, Mcm7 and cyclin E, in the absence of the E7 oncogene. E6 also prevented the expression of p16 in tumors of the reproductive tract through a mechanism mediated by the interaction of E6 with α-helix partners. PMID:17308103

  13. Understanding Discrete Facial Expressions in Video Using an Emotion Avatar Image.

    PubMed

    Songfan Yang; Bhanu, B

    2012-08-01

    Existing video-based facial expression recognition techniques analyze the geometry-based and appearance-based information in every frame as well as explore the temporal relation among frames. On the contrary, we present a new image-based representation and an associated reference image called the emotion avatar image (EAI), and the avatar reference, respectively. This representation leverages the out-of-plane head rotation. It is not only robust to outliers but also provides a method to aggregate dynamic information from expressions with various lengths. The approach to facial expression analysis consists of the following steps: 1) face detection; 2) face registration of video frames with the avatar reference to form the EAI representation; 3) computation of features from EAIs using both local binary patterns and local phase quantization; and 4) the classification of the feature as one of the emotion type by using a linear support vector machine classifier. Our system is tested on the Facial Expression Recognition and Analysis Challenge (FERA2011) data, i.e., the Geneva Multimodal Emotion Portrayal-Facial Expression Recognition and Analysis Challenge (GEMEP-FERA) data set. The experimental results demonstrate that the information captured in an EAI for a facial expression is a very strong cue for emotion inference. Moreover, our method suppresses the person-specific information for emotion and performs well on unseen data.

  14. A mouse model of melanoma driven by oncogenic KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Milagre, Carla; Dhomen, Nathalie; Geyer, Felipe C; Hayward, Robert; Lambros, Maryou; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Marais, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The small G-protein NRAS is mutated in 22% of human melanomas, whereas the related proteins, KRAS and HRAS are mutated in only 2% and 1% of melanomas respectively. We have developed a mouse models of melanoma in which Cre recombinase/loxP technology is used to drive inducible expression of G12VKRAS in the melanocytic lineage. The mice develop skin hyper-pigmentation, nevi and tumors that bear many of the cardinal histopathology features and molecular characteristics of human melanoma. These tumors invade and destroy the underlying muscles and cells derived from them can grow as subcutaneous tumors and colonise the lungs of nude mice. These data establish that oncogenic KRAS can be a founder event in melanomagenesis. PMID:20516123

  15. PNUTS functions as a proto-oncogene by sequestering PTEN.

    PubMed

    Kavela, Sridhar; Shinde, Swapnil R; Ratheesh, Raman; Viswakalyan, Kotapalli; Bashyam, Murali D; Gowrishankar, Swarnalata; Vamsy, Mohana; Pattnaik, Sujit; Rao, Subramanyeshwar; Sastry, Regulagadda A; Srinivasulu, Mukta; Chen, Junjie; Maddika, Subbareddy

    2013-01-01

    PTEN is a well-defined tumor suppressor gene that antagonizes the PI3K/Akt pathway to regulate a multitude of cellular processes, such as survival, growth, motility, invasiveness, and angiogenesis. While the functions of PTEN have been studied extensively, the regulation of its activity during normal and disease conditions still remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified the protein phosphatase-1 nuclear targeting subunit PNUTS (PPP1R10) as a PTEN-associated protein. PNUTS directly interacted with the lipid-binding domain (C2 domain) of PTEN and sequestered it in the nucleus. Depletion of PNUTS leads to increased apoptosis and reduced cellular proliferation in a PTEN-dependent manner. PNUTS expression was elevated in certain cancers compared with matched normal tissues. Collectively, our studies reveal PNUTS as a novel PTEN regulator and a likely oncogene.

  16. PNUTS functions as a proto-oncogene by sequestering PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Kavela, Sridhar; Shinde, Swapnil R; Ratheesh, Raman; Viswakalyan, Kotapalli; Bashyam, Murali D; Gowrishankar, Swarnalata; Vamsy, Mohana; Pattnaik, Sujit; Rao, Subramanyeshwar; Sastry, Regulagadda A; Srinivasulu, Mukta; Chen, Junjie; Maddika, Subbareddy

    2012-01-01

    PTEN is a well-defined tumor suppressor gene that antagonizes the PI3K/Akt pathway to regulate a multitude of cellular processes such as survival, growth, motility, invasiveness and angiogenesis. While the functions of PTEN have been studied extensively, the regulation of its activity during normal and disease conditions still remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified the protein phosphatase-1 nuclear targeting subunit PNUTS (PPP1R10) as a PTEN associated protein. PNUTS directly interacted with the lipid-binding domain (C2 domain) of PTEN and sequestered it in the nucleus. Depletion of PNUTS leads to increased apoptosis and reduced cellular proliferation in a PTEN-dependent manner. PNUTS expression was elevated in certain cancers compared to matched normal tissues. Collectively, our studies reveal PNUTS as a novel PTEN regulator and a likely oncogene. PMID:23117887

  17. An affinity matured minibody for PET imaging of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Jeffrey V.; Zhou, Yu; Olafsen, Tove; Salazar, Felix B.; McCabe, Katelyn E.; Hahm, Scott; Marks, James D.; Reiter, Robert E.; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a cell surface glycoprotein expressed in normal human prostate and bladder, is over-expressed in the majority of localized prostate cancer and most bone metastases. We have previously shown that the hu1G8 minibody, a humanized anti-PSCA antibody fragment (single-chain Fv-CH3 dimer, 80 kDa), can localize specifically and image PSCA-expressing xenografts at 21 h post-injection. However, the humanization and antibody fragment reformatting decreased its apparent affinity. Here, we sought to evaluate PET imaging contrast with affinity matured minibodies. Methods Yeast scFv display, involving four rounds of selection, was used to generate the three affinity matured antibody fragments (A2, A11, and C5) that were reformatted into minibodies. These three affinity matured anti-PSCA minibodies were characterized in vitro, and following radiolabeling with 124I were evaluated in vivo for microPET imaging of PSCA-expressing tumors. Results The A2, A11, and C5 minibody variants all demonstrated improved affinity compared to the parental (P) minibody and were ranked as follows: A2 > A11 > C5 > P. The 124I-labeled A11 minibody demonstrated higher immunoreactivity than the parental minibody and also achieved the best microPET imaging contrast in two xenograft models, LAPC-9 (prostate cancer) and Capan-1 (pancreatic cancer), when evaluated in vivo. Conclusion Of the affinity variant minibodies tested, the A11 minibody that ranked second in affinity was selected as the best immunoPET tracer to image PSCA-expressing xenografts. This candidate is currently under development for evaluation in a pilot clinical imaging study. PMID:20354850

  18. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  19. In vitro transformation of immature hematopoietic cells by the P210 BCR/ABL oncogene product of the Philadelphia chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.; Chianese, E.; Witte, O.N.

    1987-09-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome is the cytogenetic hallmark of human chronic myelogenous leukemia. RNA splicing joins sequences from a gene on chromosome 22 (BCR) across the translocation breakpoint to a portion of the ABL oncogene from chromosome 9, resulting in a chimeric protein (P210) that is an active tyrosine kinase. Although strongly correlated with this specific human neoplasm, and implicated as an oncogene by analogy to the gene product of the Abelson murine leukemia virus, the P210 gene had not been tested directly for oncogenic potential in hematopoietic cells. The authors have used a retroviral gene-transfer system to express P210 in mouse bone marrow cells. When infected bone marrow is plated under conditions for long-term culture of cells of the B-lymphoid lineage, cells expressing high amounts of P210 tyrosine kinase dominate the culture and rapidly lead to clonal outgrowths of immature lymphoid cells. Expression of P210 is growth-stimulatory but not sufficient for full oncogenic behavior. Some clonal lines progress toward a fully malignant phenotype as judged by increased cloning efficiency in agar suspension and frequency and rapidity of tumor induction in syngeneic mice. Such in vitro systems should be useful in evaluating the sequential and perhaps synergistic involvement of the P210 gene and other oncogenes as models for the progressive changes observed in human chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  20. Expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A 16, tumour protein 53 and epidermal growth factor receptor in salivary gland carcinomas is not associated with oncogenic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Senft, Ellen; Lemound, Juliana; Stucki-Koch, Angelika; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Kreipe, Hans; Hussein, Kais

    2015-03-01

    It is known that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection can cause squamous cell neoplasms at several sites, such as cervix uteri carcinoma and oral squamous carcinoma. There is little information on the expression of HPV and its predictive markers in tumours of the major and minor salivary glands of the head and neck. We therefore assessed oral salivary gland neoplasms to identify associations between HPV and infection-related epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A/p16) and tumour protein p53 (TP53). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from oral salivary gland carcinomas (n=51) and benign tumours (n=26) were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for several HPV species, including high-risk types 16 and 18. Evaluation of EGFR, CDKN2A, TP53 and cytomegalovirus (CMV) was performed by immunohistochemistry. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was evaluated by EBV-encoded RNA in situ hybridisation. We demonstrated that salivary gland tumours are not associated with HPV infection. The expression of EGFR, CDKN2A and TP53 may be associated with tumour pathology but is not induced by HPV. CMV and EBV were not detectable. In contrast to oral squamous cell carcinomas, HPV, CMV and EBV infections are not associated with malignant or benign neoplastic lesions of the salivary glands.

  1. In-gel imaging of RNA processing using Broccoli reveals optimal aptamer expression strategies

    PubMed Central

    Filonov, Grigory S.; Kam, Christina W.; Song, Wenjiao; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RNA aptamers can be expressed in cells to influence and image cellular processes. Aptamer folding is maintained by inserting the aptamers into highly structured RNA scaffolds. Here we show that commonly used RNA scaffolds exhibit unexpected instability and cleavage in bacterial and mammalian cells. Using an in-gel staining approach for rapid and simple detection of Spinach- or Broccoli-tagged RNAs in cells, we monitored the processing of RNAs tagged with scaffolded aptamers, revealing endonucleolytic cleavage, RNA instability and poor expression. We reengineered a natural three-way junction structure to generate an alternative scaffold that enables stable aptamer expression in cells. This scaffold was used to create cassettes containing up to four Broccoli units, markedly enhancing the brightness of mammalian cells expressing cassette-tagged RNAs. These experiments describe methods for screening RNA cleavage events in cells, and identify cell-compatible scaffolds that enable efficient tagging of RNAs with aptamers for cellular expression. PMID:26000751

  2. Improved detection of differentially expressed genes in microarray experiments through multiple scanning and image integration

    PubMed Central

    Romualdi, Chiara; Trevisan, Silvia; Celegato, Barbara; Costa, Germano; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2003-01-01

    The variability of results in microarray technology is in part due to the fact that independent scans of a single hybridised microarray give spot images that are not quite the same. To solve this problem and turn it to our advantage, we introduced the approach of multiple scanning and of image integration of microarrays. To this end, we have developed specific software that creates a virtual image that statistically summarises a series of consecutive scans of a microarray. We provide evidence that the use of multiple imaging (i) enhances the detection of differentially expressed genes; (ii) increases the image homogeneity; and (iii) reveals false-positive results such as differentially expressed genes that are detected by a single scan but not confirmed by successive scanning replicates. The increase in the final number of differentially expressed genes detected in a microarray experiment with this approach is remarkable; 50% more for microarrays hybridised with targets labelled by reverse transcriptase, and 200% more for microarrays developed with the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) technique. The results have been confirmed by semi-quantitative RT–PCR tests. PMID:14627839

  3. Oncogenic Role of Merlin/NF2 in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Paola A.; Yin, Wei; Camacho, Laura; Marchetti, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults, with a poor prognosis because of its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Merlin/NF2 (neurofibromatosis type 2) is a tumor suppressor found to be mutated in most nervous system tumors; however, it is not mutated in glioblastomas. Merlin associates with several transmembrane receptors and intracellular proteins serving as an anchoring molecule. Additionally, it acts as a key component of cell motility. By selecting subpopulations of U251 glioblastoma cells, we observed that high expression of phosphorylated Merlin at serine 518 (S518-Merlin), Notch1 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) correlated with increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. These cells were defective in cell-contact inhibition with changes in Merlin phosphorylation directly affecting Notch1, EGFR expression as well as downstream targets Hes1 and Ccnd. Of note, we identified a function for S518-Merlin which is distinct from what has been reported when the expression of Merlin is diminished in relation to EGFR and Notch expression, providing first-time evidence that demonstrates that the phosphorylation of Merlin at S518 in glioblastoma promotes oncogenic properties that are not only the result of inactivation of the tumor suppressor role of Merlin, but also, an independent process implicating a Merlin-driven regulation of Notch1 and EGFR. PMID:25043298

  4. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    SciTech Connect

    Sichero, Laura; Simao Sobrinho, Joao; Lina Villa, Luisa

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of gene expression using tyrosinase as a reporter gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Forbrich, Alexander; Harrison, Tyler; Hitt, Mary; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical reporter genes, such as green fluorescence protein, are powerful research tools that allow visualization of gene expression. We have successfully used tyrosinase as a reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging. Tyrosinase is the key regulatory enzyme in the production of melanin which has a broad optical absorption spectrum. MCF-7 cells were stably transfected with tyrosinase under the control of an inducible promoter. For photoacoustic experiments, MCF-7 cells were resuspended at 108 cells/mL and injected in 700 μm (inner diameter) plastic tubing. Photoacoustic signal of MCF-7 cells expressing tyrosinase were >20-fold greater than those of untransfected MCF-7 cells. Photoacoustic signal of tyrosinaseexpressing MCF-7 cells were approximately 2-fold lesser and greater than those of blood at 576 and 650 nm, respectively, suggesting that photoacoustic signal from blood and tyrosinase-expressing cells can be separated by dualwavelength analysis. Photoacoustic signal from tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 cells covered by chicken tissue could even be detected at a laser penetration depth of 4 cm, suggesting that tyrosinase can be used to image gene expression in relatively deep tissues. The current data suggests that tyrosinase is a strong reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging.

  6. Imaging Cancer Cells Expressing the Folate Receptor with Carbon Dots Produced from Folic Acid.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Nandi, Sukhendu; Stepensky, David; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-04-01

    Development of new imaging tools for cancer cells in vitro and in vitro is important for advancing cancer research, elucidating drug effects upon cancer cells, and studying cellular processes. We showed that fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) synthesized from folic acid can serve as an effective vehicle for imaging cancer cells expressing the folate receptor on their surface. The C-dots, synthesized through a simple one-step process from folic acid as the carbon source, exhibited selectivity towards cancer cells displaying the folate receptor, making such cells easily distinguishable in fluorescence microscopy imaging. Biophysical measurements and competition experiments both confirmed the specific targeting and enhanced uptake of C-dots by the folate receptor-expressing cells. The folic acid-derived C-dots were not cytotoxic, and their use in bioimaging applications could aid biological studies of cancer cells, identification of agonists/antagonists, and cancer diagnostics.

  7. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  8. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  9. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2016-07-14

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs.

  10. Activation of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by human dendritic cells infected with an attenuated influenza A virus expressing a CTL epitope derived from the HER-2/neu proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Efferson, Clay L; Schickli, Jeanne; Ko, Byung Kyum; Kawano, Kouichiro; Mouzi, Sara; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Ioannides, Constantin G

    2003-07-01

    The development of cancer vaccines requires approaches to induce expansion and functional differentiation of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) effectors which posses cytolytic capability and produce cytokines. Efficient induction of such cells is hindered by the poor immunogenicity of tumor antigens and by the poor transduction efficiency of dendritic cells (DCs) with current nonreplicating vectors. We have investigated the use of influenza A virus, a potent viral inducer of CTLs, as a vector expressing the immunodominant HER-2 CTL epitope KIF (E75). For this purpose, an attenuated influenza A/PR8/34 virus with a truncated nonstructural (NS1) gene was generated containing the E75 epitope in its neuraminidase protein (KIF-NS virus). Stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors and of tumor-associated lymphocytes from ovarian and breast cancer patients with DCs infected with KIF-NS virus (KIF-NS DC) induced CTLs that specifically recognized the peptide KIF and HER-2-expressing tumors in cytotoxicity assays and secreted gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-2 at recall with peptide. Priming with KIF-NS DCs increased the number of E75(+) CD45RO(+) cells by more than 10-fold compared to nonstimulated cells. In addition, KIF-NS virus induced high levels of IFN-alpha in DCs. This is the first report demonstrating induction of human epitope-specific CTLs against a tumor-associated antigen with a live attenuated recombinant influenza virus vector. Such vectors may provide a novel approach for tumor antigen delivery, lymphocyte activation, and differentiation in human cancer vaccine development.

  11. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells.

  12. Differential Sensitivity of Mouse Epithelial Tissues to the Polyomavirus Middle T Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Cecena, Grace; Wen, Fang; Cardiff, Robert D.; Oshima, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    To determine how different epithelial cell types respond to the same oncogenic stimulation, we have used a modified human keratin 18 gene to conditionally express the polyomavirus middle T antigen (PyMT) oncogene in simple epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. Activation of PyMT expression by transgenic Cre recombinase in mammary epithelial cells resulted in carcinomas in all bitransgenic females. PyMT expression induced by K18-driven Cre in internal epithelial organs resulted in pancreatic acinar metaplasia and ductal dysplasia with remarkable desmoplastic stromal responses in all 25 bitransgenic mice. Hepatoma formation with altered lipid metabolism and gastric adenocarcinoma occurred in 96 and 54% of these mice, respectively. Elevated PyMT RNA expression also correlated with intraepithelial neoplasia in the prostate. Activated Erk2 was found in mammary tumors, pancreatic tissues, and affected livers. Hes1 RNA, a target of Notch signaling that has been implicated downstream of Ras pathway activation, was elevated in pancreatic and liver lesions. The variety of responses of different epithelia to PyMT demonstrates the importance of the differentiated state in interpreting oncogenic signals. PMID:16400032

  13. Adaptive and Background-Aware GAL4 Expression Enhancement of Co-registered Confocal Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Martin; Schulze, Florian; Novikov, Alexey A; Tirian, Laszlo; J Dickson, Barry; Bühler, Katja

    2016-04-01

    GAL4 gene expression imaging using confocal microscopy is a common and powerful technique used to study the nervous system of a model organism such as Drosophila melanogaster. Recent research projects focused on high throughput screenings of thousands of different driver lines, resulting in large image databases. The amount of data generated makes manual assessment tedious or even impossible. The first and most important step in any automatic image processing and data extraction pipeline is to enhance areas with relevant signal. However, data acquired via high throughput imaging tends to be less then ideal for this task, often showing high amounts of background signal. Furthermore, neuronal structures and in particular thin and elongated projections with a weak staining signal are easily lost. In this paper we present a method for enhancing the relevant signal by utilizing a Hessian-based filter to augment thin and weak tube-like structures in the image. To get optimal results, we present a novel adaptive background-aware enhancement filter parametrized with the local background intensity, which is estimated based on a common background model. We also integrate recent research on adaptive image enhancement into our approach, allowing us to propose an effective solution for known problems present in confocal microscopy images. We provide an evaluation based on annotated image data and compare our results against current state-of-the-art algorithms. The results show that our algorithm clearly outperforms the existing solutions. PMID:26743993

  14. Src-like-adaptor protein (SLAP) differentially regulates normal and oncogenic c-Kit signaling.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Julhash U; Agarwal, Shruti; Sun, Jianmin; Bracco, Enrico; Rönnstrand, Lars

    2014-02-01

    The Src-like-adaptor protein (SLAP) is an adaptor protein sharing considerable structural homology with Src. SLAP is expressed in a variety of cells and regulates receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by direct association. In this report, we show that SLAP associates with both wild-type and oncogenic c-Kit (c-Kit-D816V). The association involves the SLAP SH2 domain and receptor phosphotyrosine residues different from those mediating Src interaction. Association of SLAP triggers c-Kit ubiquitylation which, in turn, is followed by receptor degradation. Although SLAP depletion potentiates c-Kit downstream signaling by stabilizing the receptor, it remains non-functional in c-Kit-D816V signaling. Ligand-stimulated c-Kit or c-Kit-D816V did not alter membrane localization of SLAP. Interestingly oncogenic c-Kit-D816V, but not wild-type c-Kit, phosphorylates SLAP on residues Y120, Y258 and Y273. Physical interaction between c-Kit-D816V and SLAP is mandatory for the phosphorylation to take place. Although tyrosine-phosphorylated SLAP does not affect c-Kit-D816V signaling, mutation of these tyrosine sites to phenylalanine can restore SLAP activity. Taken together the data demonstrate that SLAP negatively regulates wild-type c-Kit signaling, but not its oncogenic counterpart, indicating a possible mechanism by which the oncogenic c-Kit bypasses the normal cellular negative feedback control.

  15. Oncogenic transformation by vrel requires an amino-terminal activation domain

    SciTech Connect

    Kamens, J.; Brent, R. . Dept. of Molecular Biology); Richardson, P.; Gilmore, T. . Dept. of Biology); Mosialos, G. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-06-01

    The mechanism by which the products of the v-{ital rel} oncogene, the corresponding c-{ital rel} proto-oncogene, and the related {ital dorsal} gene of {ital Drosophila melanogaster} exert their effects is not clear. The authors show that the v-{ital rel}, chicken c-{ital rel}, and {ital dorsal} proteins activated gene expression when fused to LexA sequences and bound to DNA upstream of target genes in {ital Saccharomyces cerevisiae}. They have defined two distinct activation regions in the c-{ital rel} protein. Region I, located in the amino-terminal half of {ital rel} and {ital dorsal} proteins, contains no stretches of glutamines, prolines, or acidic amino acids and therefore may be a novel activation domain. Lesions in the v-{ital rel} protein that diminished or abolished oncogenic transformation of avian spleen cells correspondingly affected transcription activation by region I. Region II, located in the carboxy terminus of the c-{ital rel} protein, is highly acidic. Region II is not present in the v-{ital rel} protein or in a transforming mutant derivative of the c-{ital rel} protein. The authors' results show that the oncogenicity of Rel proteins requires activation region I and suggest that the biological function of {ital rel} and {ital dorsal} proteins depends on transcription activation by this region.

  16. Netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activities through enhancing Yes-associated protein stability.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qi; Li, Dean Y; Luo, Hongbo R; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-06-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcription coactivator, is the major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size control and cancer development. However, how YAP is regulated by extracellular stimuli in tumorigenesis remains incompletely understood. Netrin-1, a laminin-related secreted protein, displays proto-oncogenic activity in cancers. Nonetheless, the downstream signaling mediating its oncogenic effects is not well defined. Here we show that netrin-1 via its transmembrane receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer and uncoordinated-5 homolog, up-regulates YAP expression, escalating YAP levels in the nucleus and promoting cancer cell proliferation and migration. Inactivating netrin-1, deleted in colorectal cancer, or uncoordinated-5 homolog B (UNC5B) decreases YAP protein levels, abrogating cancer cell progression by netrin-1, whereas knockdown of mammalian STE20-like protein kinase 1/2 (MST1/2) or large tumor suppressor kinase 1/2 (Lats1/2), two sets of upstream core kinases of the Hippo pathway, has no effect in blocking netrin-1-induced up-regulation of YAP. Netrin-1 stimulates phosphatase 1A to dephosphorylate YAP, which leads to decreased ubiquitination and degradation, enhancing YAP accumulation and signaling. Hence, our findings support that netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activity through YAP signaling, providing a mechanism coupling extracellular signals to the nuclear YAP oncogene.

  17. Human p53 oncogene contains one promoter upstream of exon 1 and a second, stronger promoter within intron 1.

    PubMed Central

    Reisman, D; Greenberg, M; Rotter, V

    1988-01-01

    To gain insight into how transcription of the human p53 oncogene is controlled, we characterized the regulatory regions of the gene. A 3.8-kilobase-pair (kbp) EcoRI restriction fragment encompassing the 5' end of the human p53 gene, as well as subfragments generated by restriction digests, was cloned upstream of the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene and CAT activity was assayed in extracts of transfected cells. Two types of CAT vectors were used: Epstein-Barr virus oriP-derived constructs that were stably introduced into the human cell lines K562, Raji, and HL-60, and pSV0-CAT-derived constructs that were transiently introduced into the monkey cell line COS. By this approach we have identified two promoters for the human p53 gene. One promoter, p53P1, is located 100-250 bp upstream of the 218-bp noncoding first exon; a second, stronger promoter, p53P2, maps within the first intron. CAT activity and expression of CAT RNA indicate that p53P2 functions up to 50-fold more efficiently than p53P1. We conclude that the expression of the human p53 gene may be controlled by two promoters and that differential regulation of these promoters may play an important role in the altered expression of the gene in both normal and transformed cells. Images PMID:2839831

  18. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumor progression.

    PubMed

    D'Asti, Esterina; Garnier, Delphine; Lee, Tae H; Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumors. The clinical intractability of many brain tumors and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS) and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). Their biogenesis (vesiculation) and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumor cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumor-derived EVs (oncosomes) also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA, and microRNA (miR). Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumor microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumor-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII), tumor suppressors (PTEN), and oncomirs (miR-520g). It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of brain tumor patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations) of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy, or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumors [e.g., glioma or medulloblastoma (MB)]. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus, EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies. PMID:22934045

  19. Pose-variant facial expression recognition using an embedded image system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kai-Tai; Han, Meng-Ju; Chang, Shuo-Hung

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, one of the most attractive research areas in human-robot interaction is automated facial expression recognition. Through recognizing the facial expression, a pet robot can interact with human in a more natural manner. In this study, we focus on the facial pose-variant problem. A novel method is proposed in this paper to recognize pose-variant facial expressions. After locating the face position in an image frame, the active appearance model (AAM) is applied to track facial features. Fourteen feature points are extracted to represent the variation of facial expressions. The distance between feature points are defined as the feature values. These feature values are sent to a support vector machine (SVM) for facial expression determination. The pose-variant facial expression is classified into happiness, neutral, sadness, surprise or anger. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the performance for practical applications, this study also built a low resolution database (160x120 pixels) using a CMOS image sensor. Experimental results show that the recognition rate is 84% with the self-built database.

  20. Melanoma: oncogenic drivers and the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Riso, Aldo; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Richardet, Eduardo; Bria, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma over the past 30 years have contributed to a change in the consideration of melanoma as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. The finding that oncogenic BRAF mutations drive tumor growth in up to 50% of melanomas led to a molecular therapy revolution for unresectable and metastatic disease. Moving beyond BRAF, inactivation of immune regulatory checkpoints that limit T cell responses to melanoma has provided targets for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the molecular biology of melanoma and we focus on the recent advances of molecularly targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26605311

  1. MiR-191 Regulates Primary Human Fibroblast Proliferation and Directly Targets Multiple Oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Polioudakis, Damon; Abell, Nathan S; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs play a central role in numerous pathologies including multiple cancer types. miR-191 has predominantly been studied as an oncogene, but the role of miR-191 in the proliferation of primary cells is not well characterized, and the miR-191 targetome has not been experimentally profiled. Here we utilized RNA induced silencing complex immunoprecipitations as well as gene expression profiling to construct a genome wide miR-191 target profile. We show that miR-191 represses proliferation in primary human fibroblasts, identify multiple proto-oncogenes as novel miR-191 targets, including CDK9, NOTCH2, and RPS6KA3, and present evidence that miR-191 extensively mediates target expression through coding sequence (CDS) pairing. Our results provide a comprehensive genome wide miR-191 target profile, and demonstrate miR-191's regulation of primary human fibroblast proliferation.

  2. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far.

  3. Tumor suppression by miR-26 overrides potential oncogenic activity in intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zeitels, Lauren R.; Acharya, Asha; Shi, Guanglu; Chivukula, Divya; Chivukula, Raghu R.; Anandam, Joselin L.; Abdelnaby, Abier A.; Balch, Glen C.; Mansour, John C.; Yopp, Adam C.; Richardson, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Down-regulation of miR-26 family members has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple malignancies. In some settings, including glioma, however, miR-26-mediated repression of PTEN promotes tumorigenesis. To investigate the contexts in which the tumor suppressor versus oncogenic activity of miR-26 predominates in vivo, we generated miR-26a transgenic mice. Despite measureable repression of Pten, elevated miR-26a levels were not associated with malignancy in transgenic animals. We documented reduced miR-26 expression in human colorectal cancer and, accordingly, showed that miR-26a expression potently suppressed intestinal adenoma formation in Apcmin/+ mice, a model known to be sensitive to Pten dosage. These studies reveal a tumor suppressor role for miR-26 in intestinal cancer that overrides putative oncogenic activity, highlighting the therapeutic potential of miR-26 delivery to this tumor type. PMID:25395662

  4. An oncogenic MYB feedback loop drives alternate cell fates in adenoid cystic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Drier, Yotam; Cotton, Matthew J.; Williamson, Kaylyn E.; Gillespie, Shawn M.; Ryan, Russell J.H.; Kluk, Michael J.; Carey, Christopher D.; Rodig, Scott J.; Sholl, Lynette M; Afrogheh, Amir H.; Faquin, William C.; Queimado, Lurdes; Qi, Jun; Wick, Michael J.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Bradner, James E.; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Aster, Jon C.; Knoechel, Birgit; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2016-01-01

    Translocation events are frequent in cancer and may create chimeric fusions or ‘regulatory rearrangements’ that drive oncogene overexpression. Here we identify super-enhancer translocations that drive overexpression of the oncogenic transcription factor MYB as a recurrent theme in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Whole-genome sequencing data and chromatin maps reveal distinct chromosomal rearrangements that juxtapose super-enhancers to the MYB locus. Chromosome conformation capture confirms that the translocated enhancers interact with the MYB promoter. Remarkably, MYB protein binds to the translocated enhancers, creating a positive feedback loop that sustains its expression. MYB also binds enhancers that drive different regulatory programs in alternate cell lineages in ACC, cooperating with TP63 in myoepithelial cells and a Notch program in luminal epithelial cells. Bromodomain inhibitors slow tumor growth in ACC primagraft models in vivo. Thus, our study identifies super-enhancer translocations that drive MYB expression and provides insight into downstream MYB functions in the alternate ACC lineages. PMID:26829750

  5. Pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic pathways: opportunities and challenges of cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiao; Chen, Yan-Hua; Lu, Qun

    2010-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is the uncontrolled growth of cells gaining the potential to invade and disrupt vital tissue functions. This malignant process includes the occurrence of ‘unwanted’ gene mutations that induce the transformation of normal cells, for example, by overactivation of pro-oncogenic pathways and inactivation of tumor-suppressive or anti-oncogenic pathways. It is now recognized that the number of major signaling pathways that control oncogenesis is not unlimited; therefore, suppressing these pathways can conceivably lead to a cancer cure. However, the clinical application of cancer intervention has not matched up to scientific expectations. Increasing numbers of studies have revealed that many oncogenic-signaling elements show double faces, in which they can promote or suppress cancer pathogenesis depending on tissue type, cancer stage, gene dosage and their interaction with other players in carcinogenesis. This complexity of oncogenic signaling poses challenges to traditional cancer therapy and calls for considerable caution when designing an anticancer drug strategy. We propose future oncology interventions with the concept of integrative cancer therapy. PMID:20373871

  6. A humanized antibody for imaging immune checkpoint ligand PD-L1 expression in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielson, Matthew; Lisok, Ala; Wharram, Bryan; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Azad, Babak Behnam; Pomper, Martin G.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint lead to tumor regression and improved survival in several cancers. PD-L1 expression in tumors may be predictive of response to checkpoint blockade therapy. Because tissue samples might not always be available to guide therapy, we developed and evaluated a humanized antibody for non-invasive imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors. Radiolabeled [111In]PD-L1-mAb and near-infrared dye conjugated NIR-PD-L1-mAb imaging agents were developed using the mouse and human cross-reactive PD-L1 antibody MPDL3280A. We tested specificity of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb in cell lines and in tumors with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. We performed SPECT/CT imaging, biodistribution and blocking studies in NSG mice bearing tumors with constitutive PD-L1 expression (CHO-PDL1) and in controls (CHO). Results were confirmed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (MDAMB231 and SUM149) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (H2444 and H1155) xenografts with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. There was specific binding of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb to tumor cells in vitro, correlating with PD-L1 expression levels. In mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors, there was specific and persistent high accumulation of signal intensity in PD-L1 positive tumors (CHO-PDL1, MDAMB231, H2444) but not in controls. These results demonstrate that [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb can detect graded levels of PD-L1 expression in human tumor xenografts in vivo. As a humanized antibody, these findings suggest clinical translation of radiolabeled versions of MPDL3280A for imaging. Specificity of NIR-PD-L1-mAb indicates the potential for optical imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors in relevant pre-clinical as well as clinical settings. PMID:26848870

  7. Synthesis of Facial Image with Expression Based on Muscular Contraction Parameters Using Linear Muscle and Sphincter Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Seonju; Ozawa, Shinji

    We aim to synthesize individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. We have proposed a method of calculating the muscular contraction parameters from arbitrary face image without using learning for each individual. As a result, we could generate not only individual facial expression, but also the facial expressions of various persons. In this paper, we propose the muscle-based facial model; the facial muscles define both the linear and the novel sphincter. Additionally, we propose a method of synthesizing individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. First, the individual facial model with expression is generated by fitting using the arbitrary face image. Next, the muscular contraction parameters are calculated that correspond to the expression displacement of the input face image. Finally, the facial expression is synthesized by the vertex displacements of a neutral facial model based on calculated muscular contraction parameters. Experimental results reveal that the novel sphincter muscle can synthesize facial expressions of the facial image, which corresponds to the actual face image with arbitrary and mouth or eyes expression.

  8. Compact whole-body fluorescent imaging of nude mice bearing EGFP expressing tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanping; Xiong, Tao; Chu, Jun; Yu, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Issue of tumor has been a hotspot of current medicine. It is important for tumor research to detect tumors bearing in animal models easily, fast, repetitively and noninvasivly. Many researchers have paid their increasing interests on the detecting. Some contrast agents, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Discosoma red fluorescent protein (Dsred) were applied to enhance image quality. Three main kinds of imaging scheme were adopted to visualize fluorescent protein expressing tumors in vivo. These schemes based on fluorescence stereo microscope, cooled charge-coupled-device (CCD) or camera as imaging set, and laser or mercury lamp as excitation light source. Fluorescence stereo microscope, laser and cooled CCD are expensive to many institutes. The authors set up an inexpensive compact whole-body fluorescent imaging tool, which consisted of a Kodak digital camera (model DC290), fluorescence filters(B and G2;HB Optical, Shenyang, Liaoning, P.R. China) and a mercury 50-W lamp power supply (U-LH50HG;Olympus Optical, Japan) as excitation light source. The EGFP was excited directly by mercury lamp with D455/70 nm band-pass filter and fluorescence was recorded by digital camera with 520nm long-pass filter. By this easy operation tool, the authors imaged, in real time, fluorescent tumors growing in live mice. The imaging system is external and noninvasive. For half a year our experiments suggested the imaging scheme was feasible. Whole-body fluorescence optical imaging for fluorescent expressing tumors in nude mouse is an ideal tool for antitumor, antimetastatic, and antiangiogenesis drug screening.

  9. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [68Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  10. Class I PI3K in oncogenic cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Vogt, Peter K.

    2009-01-01

    Class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is a dimeric enzyme, consisting of a catalytic and a regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit occurs in four isoforms designated as p110α, p110β, p110γ and p110δ. These combine with several regulatory subunits; for p110α, β and δ the standard regulatory subunit is p85, for p110γ it is p101. PI3Ks play important roles in human cancer. PIK3CA, the gene encoding p110α, is mutated frequently in common cancers, including carcinoma of the breast, prostate, colon and endometrium. Eighty percent of these mutations are represented by one of three amino acid substitutions in the helical or kinase domains of the enzyme. The mutant p110α shows a gain of function in enzymatic and signaling activity and is oncogenic in cell culture and in animal model systems. Structural and genetic data suggest that the mutations affect regulatory inter- and intramolecular interactions and support the conclusion that there are at least two molecular mechanisms for the gain-of-function in p110α. One of these mechanisms operates largely independently of binding to p85, the other abolishes the requirement for an interaction with Ras. The non-alpha isoforms of p110 do not show cancer-specific mutations. However, they are often differentially expressed in cancer and, in contrast to p110α, wild-type non-alpha isoforms of p110 are oncogenic when overexpressed in cell culture. The isoforms of p110 have become promising drug targets. Isoform-selective inhibitors have been identified. Inhibitors that target exclusively the cancer-specific mutants of p110α constitute an important goal and challenge for current drug development. PMID:18794883

  11. Biological basis of personalized anticoagulation in cancer: oncogene and oncomir networks as putative regulators of coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    D'Asti, Esterina; Rak, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Activation of stromal response pathways in cancer is increasingly viewed as both a local and systemic extension of molecular alterations driving malignant transformation. Rather than reflecting passive and unspecific responses to anatomical abnormalities, the coagulation system is a target of oncogenic deregulation, impacting the role of clotting and fibrinolytic proteins, and integrating hemostasis, inflammation, angiogenesis and cellular growth effects in cancer. These processes signify, but do not depend on, the clinically manifest coagulopathy and thrombosis. In this regard, the role of driver mutations affecting oncoprotein coding genes such as RAS, EGFR or MET and tumour suppressors (PTEN, TP53) are well described as regulators of tissue factor (TF), protease activated receptors (PAR-1/2) and ectopic coagulation factors (FVII). Indeed, in both adult and pediatric brain tumours the expression patterns of coagulation and angiogenesis regulators (coagulome and angiome, respectively) reflect the molecular subtypes of the underlying diseases (glioblastoma or medulloblastoma) as defined by their oncogenic classifiers and clinical course. This emerging understanding is still poorly established in relation to the transforming effects of non-coding genes, including those responsible for the expression of microRNA (miR). Indeed, several miRs have been recently found to regulate TF and other effectors. We recently documented that in the context of the aggressive embryonal tumour with multilayered rosettes (ETMR) the oncogenic driver miR (miR-520g) suppresses the expression of TF and correlates with hypocoagulant tumour characteristics. Unlike in adult cancers, the growth of pediatric embryonal brain tumour cells as spheres (to maintain stem cell properties) results in upregulation of miR-520g and downregulation of TF expression and activity. We postulate that oncogenic protein and miR coding genes form alternative pathways of coagulation system regulation in different

  12. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  13. Developmental Stage Annotation of Drosophila Gene Expression Pattern Images via an Entire Solution Path for LDA.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jieping; Chen, Jianhui; Janardan, Ravi; Kumar, Sudhir

    2008-03-01

    Gene expression in a developing embryo occurs in particular cells (spatial patterns) in a time-specific manner (temporal patterns), which leads to the differentiation of cell fates. Images of a Drosophila melanogaster embryo at a given developmental stage, showing a particular gene expression pattern revealed by a gene-specific probe, can be compared for spatial overlaps. The comparison is fundamentally important to formulating and testing gene interaction hypotheses. Expression pattern comparison is most biologically meaningful when images from a similar time point (developmental stage) are compared. In this paper, we present LdaPath, a novel formulation of Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) for automatic developmental stage range classification. It employs multivariate linear regression with the L(1)-norm penalty controlled by a regularization parameter for feature extraction and visualization. LdaPath computes an entire solution path for all values of regularization parameter with essentially the same computational cost as fitting one LDA model. Thus, it facilitates efficient model selection. It is based on the equivalence relationship between LDA and the least squares method for multi-class classifications. This equivalence relationship is established under a mild condition, which we show empirically to hold for many high-dimensional datasets, such as expression pattern images. Our experiments on a collection of 2705 expression pattern images show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Results also show that the LDA model resulting from LdaPath is sparse, and irrelevant features may be removed. Thus, LdaPath provides a general framework for simultaneous feature selection and feature extraction.

  14. Developmental Stage Annotation of Drosophila Gene Expression Pattern Images via an Entire Solution Path for LDA

    PubMed Central

    YE, Jieping; Chen, Jianhui; Janardan, Ravi; Kumar, Sudhir

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression in a developing embryo occurs in particular cells (spatial patterns) in a time-specific manner (temporal patterns), which leads to the differentiation of cell fates. Images of a Drosophila melanogaster embryo at a given developmental stage, showing a particular gene expression pattern revealed by a gene-specific probe, can be compared for spatial overlaps. The comparison is fundamentally important to formulating and testing gene interaction hypotheses. Expression pattern comparison is most biologically meaningful when images from a similar time point (developmental stage) are compared. In this paper, we present LdaPath, a novel formulation of Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) for automatic developmental stage range classification. It employs multivariate linear regression with the L1-norm penalty controlled by a regularization parameter for feature extraction and visualization. LdaPath computes an entire solution path for all values of regularization parameter with essentially the same computational cost as fitting one LDA model. Thus, it facilitates efficient model selection. It is based on the equivalence relationship between LDA and the least squares method for multi-class classifications. This equivalence relationship is established under a mild condition, which we show empirically to hold for many high-dimensional datasets, such as expression pattern images. Our experiments on a collection of 2705 expression pattern images show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Results also show that the LDA model resulting from LdaPath is sparse, and irrelevant features may be removed. Thus, LdaPath provides a general framework for simultaneous feature selection and feature extraction. PMID:18769656

  15. Oncogenic Activation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Staudt, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent genetic evidence has established a pathogenetic role for NF-κB signaling in cancer. NF-κB signaling is engaged transiently when normal B lymphocytes respond to antigens, but lymphomas derived from these cells accumulate genetic lesions that constitutively activate NF-κB signaling. Many genetic aberrations in lymphomas alter CARD11, MALT1, or BCL10, which constitute a signaling complex that is intermediate between the B-cell receptor and IκB kinase. The activated B-cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma activates NF-κB by a variety of mechanisms including oncogenic mutations in CARD11 and a chronic active form of B-cell receptor signaling. Normal plasma cells activate NF-κB in response to ligands in the bone marrow microenvironment, but their malignant counterpart, multiple myeloma, sustains a variety of genetic hits that stabilize the kinase NIK, leading to constitutive activation of the classical and alternative NF-κB pathways. Various oncogenic abnormalities in epithelial cancers, including mutant K-ras, engage unconventional IκB kinases to activate NF-κB. Inhibition of constitutive NF-κB signaling in each of these cancer types induces apoptosis, providing a rationale for the development of NF-κB pathway inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:20516126

  16. Fumarase tumor suppressor gene and MET oncogene cooperate in upholding transformation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Dettori, Daniela; Lorenzato, Annalisa; Bardella, Chiara; Coltella, Nadia; Martino, Cosimo; Cammarata, Cristina; Carmeliet, Peter; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2010-08-01

    Loss of the fumarate hydratase (FH) tumor suppressor gene results in the development of benign tumors that rarely, but regrettably, progress to very aggressive cancers. Using mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) to model transformation, we found that fh knockdown results in increased expression of the met oncogene-encoded tyrosine kinase receptor through hypoxia-inducible factor (hif) stabilization. MET-increased expression was alone able to stabilize hif, thus establishing a feed forward loop that might enforce tumor progression. The fh-defective MEFs showed increased motility and protection from apoptosis. Motility, but not survival, relied on hif-1alpha and was greatly enhanced by MET ligand hepatocyte growth factor. Met cooperated with a weakly oncogenic ras in making MEFs transformed and tumorigenic, as shown by in vitro and in vivo assays. Loss of fh was not equally effective by itself but enhanced the transformed and tumorigenic phenotype induced by ras and MET. Consistently, the rescue of fumarase expression abrogated the motogenic and transformed phenotype of fh-defective MEFs. In conclusion, the data suggest that the progression of tumors where FH is lost might be boosted by activation of the MET oncogene, which is able to drive cell-autonomous tumor progression and is a strong candidate for targeted therapy. PMID:20354140

  17. The potent oncogene NPM-ALK mediates malignant transformation of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wei, Fang; Wang, Hong Yi; Liu, Xiaobin; Roy, Darshan; Xiong, Qun-Bin; Jiang, Shuguang; Medvec, Andrew; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Watt, Christopher; Tomczak, Ewa; Kalos, Michael; Riley, James L; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2013-12-01

    With this study we have demonstrated that in vitro transduction of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes with NPM-ALK results in their malignant transformation. The transformed cells become immortalized and display morphology and immunophenotype characteristic of patient-derived anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. These unique features, which are strictly dependent on NPM-ALK activity and expression, include perpetual cell growth, proliferation, and survival; activation of the key signal transduction pathways STAT3 and mTORC1; and expression of CD30 (the hallmark of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma) and of immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and cell-surface protein PD-L1/CD274. Implantation of NPM-ALK-transformed CD4(+) T lymphocytes into immunodeficient mice resulted in formation of tumors indistinguishable from patients' anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. Our findings demonstrate that the key aspects of human carcinogenesis closely recapitulating the features of the native tumors can be faithfully reproduced in vitro when an appropriate oncogene is used to transform its natural target cells; this in turn points to the fundamental role in malignant cell transformation of potent oncogenes expressed in the relevant target cells. Such transformed cells should permit study of the early stages of carcinogenesis, and in particular the initial oncogene-host cell interactions. This experimental design could also be useful for studies of the effects of early therapeutic intervention and likely also the mechanisms of malignant progression.

  18. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Henry, Curtis J; Casás-Selves, Matias; Kim, Jihye; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Aghili, Leila; Daniel, Ashley E; Jimenez, Linda; Azam, Tania; McNamee, Eoin N; Clambey, Eric T; Klawitter, Jelena; Serkova, Natalie J; Tan, Aik Choon; Dinarello, Charles A; DeGregori, James

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transferred from young mice into aged animals exhibited similar fitness defects. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, NRAS(V12), or Myc restored B cell progenitor fitness, leading to selection for oncogenically initiated cells and leukemogenesis specifically in the context of an aged hematopoietic system. Aging was associated with increased inflammation in the BM microenvironment, and induction of inflammation in young mice phenocopied aging-associated B lymphopoiesis. Conversely, a reduction of inflammation in aged mice via transgenic expression of α-1-antitrypsin or IL-37 preserved the function of B cell progenitors and prevented NRAS(V12)-mediated oncogenesis. We conclude that chronic inflammatory microenvironments in old age lead to reductions in the fitness of B cell progenitor populations. This reduced progenitor pool fitness engenders selection for cells harboring oncogenic mutations, in part due to their ability to correct aging-associated functional defects. Thus, modulation of inflammation--a common feature of aging--has the potential to limit aging-associated oncogenesis.

  19. Bim Regulation of Lumen Formation in Cultured Mammary Epithelial Acini Is Targeted by Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Reginato, Mauricio J.; Mills, Kenna R.; Becker, Esther B. E.; Lynch, Danielle K.; Bonni, Azad; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.; Brugge, Joan S.

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cells organize into cyst-like structures that contain a spherical monolayer of cells that enclose a central lumen. Using a three-dimensional basement membrane culture model in which mammary epithelial cells form hollow, acinus-like structures, we previously demonstrated that lumen formation is achieved, in part, through apoptosis of centrally localized cells. We demonstrate that the proapoptotic protein Bim may selectively trigger apoptosis of the centrally localized acinar cells, leading to temporally controlled lumen formation. Bim is not detectable during early stages of three-dimensional mammary acinar morphogenesis and is then highly upregulated in all cells of acini, coincident with detection of apoptosis in the centrally localized acinar cells. Inhibition of Bim expression by RNA interference transiently blocks luminal apoptosis and delays lumen formation. Oncogenes that induce acinar luminal filling, such as ErbB2 and v-Src, suppress expression of Bim through a pathway dependent on Erk-mitogen-activated protein kinase; however, HPV 16 E7, an oncogene that stimulates cell proliferation but not luminal filling, is unable to reduce Bim expression. Thus, Bim is a critical regulator of luminal apoptosis during mammary acinar morphogenesis in vitro and may be an important target of oncogenes that disrupt glandular epithelial architecture. PMID:15899862

  20. The impact of the MYB-NFIB fusion proto-oncogene in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mikse, Oliver R.; Tchaicha, Jeremy H.; Akbay, Esra A.; Chen, Liang; Bronson, Roderick T.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent fusion of the v-myb avian myelobastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) and nuclear factor I/B (NFIB) generates the MYB-NFIB transcription factor, which has been detected in a high percentage of individuals with adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). To understand the functional role of this fusion protein in carcinogenesis, we generated a conditional mutant transgenic mouse that expresses MYB-NFIB along with p53 mutation in tissues that give rise to ACC: mammary tissue, salivary glands, or systemically in the whole body. Expression of the oncogene in mammary tissue resulted in hyperplastic glands that developed into adenocarcinoma in 27.3% of animals. Systemic expression of the MYB-NFIB fusion caused more rapid development of this breast phenotype, but mice died due to abnormal proliferation in the glomerular compartment of the kidney, which led to development of glomerulonephritis. These findings suggest the MYB-NFIB fusion is oncogenic and treatments targeting this transcription factor may lead to therapeutic responses in ACC patients. PMID:27213588

  1. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body. PMID:24058151

  2. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body.

  3. A new engineering approach to reveal correlation of physiological change and spontaneous expression from video images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fenglei; Hu, Sijung; Ma, Xiaoyun; Hassan, Harnani; Wei, Dongqing

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous expression is associated with physiological states, i.e., heart rate, respiration, oxygen saturation (SpO2%), and heart rate variability (HRV). There have yet not sufficient efforts to explore correlation of physiological change and spontaneous expression. This study aims to study how spontaneous expression is associated with physiological changes with an approved protocol or through the videos provided from Denver Intensity of Spontaneous Facial Action Database. Not like a posed expression, motion artefact in spontaneous expression is one of evitable challenges to be overcome in the study. To obtain a physiological signs from a region of interest (ROI), a new engineering approach is being developed with an artefact-reduction method consolidated 3D active appearance model (AAM) based track, affine transformation based alignment with opto-physiological mode based imaging photoplethysmography. Also, a statistical association spaces is being used to interpret correlation of spontaneous expressions and physiological states including their probability densities by means of Gaussian Mixture Model. The present work is revealing a new avenue of study associations of spontaneous expressions and physiological states with its prospect of applications on physiological and psychological assessment.

  4. Myc and Ras oncogenes engage different energy metabolism programs and evoke distinct patterns of oxidative and DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Ostrakova, Jitka; Kosar, Martin; Hall, Arnaldur; Duskova, Pavlina; Mistrik, Martin; Merchut-Maya, Joanna Maria; Hodny, Zdenek; Bartkova, Jirina; Christensen, Claus; Bartek, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Both Myc and Ras oncogenes impact cellular metabolism, deregulate redox homeostasis and trigger DNA replication stress (RS) that compromises genomic integrity. However, how are such oncogene-induced effects evoked and temporally related, to what extent are these kinetic parameters shared by Myc and Ras, and how are these cellular changes linked with oncogene-induced cellular senescence in different cell context(s) remain poorly understood. Here, we addressed the above-mentioned open questions by multifaceted comparative analyses of human cellular models with inducible expression of c-Myc and H-RasV12 (Ras), two commonly deregulated oncoproteins operating in a functionally connected signaling network. Our study of DNA replication parameters using the DNA fiber approach and time-course assessment of perturbations in glycolytic flux, oxygen consumption and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) revealed the following results. First, overabundance of nuclear Myc triggered RS promptly, already after one day of Myc induction, causing slow replication fork progression and fork asymmetry, even before any metabolic changes occurred. In contrast, Ras overexpression initially induced a burst of cell proliferation and increased the speed of replication fork progression. However, after several days of induction Ras caused bioenergetic metabolic changes that correlated with slower DNA replication fork progression and the ensuing cell cycle arrest, gradually leading to senescence. Second, the observed oncogene-induced RS and metabolic alterations were cell-type/context dependent, as shown by comparative analyses of normal human BJ fibroblasts versus U2-OS sarcoma cells. Third, the energy metabolic reprogramming triggered by Ras was more robust compared to impact of Myc. Fourth, the detected oncogene-induced oxidative stress was due to ROS (superoxide) of non-mitochondrial origin and mitochondrial OXPHOS was reduced (Crabtree effect). Overall, our study provides novel

  5. A "liaison dangereuse" between AUF1/hnRNPD and the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK.

    PubMed

    Fawal, Mohamad; Armstrong, Florence; Ollier, Severine; Dupont, Henri; Touriol, Christian; Monsarrat, Bernard; Delsol, Georges; Payrastre, Bernard; Morello, Dominique

    2006-10-15

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) is a chimeric protein expressed in a subset of cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) for which constitutive expression represents a key oncogenic event. The ALK signaling pathway is complex and probably involves functional redundancy between various signaling substrates of ALK. Despite numerous studies on signaling mediators, the molecular mechanisms contributing to the distinct oncogenic features of NPM-ALK remain incompletely understood. The search for additional interacting partners of NPM-ALK led to the discovery of AUF1/hnRNPD, a protein implicated in AU-rich element (ARE)-directed mRNA decay. AUF1 was immunoprecipitated with ALK both in ALCL-derived cells and in NIH3T3 cells stably expressing NPM-ALK or other X-ALK fusion proteins. AUF1 and NPM-ALK were found concentrated in the same cytoplasmic foci, whose formation required NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase activity. AUF1 was phosphorylated by ALK in vitro and was hyperphosphorylated in NPM-ALK-expressing cells. Its hyperphosphorylation was correlated with increased stability of several AUF1 target mRNAs encoding key regulators of cell proliferation and with increased cell survival after transcriptional arrest. Thus, AUF1 could function in a novel pathway mediating the oncogenic effects of NPM-ALK. Our data establish an important link between oncogenic kinases and mRNA turnover, which could constitute a critical aspect of tumorigenesis.

  6. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Secreted Frizzled Related Protein-2 Expression in Murine Angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, Jason; Samples, Jennifer; Patterson, Cam; Mumper, Russell J.; Ketelsen, David; Dayton, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a biologically aggressive vascular malignancy with a high metastatic potential. In the era of targeted medicine, knowledge of specific molecular tumor characteristics has become more important. Molecular imaging using targeted ultrasound contrast agents can monitor tumor progression non-invasively. Secreted frizzled related protein 2 (SFRP2) is a tumor endothelial marker expressed in angiosarcoma. We hypothesize that SFRP2-directed imaging could be a novel approach to imaging the tumor vasculature. To develop an SFRP2 contrast agent, SFRP2 polyclonal antibody was biotinylated and incubated with streptavidin-coated microbubbles. SVR angiosarcoma cells were injected into nude mice, and when tumors were established the mice were injected intravenously with the SFRP2 -targeted contrast agent, or a control streptavidin-coated contrast agent. SFRP2 -targeted contrast agent detected tumor vasculature with significantly more signal intensity than control contrast agent: the normalized fold-change was 1.6±0.27 (n = 13, p = 0.0032). The kidney was largely devoid of echogenicity with no significant difference between the control contrast agent and the SFRP2-targeted contrast agent demonstrating that the SFRP2-targeted contrast agent was specific to tumor vessels. Plotting average pixel intensity obtained from SFRP2-targeted contrast agent against tumor volume showed that the average pixel intensity increased as tumor volume increased. In conclusion, molecularly-targeted imaging of SFRP2 visualizes angiosarcoma vessels, but not normal vessels, and intensity increases with tumor size. Molecular imaging of SFRP2 expression may provide a rapid, non-invasive method to monitor tumor regression during therapy for angiosarcoma and other SFRP2 expressing cancers, and contribute to our understanding of the biology of SFRP2 during tumor development and progression. PMID:24489757

  7. Disclosing the CXCR4 expression in lymphoproliferative diseases by targeted molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Wester, Hans Jürgen; Keller, Ulrich; Schottelius, Margret; Beer, Ambros; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Hoffmann, Frauke; Šimeček, Jakub; Gerngross, Carlos; Lassmann, Michael; Herrmann, Ken; Pellegata, Natalia; Rudelius, Martina; Kessler, Horst; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine ligand-receptor interactions play a pivotal role in cell attraction and cellular trafficking, both in normal tissue homeostasis and in disease. In cancer, chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) expression is an adverse prognostic factor. Early clinical studies suggest that targeting CXCR4 with suitable high-affinity antagonists might be a novel means for therapy. In addition to the preclinical evaluation of [(68)Ga]Pentixafor in mice bearing human lymphoma xenografts as an exemplary CXCR4-expressing tumor entity, we report on the first clinical applications of [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-Positron Emission Tomography as a powerful method for CXCR4 imaging in cancer patients. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor binds with high affinity and selectivity to human CXCR4 and exhibits a favorable dosimetry. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides images with excellent specificity and contrast. This non-invasive imaging technology for quantitative assessment of CXCR4 expression allows to further elucidate the role of CXCR4/CXCL12 ligand interaction in the pathogenesis and treatment of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25825601

  8. Disclosing the CXCR4 Expression in Lymphoproliferative Diseases by Targeted Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wester, Hans Jürgen; Keller, Ulrich; Schottelius, Margret; Beer, Ambros; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Hoffmann, Frauke; Šimeček, Jakub; Gerngross, Carlos; Lassmann, Michael; Herrmann, Ken; Pellegata, Natalia; Rudelius, Martina; Kessler, Horst; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine ligand-receptor interactions play a pivotal role in cell attraction and cellular trafficking, both in normal tissue homeostasis and in disease. In cancer, chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) expression is an adverse prognostic factor. Early clinical studies suggest that targeting CXCR4 with suitable high-affinity antagonists might be a novel means for therapy. In addition to the preclinical evaluation of [68Ga]Pentixafor in mice bearing human lymphoma xenografts as an exemplary CXCR4-expressing tumor entity, we report on the first clinical applications of [68Ga]Pentixafor-Positron Emission Tomography as a powerful method for CXCR4 imaging in cancer patients. [68Ga]Pentixafor binds with high affinity and selectivity to human CXCR4 and exhibits a favorable dosimetry. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides images with excellent specificity and contrast. This non-invasive imaging technology for quantitative assessment of CXCR4 expression allows to further elucidate the role of CXCR4/CXCL12 ligand interaction in the pathogenesis and treatment of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25825601

  9. Isolation and Live Imaging of Enteric Progenitors based on Sox10-Histone2BVenus Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Corpening, Jennifer C.; Deal, Karen K.; Cantrell, V. Ashley; Skelton, Stephanie B.; Buehler, Dennis P.; Southard-Smith, E. Michelle

    2011-01-01

    To facilitate dynamic imaging of neural crest (NC) lineages and discrimination of individual cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) where close juxtaposition often complicates viewing, we generated a mouse BAC transgenic line that drives a Histone2BVenus (H2BVenus) reporter from Sox10 regulatory regions. This strategy does not alter the endogenous Sox10 locus and thus facilitates analysis of normal NC development. Our Sox10-H2BVenus BAC transgene exhibits temporal, spatial, and cell-type specific expression that reflects endogenous Sox10 patterns. Individual cells exhibiting nuclear–localized fluorescence of the H2BVenus reporter are readily visualized in both fixed and living tissue and are amenable to isolation by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). FACS-isolated H2BVenus+ enteric NC-derived progenitors (ENPs) exhibit multi-potency, readily form neurospheres, self-renew in vitro and express a variety of stem cell genes. Dynamic live imaging as H2BVenus+ ENPs migrate down the fetal gut reveals cell fragmentation suggesting that apoptosis occurs at a low frequency during normal development of the ENS. Confocal imaging both during population of the fetal intestine and in post-natal gut muscle strips revealed differential expression between individual cells consistent with down-regulation of the transgene as progression towards non-glial fates occurs. The expression of the Sox10-H2BVenus transgene in multiple regions of the peripheral nervous system will facilitate future studies of NC lineage segregation as this tool is expressed in early NC progenitors and maintained in enteric glia. PMID:21504042

  10. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Northcott, Paul A; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David J H; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M G; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary D; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H Leighton; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimling, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Pfister, Stefan M

    2014-07-24

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoral heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for most paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family proto-oncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1 or GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate 'enhancer hijacking' as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer.

  11. Microscale technologies for imaging endogenous gene expression in individual cells within 3D tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Luo, Zhen; Ma, Yunzhe; Gill, Harvinder Singh; Nitin, N.

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study was to develop an innovative approach to image gene expression in intact 3D tissues. Imaging gene expression of individual cells in 3D tissues is expected to have a significant impact on both clinical diagnostic applications and fundamental biological science and engineering applications in a laboratory setting. To achieve this goal, we have developed an integrated approach that combines: 1) microneedle-based minimally invasive intra-tissue delivery of oligonucleotide probes and Streptolysin O (SLO) or CPP; 2) SLO as a pore forming permeation enhancer to enable intracellular delivery of oligonucleotide probes and CPP peptides can also transport conjugated cargo in cells; and 3) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair of ON probes to improve specificity and sensitivity of RNA detection in tissue models. The results of this study demonstrate uniform coating and rapid release of ON probes from microneedles in a tissue environment. Microneedle assisted delivery of ON probes in 3D tissue does not result in cell damage and the ON probes are uniformly delivered in the tissue. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of FRET imaging of ON probes in 3D tissue and highlight the potential for imaging 28-s rRNA in individual living cells.

  12. The prolactin receptor mediates HOXA1-stimulated oncogenicity in mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lin; Xu, Bing; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Goffin, Vincent; Perry, Jo K; Lobie, Peter E; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2012-12-01

    The HOX genes are a highly conserved subgroup of homeodomain-containing transcription factors that are crucial to normal development. Forced expression of HOXA1 results in oncogenic transformation of immortalized human mammary cells with aggressive tumour formation in vivo. Microarray analysis identified that the prolactin receptor (PRLR) was significantly upregulated by forced expression of HOXA1 in mammary carcinoma cells. To determine prolactin (PRL) involvement in HOXA1‑induced oncogenicity in mammary carcinoma cells (MCF-7), we examined the effect of human prolactin (hPRL)-initiated PRLR signal transduction on changes in cellular behaviour mediated by HOXA1. Forced expression of HOXA1 in MCF-7 cells increased PRLR mRNA and protein expression. Forced expression of HOXA1 also enhanced hPRL-stimulated phosphorylation of both STAT5A/B and p44/42 MAPK, and increased subsequent transcriptional activity of STAT5A and STAT5B, and Elk-1 and Sap1a, respectively. Moreover, forced expression of HOXA1 in MCF-7 cells enhanced the hPRL‑stimulated increase in total cell number as a consequence of enhanced cell proliferation and cell survival, and also enhanced hPRL-stimulated anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Increased anchorage-independent growth was attenuated by the PRLR antagonist ∆1-9-G129R‑hPRL. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that HOXA1 increases expression of the cell surface receptor PRLR and enhances PRLR-mediated signal transduction. Thus, the PRLR is one mediator of HOXA1‑stimulated oncogenicity in mammary carcinoma cells. PMID:23064471

  13. miR-203 suppresses the proliferation and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting oncogene ADAM9 and oncogenic long non-coding RNA HULC.

    PubMed

    Wan, Daiwei; Shen, Shunli; Fu, Shunjun; Preston, Burnley; Brandon, Coder; He, Songbing; Shen, Chenglong; Wu, Jian; Wang, Sutong; Xie, Wenxuan; Chen, Bin; Liya, A; Guo, Yixing; Zheng, Dingcheng; Zhi, Qiaoming; Peng, Baogang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been integrated into tumorigenic programs by regulating genes at post-transcriptional level. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are novel targets for miRNAs. Here, we reported that miR-203 down-regulation was closely linked to advanced clinical features and poor overall survival (OS) of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. We also confirmed that miR-203 and oncogene ADAM9 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 9)/oncogenic long non-coding RNA HULC (highly up-regulated in liver cancer) were inversely expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues or cell lines. More intriguingly, up-regulation of miR-203 diminished the expression of ADAM9 and HULC in HCC cancer cells. Over-expression of miR-203 could markedly inhibit cell proliferation, invasion and induce cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we identified that miR-203 modulated ADAM9 and HULC in a novel post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism. Over-expression of HULC partly rescued the miR-203-mediated antitumor effects. These results suggested that miR-203 played tumor suppressive roles by downregulating ADAM9 and HULC and indicated its potential application in cancer treatment.

  14. In vivo molecular imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in patients with advanced multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Herrmann, Ken; Knop, Stefan; Schottelius, Margret; Eiber, Matthias; Lückerath, Katharina; Pietschmann, Elke; Habringer, Stefan; Gerngroß, Carlos; Franke, Katharina; Rudelius, Martina; Schirbel, Andreas; Lapa, Constantin; Schwamborn, Kristina; Steidle, Sabine; Hartmann, Elena; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kropf, Saskia; Beer, Ambros J; Peschel, Christian; Einsele, Hermann; Buck, Andreas K; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Keller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that mediates recruitment of blood cells toward its ligand SDF-1. In cancer, high CXCR4 expression is frequently associated with tumor dissemination and poor prognosis. We evaluated the novel CXCR4 probe [68Ga]Pentixafor for in vivo mapping of CXCR4 expression density in mice xenografted with human CXCR4-positive MM cell lines and patients with advanced MM by means of positron emission tomography (PET). [68Ga]Pentixafor PET provided images with excellent specificity and contrast. In 10 of 14 patients with advanced MM [68Ga]Pentixafor PET/CT scans revealed MM manifestations, whereas only nine of 14 standard [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scans were rated visually positive. Assessment of blood counts and standard CD34+ flow cytometry did not reveal significant blood count changes associated with tracer application. Based on these highly encouraging data on clinical PET imaging of CXCR4 expression in a cohort of MM patients, we conclude that [68Ga]Pentixafor PET opens a broad field for clinical investigations on CXCR4 expression and for CXCR4-directed therapeutic approaches in MM and other diseases. PMID:25736399

  15. Molecular beacon imaging of tumor marker gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lily; Cao, Zehong; Lin, Yiming; Wood, William C; Staley, Charles A

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a fluorescence imaging-based approach to detect expression of tumor marker genes in pancreatic cancer cells using molecular beacons (MBs). MBs are short hairpin oligonucleotide probes that bind to specific oligonucleotide sequences and produce fluorescent signals. MBs targeting transcripts of two tumor marker genes, mutant K-ras and survivin, were synthesized and their specificity in detection of the expression of those genes in pancreatic cancer cells was examined. We found that K-ras MBs differentially bind to mutant K-ras mRNAs, resulting in strong fluorescent signals in pancreatic cancer cells with specific mutant K-ras genes but not in normal cells or cancer cells expressing either wild type or a different mutation of the K-ras gene. Additionally, MBs targeting survivin mRNA produced a bright fluorescent signal specifically in pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that MBs labeled with different fluorophores could detect survivin and mutant K-ras mRNAs simultaneously in single cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that survivin and K-ras MBs have a high specificity in identifying cancer cells on frozen sections of pancreatic cancer tissues. In conclusion, molecular beacon-based imaging of expression of tumor marker genes has potential for the development of novel approaches for the detection of pancreatic cancer cells.

  16. Artistic expression in the development of new technology for three dimensional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Sandra; Richardson, Martin; Azevedo, Isabel

    2011-02-01

    The medium of holography offers many new creative possibilities for the development of kinetic art. In the search of new forms of image display we examine new methods of capturing Three Dimensional animated images. Expression in new forms of visualisation leads to new methods for exploration auto-stereoscopic displays, three-dimensional imaging and holography. Artists have long combined cameras together to explore the human body as form and space and this paper sets out the potential of some of these techniques and in particular the technical potential of the use of multicamera capture techniques. Artists such as Tim Macmillan1 (2010) and Dayton Taylor2 (1997) use multi-lens cameras to create the illusion of capturing space and time for different effects, such as frozen moment, live action and slow motion (often seen as a cinemagraphic effect). However, their results are two-dimensional images made with a two-dimensional image capture system. Previous research on the interaction between art and technology has been based on twodimensional video art. This paper outlines a method of three-dimensional video capture to explore three-dimensional space and the human body. The stereoscopic specialist Ray Zone3 has written about the evolution of 3-D technology and 3-D film. Zone examines the development of these 3-D techniques and demonstrates the connection between two fields. This research extends our knowledge of Three Dimensional moving image as an art form. In the new art world, Holography has become a method increasingly used to develop kinetic art. In the search of new forms of display and image capture, we examine new techniques such as 3-D, including auto-stereoscopic display, three-dimensional imaging and holography.

  17. RECQL4 helicase has oncogenic potential in sporadic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Arora, Arvind; Agarwal, Devika; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek Ma; Lu, Huiming; Croteau, Deborah L; Moseley, Paul; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Ball, Graham; Rakha, Emad A; Chan, Stephen Yt; Ellis, Ian O; Wang, Lisa L; Zhao, Yongliang; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2016-03-01

    RECQL4 helicase is a molecular motor that unwinds DNA, a process essential during DNA replication and DNA repair. Germ-line mutations in RECQL4 cause type II Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), characterized by a premature ageing phenotype and cancer predisposition. RECQL4 is widely considered to be a tumour suppressor, although its role in human breast cancer is largely unknown. As the RECQL4 gene is localized to chromosome 8q24, a site frequently amplified in sporadic breast cancers, we hypothesized that it may play an oncogenic role in breast tumourigenesis. To address this, we analysed large cohorts for gene copy number changes (n = 1977), mRNA expression (n = 1977) and protein level (n = 1902). Breast cancer incidence was also explored in 58 patients with type II RTS. DNA replication dynamics and chemosensitivity was evaluated in RECQL4-depleted breast cancer cells in vitro. Amplification or gain in gene copy number (30.6%), high-level mRNA expression (51%) and high levels of protein (23%) significantly associated with aggressive tumour behaviour, including lymph node positivity, larger tumour size, HER2 overexpression, ER-negativity, triple-negative phenotypes and poor survival. RECQL4 depletion impaired the DNA replication rate and increased chemosensitivity in cultured breast cancer cells. Thus, although recognized as a 'safe guardian of the genome', our data provide compelling evidence that RECQL4 is tumour promoting in established breast cancers. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, EL Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression. PMID:26764384

  19. A Computational Drug Repositioning Approach for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gayvert, Kaitlyn; Dardenne, Etienne; Cheung, Cynthia; Boland, Mary Regina; Lorberbaum, Tal; Wanjala, Jackline; Chen, Yu; Rubin, Mark; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Rickman, David; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mutations in transcription factors (TFs) genes are frequently observed in tumors, often leading to aberrant transcriptional activity. Unfortunately, TFs are often considered undruggable due to the absence of targetable enzymatic activity. To address this problem, we developed CRAFTT, a Computational drug-Repositioning Approach For Targeting Transcription factor activity. CRAFTT combines ChIP-seq with drug-induced expression profiling to identify small molecules that can specifically perturb TF activity. Application to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets revealed known drug-TF interactions and a global drug-protein network analysis further supported these predictions. Application of CRAFTT to ERG, a pro-invasive, frequently over-expressed oncogenic TF predicted that dexamethasone would inhibit ERG activity. Indeed, dexamethasone significantly decreased cell invasion and migration in an ERG-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of Electronic Medical Record data indicates a protective role for dexamethasone against prostate cancer. Altogether, our method provides a broadly applicable strategy to identify drugs that specifically modulate TF activity. PMID:27264179

  20. CXCR4 in breast cancer: oncogenic role and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Haitao; Yao, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are 8–12 kDa peptides that function as chemoattractant cytokines and are involved in cell activation, differentiation, and trafficking. Chemokines bind to specific G-protein-coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play a fundamental role in the regulation of a variety of cellular, physiological, and developmental processes. Their aberrant expression can lead to a variety of human diseases including cancer. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), also known as fusin or CD184, is an alpha-chemokine receptor specific for stromal-derived-factor-1 (SDF-1 also called CXCL12). CXCR4 belongs to the superfamily of the seven transmembrane domain heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally expressed on the cell surface of various types of cancer cells. CXCR4 also plays a role in the cell proliferation and migration of these cells. Recently, CXCR4 has been reported to play an important role in cell survival, proliferation, migration, as well as metastasis of several cancers including breast cancer. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role and potential drugs that target CXCR4 in breast cancer. Additionally, CXCR4 proangiogenic molecular mechanisms will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding affinity and activation of CXCR4/CXCL12 complex make CXCR4 a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26356032

  1. Hedgehog Cholesterolysis: Specialized Gatekeeper to Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Brian P.; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Discussions of therapeutic suppression of hedgehog (Hh) signaling almost exclusively focus on receptor antagonism; however, hedgehog’s biosynthesis represents a unique and potentially targetable aspect of this oncogenic signaling pathway. Here, we review a key biosynthetic step called cholesterolysis from the perspectives of structure/function and small molecule inhibition. Cholesterolysis, also called cholesteroylation, generates cholesterol-modified Hh ligand via autoprocessing of a hedgehog precursor protein. Post-translational modification by cholesterol appears to be restricted to proteins in the hedgehog family. The transformation is essential for Hh biological activity and upstream of signaling events. Despite its decisive role in generating ligand, cholesterolysis remains conspicuously unexplored as a therapeutic target. PMID:26473928

  2. The guardians of inherited oncogenic vulnerabilities.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Audrey; Tissot, Tazzio; Ujvari, Beata; Nunney, Leonard; Solary, Eric; Laplane, Lucie; Bonhomme, François; Vittecoq, Marion; Tasiemski, Aurélie; Renaud, François; Pujol, Pascal; Roche, Benjamin; Thomas, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Similar to seemingly maladaptive genes in general, the persistence of inherited cancer-causing mutant alleles in populations remains a challenging question for evolutionary biologists. In addition to traditional explanations such as senescence or antagonistic pleiotropy, here we put forward a new hypothesis to explain the retention of oncogenic mutations. We propose that although natural defenses evolve to prevent neoplasm formation and progression thus increasing organismal fitness, they also conceal the effects of cancer-causing mutant alleles on fitness and concomitantly protect inherited ones from purging by purifying selection. We also argue for the importance of the ecological contexts experienced by individuals and/or species. These contexts determine the locally predominant fitness-reducing risks, and hence can aid the prediction of how natural selection will influence cancer outcomes. PMID:26519218

  3. PLAG1 fusion oncogenes in lipoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hibbard, M K; Kozakewich, H P; Dal Cin, P; Sciot, R; Tan, X; Xiao, S; Fletcher, J A

    2000-09-01

    Lipoblastomas are pediatric neoplasms resulting from transformation of adipocytes. These benign tumors are typically composed of adipose cells in different stages of maturation within a variably myxoid matrix, and they contain clonal rearrangements of chromosome band 8q12. Because lipoblastomas resemble embryonic adipose tissue, characterization of their transforming mechanisms might reveal biological pathways in physiological adipogenesis. Herein, we demonstrate that lipoblastoma chromosome 8q12 rearrangements bring about promoter-swapping events in the PLAG1 oncqgene. We show that the hyaluronic acid synthase 2 (HAS2) or collagen 1 alpha 2 (COL1A2) gene promoter regions are fused to the entire PLAG1 coding sequence in each of four lipoblastomas. PLAG1 is a developmentally regulated zinc finger gene whose tumorigenic function has been shown previously only in epithelial salivary gland cells. Our findings reveal that PLAG1 activation, presumably resulting from transcriptional up-regulation, is a central oncogenic event in lipoblastoma.

  4. Targeting the production of oncogenic microRNAs with multimodal synthetic small molecules.

    PubMed

    Vo, Duc Duy; Staedel, Cathy; Zehnacker, Laura; Benhida, Rachid; Darfeuille, Fabien; Duca, Maria

    2014-03-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered category of small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs are aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers and revealed to be oncogenic and to play a pivotal role in initiation and progression of these pathologies. It is now clear that the inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs, defined as blocking their biosynthesis or their function, could find an application in the therapy of different types of cancer in which these miRNAs are implicated. Here we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of new small-molecule RNA ligands targeting the production of oncogenic microRNAs. In this work we focused our attention on miR-372 and miR-373 that are implicated in the tumorigenesis of different types of cancer such as gastric cancer. These two oncogenic miRNAs are overexpressed in gastric cancer cells starting from their precursors pre-miR-372 and pre-miR-373, two stem-loop structured RNAs that lead to mature miRNAs after cleavage by the enzyme Dicer. The small molecules described herein consist of the conjugation of two RNA binding motives, i.e., the aminoglycoside neomycin and different natural and artificial nucleobases, in order to obtain RNA ligands with increased affinity and selectivity compared to that of parent compounds. After the synthesis of this new series of RNA ligands, we demonstrated that they are able to inhibit the production of the oncogenic miRNA-372 and -373 by binding their pre-miRNAs and inhibiting the processing by Dicer. Moreover, we proved that some of these compounds bear anti-proliferative activity toward gastric cancer cells and that this activity is likely linked to a decrease in the production of targeted miRNAs. To date, only few examples of small molecules targeting oncogenic miRNAs have been reported, and such inhibitors could be extremely useful for the development of new anticancer therapeutic

  5. Enhanced MAF Oncogene Expression and Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Milica; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Rojo, Federico; Bellmunt, Anna; Tarragona, Maria; Guiu, Marc; Planet, Evarist; Garcia-Albéniz, Xabier; Morales, Mónica; Urosevic, Jelena; Gawrzak, Sylwia; Rovira, Ana; Prat, Aleix; Nonell, Lara; Lluch, Ana; Jean-Mairet, Joël; Coleman, Robert; Albanell, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are currently no biomarkers for early breast cancer patient populations at risk of bone metastasis. Identification of mediators of bone metastasis could be of clinical interest. Methods: A de novo unbiased screening approach based on selection of highly bone metastatic breast cancer cells in vivo was used to determine copy number aberrations (CNAs) associated with bone metastasis. The CNAs associated with bone metastasis were examined in independent primary breast cancer datasets with annotated clinical follow-up. The MAF gene encoded within the CNA associated with bone metastasis was subjected to gain and loss of function validation in breast cancer cells (MCF7, T47D, ZR-75, and 4T1), its downstream mechanism validated, and tested in clinical samples. A multivariable Cox cause-specific hazard model with competing events (death) was used to test the association between 16q23 or MAF and bone metastasis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: 16q23 gain CNA encoding the transcription factor MAF mediates breast cancer bone metastasis through the control of PTHrP. 16q23 gain (hazard ratio (HR) for bone metastasis = 14.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 6.4 to 32.9, P < .001) as well as MAF overexpression (HR for bone metastasis = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.7 to 3.8, P < .001) in primary breast tumors were specifically associated with risk of metastasis to bone but not to other organs. Conclusions: These results suggest that MAF is a mediator of breast cancer bone metastasis. 16q23 gain or MAF protein overexpression in tumors may help to select patients at risk of bone relapse. PMID:26376684

  6. Transglutaminase 2 contributes to a TP53-induced autophagy program to prevent oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Shi Yun; Itahana, Yoko; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Han, Rachel; Iwamoto, Kozue; Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Bao, Yi; Kleiber, Kai; Wu, Ya Jun; Bay, Boon Huat; Voorhoeve, Mathijs; Itahana, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Genetic alterations which impair the function of the TP53 signaling pathway in TP53 wild-type human tumors remain elusive. To identify new components of this pathway, we performed a screen for genes whose loss-of-function debilitated TP53 signaling and enabled oncogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells. We identified transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) as a putative tumor suppressor in the TP53 pathway. TGM2 suppressed colony formation in soft agar and tumor formation in a xenograft mouse model. The depletion of growth supplements induced both TGM2 expression and autophagy in a TP53-dependent manner, and TGM2 promoted autophagic flux by enhancing autophagic protein degradation and autolysosome clearance. Reduced expression of both CDKN1A, which regulates the cell cycle downstream of TP53, and TGM2 synergized to promote oncogenic transformation. Our findings suggest that TGM2-mediated autophagy and CDKN1A-mediated cell cycle arrest are two important barriers in the TP53 pathway that prevent oncogenic transformation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07101.001 PMID:26956429

  7. Individual and Complementary Effects of Human Papillomavirus Oncogenes on Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Sven; Halec, Gordana; Schmitt, Markus; Aubin, François; Alonso, Angel; Auvinen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 protein functions have established the oncogenic nature of three viral proteins: E5, E6 and E7. Here we have studied the functions of these proteins by functional deletion of the individual E5, E6 or E7, or both E6 and E7 oncogenes in the context of the whole viral genome. These mutants, or the intact wild-type genome, were expressed from the natural viral promoters along with differentiation of epithelial HaCaT cells in three-dimensional collagen raft cultures. High episomal viral copy numbers were obtained using a transfection-based loxp-HPV16-eGFP-N1 vector system. All epithelial equivalents carrying the different HPV type 16 genomes showed pronounced hyperplastic and dysplastic morphology. Particularly the E7 oncogene, with contribution of E6, was shown to enhance cell proliferation. Specifically, the crucial role of E7 in HPV-associated hyperproliferation was clearly manifested. Based on morphological characteristics, immunohistochemical staining for differentiation and proliferation markers, and low expression of E1^E4, we propose that our raft culture models produce cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)1 and CIN2-like tissue. Our experimental setting provides an alternative tool to study concerted functions of HPV proteins in the development of epithelial dysplasia. PMID:26636751

  8. Transgenic nude mice ubiquitously expressing fluorescent proteins for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) nude mouse with ubiquitous GFP expression. The GFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the β-actin promoter drives GFP expression in essentially all tissues. In the adult mice, many organs brightly expressed GFP, including the spleen, heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum as well as the circulatory system. The liver expressed GFP at a lesser level. The red fluorescent protein (RFP) transgenic nude mouse was obtained by crossing non-transgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives RFP (DsRed2) expression in essentially all tissues. In the RFP nude mouse, the organs all brightly expressed RFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, liver, duodenum, the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart, and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed RFP. The bone marrow and spleen cells were also RFP positive. The cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) nude mouse was developed by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic CK/ECFP mouse in which the β-actin promoter drives expression of CFP in almost all tissues. In the CFP nude mice, the pancreas and reproductive organs displayed the strongest fluorescence signals of all internal organs, which vary in intensity. The GFP, RFP, and CFP nude mice when transplanted with cancer cells of another color are powerful models for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment (TME) at the cellular level.

  9. Role of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in cellular transformation and ARF repression.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Merghoub, Taha; Guernah, Ilhem; Zelent, Arthur; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-20

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodelling and histone deacetylation has been postulated to represent a driving force underlying tumorigenesis because histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to be effective in cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms by which transcriptional derepression would be linked to tumour suppression are poorly understood. Here we identify the transcriptional repressor Pokemon (encoded by the Zbtb7 gene) as a critical factor in oncogenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Zbtb7 are completely refractory to oncogene-mediated cellular transformation. Conversely, Pokemon overexpression leads to overt oncogenic transformation both in vitro and in vivo in transgenic mice. Pokemon can specifically repress the transcription of the tumour suppressor gene ARF through direct binding. We find that Pokemon is aberrantly overexpressed in human cancers and that its expression levels predict biological behaviour and clinical outcome. Pokemon's critical role in cellular transformation makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15662416

  10. WISP-1 is a Wnt-1- and beta-catenin-responsive oncogene.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Corcoran, R B; Welsh, J W; Pennica, D; Levine, A J

    2000-03-01

    WISP-1 (Wnt-1 induced secreted protein 1) is a member of the CCN family of growth factors. This study identifies WISP-1 as a beta-catenin-regulated gene that can contribute to tumorigenesis. The promoter of WISP-1 was cloned and shown to be activated by both Wnt-1 and beta-catenin expression. TCF/LEF sites played a minor role, whereas the CREB site played an important role in this transcriptional activation. WISP-1 demonstrated oncogenic activities; overexpression of WISP-1 in normal rat kidney fibroblast cells (NRK-49F) induced morphological transformation, accelerated cell growth, and enhanced saturation density. Although these cells did not acquire anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, they readily formed tumors in nude mice, suggesting that appropriate cellular attachment is important for signaling oncogenic events downstream of WISP-1.

  11. Menin-MLL inhibitors reverse oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Grembecka, Jolanta; He, Shihan; Shi, Aibin; Purohit, Trupta; Muntean, Andrew G; Sorenson, Roderick J; Showalter, Hollis D; Murai, Marcelo J; Belcher, Amalia M; Hartley, Thomas; Hess, Jay L; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2012-03-01

    Translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene result in human acute leukemias with very poor prognosis. The leukemogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins is critically dependent on their direct interaction with menin, a product of the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN1) gene. Here we present what are to our knowledge the first small-molecule inhibitors of the menin-MLL fusion protein interaction that specifically bind menin with nanomolar affinities. These compounds effectively reverse MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemic transformation by downregulating the expression of target genes required for MLL fusion protein oncogenic activity. They also selectively block proliferation and induce both apoptosis and differentiation of leukemia cells harboring MLL translocations. Identification of these compounds provides a new tool for better understanding MLL-mediated leukemogenesis and represents a new approach for studying the role of menin as an oncogenic cofactor of MLL fusion proteins. Our findings also highlight a new therapeutic strategy for aggressive leukemias with MLL rearrangements.

  12. Mitochondrial Ca2+ Remodeling is a Prime Factor in Oncogenic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rimessi, Alessandro; Patergnani, Simone; Bonora, Massimo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is sustained by defects in the mechanisms underlying cell proliferation, mitochondrial metabolism, and cell death. Mitochondrial Ca2+ ions are central to all these processes, serving as signaling molecules with specific spatial localization, magnitude, and temporal characteristics. Mutations in mtDNA, aberrant expression and/or regulation of Ca2+-handling/transport proteins and abnormal Ca2+-dependent relationships among the cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria can cause the deregulation of mitochondrial Ca2+-dependent pathways that are related to these processes, thus determining oncogenic behavior. In this review, we propose that mitochondrial Ca2+ remodeling plays a pivotal role in shaping the oncogenic signaling cascade, which is a required step for cancer formation and maintenance. We will describe recent studies that highlight the importance of mitochondria in inducing pivotal “cancer hallmarks” and discuss possible tools to manipulate mitochondrial Ca2+ to modulate cancer survival. PMID:26161362

  13. Oncogenic MITF dysregulation in clear cell sarcoma: defining the MiT family of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ian J; Kim, Jessica J; Ozsolak, Fatih; Widlund, Hans R; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Granter, Scott R; Du, Jinyan; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Denny, Christopher T; Lessnick, Stephen L; Linehan, W Marston; Kung, Andrew L; Fisher, David E

    2006-06-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) harbors a pathognomonic chromosomal translocation fusing the Ewing's sarcoma gene (EWS) to the CREB family transcription factor ATF1 and exhibits melanocytic features. We show that EWS-ATF1 occupies the MITF promoter, mimicking melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) signaling to induce expression of MITF, the melanocytic master transcription factor and an amplified oncogene in melanoma. Knockdown/rescue studies revealed that MITF mediates the requirement of EWS-ATF1 for CCS survival in vitro and in vivo as well as for melanocytic differentiation. Moreover, MITF and TFE3 reciprocally rescue one another in lines derived from CCS or pediatric renal carcinoma. Seemingly unrelated tumors thus employ distinct strategies to oncogenically dysregulate the MiT family, collectively broadening the definition of MiT-associated human cancers.

  14. Role of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in cellular transformation and ARF repression.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Merghoub, Taha; Guernah, Ilhem; Zelent, Arthur; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-20

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodelling and histone deacetylation has been postulated to represent a driving force underlying tumorigenesis because histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to be effective in cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms by which transcriptional derepression would be linked to tumour suppression are poorly understood. Here we identify the transcriptional repressor Pokemon (encoded by the Zbtb7 gene) as a critical factor in oncogenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Zbtb7 are completely refractory to oncogene-mediated cellular transformation. Conversely, Pokemon overexpression leads to overt oncogenic transformation both in vitro and in vivo in transgenic mice. Pokemon can specifically repress the transcription of the tumour suppressor gene ARF through direct binding. We find that Pokemon is aberrantly overexpressed in human cancers and that its expression levels predict biological behaviour and clinical outcome. Pokemon's critical role in cellular transformation makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  15. KRAS2 oncogene overexpression in myelodysplastic syndrome with translocation 5;12.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Boswell, H S; Heerema, N A; Nahreini, P; Lauer, R C; Antony, A C; Hoffman, R; Tricot, G J

    1988-10-01

    The factors that initiate and maintain the abnormal hematopoietic clone in the myelo-dysplastic syndromes (MDS) remain largely unknown. We describe a patient with MDS associated with an abnormal karyotype, 46,XY,t(5;12)(q31;p12). According to the FAB cooperative group classification, the patient was classified as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Because of the particular chromosomal translocation, the structure-function relationship of three genes relevant to the translocation breakpoints, CSF2, FMS, and KRAS2, was studied in bone marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes in this patient. No major structural alterations were observed at these three genetic loci. Although the levels of expression of the CSF2 and FMS genes remained unaltered, the KRAS2 oncogene was overexpressed approximately six-fold in bone marrow cells from the MDS patient compared with normal donors. We postulate that the RAS oncogene activation may be instrumental in the genesis of MDS.

  16. NSD3-NUT Fusion Oncoprotein in NUT Midline Carcinoma: Implications for a Novel Oncogenic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    French, Christopher A.; Rahman, Shaila; Walsh, Erica M.; Kühnle, Simone; Grayson, Adlai R.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Grunfeld, Noam; Rubin, Brian P.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Zhang, Songlin; Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Cin, Paola Dal; Howley, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is an aggressive subtype of squamous cell carcinoma that typically harbors BRD4/3-NUT fusion oncoproteins that block differentiation and maintain tumor growth. In 20% of cases NUT is fused to uncharacterized non-BRD gene(s). We established a new patient-derived NMC cell line (1221) and demonstrated that it harbors a novel NSD3-NUT fusion oncogene. We find that NSD3-NUT is both necessary and sufficient for the blockade of differentiation and maintenance of proliferation in NMC cells. NSD3-NUT binds to BRD4, and BRD bromodomain inhibitors induce differentiation and arrest proliferation of 1221 cells. We find further that NSD3 is required for the blockade of differentiation in BRD4-NUT-expressing NMCs. These findings identify NSD3 as a novel critical oncogenic component and potential therapeutic target in NMC. PMID:24875858

  17. Non-invasive PET Imaging of PARP1 Expression in Glioblastoma Models

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Brandon; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Salinas, Beatriz; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Kossatz, Susanne; Vansteene, Axel; Longo, Valerie A.; Bolaender, Alexander; Chiosis, Gabriela; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Reiner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current study presents [18F]PARPi as imaging agent for PARP1 expression. Procedures [18F]PARPi was generated by conjugating a 2H-phthalazin-1-one scaffold to 4-[18F]fluorobenzoic acid. Biochemical assays, optical in vivo competition, biodistribution analysis, positron emission tomography (PET)/X-ray computed tomography, and PET/ magnetic resonance imaging studies were performed in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of glioblastoma. Results [18F]PARPi shows suitable pharmacokinetic properties for brain tumor imaging (IC50=2.8±1.1 nM; logPCHI=2.15±0.41; plasma-free fraction=63.9±12.6 %) and accumulates selectively in orthotopic brain tumor tissue. Tracer accumulation in subcutaneous brain tumors was 1.82±0.21 %ID/g, whereas in healthy brain, the uptake was only 0.04±0.01 %ID/g. Conclusions [18F]PARPi is a selective PARP1 imaging agent that can be used to visualize glioblastoma in xenograft and orthotopic mouse models with high precision and good signal/noise ratios. It offers new opportunities to non-invasively image tumor growth and monitor interventions. PMID:26493053

  18. Combining volumetric edge display and multiview display for expression of natural 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Ryota; Matsuda, Isamu; Kakeya, Hideki

    2006-02-01

    In the present paper the authors present a novel stereoscopic display method combining volumetric edge display technology and multiview display technology to realize presentation of natural 3D images where the viewers do not suffer from contradiction between binocular convergence and focal accommodation of the eyes, which causes eyestrain and sickness. We adopt volumetric display method only for edge drawing, while we adopt stereoscopic approach for flat areas of the image. Since focal accommodation of our eyes is affected only by the edge part of the image, natural focal accommodation can be induced if the edges of the 3D image are drawn on the proper depth. The conventional stereo-matching technique can give us robust depth values of the pixels which constitute noticeable edges. Also occlusion and gloss of the objects can be roughly expressed with the proposed method since we use stereoscopic approach for the flat area. We can attain a system where many users can view natural 3D objects at the consistent position and posture at the same time in this system. A simple optometric experiment using a refractometer suggests that the proposed method can give us 3-D images without contradiction between binocular convergence and focal accommodation.

  19. Multimodal molecular imaging system for pathway-specific reporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marco; Massai, Luisa; Diamanti, Daniela; Fiengo, Pasquale; De Rosa, Antonella; Magrini, Roberta; Magnoni, Letizia; Chellini, Sara; Coniglio, Silvia; Diodato, Enrica; Pilli, Elena; Caradonna, Nicola Pasquale; Sardone, Gianluca; Monti, Martina; Roggeri, Riccardo; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Recchia, Fabio; Tunici, Patrizia; Valensin, Silvia; Scali, Carla; Pollio, Giuseppe; Porcari, Valentina

    2016-04-30

    Preclinical imaging modalities represent an essential tool to develop a modern and translational biomedical research. To date, Optical Imaging (OI) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are used principally in separate studies for molecular imaging studies. We decided to combine OI and MRI together through the development of a lentiviral vector to monitor the Wnt pathway response to Lithium Chloride (LiCl) treatment. The construct was stably infected in glioblastoma cells and, after intracranial transplantation in mice, serial MRI and OI imaging sessions were performed to detect human ferritin heavy chain protein (hFTH) and firefly luciferase enzyme (FLuc) respectively. The system allowed also ex vivo analysis using a constitutive fluorescence protein expression. In mice, LiCl administration has shown significantly increment of luminescence signal and a lower signal of T2 values (P<0.05), recorded noninvasively with OI and a 7 Tesla MRI scanner. This study indicates that OI and MRI can be performed in a single in vivo experiment, providing an in vivo proof-of-concept for drug discovery projects in preclinical phase. PMID:26987608

  20. Synthesizing oncogenic signal-processing systems that function as both "signal counters" and "signal blockers" in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuchen; Huang, Weiren; Zhou, Dexi; Han, Yonghua; Duan, Yonggang; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Zhang, Hu; Jiang, Zhimao; Gui, Yaoting; Cai, Zhiming

    2013-07-01

    RNA-protein interaction plays a significant role in regulating eukaryotic translation. This phenomenon raises questions about the ability of artificial biological systems to take the advantage of protein-RNA interaction. Here, we designed an oncogenic signal-processing system expressing both a Renilla luciferase reporter gene controlled by RNA-protein interaction in its 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and a Firefly luciferase normalization gene. To test the ability of the designed system, we then constructed vectors targeting the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) or the β-catenin signal. We found that the inhibition (%) of luciferase expression was correlated to the targeted protein content, allowing quantitative measurement of oncogenic signal intensity in cancer cells. The systems inhibited the expression of oncogenic signal downstream genes and induced bladder cancer cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis without affecting normal urothelial cells. Compared to traditional methods (ELISA and quantitative immunoblotting), the bio-systems provided highly accurate, consistent, and reproducible quantification of protein signals and were able to discriminate between cancerous and non-cancerous cells. In conclusion, the synthetic systems function as both "signal counters" and "signal blockers" in cancer cells. This approach provides a synthetic biology platform for oncogenic signal measurement and cancer treatment.

  1. Activation of cellular oncogenes by chemical carcinogens in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, R.; Reiss, E.; Roellich, G.; Schiffmann, D. ); Barrett, J.C.; Wiseman, R.W. ); Pechan, R.

    1990-08-01

    Carcinogen-induced point mutations resulting in activation of ras oncogenes have been demonstrated in various experimental systems such as skin carcinogenesis, mammary, and liver carcinogenesis. In many cases, the data support the conclusion that these point mutations are critical changes in the initiation of these tumors. The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation model system has been widely used to study the multistep process of chemically induced neoplastic transformation. Recent data suggest that activation of the Ha-ras gene via point mutation is one of the crucial events in the transformation of these cells. The authors have now cloned the c-Ha-ras proto-oncogene from SHE cDNA-libraries, and we have performed polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing to analyze tumor cell lines induced by different chemical carcinogens for the presence of point mutations. No changes were detectable at codons 12, 13, 59, 61, and 117 or adjacent regions in tumor cell lines induced by diethylstilbestrol, asbestos, benzo(a)pyrene, trenbolone, or aflatoxin B{sub 1}. Thus, it is not known whether point mutations in the Ha-ras proto-oncogene are essential for the acquisition of the neoplastic phenotype of SHE cells. Activation of other oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes may be responsible for the neoplastic progression of these cells. However, in SHE cells neoplastically transformed by diethylstilbestrol or trenbolone, a significant elevation of the c-Ha-ras expression was observed. Enhanced expression of c-myc was detected in SHE cells transformed by benzo(a)pyrene or trenbolone.

  2. Cellular senescence checkpoint function determines differential Notch1-dependent oncogenic and tumor suppressor activities

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Shingo; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Whelan, Kelly A.; Facompre, Nicole; Naganuma, Seiji; Ohashi, Shinya; Kinugasa, Hideaki; Egloff, Ann Marie; Basu, Devraj; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Bass, Adam; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Diehl, J. Alan; Rustgi, Anil K.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Notch activity regulates tumor biology in a context-dependent and complex manner. Notch may act as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor gene even within the same tumor type. Recently, Notch signaling has been implicated in cellular senescence. Yet, it remains unclear as to how cellular senescence checkpoint functions may interact with Notch-mediated oncogenic and tumor suppressor activities. Herein, we used genetically engineered human esophageal keratinocytes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells to delineate the functional consequences of Notch activation and inhibition along with pharmacological intervention and RNA interference (RNAi) experiments. When expressed in a tetracycline-inducible manner, the ectopically expressed activated form of Notch1 (ICN1) displayed oncogene-like characteristics inducing cellular senescence corroborated by the induction of G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, Rb dephosphorylation, flat and enlarged cell morphology and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Notch-induced senescence involves canonical CSL/RBPJ-dependent transcriptional activity and the p16INK4A-Rb pathway. Loss of p16INK4A or the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene products not only prevented ICN1 from inducing senescence, but permitted ICN1 to facilitate anchorage-independent colony formation and xenograft tumor growth with increased cell proliferation and reduced squamous-cell differentiation. Moreover, Notch1 appears to mediate replicative senescence as well as TGF-β-induced cellular senescence in non-transformed cells and that HPV E6/E7 targets Notch1 for inactivation to prevent senescence, revealing a tumor suppressor attribute of endogenous Notch1. In aggregate, cellular senescence checkpoint functions may influence dichotomous Notch activities in the neoplastic context. PMID:24931169

  3. Cellular senescence checkpoint function determines differential Notch1-dependent oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, S; Natsuizaka, M; Whelan, K A; Facompre, N; Naganuma, S; Ohashi, S; Kinugasa, H; Egloff, A M; Basu, D; Gimotty, P A; Klein-Szanto, A J; Bass, A J; Wong, K-K; Diehl, J A; Rustgi, A K; Nakagawa, H

    2015-04-30

    Notch activity regulates tumor biology in a context-dependent and complex manner. Notch may act as an oncogene or a tumor-suppressor gene even within the same tumor type. Recently, Notch signaling has been implicated in cellular senescence. Yet, it remains unclear as to how cellular senescence checkpoint functions may interact with Notch-mediated oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities. Herein, we used genetically engineered human esophageal keratinocytes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells to delineate the functional consequences of Notch activation and inhibition along with pharmacological intervention and RNA interference experiments. When expressed in a tetracycline-inducible manner, the ectopically expressed activated form of Notch1 (ICN1) displayed oncogene-like characteristics inducing cellular senescence corroborated by the induction of G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, Rb dephosphorylation, flat and enlarged cell morphology and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Notch-induced senescence involves canonical CSL/RBPJ-dependent transcriptional activity and the p16(INK4A)-Rb pathway. Loss of p16(INK4A) or the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene products not only prevented ICN1 from inducing senescence but permitted ICN1 to facilitate anchorage-independent colony formation and xenograft tumor growth with increased cell proliferation and reduced squamous-cell differentiation. Moreover, Notch1 appears to mediate replicative senescence as well as transforming growth factor-β-induced cellular senescence in non-transformed cells and that HPV E6/E7 targets Notch1 for inactivation to prevent senescence, revealing a tumor-suppressor attribute of endogenous Notch1. In aggregate, cellular senescence checkpoint functions may influence dichotomous Notch activities in the neoplastic context.

  4. Reconstructing 3D Face Model with Associated Expression Deformation from a Single Face Image via Constructing a Low-Dimensional Expression Deformation Manifold.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Fan; Lai, Shang-Hong

    2011-10-01

    Facial expression modeling is central to facial expression recognition and expression synthesis for facial animation. In this work, we propose a manifold-based 3D face reconstruction approach to estimating the 3D face model and the associated expression deformation from a single face image. With the proposed robust weighted feature map (RWF), we can obtain the dense correspondences between 3D face models and build a nonlinear 3D expression manifold from a large set of 3D facial expression models. Then a Gaussian mixture model in this manifold is learned to represent the distribution of expression deformation. By combining the merits of morphable neutral face model and the low-dimensional expression manifold, a novel algorithm is developed to reconstruct the 3D face geometry as well as the facial deformation from a single face image in an energy minimization framework. Experimental results on simulated and real images are shown to validate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithm. PMID:21576739

  5. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  6. Image and spectral image compression for four experiments on the ROSETTA and Mars Express missions of ESA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, Yves; Forni, O.

    2000-12-01

    The output rates of imaging scientific experiments on planetary missions far exceed the few 10 kbits/s provided by X or Ka band downlink. This severely restricts the duration and frequency of observations. Space applications present specific constraints for compression methods: space qualified ROM and fast RAM chips have limited capacity and large power requirements. Real time compression is therefore preferable (no large local data buffer) but requires a large processing throughput. Wavelet compression provides a fast and efficient method for lossy data compression, when combined with tree- coding algorithms such as that of Said and Pearlman. We have developed such an algorithm for four instruments on ROSETTA (ESA cometary rendez-vous mission) and Mars Express (ESA Mars Orbiter and Lander mission), building on the experience from two experiments on CASSINI and MARS 96 for which lossless compression was implemented. Modern Digital Signal Processors using a pipeline architecture provide the required high computing capability. The Said-Pearlman tree-coding algorithm has been optimized for speed and code size by reducing branching and bit manipulation, which are very costly in terms of processor cycles. Written in C with a few assembly language modules, the implementation on a DSP of this new version of the Said-Pearlman algorithm provides a processing capability of 500 kdata/s (imaging), which is adequate for our applications. Compression ratios of at least 10 can be achieved with acceptable data quality.

  7. Noncanonical Roles of the Immune System in Eliciting Oncogene Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Bellovin, David I.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cancer is highly complex. The magnitude of this complexity makes it highly surprising that even the brief suppression of an oncogene can sometimes result in rapid and sustained tumor regression illustrating that cancers can be “oncogene addicted” [1-10]. The essential implication is that oncogenes may not only fuel the initiation of tumorigenesis, but in some cases necessarily their surfeit of activation is paramaount to maintain a neoplastic state [11]. Oncogene suppression acutely restores normal physiological programs that effectively overrides secondary genetic events and a cancer collapses [12,13]. Oncogene addiction is mediated both through both tumor intrinsic cell-autonomous mechanisms including proliferative arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and cellular senescence [1,2,4,12] but also host-dependent mechanisms that interact with these tumor intrinsic programs [14,15]. Notably, oncogene inactivation elicits a host immune response that involves specific immune effectors and cytokines that facilitate a remodeling of the tumor microenvironment including the shut down of angiogenesis and the induction of cellular senescence of tumor cells [16]. Hence, immune effectors are critically involved in tumor initiation and prevention [17-19] and progression [20], but also appear to be essential to tumor regression upon oncogene inactivation [21-23]. The understanding how the inactivation of an oncogene elicits a systemic signal in the host that prompts a deconstruction of a tumor could have important implications. The combination of oncogene-targeted therapy together with immunomodulatory therapy may be ideal for the development of both a robust tumor intrinsic as well as immunological effectively leading to sustained tumor regression. PMID:23571026

  8. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Oncogenic KRAS and BRAF Drive Metabolic Reprogramming in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Josiah E; Wang, Xiaojing; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Slebos, Robbert J C; Trenary, Irina A; Young, Jamey D; Li, Ming; Liebler, Daniel C

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic reprogramming, in which altered utilization of glucose and glutamine supports rapid growth, is a hallmark of most cancers. Mutations in the oncogenes KRAS and BRAF drive metabolic reprogramming through enhanced glucose uptake, but the broader impact of these mutations on pathways of carbon metabolism is unknown. Global shotgun proteomic analysis of isogenic DLD-1 and RKO colon cancer cell lines expressing mutant and wild type KRAS or BRAF, respectively, failed to identify significant differences (at least 2-fold) in metabolic protein abundance. However, a multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) strategy targeting 73 metabolic proteins identified significant protein abundance increases of 1.25-twofold in glycolysis, the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway, glutamine metabolism, and the phosphoserine biosynthetic pathway in cells with KRAS G13D mutations or BRAF V600E mutations. These alterations corresponded to mutant KRAS and BRAF-dependent increases in glucose uptake and lactate production. Metabolic reprogramming and glucose conversion to lactate in RKO cells were proportional to levels of BRAF V600E protein. In DLD-1 cells, these effects were independent of the ratio of KRAS G13D to KRAS wild type protein. A study of 8 KRAS wild type and 8 KRAS mutant human colon tumors confirmed the association of increased expression of glycolytic and glutamine metabolic proteins with KRAS mutant status. Metabolic reprogramming is driven largely by modest (<2-fold) alterations in protein expression, which are not readily detected by the global profiling methods most commonly employed in proteomic studies. The results indicate the superiority of more precise, multiplexed, pathway-targeted analyses to study functional proteome systems. Data are available through MassIVE Accession MSV000079486 at ftp://MSV000079486@massive.ucsd.edu. PMID:27340238

  10. Dense Image Matching for Mars Express HRSC Imagery Based on Precise Point Prediction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, X.; Xu, Q.; Miao, J.; Hou, Y. F.; Xing, S.; Lan, C. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Currently, Mars Express HRSC imagery is an essential data source to derive high accuracy Mars topographic data. In view of the characteristics of Martian surface satellite imagery, a dense image matching scheme for HRSC imagery based on precise point prediction method is proposed. The image matching strategies of our method are elaborated in detail. Based on the proposed method, DEM and DOM of Martian surface are derived and compared with those published by ESA. The experiment results show that the root mean square error in planar direction is about three pixels, while the root mean square error in height direction is about one pixel. Moreover, the mean square error in plane direction show a certain systematic error and the reasons are analysed. Experiment results also demonstrate that the point prediction accuracy for corresponding points is up to 1-3 pixels.

  11. A protein tagging system for signal amplification in gene expression and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Qi, Lei S.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Signals in many biological processes can be amplified by recruiting multiple copies of regulatory proteins to a site of action. Harnessing this principle, we have developed a novel protein scaffold, a repeating peptide array termed SunTag, which can recruit multiple copies of an antibody-fusion protein. We show that the SunTag can recruit up to 24 copies of GFP, thereby enabling long-term imaging of single protein molecules in living cells. We also use the SunTag to create a potent synthetic transcription factor by recruiting multiple copies of a transcriptional activation domain to a nuclease-deficient CRISPR/Cas9 protein and demonstrate strong activation of endogenous gene expression and re-engineered cell behavior with this system. Thus, the SunTag provides a versatile platform for multimerizing proteins on a target protein scaffold and is likely to have many applications in imaging and in controlling biological outputs. PMID:25307933

  12. Imaging brain structure and function, infection and gene expression in the body using light.

    PubMed

    Benaron, D A; Contag, P R; Contag, C H

    1997-06-29

    Light can be used to probe the function and structure of human tissues. We have been exploring two distinct methods: (i) externally emitting light into tissue and measuring the transmitted light to characterize a region through which the light has passed, and (ii) internally generating light within tissue and using the radiated light as a quantitative homing beacon. The emitted-light approach falls within the domain of spectroscopy, and has allowed for imaging of intracranial haemorrhage in newborns and of brain functions in adults. The generated-light approach is conceptually parallel to positron emission tomography (PET) or nuclear medicine scanning, and has allowed for real-time, non-invasive monitoring and imaging of infection and gene expression in vivo using low-light cameras and ordinary lenses. In this paper, we discuss recent results and speculate on the applications of such techniques.

  13. Evolutionary Techniques for Image Processing a Large Dataset of Early Drosophila Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirov, Alexander; Holloway, David M.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding how genetic networks act in embryonic development requires a detailed and statistically significant dataset integrating diverse observational results. The fruit fly ( Drosophila melanogaster) is used as a model organism for studying developmental genetics. In recent years, several laboratories have systematically gathered confocal microscopy images of patterns of activity (expression) for genes governing early Drosophila development. Due to both the high variability between fruit fly embryos and diverse sources of observational errors, some new nontrivial procedures for processing and integrating the raw observations are required. Here we describe processing techniques based on genetic algorithms and discuss their efficacy in decreasing observational errors and illuminating the natural variability in gene expression patterns. The specific developmental problem studied is anteroposterior specification of the body plan.

  14. Imaging of P-glycoprotein function and expression to elucidate mechanisms of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The issue of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy has received considerable attention in recent years, and a number of plausible hypotheses have been proposed. Of these, the so-called transporter hypothesis is the most extensively researched and documented. This hypothesis assumes that refractory epilepsy is associated with a localised over-expression of drug transporter proteins such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) in the region of the epileptic focus, which actively extrudes antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) from their intended site of action. However, although this hypothesis has biological plausibility, there is no clinical evidence to support the assertion that AEDs are sufficiently strong substrates for transporter-mediated extrusion from the brain. The use of modern brain imaging techniques to determine Pgp function in patients with refractory epilepsy has started only recently, and may ultimately determine whether increased expression and function of Pgp or other efflux transporters are involved in AED resistance. PMID:20645916

  15. RNF4-Dependent Oncogene Activation by Protein Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jane J; Abed, Mona; Heuberger, Julian; Novak, Rostislav; Zohar, Yaniv; Beltran Lopez, Angela P; Trausch-Azar, Julie S; Ilagan, Ma Xenia G; Benhamou, David; Dittmar, Gunnar; Kopan, Raphael; Birchmeier, Walter; Schwartz, Alan L; Orian, Amir

    2016-09-20

    Ubiquitylation regulates signaling pathways critical for cancer development and, in many cases, targets proteins for degradation. Here, we report that ubiquitylation by RNF4 stabilizes otherwise short-lived oncogenic transcription factors, including β-catenin, Myc, c-Jun, and the Notch intracellular-domain (N-ICD) protein. RNF4 enhances the transcriptional activity of these factors, as well as Wnt- and Notch-dependent gene expression. While RNF4 is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, protein stabilization requires the substrate's phosphorylation, rather than SUMOylation, and binding to RNF4's arginine-rich motif domain. Stabilization also involves generation of unusual polyubiquitin chains and docking of RNF4 to chromatin. Biologically, RNF4 enhances the tumor phenotype and is essential for cancer cell survival. High levels of RNF4 mRNA correlate with poor survival of a subgroup of breast cancer patients, and RNF4 protein levels are elevated in 30% of human colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, RNF4-dependent ubiquitylation translates transient phosphorylation signal(s) into long-term protein stabilization, resulting in enhanced oncoprotein activation. PMID:27653698

  16. Relaxin Enhances the Oncogenic Potential of Human Thyroid Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Bialek, Joanna; Trojanowicz, Bogusz; Weber, Ekkehard; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Silvertown, Josh D.; Summerlee, Alastair J.; Dralle, Henning; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Klonisch, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The role of members of the insulin-like superfamily in human thyroid carcinoma is primarily unknown. Here we demonstrate the presence of RLN2 relaxin and relaxin receptor LGR7 in human papillary, follicular, and undifferentiated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma suggesting a specific involvement of relaxin-LGR7 signaling in thyroid carcinoma. Stable transfectants of the LGR7-positive human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell lines FTC-133 and FTC-238 that secrete bioactive proRLN2 revealed this hormone to act as a multifunctional endocrine factor in thyroid carcinoma cells. Although RLN2 did not act as a mitogen, it acted as an autocrine/paracrine factor and significantly increased anchorage-independent growth and thyroid carcinoma cell motility and invasiveness through elastin matrices. Suppression of LGR7 expression by LGR7-siRNA abolished the RLN2-mediated accelerated tumor cell motility. The increased elastinolytic activity correlated with enhanced production and secretion of the lysosomal proteinases cathepsin-D (cath-D) and cath-L forms hereby identified as new RLN2 target molecules in human neoplastic thyrocytes. We found the intracellular distribution of procath-L specifically altered in RLN2 transfectants, providing first evidence for selective actions of relaxin on the powerful elastinolytic cath-L production, storage, and secretion in thyroid carcinoma cells. Thus, relaxin enhances the oncogenic potential and acts as novel endocrine modulator of invasiveness in human thyroid carcinoma cells. PMID:16877360

  17. Relaxin enhances the oncogenic potential of human thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Bialek, Joanna; Trojanowicz, Bogusz; Weber, Ekkehard; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Silvertown, Josh D; Summerlee, Alastair J; Dralle, Henning; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Klonisch, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    The role of members of the insulin-like superfamily in human thyroid carcinoma is primarily unknown. Here we demonstrate the presence of RLN2 relaxin and relaxin receptor LGR7 in human papillary, follicular, and undifferentiated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma suggesting a specific involvement of relaxin-LGR7 signaling in thyroid carcinoma. Stable transfectants of the LGR7-positive human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell lines FTC-133 and FTC-238 that secrete bioactive proRLN2 revealed this hormone to act as a multifunctional endocrine factor in thyroid carcinoma cells. Although RLN2 did not act as a mitogen, it acted as an autocrine/paracrine factor and significantly increased anchorage-independent growth and thyroid carcinoma cell motility and invasiveness through elastin matrices. Suppression of LGR7 expression by LGR7-siRNA abolished the RLN2-mediated accelerated tumor cell motility. The increased elastinolytic activity correlated with enhanced production and secretion of the lysosomal proteinases cathepsin-D (cath-D) and cath-L forms hereby identified as new RLN2 target molecules in human neoplastic thyrocytes. We found the intracellular distribution of procath-L specifically altered in RLN2 transfectants, providing first evidence for selective actions of relaxin on the powerful elastinolytic cath-L production, storage, and secretion in thyroid carcinoma cells. Thus, relaxin enhances the oncogenic potential and acts as novel endocrine modulator of invasiveness in human thyroid carcinoma cells.

  18. Fusion oncogenes in salivary gland tumors: molecular and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Göran

    2013-07-01

    Salivary gland tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of uncommon diseases that pose significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. However, the recent discovery of a translocation-generated gene fusion network in salivary gland carcinomas as well in benign salivary gland tumors opens up new avenues for improved diagnosis, prognostication, and development of specific targeted therapies. The gene fusions encode novel fusion oncoproteins or ectopically expressed normal or truncated oncoproteins. The major targets of the translocations are transcriptional coactivators, tyrosine kinase receptors, and transcription factors involved in growth factor signaling and cell cycle regulation. Notably, several of these targets or pathways activated by these targets are druggable. Examples of clinically significant gene fusions in salivary gland cancers are the MYB-NFIB fusion specific for adenoid cystic carcinoma, the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion typical of low/intermediate-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and the recently identified ETV6-NTRK3 fusion in mammary analogue secretory carcinoma. Similarly, gene fusions involving the PLAG1 and HMGA2 oncogenes are specific for benign pleomorphic adenomas. Continued studies of the molecular consequences of these fusion oncoproteins and their down-stream targets will ultimately lead to the identification of novel driver genes in salivary gland neoplasms and will also form the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies for salivary gland cancers and, perhaps, other neoplasms.

  19. Transformation with Oncogenic Ras and the Simian Virus 40 T Antigens Induces Caspase-Dependent Sensitivity to Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihao; Spencer, Cody M.

    2015-01-01

    drive the transformation of normal cells to the cancerous state. These oncogenic alterations induce metabolic changes and dependencies that can be targeted to kill cancerous cells. Here, we find that the cellular transformation resulting from combined expression of the SV40 early region with an oncogenic Ras allele is sufficient to induce cellular susceptibility to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. Inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis in these cells resulted in programmed cell death, which could be rescued by supplementing the medium with nonsaturated fatty acids. Similar results were observed with the expression of oncogenic Ras in nontransformed breast epithelial cells. Combined, our results suggest that specific oncogenic alleles induce metabolic dependencies that can be exploited to selectively kill cancerous cells. PMID:25855740

  20. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis.

  1. Trefoil Factor 3 Is Oncogenic and Mediates Anti-Estrogen Resistance in Human Mammary Carcinoma123

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Nagarajan; Kang, Jian; Kong, Xiangjun; Tang, Jianzhong; Perry, Jo K; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Miller, Lance D; Liu, Edison T; Mertani, Hichem C; Zhu, Tao; Grandison, Prudence M; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    We report herein that trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased cell proliferation and survival, enhanced anchorage-independent growth, and promoted migration and invasion. Moreover, forced expression of TFF3 increased tumor size in xenograft models. Conversely, depletion of endogenous TFF3 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased the oncogenicity and invasiveness of mammary carcinoma cells. Neutralization of secreted TFF3 by antibody promoted apoptosis, decreased cell growth in vitro, and arrested mammary carcinoma xenograft growth. TFF3 expression was significantly correlated to decreased survival of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased ER transcriptional activity, promoted estrogen-independent growth, and produced resistance to tamoxifen and fulvestrant in vitro and to tamoxifen in xenograft models. siRNA-mediated depletion or antibody inhibition of TFF3 significantly enhanced the efficacy of antiestrogens. Increased TFF3 expression was observed in tamoxifen-resistant (TAMR) cells and antibody inhibition of TFF3 in TAMR cells improved tamoxifen sensitivity. Functional antagonism of TFF3 therefore warrants consideration as a novel therapeutic strategy for mammary carcinoma. PMID:21170268

  2. Trefoil factor 3 is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Nagarajan; Kang, Jian; Kong, Xiangjun; Tang, Jianzhong; Perry, Jo K; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Miller, Lance D; Liu, Edison T; Mertani, Hichem C; Zhu, Tao; Grandison, Prudence M; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E

    2010-12-01

    We report herein that trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased cell proliferation and survival, enhanced anchorage-independent growth, and promoted migration and invasion. Moreover, forced expression of TFF3 increased tumor size in xenograft models. Conversely, depletion of endogenous TFF3 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased the oncogenicity and invasiveness of mammary carcinoma cells. Neutralization of secreted TFF3 by antibody promoted apoptosis, decreased cell growth in vitro, and arrested mammary carcinoma xenograft growth. TFF3 expression was significantly correlated to decreased survival of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased ER transcriptional activity, promoted estrogen-independent growth, and produced resistance to tamoxifen and fulvestrant in vitro and to tamoxifen in xenograft models. siRNA-mediated depletion or antibody inhibition of TFF3 significantly enhanced the efficacy of antiestrogens. Increased TFF3 expression was observed in tamoxifen-resistant (TAMR) cells and antibody inhibition of TFF3 in TAMR cells improved tamoxifen sensitivity. Functional antagonism of TFF3 therefore warrants consideration as a novel therapeutic strategy for mammary carcinoma.

  3. Detection of the c-myc oncogene product in colonic polyps and carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J.; Evan, G.; Watson, J.; Sikora, K.

    1986-01-01

    The c-myc oncogene has been implicated in the processes of normal cell proliferation and differentiation. Elevated levels of c-myc mRNA and its gene product (p62c-myc), have been detected in a variety of solid tumours and cultured cel lines. Its precise role in normal cell function and in neoplastic transformation and progression has yet to be elucidated. We have used a monoclonal antibody, raised by peptide immunisation, to determine the distribution by immunoperoxidase staining of the c-myc oncogene product in archival specimens of colonic polyps and carcinomas. Samples from 42 patients with colon carcinoma, 24 with benign polyps and 15 normal colon biopsies were examined. Normal colon revealed maximum staining in the mid-zone of the crypts, corresponding to the zone of differentiation and maturation. The staining was predominantly cytoplasmic. Adenomatous polyps revealed the most intense pattern of staining in areas of dysplastic change. Colonic tumours showed a wide range of staining. Well differentiated tumours contained more cytoplasmic p62c-myc than poorly differentiated tumours. These findings suggest that the c-myc oncogene product may play an important role in the evolution of colonic neoplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3511934

  4. Modulation of junction tension by tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes regulates cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Bosveld, Floris; Guirao, Boris; Wang, Zhimin; Rivière, Mathieu; Bonnet, Isabelle; Graner, François; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-15

    Tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes play crucial roles in tissue proliferation. Furthermore, de-regulation of their functions is deleterious to tissue architecture and can result in the sorting of somatic rounded clones minimizing their contact with surrounding wild-type (wt) cells. Defects in the shape of somatic clones correlate with defects in proliferation, cell affinity, cell-cell adhesion, oriented cell division and cortical contractility. Combining genetics, live-imaging, laser ablation and computer simulations, we aim to analyze whether distinct or similar mechanisms can account for the common role of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes in cell-cell contact regulation. In Drosophila epithelia, the tumor suppressors Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds) regulate cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, planar cell polarity and junction tension. By analyzing the evolution over time of ft mutant cells and clones, we show that ft clones reduce their cell-cell contacts with the surrounding wt tissue in the absence of concomitant cell divisions and over-proliferation. This contact reduction depends on opposed changes of junction tensions in the clone bulk and its boundary with neighboring wt tissue. More generally, either clone bulk or boundary junction tension is modulated by the activation of Yorkie, Myc and Ras, yielding similar contact reductions with wt cells. Together, our data highlight mechanical roles for proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor pathways in cell-cell interactions.

  5. Cooperation between the polyomavirus middle-T-antigen gene and the human c-myc oncogene in a rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell line: model of in vitro progression.

    PubMed Central

    Berlingieri, M T; Portella, G; Grieco, M; Santoro, M; Fusco, A

    1988-01-01

    Two rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell lines, PC Cl 3 and PC myc, were infected with the polyoma murine leukemia virus (PyMLV) carrying the Middle-T-antigen gene of polyomavirus. After infection, both cell lines acquired the typical markers of neoplastic transformation; however, the PC myc cells showed a greater malignant phenotype. Furthermore, the thyroid differentiated functions were completely suppressed in PC myc cells transformed by PyMLV, whereas they were, at least partially, retained in PC Cl 3 cells transformed by PyMLV, and in particular, thyroglobulin synthesis and secretion were not affected at all. Since no differences in the expression of the middle-T-antigen gene were observed in the two PyMLV-transformed cell lines, the different properties shown by these two infected cell lines must be ascribed to the expression of the c-myc oncogene. Images PMID:2838744

  6. Dual-Labeled Near-Infrared/(99m)Tc Imaging Probes Using PAMAM-Coated Silica Nanoparticles for the Imaging of HER2-Expressing Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Haruka; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Tsubokawa, Norio

    2016-01-01

    We sought to develop dual-modality imaging probes using functionalized silica nanoparticles to target human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and achieve efficient target imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Polyamidoamine-based functionalized silica nanoparticles (PCSNs) for multimodal imaging were synthesized with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (indocyanine green (ICG)) and technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) radioactivity. Anti-HER2 antibodies were bound to the labeled PCSNs. These dual-imaging probes were tested to image HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells. In vivo imaging was also examined in breast tumor xenograft models in mice. SK-BR3 (HER2 positive) cells were imaged with stronger NIR fluorescent signals than that in MDA-MB231 (HER2 negative) cells. The increased radioactivity of the SK-BR3 cells was also confirmed by phosphor imaging. NIR images showed strong fluorescent signals in the SK-BR3 tumor model compared to muscle tissues and the MDA-MB231 tumor model. Automatic well counting results showed increased radioactivity in the SK-BR3 xenograft tumors. We developed functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with (99m)Tc and ICG for the targeting and imaging of HER2-expressing cells. The dual-imaging probes efficiently imaged HER2-overexpressing cells. Although further studies are needed to produce efficient isotope labeling, the results suggest that the multifunctional silica nanoparticles are a promising vehicle for imaging specific components of the cell membrane in a dual-modality manner. PMID:27399687

  7. Dual-Labeled Near-Infrared/99mTc Imaging Probes Using PAMAM-Coated Silica Nanoparticles for the Imaging of HER2-Expressing Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Haruka; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Tsubokawa, Norio

    2016-01-01

    We sought to develop dual-modality imaging probes using functionalized silica nanoparticles to target human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and achieve efficient target imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Polyamidoamine-based functionalized silica nanoparticles (PCSNs) for multimodal imaging were synthesized with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (indocyanine green (ICG)) and technetium-99m (99mTc) radioactivity. Anti-HER2 antibodies were bound to the labeled PCSNs. These dual-imaging probes were tested to image HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells. In vivo imaging was also examined in breast tumor xenograft models in mice. SK-BR3 (HER2 positive) cells were imaged with stronger NIR fluorescent signals than that in MDA-MB231 (HER2 negative) cells. The increased radioactivity of the SK-BR3 cells was also confirmed by phosphor imaging. NIR images showed strong fluorescent signals in the SK-BR3 tumor model compared to muscle tissues and the MDA-MB231 tumor model. Automatic well counting results showed increased radioactivity in the SK-BR3 xenograft tumors. We developed functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with 99mTc and ICG for the targeting and imaging of HER2-expressing cells. The dual-imaging probes efficiently imaged HER2-overexpressing cells. Although further studies are needed to produce efficient isotope labeling, the results suggest that the multifunctional silica nanoparticles are a promising vehicle for imaging specific components of the cell membrane in a dual-modality manner. PMID:27399687

  8. Emerging Roles of Agrobacterial Plant-Transforming Oncogenes in Plant Defense Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, Victor P.; Inyushkina, Yuliya V.; Gorpenchenko, Tatiana Y.; Koren, Olga G.; Shkryl, Yuri N.; Zhuravlev, Yuri N.

    2009-01-01

    For recent years, engineering plant metabolic pathways by using rol genes looks promising in several aspects. New directions of rol-gene studies are highlighted in this work underlying the unique regulatory properties of the genes. It is known that following agrobacterial infection, the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rolA, rolB and rolC genes are transferred to plant genome, causing tumor formation and hairy root disease. In this report, we show mat these oncogenes are also involved in regulation of plant defense reactions, including the production of secondary metabolites. Situations occur where the rol genes perform their own critical function to regulate secondary metabolism by bypassing upstream plant control mechanisms and directing defense reactions via a "short cut." The rolC gene expressed in transformed plant cells is efficient in establishing an enhanced resistance of host cells to salt and temperature stresses. The emerging complexity of the rol-gene triggered effects and the involvement of signals generated by these genes in basic processes of cell biology such as calcium and ROS signaling indicate that the plant oncogenes, like some animal protooncogenes, use sophisticated strategies to affect cell growth and differentiation. The data raise the intriguing possibility that some components of plant and animal oncogene signaling pathways share common features.

  9. The tumor suppressor microRNA let-7 represses the HMGA2 oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Sun; Dutta, Anindya

    2007-01-01

    HMGA2, a high-mobility group protein, is oncogenic in a variety of tumors, including benign mesenchymal tumors and lung cancers. Knockdown of Dicer in HeLa cells revealed that the HMGA2 gene is transcriptionally active, but its mRNA is destabilized in the cytoplasm through the microRNA (miRNA) pathway. HMGA2 was derepressed upon inhibition of let-7 in cells with high levels of the miRNA. Ectopic expression of let-7 reduced HMGA2 and cell proliferation in a lung cancer cell. The effect of let-7 on HMGA2 was dependent on multiple target sites in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR), and the growth-suppressive effect of let-7 on lung cancer cells was rescued by overexpression of the HMGA2 ORF without a 3′UTR. Our results provide a novel example of suppression of an oncogene by a tumor-suppressive miRNA and suggest that some tumors activate the oncogene through chromosomal translocations that eliminate the oncogene’s 3′UTR with the let-7 target sites. PMID:17437991

  10. Tissue-specific p19Arf regulation dictates the response to oncogenic K-ras.

    PubMed

    Young, Nathan P; Jacks, Tyler

    2010-06-01

    The ability of oncogenes to engage tumor suppressor pathways represents a key regulatory mechanism that can limit the outgrowth of incipient tumor cells. For example, in a number of settings oncogenic Ras strongly activates the Ink4a/Arf locus, resulting in cell cycle arrest or senescence. The capacity of different cell types to execute tumor suppressor programs following expression of endogenous K-ras(G12D) in vivo has not been examined. Using compound mutant mice containing the Arf(GFP) reporter and the spontaneously activating K-ras(LA2) allele, we have uncovered dramatic tissue specificity of K-ras(G12D)-dependent p19(Arf) up-regulation. Lung tumors, which can arise in the presence of functional p19(Arf), rarely display p19(Arf) induction. In contrast, sarcomas always show robust activation, which correlates with genetic evidence, suggesting that loss of the p19(Arf)-p53 pathway is a requisite event for sarcomagenesis. Using constitutive and inducible RNAi systems in vivo, we highlight cell type-specific chromatin regulation of Ink4a/Arf as a critical determinant of cellular responses to oncogenic K-ras. Polycomb-group complexes repress the locus in lung tumors, whereas the SWI/SNF family member Snf5 acts as an important mediator of p19(Arf) induction in sarcomas. This variation in tumor suppressor induction might explain the inherent differences between tissues in their sensitivity to Ras-mediated transformation. PMID:20479239

  11. Common Oncogene Mutations and Novel SND1-BRAF Transcript Fusion in Lung Adenocarcinoma from Never Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jin Sung; Lee, Adam; Li, Jun; Liyanage, Hema; Yang, Yanan; Guo, Lixia; Asmann, Yan W.; Li, Peter W.; Erickson-Johnson, Michele; Sakai, Yuta; Sun, ZhiFu; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hwang, Hayoung; Bungum, Aaron O.; Edell, Eric S.; Simon, Vernadette A.; Kopp, Karla J.; Eckloff, Bruce; Oliveira, Andre M.; Wieben, Eric; Aubry, Marie Christine; Yi, Eunhee; Wigle, Dennis; Diasio, Robert B.; Yang, Ping; Jen, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinomas from never smokers account for approximately 15 to 20% of all lung cancers and these tumors often carry genetic alterations that are responsive to targeted therapy. Here we examined mutation status in 10 oncogenes among 89 lung adenocarcinomas from never smokers. We also screened for oncogene fusion transcripts in 20 of the 89 tumors by RNA-Seq. In total, 62 tumors had mutations in at least one of the 10 oncogenes, including EGFR (49 cases, 55%), K-ras (5 cases, 6%), BRAF (4 cases, 5%), PIK3CA (3 cases, 3%), and ERBB2 (4 cases, 5%). In addition to ALK fusions identified by IHC/FISH in four cases, two previously known fusions involving EZR- ROS1 and KIF5B-RET were identified by RNA-Seq as well as a third novel fusion transcript that was formed between exons 1–9 of SND1 and exons 2 to 3′ end of BRAF. This in-frame fusion was observed in 3/89 tested tumors and 2/64 additional never smoker lung adenocarcinoma samples. Ectopic expression of SND1-BRAF in H1299 cells increased phosphorylation levels of MEK/ERK, cell proliferation, and spheroid formation compared to parental mock-transfected control. Jointly, our results suggest a potential role of the novel BRAF fusion in lung cancer development and therapy. PMID:25985019

  12. PIK3CA is implicated as an oncogene in ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shayesteh, Laleh; Lu, Yiling; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Baldocchi, Russell; Godfrey, Tony; Collins, Colin; Pinkel, Daniel; Powell, Bethan; Mills,Gordon B.; Gray, Joe W.

    1998-03-25

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer death among American women, yet little is known about its molecular aetiology. Studies using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) have revealed several regions of recurrent, abnormal, DNA sequence copy number that may encode genes involved in the genesis or progression of the disease. One region at 3q26 found to be increased in copy number in approximately 40 percent of ovarian and other cancers contains PIK3CA, which encodes the p110 a catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase(PI3-kinase). The association between PIK3CA copy number and PI3-kinase activity makes PIK3CA a candidate oncogene because a broad range of cancer-related functions have been associated with PI3-kinase mediated signaling. These include proliferation, glucose transport and catabolism, cell adhesion, apoptosis, RAS signaling and oncogenic transformation. In addition, downstream effectors of PI3-kinase,AKT1 and AKT2, have been found to be amplified or activated in human tumors, including ovarian cancer. We show here that PIK3CA is frequently increased in copy number in ovarian cancers, that the increased copy number is associated with increased PIK3CA transcription, p110 a protein expression and PI3-kinase activity and that treatment with the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 decreases proliferation and increases apoptosis. Our observations suggest PIK3CA is an oncogene that has an important role in ovarian cancer.

  13. Common Oncogene Mutations and Novel SND1-BRAF Transcript Fusion in Lung Adenocarcinoma from Never Smokers.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jin Sung; Lee, Adam; Li, Jun; Liyanage, Hema; Yang, Yanan; Guo, Lixia; Asmann, Yan W; Li, Peter W; Erickson-Johnson, Michele; Sakai, Yuta; Sun, ZhiFu; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hwang, Hayoung; Bungum, Aaron O; Edell, Eric S; Simon, Vernadette A; Kopp, Karla J; Eckloff, Bruce; Oliveira, Andre M; Wieben, Eric; Aubry, Marie Christine; Yi, Eunhee; Wigle, Dennis; Diasio, Robert B; Yang, Ping; Jen, Jin

    2015-05-18

    Lung adenocarcinomas from never smokers account for approximately 15 to 20% of all lung cancers and these tumors often carry genetic alterations that are responsive to targeted therapy. Here we examined mutation status in 10 oncogenes among 89 lung adenocarcinomas from never smokers. We also screened for oncogene fusion transcripts in 20 of the 89 tumors by RNA-Seq. In total, 62 tumors had mutations in at least one of the 10 oncogenes, including EGFR (49 cases, 55%), K-ras (5 cases, 6%), BRAF (4 cases, 5%), PIK3CA (3 cases, 3%), and ERBB2 (4 cases, 5%). In addition to ALK fusions identified by IHC/FISH in four cases, two previously known fusions involving EZR- ROS1 and KIF5B-RET were identified by RNA-Seq as well as a third novel fusion transcript that was formed between exons 1-9 of SND1 and exons 2 to 3' end of BRAF. This in-frame fusion was observed in 3/89 tested tumors and 2/64 additional never smoker lung adenocarcinoma samples. Ectopic expression of SND1-BRAF in H1299 cells increased phosphorylation levels of MEK/ERK, cell proliferation, and spheroid formation compared to parental mock-transfected control. Jointly, our results suggest a potential role of the novel BRAF fusion in lung cancer development and therapy.

  14. Oncogene ablation-resistant pancreatic cancer cells depend on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Viale, Andrea; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Ying, Haoqiang; Sánchez, Nora; Marchesini, Matteo; Carugo, Alessandro; Green, Tessa; Seth, Sahil; Giuliani, Virginia; Kost-Alimova, Maria; Muller, Florian; Colla, Simona; Nezi, Luigi; Genovese, Giannicola; Deem, Angela K; Kapoor, Avnish; Yao, Wantong; Brunetto, Emanuela; Kang, Ya'an; Yuan, Min; Asara, John M; Wang, Y Alan; Heffernan, Timothy P; Kimmelman, Alec C; Wang, Huamin; Fleming, Jason B; Cantley, Lewis C; DePinho, Ronald A; Draetta, Giulio F

    2014-10-30

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest cancers in western countries, with a median survival of 6 months and an extremely low percentage of long-term surviving patients. KRAS mutations are known to be a driver event of PDAC, but targeting mutant KRAS has proved challenging. Targeting oncogene-driven signalling pathways is a clinically validated approach for several devastating diseases. Still, despite marked tumour shrinkage, the frequency of relapse indicates that a fraction of tumour cells survives shut down of oncogenic signalling. Here we explore the role of mutant KRAS in PDAC maintenance using a recently developed inducible mouse model of mutated Kras (Kras(G12D), herein KRas) in a p53(LoxP/WT) background. We demonstrate that a subpopulation of dormant tumour cells surviving oncogene ablation (surviving cells) and responsible for tumour relapse has features of cancer stem cells and relies on oxidative phosphorylation for survival. Transcriptomic and metabolic analyses of surviving cells reveal prominent expression of genes governing mitochondrial function, autophagy and lysosome activity, as well as a strong reliance on mitochondrial respiration and a decreased dependence on glycolysis for cellular energetics. Accordingly, surviving cells show high sensitivity to oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors, which can inhibit tumour recurrence. Our integrated analyses illuminate a therapeutic strategy of combined targeting of the KRAS pathway and mitochondrial respiration to manage pancreatic cancer.

  15. A dual role for Hdac1: oncosuppressor in tumorigenesis, oncogene in tumor maintenance.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Fabio; Botrugno, Oronza A; Dal Zuffo, Roberto; Pallavicini, Isabella; Matthews, Geoffrey M; Cluse, Leonie; Barozzi, Iros; Senese, Silvia; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Moretti, Simona; Altucci, Lucia; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Chiocca, Susanna; Johnstone, Ricky W; Minucci, Saverio

    2013-04-25

    Aberrant recruitment of histone deacetylases (HDACs) by the oncogenic fusion protein PML-RAR is involved in the pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). PML-RAR, however, is not sufficient to induce disease in mice but requires additional oncogenic lesions during the preleukemic phase. Here, we show that knock-down of Hdac1 and Hdac2 dramatically accelerates leukemogenesis in transgenic preleukemic mice. These events are not restricted to APL because lymphomagenesis driven by deletion of p53 or, to a lesser extent, by c-myc overexpression, was also accelerated by Hdac1 knock-down. In the preleukemic phase of APL, Hdac1 counteracts the activity of PML-RAR in (1) blocking differentiation; (2) impairing genomic stability; and (3) increasing self-renewal in hematopoietic progenitors, as all of these events are affected by the reduction in Hdac1 levels. This led to an expansion of a subpopulation of PML-RAR-expressing cells that is the major source of leukemic stem cells in the full leukemic stage. Remarkably, short-term treatment of preleukemic mice with an HDAC inhibitor accelerated leukemogenesis. In contrast, knock-down of Hdac1 in APL mice led to enhanced survival duration of the leukemic animals. Thus, Hdac1 has a dual role in tumorigenesis: oncosuppressive in the early stages, and oncogenic in established tumor cells.

  16. Development of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies for oncogenic human papillomavirus types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

    PubMed

    Brown, Martha J; Seitz, Hanna; Towne, Victoria; Müller, Martin; Finnefrock, Adam C

    2014-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiological agent for all cervical cancers, a significant number of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Two licensed vaccines offer protection against the most prevalent oncogenic types, 16 and 18, responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide and one of these also offers protection against types 6 and 11, responsible for 90% of genital warts. The vaccines are comprised of recombinantly expressed major capsid proteins that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) and prevent infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies. Adding the other frequently identified oncogenic types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 to a vaccine would increase the coverage against HPV-induced cancers to approximately 90%. We describe the generation and characterization of panels of monoclonal antibodies to these five additional oncogenic HPV types, and the selection of antibody pairs that were high affinity and type specific and recognized conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes. Such characteristics make these antibodies useful tools for monitoring the production and potency of a prototype vaccine as well as monitoring vaccine-induced immune responses in the clinic. PMID:24574536

  17. Oncogenes: The Passport for Viral Oncolysis Through PKR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    The transforming properties of oncogenes are derived from gain-of-function mutations, shifting cell signaling from highly regulated homeostatic to an uncontrolled oncogenic state, with the contribution of the inactivating mutations in tumor suppressor genes P53 and RB, leading to tumor resistance to conventional and target-directed therapy. On the other hand, this scenario fulfills two requirements for oncolytic virus infection in tumor cells: inactivation of tumor suppressors and presence of oncoproteins, also the requirements to engage malignancy. Several of these oncogenes have a negative impact on the main interferon antiviral defense, the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), which helps viruses to spontaneously target tumor cells instead of normal cells. This review is focused on the negative impact of overexpression of oncogenes on conventional and targeted therapy and their positive impact on viral oncolysis due to their ability to inhibit PKR-induced translation blockage, allowing virion release and cell death. PMID:27486347

  18. Oncogene-dependent apoptosis is mediated by caspase-9

    PubMed Central

    Fearnhead, Howard O.; Rodriguez, Joe; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Guo, Wenjun; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Hannon, Greg; Lazebnik, Yuri A.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding how oncogenic transformation sensitizes cells to apoptosis may provide a strategy to kill tumor cells selectively. We previously developed a cell-free system that recapitulates oncogene dependent apoptosis as reflected by activation of caspases, the core of the apoptotic machinery. Here, we show that this activation requires a previously identified apoptosis-promoting complex consisting of caspase-9, APAF-1, and cytochrome c. As predicted by the in vitro system, preventing caspase-9 activation blocked drug-induced apoptosis in cells sensitized by E1A, an adenoviral oncogene. Oncogenes, such as E1A, appear to facilitate caspase-9 activation by several mechanisms, including the control of cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. PMID:9811857

  19. Oncogenes: The Passport for Viral Oncolysis Through PKR Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    The transforming properties of oncogenes are derived from gain-of-function mutations, shifting cell signaling from highly regulated homeostatic to an uncontrolled oncogenic state, with the contribution of the inactivating mutations in tumor suppressor genes P53 and RB, leading to tumor resistance to conventional and target-directed therapy. On the other hand, this scenario fulfills two requirements for oncolytic virus infection in tumor cells: inactivation of tumor suppressors and presence of oncoproteins, also the requirements to engage malignancy. Several of these oncogenes have a negative impact on the main interferon antiviral defense, the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), which helps viruses to spontaneously target tumor cells instead of normal cells. This review is focused on the negative impact of overexpression of oncogenes on conventional and targeted therapy and their positive impact on viral oncolysis due to their ability to inhibit PKR-induced translation blockage, allowing virion release and cell death. PMID:27486347

  20. Integrated, genome-wide screening for hypomethylated oncogenes in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chunbo; Sun, Wenyue; Tan, Marietta; Glazer, Chad A.; Bhan, Sheetal; Zhong, Xiaoli; Fakhry, Carole; Sharma, Rajni; Westra, William H.; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Sidransky, David; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy that is poorly understood. In order to look for relevant oncogene candidates under the control of promoter methylation, an integrated, genome-wide screen was performed. Experimental Design Global demethylation of normal salivary gland cell strains using 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza dC) and Trichostatin A (TSA), followed by expression array analysis was performed. ACC-specific expression profiling was generated using expression microarray analysis of primary ACC and normal samples. Next, the two profiles were integrated to identify a subset of genes for further validation of promoter demethylation in ACC versus normal. Finally, promising candidates were further validated for mRNA, protein, and promoter methylation levels in larger ACC cohorts. Functional validation was then performed in cancer cell lines. Results We found 159 genes that were significantly re-expressed after 5-Aza dC/TSA treatment and overexpressed in ACC. After initial validation, eight candidates showed hypomethylation in ACC: AQP1, CECR1, C1QR1, CTAG2, P53AIP1, TDRD12, BEX1, and DYNLT3. Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) showed the most significant hypomethylation and was further validated. AQP1 hypomethylation in ACC was confirmed with two independent cohorts. Of note, there was significant overexpression of AQP1 in both mRNA and protein in the paraffin-embedded ACC cohort. Furthermore, AQP1 was up-regulated in 5-Aza dC/TSA treated SACC83. Lastly, AQP1 promoted cell proliferation and colony formation in SACC83. Conclusions Our integrated, genome-wide screening method proved to be an effective strategy for detecting novel oncogenes in ACC. AQP1 is a promising oncogene candidate for ACC and is transcriptionally regulated by promoter hypomethylation. PMID:21551254

  1. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  2. Mate choice for more melanin as a mechanism to maintain a functional oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, André A.; Morris, Molly R.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cancer evolves and persists in natural systems have been difficult to ascertain. In the Xiphophorus melanoma model, a functional oncogene (Xiphophorus melanoma receptor kinase Xmrk) has been maintained for several million years despite being deleterious and in an extremely unstable genomic region. Melanomas in Xiphophorus spp. fishes (platyfishes and swordtails) have been investigated since the 1920s, and, yet, positive selection that could explain the maintenance of Xmrk has not been found. Here, we show that Xiphophorus cortezi females from two populations prefer males with the spotted caudal (Sc) melanin pattern, which is associated with the presence of the Xmrk oncogene and serves as the site of melanoma formation within this species. Moreover, X. cortezi females prefer males with an enhanced Sc to males with a reduced Sc pattern. RT-PCR analysis confirms tissue-specific Xmrk expression within the Sc pattern in X. cortezi. Because of the association of Xmrk with the Sc pigment pattern and the fact that melanoma formation augments this visual signal, sexual selection appears to be maintaining this oncogene because of a mating preference for Sc, as well as the exaggeration of this male trait. At the individual level, decreases in viability and fecundity because of Xmrk and subsequent melanoma formation may be mitigated via increases in mate acquisition. At the population level, maintenance of this oncogene appears to be under frequency dependent selection, as we detected female preference for males without Sc in a third population that had higher frequencies of Sc in females. PMID:18757731

  3. Systemic delivery of siRNA by actively targeted polyion complex micelles for silencing the E6 and E7 human papillomavirus oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Haruka; Matsumoto, Yoko; Kawana, Kei; Christie, R James; Naito, Mitsuru; Kim, Beob Soo; Toh, Kazuko; Min, Hyun Su; Yi, Yu; Matsumoto, Yu; Kim, Hyun Jin; Miyata, Kanjiro; Taguchi, Ayumi; Tomio, Kensuke; Yamashita, Aki; Inoue, Tomoko; Nakamura, Hiroe; Fujimoto, Asaha; Sato, Masakazu; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Arimoto, Takahide; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-06-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes are essential for the immortalization and maintenance of HPV-associated cancer and are ubiquitously expressed in cervical cancer lesions. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) coding for E6 and E7 oncogenes is a promising approach for precise treatment of cervical cancer, yet a delivery system is required for systemic delivery to solid tumors. Here, an actively targeted polyion complex (PIC) micelle was applied to deliver siRNAs coding for HPV E6/E7 to HPV cervical cancer cell tumors in immune-incompetent tumor-bearing mice. A cell viability assay revealed that both HPV type 16 and 18 E6/E7 siRNAs (si16E6/E7 and si18E6/E7, respectively) interfered with proliferation of cervical cancer cell lines in an HPV type-specific manner. A fluorescence imaging biodistribution analysis further revealed that fluorescence dye-labeled siRNA-loaded PIC micelles efficiently accumulated within the tumor mass after systemic administration. Ultimately, intravenous injection of si16E6/E7 and si18E6/E7-loaded PIC micelles was found to significantly suppress the growth of subcutaneous SiHa and HeLa tumors, respectively. The specific activity of siRNA treatment was confirmed by the observation that p53 protein expression was restored in the tumors excised from the mice treated with si16E6/E7- and si18E6/E7-loaded PIC micelles for SiHa and HeLa tumors, respectively. Therefore, the actively targeted PIC micelle incorporating HPV E6/E7-coding siRNAs demonstrated its therapeutic potential against HPV-associated cancer. PMID:26979870

  4. ERβ decreases the invasiveness of triple-negative breast cancer cells by regulating mutant p53 oncogenic function

    PubMed Central

    Bado, Igor; Nikolos, Fotis; Rajapaksa, Gayani; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Thomas, Christoforos

    2016-01-01

    Most (80%) of the triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) express mutant p53 proteins that acquire oncogenic activities including promoting metastasis. We previously showed that wild-type ERβ (ERβ1) impedes epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and decreases the invasiveness of TNBC cells. In the present study we searched for signaling pathways that ERβ1 uses to inhibit EMT and invasion in TNBC cells. We show that ERβ1 binds to and opposes the transcriptional activity of mutant p53 at the promoters of genes that regulate metastasis. p63 that transcriptionally cooperates with mutant p53 also binds to ERβ1. Downregulation of p63 represses the epithelial phenotype of ERβ1-expressing cells and alters the expression of mutant p53 target genes. These results describe a novel mechanism through which ERβ1 can disturb oncogenic signals to inhibit aggressiveness in TNBCs. PMID:26871946

  5. Inhibition of Ras oncogenic activity by Ras protooncogenes.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Roberto; Lue, Jeffrey; Mathews, Jeremy; Yoon, Andrew; Ahn, Daniel; Garcia-España, Antonio; Leonardi, Peter; Vargas, Marcelo P; Pellicer, Angel

    2005-01-10

    Point mutations in ras genes have been found in a large number and wide variety of human tumors. These oncogenic Ras mutants are locked in an active GTP-bound state that leads to a constitutive and deregulated activation of Ras function. The dogma that ras oncogenes are dominant, whereby the mutation of a single allele in a cell will predispose the host cell to transformation regardless of the presence of the normal allele, is being challenged. We have seen that increasing amounts of Ras protooncogenes are able to inhibit the activity of the N-Ras oncogene in the activation of Elk in NIH 3T3 cells and in the formation of foci. We have been able to determine that the inhibitory effect is by competition between Ras protooncogenes and the N-Ras oncogene that occurs first at the effector level at the membranes, then at the processing level and lastly at the effector level in the cytosol. In addition, coexpression of the N-Ras protooncogene in thymic lymphomas induced by the N-Ras oncogene is associated with increased levels of p107, p130 and cyclin A and decreased levels of Rb. In the present report, we have shown that the N-Ras oncogene is not truly dominant over Ras protooncogenes and their competing activities might be depending on cellular context.

  6. Imaging neuronal responses in slice preparations of vomeronasal organ expressing a genetically encoded calcium sensor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limei; Haga-Yamanaka, Sachiko; Yu, Qingfeng Elden; Qiu, Qiang; Kim, Sangseong; Yu, C Ron

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects chemosensory signals that carry information about the social, sexual and reproductive status of the individuals within the same species. These intraspecies signals, the pheromones, as well as signals from some predators, activate the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) with high levels of specificity and sensitivity. At least three distinct families of G-protein coupled receptors, V1R, V2R and FPR, are expressed in VNO neurons to mediate the detection